• Unraveling the Beautiful History of Disability Fashion
    https://www.bitchmedia.org/article/disability-fashion-history-access-issue

    “To be well dressed is to feel well dressed.”—Helen Cookman There are no “firsts” in disability fashion, and there can’t be a future for disability fashion without acknowledging its lineage of disabled creators. People have always made clothes for disabled bodies. Whenever possible, we disabled people have modified garments and assistive devices to fit our bodies for style, comfort, and function. In 1948, for example, a British woman named Gladys Reed was frustrated with her body-worn hearing aid, which placed separate battery packs in a “handbag container” worn over her shoulder. Because the handbag regularly slipped off Reed’s shoulder, she decided to create a better solution: a belt with hip pockets for carrying her instrument and batteries. Her later designs—including bra pockets and (...)

  • The Coronavirus Pandemic Returned Pride Month to Its Radical Roots | Bitch Media
    https://www.bitchmedia.org/article/pride-returns-radical-roots

    Even the Gay Liberation Monument, a West Village sculpture commissioned on the 10th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, is a sanitized commemoration of the events. It features two standing men and two sitting women whose features are traditionally white. All four figures are covered in white lacquer, a staple of the artist George Segal’s work. In this sanitized version of Pride, there’s no room for outliers. There are no Black drag queens with broad smiles and flower-crowns balanced precariously, like Marsha P. Johnson; no biracial androgynous lesbians wearing tuxedos with close-cropped hair, like Storme DeLarverie; and no curly-haired Latinas carrying Molotov cocktails with gender identities too fluid to be contained, like Sylvia Rivera. In this version of Pride, the one co-opted into commercials and storefronts, there’s no space for the queer people who don’t fit neatly into the expectation of normalcy, gays who aren’t pining for a prepackaged wedding and the evolution of our marriage into 2.5 kids and a one-car garage in suburbia.

    But 2020 isn’t a normal Pride or even a normal year. Many of us spent our spring cooped up, hearing sirens scream as they carted bodies to overfilled hospitals without enough ventilators. Those of us in quarantine haven’t seen our friends and families for months, separated from contact with other humans by six feet and masks that cover half of our faces. As a result, the expected public celebrations of Pride were canceled, and no one was exactly sure when things would return to normal. The appeal of crowding onto dance floors or the crushing flow of other queers diminished, replaced instead by existential terror about catching or spreading the illness. But then Breonna Taylor’s murder at the hands of Louisville, Kentucky, police officers as they executed a no-knock warrant on her home in the middle of the night came to the national spotlight. And then Minneapolis police officers murdered George Floyd, kneeling on his neck for more than eight minutes while he cried out for his dead mother. And then white America finally took to the streets to join the Black Lives Matter movement in demanding that racist police stop killing Black and Brown people.

    #Pride #LGBT

  • Stop Asking What Sexual Violence Victims Will Do without Police | Bitch Media
    https://www.bitchmedia.org/article/what-will-survivors-of-sexual-violence-do-if-we-defund-the-police

    Looking at the evidence, the answer to the question, “What will sexual assault victims do without the police?” is easily answerable: Sans police, their chances of obtaining justice would be much higher than they are right now. The criminal justice system has a long and well-documented history of failing survivors and victims of sexual violence at literally every turn; often retraumatizing them in the process. A 2019 New York Times article detailed horrific police misconduct in rape cases, with officers’ behavior ranging from shaming the victims for “flirting” and “partying,” to a blatant mishandling of evidence. There’s substantial evidence that shows several precincts across the country falsely inflating their conviction rates on rape cases. Perhaps most shocking of all is a 2018 study that found hundreds of police officers have been charged with rape and sexual assault (if not thousands—the study notes that the numbers may be much larger than what has been officially reported).

    Despite the mountain of evidence pointing toward the fact that the police exacerbate harm to women and femmes, the sexual-assault argument has a way of persisting. At first glance, it can seem like a valid concern—especially to feminists and progressives who may otherwise support abolition—but upon further investigation, it’s part of a much larger (and far more dangerous) trend. For decades, white supremacy has found shelter behind the aesthetics of feminism, and the argument that sexual violence necessitates the existence of the police is just another example of anti-Black ideology commodifying feminist language to Trojan-horse its way into progressive discourse. White feminism has bastardized the women’s rights movement to justify racist and oppressive institutions for as long as there’s been a women’s rights movement, and it’s time to call it out for what it is: racism.

    Je trouve que c’est exagérer et qu’il y a beaucoup d’ignorance et de manque d’imagination derrière cet « engouement des féministes blanches pour la police »... mais peut-être que le contexte US est si différent qu’il y a là vraiment des féministes blanches et activement racistes. En France il me semble que les féministes, même blanches, n’attendent rien de la police, sauf à être composée pour le prochain Noël d’une majorité de femmes qui ne sont pas étranglées par leurs collègues. Et encore.
    #police #abolition_de_la_police #féminisme_blanc

  • What a World Without Cops Would Look Like – Mother Jones
    https://www.motherjones.com/crime-justice/2020/06/police-abolition-george-floyd

    Efforts to cut off funding for police have already taken root in Minneapolis, where the police department’s budget currently totals $193 million. (In 2017, the department received 36 percent of the city’s general fund expenditures.) Two days after Floyd’s killing, the president of the University of Minnesota declared that that the campus would no longer contract with the police department to provide security for large gatherings like football games. On Friday, a member of the Minneapolis Board of Education announced a resolution to end the school district’s contract to station 14 cops in its schools. And community groups such as the Black Visions Collective and Reclaim the Block are petitioning the city council to cut the police department’s budget by $45 million and reinvest the money in health and (non-police) safety programs.

    With other campaigns to cut police budgets underway in cities like Los Angeles and New York and calls to defund the police gathering steam on social media, I spoke with Brooklyn College sociology professor Alex Vitale, the coordinator of the Policing & Social Justice Project and author of The End of Policing, to talk about the sweeping vision of police abolition and what it means in practice.

