LieuxCommuns

Site indépendant et ordinaire pour une auto-transformation radicale de la société

  • Revue de presse continue : crises déclenchées par le Covid19
    https://collectiflieuxcommuns.fr/?672-revue-de-presse-semaine-du

    [Màj : 9h]

    Confinement : le risque de rupture du consentement

    Le muezzin et les cloches

    Aux Etats-Unis, l’épidémie semble frapper démesurément les Noirs

    La pandémie, une arme de désinformation contre l’Europe

    L’enseignement à distance, cruel accélérateur des inégalités sociales

    Yvelines : la police tombe dans un guet-apens à Sartrouville

    Interdiction des licenciements, revenu universel : face à l’urgence économique, l’Espagne avance son « bouclier social »

    Le coronavirus peut-il altérer la confiance en la science ?

    Pandémie, guerre du pétrole et carbone

    Allemagne : crainte d’une montée d’antisémitisme liée au virus

    Paradoxe : alors que Bruxelles est incapable d’empêcher un désastre économique, les médecins et chercheurs réussissent à coopérer comme jamais pour limiter un désastre humain

    (.../...) Voir la suite

    Bonus

    *

    Présentation/Archives/Abonnement

  • Outbreaks like coronavirus start in and spread from the edges of cities

    Emerging infectious disease has much to do with how and where we live. The ongoing coronavirus is an example of the close relationships between urban development and new or re-emerging infectious diseases.

    Like the SARS pandemic of 2003, the connections between accelerated urbanization, more far-reaching and faster means of transportation, and less distance between urban life and non-human nature due to continued growth at the city’s outskirts — and subsequent trans-species infection — became immediately apparent.

    The new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, first crossed the animal-human divide at a market in Wuhan, one of the largest Chinese cities and a major transportation node with national and international connections. The sprawling megacity has since been the stage for the largest quarantine in human history, and its periphery has seen the pop-up construction of two hospitals to deal with infected patients.

    When the outbreak is halted and travel bans lifted, we still need to understand the conditions under which new infectious diseases emerge and spread through urbanization.
    No longer local

    Infectious disease outbreaks are global events. Increasingly, health and disease tend to be urban as they coincide with prolific urban growth and urban ways of life. The increased emergence of infectious diseases is to be expected.

    SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) hit global cities like Beijing, Hong Kong, Toronto and Singapore hard in 2003. COVID-19, the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, goes beyond select global financial centres and lays bare a global production and consumption network that sprawls across urban regions on several continents.

    To study the spread of disease today, we have to look beyond airports to the European automobile and parts industry that has taken root in central China; Chinese financed belt-and-road infrastructure across Asia, Europe and Africa; and in regional transportation hubs like Wuhan.

    While the current COVID-19 outbreak exposes China’s multiple economic connectivities, this phenomenon is not unique to that country. The recent outbreak of Ebola in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, for example, shone a light on the myriad strategic, economic and demographic relations of that country.
    New trade connections

    In January 2020, four workers were infected with SARS-CoV-2 during a training session at car parts company Webasto headquartered near Munich, revealing a connection with the company’s Chinese production site in Wuhan.

    The training was provided by a colleague from the Chinese branch of the firm who didn’t know she was infected. At the time of the training session in Bavaria, she did not feel sick and only fell ill on her flight back to Wuhan.

    First one, then three more colleagues who had participated in the training event in Germany, showed symptoms and soon were confirmed to have contracted the virus and infected other colleagues and family members.

    Eventually, Webasto and other German producers stopped fabrication in China temporarily, the German airline Lufthansa, like other airlines, cancelled all flights to that country and 110 individuals who had been contact traced to have been in touch with the four infected patients in Bavaria were advised by health officials to observe “domestic isolation” or “home quarantine.”

    This outbreak will likely be stopped. Until then, it will continue to cause human suffering and even death, and economic damage. The disease may further contribute to the unravelling of civility as the disease has been pinned to certain places or people. But when it’s over, the next such outbreak is waiting in the wings.
    Disease movements

    We need to understand the landscapes of emerging extended urbanization better if we want to predict, avoid and react to emerging disease outbreaks more efficiently.

    First, we need to grasp where disease outbreaks occur and how they relate to the physical, spatial, economic, social and ecological changes brought on by urbanization. Second, we need to learn more about how the newly emerging urban landscapes can themselves play a role in stemming potential outbreaks.

    Rapid urbanization enables the spread of infectious disease, with peripheral sites being particularly susceptible to disease vectors like mosquitoes or ticks and diseases that jump the animal-to-human species boundary.

    Our research identifies three dimensions of the relationships between extended urbanization and infectious disease that need better understanding: population change and mobility, infrastructure and governance.
    Travel and transport

    Population change and mobility are immediately connected. The coronavirus travelled from the periphery of Wuhan — where 1.6 million cars were produced last year — to a distant Bavarian suburb specializing in certain auto parts.

    Quarantined megacities and cruise ships demonstrate what happens when our globalized urban lives come grinding to a halt.

    Infrastructure is central: diseases can spread rapidly between cities through infrastructures of globalization such as global air travel networks. Airports are often located at the edges of urban areas, raising complex governance and jurisdictional issues with regards to who has responsibility to control disease outbreaks in large urban regions.

    We can also assume that disease outbreaks reinforce existing inequalities in access to and benefits from mobility infrastructures. These imbalances also influence the reactions to an outbreak. Disconnections that are revealed as rapid urban growth is not accompanied by the appropriate development of social and technical infrastructures add to the picture.

    Lastly, SARS-CoV-2 has exposed both the shortcomings and potential opportunities of governance at different levels. While it is awe-inspiring to see entire megacities quarantined, it is unlikely that such drastic measures would be accepted in countries not governed by centralized authoritarian leadership. But even in China, multilevel governance proved to be breaking down as local, regional and central government (and party) units were not sufficiently co-ordinated at the beginning of the crisis.

    This mirrored the intergovernmental confusion in Canada during SARS. As we enter another wave of megaurbanization, urban regions will need to develop efficient and innovative methods of confronting emerging infectious disease without relying on drastic top-down state measures that can be globally disruptive and often counter-productive. This may be especially relevant in fighting racism and intercultural conflict.

    The massive increase of the global urban population over the past few decades has increased exposure to diseases and posed new challenges to the control of outbreaks. Urban researchers need to explore these new relationships between urbanization and infectious disease. This will require an interdisciplinary approach that includes geographers, public health scientists, sociologists and others to develop possible solutions to prevent and mitigate future disease outbreaks.

    https://theconversation.com/outbreaks-like-coronavirus-start-in-and-spread-from-the-edges-of-ci
    #villes #urban_matter #géographie_urbaine #covid-19 #coronavirus #ressources_pédagogiques

    ping @reka

    • The Urbanization of COVID-19

      Three prominent urban researchers with a focus on infectious diseases explain why political responses to the current coronavirus outbreak require an understanding of urban dynamics. Looking back at the last coronavirus pandemic, the SARS outbreak in 2002/3, they highlight what affected cities have learned from that experience for handling the ongoing crisis. Exploring the political challenges of the current state of exception in Canada, Germany, Singapore and elsewhere, Creighton Connolly, Harris Ali and Roger Keil shed light on the practices of urban solidarity as the key to overcoming the public health threat.

      Guests:

      Creighton Connolly is a Senior Lecturer in Development Studies and the Global South in the School of Geography, University of Lincoln, UK. He researches urban political ecology, urban-environmental governance and processes of urbanization and urban redevelopment in Southeast Asia, with a focus on Malaysia and Singapore. He is editor of ‘Post-Politics and Civil Society in Asian Cities’ (Routledge 2019), and has published in a range of leading urban studies and geography journals. Previously, he worked as a researcher in the Asian Urbanisms research cluster at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore.

