Latest breaking news available as free video on demand

https://www.euronews.com

  • George Floyd murder: A year on, did the protests it inspired in Europe change anything? | Euronews
    https://www.euronews.com/my-europe/2021/05/24/george-floyd-murder-a-year-on-did-the-protests-it-inspired-in-europe-chang

    In short yes some things did change but too little:
    – “the European Parliament passed a resolution on the George Floyd protests, tackling structural racism and police brutality in Europe”.
    – “there is a “major data gap” across the continent when it comes to recording police violence against minority groups.”
    – “appointment of the EU’s first anti-racism coordinator - Michaela Moua”
    – “The protests put anti-racism and racial justice on the policy agenda, where policymakers could no longer ignore the issue”

    Black Lives Matter protests erupted across Europe after the murder of George Floyd - Copyright Markus Schreiber/AP

    One year ago on Tuesday (May 25th), George Floyd was murdered by a police officer in the city of Minneapolis in the US.

    The city was subsequently rocked by huge racial justice protests, which spread first across the US, and then further afield, with massive demonstrations taking place in many major European cities.

    These protests didn’t just centre on police brutality. As the Black Lives Matter movement gained recognition in Europe, the issues of systemic discrimination and even Europe’s colonial past started to be raised .

    A year on since the murder that sparked a summer of protest, how much has actually changed in Europe?
    Police brutality ‘a problem in Europe too’

    “Where there have been promising changes, we’re still in the implementation stage, but the impact hasn’t yet been felt on the ground,” says Ojeaku Nwabuzo, a senior research officer at the European Network Against Racism.

    She tells Euronews the Black Lives Matter uprising “was the spark of a lot of development and discussion in Europe around police violence,” but concrete changes are yet to be seen.

    Nwabuzo is in the midst of researching police brutality in Europe between the years 2015 and 2020, and points out there is a “major data gap” across the continent when it comes to recording police violence against minority groups.

    “What we do know is there is a problem with police and law enforcement disproportionately brutalising, profiling and surveilling racialised groups,” she says.

    But many of the demands organisations like hers have been working on for years - “such as looking at structural, systemic forms of racism” - were quickly listened to and acted upon following the outbreak of protests, she says, “specifically in the EU”.
    EU ‘action plan’ on racism

    In June last year, the European Parliament passed a resolution on the George Floyd protests, tackling structural racism and police brutality in Europe.

    This was quickly followed up by a Commission anti-racism action plan - drawing some praise from campaigners.

    “This is a direct response to the Black Lives Matter movement,” says Nwabuzo. “The way in which these plans were developed, the language used, acknowledging structural and systemic racism in a way we have not seen the Commission do before.”

    Evin Incir MEP, a co-president of the European Parliament’s Anti-Racism and Diversity Intergroup, tells Euronews the action plan was “an important sign the Commission immediately took this situation seriously”.

    She says the protests put pressure on politicians “even we thought might not vote for such wording that the resolution contained,” and says the recent appointment of the EU’s first anti-racism coordinator - Michaela Moua - is “very important”.

    EU needs ’holistic approach’ if they want to tackle racial discrimination
    Analysis: Is Europe any better than the US when it comes to racism?

    Moua’s role is to coordinate the implementation of the action plan, which Incir says hasn’t yet borne fruit in people’s everyday lives.

    The action plan contains proposals for improving law enforcement policies, security from extremists, and greater equality in areas such as employment, health and housing - but additional legislation to fill any gaps won’t be until 2022.

    ENAR’s Nwabuzo says the protests in Europe were “really significant” in forcing concrete action on a legislative level.

    “The protests put anti-racism and racial justice on the policy agenda, where policymakers could no longer ignore the issue,” she says.

    “It’s important we continue making our voices loud on the matter, that we don’t stop,” Incir says.

    “Some part of the knowledge has reached the legislators, but also the people need to continue rising up for anti-racism because otherwise, unfortunately, there are some legislators who have a very short memory.”
    Colonial commemorations

    The protests also forced some European countries into a reckoning with their colonial pasts.

    Demonstrators targeted statues in public places commemorating figures linked to colonial violence and the slave trade.