    #abolir_la_police #police #justice #justice_réparative #USA

    • Minneapolis council member: Conversations underway to disband police
      https://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/america-in-crisis/minneapolis-council-member-conversations-underway-to-disband-polic

      "The department is ungovernable,” Fletcher said. “Chief (Medaria) Arradondo is a leader that we’ve all had very high hopes in and that I imagined could play a role in envisioning the next version of public safety. But he has clearly not been able to make the culture change happen that we were hoping for and investing in.”

      What it would take to disband the department is unclear. But what is clear is that the department is already seeing a reduced role in the protection of the city.

      On Wednesday, the Minneapolis Park Board voted to terminate its relationship with the department, and the Minneapolis Police will no longer be involved in guarding events on park property.

      Fletcher said in a Twitter post that it’s time to “declare policing as we know it a thing of the past.”

      Minneapolis City Council members look to disband the police department as schools and other city agencies cut ties with police
      https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/world/minneapolis-city-council-members-look-to-disband-the-police-department-as-schools-and-other-city-agencies-cut-ties-with-police/ar-BB152szZ
      https://img-s-msn-com.akamaized.net/tenant/amp/entityid/BB152eBW.img?h=630&w=1200&m=6&q=60&o=t&l=f&f=jpg

      Several members of the Minneapolis City Council are exploring ways to permanently disband the Minneapolis Police Department.
      Over the past week, several other city agencies have severed their ties to the department.
      “We can send a city response that makes situations better. We can resolve confusion over a $US20 grocery transaction without drawing a weapon, or pulling out handcuffs,” Councilmember Steve Fletcher said.

      Mais pas de grosse presse sur ça...

    • Six Ideas for a Cop-Free World - Rolling Stone
      https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/politics-news/police-brutality-cop-free-world-protest-199465

      Editor’s note: This story was originally published on December 16th, 2014, following the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner, black men who were killed by police. In recent days, in the wake of nationwide protests demanding justice for George Floyd, we are sharing some of our previous coverage about how to end systematic racism in America.

      After months of escalating protests and grassroots organizing in response to the police killings of Michael Brown and Eric Garner, police reformers have issued many demands. The moderates in this debate typically qualify their rhetoric with “We all know we need police, but…” It’s a familiar refrain to those of us who’ve spent years in the streets and the barrios organizing around police violence, only to be confronted by officers who snarl, “But who’ll help you if you get robbed?” We can put a man on the moon, but we’re still lacking creativity down here on Earth.

      But police are not a permanent fixture in society. While law enforcers have existed in one form or another for centuries, the modern police have their roots in the relatively recent rise of modern property relations 200 years ago, and the “disorderly conduct” of the urban poor. Like every structure we’ve known all our lives, it seems that the policing paradigm is inescapable and everlasting, and the only thing keeping us from the precipice of a dystopic Wild West scenario. It’s not.

    • I’m a Minneapolis City Council Member. We Must Disband the Police—Here’s What Could Come Next | Time
      https://time.com/5848705/disband-and-replace-minneapolis-police

      I have been surprised, then, by how difficult and controversial it has been to pass the relatively small budget changes that we have made, which have not even cut their budget but merely redirected some proposed increases to fund a new Office of Violence Prevention. Other programmatic proposals to change the way we police have been met with stiff institutional resistance.

      Minneapolis Police had an opportunity to distance themselves from Derek Chauvin, to express sympathy, to be a calming presence. Instead, they deployed tear gas and rubber bullets, effectively escalating the situation from protest to pitched conflict. By the next day, it was clear that people on Lake Street were rallying for much more than the prosecution of four officers. They were demonstrating their anger at decades of harassment and racialized violence and calling for it to end.

      We have a talented, thoughtful police chief who has attempted some important steps. He has fired officers for significant abuses only to have his decisions overturned and those officers reinstated by arbitrators. Mayor Frey has met fierce resistance from the Federation to implement even minor policy changes.

      After viewing George Floyd’s murder, watching police not only fail to apologize, but escalate the situation with aggressive tactics, and finally watching the department abandon neighborhood businesses to exclusively defend their precinct building, most of my constituents have had enough.

      Every member of the Minneapolis City Council has now expressed the need for dramatic structural change. I am one of many on the Council, including the Council President and the Chair of Public Safety, who are publicly supporting the call to disband our police department and start fresh with a community-oriented, non-violent public safety and outreach capacity. What I hear from most of my constituents is that they want to make sure we provide for public safety, and they have learned their whole lives to equate “safety” with “police,” but are now concluding that need not be the case.

      We had already pushed for pilot programs to dispatch county mental health professionals to mental health calls, and fire department EMTs to opioid overdose calls, without police officers. We have similarly experimented with unarmed, community-oriented street teams on weekend nights downtown to focus on de-escalation. We could similarly turn traffic enforcement over to cameras and, potentially, our parking enforcement staff, rather than our police department.

      By Steve Fletcher
      June 5, 2020 9:57 AM EDT
      Fletcher is a City Council Member for Ward 3 in Minneapolis, Minn.

      We can invest in cultural competency and mental health training, de-escalation and conflict resolution. We can send a city response that that is appropriate to each situation and makes it better. We can resolve confusion over a $20 grocery transaction without drawing a weapon or pulling out handcuffs.

      Mostly—and this might be the hardest part to envision and make real—we need to be more deeply engaged with each other. We need to build the relationship networks, skills, and capacity in our communities to support each other in resolving conflicts and keeping each other safe before things escalate dangerously. Our isolation from each other has required us to outsource the management of social interactions. We have to get relational.

    • Opinion | The Police Killed George Floyd. Redirect Their Funding Elsewhere. - The New York Times
      https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/30/opinion/george-floyd-police-funding.html

      The only way we’re going to stop these endless cycles of police violence is by creating alternatives to policing. Because even in a pandemic where black people have been disproportionately killed by the coronavirus, the police are still murdering us.

