Libya return demand triggers reintegration headaches

/140967

    • v. aussi :

      Some EU states will offer in-kind support, used to set up a business, training or other similar activities. Others tailor their schemes for different countries of origin.

      Some others offer cash handouts, but even those differ vastly.

      Sweden, according to a 2015 European Commission report, is the most generous when it comes to cash offered to people under its voluntary return programme.

      It noted that in 2014, the maximum amount of the in-cash allowance at the point of departure/after arrival varied from €40 in the Czech Republic and €50 in Portugal to €3,750 in Norway for a minor and €3,300 in Sweden for an adult.

      Anti-migrant Hungary gave more (€500) than Italy (€400), the Netherlands (€300) and Belgium (€250).

      However, such comparisons on cash assistance does not reveal the full scope of help given that some of the countries also provide in-kind reintegration support.

      https://euobserver.com/migration/140967

  • Je pensais avoir archivé sur seenthis un article (au moins) qui montrait qu’une partie des personnes rapatriées (#retours_volontaires), par l’#OIM (#IOM) notamment, du #Niger et de #Libye vers leurs pays d’origine reprenaient la route du Nord aussitôt...
    Mais je ne retrouve plus cet article... est-ce que quelque seenthisien se rappelle de cela ? ça serait super !
    #renvois #expulsions #migrations #réfugiés #retour_volontaire

    J’étais presque sûre d’avoir utilisé le tag #migrerrance, mais apparemment pas...

    • #merci @02myseenthis01, en effet il s’agit d’articles qui traitent du retour volontaire, mais non pas de ce que je cherche (à moins que je n’ai pas loupé quelque chose), soit de personnes qui, une fois rapatriées via le programme de retour volontaires, décident de reprendre la route de la migration (comme c’est le cas des Afghans, beaucoup plus documenté, notamment par Liza Schuster : https://www.city.ac.uk/people/academics/liza-schuster)

    • Libya return demand triggers reintegration headaches

      “This means that the strain on the assistance to integration of the country of origin has been particularly high because of the success, paradoxically of the return operation,” said Eugenio Ambrosi, IOM’s Europe director, on Monday (12 February).

      “We had to try, and we are still trying, to scale up the reintegration assistance,” he said.

      Since November, It has stepped up operations, along with the African Union, and helped 8,581 up until earlier this month. Altogether some 13,500 were helped given that some were also assisted by African Union states. Most ended up in Nigeria, followed by Mali and Guinea.

      People are returned to their home countries in four ways. Three are voluntary and one is forced. The mixed bag is causing headaches for people who end up in the same community but with entirely different integration approaches.

      “The level of assistance and the type of reintegration assistance that these different programmes offer is not the same,” noted Ambrosi.

      https://euobserver.com/migration/140967
      #réintégration

      Et une partie de cet article est consacrée à l’#aide_au_retour par les pays européens :

      Some EU states will offer in-kind support, used to set up a business, training or other similar activities. Others tailor their schemes for different countries of origin.

      Some others offer cash handouts, but even those differ vastly.

      Sweden, according to a 2015 European Commission report, is the most generous when it comes to cash offered to people under its voluntary return programme.

      It noted that in 2014, the maximum amount of the in-cash allowance at the point of departure/after arrival varied from €40 in the Czech Republic and €50 in Portugal to €3,750 in Norway for a minor and €3,300 in Sweden for an adult.

      Anti-migrant Hungary gave more (€500) than Italy (€400), the Netherlands (€300) and Belgium (€250).

      However, such comparisons on cash assistance does not reveal the full scope of help given that some of the countries also provide in-kind reintegration support.

    • For Refugees Detained in Libya, Waiting is Not an Option

      Niger generously agreed to host these refugees temporarily while European countries process their asylum cases far from the violence and chaos of Libya and proceed to their resettlement. In theory it should mean a few weeks in Niger until they are safely transferred to countries such as France, Germany or Sweden, which would open additional spaces for other refugees trapped in Libya.

      But the resettlement process has been much slower than anticipated, leaving Helen and hundreds of others in limbo and hundreds or even thousands more still in detention in Libya. Several European governments have pledged to resettle 2,483 refugees from Niger, but since the program started last November, only 25 refugees have actually been resettled – all to France.