    In Bristol in the UK, a crowd tore down the statue of Edward Colston - a wealthy ‘philanthropist’ who made the bulk of his fortune in the slave trade - and threw it in the river.

    Similar acts occurred in Belgium, where many statues of King Leopold II - notorious for his rule over the Congo Free State - adorn the streets.

    Daphné Budasz, a PhD researcher at the European University Institute, says the debate over statues existed long before the protests in 2020, especially in countries such as the UK and Belgium.

    But it did widen the debate, opening up similar conversations in countries that until then hadn’t paid it much attention.

    “Living in Switzerland, Swiss people don’t usually consider they have a link to colonial history, but even here last year we had a debate about a statue in Neuchâtel, a guy called David de Pury, who made his fortune from the slave trade,” she tells Euronews.

    “This was a non-existent debate, and suddenly because of Black Lives Matter it became visible even here.”

    However, the momentum around this issue appears to have stalled. Just last week in the UK, the long-running campaign to have a statue of colonialist Cecil Rhodes removed from a college at the University of Oxford saw defeat once again.

    Oxford University to keep Cecil Rhodes statue despite recommendation to remove it

    Despite Oriel College claiming it agreed the statue — at the centre of a years’ long #RhodesMustFall campaign — should be removed, it said high costs and complex heritage planning rules meant it won’t be taken down.

    It said instead it will work on the “contextualisation” of the college’s relationship with Rhodes.

    “I have the impression there’s no real political willingness to properly discuss this question,” says Budasz, who points to French President Emmanuel Macron’s response to calls for statues to come down.

    “The Republic will not erase any trace or name from its history,” he said in a television address last year.

    “It will not forget any of its works, it will not remove any of its statues.”

    “What they’re suggesting is that the people asking for removal are the reactionary ones, the ones who want to change history,” says Budasz.

    “We don’t want to change history. The debate is too polarised and there’s a kind of refusal to understand the symbolic element in monuments and the meaning in commemoration,” she adds.

    Her view is that the debate over statues was perhaps more of “a buzz”, which did reach a wider audience at the time, but now those still fighting for [the] removal of colonial relics are in the minority again.

    “We still use history as a tool to build or reinforce national identities, when history should be a critical tool to understand today’s society,” she argues, pointing out monuments are for the purpose of commemoration.

    “A statue is not an historical artefact, it’s not an archive, it’s a narrative of history. It’s been put there on purpose.”

    Every weekday, Uncovering Europe brings you a European story that goes beyond the headlines. Download the Euronews app to get a daily alert for this and other breaking news notifications. It’s available on Apple and Android devices.

    #BLM #Contestedmonuments #police #police_violence #violence_policière #eslavage #statue #monument

  • Covid-19 et Omicron : face au coût exorbitant des tests, faut-il se tourner vers l’analyse des eaux usées ? - ladepeche.fr
    https://www.ladepeche.fr/2022/02/13/covid-19-et-omicron-face-au-cout-exorbitant-des-tests-faut-il-se-tourner-v

    En janvier, selon Vincent Maréchal, professeur de virologie à la Sorbonne intervenant pour nos confrères de franceinfo, « le coût des tests s’est élevé à plus de 1,6 milliard d’euros » pour l’État. Un chiffre exorbitant au regard de la circulation très importante du virus, boosté par l’arrivée du variant Omicron. C’est pourquoi ce scientifique a la volonté de mettre en avant une autre méthode de suivi de l’épidémie, à travers son projet Obépine (Observatoire épidémiologique dans les eaux usées), dont il est le cofondateur.

    • Les tests servent à informer chacun s’il est ou non positif, et ainsi d’éviter d’aller contaminer les autres. Ce n’est pas du tout du même registre que le suivi de l’épidémie via les eaux usées.

      L’abandon des tests, c’est à partir du moment où l’on considère qu’il n’y a plus aucun intérêt à limiter la propagation du virus en isolant les personnes positives.

    • Ce qui reviendrait à dire qu’il n’y a plus aucune politique de santé publique dans ce pays. Remarquez, quand on voit dans quel état de délabrement s’est retrouvé l’hôpital public, et ce bien avant la crise du Covid, on est en droit de se dire que depuis une bonne vingtaine d’années, toutes ces crapules gestionnaires illébérales nous ont mis dans une béchamelle verdâtre.