      On Monday, a worker at a store in Minneapolis called 911, claiming that George Floyd had used counterfeit money. The incident ended with a police officer suffocating Mr. Floyd to death, despite his and bystanders’ pleas for mercy. Protests have since erupted across the country while the police respond with military-style violence.

      As the case of George Floyd makes clear, calling 911 for even the slightest thing can be a death sentence for black people. For many marginalized communities, 911 is not a viable option because the police often make crises worse.

      More training or diversity among police officers won’t end police brutality, nor will firing and charging individual officers. Look at the Minneapolis Police Department, which is held up as a model of progressive police reform. The department offers procedural justice as well as trainings for implicit bias, mindfulness and de-escalation. It embraces community policing and officer diversity, bans “warrior style” policing, uses body cameras, implemented an early intervention system to identify problematic officers, receives training around mental health crisis intervention, and practices “reconciliation” efforts in communities of color.

      George Floyd was still murdered. The focus on training, diversity and technology like body cameras shifts focus away from the root cause of police violence and instead gives the police more power and resources. The problem is that the entire criminal justice system gives police officers the power and opportunity to systematically harass and kill with impunity.

      The solution to ending police violence and cultivating a safer country lies in reducing the power of the police and their contact with the public.

      Municipalities can begin by changing policies or statutes so police officers never respond to certain kinds of emergencies, including ones that involve substance abuse, domestic violence, homelessness or mental health. Instead, health care workers or emergency response teams would handle these incidents.

      Ideally, people would have the option to call a different number — say 727 — to access various trained response teams.

      The good news is, this is already happening. Violence interruption programs exist throughout the country and they’re often led by people from the community who have experience navigating tricky situations. Some programs, like one in Washington, D.C., do not work with the police; its staff members rely instead on personal outreach and social connections for information about violence that they work to mediate and diffuse. We should invest in these programs, which operate on shoestring budgets, so they have their own dedicated dispatch centers outside of 911.

      Dallas is pioneering a new approach where social workers are being dispatched to some 911 calls that involve mental health emergencies. The program has shown success, and many of the people receive care that they would never have gotten in jails or overcrowded hospitals.

      In California, the Bay Area Transformative Justice Collective deals with child sexual abuse without the police. The collective develops pods — groups of people including survivors, bystanders or people who have harmed in the past — that each pod-member feels they can turn to for support when needed.

      Here’s another idea: Imagine if the money used to pay the salaries of police officers who endlessly patrol public housing buildings and harass residents can be used to fund plans that residents design to keep themselves safe. The money could also pay the salaries of maintenance and custodial workers; fund community programs, employment and a universal basic income; or pay for upgrades to elevators and apartment units so residents are not stuck without gas during a pandemic, as some people in Brooklyn were.

      https://batjc.wordpress.com

      By Philip V. McHarris and Thenjiwe McHarris

      Mr. McHarris is a doctoral candidate focusing on race, housing and policing. Ms. McHarris is a strategist with the Movement for Black Lives.

    • Black Lives Matter Has Been Doing The Work To ’Defund The Police’ For Years
      https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/black-lives-matter-has-been-doing-the-work-to-defund-the-police-for-years/ar-BB156D9S
      https://img-s-msn-com.akamaized.net/tenant/amp/entityid/BB156BjH.img?h=630&w=1200&m=6&q=60&o=t&l=f&f=jpg&x=3157&y=7

      Los Angeles’ BLM chapter and its partners proposed an alternative “People’s Budget,” which showed how redirecting money allocated for LAPD could pay for desperately needed housing assistance, rent suspension, mental health services and support for public schools. The activists succeeded in embarrassing City Council members into delaying a vote on the budget and ultimately allowing a June 1 deadline to pass without revising the budget.

      Despite its progressive reputation, Los Angeles has lagged behind the rest of the state in criminal justice reform. L.A. County jails incarcerate more people than any other jail system in the country.Black Lives Matter activists have been at the forefront of efforts to change that.

      Although Black Lives Matter does not endorse candidates, it has led the effort to oust Lacey, who has opposed almost every criminal justice reform measure that has come up during her eight years in office. Lacey, the county’s first Black district attorney, ran for reelection in 2016 unopposed but is facing a progressive challenger in November after failing to secure more than 50% of the vote in the primary.

      Thanks to BLM organizing, L.A. residents will also have the chance to vote on Measure R, a civilian-driven ballot initiative that aims to reduce the county’s jail population by getting prisoners with mental health conditions out of jail and into treatment. Organizers collected 250,000 signatures to get Measure R on the ballot.

    • What does ’defund the police’ mean? The rallying cry sweeping the US – explained | US news | The Guardian
      https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/jun/05/defunding-the-police-us-what-does-it-mean?ref=hvper.com
      https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/8fd0ed9636b86ed15b807511f42695dda676873d/0_135_3219_1931/master/3219.jpg?width=1200&height=630&quality=85&auto=format&fit=crop&overlay-ali

      For years, community groups have advocated for defunding law enforcement – taking money away from police and prisons – and reinvesting those funds in services. The basic principle is that government budgets and “public safety” spending should prioritize housing, employment, community health, education and other vital programs, instead of police officers. Advocates argue that defunding is the best way forward since attempts to reform police practices over the last five years have failed, as evidenced by the brutal killing of George Floyd. Groups have a range of demands, with some seeking modest reductions and others viewing full defunding as a step toward abolishing contemporary police services.
      How much does America currently spend on police?

      In the past four decades, the cost of policing in the US has tripled and is now $115bn, according to a recent analysis. That steady increase comes as crime has been consistently declining. In most cities, spending on police is significantly greater than spending on services and other departments ($1.8bn on police in Los Angeles, for example, which is more than half the city’s general fund). The Covid-19 economic crisis has led cities and states to make drastic budget cuts to education, youth programs, arts and culture, parks, libraries, housing services and more. But police budgets have grown or gone largely untouched – until pressure from protests this week.

