• Finland PM : Wide Political Support for Russia Border Fence

    Finland’s prime minister says she was convinced that there is a “wide support” within the Parliament to build a fence on the Nordic country’s border with Russia as proposed by the Finnish border guard officials.

    Finland’s prime minister said Tuesday she was convinced that there is a “wide support” within the Parliament to build a fence on the Nordic country’s border with Russia as proposed by the Finnish border guard officials.

    “It is a question of securing proper surveillance of Finland’s (eastern) border in the future,” Prime Minister Sanna Marin told reporters at the legislature before a meeting with parliamentary groups on the border fence issue.

    The Finnish Border Guard had earlier suggested covering parts of the 1,340-kilometer (830-mile) border Finland shares with Russia, the longest of any European Union member, to help in preventing possible large-scale and illegal migration — a concern that has grown in Helsinki amid Russia’s war in Ukraine.

    Based on a risk analysis by border officials, the fence would be up to 260 kilometers (162 miles) long in total and cover areas that have been identified as potential risks for large-scale migration from Russia.

    The main parts of the fence would be erected in southeastern Finland, where most border traffic to and from Russia takes place, but some sections are likely be built also around border stations in the north.

    The construction of the fence would take up to four years and is expected to cost several hundreds of millions of euros (dollars) in total, according to Finnish news agency STT. Finnish media reported there is support for the project from parties in Marin’s center-left coalition government and the opposition alike.

    A pilot section of the fence running the length of around three kilometers (two miles) will be decided on soon and built quickly, but the decision of the entire fence project may be postponed to the next government as Finland holds a general election in April 2023.

    https://www.usnews.com/news/business/articles/2022-10-18/finland-pm-wide-political-support-for-russia-border-fence
    #Finlande #murs #barrières_frontalières #Russie #frontières

    En 2018, la Finlande avait considéré la possibilité de construire un mur pour stopper les #sangliers :
    Suomen itärajalla kulkee hontelo piikkilanka, ja Valko-Venäjän kriisi aloitti pohdinnan kunnon aidasta – rajan lähellä ajatukset ristiriitaisia
    https://seenthis.net/messages/959319

    –—

    Et la proposition de construire un mur date au moins de novembre 2021, selon ce tweet de Ville Laakkonen :

    Inspired by the situation at the Polish border, conservatives in Finland are actually proposing a wall on our border with Russia. If we set aside the plain fascism and racism involved for a while, the border is also over 1300 kilometres long.

    https://twitter.com/vvlaakkonen/status/1459469949907386372

    via @fil

    • Ville Laakkonen, 18.10.2022 :

      Now Finland has decided to fence the border, in the first stage over 200km. This will cost hundreds of millions of €. First, you need to have roads suitable for building and maintenance. Next, the ground must be worked on to be suitable for the fence. Then comes the building.
      And the fence will not only require maintenance, but also constant monitoring and enforcement; guards and surveillance technology. What we know from such border fences and walls is that they rarely even accomplish what they’re set up to do. Yet it’s widely supported.

      https://twitter.com/vvlaakkonen/status/1582486620171042816

    • Finland’s political party leaders express support for partial border fence

      The Finnish Border Guard has proposed that between 130 and 260 kilometres of partial fencing be built along Finland’s 1,300 kilometres border with Russia.

      The leaders of Finland’s main political parties have given their support to a proposal by the Finnish Border Guard to build a partial fence along the nation’s eastern border with Russia.

      Prime Minister Sanna Marin (SDP) called a cross-party meeting of leaders on Tuesday evening to discuss the proposal, and where it received widespread backing.

      Marin had told reporters as she arrived at the meeting that the political support for the proposal is so strong because the Border Guard’s view is trusted.

      “It is about being able to make sure that the border is well controlled and we can preemptively influence the situations that may occur at the border,” Marin said.

      Petteri Orpo, chair of the opposition National Coalition Party, reminded reporters on his arrival that his party has long supported the idea of a fence along the eastern border.

      “The world has become such that this is needed. Now everyone sees it as essential,” Orpo said, adding that he also wants to know from the government if Finland is ready to close the border completely should a large number of asylum seekers arrive from Russia.

      Finns Party chair Riikka Purra, meanwhile, wondered why a meeting of the parties was necessary, as there is already a consensus across the political spectrum about the need for a border fence.

      In response to a media question based on Purra’s comment, Interior Minister Krista Mikkonen (Green) stated that it is important the proposal is discussed widely among the parties because it is a long-term and far-reaching project.

      The Border Guard has proposed that between 130 and 260 kilometres of partial fencing be built along Finland’s 1,300 kilometres border with Russia.

      The main section of the proposed fence would be located around the border control posts in southeastern Finland, but could also be built at border crossings further north. The cost of the project is estimated to run into hundreds of millions of euros and construction would take about 3-4 years.

      Speaking to Yle News’ All Points North podcast, Matti Pitkäniitty, Head of the International Affairs Unit of the Finnish Border Guard, said that Finland’s border policy needs to adapt to the changing nature of modern migration.

      “The world has evolved and our basic conclusion is that our traditional methods, our traditional way of working, is not up to these tasks that we see in the world today,” Pitkäniitty said.

      https://yle.fi/news/3-12662282