      [edit] Mais là où l’on pourrait se marrer si la situation n’était pas aussi grave, c’est que les gestionnaires du « vivre avec », et bien, ils l’ont dans le vase :

      Thread by C_A_Gustave on Thread Reader App – Thread Reader App
      https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1492868314762252298.html

      1/9
      Avec le recul, la politique sanitaire ZeroCovid restera la meilleure option.
      Sur le plan économique, le monde occidental du "vivre avec" aura eu les mêmes fermetures généralisées ou ciblées, et les dépenses+++ pour compenser la ↘️↘️ de la demande...
      2/9
      Sur le plan sociologique, le monde occidental du vivre avec se retrouve avec les mêmes protestations populaires que les récentes protestations observées en Extrême-Orient :
      Exemple en nouvelle Zélande :
      A) bbc.com/news/world-asi…
      B)
      New Zealand anti-vax protesters inspired by Canada truckers camp outside parliament
      PM Ardern dismisses anti-vax demonstrators camped outside parliament as minority.
      https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-60314091
      New Zealand plays Barry Manilow to repel parliament protesters
      Protesters opposed to Covid-19 vaccine mandates remain camped outside parliament.
      https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-60362529
      3/9
      Exemple en Australie :
      A) bbc.com/news/world-aus…
      B)
      Violent anti-vaccine protests continue in Melbourne
      Demonstrators have been marching against lockdowns and mandatory vaccines in Australia’s second largest city.
      https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-australia-58647483
      Australia : Protesters set Old Parliament House in Canberra on fire
      The blaze was quickly put out but marks an escalation in indigenous protests in Canberra.
      https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-59824914
      4/9
      Exemple en Corée du Sud :
      South Korean business owners shave heads to protest restrictions
      Hundreds of South Korean business owners shaved their heads to protest the South Korean government’s virus restrictions
      https://www.euronews.com/2022/01/25/south-korean-business-owners-shave-heads-to-protest-restrictions
      5/9
      Sauf que ces pays auront beaucoup mieux préserver leur économie, leur activité :
      A) lemonde.fr/idees/article/…
      B) institutmolinari.org/wp-content/upl…
      « La stratégie zéro Covid a montré sa supériorité sur les plans sanitaire et économique »
      TRIBUNE. Les pays ayant appliqué le « tester, tracer, isoler » ont enrayé la circulation du Covid-19, et ceux qui, comme la France, ont choisi le « stop and go », n’y arrivent pas, notent les économis…
      https://www.lemonde.fr/idees/article/2021/02/24/philippe-aghion-et-patrick-artus-la-strategie-zero-covid-a-montre-sa-superio
      6/9
      Également mieux protégé la santé mentale de leur population
      thelancet.com/journals/lance… ImageImage
      7/9
      Y compris vis-à-vis des enfants, dont la santé mentale ne se dégrade pas à cause des confinement, mais, contrairement au story telling de la SFP et des pro-GBD, durant les vagues épidémiques !
      Unroll available on Thread Reader
      8/9
      Et surtout le ZeroCovid aura bien mieux protégé les populations et leur santé en attendant l’arrivée des vaccins permettant une réouverture sous protection immunitaire !
      A noter, leur mortalité n’↗️ que depuis l’abandon du ZeroCovid à cause des variants venant de chez nous ! Image
      9/9
      L’Histoire ne le retiendra pas car elle sera construite sur l’auto-congratulation des occidentaux s’évaluant sur des critères subjectifs internes.
      Mais les faits et la comparaison exogène à l’échelle mondiale seront têtus ! 😉

      • • •

  • Italian town faces backlash for ’sexist’ bronze statue of ’#La_Spigolatrice'

    Italian authorities in Sapri have defended a new bronze statue of a woman wearing a transparent dress.

    The sculpture is a tribute to La Spigolatrice di Sapri (The Gleaner of Sapri), an 1857 poem written by Luigi Mercantini.

    The poem refers to a female gleaner who leaves her job to join Italian revolutionary Carlo Pisacane’s failed expedition against the Kingdom of Naples.

