• Rwanda to receive over 500 migrants from Libya

    Rwanda and Libya are currently working out an evacuation plan for some hundreds of migrants being held in detention centres in the North African country, officials confirmed.

    Diyana Gitera, the Director General for Africa at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation told The New Times that Rwanda was working on a proposal with partners to evacuate refugees from Libya.

    She said that initially, Rwanda will receive 500 refugees as part of the commitment by President Paul Kagame in late 2017.

    President Kagame made this commitment after revelations that tens of thousands of different African nationalities were stranded in Libya having failed to make it across the Mediterranean Sea to European countries.

    “We are talking at this time of up to 500 refugees from Libya,” Gitera said, without revealing more details.

    She however added that the exact timing of when these would be brought will be confirmed later.

    It had earlier been said that Rwanda was ready to receive up to 30,000 immigrants under this arrangement.

    Rwanda’s intervention came amid harrowing revelations that the migrants, most of them from West Africa, are being sold openly in modern-day slave markets in Libya.

    The immigrants are expected to be received under an emergency plan being discussed with international humanitarian agencies and other partners.

    Gitera highlighted that the process was being specifically supported by the African Union (AU) with funding from European Union (EU) and the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR).

    The proposal comes as conflict in war-torn North African country deepens.

    The United Nations estimates almost 5,000 migrants are in detention centres in Libya, about 70 per cent of them refugees and asylum seekers, most of whom have been subjected to different forms of abuse.

    This is however against the backdrop of accusations against the EU over the plight of migrants.

    Already, thousands of the migrants have died over the past few years while trying to cross the Mediterranean Sea to European countries where they hope for better lives.

    Human rights groups have documented multiple cases of rape, torture and other crimes at the facilities, some of which are run by militias.

    Rwanda hopes to step in to rescue some of these struggling migrants in its capacity.

    The Government of Rwanda has been generously hosting refugees for over two decades and coordinates the refugee response with UNHCR, as well as providing land to establish refugee camps and ensuring camp management and security.

    Generally, Rwanda offers a favourable protection environment for refugees.

    They have the right to education, employment, cross borders, and access to durable solutions (resettlement, local integration and return) is unhindered.

    Camps like Gihembe, Kigeme, Kiziba, Mugombwa and Nyabiheke host thousands of refugees, especially from the Democratic Republic of Congo and Burundi where political instabilities have forced people to leave their countries.

    https://www.newtimes.co.rw/news/rwanda-receive-over-500-migrants-libya
    #Libye #évacuation #Rwanda #asile #migrations #réfugiés #union_africaine #plan_d'urgence #UE #EU #externalisation #Union_européenne #HCR #UNHCR

    via @pascaline

    • Europe Keeps Asylum Seekers at a Distance, This Time in Rwanda

      For three years, the European Union has been paying other countries to keep asylum seekers away from a Europe replete with populist and anti-migrant parties.

      It has paid Turkey billions to keep refugees from crossing to Greece. It has funded the Libyan Coast Guard to catch and return migrant boats to North Africa. It has set up centers in distant Niger to process asylum seekers, if they ever make it that far. Most don’t.

      Even as that arm’s-length network comes under criticism on humanitarian grounds, it is so overwhelmed that the European Union is seeking to expand it, as the bloc aims to buttress an approach that has drastically cut the number of migrants crossing the Mediterranean.

      It is now preparing to finish a deal, this time in Rwanda, to create yet another node that it hopes will help alleviate some of the mounting strains on its outsourcing network.
      Sign up for The Interpreter

      Subscribe for original insights, commentary and discussions on the major news stories of the week, from columnists Max Fisher and Amanda Taub.

      Critics say the Rwanda deal will deepen a morally perilous policy, even as it underscores how precarious the European Union’s teetering system for handling the migrant crisis has become.

      Tens of thousands of migrants and asylum seekers remain trapped in Libya, where a patchwork of militias control detention centers and migrants are sold as slaves or into prostitution, and kept in places so packed that there is not even enough floor space to sleep on.

      A bombing of a migrant detention center in July left 40 dead, and it has continued to operate in the months since, despite part of it having been reduced to rubble.

      Even as the system falters, few in the West seem to be paying much attention, and critics say that is also part of the aim — to keep a problem that has roiled European politics on the other side of Mediterranean waters, out of sight and out of mind.

      Screening asylum seekers in safe, remote locations — where they can qualify as refugees without undertaking perilous journeys to Europe — has long been promoted in Brussels as a way to dismantle smuggler networks while giving vulnerable people a fair chance at a new life. But the application by the European Union has highlighted its fundamental flaws: The offshore centers are too small and the pledges of refugee resettlement too few.

      European populists continue to flog the narrative that migrants are invading, even though the European Union’s migration policy has starkly reduced the number of new arrivals. In 2016, 181,376 people crossed the Mediterranean from North Africa to reach Italian shores. Last year, the number plummeted to 23,485.

      But the bloc’s approach has been sharply criticized by humanitarian and refugee-rights groups, not only for the often deplorable conditions of the detention centers, but also because few consigned to them have any real chance of gaining asylum.

      “It starts to smell as offshore processing and a backdoor way for European countries to keep people away from Europe, in a way that’s only vaguely different to how Australia manages it,” said Judith Sunderland, an expert with Human Rights Watch, referring to that country’s policy of detaining asylum seekers on distant Pacific islands.

      Such criticism first surfaced in Europe in 2016, when the European Union agreed to pay Turkey roughly $6 billion to keep asylum seekers from crossing to Greece, and to take back some of those who reached Greece.

      On the Africa front, in particular in the central Mediterranean, the agreements have come at a lower financial cost, but arguably at a higher moral one.
      Image
      A migrant detention center in Tripoli, Libya, in 2015.

      Brussels’ funding of the Libyan Coast Guard to intercept migrant boats before they reach international waters has been extremely effective, but has left apprehended migrants vulnerable to abuses in a North African country with scant central governance and at the mercy of an anarchic, at-war state of militia rule.

      A handful are resettled directly out of Libya, and a few thousand more are transferred by the United Nations refugee agency and its partner, the International Organization for Migration, to a processing center in Niger. Only some of those have a realistic shot at being granted asylum in Europe.

      With many European Union member states refusing to accept any asylum seekers, Brussels and, increasingly, President Emmanuel Macron of France have appealed to those willing to take in a few who are deemed especially vulnerable.

      As Italy has continued to reject migrant rescue vessels from docking at its ports, and threatened to impose fines of up to 1 million euros, about $1.1 million, on those who defy it, Mr. Macron has spearheaded an initiative among European Union members to help resettle migrants rescued in the Mediterranean. Eight nations have joined.

      But ultimately, it’s a drop in the bucket.

      An estimated half a million migrants live in Libya, and just 51,000 are registered with the United Nations refugee agency. Five thousand are held in squalid and unsafe detention centers.

      “European countries face a dilemma,” said Camille Le Coz, an expert with the Migration Policy Institute in Brussels. “They do not want to welcome more migrants from Libya and worry about creating pull factors, but at the same time they can’t leave people trapped in detention centers.”
      Editors’ Picks
      25 Years Later, It Turns Out Phoebe Was the Best Friend
      Following the Lead of the Diving Girl
      The Perfect Divorce

      The United Nations refugee agency and the International Organization for Migration, mostly using European Union funding, have evacuated about 4,000 people to the transit center in Niger over the past two years.

      Niger, a country that has long served as a key node in the migratory route from Africa to Europe, is home to some of the world’s most effective people-smugglers.

      The capacity of the center in Agadez, where smugglers also base their operations, is about 1,000. But it has at times held up to three times as many, as resettlement to Europe and North America has been slack.

      Fourteen countries — 10 from the European Union, along with Canada, Norway, Switzerland and the United States — have pledged to resettle about 6,600 people either directly from Libya or from the Niger facility, according to the United Nations refugee agency.