    • Abolishing Prisons Is within Our Grasp | Bitch Media
      https://www.bitchmedia.org/article/prison-abolition-should-be-the-american-dream

      The United States incarcerates more people than any other country, with 2.2 million adults in prisons or jails at the end of 2016. Nearly 60,000 children under the age of 18 are also incarcerated in juvenile jails or prisons, and about 10,000 more children are held in adult jails or prisons. Citizens pay the high price for this system because our tax dollars are funneled into policing and incarcerating the people in these systems—predominantly Black and Brown people. This is by design. Slavery legally ended in 1865 with the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, but the language of this amendment still allowed slavery as punishment for a crime. The carceral system revived slave labor, allowing the United States to continue disenfranchising and enslaving incarcerated Black people. Now almost every aspect of Black and Brown people’s lives is affected by the carceral state—from extra surveillance and imprisonment to disenfranchisement upon release. The entire system is built to maintain white supremacy, which remains the status quo in the United States.

      “It might be challenging to envision a world without policing or imprisonment because we’re constantly being told that these systems are natural [they’re not] and have always existed [they haven’t],” says Mohamed Shehk, the national media and communications director of Critical Resistance. Though some Americans have difficulties imagining a world without police or prisons, communities who don’t rely on the PIC do exist. Shehk says the Palestinian village where his mother grew up doesn’t have a police force. Problems there are resolved by “bringing in the elders of the community to come up with a resolution.” In 2011, the indigenous Purépecha town of Cherán banned political parties, gangs, and police. Since then, they boast the lowest murder rate in the entire Michoacán region, which is historically one of the most violent regions in Mexico. What’s more, since Cherán abolished the corrupt police force, they haven’t had a single kidnapping.

      “Policing exists to manage the consequences of inequality in ways that benefit those people who are creating the inequality,” says Alex S. Vitale, a sociology professor at Brooklyn College and author of the 2017 book The End of Policing. “The decision to use police to manage the problems of the poor is inherently unjust in most circumstances and actually racist because this burden so falls most heavily on communities of color.” Many wealthy white communities have already abolished police forces because they don’t want the criminal justice system solving their intercommunal problems. Why is this option not available to all of us?

      Abolitionists are often asked to explain what will happen to people who commit murder or rape if police and prisons are abolished. Shehk responds with a similar question: “What are we doing now with people who commit those harms?” Some of the high-profile assault stories that surfaced during the #MeToo movement, including Chanel Miller’s rape at the hands of Brock Turner and Dr. Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony of her assault by Brett Kavanaugh, revealed that survivors of sexual harassment and assault aren’t being protected by this system. Instead, the criminal justice system protects and maintains agents of the patriarchy, including students like Turner, police officers, lawyers, Supreme Court justices, and presidents.

      Since the United States locks people up at a higher rate than any other country, you’d assume this “would be the safest place, virtually free of harm or violence,” Shehk says, but that’s obviously not the case. The president of the United States and two Supreme Court justices have been accused of sexual harassment or sexual assault on multiple occasions. Less than 1 percent of rapes result in the incarceration of the perpetrator, while at least 89 percent of survivors face emotional and physical consequences. Often the rapes reported to police aren’t even investigated, considering the 200,000 rape kits the federal government estimates are sitting—submitted, yet unopened—in police storage. That’s not justice.

      ActivismMagazinePoliticsprisonThe Fantasy Issue
      Beyond BarsPrison Abolition Should Be the American Dream
      by Reina Sultan |

      artwork by Matice Moore and Dawud Lee
      Published on June 4, 2020

      I do not have all the answers, left. I try to have conversations about every subject we must deal with in our communities, center. Someone you love needs your support, but you cannot be there, no matter how much they need you, right. (Artwork by Matice Moore and Dawud Lee for the LifeLines Project)
      This article was published in Fantasy Issue #87 | Summer 2020 Subscribe »

      In her 2003 book, Are Prisons Obsolete?, scholar and activist Angela Y. Davis wrote, “Prison abolitionists are dismissed as utopians and idealists whose ideas are at best unrealistic and impracticable, and, at worst, mystifying and foolish.” Those who oppose prison-industrial complex (PIC) abolition partially see it as a fantasy that can’t be realized. “This is a measure of how difficult it is to envision a social order that does not rely on the threat of sequestering people in dreadful places designed to separate them from their communities and families. The prison is considered so ‘natural’ that it is extremely hard to imagine life without it,” Davis writes.

      But activists and organizations have been imagining life without prisons for decades. The Prison Research/Education/Action Project’s 1976 pamphlet “Instead of Prisons: A Handbook for Abolitionists” laid out the pillars of abolition: “moratorium,” “decarceration,” and “excarceration.” “Moratorium” calls for an end to the building of prisons, jails, and detention centers; “decarceration” works to have nonviolent offenders released from prison; and “excarceration” involves diverting people away from interacting with law enforcement through decriminalization. In 1997, Davis and City University of New York professor Ruth Wilson Gilmore cofounded Critical Resistance, an international organization that aims to dismantle the pic by using these three pillars. A year later, 3,500 people convened for a three-day Critical Resistance conference to discuss the limitations of the PIC in the United States.

      Other organizations with similar goals have also been erected: Decrim NY wants to decriminalize sex work in New York City and in the state and decarcerate sex workers. The Black Youth Project 100 uses a Black, queer, and feminist lens to work toward the liberation of all Black people, including those who are currently incarcerated. No New Jails NYC calls for an end to the building and funding of new prisons and jails in New York City. All of these organizations are working toward a common goal: ending the pic.
      Justice Is Not Served

      The United States incarcerates more people than any other country, with 2.2 million adults in prisons or jails at the end of 2016. Nearly 60,000 children under the age of 18 are also incarcerated in juvenile jails or prisons, and about 10,000 more children are held in adult jails or prisons. Citizens pay the high price for this system because our tax dollars are funneled into policing and incarcerating the people in these systems—predominantly Black and Brown people. This is by design. Slavery legally ended in 1865 with the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, but the language of this amendment still allowed slavery as punishment for a crime. The carceral system revived slave labor, allowing the United States to continue disenfranchising and enslaving incarcerated Black people. Now almost every aspect of Black and Brown people’s lives is affected by the carceral state—from extra surveillance and imprisonment to disenfranchisement upon release. The entire system is built to maintain white supremacy, which remains the status quo in the United States.