      Harris Ali is a Professor of Sociology, York University in Toronto. He researches issues in environmental sociology, environmental health and disasters including the social and political dimensions of infectious disease outbreaks. He is currently conducting research on the role of community-based initiatives in the Ebola response in Africa.

      Roger Keil is a Professor at the Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University in Toronto. He researches global suburbanization, urban political ecology, cities and infectious disease, and regional governance. Keil is the author of “Suburban Planet” (Polity 2018) and editor of “Suburban Constellations” (Jovis 2013). A co-founder of the International Network for Urban Research and Action (INURA), he was the inaugural director of the CITY Institute at York University and former co-editor of the International Journal of Urban and Regional Research.

      Referenced Literature:

      Ali, S. Harris, and Roger Keil, eds. 2011. Networked disease: emerging infections in the global city. Vol. 44. John Wiley & Sons.

      Keil, Roger, Creighton Connolly, and Harris S. Ali. 2020. “Outbreaks like coronavirus start in and spread from the edges of cities.” The Conversation, February 17. Available online here: https://theconversation.com/outbreaks-like-coronavirus-start-in-and-spread-from-the-edges-of-ci

      https://urbanpolitical.podigee.io/16-covid19

    • Extended urbanisation and the spatialities of infectious disease: Demographic change, infrastructure and governance

      Emerging infectious disease has much to do with how and where we live. The recent COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak is an example of the close relationships between urban development and new or re-emerging infectious diseases. Like the SARS pandemic of 2003, the connections between accelerated urbanisation, more expansive and faster means of transportation, and increasing proximity between urban life and non-human nature — and subsequent trans-species infections — became immediately apparent.

      Our Urban Studies paper contributes to this emerging conversation. Infectious disease outbreaks are now global events. Increasingly, health and disease tend to be urban as they coincide with the proliferation of planetary urbanisation and urban ways of life. The increased emergence of infectious diseases is to be expected in an era of extended urbanisation.

      We posit that we need to understand the landscapes of emerging extended urbanisation better if we want to predict, avoid and react to emerging disease outbreaks more efficiently. First, we need to grasp where disease outbreaks occur and how they relate to the physical, spatial, economic, social and ecological changes brought on by urbanisation. Second, we need to learn more about how the newly emerging urban landscapes can themselves play a role in stemming potential outbreaks. Rapid urbanisation enables the spread of infectious disease, with peripheral sites being particularly susceptible to disease vectors like mosquitoes or ticks and diseases that jump the animal-to-human species boundary.

      Our research identifies three dimensions of the relationships between extended urbanisation and infectious disease that need better understanding: population change and mobility, infrastructure and governance. Population change and mobility are immediately connected. Population growth in cities - driven primarily by rural-urban migration - is a major factor influencing the spread of disease. This is seen most clearly in rapidly urbanising regions such as Africa and Asia, which have experienced recent outbreaks of Ebola and SARS, respectively.

      Infrastructure is also central: diseases can spread rapidly between cities through infrastructures of globalisation such as global air travel networks. Airports are often located at the edges of urban areas, raising complex governance and jurisdictional issues with regards to who has responsibility to control disease outbreaks in large urban regions. We can also assume that disease outbreaks reinforce existing inequalities in access to and benefits from mobility infrastructures. We therefore need to consider the disconnections that become apparent as rapid demographic and peri-urban growth is not accompanied by appropriate infrastructure development.

      Lastly, the COVID-19 outbreak has exposed both the shortcomings and potential opportunities of governance at different levels. While it is awe-inspiring to see entire megacities quarantined, it is unlikely that such drastic measures would be accepted in countries not governed by centralised authoritarian leadership. But even in China, multilevel governance proved to be breaking down as local, regional and central government (and party) units were not sufficiently co-ordinated at the beginning of the crisis. This mirrored the intergovernmental confusion in Canada during SARS.

      As we enter another wave of megaurbanisation, urban regions will need to develop efficient and innovative methods of confronting emerging infectious disease without relying on drastic top-down state measures that can be globally disruptive and often ineffective. This urges upon urban researchers to seek new and better explanations for the relationships of extended urbanisation and the spatialities of infectious disease - an effort that will require an interdisciplinary approach including geographers, health scientists, sociologists.

      https://www.urbanstudiesonline.com/resources/resource/extended-urbanisation-and-the-spatialities-of-infectious-disease
      #géographie_de_la_santé #maladies_infectieuses

    • Cities after coronavirus: how Covid-19 could radically alter urban life

      Pandemics have always shaped cities – and from increased surveillance to ‘de-densification’ to new community activism, Covid-19 is doing it already.

      Victoria Embankment, which runs for a mile and a quarter along the River Thames, is many people’s idea of quintessential London. Some of the earliest postcards sent in Britain depicted its broad promenades and resplendent gardens. The Metropolitan Board of Works, which oversaw its construction, hailed it as an “appropriate, and appropriately civilised, cityscape for a prosperous commercial society”.

      But the embankment, now hardwired into our urban consciousness, is entirely the product of pandemic. Without a series of devastating global cholera outbreaks in the 19th century – including one in London in the early 1850s that claimed more than 10,000 lives – the need for a new, modern sewerage system may never have been identified. Joseph Bazalgette’s remarkable feat of civil engineering, which was designed to carry waste water safely downriver and away from drinking supplies, would never have materialised.

      From the Athens plague in 430BC, which drove profound changes in the city’s laws and identity, to the Black Death in the Middle Ages, which transformed the balance of class power in European societies, to the recent spate of Ebola epidemics across sub-Saharan Africa that illuminated the growing interconnectedness of today’s hyper-globalised cities, public health crises rarely fail to leave their mark on a metropolis.
      Coronavirus: the week explained - sign up for our email newsletter
      Read more

      As the world continues to fight the rapid spread of coronavirus, confining many people to their homes and radically altering the way we move through, work in and think about our cities, some are wondering which of these adjustments will endure beyond the end of the pandemic, and what life might look like on the other side.

      One of the most pressing questions that urban planners will face is the apparent tension between densification – the push towards cities becoming more concentrated, which is seen as essential to improving environmental sustainability – and disaggregation, the separating out of populations, which is one of the key tools currently being used to hold back infection transmission.

      “At the moment we are reducing density everywhere we can, and for good reason,” observes Richard Sennett, a professor of urban studies at MIT and senior adviser to the UN on its climate change and cities programme. “But on the whole density is a good thing: denser cities are more energy efficient. So I think in the long term there is going to be a conflict between the competing demands of public health and the climate.”

      Sennett believes that in the future there will be a renewed focus on finding design solutions for individual buildings and wider neighbourhoods that enable people to socialise without being packed “sardine-like” into compressed restaurants, bars and clubs – although, given the incredibly high cost of land in big cities like New York and Hong Kong, success here may depend on significant economic reforms as well.

      In recent years, although cities in the global south are continuing to grow as a result of inward rural migration, northern cities are trending in the opposite direction, with more affluent residents taking advantage of remote working capabilities and moving to smaller towns and countryside settlements offering cheaper property and a higher quality of life.

      The “declining cost of distance”, as Karen Harris, the managing director of Bain consultancy’s Macro Trends Group, calls it, is likely to accelerate as a result of the coronavirus crisis. More companies are establishing systems that enable staff to work from home, and more workers are getting accustomed to it. “These are habits that are likely to persist,” Harris says.

      The implications for big cities are immense. If proximity to one’s job is no longer a significant factor in deciding where to live, for example, then the appeal of the suburbs wanes; we could be heading towards a world in which existing city centres and far-flung “new villages” rise in prominence, while traditional commuter belts fade away.