      It has taken two years to fulfill about half of those pledges, with some resettlements taking up to 12 months to process, a spokesman for the agency said.

      Some countries that made pledges, such as Belgium and Finland, have taken only a few dozen people; others, like the Netherlands, fewer than 10; Luxembourg has taken none, a review of the refugee agency’s data shows.

      Under the agreement with Rwanda, which is expected to be signed in the coming weeks, the east African country will take in about 500 migrants evacuated from Libya and host them until they are resettled to new homes or sent back to their countries of origin.

      It will offer a way out for a lucky few, but ultimately the Rwandan center is likely to run into the same delays and problems as the one in Agadez.

      “The Niger program has suffered from a lot of setbacks, hesitation, very slow processing by European and other countries, very low numbers of actual resettlements,” said Ms. Sunderland of Human Rights Watch. “There’s not much hope then that the exact same process in Rwanda would lead to dramatically different outcomes.”

      https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/08/world/europe/migrants-africa-rwanda.html

    • Vu des États-Unis.L’UE choisit le Rwanda pour relocaliser les demandeurs d’asile

      L’Union européenne va conclure un accord avec le Rwanda pour tenir les demandeurs d’asile à l’écart de ses frontières. Déchirée sur la question des migrants, l’Europe poursuit une politique déjà expérimentée et critiquée, analyse The New York Times.

      https://www.courrierinternational.com/article/vu-des-etats-unis-lue-choisit-le-rwanda-pour-relocaliser-les-

    • Le Rwanda, un nouveau #hotspot pour les migrants qui fuient l’enfer libyen

      Comme au Niger, le Haut-commissariat aux réfugiés de l’ONU va ouvrir un centre de transit pour accueillir 500 migrants détenus en Libye. D’autres contingents d’évacués pourront prendre le relais au fur et à mesure que les 500 premiers migrants auront une solution d’installation ou de rapatriement.

      Quelque 500 migrants actuellement enfermés en centres de détention en Libye vont être évacués vers le Rwanda dans les prochaines semaines, en vertu d’un accord signé mardi 10 septembre par le gouvernement rwandais, le Haut-commissariat aux réfugiés de l’ONU (HCR), et l’Union africaine (UA).

      Il s’agira principalement de personnes originaires de la corne de l’Afrique, toutes volontaires pour être évacuées vers le Rwanda. Leur prise en charge à la descente de l’avion sera effectuée par le HCR qui les orientera vers un centre d’accueil temporaire dédié.

      Situé à 60 km de Kigali, la capitale rwandaise, le centre de transit de Gashora a été établi en 2015 “pour faire face, à l’époque, à un afflux de migrants burundais” fuyant des violences dans leur pays, explique à InfoMigrants Elise Villechalane, représentante du HCR au Rwanda. D’une capacité de 338 places, l’édifice implanté sur un terrain de 26 hectares a déjà accueilli, au fil des années, un total de 30 000 Burundais. “Des travaux sont en cours pour augmenter la capacité et arriver à 500 personnes”, précise Elise Villechalane.

      Les premiers vols d’évacués devraient arriver dans les prochaines semaines et s’étaler sur plusieurs mois. Le HCR estime que le centre tournera à pleine capacité d’ici la fin de l’année. À l’avenir, d’autres contingents d’évacués pourront prendre le relais au fur et à mesure que les 500 premiers migrants quitteront les lieux.

      Certains réfugiés "pourraient recevoir l’autorisation de rester au Rwanda"

      “Une fois [les migrants] arrivés sur place, nous procéderons à leur évaluation [administrative] afin de trouver une solution au cas par cas”, poursuit Elise Villechalane. “En fonction de leur parcours et de leur vulnérabilité, il pourra leur être proposé une réinstallation dans un pays tiers, ou dans un pays où ils ont déjà obtenu l’asile avant de se rendre en Libye, mais aussi un retour volontaire dans leur pays d’origine quand les conditions pour un rapatriement dans la sécurité et la dignité sont réunies.”

      Dans des cas plus rares, et si aucune solution n’est trouvée, certains réfugiés "pourraient recevoir l’autorisation de rester au Rwanda", a indiqué Germaine Kamayirese, la ministre chargée des mesures d’Urgence, lors d’une déclaration à la presse à Kigali.

      Le Rwanda a décidé d’accueillir des évacués de Libye à la suite d’un discours du chef de l’État rwandais Paul Kagame le 23 novembre 2017, peu après la diffusion d’un document choc de CNN sur des migrants africains réduits en esclavage en Libye. “Le président a offert généreusement d’accueillir des migrants, ce qui a, depuis, été élargi pour inclure les réfugiés, les demandeurs d’asile et toutes les autres personnes spécifiées dans le mémorandum d’accord”, affirme Olivier Kayumba, secrétaire du ministère chargé de la Gestion des situations d’urgence, contacté par InfoMigrants.

      Le pays reconnaît, en outre, qu’il existe actuellement en Libye “une situation de plus en plus complexe et exceptionnelle conduisant à la détention et aux mauvais traitements de ressortissants de pays tiers”, continue Olivier Kayumba qui rappelle qu’en tant que signataire de la Convention de 1951 relative au statut des réfugiés, son pays s’est senti le devoir d’agir.

      Le Rwanda prêt à accueillir jusqu’à 30 000 africains évacués

      Plus de 149 000 réfugiés, principalement burundais et congolais, vivent actuellement au Rwanda qui compte une population de 12 millions d’habitants. “Les Rwandais sont habitués à vivre en harmonie avec les réfugiés”, ajoute Olivier Kayumba. “Grâce à la mise en place d’une stratégie d’inclusion, les enfants de réfugiés vont à l’école avec les locaux, les communautés d’accueil incluent aussi les réfugiés dans le système d’assurance maladie et d’accès à l’emploi.”

      Le gouvernement rwandais se dit prêt à accueillir jusqu’à 30 000 Africains évacués de Libye dans son centre de transit, mais uniquement par groupes de 500, afin d’éviter un engorgement du système d’accueil.

      "C’est un moment historique, parce que des Africains tendent la main à d’autres Africains", s’est réjouie Amira Elfadil, commissaire de l’Union africaine (UA) aux Affaires sociales, lors d’une conférence de presse. "Je suis convaincue que cela fait partie des solutions durables".

      L’UA espère désormais que d’autres pays africains rejoindront le Rwanda en proposant un soutien similaire aux évacués de Libye.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/19455/le-rwanda-un-nouveau-hotspot-pour-les-migrants-qui-fuient-l-enfer-liby

    • Signing of MoU between the AU, Government of Rwanda and UNHCR

      Signing of the MoU between the @_AfricanUnion, the Government of #Rwanda and the United Nations High Commissioner for @Refugees (UNHCR) to establish an Emergency Transit Mechanism #ETM in Rwanda for refugees and asylum-seekers stranded in #Libya

      https://twitter.com/_AfricanUnion/status/1171307373945937920?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E11
      Lien vers la vidéo:
      https://livestream.com/AfricanUnion/events/8813789/videos/196081645
      #Memorandum_of_understanding #signature #vidéo #MoU #Emergency_Transit_Mechanism #Union_africaine #UA

    • Le HCR, le Gouvernement rwandais et l’Union africaine signent un accord pour l’évacuation de réfugiés hors de la Libye

      Le Gouvernement rwandais, le HCR, l’Agence des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés, et l’Union africaine ont signé aujourd’hui un mémorandum d’accord qui prévoit de mettre en œuvre un dispositif pour évacuer des réfugiés hors de la Libye.

      Selon cet accord, le Gouvernement rwandais recevra et assurera la protection de réfugiés qui sont actuellement séquestrés dans des centres de détention en Libye. Ils seront transférés en lieu sûr au Rwanda sur une base volontaire.

      Un premier groupe de 500 personnes, majoritairement originaires de pays de la corne de l’Afrique, sera évacué. Ce groupe comprend notamment des enfants et des jeunes dont la vie est menacée. Après leur arrivée, le HCR continuera de rechercher des solutions pour les personnes évacuées.