      “It might be challenging to envision a world without policing or imprisonment because we’re constantly being told that these systems are natural [they’re not] and have always existed [they haven’t],” says Mohamed Shehk, the national media and communications director of Critical Resistance. Though some Americans have difficulties imagining a world without police or prisons, communities who don’t rely on the PIC do exist. Shehk says the Palestinian village where his mother grew up doesn’t have a police force. Problems there are resolved by “bringing in the elders of the community to come up with a resolution.” In 2011, the indigenous Purépecha town of Cherán banned political parties, gangs, and police. Since then, they boast the lowest murder rate in the entire Michoacán region, which is historically one of the most violent regions in Mexico. What’s more, since Cherán abolished the corrupt police force, they haven’t had a single kidnapping.
      Doctor Climax

      From Our Sponsors

      Some communities within the United States are also accustomed to policing themselves. Shehk says it’s “important to remember that many communities don’t call the cops because of rightful mistrust.” He also points out that “you can also visit Beverly Hills or the Golden Triangle or the other elite, wealthy, white neighborhoods of this country to see what a community without police or prisons looks like.” When a student at an elite private school in Orange County, California, is found with weed in their backpack, teachers don’t call the police—and there isn’t an active police presence within the school itself. Instead, teachers call the student’s parents, believing it’s an issue that can be solved within the family. Black and Brown students, on the other hand, are funneled from school into the criminal justice system in what is commonly known as the school-to-prison pipeline. These students are increasingly accused of crimes, suspended, or reported to the police compared to their white counterparts, which often creates a lasting connection with the carceral state.

      Reducing interaction with law enforcement would allow students the space to make mistakes and learn from them, and would encourage teachers to build better relationships with parents. It also moves resources away from metal detectors, surveillance equipment, and onsite police and toward quality educators, better school supplies, and extracurricular activities. “Policing exists to manage the consequences of inequality in ways that benefit those people who are creating the inequality,” says Alex S. Vitale, a sociology professor at Brooklyn College and author of the 2017 book The End of Policing. “The decision to use police to manage the problems of the poor is inherently unjust in most circumstances and actually racist because this burden so falls most heavily on communities of color.” Many wealthy white communities have already abolished police forces because they don’t want the criminal justice system solving their intercommunal problems. Why is this option not available to all of us?
      What Does Abolition Look Like?

      Abolitionists are often asked to explain what will happen to people who commit murder or rape if police and prisons are abolished. Shehk responds with a similar question: “What are we doing now with people who commit those harms?” Some of the high-profile assault stories that surfaced during the #MeToo movement, including Chanel Miller’s rape at the hands of Brock Turner and Dr. Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony of her assault by Brett Kavanaugh, revealed that survivors of sexual harassment and assault aren’t being protected by this system. Instead, the criminal justice system protects and maintains agents of the patriarchy, including students like Turner, police officers, lawyers, Supreme Court justices, and presidents.

      Since the United States locks people up at a higher rate than any other country, you’d assume this “would be the safest place, virtually free of harm or violence,” Shehk says, but that’s obviously not the case. The president of the United States and two Supreme Court justices have been accused of sexual harassment or sexual assault on multiple occasions. Less than 1 percent of rapes result in the incarceration of the perpetrator, while at least 89 percent of survivors face emotional and physical consequences. Often the rapes reported to police aren’t even investigated, considering the 200,000 rape kits the federal government estimates are sitting—submitted, yet unopened—in police storage. That’s not justice.

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      Murder clearance rates aren’t much better, with police reportedly solving only about 60 percent of murders. When the victim is Black—as the majority of homicide victims are—the clearance rate declines to the lowest of any other racial group. In communities that are particularly disenfranchised, those rates can be in the single digits. These figures don’t instill much faith in law enforcement’s efficacy.

      As Vitale puts it, “serial killers don’t just fall out of the sky.” According to him, treating criminalization as the only option for deterrence is one of the reasons nothing is done to help children or teenagers who, despite the threat of prison, still exhibit violent tendencies. That violence might be prevented through robust social services, mental healthcare, and support systems. Shehk also lists “restorative and transformative justice practices, healing circles, or community accountability models” as examples of nonpunitive ways of addressing harm. “Rather than trying to cage away the problem, one key part of these models is an attempt to address the root cause of the harm and to change the conditions in which it occurred so that it doesn’t happen again,” he says. “Many of these are informed by Indigenous practices, and all of them seek to uplift the humanity of the parties involved.”

      Mass incarceration costs $182 billion a year, when considering policing, court costs, and the operating costs of prisons and jails—and it doesn’t even effectively deter crime, achieve justice for victims, or rehabilitate perpetrators. Rather than funneling money into the PIC, the United States could fund an education system that invests in mental-health services instead of policing and surveillance. We could use those billions of dollars to finance living accommodations for houseless people and provide them with mental healthcare and drug rehabilitation as needed. This money could be used to train crisis intervention teams or violence interrupters to deal with escalated situations.