      As a result, UNHCR announced last week that Niger authorities have requested that the agency halt evacuations until more refugees depart from the capital, Niamey. For refugees in Libya, this means their lifeline to safety has been suspended.

      Many of the refugees I met in Niger found themselves in detention after attempting the sea journey to Europe. Once intercepted by the Libyan coast guard, they were returned to Libya and placed in detention centers run by Libya’s U.N.-backed Government of National Accord (GNA). The E.U. has prioritized capacity building for the Libyan coast guard in order to increase the rate of interceptions. But it is an established fact that, after being intercepted, the next stop for these refugees as well as migrants is detention without any legal process and in centers where human rights abuses are rife.

      https://www.newsdeeply.com/refugees/community/2018/03/12/for-refugees-detained-in-libya-waiting-is-not-an-option

      #limbe #attente

      #réinstallation (qui évidemment ne semble pas vraiment marcher, comme pour les #relocalisations en Europe depuis les #hotspots...) :

      Several European governments have pledged to resettle 2,483 refugees from Niger, but since the program started last November, only 25 refugees have actually been resettled – all to France.

    • “Death Would Have Been Better” : Europe Continues to Fail Refugees and Migrants in Libya

      Today, European policies designed to keep asylum seekers, refugees, and migrants from crossing the Mediterranean Sea to Italy are trapping thousands of men, women and children in appalling conditions in Libya. This Refugees International report describes the harrowing experiences of people detained in Libya’s notoriously abusive immigration detention system where they are exposed to appalling conditions and grave human rights violations, including arbitrary detention and physical and sexual abuse.

      https://www.refugeesinternational.org/reports/libyaevacuations2018

      #rapport

      Lien vers le rapport :

      The report is based on February 2018 interviews conducted with asylum seekers and refugees who had been evacuated by UNHCR from detention centers in Libya to Niamey, Niger, where these men, women, and children await resettlement to a third country. The report shows that as the EU mobilizes considerable resources and efforts to stop the migration route through Libya, asylum seekers, refugees and migrants continue to face horrendous abuses in Libya – and for those who attempt it, an even deadlier sea crossing to Italy. RI is particularly concerned that the EU continues to support the Libyan coast guard to intercept boats carrying asylum seekers, refugees and migrants and bring them back to Libyan soil, even though they are then transferred to detention centers.

      https://static1.squarespace.com/static/506c8ea1e4b01d9450dd53f5/t/5ad3ceae03ce641bc8ac6eb5/1523830448784/2018+Libya+Report+PDF.pdf
      #évacuation #retour_volontaire #renvois #Niger #Niamey

    • #Return_migration – a regional perspective

      The current views on migration recognize that it not necessarily a linear activity with a migrant moving for a singular reason from one location to a new and permanent destination. Within the study of mixed migration, it is understood that patterns of movements are constantly shifting in response to a host of factors which reflect changes in individual and shared experiences of migrants. This can include the individual circumstance of the migrant, the environment of host country or community, better opportunities in another location, reunification, etc.[1] Migrants returning to their home country or where they started their migration journey – known as return migration—is an integral component of migration.

      Return migration is defined by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) as the act or process of going back to the point of departure[2]. It varies from spontaneous, voluntary, voluntary assisted and deportation/forced return. This can also include cyclical/seasonal return, return from short or long term migration, and repatriation. Such can be voluntary where the migrant spontaneously returns or assisted where they benefit from administrative, logistical, financial and reintegration support. Voluntary return includes workers returning home at the end of their labour arrangements, students upon completion of their studies, refugees and asylum seekers undertaking voluntary repatriation either spontaneously or with humanitarian assistance and migrants returning to their areas of origin after residency abroad. [3] Return migration can also be forced where migrants are compelled by an administrative or judicial act to return to their country of origin. Forced returns include the deportation of failed asylum seekers and people who have violated migration laws in the host country.