      Si certains peuvent bénéficier d’une réinstallation dans des pays tiers, d’autres seront aidés à retourner dans les pays qui leur avait précédemment accordé l’asile ou à regagner leur pays d’origine, s’ils peuvent le faire en toute sécurité. Certains pourront être autorisés à rester au Rwanda sous réserve de l’accord des autorités compétentes.

      Les vols d’évacuation devraient commencer dans les prochaines semaines et seront menés en coopération avec les autorités rwandaises et libyennes. L’Union africaine apportera son aide pour les évacuations, fournira un soutien politique stratégique en collaborant avec la formation et la coordination et aidera à mobiliser des ressources. Le HCR assurera des prestations de protection internationale et fournira l’aide humanitaire nécessaire, y compris des vivres, de l’eau, des abris ainsi que des services d’éducation et de santé.

      Le HCR exhorte la communauté internationale à contribuer des ressources pour la mise en œuvre de cet accord.

      Depuis 2017, le HCR a évacué plus de 4400 personnes relevant de sa compétence depuis la Libye vers d’autres pays, dont 2900 par le biais du mécanisme de transit d’urgence au Niger et 425 vers des pays européens via le centre de transit d’urgence en Roumanie.

      Néanmoins, quelque 4700 personnes seraient toujours détenues dans des conditions effroyables à l’intérieur de centres de détention en Libye. Il est urgent de les transférer vers des lieux sûrs, de leur assurer la protection internationale, de leur fournir une aide vitale d’urgence et de leur rechercher des solutions durables.


      https://www.unhcr.org/fr/news/press/2019/9/5d778a48a/hcr-gouvernement-rwandais-lunion-africaine-signent-accord-levacuation-refugie

    • ‘Life-saving’: hundreds of refugees to be evacuated from Libya to Rwanda

      First group expected to leave dire detention centres in days, as UN denies reports that plan is part of EU strategy to keep refugees from Europe

      Hundreds of African refugees and asylum seekers trapped in Libyan detention centres will be evacuated to Rwanda under a “life-saving” agreement reached with Kigali and the African Union, the UN refugee agency said on Tuesday.

      The first group of 500 people, including children and young people from Somalia, Eritrea and Sudan, are expected to arrive in Rwanda over the coming days, out of 4,700 now estimated to be in custody in Libya, where conflict is raging. The measure is part of an “emergency transit mechanism”, to evacuate people at risk of harm in detention centres inside the county.

      Babar Baloch, UNHCR spokesman in Geneva, said the agreement was “a life-line” mechanism to allow those in danger to get to a place of safety.

      “This is an expansion of the humanitarian evacuation to save lives,” said Baloch. “The focus is on those trapped inside Libya. We’ve seen how horrible the conditions are and we want to get them out of harm’s way.”

      More than 50,000 people fleeing war and poverty in Africa remain in Libya, where a network of militias run overcrowded detention centres, and where there are reports that people have been sold as slaves or into prostitution.

      The UN denied reports the European Union were behind the agreement, as part of a strategy to keep migrants away from Europe. Vincent Cochetel, the special envoy for the UNHCR for the central Mediterranean, told Reuters the funding would mainly come from the EU, but also from the African Union which has received $20m (£16m) from Qatar to support the reintegration of African migrants. But he later said on Twitter that no funding had yet been received and that he was working on it “with partners” (https://twitter.com/cochetel/status/1171400370339373057).

      Baloch said: “We are asking for support from all of our donors, including the EU. The arrangement is between UNHCR, the African Union and Rwanda.”

      The EU has been criticised for funding the Libyan coastguard, who pick up escaped migrants from boats in the Mediterranean and send them back to centres where they face beatings, sexual violence and forced labour according to rights groups.

      In July, the bombing of a migrant detention centre in Tripoli left 44 people dead, leading to international pressure to find a safe haven for refugees.
      Fear and despair engulf refugees in Libya’s ’market of human beings’
      Read more

      Under the agreement, the government of Rwanda will receive and provide protection to refugees and asylum seekers in groups of about 50, who will be put up in a transit facility outside the capital of Kigali. After their arrival, the UNHCR will continue to pursue solutions for them. Some will be resettled to third countries, others helped to return to countries where asylum had previously been granted and others will stay in Rwanda. They will return to their homes if it is safe to do so.

      Cochetel said: “The government has said, ‘If you [UNHCR] think the people should stay long-term in Rwanda, no problem. If you think they should be reunited with their family, they should be resettled, no problem. You [UNHCR] decide on the solution.’”

      “Rwanda has said, ‘We’ll give them the space, we’ll give them the status, we’ll give them the residence permit. They will be legally residing in Rwanda as refugees.’”

      Rwanda, a country of 12 million, is the second African country to provide temporary refuge to migrants in Libya. It already supports around 150,000 refugees from neighbouring Democratic Republic of the Congo and Burundi.

      UNHCR has evacuated more than 2,900 refugees and asylum seekers out of Libya to Niger through an existing emergency transit mechanism. Almost 2,000 of them have been resettled, to countries in Europe, the US and Canada, the agency said, with the rest remaining in Niger.

      https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2019/sep/10/hundreds-refugees-evacuated-libya-to-rwanda?CMP=share_btn_fb

    • INTERVIEW-African refugees held captive in Libya to go to Rwanda in coming weeks - UNHCR

      Hundreds of African refugees trapped in Libyan detention centres will be evacuated to Rwanda within the next few weeks as part of increasingly urgent efforts to relocate people as conflict rages in north African nation, the United Nations said on Tuesday.

      Vincent Cochetel, special envoy for the central Mediterranean for the U.N. refugee agency (UNHCR), said 500 refugees will be evacuated to Rwanda in a deal signed with the small east African nation and the African Union on Tuesday.

      “The agreement with Rwanda says the number can be increased from 500 if they are satisfied with how it works,” Cochetel told the Thomson Reuters Foundation in an interview ahead of the official U.N. announcement.

      “It really depends on the response of the international community to make it work. But it means we have one more solution to the situation in Libya. It’s not a big fix, but it’s helpful.”

      Libya has become the main conduit for Africans fleeing war and poverty trying to reach Europe, since former leader Muammar Gaddafi was toppled in a NATO-backed uprising in 2011.

      People smugglers have exploited the turmoil to send hundreds of thousands of migrants on dangerous journeys across the central Mediterranean although the number of crossings dropped sharply from 2017 amid an EU-backed push to block arrivals.

      Many are picked up at sea by the EU-funded Libyan Coast Guard which sends them back, often to be detained in squalid, overcrowded centres where they face beatings, rape and forced labour, according to aid workers and human rights groups.

      According to the UNHCR, there are about 4,700 people from countries such as Eritrea, Somalia, Ethiopia and Sudan currently held in Libya’s detention centres, which are nominally under the government but often run by armed groups.

      A July air strike by opposition forces, which killed dozens of detainees in a centre in the Libyan capital Tripoli, has increased pressure on the international community to find a safe haven for the refugees and migrants.

      https://news.yahoo.com/interview-african-refugees-held-captive-100728525.html?guccounter=1&guce

    • Accueil de migrants évacués de Libye : « Un bon coup politique » pour le Rwanda

      Le Rwanda a signé il y a quelques jours à Addis-Abeba un accord avec le Haut-commissariat pour les réfugiés (HCR) et l’Union africaine (UA) en vue d’accueillir des migrants bloqués dans l’enfer des centres de détention libyens. Camille Le Coz, analyste au sein du think tank Migration Policy Institute, décrypte cette annonce.

      Cinq cent personnes vont être évacuées de Libye vers le Rwanda « dans quelques semaines », a précisé mardi Hope Tumukunde Gasatura, représentante permanente du Rwanda à l’UA, lors d’une conférence de presse à Addis-Abeba où avait lieu la signature de l’accord.