      The possibilities are endless, if we allow ourselves to dream bigger than criminalization and bondage. “Being an abolitionist is the most realistic position because it is based in statistics and logic along with empathy and respect for human dignity,” says Agbebiyi. To Daoud, “over-policing creates a system of engineered conflict and perpetuates harm. As such, she—and others at BBO—believes that abolishing prisons must be coupled with radically caring for your community in many forms, including cop-watching and bystander intervention. The dream of abolition is being realized every day by people working for a more equitable world. “If you’re doing work to advocate for a living wage, that’s abolitionist work. If you’re doing work to advocate against environmental racism, that’s abolitionist work. If you’re working to make sure folks have access to affordable healthcare, that’s abolitionist work,” Agbebiyi says. Moving abolition from a fantasy to a reality is going to happen incrementally, but we can certainly make it happen. Vitale confirms this, saying, “Abolition is embedded in tons of movements all over the country and it’s happening right now.”

      by Reina Sultan
      #abolitionnisme_carcéral #prison

    • Majority of the Minneapolis City Council pledges to dismantle the Police Department.
      https://seenthis.net/messages/859237

      Nine members — a veto-proof majority — of the Minneapolis City Council pledged on Sunday to dismantle the city’s Police Department, promising to create a new system of public safety in a city where law enforcement has long been accused of racism.

      Saying that the city’s current policing system could not be reformed, the council members stood before hundreds of people gathered late in the day on a grassy hill, and signed a pledge to begin the process of taking apart the Police Department as it now exists.

    • Mpls. Council majority backs dismantling police department - StarTribune.com
      https://www.startribune.com/mpls-council-majority-backs-dismantling-police-department/571088302


      Alondra Cano was one of nine Minneapolis Council members who spoke out in support of advocacy group Black Visions, which is calling for the end of the Minneapolis Police Department.
      JERRY HOLT – STAR TRIBUNE

      In their boldest statement since George Floyd’s killing, nine Minneapolis City Council members told a crowd Sunday that they will “begin the process of ending the Minneapolis Police Department.

      We recognize that we don’t have all the answers about what a police-free future looks like, but our community does,” they said, reading off a prepared statement. “We’re committed to engaging with every willing community member in the City of Minneapolis over the next year to identify what safety looks like for you.

      Their words — delivered one day after Mayor Jacob Frey told a crowd of protesters he does not support the full abolishment of the MPD — set off what is likely to be a long, complicated debate about the future of the state’s largest police force.

      With the world watching, and the city’s leaders up for re-election next year, the stakes are particularly high. While Minneapolis has debated the issue in the past, Floyd’s death at the hands of Minneapolis police has added a sense of urgency, and the calls for police departments to be disbanded have echoed in other cities around the country.

      Council members have noted repeatedly since Floyd’s death that Minneapolis has the chance to redefine policing. On a sunny Sunday afternoon, nine of them walked onto a stage at Powderhorn Park to support members of advocacy group Black Visions, who were calling for the end of the MPD. On stage were Council President Lisa Bender, Vice President Andrea Jenkins and Council Members Alondra Cano, Phillippe Cunningham, Jeremiah Ellison, Steve Fletcher, Cam Gordon, Andrew Johnson and Jeremy Schroeder.

      Decades of police reform efforts have proved that the Minneapolis Police Department cannot be reformed and will never be accountable for its actions,” they said. “We are here today to begin the process of ending the Minneapolis Police Department and creating a new, transformative model for cultivating safety in Minneapolis.

      #démantèlement de la #police_municipale


      Gallery: A new sculpture was erected on Chicago Avenue S. just north of E. 38th Street, the site where George Floyd was was asphyxiated in Minneapolis police custody
      JEFF WHEELER – STAR TRIBUNE.


      Visitors to the intersection where George Floyd was killed in Minneapolis were continuously leaving fresh flowers on the names of other victims of police violence on Sunday, June 7.
      JEFF WHEELER – STAR TRIBUNE_

    • The End of Policing: Alex Vitale on How Cops & Their Unions Cover Up Inequality, Exploitation | Democracy Now!
      https://www.democracynow.org/2020/6/8/alex_vitale_end_of_policing#transcript

      Professor Alex Vitale argues the answer to police violence is not “reform.” It’s defunding. The author of “The End of Policing” says the movement to defund the police is part of “a long story about the use of police and prisons to manage problems of inequality and exploitation.” He asks, “Why are we using police to paper over problems of economic exploitation?” He also discusses the role of police unions. “They become, in many cities, the locus, the institutional hub, for a whole set of right-wing ’thin blue line’ politics that believe that policing is not only effective but it’s the most desirable way to solve our problems. And embedded in this is a deep racism that says that certain populations can only be managed through constant threats of coercion.”

    • Minneapolis City Council Vows to Dismantle Police Dept. After Mass Protests & Grassroots Organizing | Democracy Now!
      https://www.democracynow.org/2020/6/8/minneapolis_police_abolition#transcript

      The City Council of Minneapolis announced Saturday it would disband and abolish the police department responsible for the killing of African American man George Floyd, following nearly two weeks of mass protest and growing calls to defund the police.

      In a statement, nine of the city’s 12 councilmembers said, quote, “Decades of police reform efforts have proved that the Minneapolis Police Department cannot be reformed, and will never be accountable for its action. … We recognize that we don’t have all the answers about what a police-free future looks like, but our community does,” they said.

      The historic announcement comes after years of organizing on the ground by groups like Reclaim the Block, Black Visions Collective and MPD150.

  • Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Won’t Fact-Check Trump | Bitch Media
    https://www.bitchmedia.org/article/mark-zuckerberg-says-facebook-wont-fact-check-trump-and-politicians
    https://www.bitchmedia.org/sites/default/files/styles/facebook_ratio/public/open-graph/Mark+Zuckerberg%20social.jpg?itok=V9Rjp5zN

    On May 26, Twitter finally fact-checked a Trump tweet about mail-in voting leading to rampant voter fraud. Because Twitter called his tweets “potentially misleading,” Trump responded by signing an executive order, saying that it will “defend free speech from one of the gravest dangers it has faced in American history.” Given that Facebook, along with Twitter, is a leading social media platform (and that the former has faced scrutiny for allowing disinformation to spread unchecked), The Daily Briefing host Dana Perino asked Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg about Twitter’s decision to fact-check Trump’s tweets. “I believe strongly that Facebook shouldn’t be the arbiter of truth of everything people say online,” Zuckerberg said. “These platform companies shouldn’t be in the position of doing that. We’ve been pretty clear in our policy that we think it wouldn’t be right for us to do fact checks for politicians in that people should be able to hear what politicians say—there’s plenty of scrutiny about politicians’ speech already, that’s what the media does.” He continued, saying that Facebook is “really strong in favor of giving people a voice and free expression.” Apparently, free expression includes allowing politicians to spread lies with impunity.