      Where supported by appropriate policies and implementation and a rights-based approach, return migration can beneficial to the migrant, the country of origin and the host country. Migrants who successfully return to their country of origin stand to benefit from reunification with family, state protection and the possibility of better career opportunities owing to advanced skills acquired abroad. For the country of origin, the transfer of skills acquired by migrants abroad, reverse ‘brain drain’, and transactional linkages (i.e. business partnerships) can bring about positive change. The host country benefits from such returns by enhancing strengthened ties and partnerships with through return migrants. However, it is critical to note that return migration should not be viewed as a ‘solution’ to migration or a pretext to arbitrarily send migrants back to their home country. Return migration should be studied as a way to provide positive and safe options for people on the move.
      Return migration in East Africa

      The number of people engaging in return migration globally and in the Horn of Africa and Yemen sub-region has steadily increased in recent years. In 2016, IOM facilitated voluntary return of 98,403 persons worldwide through its assisted voluntary return and re-integration programs versus 69,540 assisted in 2015. Between December 2014 and December 2017, 76,589 refugees and asylum seekers were assisted by humanitarian organisations to return to Somalia from Kenya.

      In contexts such as Somalia, where conflict, insecurity and climate change are common drivers for movement (in addition to other push and pull factors), successful return and integration of refugees and asylum seekers from neighbouring countries is likely to be frustrated by the failure to adequately address such drivers before undertaking returns. In a report titled ‘Not Time To Go Home: Unsustainable returns of refugees to Somalia’,Amnesty International highlights ongoing conflict and insecurity in Somalia even as the governments of Kenya and Somali and humanitarian agencies continue to support return programs. The United Nations has cautioned that South and Central parts of Somalia are not ready for large scale returns in the current situation with over 2 million internally displaced persons (IDPs) in the country and at least half of the population in need of humanitarian assistance; painting a picture of returns to a country where safety, security and dignity of returnees cannot be guaranteed.

      In March 2017, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia ordered all undocumented migrants to regularize their status in the Kingdom giving them a 90-day amnesty after which they would face sanctions including deportations. IOM estimates that 150,000 Ethiopians returned to Ethiopia from Saudi Arabia between March 2017 and April 2018. Since the end of the amnesty period in November 2017, the number of returns to Ethiopia increased drastically with approximately 2,800 migrants being deported to Ethiopia each week. Saudi Arabia also returned 9,563 Yemeni migrants who included migrants who were no longer able to meet residency requirements. Saudi Arabia also forcibly returned 21,405 Somali migrants between June and December 2017.

      Migrant deportations from Saudi Arabia are often conducted in conditions that violate human rights with migrants from Yemen, Somalia and Ethiopia reporting violations. An RMMS report titled ‘The Letter of the Law: Regular and irregular migration in Saudi Arabia in a context of rapid change’ details violations which include unlawful detention prior to deportation, physical assault and torture, denial of food and confiscation of personal property. There were reports of arrest and detention upon arrival of Ethiopian migrants who had been deported from Saudi Arabia in 2013 during which the migrants were reportedly tortured by Ethiopian security forces.

      Further to this, the sustainability of such returns has also been questioned with reports of returnees settling in IDP camps instead of going back to their areas of origin. Such returnees are vulnerable to (further) irregular migration given the inability to integrate. Somali refugee returnees from Kenya face issues upon return to a volatile situation in Somalia, often settling in IDP camps in Somalia. In an RMMS research paper ‘Blinded by Hope: Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices of Ethiopian Migrants’, community members in parts of Ethiopia expressed concerns that a large number of returnees from Saudi Arabia would migrate soon after their return.

      In November 2017, following media reports of African migrants in Libya being subjected to human rights abuses including slavery, governments, humanitarian agencies and regional economic communities embarked on repatriating vulnerable migrants from Libya. African Union committed to facilitating the repatriation of 20,000 nationals of its member states within a period of six weeks. African Union, its member states and humanitarian agencies facilitated the return of 17,000 migrants in 2017 and a further 14,000 between January and March 2018.[4]
      What next?