      RFI : Le Rwanda accueille déjà près de 150 000 réfugiés venus de RDC et du Burundi. Et ce n’est pas vraiment la porte à côté de la Libye. Sans compter que le régime de Paul Kagame est régulièrement critiqué pour ses violations des droits de l’homme. Alors comment expliquer que cet État se retrouve à prendre en charge des centaines de migrants ?

      Camille Le Coz : En fait, tout commence en novembre 2017 après la publication par CNN d’une vidéo révélant l’existence de marchés aux esclaves en Libye. C’est à ce moment-là que Kigali se porte volontaire pour accueillir des migrants bloqués en Libye. Mais c’est finalement vers l’Europe et le Niger, voisin de la Libye, que s’organisent ces évacuations. Ainsi, depuis 2017, près de 4 000 réfugiés ont été évacués de Libye, dont 2 900 au Niger. La plupart d’entre eux ont été réinstallés dans des pays occidentaux ou sont en attente de réinstallation. Mais du fait de la reprise des combats en Libye cet été, ce mécanisme est vite apparu insuffisant. L’option d’organiser des évacuations vers le Rwanda a donc été réactivée et a donné lieu à des discussions avec Kigali, le HCR, l’UA mais aussi l’UE sur les aspects financiers.

      Quel bénéfice le Rwanda peut-il tirer de cet accord ?

      Pour le Rwanda, faire valoir la solidarité avec les migrants africains en Libye est un bon coup politique, à la fois sur la scène internationale et avec ses partenaires africains. La situation des migrants en Libye est au cœur de l’actualité et les ONG et l’ONU alertent régulièrement sur les conditions effroyables pour les migrants sur place. Donc d’un point de vue politique, c’est très valorisant pour le Rwanda d’accueillir ces personnes.

      Que va-t-il se passer pour ces personnes quand elles vont arriver au Rwanda ?

      En fait, ce mécanisme soulève deux questions. D’une part, qui sont les migrants qui vont être évacués vers le Rwanda ? D’après ce que l’on sait, ce sont plutôt des gens de la Corne de l’Afrique et plutôt des gens très vulnérables, notamment des enfants. D’autre part, quelles sont les solutions qui vont leur être offertes au Rwanda ? La première option prévue par l’accord, c’est la possibilité pour ces personnes de retourner dans leur pays d’origine. La deuxième option, c’est le retour dans un pays dans lequel ces réfugiés ont reçu l’asile dans le passé. Cela pourrait par exemple s’appliquer à des Érythréens réfugiés en Éthiopie avant de partir vers l’Europe. Ces deux options demanderont néanmoins un suivi sérieux des conditions de retour : comment s’assurer que ces retours seront effectivement volontaires, et comment garantir la réintégration de ces réfugiés ? La troisième option, ce serait la possibilité pour certains de rester au Rwanda mais on ne sait pas encore sous quel statut. Enfin, ce que l’on ne sait pas encore, c’est si des États européens s’engageront à relocaliser certains de ces rescapés.

      Cet accord est donc une réplique de celui conclu avec le Niger, qui accueille depuis 2017 plusieurs milliers de réfugiés évacués de Tripoli ?

      L’approche est la même mais d’après ce que l’on sait pour l’instant, les possibilités offertes aux réfugiés évacués sont différentes : dans le cas du mécanisme avec le Niger, les pays européens mais également les États-Unis, le Canada, la Norvège et la Suisse s’étaient engagés à réinstaller une partie de ces réfugiés. Dans le cas du Rwanda, on n’a pas encore eu de telles promesses.

      Cet accord est-il la traduction de l’évolution de la politique migratoire européenne ?

      Aujourd’hui, près de 5 000 migrants et réfugiés sont dans des centres de détention en Libye où les conditions sont horribles. Donc la priorité, c’est de les en sortir. Les évacuations vers le Rwanda peuvent participer à la résolution de ce problème. Mais il reste entier puisque les garde-côtes libyens, financés par l’Europe, continuent d’intercepter des migrants qui partent vers l’Italie et de les envoyer vers ces centres de détention. En d’autres termes, cet accord apporte une réponse partielle et de court terme à un problème qui résulte très largement de politiques européennes.

      On entend parfois parler d’« externalisation des frontières » de l’Europe. En gros, passer des accords avec des pays comme le Rwanda permettrait aussi d’éloigner le problème des migrants des côtes européennes. Est-ce vraiment la stratégie de l’Union européenne ?

      Ces évacuations vers le Rwanda sont plutôt un mécanisme d’urgence pour répondre aux besoins humanitaires pressants de migrants et réfugiés détenus en Libye (lire encadré). Mais il est clair que ces dernières années, la politique européenne a consisté à passer des accords avec des pays voisins afin qu’ils renforcent leurs contrôles frontaliers. C’est le cas par exemple avec la Turquie et la Libye. En échange, l’Union européenne leur fournit une assistance financière et d’autres avantages économiques ou politiques. L’Union européenne a aussi mis une partie de sa politique de développement au service d’objectifs migratoires, avec la création d’un Fond fiduciaire d’urgence pour l’Afrique en 2015, qui vise notamment à développer la capacité des États africains à mettre en œuvre leur propre politique migratoire et à améliorer la gestion de leurs frontières. C’est le cas notamment au Niger où l’Union européenne a soutenu les autorités pour combattre les réseaux de passeurs et contrôler les passages vers la Libye.

      Justement, pour le Rwanda, y a-t-il une contrepartie financière ?

      L’accord est entre le HCR, l’UA et le Rwanda. Mais le soutien financier de l’Union européenne paraît indispensable pour la mise en œuvre de ce plan. Reste à voir comment cela pourrait se matérialiser. Est-ce que ce sera un soutien financier pour ces 500 personnes ? Des offres de relocalisation depuis le Rwanda ? Ou, puisque l’on sait que le Rwanda a signé le Pacte mondial sur les réfugiés, l’Union européenne pourrait-elle appuyer la mise en œuvre des plans d’action de Kigali dans ce domaine ? Ce pourrait être une idée.

      La commissaire de l’UA aux affaires sociales Amira El Fadil s’est dite convaincue que ce genre de partenariat pourrait constituer des solutions « durables ». Qu’en pensez-vous ?

      C’est un signe positif que des pays africains soient plus impliqués sur ce dossier puisque ces questions migratoires demandent une gestion coordonnée de part et d’autre de la Méditerranée. Maintenant, il reste à voir quelles solutions seront offertes à ces 500 personnes puisque pour l’instant, le plan paraît surtout leur proposer de retourner dans le pays qu’elles ont quitté. Par ailleurs, il ne faut pas perdre de vue que la plupart des réfugiés africains ne sont pas en Libye, mais en Afrique. Les plus gros contingents sont au Soudan, en Ouganda et en Éthiopie et donc, les solutions durables sont d’abord et avant tout à mettre en œuvre sur le continent.

      ■ Un geste de solidarité de la part du Rwanda, selon le HCR

      Avec notre correspondant à Genève, Jérémie Lanche

      D’après le porte-parole du HCR Babar Baloch, l’accueil par Kigali d’un premier contingent de réfugiés est une « bouée de sauvetage » pour tous ceux pris au piège en Libye. L’Union européenne, dont les côtes sont de plus en plus inaccessibles pour les candidats à l’exil, pourrait financer une partie de l’opération, même si rien n’est officiel. Mais pour le HCR, l’essentiel est ailleurs. La vie des migrants en Libye est en jeu, dit Babar Baloch :

      « Il ne faut pas oublier qu’il y a quelques semaines, un centre de détention [pour migrants] a été bombardé en Libye. Plus de 50 personnes ont été tuées. Mais même sans parler de ça, les conditions dans ces centres sont déplorables. Il faut donc sortir ceux qui s’y trouvent le plus rapidement possible. Et à part le Niger, le Rwanda est le deuxième pays qui s’est manifesté pour nous aider à sauver ces vies. »

      Les réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile doivent être logés dans des installations qui ont déjà servi pour accueillir des réfugiés burundais. Ceux qui le souhaitent pourront rester au Rwanda et y travailler selon Kigali. Les autres pourront être relocalisés dans des pays tiers voire dans leur pays d’origine s’ils le souhaitent. Le Rwanda se dit prêt à recevoir en tout dans ses centres de transit jusqu’à 30 000 Africains bloqués en Libye.