    It was unveiled at a ceremony on Saturday in the province of Salerno, at a ceremony featuring local officials and former Italian prime minister Giuseppe Conte.

    But the statue has generated some backlash on social media, with many labeling its design “sexist” and others calling for it to be taken down.

    Italian authorities in Sapri have defended a new bronze statue of a woman wearing a transparent dress.

    Laura Boldrini, an MP with the centre-left Democratic party, said the monument was “an offense to women and to the history it is supposed to celebrate”.

    “How can even the institutions accept the representation of women as sexualised bodies,” she added on Twitter.


    https://twitter.com/MonicaCirinna/status/1442204598190714891

    Monica Cirinnà, a member of the Italian Senate, also stated that it was a “slap in the face to history and to women who are still only sexualised bodies.”

    “This statue of the Gleaner says nothing about the self-determination of the woman who chose not to go to work in order to stand up against the Bourbon oppressor”.

    The mayor of Sapri has defended the statue as “a very important work of art which will be a great tourist attraction for our town”.

    In a post on Facebook, Antonio Gentile said that critics of the statue held “a lack of knowledge of local history”.

    “Our community...has always been committed to combating all forms of gender violence,” he added.

    La nuova statua della Spigolatrice di Sapri è stata realizzata con maestria e impeccabile interpretazione dall’artista...

    –—

    Meanwhile, the sculptor #Emanuele_Stifano stated that he was “appalled and disheartened” by the criticism.

    “All kinds of accusations have been made against me which have nothing to do with my person and my story,” Stifano said on Facebook.

    “When I make a sculpture, I always tend to cover the human body as little as possible, regardless of gender.”

    https://www.euronews.com/2021/09/28/italian-town-of-sapri-faces-backlash-for-sexist-bronze-statue-of-la-spigol
    #image #femmes #travailleuses #statue #Italie #commémoration #sexisme #espace_public #spigolatrice #corps

    ping @cede

    • Anche no

      Sui social da qualche giorno è in atto una forte polemica su una statua commissionata dal Comune di Sapri (Salerno) allo scultore Emanuele Stifano. Raffigura una giovane donna voluttuosa, coperta solo da un abito succinto e trasparente, in stile camicia bagnata vedo/non vedo che mette in risalto seni e glutei. Ricordo una polemica simile per la statua discinta della Violata ad Ancona, commissionata per portare l’attenzione sulla violenza maschile sulle donne.

      Il riferimento stavolta è alla spigolatrice protagonista di una notissima poesia di #Luigi_Mercantini ispirata a un tragico episodio del Risorgimento italiano: la spedizione del socialista Carlo Pisacane, che aveva lo scopo di innescare una rivoluzione antiborbonica nel Regno delle Due Sicilie, ma al posto delle masse rivoluzionarie trovò una popolazione ostile che si unì alla gendarmeria borbonica per trucidarli. La contadina immaginata dal poeta assiste allo sbarco, affascinata da una speranza di libertà lascia il lavoro per seguirli e inorridita e incredula piange i trecento giovani morti.
      Siamo in presenza di un’opera a destinazione pubblica, esposta in pubblico, pagata con fondi pubblici, che ha una dichiarata funzione celebrativa.  Poteva essere il simbolo della presenza femminile nelle battaglie, nella storia, nella letteratura. È diventata l’ennesimo triste ammiccante tributo non alla rappresentazione artistica del nudo femminile, ma agli stereotipi che l’accompagnano.
      Giunta e scultore ovviamente difendono l’iniziativa. La perversione è nell’occhio di chi guarda, dicono.
      L’inaugurazione avviene alla presenza delle autorità locali e del presidente M5s Giuseppe Conte in tour elettorale nella zona. Uomini con responsabilità di governo, noti e applauditi, si fanno fotografare compunti, con la mano sul cuore, di fronte a una statua di donna che stimola reazioni pruriginose e a noi pare ridicola per la storia, per la dignità, per il buonsenso e per il buon gusto.
      Non si pongono alcun problema, sembra che la banalità di questa iconografia non li riguardi.
      Le intenzioni non bastano quando il messaggio è sbagliato.
      No, Prassitele o Canova non c’entrano. Non c’entrano «le fattezze fisiche delle donne meridionali», come sostiene un arguto senatore. Figuriamoci se pensiamo che il nudo in sé rechi offesa. Non è la presenza di modelle più o meno vestite a determinare una lesione alla persona, ma l’uso del loro corpo e il senso della posa e dell’atteggiamento, troppo spesso evidentemente allusivi a una disponibilità sul piano sessuale.
      Dietro alla statua bronzea di Sapri c’è la plastica rappresentazione non della forza femminile o del risveglio della coscienza popolare (come pretende l’autore) ma dei più scontati sogni erotici maschili.