      Another potential impact of coronavirus may be an intensification of digital infrastructure in our cities. South Korea, one of the countries worst-affected by the disease, has also posted some of the lowest mortality rates, an achievement that can be traced in part to a series of technological innovations – including, controversially, the mapping and publication of infected patients’ movements.

      In China, authorities have enlisted the help of tech firms such as Alibaba and Tencent to track the spread of Covid-19 and are using “big data” analysis to anticipate where transmission clusters will emerge next. If one of the government takeaways from coronavirus is that “smart cities” including Songdo or Shenzhen are safer cities from a public health perspective, then we can expect greater efforts to digitally capture and record our behaviour in urban areas – and fiercer debates over the power such surveillance hands to corporations and states.

      Indeed, the spectre of creeping authoritarianism – as emergency disaster measures become normalised, or even permanent – should be at the forefront of our minds, says Sennett. “If you go back through history and look at the regulations brought in to control cities at times of crisis, from the French revolution to 9/11 in the US, many of them took years or even centuries to unravel,” he says.

      At a time of heightened ethnonationalism on the global stage, in which rightwing populists have assumed elected office in many countries from Brazil to the US, Hungary and India, one consequence of coronavirus could be an entrenchment of exclusionary political narratives, calling for new borders to be placed around urban communities – overseen by leaders who have the legal and technological capacity, and the political will, to build them.

      In the past, after a widespread medical emergency, Jewish communities and other socially stigmatised groups such as those affected by leprosy have borne the brunt of public anger. References to the “China virus” by Donald Trump suggest such grim scapegoating is likely to be a feature of this pandemic’s aftermath as well.

      On the ground, however, the story of coronavirus in many global cities has so far been very different. After decades of increasing atomisation, particularly among younger urban residents for whom the impossible cost of housing has made life both precarious and transient, the sudden proliferation of mutual aid groups – designed to provide community support for the most vulnerable during isolation – has brought neighbours together across age groups and demographic divides. Social distancing has, ironically, drawn some of us closer than ever before. Whether such groups survive beyond the end of coronavirus to have a meaningful impact on our urban future depends, in part, on what sort of political lessons we learn from the crisis.

      The vulnerability of many fellow city dwellers – not just because of a temporary medical emergency but as an ongoing lived reality – has been thrown into sharp relief, from elderly people lacking sufficient social care to the low-paid and self-employed who have no financial buffer to fall back on, but upon whose work we all rely.

      A stronger sense of society as a collective whole, rather than an agglomeration of fragmented individuals, could lead to a long-term increase in public demands for more interventionist measures to protect citizens – a development that governments may find harder to resist given their readiness in the midst of coronavirus to override the primacy of markets.

      Private hospitals are already facing pressure to open up their beds without extra charge for those in need; in Los Angeles, homeless citizens have seized vacant homes, drawing support from some lawmakers. Will these kinds of sentiments dwindle with the passing of coronavirus, or will political support for urban policies that put community interests ahead of corporate ones – like a greater imposition of rent controls – endure?

      We don’t yet know the answer, but in the new and unpredictable connections swiftly being forged within our cities as a result of the pandemic, there is perhaps some cause for optimism. “You can’t ‘unknow’ people,” observes Harris, “and usually that’s a good thing.” Sennett thinks we are potentially seeing a fundamental shift in urban social relations. “City residents are becoming aware of desires that they didn’t realise they had before,” he says, “which is for more human contact, for links to people who are unlike themselves.” Whether that change in the nature of city living proves to be as lasting as Bazalgette’s sewer-pipe embankment remains, for now, to be seen.

      https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/26/life-after-coronavirus-pandemic-change-world
      #le_monde_d'après

    • Listening to the city in a global pandemic

      What’s the role of ‘academic experts’ in the debate about COVID-19 and cites, and how can we separate our expert role from our personal experience of being locked down in our cities and homes?

      This is a question we’ve certainly been struggling with at City Road, and we think it’s a question that a lot of academics are struggling with at the moment. Perhaps it’s a good time to listen to the experiences of academics as their cities change around them, rather than ask them to speak at us about their urban expertise. With this in mind, we asked academics from all over the world to open up the voice recorder on their phones and record a two minute report from the field about their city.

      Over 25 academics from all over the world responded. As you will hear, some of their recordings are not great quality, but their stories certainly are. Many of those who responded to our call are struggling , just like us, to make sense of their experience in the COVID-19 city.

      https://cityroadpod.org/2020/03/29/listening-to-the-city-in-a-global-pandemic

    • Ce que les épidémies nous disent sur la #mondialisation

      Bien que la première épidémie connue par une trace écrite n’ait eu lieu qu’en 430 avant J.-C. à Athènes, on dit souvent que les microbes, et les épidémies auxquels ils donnent lieu, sont aussi vieux que le monde. Mais le Monde est-il aussi vieux qu’on veutbien le dire ? Voici une des questions auxquelles l’étude des épidémies avec les sciences sociales permet d’apporter des éléments de réponse. Les épidémies ne sont pas réservées aux épidémiologistes et autres immunologistes. De grands géographes comme Peter Haggett ou Andrew Cliff ont déjà investi ce domaine, dans une optique focalisée sur les processus de diffusion spatiale. Il est possible d’aller au-delà de cette approche mécanique et d’appréhender les épidémies dans leurs interactions sociales. On verra ici qu’elles nous apprennent aussi beaucoup sur le Monde, sur l’organisation de l’espace mondial et sur la dimension sociétale du processus de mondialisation.

      http://cafe-geo.net/wp-content/uploads/epidemies-mondialisation.pdf
      #épidémie #globalisation

    • Città ai tempi del Covid

      Lo spazio pubblico urbano è uno spazio di relazioni, segnato dai corpi, dagli incontri, dalla casualità, da un ordine spontaneo che non può, se lo spazio è pubblico veramente, accettare altro che regole di buon senso e non di imposizione. È un palcoscenico per le vite di tutti noi, che le vogliamo in mostra o in disparte, protagonisti o comparse della commedia urbana e, come nella commedia, con un fondo di finzione ed un ombra di verità.
      Ma cosa accade se gli attori abbandonano la scena, se i corpi sono negati allo spazio? Come percepiamo quel che rimane a noi frequentabile di strade e piazze che normalmente percorriamo?

      Ho invitato gli studenti che negli anni hanno frequentato il seminario “Fotografia come strumento di indagine urbana”, ma non solo loro, ad inviarmi qualche immagine che documenta (e riflette su) spazio pubblico, città e loro stessi in questi giorni. Come qualcuno mi ha scritto sono immagini spesso letteralmente ‘rubate’, quasi sentendosi in colpa. Eppure documentare e riflettere è un’attività tanto più essenziale quanto la criticità si prolunga e tocca la vita di tutti noi.