      "Depuis un demi-siècle, le Rwanda a produit beaucoup de réfugiés. Donc le fait qu’il y ait une telle tragédie, une telle détresse, de la part de nos frères et soeurs africains, cela nous interpelle en tant que Rwandais. Ce dont on parle, c’est un centre de transit d’urgence. Une fois [qu’ils seront] arrivés au Rwanda, le HCR va continuer à trouver une solution pour ces personnes. Certains seront envoyés au pays qui leur ont accordé asile, d’autres seront envoyés aux pays tiers et bien sûr d’autres pourront retourner dans leur pays si la situation sécuritaire le permet. Bien sûr, ceux qui n’auront pas d’endroits où aller pourront rester au Rwanda. Cela devra nécessiter bien sûr l’accord des autorités de notre pays." Olivier Nduhungirehe, secrétaire d’État en charge de la Coopération et de la Communauté est-africaine

      http://www.rfi.fr/afrique/20190912-accord-accueil-migrants-rwanda-libye-politique

    • ‘Maybe they can forget us there’: Refugees in Libya await move to Rwanda

      Hundreds in detention centres expected to be transferred under deal partly funded by EU

      Hundreds of refugees in Libya are expected to be moved to Rwanda in the coming weeks, under a new deal partly funded by the European Union.

      “This is an expansion of the humanitarian evacuation to save lives,” said Babar Baloch, from the United Nations Refugee Agency. “The focus is on those trapped inside Libya. We’ve seen how horrible the conditions are and we want to get them out of harm’s way.”

      Many of the refugees and migrants expected to be evacuated have spent years between detention centres run by Libya’s Department for Combatting Illegal Migration, and smugglers known for brutal torture and abuse, after fleeing war or dictatorships in their home countries.

      They have also been victims of the European Union’s hardening migration policy, which involves supporting the Libyan coast guard to intercept boats full of people who try to cross the Mediterranean Sea to Europe, returning those on board to indefinite detention in a Libya at war.
      Apprehension

      In Libyan capital Tripoli, refugees and migrants who spoke to The Irish Times by phone were apprehensive. They questioned whether they will be allowed to work and move freely in Rwanda, and asked whether resettlement spaces to other countries will be offered, or alternative opportunities to rebuild their lives in the long-term.

      “People want to go. We want to go,” said one detainee, with slight desperation, before asking if Rwanda is a good place to be. “Please if you know about Rwanda tell me.”

      “We heard about the evacuation plan to Rwanda, but we have a lot of questions,” said another detainee currently in Zintan detention centre, where 22 people died in eight months because of a lack of medical care and abysmal living conditions. “Maybe they can forget us there.”

      In a statement, UNHCR said that while some evacuees may benefit from resettlement to other countries or may be allowed to stay in Rwanda in the long term, others would be helped to go back to countries where they had previously been granted asylum, or to their home countries, if safe.

      The original group of evacuees is expected to include 500 volunteers.

      Rwanda’s government signed a memorandum of understanding with the United Nations Refugee Agency and the African Union on September 10th to confirm the deal.

      In 2017, a year-long investigation by Foreign Policy magazine found that migrants and refugees were being sent to Rwanda or Uganda from detention centres in Israel, and then moved illegally into third countries, where they had no rights or any chance to make an asylum claim.

      Officials working on the latest deal say they are trying to make sure this doesn’t happen again.

      “We are afraid, especially in terms of time,” said an Eritrean, who witnessed a fellow detainee burn himself to death in Triq al Sikka detention centre last year, after saying he had lost hope in being evacuated.

      “How long will we stay in Rwanda? Because we stayed in Libya more than two years, and have been registered by UNHCR for almost two years. Will we take similar time in Rwanda? It is difficult for asylum seekers.”

      https://www.irishtimes.com/news/world/africa/maybe-they-can-forget-us-there-refugees-in-libya-await-move-to-rwanda-1.

    • Le Rwanda accueille des premiers migrants évacués de Libye

      Le Rwanda a accueilli ce jeudi soir le premier groupe de réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile en provenance de Libye, dans le cadre d’un accord signé récemment entre ce pays, le Haut Commissariat aux réfugiés et l’Union africaine.

      L’avion affrété par le Haut Commissariat aux réfugiés a atterri à Kigali cette nuit. À son bord, 59 hommes et 7 femmes, en grande majorité Erythréens, mais aussi Somaliens et Soudanais. Le plus jeune migrant en provenance des centres de détention libyens est un bébé de 2 mois et le plus âgé un homme de 39 ans.

      Ils ont été accueillis en toute discrétion, très loin des journalistes qui n’ont pas eu accès à l’aéroport international de Kigali. « Ce ne sont pas des gens qui reviennent d’une compétition de football avec une coupe et qui rentrent joyeux. Non, ce sont des gens qui rentrent traumatisés et qui ont besoin d’une certaine dignité, de respect. Ils étaient dans une situation très chaotique », justifie Olivier Kayumba, secrétaire permanent du ministère en charge de la gestion des Urgences.

      Des bus les ont ensuite acheminés vers le site de transit de Gashora, à quelque 60 km au sud-est de Kigali. Une structure qui peut accueillir pour le moment un millier de personnes, mais dont la capacité peut être portée rapidement à 8 000, selon le responsable rwandais.

      Des ONG ont accusé le Rwanda d’avoir monté toute cette opération pour redorer l’image d’un régime qui viole les droits de l’homme. Olivier Kayumba balaie cette accusation. « Nous agissons pour des raisons humanitaires et par panafricanisme », explique-t-il. Selon les termes de l’accord, 500 migrants coincés dans les camps en Libye doivent être accueillis provisoirement au Rwanda, avant de trouver des pays d’accueil.


      http://www.rfi.fr/afrique/20190927-rwanda-accueille-premiers-migrants-evacues-libye

    • Évacués au Rwanda, les réfugiés de Libye continuent de rêver d’Europe

      Le Rwanda accueille depuis quelques semaines des demandeurs d’asile évacués de Libye, dans le cadre d’un accord avec le Haut Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés et l’Union africaine signé le mois dernier. Un programme d’urgence présenté comme une réponse à la crise des quelque 4 700 réfugiés et migrants bloqués dans ce pays en guerre. Reportage.

      Le centre de #Gashora est en pleine effervescence. Situé dans la région du #Bugesera, au sud de Kigali, il accueillait auparavant des réfugiés venus du Burundi. Aujourd’hui, des équipes s’affairent pour rénover et agrandir les structures afin d’héberger les quelque 500 réfugiés évacués de Libye que le Rwanda a promis d’accueillir dans un premier temps.

      Les 189 demandeurs d’asile déjà arrivés sont logés dans de petites maisons de briques disséminées dans les bois alentour. Un groupe de jeunes en jogging et baskets se passent la balle sur un terrain de volley. D’autres, le regard fuyant, parfois égaré, sont assis sur des bancs à l’ombre.

      « Je n’ai pas encore réalisé mon rêve »

      Rodouane Abdallah accepte de parler aux journalistes, arrivés en groupe dans un bus acheminé par le gouvernement rwandais. Originaire du Darfour, ce jeune homme de 18 ans au regard doux a posé le pied en Libye en 2017. Il a tenté sept fois de traverser la Méditerranée. Il a survécu par miracle.

      Aujourd’hui, il se souvient encore de toutes les dates avec précision : le nombre de jours et d’heures passées en mer, les mois en détention. Deux ans entre les mains de geôliers ou de passeurs. « Là bas, vous êtes nourris seulement une fois par jour, vous buvez l’eau des toilettes, vous ne pouvez pas vous doucher et vous devez travailler gratuitement sinon vous êtes battus », se souvient-il.