    At this point, it’s impossible to argue that social media is a neutral force. Millions of people use these platforms to connect, to learn about politics and other social issues, and to network with people who have similar interests, which means that millions of people—politicians included—are bringing their values to a public forum.

    #Facebook #post-vérité #censure

  • Democrats Are Using Classic Rape Culture Tactics to Protect Joe Biden | Wagatwe Wanjuki
    https://www.bitchmedia.org/article/joe-biden-rape-culture-on-the-left

    When the New York Times and the New Yorker published devastating reports in October 2017 that exposed powerful producer Harvey Weinstein’s history of sexual violence, I was excited to see such widespread attention on and participation in speaking out against sexual assault. But, as an antirape activist who’s been organizing and educating against rape culture for more than a decade, the rise of the #MeToo hashtag also made me nervous. When an issue becomes more mainstream, the heightened visibility can be both a blessing and a curse. Yes, more people are paying attention, but it also becomes easier for people with less hands-on antirape advocacy experience to take up the most space. That fear was quickly realized on October 15, 2017, when Alyssa Milano was credited with starting the (...)

  • Off Brand : The Limits of Celebrity Feminism | Bitch Media
    https://www.bitchmedia.org/article/celebrity-feminism-hearken

    Kim Kardashian emphasized that despite everything she says about empowerment and choice and making her own money, feminism is Not Her Thing. “I don’t like labels,” she said during a discussion led by BlogHer cofounder Elisa Camahort. “I just think I do what makes me happy and I want women to be confident and I’m so supportive of women.”

    So many of the sentiments that we understand as “feminist” these days are ones that might be described as “feminist-but”: Feminist but funny, feminist but sexy, feminist but fun, feminist but not, you know, man-hating. The TV shows and cute t-shirts and celebrity tweets and selfies tagged with #feminism are pushing back against years of stereotypes and baggage and ugly epithets in part by depoliticizing feminism itself. Kardashian “want[s] women to be confident,” but her brand depends on such women understanding confidence as something you get from being on display for others, rather than, say, questioning why performative sexual confidence is prized above everything else. Schumer, meanwhile, taps effortlessly into the rich vein of collective female frustration that results from such a narrow definition of confidence, but insists that she’s speaking only for herself. Both are cautionary tales about the limits of marketplace and celebrity feminism, and both are reminders that there’s little room for collective change within a personal brand.

    #féminisme_de_droite #féminisme_libéral #féminisme_du_choix #people
    Et le roi est nu, on se rend compte que c’est pas vraiment du féminisme

  • The Best and Worst Celebrity Responses to COVID-19 | Bitch Media
    https://www.bitchmedia.org/article/the-best-and-worst-celebrity-responses-to-coronavirus-pandemic
    https://www.bitchmedia.org/sites/default/files/styles/facebook_ratio/public/open-graph/Gwyneth+Paltrow%20%28%40gwynethpaltrow%29%20social%20image.jpg?itok=5UJY

    There’s something about a multimillionaire—in this case, Madonna—talking in a bathtub filled with roses about a global pandemic being a “great equalizer” that makes us wonder if we ever need celebrities on the frontlines of awareness campaigns. Madonna, who has an estimated net worth of $850 million, could’ve volunteered to cover some people’s rent or mortgages as the United States shuts down to prepare for the continuing spread of coronavirus, but instead, she offered up some saccharine nonsense that helped no one. Luckily, some celebrities are making more sense: Britney Spears appeared to call for a strike and for wealth redistribution in a regrammed Instagram post of a Mimi Zhu quote that Spears captioned with, “Communion goes beyond walls” along with three rose emojis (the official emoji of socialists). Meanwhile, Hillary Duff called out people who aren’t taking Coronavirus seriously, and JoJo wrote an entire song about it.

    Ultimately, as Dark Sky Lady and Clarkisha Kent wrote in a recent piece for Wear Your Voice, “Celebrities are also proving lately that they don’t know what the fuck to do when the world is not revolving around them and their vapid asses for once.” Here are some of the best and worst celebrity responses to COVID-19 to mull over as we all ponder the actual usefulness and cultural relevance of celebrities.

    • Dans Bitch Magazine j’avais lu pas mal d’article sur le genre des gamers, cette impression d’un milieu masculin où en fait il y a beaucoup de femmes, cachées sous pseudo masculin ou qui la jouent discrète à cause de la violence de genre des échanges...

      Carolyn Petit Is at the Forefront of Feminist Video Game Criticism | Bitch Media
      https://www.bitchmedia.org/article/carolyn-petit-bitch-50-interview
      https://www.bitchmedia.org/sites/default/files/styles/facebook_ratio/public/open-graph/Carolyn+Petit%20in%20Queer%20Tropes%20vs.%20Video%20Games%20social%20ima

      A decade ago, video-game criticism was bleak. The gaming industry seemed to be the virtual final frontier where straight, white, cis dudes could roam free without ever having to consider the implications of the content they consumed. While every other form of media, from literature to film to music, was ripe for feminist analysis, the men treated as the intended audience of most video games had no interest in critically thinking about topics like queer representation, violence against women, or the male gaze.

      Enter Feminist Frequency’s Tropes vs. Women in Video Games. In 2013, the Kickstarter-funded YouTube series analyzing the representation of women in games became an immediate success; the crowdfunding campaign raised more than $150,000 and garnered millions of views. Unfortunately, Tropes vs. Women received its fair share of backlash. To say that Gamergate—an online harassment campaign targeting women in the gaming industry—was an utter shit show would be a massive understatement. As it turned out, hordes of angry, faceless men were supremely invested in shielding their beloved games from social critique.