      Return migration can play an important role for migrants, their communities, and their countries, yet there is a lack of research and data on this phenomenon. For successful return migration, the drivers to migration should first be examined, including in the case of forced displacement or irregular migration. Additionally, legal pathways for safe, orderly and regular migration should be expanded for all countries to reduce further unsafe migration. Objective 21 of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (Draft Rev 1) calls upon member states to ‘cooperate in facilitating dignified and sustainable return, readmission and reintegration’.

      In addition, a legal and policy framework facilitating safe and sustainable returns should be implemented by host countries and countries of origin. This could build on bilateral or regional agreements on readmissions, creation of reception and integration agencies for large scale returns, the recognition and assurance of migrant legal status, provision of identification documents where needed, amending national laws to allow for dual citizenship, reviewing taxes imposed on the diaspora, recognition of academic and vocational skills acquired abroad, support to vulnerable returnees, financial assistance where needed, incentives to returnee entrepreneurs, programs on attracting highly skilled returnees. Any frameworks should recognize that people have the right to move, and should have their human rights and dignity upheld at all stages of the migration journey.

      http://www.mixedmigration.org/articles/return-migration-a-regional-perspective

    • Reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 20.09.2018

      Niamey, le 20 septembre 2018

      D’après des témoignages recueillis près du #centre_de_transit des #mineurs_non_accompagnés du quartier #Bobiel à Niamey (Niger), des rixes ont eu lieu devant le centre, ce mardi 18 septembre.

      A ce jour, le centre compterait 23 mineurs et une dizaine de femmes avec des enfants en bas âge, exceptionnellement hébergés dans ce centre en raison du surpeuplement des structures réservées habituellement aux femmes.

      Les jeunes du centre font régulièrement état de leurs besoins et du non-respect de leurs droits au directeur du centre. Certains y résident en effet depuis plusieurs mois et ils sont informés des services auxquels ils devraient avoir accès grâce à une #charte des centre de l’OIM affichée sur les murs (accès aux soins de santé, repas, vêtements - en particulier pour ceux qui sont expulsés de l’Algérie sans leurs affaires-, activité récréative hebdomadaire, assistance légale, psychologique...). Aussi, en raison de la lourdeur des procédures de « #retours_volontaires », la plupart des jeunes ne connaissent pas la date de leur retour au pays et témoignent d’un #sentiment_d'abandon.

      Ces derniers jours certains jeunes ont refusé de se nourrir pour protester contre les repas qui leur sont servis (qui seraient identiques pour tous les centres et chaque jour).
      Ce mardi, après un vif échange avec le directeur du centre, une délégation de sept jeunes s’est organisée et présentée au siège de l’OIM. Certains d’entre eux ont été reçus par un officier de protection qui, aux vues des requêtes ordinaires des migrants, s’est engagé à répondre rapidement à leurs besoins.
      Le groupe a ensuite rejoint le centre où les agents de sécurité du centre auraient refusé de les laisser entrer. Des échanges de pierres auraient suivi, et les gardiens de la société #Gadnet-Sécurité auraient utilisé leurs matraques et blessé légèrement plusieurs jeunes. Ces derniers ont été conduits à l’hôpital, après toutefois avoir été menottés et amenés au siège de la société de gardiennage.

      L’information a été diffusée hier soir sur une chaine de télévision locale mais je n’ai pas encore connaissance d’articles à ce sujet.

      Alizée

      #MNA #résistance #violence

    • Agadez, des migrants manifestent pour rentrer dans leurs pays

      Des migrants ont manifesté lundi matin au centre de transit de l’Organisation Internationale pour les Migrations (OIM). Ce centre est situé au quartier #Sabon_Gari à Agadez au Niger. Il accueille à ce jour 800 migrants.

      Parmi eux, une centaine de Maliens. Ces migrants dénoncent la durée de leurs séjours, leurs conditions de vie et le manque de communication des responsables de l’OIM.


      https://www.studiotamani.org/index.php/magazines/16726-le-magazine-du-21-aout-2018-agadez-des-migrants-maliens-manifest
      #manifestation #Mali #migrants_maliens

  • Reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop (envoyé par Pascaline Chappart) :

    Deux articles où il est question d’évacuation depuis les centres de détention libyens vers le #Niger, en vue d’une réinstallation en Europe...