      Rodouane est aujourd’hui logé et nourri à Gashora. Il bénéficie également de soins médicaux et psychologiques. Cependant, il voit le Rwanda comme une simple étape : « Je suis heureux d’avoir eu la chance de pouvoir venir ici. C’est mieux qu’en Libye. Mais je ne suis pas arrivé à la fin de mon voyage, car je n’ai pas encore réalisé mon rêve. Je veux aller en Europe et devenir ingénieur en informatique », assure-t-il. Ce rêve, cette idée fixe, tous la martèlent aux journalistes. Pourtant les places en Europe risquent d’être limitées.

      « #Emergency_Transit_Mechanism »

      Dans le cadre de l’Emergency Transit Mechanism (#ETM), le nom donné à ce programme d’#évacuation d’urgence, les réfugiés de Gashora ont aujourd’hui plusieurs possibilités. Ils peuvent soit faire une demande d’asile dans un pays occidental, soit rentrer chez eux si les conditions sécuritaires sont réunies, soit bénéficier d’un processus de réinstallation dans un pays tiers sur le continent africain. Les mineurs non accompagnés pourraient ainsi rejoindre leur famille et les étudiants s’inscrire dans des universités de la région selon le HCR.

      « Ils ont beaucoup souffert pour atteindre l’Europe, c’est donc un objectif qui est encore très cher à leur cœur. Mais maintenant qu’ils sont au Rwanda, nous essayons d’identifier avec eux toute une palette de solutions », explique Élise Villechalane, chargée des relations extérieures du HCR au Rwanda.

      Mais la démarche inquiète déjà certains réfugiés : « Les pays européens dépensent beaucoup d’argent pour nous éloigner de la mer Méditerranée. Et si c’est pour cela qu’on a été amenés ici, ce serait honteux. La seule chose que je pourrais faire serait de retourner en Libye et de tenter de traverser la Méditerranée », explique un jeune Érythréen, qui préfère garder l’anonymat.

      Une solution viable ?

      Le Rwanda n’est pas le premier pays à mettre en place ce type de mécanisme. Le Niger a lui aussi lancé un ETM en 2017. Depuis, environ 2 900 réfugiés y ont été évacués de Libye. Environ 1 700 d’entre eux ont été réinstallés dans des pays occidentaux à ce jour. Aujourd’hui, l’Union africaine et le HCR appellent d’autres pays africains à suivre l’exemple. Mais certaines ONG sont sceptiques quant à la viabilité du système.

      Au Niger, le traitement des dossiers est long, ce qui crée des tensions. Le #Mixed_Migration_Center, un centre de recherche indépendant, rapporte que des réfugiés auraient ainsi attaqué un véhicule du HCR en signe de protestation dans le centre de transit d’Hamdallaye en juin dernier.

      Plus généralement, Johannes Claes, chef de projet Afrique de l’Ouest au MMC, dénonce une externalisation des obligations des pays occidentaux en matière de droit d’asile : « Avec ce type schéma, l’UE délègue une part de sa responsabilité au continent africain. C’est d’autant plus cynique quand on sait que l’Union européenne finance les garde-côtes libyens qui interceptent les migrants avant de les envoyer en centre de détention », explique-t-il.

      Du côté des signataires de l’accord, on présente le projet sous un jour différent : « Ce qui compte aujourd’hui, c’est que ces personnes sont en sécurité le temps que leurs dossiers soient traités. Et je suis fière que le Rwanda se soit porté volontaire », indique Hope Tumukunde, représentante permanente du Rwanda à l’Union africaine.

      Début septembre, au moment de la signature de l’accord, Vincent Cochetel, l’envoyé spécial du HCR pour la situation en Méditerranée, assurait à Reuters que la plus grande partie du financement de ce mécanisme d’évacuation d’urgence viendrait de l’Union européenne. Il est depuis revenu sur ces déclarations. Pour le moment, c’est le HCR qui assure la totalité du financement de l’opération.

      http://www.rfi.fr/afrique/20191103-rwanda-refugies-libye-hcr-ua

    • Norway opens its doors to 600 people evacuated from Libya to Rwanda

      Refugees and asylum seekers who found respite in Rwanda camp after escaping conflict in Libya will be resettled in Norway.
      Hundreds of refugees and asylum seekers evacuated from Libyan detention centres to a transit camp in Rwanda are to be resettled this year in Norway, according to Rwanda’s foreign minister.

      Speaking at a news conference in Kigali on Wednesday, Rwanda’s foreign minister Vincent Biruta said the African nation was currently hosting more than 300 refugees and asylum seekers at the Gashora transit centre south of Kigali, most of whom hail from Somalia, Sudan and Eritrea, according to CGTN Africa.

      Only Norway and Sweden had so far agreed to resettle people from the camp, Biruta added. Norway agreed to resettle 600 people, while Sweden had so far accepted seven, according to Biruta.

      Rwanda signed a deal with the UN and African Union in September aimed at resettling people who had been detained in Libya while trying to reach Europe. More than 4,000 people are believed to still be living in Libyan detention centres, according to the latest figures.

      In a statement to Reuters, Norwegian justice minister Jøran Kallmyr said the plan to resettle 600 people proved that “we don’t support cynical people smugglers, and instead bring in people who need protection in an organised manner”.

      Kallmyr added: “A transit camp like the one in Rwanda will contribute to that effort.”

      Norway’s four-party government coalition agreed last year to accept a total of 3,000 refugees from UN camps in 2020.

      The UN in Libya has come under intense criticism for complying with EU migration policy, which entails funding the Libyan coastguard to intercept boats with refugees and migrants destined for Europe. Many people end up detained in militia-run centres and subjected to grave human rights abuses, including sexual abuse, denial of food and water, and forced recruitment into the on-going Libyan conflict.

      Elisabeth Haslund, Nordic spokesperson for the UN refugee agency, said that of the 4,000-plus people estimated to still be detained in Libyan centres, roughly 2,500 people are refugees and asylum-seekers.

      “As the violence and unrest have been intensifying in Libya and thousands of refugees are still at risk in the country, the evacuations of the most vulnerable refugees are more urgent than ever,” said Haslund.

      “UNHCR very much welcomes Norway’s decision to resettle refugees who have been evacuated to Rwanda and also notes the important and valuable financial contributions from Norway to help support the operation of the transit centre in Gashora.”

      As the 600 people who are expected to be resettled this year in Norway had not yet been chosen, Haslund added, it was impossible to give details on their age, gender or country of origin.

      https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2020/jan/10/norway-opens-its-doors-to-600-people-evacuated-from-libya-to-rwanda

      ping @reka

    • Países europeos acogerán a más de 500 refugiados evacuados de Libia a Ruanda

      Noruega, Suecia y Francia han prometido acoger a más de medio millar de refugiados y solicitantes de asilo que fueron evacuados de Libia y están alojados de forma temporal en Ruanda, confirmaron hoy a Efe fuentes oficiales ruandesas.

      «Actualmente, tenemos a 306 que van a ser reubicados en Noruega, Suecia y Francia», dijo a Efe el ministro de Asuntos Exteriores de Ruanda, Vincent Biruta.

      Después de esa primera tanda, Ruanda enviará al siguiente grupo.

      Según Biruta, Noruega ha aceptado alojar a 500, Suecia a siete y Francia también acogerá a algunos (sin especificar la cifra).

      La reubicación producirá después de que Ruanda firmara el año pasado un acuerdo con la Agencia de Refugiados de la ONU (Acnur) y la Unión Africana (UA) para alojar temporalmente a refugiados y solicitantes de asilo que estaban atrapados en centros de detención en Libia.

      Los evacuados, incluidos bebés, procedían principalmente de la zona occidental de África -de naciones como Somalia, Sudán o Eritrea- y quedaban alojados en Ruanda bajo un Mecanismo de Tránsito de Emergencia.

