Hungary ignoring court orders to improve border camp conditions : watchdog – POLITICO

/hungary-refugee-camp-conditions-food-sh

  • Hungary will cease providing Kiskunhalas asylum-seekers with food by end of April

    Refugees at the #Kiskunhalas camp in southern Hungary have been notified that soon they will no longer receive any food or stipends for purchasing food.


    http://budapestbeacon.com/featured-articles/hungary-will-cease-providing-kiskunhalas-asylum-seekers-food-end-april/46180
    #camps_de_réfugiés #Hongrie #asile #migrations #réfugiés #nourriture #it_has_begun

    • Hungary denying food to asylum seekers, say human rights groups

      Some adults whose claims were rejected went without food for up to five days, claim activists.

      Hungarian authorities are systematically denying food to failed asylum seekers detained in the country’s border transit zones, say rights activists.

      The policy, whereby adults whose asylum claims have been rejected are denied food, was described as “an unprecedented human rights violation in 21st-century Europe” by the Hungarian Helsinki Committee, a human rights organisation working to offer legal support to those in the transit zones.

      It may amount to “inhuman treatment and even to torture” under international human rights law, said the organisation in a statement released this week. It documented eight cases involving 13 people this year when the Hungarian authorities had begun providing food to people only after the European court of human rights had intervened. Some went without food for up to five days before the rulings were granted.

      Hungary’s nationalist prime minister, Viktor Orbán, has built his political programme around being tough on migration and demonising refugees and migrants. In 2015, he ordered a fence built along the country’s southern border with Serbia and regularly rails against the danger of migration in his speeches. A tax has been imposed on NGOs who work on migration-related issues.

      The Hungarian authorities only accept asylum applications from a small quota of people allowed into its border transit zones, and a July ruling last year made it even harder to satisfy the requirements, noting that anyone who had arrived in Hungary from a safe country was automatically ineligible. Most people arrive from Serbia, which is considered safe.

      Orbán’s spokesman, Zoltán Kovács, dismissed criticism of the policy of withholding food, saying the authorities provided “everything for people who have a legal right to stay in the transit zone”, but added that food would not be provided for those who had been tested and found to be ineligible. “It’s a businesslike approach. When business is finished, there’s nothing we can do,” he said.

      Kovács said the government still provided asylum or the right to stay for people who come with “not only a story but real proof” their lives were in danger. Last year, Hungarian authorities accepted 349 applications made through the transit zone, mainly from Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria, though it is not clear how many of these came before the July ruling on safe countries.

      Kovács said when people’s asylum claims were rejected they were free to leave the transit zone and return to Serbia. “There is no free meal for anyone,” he said in an interview last year.

      However, Hungary and Serbia have no readmission agreement, meaning those in the transit zone cannot be legally deported.

      “The idea is that if you make people hungry enough, you’ll force them to go back to Serbia,” said Márta Pardavi, the co-chair of the Hungarian Helsinki Committee. “This would mean they enter Serbia in a way that is completely unauthorised by Serbian authorities.”

      Orbán’s Fidesz party is campaigning on an anti-migration platform for European parliament elections next month. In this climate, all discussions of migration-related issues retain a political dimension, with organisations such as the Hungarian Helsinki Committee denounced in government-linked media.

      The independent Hungarian MP Bernadett Szél criticised the detention of children in the border transit zones after visiting one of the holding centres earlier this month. “They are locked between fences topped with barbed wire. And there is a lot of dust everywhere … I think the government is not allowing us to take photos inside because people would feel pity for these kids if they saw them.”

      https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/apr/26/hungary-denying-food-to-asylum-seekers-say-human-rights-groups

    • Hungary continues to starve detainees in the transit zones

      23 April 2019

      Hungary started to deprive of food some third-country nationals detained in the transit zones started in August 2018. After 5 such cases successfully challenged by the HHC with obtaining interim measures from the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR), the Hungarian Immigration and Asylum Office (IAO) promised in August 2018 to discontinue this practice and provide food to all asylum-seekers in the transit zone. While welcoming the announcement to end starvation, the HHC also warned already in August 2018 that unless the legal framework is amended to clearly stipulate the requirement to provide food to all those detained in the transit zone, similar cases will occur in the future. Less than 6 months later, on 8 February 2019, an Iraqi family of five was informed that the parents would not be given food while detained in the transit zone. The IAO actually refused to provide the parents with food for 5 days, until the HHC secured an interim measure from the ECtHR that ordered the Hungarian authorities to immediately stop this practice.

      Between February 2019 and the 23rd of April 2019, the HHC had to request interim measures on a case-by-case basis in a total of 8 cases, pertaining to 13 starved people in the transit zones, bringing the total number of starvation cases since August 2018 to 13, and that of the affected individuals to 21.