    – « Un pont aérien pour les réfugiés », les Echos du 30/8/2017 : "Avramopoulos demande aussi le soutien des Etats-membres pour le plan de l’UNHCR de « procéder temporairement à une #évacuation d’urgence des groupes de migrants les plus vulnérables de la #Libye vers le #Niger et d’autres pays de la région ».

    – Le Monde, 22/9/2017 :Vincent Cochel, responsable de la situation en mer Méditerranée

    "Pour accélérer l’amélioration de la situation, nous oeuvrons à la création de centres ouverts de réception qui pourraient être installés en Libye. Il y a urgence compte tenu des conditions existantes
    dans les centres de détention. Le dossier avance, mais n’est pas bouclé. Ces centres nous permettront également d’évacuer en urgence certains réfugiés vers des pays tiers en vue de leur transfert dans des pays européens ou autres. Cependant, sans clarification rapide des intentions chiffrées des pays de réinstallation, nous ne pourrons pas évacuer ces réfugiés en danger vers des pays de transit susceptibles de les accueillir temporairement."

    –---------------------

    Migrants : « La France doit clarifier au plus tôt la hauteur de son engagement »

    Vincent Cochetel, responsable de la situation en mer Méditerranée pour l’Agence des Nations unies
    chargée des réfugiés, dénonce la faiblesse des réinstallations d’exilés en Europe.
    LE MONDE | 22.09.2017 à 11h19 | Propos recueillis par Maryline Baumard (/journaliste/maryline-baumard/)

    Après les annonces estivales d’Emmanuel Macron, qui propose d’ouvrir une voie légale d’accès en
    France pour éviter la traversée de la Méditerranée, Vincent Cochetel, l’émissaire spécial pour cette
    zone de l’Agence des Nations unies chargée des réfugiés (UNHCR), s’impatiente de l’absence
    d’engagement chiffré.
    Emmanuel Macron a annoncé en juillet que la France irait chercher des Africains sur les
    routes migratoires, avant leur arrivée en Libye, afin d’éviter qu’ils ne risquent la mort en mer.

    Le HCR se réjouit-il de cette initiative ?
    La réinstallation n’est pas la solution au problème migratoire, mais elle fait partie de l’approche
    globale… Ce message, qui consiste à aller chercher des réfugiés dans les pays voisins de zones de
    conflits et à leur offrir un avenir, une protection, a été plus ou moins entendu lorsqu’il s’agit des
    Syriens réfugiés au Liban, en Jordanie ou en Turquie, il ne l’était pas à ce jour pour les réfugiés
    africains.
    Nous nous réjouissons que la France organise des opérations avec notre soutien depuis le Tchad et
    le Niger. La situation est difficile sur ces deux zones, puisque le Tchad accueille un nombre
    important de réfugiés venus du Soudan (Darfour) ou de Centrafrique, et que le Niger reçoit ceux qui
    fuient les zones où sévit Boko Haram, mais aussi sur le Mali, où la situation actuelle nous inquiète.

    Quel rôle jouez-vous au Tchad et au Niger ?
    Nous gérons, avec les autorités, les camps de réfugiés dans les quinze pays qui longent la route
    migratoire des Africains que nous retrouvons ensuite en Libye. Les Etats y accordent une protection
    internationale et nous les assistons, ainsi que nos partenaires ONG, dans les services qu’ils offrent
    à ces populations fragilisées. Dans chaque pays, nous établissons une liste de personnes
    vulnérables qui nécessitent un transfert. Elle est de 83 500 au Tchad et de 10 500 au Niger, les deux
    pays dans lesquels la France projette de venir chercher des Africains pour les réinstaller. En plus,
    nous aimerions que la France et d’autres pays acceptent d’accueillir des réfugiés que nous voulons
    évacuer en urgence de Libye.