      Thankfully, video-game criticism and the content of the games themselves has come a long way.

      #jeux_vidéo #masculinité

  • 17 Nonfiction Books Feminists Should Read in 2020 | Bitch Media
    https://www.bitchmedia.org/article/bitchreads/most-anticipated-nonfiction-books-2020
    https://www.bitchmedia.org/sites/default/files/styles/facebook_ratio/public/open-graph/Screen+Shot%202020-01-09%20at%204.26.42%20PM.png?itok=Oq42k7yl

    Boys & Sex: Young Men on Hookups, Love, Porn, Consent, and Navigating the New Masculinity

    Quelques bonnes lectures. Celle qui me fait le plus envie :

    Boys & Sex - Peggy Orenstein - E-book
    https://www.harpercollins.com/9780062666994/boys-and-sex

    The author of the groundbreaking New York Times bestsellers Girls & Sex and Cinderella Ate My Daughter now turns her focus to the sexual lives of young men, once again offering “both an examination of sexual culture and a guide on how to improve it” (Washington Post).

    #livres_féministes

  • Performative Environmentalism Won’t Reverse Climate Change | Bitch Media
    https://www.bitchmedia.org/article/personal-will-not-save-you-environmentalism

    The stakes of performative environmentalism—fixating on tiny, ultimately meaningless consumer products as the root of all evil—are escalating, and will become even more heated this decade. Individual-focused “save the earth” campaigns focus on the micro, individual actions, not the macro, global ones: Polluting components in inhalers, say, instead of the industrial pollution in communities of color that causes sky-high asthma rates or the wildfires across the West that leave thousands struggling for breath every summer and fall. In the process, they can have a penalizing effect, punching down at people who don’t have as much control over how they live and their consumer choices, and alienating them from discussions about environmental activism.

    Living a “green lifestyle” is treated as an exemplary act, a critical trait to possess in a culture that values those who exhibit virtue. In the United States, a colonized nation with deep-seated Puritan ideals, virtue is woven deep into the national culture, particularly when it necessitates privation and sacrifice. Performance of that virtue is a vital element: How else will people know you’re better than them? There’s a peculiar reluctance in some circles to abandon environmental action that focuses on the personal, sometimes to the exclusion of taking on big institutions: British climate-action group Extinction Rebellion, for instance, is happy to mount its flashy blockades of public transit, but stubbornly resistant to examining the roles of colonialism and racism in the climate crisis.

    #écologie_des_riches #consumérisme_vert #capitalisme_vert

  • Where the 2020 Presidential Candidate Stand on Regulating Pesticides | Amy Roost
    https://www.bitchmedia.org/article/presidential-candidates-stance-pesticides

    The regulation of pesticides, herbicides, and other chemical toxins has not traditionally been considered a feminist issue or worthy of inclusion on high-profile political campaigns. That could soon change though, given the inevitable public-health consequences of the Trump Administration’s environmental rollbacks over the past three years. Source: Bitch Media

  • La réunion de mes deux passions :

    Erica Feldmann’s “HausMagick” Will Help You Cast a Spell on Your Home | Bitch Media
    https://www.bitchmedia.org/article/hausmagick-erica-feldmann-hauswitch

    What’s the importance of accessibility in interior design, and why does it matter to you that the tips you give in the book are affordable?

    This is a huge thing for me. The business of interiors is very aspirational, and everything is based on creating a “look,” no matter how unattainable it is to everyday people. For some people that [might] be fun, but for me it created a lot of shame. When I was younger, I didn’t understand that meritocracy is a myth and that most people featured in design magazines are enormously wealthy and/or privileged. I only understood that I didn’t have access to that lifestyle, and on some level that made me feel like a failure.

    I think a lot of people have that reaction. It’s similar to how fashion magazines make people feel about their bodies: We know how damaging that dynamic is, especially for women and girls, and it’s a very similar problem here. It’s important to me that I make everything HausWitch does as accessible as possible to break that pattern. Poor people deserve comfort too! Plus, a lot of times my favorite projects are the ones that cost the least. My creativity is inspired by a lack of resources in a lot of ways. Not having access to everything you need forces you to think differently, and [to] dig deeper into what you need versus what society tells you to want.

    #habitat #sorcellerie #magie #logement

  • How Endometriosis Became Ground Zero for Healthcare Access | Evette Dionne
    https://www.bitchmedia.org/article/bitch-interview/abby-norman-endometriosis-chronic-illness

    In 2010, Abby Norman was attending Sarah Lawrence College on a scholarship after escaping her hometown and a household where she rarely felt loved and nurtured. She was pursuing a career in dance and didn’t have to foot the bill for her college education because she’d earned an academic scholarship. All of that changed during a routine shower. While Norman was showering, an excruciating, but unexplainable, pain took hold of her body. She found that she could barely pull herself out of the shower and even laying in her bed in the fetal position didn’t ease the persistent pain. In fact, since that fateful shower, the pain has never really left. Source: itch (...)

  • No Girls Allowed: The Lasting Rules of GamerGate and Toxic Misogyny | Sam Riedel
    https://www.bitchmedia.org/article/no-girls-allowed-the-lasting-rules-of-gamergate-and-toxic-misogyny

    Most gamers knew the truth: there was a cancer at the center of their culture, a malignant growth of bitterness without direction and pain without cause. Many tried to mask or downplay its presence, even deny it outright, but the truth remained. Since the advent of “gaming” as we know it today—console video games, tabletop board-and-role-playing games, virtual reality, and so on—the surrounding subculture had been dominated by men who became its jealous gatekeepers; first to guard against childhood tormentors, bullies, and the like and, over time, simply to keep out those who were different. Most threatening of all were women, whose presence grew over time into a monolith of judgment and derision; they had no place in “gamer culture.” Until they did. Source: Bitch (...)