      Ya en Ruanda, los refugiados podrían ser voluntariamente reubicados en terceros países, viajar a aquellos donde el asilo les haya sido concedido o regresar a sus naciones en caso de que se tratase de una alternativa segura.

      También se podían quedar a vivir en Ruanda si conseguían el permiso de las autoridades de este país, que acoge a más de 145.000 refugiados y solicitantes de asilo (principalmente de Burundi y de la República Democrática del Congo), según cifras de Acnur.

      «Hemos recibido compromisos de Francia, Noruega y Suecia. Siete personas ya se marcharon a Suecia en diciembre», confirmó a Efe Elise Villechalane, portavoz de Acnur en Kigali.

      También explicó que no está claro que la oferta de Noruega se refiera específicamente al grupo de rescatados de libia, aunque expresó esperanzas de que la mayor parte de plazas sean destinadas a ellos.

      «Lo que hacemos es procesar los casos, hacer entrevistas con ellos y, entonces, los casos son propuestos y enviados a Noruega. Pero, al final, la decisión la toma el Gobierno noruego», detalló.

      La prioridad será, según Villechalane, reubicar a 168 menores no acompañados que están bajo el Mecanismo de Tránsito de Emergencia ruandés, siempre que se haya determinado previamente que no hay alternativas mejores, como encontrar a sus padres.

      «Aunque algunos países han pedido específicamente a los menores no acompañados, tenemos que averiguar que sea en lo mejor para ellos», precisó la portavoz.

      El Mecanismo de Tránsito de Emergencia ruandés se estableció para dar alojamiento temporal a los evacuados de Libia, a la espera de encontrar soluciones duraderas para ellos, tales como la repatriación o la reubicación.

      Libia es un Estado fallido, víctima del caos y la guerra civil, desde que hace ocho años la OTAN contribuyera militarmente a la victoria de los heterogéneos grupos rebeldes sobre la dictadura de Muamar el Gadafi.

      https://www.lavanguardia.com/vida/20200109/472795695059/paises-europeos-acogeran-a-mas-de-500-refugiados-evacuados-de-libia-a-
      #Norvège #Suède #France

    • Le Rwanda reçoit des réfugiés évacués de Libye, « solution africaine aux problèmes africains »

      Depuis septembre 2019, 500 demandeurs d’asile ont atterri dans le petit Etat d’Afrique centrale en attendant que leur dossier soit traité dans un pays occidental.

      Autour d’un baby-foot, une dizaine de jeunes Erythréens luttent contre l’ennui, en savourant une liberté retrouvée. Il y a quatre mois encore, ils étaient en détention en Libye, sur la route de l’Europe, et les voilà redescendus 4 000 kilomètres plus au sud, dans un centre de transit du district de Gashora, dans l’est du Rwanda.

      Selon un accord signé en septembre 2019 avec le Haut-Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (HCR) et l’Union africaine, ce petit pays d’Afrique centrale s’est engagé à accueillir un premier contingent de 500 réfugiés évacués de Libye, jusqu’à ce que leur demande d’asile soit traitée. Dans le cadre de ce programme appelé « Mécanisme de transit d’urgence » (ETM), ils pourront bénéficier de l’asile dans un pays occidental, être rapatriés dans leur pays d’origine, réinstallés dans un pays de la région ou rester au Rwanda. En 2017, le gouvernement rwandais s’était dit prêt à recevoir jusqu’à 30 000 migrants africains sur son sol, mais uniquement par groupe de 500, afin d’éviter tout débordement.
      Protéger des persécutions

      Ce système est présenté par le HCR comme une réponse à la crise des réfugiés en Libye : plus de 40 000 sont enregistrés dans le pays et quelque 4 000, parmi eux, sont actuellement bloqués dans des centres de détention, où l’accès des travailleurs humanitaires est restreint. « Notre but est de les protéger des persécutions dont ils sont victimes là-bas et de leur éviter une traversée dangereuse de la Méditerranée tout en leur proposant une palette de solutions », explique Elise Villechalane, porte-parole de l’agence onusienne à Kigali.

      Pour le Rwanda, qui accueille déjà 150 000 réfugiés venus principalement de la République démocratique du Congo (RDC) et du Burundi, c’est une manière de soutenir des « solutions africaines aux problèmes africains », l’un des mantras du président Paul Kagame. « C’est une question d’humanité. Nous portons une assistance aux autres Africains qui souffrent en Libye », ajoutait récemment Olivier Kayumba, secrétaire permanent au ministère de la gestion des urgences (Minema), lors d’une visite du centre de Gashora.

      Auparavant destiné à l’accueil de réfugiés burundais, le centre, situé dans la région du Bugesera, au sud de Kigali, a donc fait peau neuve. Les petites maisons de briques disséminées dans les bois hébergent 300 demandeurs d’asile, majoritairement originaires d’Erythrée, de Somalie, d’Ethiopie et du Soudan. Ils sont libres de se rendre dans les villages alentour, peuvent suivre des cours de langue et bénéficient d’un suivi psychologique et médical.

      Quatre mois après la première évacuation, sept réfugiés ont déjà bénéficié d’un processus de réinstallation vers la Suède, une trentaine d’autres se préparent à les suivre et deux ont fait une demande de retour vers la Somalie, leur pays d’origine. Les autres attendent d’être fixés sur leur sort. Parfois avec inquiétude.

      « Ils nous disent que certains vont rester au Rwanda, lâche Robiel, un jeune Erythréen de 24 ans, mais le Rwanda, ce n’est pas ma destination. J’ai trop souffert, perdu trop d’argent et trop de temps pour arriver en Europe. » Assis sur un banc, il écoute ses amis jouer du krar, un instrument à cordes traditionnel de la Corne de l’Afrique. Le regard fuyant, il égrène les innombrables étapes d’une errance de plus de quatre ans qui a coûté 14 000 dollars (12 700 euros) à sa famille. Son départ d’Erythrée en bateau vers Port-Soudan, puis l’Egypte, où il est emprisonné sept mois avant d’être renvoyé en Ethiopie. Un nouveau départ vers le Soudan, puis la Libye et sa tentative de traversée de la Méditerranée. Après vingt-trois heures en mer, son bateau est intercepté par des gardes-côtes libyens et il est envoyé en centre de détention.

      « Là-bas, c’est l’enfer sur Terre. Il y a beaucoup de maladies. J’ai vu des gens se faire torturer. Les policiers prennent des drogues la nuit et viennent pour battre les détenus », se souvient-il. Au terme de trois ans de détention, il est finalement sélectionné par le HCR pour être évacué au Rwanda, un pays encore plus éloigné des frontières de l’espace Schengen que son point de départ.
      Gérer les frustrations

      Le Rwanda n’est pas le premier pays à mettre en place ce type de mécanisme. Depuis le mois de novembre 2017, le Niger en a déjà accueilli environ 3 000 dans le cadre d’un accord similaire avec le HCR. Parmi eux, 2 300 ont bénéficié d’une réinstallation dans un pays occidental. « Cependant, le traitement des dossiers peut prendre beaucoup de temps, ce qui pose la question de la capacité qu’ont ces pays de transit à accueillir les réfugiés sur le long terme et à gérer les frustrations qui vont avec », tempère Johannes Claes, expert sur les migrations en Afrique de l’Ouest.

      Le Mixed Migration Centre, un centre de recherche indépendant, rapporte que, lors de la Journée mondiale des réfugiés, le 20 juin 2019, des demandeurs d’asile évacués de Libye en 2017 ont attaqué des véhicules du HCR en signe de protestation contre leur situation, dans le centre de transit d’Hamdallaye, à 40 kilomètres de Niamey. « Avec ce système, les pays occidentaux délèguent leurs responsabilités en termes d’asile à d’autres Etats et c’est une tendance inquiétante », conclut Johannes Claes.