    Vous aimeriez que les pays européens en réinstallent 40 000, sélectionnés dans vos listes…
    La France vous a-t-elle fait part de quotas chiffrés d’Africains qu’elle souhaite accueillir ?
    Pas à ce jour. Aussi nous demandons au gouvernement français de clarifier au plus tôt la hauteur de
    son engagement. Le comptage des réinstallations déjà effectuées depuis ces zones est assez
    rapide. En 2015 et en 2016, aucun réfugié africain n’a été transféré depuis le Niger et un seul l’a été,
    vers la France, en 2017. Lorsque l’on s’intéresse au Tchad, 856 ont été réinstallés en 2015, 641
    en 2016 et 115 en 2017. Presque aucun vers l’Europe ; la plupart ont été accueillis au Canada ou
    aux Etats-Unis.

    Comment allez-vous travailler avec la France ?
    Nous commencerons par envoyer à l’Office français de protection des réfugiés et apatrides [Ofpra]
    une liste de dossiers de personnes vulnérables sélectionnées par nos soins comme devant de toute
    urgence rejoindre l’Europe. Leur cas sera d’abord analysé à Paris. L’Ofpra les étudiera du point de
    vue des critères de l’asile, et des spécialistes vérifieront les questions de sécurité et si toutes les
    conditions sont réunies. Ensuite, les équipes françaises de l’Ofpra entendront sur place les
    personnes sélectionnées. Ces entretiens pourront avoir lieu dans nos locaux avec éventuellement
    nos interprètes. Pendant que la France préparera leur accueil, une sensibilisation culturelle sur le
    pays leur sera prodiguée, afin qu’elles disposent d’emblée de quelques éléments de contexte.
    Emmanuel Macron a décidé d’intervenir au Niger et au Tchad, mais rêve dans le fond de
    travailler plus directement avec la Libye. Ce que fait ou tente de faire le HCR…
    Il faut que les Etats européens arrêtent de se bercer d’illusions sur les possibilités actuelles de
    travailler avec ce pays. Notre rôle à nous, agence de l’ONU, y reste malheureusement très limité.
    Même lorsque nous sommes présents dans les prisons officielles, où entre 7 000 et 9 000 migrants
    et demandeurs d’asile sont emprisonnés, sur 390 000 présents dans le pays. D’autres subissent des
    traitements inhumains dans des lieux de détention tenus par des trafiquants. Dans les prisons
    « officielles », nous n’avons pour l’instant l’autorisation de nous adresser qu’aux ressortissants de
    sept nationalités (Irakiens, Palestiniens, Somaliens, Syriens, Ethiopiens s’ils sont Oromos,
    Soudanais du Darfour et Erythréens). Ce qui signifie que nous n’avons jamais parlé à un Soudanais
    du Sud, à un Malien, à un Yéménite, etc.
    L’Organisation internationale pour les migrations a assisté cette année plus de 3 000 personnes
    arrivées en Libye afin de leur permettre de rentrer chez elles. Nous croyons que cette solution est
    très utile pour nombre d’entre elles. Il faut garder à l’esprit que 56 % des migrants en Libye disent
    avoir atteint leur destination finale. Ils espéraient y trouver du travail, ce qui ne s’est pas matérialisé
    pour beaucoup d’entre eux.
    Pour accélérer l’amélioration de la situation, nous oeuvrons à la création de centres ouverts de
    réception qui pourraient être installés en Libye. Il y a urgence compte tenu des conditions existantes
    dans les centres de détention. Le dossier avance, mais n’est pas bouclé. Ces centres nous
    permettront également d’évacuer en urgence certains réfugiés vers des pays tiers en vue de leur
    transfert dans des pays européens ou autres. Cependant, sans clarification rapide des intentions
    chiffrées des pays de réinstallation, nous ne pourrons pas évacuer ces réfugiés en danger vers des
    pays de transit susceptibles de les accueillir temporairement.

    Un pont aérien pour les réfugiés
    Les Echos, 30 août 2017
    https://www.lecho.be/economie-politique/europe-general/Un-pont-aerien-pour-les-refugies/9927215?ckc=1&ts=1507288383

    La Commission demande aux États membres de se montrer solidaires envers les Africains : jusqu’à 37.700 réfugiés pourraient rejoindre l’Europe en avion, en direct de Libye, d’Egypte, du Niger, d’Éthiopie et du Soudan.
    Dans la crise de la migration, l’attention européenne se porte de plus en plus vers le flux de migrants qui tentent la traversée vers l’Italie à partir de l’Afrique du Nord et de la corne de l’Afrique, via la Libye. Dans une lettre envoyée vendredi dernier à tous les ministres des États membres, le commissaire européen à la Migration, Dimitris Avramopoulos, demande un doublement des efforts de réinstallation, ce qui porterait à 40.000 le nombre de réfugiés accueillis en Europe.