      Appunti di viaggio – Iacopo Zetti Ho avuto modo, per una serie di evenienze, di attraversare Firenze di mattina e di sera. Aspettavo il silenzio ed infatti l’ho ascoltato. Il silenzio non è quello dei luoghi extraurbani. ...
      Inferriata – Eni Nurihana L’inferriata de balcone ricorda sempre di più le sbarre carcerarie 23 marzo 2020, 15:11
      Situazioni di necessità – Chiara Zavattaro Le strade della zona di Sant’Ambrogio a Firenze
      Ora d’aria – Antonella Zola Ho avuto la possibilità di scattare queste foto dopo 10 giorni di quarantena completa, in cui ho rinunciato a qualunque contatto con il mondo esterno. Alla fine sono dovuta uscire ...
      Firenze – Agnese Turchi Firenze - Agnese Turchi
      Nostalgia di Silenzi – Gabriele Pierini
      Il recinto – Laura Panichi In un libro che ho letto in questo periodo di “reclusione”, Haruki Murakami dice che quando si prova ad uscire da una gabbia alla fine si finisce sempre per trovarci ...
      Spazio solidale – Jacopo Lorenzini
      Castagneto Carducci – Cristian Farina Chissà se dall’alto qualcuno si è accorto che ci siamo fermati solo per un attimo Da lontano si scorgano i monumenti fermi nel tempo, quasi come noi, fermi nello spazio
      Firenze, mercoledì 18/03/20 ore 15.30 circa – Leonardo Ceccarelli Firenze, mercoledì 18/03/20 ore 15.30 circa - Leonardo Ceccarelli
      Firenze, marzo 2020 – Giulia D’Ercole Firenze, marzo 2020 - Giulia D’Ercole
      Feriale d’altri tempi – Dario Albamonte La mia fortuna è quella di vivere in campagna e di potermi muovere liberamente e avere molto spazio a disposizione senza varcare i confini di casa mia. Quello che mi ...
      L’architettura è fatta di mattoni e PERSONE – Laura Pagnotelli L’architettura è fatta di mattoni e PERSONE. Esse sono il fine ultimo del costruire, del dare vita a spazi sempre nuovi. Senza la loro presenza, dell’architettura non resta che una scatola vuota, priva ...
      Il traffico di Firenze – Veronica Capecchi Il Traffico di Firenze, oggi è scomparso, e lascia intravedere la città, profondamente diversa e silenziosa. Una città che è sempre viva, oggi priva della sua vitalità, dei suoi rumori, una ...
      Dalla finestra – Lucio Fiorentino Ho sentito dei rumori nella strada sotto la mia finestra e ho immaginato l’atmosfera scura di un film di Bergman, (goffamente) ho cercato di riprodurla Nel palazzo di fronte alla mia ...
      Livorno, 28 marzo – Giulia Bandini Luoghi affollati di ricordi vie trafficate di emozioni ormai vinte dal tempo ma vive nella mente di chi sa sperare forte
      Sesto Fiorentino: la piana senza smog – Alice Giordano Sesto Fiorentino: la piana senza smog - Alice Giordano
      Lari e Pontedera – Silvia Princi Ritorno alle origini – Perignano di Lari (Pi), 23 marzo 2020 La semina del trattore, rappresenta uno dei pochi segni di vitalità umana e meccanica,in questo periodo di quarantena e di ...
      A distanza sociale nel parco: Zurigo – Philipp Klaus A distanza sociale nel parco: Zurigo - Philipp Klaus
      Galleggiare in un mondo irreale – Alessio Prandin

      http://controgeografie.net/controgeografie/citta-ai-tempi-del-covid

  • Revue de presse continue : crises déclenchées par le Covid19
    https://collectiflieuxcommuns.fr/?672-revue-de-presse-semaine-du

    [Màj : 9h]

    Confinement : « Ce qui définit la démocratie, c’est la possibilité de se côtoyer »

    « L’État islamique entend profiter de la saturation de nos capacités sécuritaires »

    L’échelle sociale inversée

    En Afrique, 20 millions d’emplois menacés par le coronavirus, selon l’Union africaine

    Crise sanitaire : Monsieur le Président, la liberté d’expression reste essentielle

    Tout changer dans le monde d’après ? Le scénario noir que cela pourrait bien déclencher

    « Le gouvernement grec a anticipé très tôt la crise du coronavirus »

    Coronavirus : les conseils de DSK pour surmonter la crise économique

    Climat : « L’urgence sanitaire ne doit pas faire oublier l’urgence du siècle »

    L’Espagne va instaurer un revenu universel face au coronavirus

    « Trouver des toilettes est devenu un challenge » : la semaine de Thierry, chauffeur routier alsacien

    Coronavirus en Italie : Un maire imprime une monnaie locale pour aider ses habitants

    (.../...) Voir la suite

    Bonus

    *

    Présentation/Archives/Abonnement

  • Coronavirus - confinement : la vente de plants potagers désormais considérée de « première nécessité »
    https://www.francebleu.fr/infos/agriculture-peche/confinement-la-vente-de-plants-potagers-desormais-consideree-de-premiere-

    La secrétaire d’État Agnès Pannier-Runacher a annoncé mercredi soir que les plants et semences à vocation alimentaire étaient désormais considérés comme de « première nécessité », pendant le confinement lié au coronavirus. Un bol d’air pour les horticulteurs, mais leur situation reste délicate.

    Jardiner pendant le confinement, c’est possible, si vous avez la chance d’avoir un jardin. Mais encore faut-il avoir de quoi planter. Sauf que les pépinières et les jardineries étaient fermées jusque là, comme tous les commerces non essentiels pendant le confinement lié à l’épidémie de Covid-19.

    La donne vient cependant de changer. Le gouvernement les autorise depuis désormais à rouvrir, sous conditions strictes. Pas question pour autant de vendre des plants d’ornement. Mais des arbres fruitiers, ou des plants de légumes pour le potager, oui ! La secrétaire d’Etat Agnès Pannier-Runnacher l’a annoncé mercredi 1er avril devant le Sénat : « Dans le cadre des arbitrages que nous venons de rendre, la vente des #plants_potagers est considérée comme un achat de première nécessité. »

    #jardinage _alimentaire

  • Revue de presse continue : crises déclenchées par le Covid19
    https://collectiflieuxcommuns.fr/?672-revue-de-presse-semaine-du

    [Màj : 9h]

    La générosité très intéressée de la Chine et de la Russie pour l’Italie

    Quelques pensées sur COVID-19 et la transmission par aérosol

    La vente de plants potagers désormais considérée de « première nécessité »

    Didier Lallement et Sibeth Ndiaye les duettistes de la peur et du mépris du peuple

    Côte d’Ivoire : destruction d’un centre contre le coronavirus par la population

    Yvelines : une fillette grièvement blessée en marge d’affrontements entre jeunes et policiers

    Devenir centenaire n’est pas un droit de l’homme

    Eurobonds et survie de l’Europe : cette vieille histoire américaine que l’UE ferait bien de sérieusement méditer

    WHO Health Emergency Dashboard

    Coronavirus : des appels à la prière à Molenbeek, actes de la droite identitaire ?

    Algérie/virus : quand la Chine vient en aide

    « L’Europe et ses nations doivent reconquérir une autonomie stratégique »

    (.../...) Voir la suite

    Bonus

    *

    Présentation/Archives/Abonnement

  • Varsovie, Budapest et Prague ont manqué à leurs obligations sur l’accueil des réfugiés, décide la justice européenne

    Fin 2017, la Commission européenne avait saisi la #CJUE, car les trois pays avaient refusé leurs #quotas d’#accueil de réfugiés décidés dans le cadre du programme de #répartition par Etat membre de dizaines de milliers de demandeurs d’asile lancé en 2015 et qui a pris fin en septembre 2017.

    C’est un #arrêt essentiellement symbolique. La justice européenne a considéré jeudi 2 avril que la #Pologne, la #Hongrie et la #République_tchèque n’ont pas respecté le droit de l’Union européenne en refusant d’accueillir en 2015, au plus fort des arrivées de migrants, des demandeurs d’asile relocalisés depuis l’Italie ou la Grèce.

    Dans son arrêt, la Cour de justice de l’UE (CJUE) considère que les trois pays ont « manqué à leurs obligations » en ne respectant pas la décision prise collectivement par l’UE d’accueillir un #quota de réfugiés par Etat membre.

    La Cour estime que les trois capitales « ne peuvent invoquer ni leurs responsabilités en matière de maintien de l’ordre public et de sauvegarde de la sécurité intérieure, ni le prétendu dysfonctionnement du mécanisme de relocalisation, pour se soustraire à la mise en œuvre de ce mécanisme ».