      A ce jour, quatre pays ont promis d’accueillir des réfugiés de Gashora : la France (100), la Suède (150), le Canada (200) et la Norvège (450). Le programme a obtenu le soutien de l’Union européenne, qui a promis une participation à hauteur de 10 millions d’euros. La Norvège finance également une partie des frais du centre de transit. Joran Kallmyr, membre du Parti du progrès norvégien, une mouvance populiste et anti-immigration qui vient de quitter le gouvernement, est d’ailleurs venu au centre de Gashora en janvier.

      Celui qui était alors ministre norvégien de la justice et de l’immigration a salué l’initiative rwandaise. « C’est très bien que le Rwanda accueille les réfugiés les plus vulnérables afin que leur demande d’asile soit examinée ici, sur le continent africain, plutôt que les migrants viennent en Europe déposer leur demande et que la plupart d’entre eux soient finalement renvoyés en Afrique », a-t-il déclaré, semblant ainsi plaider pour une généralisation du système.

      Alors que plus de 1 000 migrants sont morts en 2019 en tentant de traverser la Méditerranée, les signataires de l’accord insistent, quant à eux, sur les vies sauvées. « Ce qui compte, aujourd’hui, c’est que ces personnes sont en sécurité le temps que leur dossier soit traité. Et je suis fière que le Rwanda se soit porté volontaire », avait déclaré Hope Tumukunde, représentante permanente du Rwanda à l’Union africaine, à la suite des premières évacuations à la fin du mois de septembre.

      https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2020/01/29/le-rwanda-recoit-des-refugies-evacues-de-libye-solution-africaine-aux-proble

    • Rwanda : la nouvelle vie des réfugiés sortis de l’enfer libyen

      Depuis quelques mois, le Rwanda accueille des réfugiés exfiltrés des camps en Libye. Souvent très jeunes, ils réapprennent à vivre, sans oublier leurs traumatismes, en attendant un éventuel départ vers l’Europe. Reportage à Gashora, au sud du pays, qui a lui-même longtemps connu le drame de l’exil forcé.

      « Je veux quitter l’Afrique ! Je n’y ai connu que la mort et la violence. En Europe, je pourrais peut-être étudier ? Apprendre la sociologie ? » suggère Mati, 16 ans, la tête couronnée de petites dreadlocks. Voilà déjà plus de trois ans qu’il a quitté son pays natal, le Soudan du Sud dévasté par la guerre, laissant derrière lui la maison familiale calcinée à Bentiu, ville martyre décimée par les combats entre fractions rivales. Sa fuite l’a conduit en Libye, et ce fut un autre enfer. Après avoir échoué à traverser la Méditerranée, suite à une panne de moteur, il finit par se retrouver dans le sinistre camp de détention de Tadjoura. N’échappant que par miracle au bombardement du 2 juillet 2019 qui y a fait plusieurs dizaines de morts. Un carnage dont la responsabilité a été attribuée à « un avion étranger », selon les conclusions de l’enquête de l’ONU rendue publique lundi.

      En ce mois de janvier pourtant, Mati sourit enfin : la Libye n’est plus qu’un mauvais souvenir. Il en a été évacué en novembre, non pas vers l’Europe mais au Rwanda. Se retrouver au cœur de l’Afrique des Grands Lacs ? Ce n’est pas exactement ce qu’il avait envisagé. « Mais le Rwanda m’a sauvé la vie. En Libye, on était traités comme des animaux », reconnaît-il.

      C’est en 2017, peu après la diffusion d’un reportage de CNN accusant les Libyens de « vendre » les réfugiés sur des marchés aux esclaves, que le président rwandais Paul Kagame s’était engagé à accueillir dans son pays, par vagues successives, jusqu’à 30 000 Africains détenus en Libye. Fin 2019, un accord avec l’Union européenne a permis d’exfiltrer vers le Rwanda quelque 300 réfugiés, tous ressortissants de cinq pays africains : la Somalie, l’Erythrée, l’Ethiopie, le Soudan et le Soudan du Sud.
      Rêves d’Europe

      Le deal est simple : avec une aide 10 millions d’euros de la part de l’UE, le Rwanda s’engage à héberger des groupes de réfugiés choisis en Libye parmi les plus vulnérables, et qui auront désormais le choix entre rester en Afrique ou postuler pour une demande d’asile dans des pays européens volontaires pour les accueillir. Comme Mati, tous veulent retenter leur chance vers l’Europe. Sept d’entre eux sont déjà partis en Suède. La France s’est engagée à en accueillir 100, le Canada 200 et la Norvège 450. En attendant d’autres propositions. L’accord a suscité quelques critiques : n’est-ce pas encore une façon pour l’Europe de se défausser ? En délocalisant en Afrique la gestion de ces migrations, comme ce fut déjà le cas lors d’un deal équivalent conclu avec le Niger ? Et si l’Europe ne tient pas ses promesses, que deviendront ces réfugiés qui n’ont pas renoncé à leurs rêves ?

      Ils sont pour la plupart très jeunes, plus de la moitié sont même encore mineurs. Et dans l’immédiat, leur soulagement est palpable à Gashora, petite localité du sud du Rwanda où ils ont été installés. Une mélodie éthiopienne s’échappe de l’un des bâtiments en briques du camp qui a longtemps servi de centre de transit pour des réfugiés venus du Burundi voisin. Plus loin, un groupe d’ados, agglutinés autour d’un baby-foot, hèlent avec des accents taquins deux jeunes filles en leggings qui minaudent en agitant leurs longs cheveux bouclés. « Ils se comportent enfin comme tous les jeunes gens de leur âge », murmure, en les observant, Elysée Kalyango, le directeur du centre. « Quand ils sont arrivés ici, ils avaient l’air si traumatisés. Maigres, avec des yeux exorbités. Petit à petit, ils ont repris des forces, ils ont tous grossi ! » souligne-t-il.
      Hanté par « les images de la vie d’avant »

      Les souffrances ne sont pas effacées pour autant. Seul Sud-Soudanais évacué au Rwanda, Mati ne parvient pas à oublier ses compatriotes restés en Libye : « Je pense sans cesse à eux qui continuent à subir les coups et les menaces. Il faut les évacuer eux aussi ! » plaide-t-il. Dalmar, lui, reste hanté par « les images de la vie d’avant ». Ce jeune Somalien de 21 ans, originaire de la ville de Baled Hawa à la frontière avec le Kenya, a vu son père et son frère tués sous ses yeux par les chebabs, ces milices jihadistes qui sèment toujours la terreur dans son pays. Chaque soir, il redoute presque de s’endormir et d’ouvrir ainsi la porte à ses cauchemars. Mais désormais il peut aussi rêver à haute voix de devenir footballeur professionnel.

      Lui, comme les autres réfugiés, connaît peu l’histoire du Rwanda, encore marqué par le génocide des Tutsis en 1994. Ils ne savent pas non plus qu’avant même cette tragédie, les massacres récurrents de Tutsis avaient poussé plusieurs générations de Rwandais sur les routes de l’exil. L’actuel président lui-même avait dû fuir son pays à l’âge de 4 ans, et a grandi dans un camp en Ouganda. La crise des réfugiés rwandais des années 60 fut d’ailleurs la première à laquelle le Haut Commissariat pour les réfugiés (HCR), créé en 1950, fut confronté en Afrique subsaharienne. Cette mémoire collective explique peut-être aussi la main tendue à ceux qui subissent désormais le même sort, alors que ce petit pays, l’un des plus densément peuplés du continent (463 habitants au km2) accueille déjà près de 150 000 réfugiés burundais et congolais.

      A Gashora, les jeunes venus de Libye découvrent peu à peu leur nouvel environnement, libres de se balader dans le village de Gashora. Mais ils ignorent certainement ce que signifie le nom de la localité la plus proche, Nyabagendwa, en kinyarwanda, la langue nationale du Rwanda : « Soyez les bienvenus. »

      https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2020/01/30/rwanda-la-nouvelle-vie-des-refugies-sortis-de-l-enfer-libyen_1776007