    Le commissaire européen à la Migration demande un doublement des efforts de réinstallation.
    Le pont aérien ne devrait pas se limiter aux pays voisins de la Syrie. Avramopoulos demande également que l’on accueille les réfugiés qui ont besoin de la protection internationale le long de la route de l’Europe centrale. Il demande « que l’on concentre la réinstallation au départ de l’Egypte, la Libye, le Niger, l’Éthiopie et le Soudan ».
    C’est au Haut commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés, l’UNHCR, qu’il reviendra de définir le profil des migrants qui pourront être pris en considération pour une réinstallation en Europe. Avramopoulos demande aussi le soutien des Etats-membres pour le plan de l’UNHCR de « procéder temporairement à une évacuation d’urgence des groupes de migrants les plus vulnérables de la Libye vers le Niger et d’autres pays de la région ».
    Les États membres ont jusqu’à la mi-septembre pour annoncer leurs plans. Ils ne sont pas obligés de participer à ce pont aérien. Le cadre européen de réinstallation travaille sur base d’engagements volontaires. La Commission européenne offre cependant une aide financière non négligeable de 10.000 euros par réfugié, pour un budget total de 377 millions d’euros.

    « J’ai toujours défendu le principe de réinstallation. La Belgique est prête à faire sa part. Il y a cependant une condition cruciale. La migration sûre et légale, via la réinstallation ne pourra se faire que si l’on met fin à l’asile après une migration illégale. »
    Theo Francken Secrétaire d’État à la Migration

    Vers une nouvelle controverse sur la solidarité ?
    Au cours de l’été 2015, la Commission avait déjà lancé un cadre commun pour l’UE portant sur l’acheminement direct de 22.000 réfugiés, au départ des pays voisins de la Syrie. Objectif : éviter les traversées dangereuses vers la Grèce.
    Aujourd’hui, 17.000 réfugiés – dont plus de 7.800 Syriens acheminés à partir de la Turquie dans le cadre de la convention entre l’Europe et la Turquie – ont effectivement bénéficié du pont aérien vers l’Europe au départ des pays voisins de la Syrie.
    Les diplomates européens craignent que cette nouvelle proposition ne provoque une nouvelle controverse sur la solidarité dans le cadre de la crise de la migration. La concentration sur l’Afrique et la route centrale via la mer Méditerranée pourrait avoir du mal à passer. Car elle donne l’impression que l’Europe essaie de reproduire l’accord avec la Turquie, mais dans une Libye dangereuse, instable et imprévisible. Une solution que le président du parlement européen, Antonio Tajani, défend ouvertement.
    Par ailleurs, la route entre la Libye et l’Italie est surtout utilisée par des migrants économiques, qui ne sont en principe pas éligibles pour l’asile. C’est pourquoi les efforts européens de ces derniers mois se sont surtout concentrés sur le renvoi de ces migrants dans leur pays, et l’arrêt des flux migratoires.
    Malgré tout, l’Allemagne, la France, l’Italie et l’Espagne ont déjà répondu à l’appel. Lors du mini-sommet qui s’est tenu lundi à Paris, les chefs de gouvernement de ces quatre pays ont promis, non seulement un soutien supplémentaire aux pays du Sahel afin de fermer la route vers la Libye, mais aussi davantage de solidarité lors de la réinstallation en Europe des personnes ayant droit à l’asile.
    Theo Francken, secrétaire d’État à la Migration, soutient Avramopoulos. « J’ai toujours défendu le principe de réinstallation. La Belgique est prête à faire sa part. Il y a cependant une condition cruciale. La migration sûre et légale, via la réinstallation ne pourra se faire que si l’on met fin à l’asile après une migration illégale. »
    Source : L’Echo

    #réinstallation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #centres_de_transit