      You can read our full information note, including the summaries of cases here: https://www.helsinki.hu/wp-content/uploads/Starvation-2019.pdf

      https://www.helsinki.hu/en/hungary-continues-to-starve-detainees-in-the-transit-zones
      #zones_de_transit

    • La Commission saisit la Cour d’un recours contre la Hongrie pour incrimination des activités de soutien aux demandeurs d’asile et ouvre une nouvelle procédure d’infraction pour refus de nourriture dans les zones de transit

      La Commission européenne a décidé aujourd’hui de saisir la Cour de justice de l’UE d’un recours contre la Hongrie portant sur sa législation qui incrimine les activités de soutien aux demandes d’asile et qui restreint davantage encore le droit de demander l’asile. La Commission a également décidé d’adresser une lettre de mise en demeure à la Hongrie concernant le refus de nourriture aux personnes en attente d’un retour qui sont placées en rétention dans les zones de transit hongroises à la frontière avec la Serbie. Une autre décision prise aujourd’hui concerne la saisine de la Cour de justice de l’UE d’un recours contre la Hongrie au motif que cet État membre exclut de l’exercice de la profession de vétérinaire les ressortissants de pays tiers ayant le statut de résident de longue durée.

      Saisine de la Cour pour incrimination des activités de soutien aux demandes d’asile et de séjour

      En juillet 2018, la Commission a adressé une lettre de mise en demeure à la Hongrie concernant la législation « Stop Soros » qui érige en infractions pénales les activités visant à soutenir les demandes d’asile et de séjour et restreint davantage encore le droit de demander l’asile. Ayant reçu une réponse insatisfaisante, la Commission y a donné suite par un avis motivé en janvier 2019. Après avoir analysé la réponse des autorités hongroises, la Commission a, en effet, considéré que la plupart des préoccupations exprimées n’avaient toujours pas été prises en compte et a décidé de saisir la Cour de justice de l’UE d’un recours contre la Hongrie. Plus particulièrement, la Commission estime que la législation hongroise est contraire au droit de l’Union en ce qui concerne les points suivants :

      Érection en infraction pénale du soutien aux demandeurs d’asile : en incriminant le soutien aux demandes d’asile, la législation hongroise restreint le droit des demandeurs d’asile de communiquer avec les organisations nationales, internationales et non gouvernementales concernées et d’être assistés par elles, ce qui enfreint la directive sur les procédures d’asile et la directive sur les conditions d’accueil.
      Limitation illégale du droit d’asile et introduction de nouveaux motifs d’irrecevabilité des demandes d’asile : la nouvelle législation et la modification constitutionnelle concernant l’asile ont instauré de nouveaux motifs pour lesquels une demande d’asile peut être déclarée irrecevable, restreignant ainsi le droit d’asile aux seules personnes qui arrivent en Hongrie en provenance directe d’un lieu où leur vie ou leur liberté sont menacées. Ces motifs d’irrecevabilité supplémentaires applicables aux demandes d’asile excluent les personnes entrées en Hongrie en provenance d’un pays où elles n’étaient certes pas persécutées mais où les conditions ne sont pas réunies pour que ce pays puisse être considéré comme un « pays tiers sûr ». Par conséquent, ces motifs d’irrecevabilité limitent le droit d’asile d’une manière qui n’est pas compatible avec le droit de l’Union ou le droit international. À ce titre, la réglementation nationale enfreint la directive sur les procédures d’asile, la directive sur les conditions que doivent remplir les demandeurs d’asile et la charte des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne.

      Lettre de mise en demeure concernant la situation des personnes soumises à un retour placées en rétention dans les zones de transit hongroises

      La Commission européenne a décidé aujourd’hui d’adresser une lettre de mise en demeure à la Hongrie portant sur la situation des personnes retenues dans les zones de transit hongroises à la frontière avec la Serbie, dont les demandes de protection internationale ont été rejetées et qui sont contraintes de retourner dans un pays tiers.

      De l’avis de la Commission, leur séjour obligatoire dans les zones de transit hongroises relève de la rétention en vertu de la directive européenne sur le retour. La Commission constate que les conditions de rétention dans les zones de transit hongroises, en particulier le refus de nourriture, ne sont pas conformes aux conditions matérielles prescrites par la directive « retour » et par la charte des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne.

      Compte tenu de l’urgence de la situation, le délai imparti à la Hongrie pour répondre aux préoccupations de la Commission est fixé à 1 mois, après quoi la Commission pourrait décider de lui adresser un avis motivé.

      La Cour européenne des droits de l’homme a déjà accordé le bénéfice de mesures provisoires dans plusieurs cas, obligeant la Hongrie à procurer de la nourriture aux personnes placées en rétention dans les zones de transit. En juillet 2018, la Commission a saisi la Cour de justice d’un recours dirigé contre la Hongrie dans une affaire relative à la rétention de demandeurs d’asile dans les zones de transit hongroises. Cette affaire est actuellement pendante devant la Cour.

      Saisine de la Cour de justice pour non-respect de la législation de l’Union relative aux résidents de longue durée

      La Commission européenne a décidé aujourd’hui de saisir la Cour de justice de l’UE d’un recours contre la Hongrie au motif que cet État membre exclut de l’exercice de la profession de vétérinaire les ressortissants de pays tiers ayant le statut de résident de longue durée, transposant ainsi erronément certaines dispositions de la directive relative aux résidents de longue durée (directive 2003/109/CE du Conseil). Cette directive exige que les ressortissants de pays tiers qui résident légalement dans un État membre de l’UE depuis au moins cinq ans bénéficient d’un traitement égal à celui des ressortissants nationaux dans certains domaines, y compris l’accès aux activités salariées et indépendantes. La Commission a adressé une lettre de mise en demeure à la Hongrie en juillet 2018 et y a donné suite par l’envoi d’un avis motivé en janvier 2019.

      http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-19-4260_fr.htm