    Fin 2017, la Commission européenne avait saisi la CJUE, constatant que les trois pays avaient refusé leurs quotas d’accueil de réfugiés décidés dans le cadre du programme de répartition par Etat membre de dizaines de milliers de demandeurs d’asile depuis l’#Italie et la #Grèce, lancé en 2015 et qui a pris fin en septembre 2017.

    Décision « sans conséquence » pour la Hongrie

    Cela rend impossible l’idée de forcer désormais ces pays à accueillir des migrants. « Cette décision n’aura aucune conséquence. La politique de quotas étant depuis longtemps caduque, nous n’avons aucune obligation de prendre des demandeurs d’asile », a réagi la ministre de la justice hongroise, Judit Varga. « Nous avons perdu le différend, mais ce n’est pas important. Ce qui est important, c’est que nous n’avons rien à payer », a abondé le premier ministre tchèque, Andrej Babis. « Le fait est que nous n’accepterons aucun migrant car les quotas ont expiré entre-temps ». La Commission peut désormais seulement demander des amendes contre les trois pays.

    La Cour a repoussé l’argument selon lequel le recours de la Commission n’était pas valable étant donné que, le programme ayant expiré, les trois pays ne pouvaient plus s’y conformer, estimant qu’il suffisait à la Commission de constater le manquement allégué.

    La Pologne et la Hongrie n’ont accueilli aucun réfugié, la République tchèque se contentant d’en recevoir une douzaine avant de se désengager du programme. Varsovie et Budapest estimaient avoir le droit de se soustraire à leurs #obligations en vertu de leur #responsabilité de « #maintien_de_l’ordre_public » et de la « #sauvegarde_de_la_sécurité_intérieure ». Or, pour que l’argument soit recevable, les deux pays auraient dû « pouvoir prouver la nécessité de recourir à (cette) #dérogation ».

    Pour cela, les « autorités devaient s’appuyer, au terme d’un examen au cas par cas, sur des éléments concordants, objectifs et précis, permettant de soupçonner que le demandeur en cause représente un danger actuel ou potentiel ». La Cour a jugé que la décision prise par Varsovie et Budapest avait un caractère « général », et ne se prévalait d’aucun « rapport direct avec un cas individuel ».

    De son côté, Prague a avancé que le dispositif n’était pas efficace pour justifier de ne pas l’appliquer. Une « appréciation unilatérale » qui ne peut servir d’argument pour ne pas appliquer une décision de l’UE, a souligné la Cour.

    Le #plan_de_relocalisation découlait de deux décisions successives du Conseil européen, qui concernaient potentiellement jusqu’à 40 000 et 120 000 demandeurs de protection internationale. Au total, 12 706 personnes ont été relocalisées d’Italie et 21 199 de Grèce vers les autres Etats membres, soit « quasiment toutes les personnes qui rentraient dans les critères ».

    https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2020/04/02/varsovie-budapest-et-prague-ont-manque-a-leurs-obligations-sur-l-accueil-des

    #relocalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #justice #hotspots

  • La contre-urbanisation : tous à la campagne ?

    https://www.franceculture.fr/geographie/la-contre-urbanisation-tous-a-la-campagne

    Vivre dans les mégapoles, trop densément peuplées et aux loyers prohibitifs, n’attire plus ni les seniors, ni les Millenials. Le télétravail va-t-il enfin permettre à ceux qui rêvaient de se mettre au vert de réaliser leur souhait ? Cela pourrait être l’une des conséquences de cette crise sanitaire.

    #rurbanisation #urbanisation #zurich #urban_matter

    • 7 milliards à la campagne avec son jardin ca laisse combien de place pour les chauves-souris et les pangolins ? Plus ca va et plus je me dit qu’on devrait se replier sur les villes et chercher des ressources en hydroponie et haut rendement en zone urbaine autosuffisantes à base d’insectes et bouffe techno et laisser tout ce qui n’est pas la ville redevenir sauvage. Je dit pas qu’il faut chasser les paysan·nes des campagnes mais pas besoin d’en rajouter. Un retour massif de 7 millards de nous à la campagne ca serait la mort du moindre milimètre de nature sauvage. Ré-ensauvagons le monde et replions nous en ville comme les bêtes eusociales que nous sommes au lieu de conquérir toujours plus des endroits qui meurent de notre présence. A moins qu’on extermine les 3/4 de nous c’est pas un projet collecif d’avoir chacun·es son petit jardin pour son petit cul à soi.

  • Revue de presse (Covid free) du 29.03 au 04.04.20
    https://collectiflieuxcommuns.fr/?672-revue-de-presse-semaine-du

    L’essor des listes participatives

    Attaque de Romans-sur-Isère : ce que l’on sait de l’assaillant et des possibles raisons de son geste

    « Le tableau du monde s’est considérablement rapproché de celui brossé par Spengler »

    Le Tchad déploie des militaires au Nigeria et au Niger pour lutter contre Boko Haram

    Les Anglais laissent tomber le T

    « Si la transition écologique par le nucléaire est le choix de la technocratie française, il faut le dire clairement »

    « Pour en finir avec la logique de propagande »

    Varsovie, Budapest et Prague ont manqué à leurs obligations sur l’accueil des réfugiés, décide la justice européenne

    En Chine, le business de vidéos d’enfants africains prospère

    Tunisie : deux « terroristes » abattus dans le centre-ouest

    Une machine réussit désormais à traduire des ondes cérébrales en phrases

    La dictature des identités

    Bonus

    *

    Présentation/Archives/Abonnement

  • SARSCOV2 un virus des villes, pas un virus des champs. Effet de masse critique en zone urbaine. - Doc GOMI
    https://dr-gomi.blog4ever.com/sarscov2-un-virus-des-villes-pas-un-virus-des-champs-effet-de-mas
    /resources/img/blogs/dizperso/headers/header-3.jpg

    Mes conclusions (ainsi que les données d ’études) sont celles ci :

    – notre population étant immunologiquement totalement naive sans protection croisée (a priori), l’importance des inoculum viraux et leur répétition avant la phase symptomatique est à même de provoquer une forme plus symptomatique ou plus grave. C’est une donnée « classique » en virologie, dont il n’a pas été tenu compte jusqu’à présent dans la modélisation, et je mets cette donnée au premier plan de mes réflexions, d autant plus que ce facteur joue un rôle probablement plus prépondérant en l’absence totale d immunité. (non validé, hypothèse personnelle).

    – la charge virale est corrélée a la gravité de la maladie. (validé)

    – en zone de cluster le phénomène de masse critique se produit lorsqu un individu est à même de recevoir plusieurs inoculum viraux, de façon répétée, déclenchant une forme plus grave ou plus symptomatique, provoquant une excrétion plus forte (toux), avec de plus nombreux cas secondaires, eux mêmes plus symptomatiques (hypothèse personnelle).

    L’existence des « superspreaders » (individus fortement excréteurs même si ils sont peu symptomatiques) est discutable, leur caractéristique étant de contaminer parfois 20 ou 40 personnes quand le taux admis est proche de 2,7 ; il y a de forts excréteurs , mais il y a surtout des situations claires de forte propagation : lieu confiné ou grande foule compacte, qui provoquent des contagions de masse.

    – hors cluster les contaminations peuvent se produire a très bas bruit et sans visibilité : selon Bedford (USA) , 1200 personnes ont été contaminées avant l’épisode très visible du cluster de Seattle, ce qui est retrouvé dans l ’étude italienne qui fait remonter l’épidémie a une période précédant sa visibilité.

    – hors cluster le phénomène de masse critique peut se produire dans les établissements de soins, ce qui explique l’extrême nosocomialité du CO19. Ce phénomène est aggravé par de possibles aérosolisations ponctuelles (oxygénothérapie) mais aussi par le risque microdroplet : parallèlement aux droplets, des microdroplets sont produites lors de la toux, la parole, et le chant , qui peuvent rester en suspension ; leur potentiel contaminant n’est pas avéré, mais seraient une excellente explication aux phénomènes observés en lieu confiné ou lors des grandes manifestations de foule (réunion église évangélique et match de football).

    – Hors cluster il est envisageable que la voie de contamination soit préférentiellement contact, moins de formes sévères, moins de toux , moins de droplets, provoquant des cas secondaires moins sévères ; sauf quand le virus entre dans un lieu confiné avec plusieurs excréteurs (EHPAD) et une population fragile.

    #coronavirus #urbain

  • « Ce qui est inédit, c’est que la plupart des gouvernements ont choisi d’arrêter l’économie pour sauver des vies »
    https://www.bastamag.net/mondialisation-covid19-effondrement-virus-collapse-transition-relocalisati

    De quoi la crise du coronavirus est-elle le nom ? D’un déséquilibre écologique, d’une nouvelle façon de penser le risque, d’un grand effondrement annoncé ? Qu’a-t-elle de véritablement inédit ? L’ historien des sciences Jean-Baptiste Fressoz répond à quelques idées reçues sur le sujet. Entretien. Basta ! : Peut-on considérer le coronavirus comme une crise d’ordre écologique ? Jean-Baptiste Fressoz [1] : Le changement climatique et la crise environnementale sont suffisamment graves, il n’est pas nécessaire (...) #Décrypter

    / A la une, #Entretiens, #Climat, #Société_de_consommation, Santé

    #Santé_

    • J’ai pas l’impression que la plus part des gouv ont choisis d’arreter l’économie pour sauver des vies. Les gouvernement en GB, Hollande, Brésil, USA et France ont préféré misés sur l’immunité de groupe tant que c’était possible et les entreprises non essentielles tournent toujours, ce qui fait beaucoup de vies en danger pour l’économie et que le premières de corvées sont toujours empilés sans masques dans le RER à 6h du mat. Et il y a de l’argent pour les entreprises et toujours des promesses pour après faites aux soignantes. Pour l’instant on protege les riches et on attaque les droits sous prétexte de lutte contre le virus.

  • Revue de presse continue : crises déclenchées par le Covid19
    https://collectiflieuxcommuns.fr/?672-revue-de-presse-semaine-du

    Au Québec, la crise du coronavirus pourrait ouvrir « le grand chantier de l’autosuffisance » alimentaire

    COVID-19 : quand une note diplomatique française prédit la chute de certains Etats africains

    SARSCOV2 un virus des villes, pas un virus des champs. Effet de masse critique en zone urbaine

    Inflation en chute libre : la déflation est en marche et nous ne réagissons pas (assez)

    La hausse des contaminés en Seine-Saint-Denis s’explique car le « département est sous médicalisé » selon un médecin du Samu

    Immobilier : avec le confinement, la montée des impayés des locataires fait craindre le pire

    Des policiers visés par des tirs de mortiers à Compiègne

    Coronavirus : les experts du Quai d’Orsay redoutent le « coup de trop » qui « déstabilise » l’Afrique

    En Algérie, la double peine face au coronavirus

    Coronavirus : 6266 détenus en moins dans les prisons françaises depuis le 16 mars

    La technocratie, les médecins et les politiques

    Coronavirus : quand la Turquie accuse la France d’égoïsme

    Voir la suite...

    Bonus

    *

    Présentation/Archives/Abonnement

  • Premières remarques sur la crise ouverte par la pandémie II
    https://collectiflieuxcommuns.fr/?1009-Premieres-remarques-sur-la-crise

    Voir la première partie : introduction et questions épidémiologiques (…/…) 2 – La question de la réaction sociale La première strate d’analyse ne peut qu’être l’échelle sociale, celle des humains formant société, de leur compréhension de ce qui se passe, de leurs réactions – ou non-réactions –, de leurs peurs, de leurs désirs, de ce qu’ils sont prêts à faire pour ce qu’ils veulent, de la manière dont cette crise fait sens pour eux – bref, de l’imaginaire social. Si cela est vrai quelle que soit la situation, (...) #Analyses

    / #Lieux_Communs, #Anthropologie, #Politique, #Prospective, #Pandémie_2019-2020, #Progressisme, #Apathie, #Article, #Bêtise, #Type_anthropologique, #Décence_commune, Mortalité / finitude, (...)

    #Mortalité_/_finitude #Pseudo-subversion

  • 2020-03-31-CP_Covid19_Surete.pdf
    http://www.criirad.org/actualites/dossier2020/2020-03-31-CP_Covid19_Surete.pdf

    La crise du coronavirus nous interpelle tous sur les conséquences qu’elle pourrait avoir sur la sûreté des installations nucléaires, et en particulier des centrales nucléaires.

    En attendant,l’inquiétude et la colère montent chez les sous-traitants comme l’a expliqué Gilles Reynaud le 30 mars dans le cadre de la commission d’enquête de suivi du Covid-19 mise en place par les parlementaires du groupe la France insoumise à l’Assemblée nationale et au Parlement européen. Il témoigne de l’inquiétude liée à la promiscuité dans les vestiaires, au manque de gel hydro alcoolique et de masques de protection, au risque de transmission lors de passages répétés sur les dispositifs de contrôle de non contamination radioactive en sortie de zone, des dispositifs qui ne sont pas nettoyés entre chaque passage. Il dénonce également les pressions subies par les salariés qui veulent faire jouer leur droit de retrait. Son message est simple : le risque de mal faire leur travail est plus élevé lorsque les salariés sont angoissés et stressés, ce qui met en péril la sûreté des installations nucléaires dès maintenant ou en différé,lors du redémarrage d’installations pour lesquelles les opérations de maintenance auront été réalisées dans de mauvaises conditions. Le dépistage systématique, et répété dans le temps, de tous les intervenants permettrait évidemment de circonscrire le risque mais comme pour les masques respiratoires et le gel hydro-alcoolique, la gestion de la pénurie se substitue aux décisions logiques de protection.

    source Criirad
    #nucléaire

  • Revue de presse continue : crises déclenchées par le Covid19
    https://collectiflieuxcommuns.fr/?672-revue-de-presse-semaine-du

    La technocratie, les médecins et les politiques

    Coronavirus : quand la Turquie accuse la France d’égoïsme

    De nouvelles recherches suggèrent que l’élevage industriel, et non les marchés de produits frais, pourrait être à l’origine du Covid-19

    Confinement : plongée dans ce si africain 18e arrondissement de Paris

    Europe : évitons la guerre de sécession !

    Face au coronavirus, la menace de la rougeole se fait plus pressante en Afrique

    Epidémie : à quoi a donc servi le rapport sénatorial de 2010 ?

    L’Adhan résonne à Lyon en signe de solidarité face au coronavirus

    De Dieudonné à Pharmacie d’Auvergne, le business pas net des protections « anti-coronavirus »

    Le Maghreb malade du coronavirus

    « Ce qui est inédit, c’est que la plupart des gouvernements ont choisi d’arrêter l’économie pour sauver des vies »

    Comment la France imagine une possible implosion de l’Afrique face au Covid-19

    Voir la suite...

    Bonus

    *

    Présentation/Archives/Abonnement

  • Revue de presse continue : crises déclenchées par le Covid19
    https://collectiflieuxcommuns.fr/?672-revue-de-presse-semaine-du

    Et si la sévérité des symptômes que provoque le Covid-19 dépendait de nos gènes ?

    Numérisation de l’école : « On ne fait pas un cours de philosophie par courriels »

    COVID-19 et sûreté nucléaire, faut-il s’inquiéter ?

    Quand la peste noire emportait le Moyen-Orient

    En Colombie, les gangs profitent du confinement pour assassiner des militants des droits humains

    La Chine à la rescousse d’une Algérie reconnaissante

    Les Français dessinent les contours du « nouveau monde » et prennent les élites à contre-pied

    Un risque de crise alimentaire mondiale liée au coronavirus, selon l’ONU et l’OMC

    Coronavirus : pour les immigrés, la peur de ne pas être enterré au pays

    Renaissance des frontières

    Couvre-feu à la matraque : l’Afrique de l’Ouest se rebelle

    Le coronavirus annonce « la fin du capitalisme néolibéral », selon le chef économiste de la banque Natixis

    L’Armée en renfort à Nîmes et dans les grandes villes du Sud

    Voir la suite...

    Bonus

    *

    Présentation/Archives/Abonnement

  • Revue de presse continue : crises déclenchées par le Covid19
    https://collectiflieuxcommuns.fr/?672-revue-de-presse-semaine-du

    Coronavirus : Facebook et Twitter font la police des contenus... y compris ceux des chefs d’Etat

    Défaillance de l’État Macron : les responsables seront jugés

    « L’épidémie doit nous conduire à habiter autrement le monde »

    Covid19 dans le monde et par pays

    C’est la guerre, malheur à celui qui se pose des questions !

    32.500 masques en provenance de Chine saisis dans un entrepôt en Seine-Saint-Denis

    Covid-19... et les autres : pourquoi le nombre de maladies infectieuses est reparti à la hausse au 21e siècle

    Coronavirus : environ 21.000 entreprises ont eu recours au prêt garanti par l’Etat, annonce Le Maire

    “Parfum du prophète” et huile aux fleurs : comment la « médecine islamique » a aggravé l’épidémie de Covid-19 en Iran

    « Crise sanitaire : les libertés abandonnées ne seront pas retrouvées intactes »

    En Chine, de sérieux doutes sur le nombre officiel de morts du coronavirus

    Sauver l’économie ou sauver des vies ? Pourquoi les citoyens occidentaux ne sont pas plus au clair que leurs gouvernements

    Des associations de soignants exigent en référé la « réquisition des moyens de production » de médicaments et matériel

    Bonus

    *

    Présentation/Archives/Abonnement

  • « Il faut revoir l’échelle de la reconnaissance sociale et de la rémunération des métiers » (Dominique Méda, France Culture, 28.03.2020)
    https://www.franceculture.fr/economie/dominique-meda-il-faut-revoir-lechelle-de-la-reconnaissance-sociale-et

    C’est vrai qu’il y a finalement beaucoup de #métiers nécessaires à la survie des personnes. Mais cela nous invite évidemment à faire le test très simple proposé par David Graebert dans Bullshit Jobs : pour savoir si un métier est utile ou non, imaginez sa disparition et regardez les effets sur la #société.

    Soudain, les professions souvent les plus dévalorisées apparaissent les plus essentielles et d’autres, aujourd’hui extrêmement bien rémunérées, apparaissent radicalement inutiles.
    […] Cela nous donne vraiment beaucoup à réfléchir pour la suite. Il faut revoir l’échelle de la considération, de la reconnaissance sociale et de la #rémunération.

  • Romain Dureau : « La crise du #coronavirus est le grain de sable qui bloque l’#agriculture mondialisée »
    https://www.marianne.net/economie/romain-dureau-la-crise-du-coronavirus-est-le-grain-de-sable-qui-bloque-l-a

    Entre la fermeture des #frontières, l’appel aux citoyens à aller « aux champs » et la fermeture des #marchés, l’épidémie de coronavirus a bouleversé notre #modèle agricole dans ses certitudes. Afin d’éclaircir l’impact du #Covid-19 et dresser des perspectives pour le futur, Marianne a interrogé Romain Dureau, agroéconomiste et cofondateur du laboratoire d’idées Urgence transformation agricole et alimentaire (UTAA), qui prône l’instauration d’un nouveau système de production appuyé sur la relocalisation, l’agriculture paysanne et le #protectionnisme.

  • Revue de presse continue : crises déclenchées par le Covid19
    https://collectiflieuxcommuns.fr/?672-revue-de-presse-semaine-du

    En Chine, de sérieux doutes sur le nombre officiel de morts du coronavirus

    Sauver l’économie ou sauver des vies ? Pourquoi les citoyens occidentaux ne sont pas plus au clair que leurs gouvernements

    Des associations de soignants exigent en référé la « réquisition des moyens de production » de médicaments et matériel

    L’alliance américano-saoudienne à l’épreuve de la guerre du pétrole

    Premières images de la levée du confinement en Chine : « On a peur de replonger trop vite dans la vie normale »

    « Il faut revoir l’échelle de la reconnaissance sociale et de la rémunération des métiers »

    Coronavirus : des hôpitaux craignent une pénurie de médicaments en réanimation

    « La crise du coronavirus est le grain de sable qui bloque l’agriculture mondialisée »

    « Renoncer à faire respecter le confinement dans les quartiers, c’est abandonner les populations sur place ! »

    Dans le sud de l’Italie, une bombe sociale prête à exploser

    Coronavirus : L’UE fait don de 450 millions d’euros au Fonds spécial mis en place au Maroc

    « Le nihilisme n’a pas encore vaincu, nous demeurons une civilisation »

    Longtemps épargnée par l’épidémie, l’Afrique s’inquiète des risques sanitaires et économiques du coronavirus

    Bonus

    *

    Présentation/Archives/Abonnement

  • Didier Sicard : « Il est urgent d’enquêter sur l’origine animale de l’épidémie de Covid-19 »
    https://www.franceculture.fr/sciences/didier-sicard-il-est-urgent-denqueter-sur-lorigine-animale-de-lepidemi

    D’un côté, déforestation massive et trafic d’animaux sauvages. De l’autre, désintérêt et financement anémique des recherches sur les virus hébergés par ces mêmes animaux… Tableau flippant d’un cocktail explosif par un spécialiste des maladies infectieuses
    #coronavirus

    • #animaux #animaux_sauvages #déforestation

      #Rony_Brauman en parle un peu :

      Le point commun du Covid, du Sras, du Mers et d’Ebola est que ces maladies sont le fruit d’un passage de la #barrière_virale_d'espèces entre les #animaux et les hommes. L’extension des certaines mégapoles entraîne une interpénétration entre #ville et #forêts : c’est le cas d’Ebola, qui trouve son origine dans la présence des #chauves-souris en ville et qui mangeaient par des humains. Mais ce paramètre, s’il faut avoir à l’esprit, est à manier avec une certaine retenue. Car il s’agit d’une constance dans l’histoire des épidémies : la plupart, à commencer par la #peste, sont liées à ce franchissement. L’homme vit dans la compagnie des animaux depuis le néolithique, notre existence est rendue possible par cette coexistence. Mais la peste avait été importée par la puce du rat qui était disséminé sur les bateaux et les caravanes ; pour le corona, ce sont les #avions qui ont fait ce travail. La spécificité du Covid-19, c’est sa vitesse de #diffusion. Le professeur Sansonnetti, infectiologue et professeur au Collège de France, parle d’une « maladie de l’#anthropocène » : en superposant la carte de l’extension du virus et celle des déplacements aériens, il montre que les deux se recouvrent parfaitement.

      https://www.nouvelobs.com/coronavirus-de-wuhan/20200327.OBS26690/rony-brauman-repond-a-macron-la-metaphore-de-la-guerre-sert-a-disqualifie

      Et #Sansonetti dans sa conférence :
      https://seenthis.net/messages/834008

    • L’indifférence aux #marchés d’#animaux sauvages dans le monde est dramatique. On dit que ces marchés rapportent autant d’argent que le marché de la #drogue.

      [...]

      on sait que ces #épidémies vont recommencer dans les années à venir de façon répétée si on n’interdit pas définitivement le #trafic d’animaux sauvages. Cela devrait être criminalisé comme une vente de cocaïne à l’air libre. Il faudrait punir ce #crime de prison. Je pense aussi à ces élevages de poulet ou de porc en batterie que l’on trouve en #Chine. Ils donnent chaque année de nouvelles crises grippales à partir de virus d’origine aviaire. Rassembler comme cela des animaux, ce n’est pas sérieux.

      [...]

      C’est comme si l’art vétérinaire et l’art médical humain n’avaient aucun rapport. L’origine de l’épidémie devrait être l’objet d’une mobilisation internationale majeure.

    • animaux sauvages ou non (poissons oiseaux mamifères) avec les parasites et les insectes par les déjections alvines à ciel ouvert ou en bout de canal , le cycle de contamination n’est jamais simple

    • Les pangolins, les mammifères les plus braconnés au monde, ont été identifiés comme des porteurs du coronavirus.
      https://www.nationalgeographic.fr/animaux/2020/03/les-pangolins-sont-bien-porteurs-de-souches-de-coronavirus

      Bien que le commerce international des huit espèces connues de #pangolins soit strictement interdit, ceux-ci restent les mammifères les plus braconnés au monde. Les écailles de milliers de pangolins sont chaque année passées en contrebande en Chine à des fins médicinales. Leur viande est par ailleurs considérée comme un mets délicat par certaines franges des populations chinoise et vietnamienne. Étant donné que les coronavirus peuvent être transmis par certains fluides corporels, les matières fécales et la viande, le commerce de pangolins vivants à des fins alimentaires est plus préoccupant pour la propagation de la maladie que celui des écailles.

    • Ban wildlife markets to avert pandemics, says UN biodiversity chief

      Warning comes as destruction of nature increasingly seen as key driver of zoonotic diseases.

      The United Nations’ biodiversity chief has called for a global ban on wildlife markets – such as the one in Wuhan, China, believed to be the starting point of the coronavirus outbreak – to prevent future pandemics.

      Elizabeth Maruma Mrema, the acting executive secretary of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity, said countries should move to prevent future pandemics by banning “wet markets” that sell live and dead animals for human consumption, but cautioned against unintended consequences.

      China has issued a temporary ban on wildlife markets where animals such as civets, live wolf pups and pangolins are kept alive in small cages while on sale, often in filthy conditions where they incubate diseases that can then spill into human populations. Many scientists have urged Beijing to make the ban permanent.
      Using the examples of Ebola in west-central Africa and the Nipah virus in east Asia, Mrema said there were clear links between the destruction of nature and new human illnesses, but cautioned against a reactionary approach to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic.

      “The message we are getting is if we don’t take care of nature, it will take care of us,” she told the Guardian.

      “It would be good to ban the live animal markets as China has done and some countries. But we should also remember you have communities, particularly from low-income rural areas, particularly in Africa, which are dependent on wild animals to sustain the livelihoods of millions of people.

      “So unless we get alternatives for these communities, there might be a danger of opening up illegal trade in wild animals which currently is already leading us to the brink of extinction for some species.

      “We need to look at how we balance that and really close the hole of illegal trade in the future.”

      As the coronavirus has spread around the world, there has been increased focus on how humanity’s destruction of nature creates conditions for new zoonotic illness to spread.

      Jinfeng Zhou, secretary general of the China Biodiversity Conservation and Green Development Foundation, called on authorities to make the ban on wildlife markets permanent, warning diseases such as Covid-19 would appear again.

      “I agree there should be a global ban on wet markets, which will help a lot on wildlife conservation and protection of ourselves from improper contacts with wildlife,” Zhou said. “More than 70% of human diseases are from wildlife and many species are endangered by eating them.”

      Mrema said she was optimistic that the world would take the consequences of the destruction of the natural world more seriously in the wake of the Covid-19 outbreak when countries returned to negotiate the post-2020 framework for biodiversity, billed as the Paris agreement for nature.

      “Preserving intact ecosystems and biodiversity will help us reduce the prevalence of some of these diseases. So the way we farm, the way we use the soils, the way we protect coastal ecosystems and the way we treat our forests will either wreck the future or help us live longer,” she said.

      “We know in the late 1990s in Malaysia with the outbreak of Nipah virus, it is believed that the virus was a result of forest fires, deforestation and drought which had caused fruit bats, the natural carriers of the virus, to move from the forests into the peat farms. It infected the farmers, which infected other humans and that led to the spread of disease.

      “Biodiversity loss is becoming a big driver in the emergence of some of these viruses. Large-scale deforestation, habitat degradation and fragmentation, agriculture intensification, our food system, trade in species and plants, anthropogenic climate change – all these are drivers of biodiversity loss and also drivers of new diseases. Two thirds of emerging infections and diseases now come from wildlife.”

      In February, delegates from more than 140 countries met in Rome to respond for the first time to a draft 20-point agreement to halt and reverse biodiversity loss, including proposals to protect almost a third of the world’s oceans and land and reduce pollution from plastic waste and excess nutrients by 50%.

      A major summit to sign the agreement in October was scheduled in the Chinese city of Kunming but has been postponed because of the coronavirus outbreak.

      https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/06/ban-live-animal-markets-pandemics-un-biodiversity-chief-age-of-extincti

      #animaux_sauvages

  • Revue de presse continue : crises déclenchées par le Covid19
    https://collectiflieuxcommuns.fr/?672-revue-de-presse-semaine-du

    Comment le Coronavirus Détricote l’Union Européenne

    #IlsSavaient, #OnNoublieraPas… La grogne sociale monte sur les réseaux sociaux

    Coronavirus : 3 500 détenus libérés depuis le début du confinement

    Coronavirus : la Chine accusée d’avoir volontairement minimisé son nombre de morts

    Voilà ce qui se serait passé si on n’avait rien fait contre l’épidémie

    Coronavirus : quand l’Afrique dénonce la « maladie des blancs »

    Paris : les toxicomanes affluent dans le quartier de la salle de shoot

    Coronavirus : visualisez les pays qui ont « aplati la courbe » de l’épidémie et ceux qui n’y sont pas encore parvenus

    En Chine, une seconde vague d’épidémie de Covid-19 semble inévitable

    Didier Sicard : « Il est urgent d’enquêter sur l’origine animale de l’épidémie de Covid-19 »

    Thomas Porcher : « Cette crise est un moment idéal pour faire passer les pires lois »

    Coronavirus : l’incroyable scénario de Prato en Italie, surnommée la « petite Chine »

    Bonus

    *

    Présentation/Archives/Abonnement

  • Revue de presse (Covid free) du 22.03 au 28.03.20
    https://collectiflieuxcommuns.fr/?672-revue-de-presse-semaine-du

    « A Bobigny, le clientélisme de la droite a fracturé la communauté nationale, la seule qui rassemble tout le monde »

    Malaise dans l’agriculture française

    Tchad : près de cent militaires tués par Boko Haram dans la province du Lac

    « Les réseaux sociaux, ce nouveau Léviathan sans frontières »

    A la frontière grecque, les réfugiés décident de retourner en Turquie

    Le rôle du méthane dans le réchauffement a été fortement sous estimé

    Elargissement de l’UE : l’ouverture de négociations avec l’Albanie et la Macédoine du Nord se profile

    La Corée du Nord tire « un projectile non identifié »

    « Le problème est que la jeunesse ivoirienne a pour modèle de réussite tout ce qui est en dehors de ses frontières »

    La crise de l’universel

    Ouganda : les infortunes de l’exploitation pétrolière

    « L’Amérique ne sera plus très longtemps le baby-sitter de l’Europe »

    Bonus

    *

    Présentation/Archives/Abonnement