      Non c’entrano la censura né la cancel culture, né il puritanesimo. Le opere d’arte non devono per forza essere “politicamente corrette”, né pudiche, né rappresentare fedelmente una scena storica. Tuttavia per un’opera pubblica il problema del contesto culturale è importante (già Facebook sta riportando autoscatti orgogliosi di maschietti che palpano il sedere della statua. E ve le immaginate le gite scolastiche con ragazzini in pieno tumulto ormonale?).
      Lo scultore afferma di «prescindere dal sesso», ma eroi risorgimentali in perizoma nelle piazze italiane o nei parchi io non ne ho visti mai.
      Rompere l’assuefazione.
      Si possono raccontare le donne senza spogliarle, senza ridurle allo stereotipo della fanciulla sexy offerta agli sguardi, inchiodata al ruolo-gabbia di oggetto di piacere che i maschi hanno costruito per lei? Si può prescindere dalla ricca elaborazione che studiose di molte discipline hanno prodotto sulla mercificazione a scopi promozionali e pubblicitari dei corpi femminili? Può chi ha responsabilità pubbliche non interrogarsi sulle condizioni del discorso, ignorare il risultato sull’immaginario collettivo di decenni di offerte di immagini scollacciate?
      Oppure la rappresentazione stereotipata della donna è considerata in Italia un tratto antropologico così radicato che non si pensa valga la pena di contrastarlo con politiche evolutive?
      I commentatori si appiattiscono su quell’altro cliché, “che noia queste femministe”. Nessuno sa o comprende che molte delle voci che si levano sono di persone che sul tema riflettono da anni. Probabilmente ben pochi leggono, molti rifuggono da firme femminili. L’importante è ridurre tutto a un quadro di donne frustrate che polemizzano su qualsiasi cosa.

      Il sessismo: c’è chi lo riconosce e chi no. C’è chi pensa, parla e agisce per contrastarlo e chi per preservarlo. C’è chi fa l’indifferente, perché gli va bene così.

      In copertina, Jean-François Millet, Le spigolatrici (Des glaneuses), 1857, Parigi, Musée d’Orsay.

      https://vitaminevaganti.com/2021/10/02/anche-no

    • Italy: bronze statue of scantily dressed woman sparks sexism row

      Sculpture based on the poem The Gleaner of Sapri was unveiled by former PM Giuseppe Conte on Saturday

      https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/6e3f31968859d9d7365fb84bdc985fa5432a7582/146_54_1486_892/master/1486.jpg?width=620&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=d07d56bfc81ea233dc82fb

      A statue depicting a scantily dressed woman from a 19th-century poem has sparked a sexism row in Italy.

      The bronze statue, which portrays the woman in a transparent dress, was unveiled on Saturday during a ceremony attended by the former prime minister Giuseppe Conte in Sapri, in the southern Campania region.

      The work by the sculptor Emanuele Stifano is a tribute to La Spigolatrice di Sapri (The Gleaner of Sapri), written by the poet Luigi Mercantini in 1857. The poem is based on the story of a failed expedition against the Kingdom of Naples by Carlo Pisacane, one of the first Italian socialist thinkers.


      https://twitter.com/lauraboldrini/status/1442235735478702081

      Laura Boldrini, a deputy with the centre-left Democratic party, said the statue was an “offence to women and the history it should celebrate”. She wrote on Twitter: “But how can even the institutions accept the representation of a woman as a sexualised body?”

      A group of female politicians from the Democratic party’s unit in Palermo called for the statue to be knocked down. “Once again, we have to suffer the humiliation of seeing ourselves represented in the form of a sexualised body, devoid of soul and without any connection with the social and political issues of the story,” the group said in a statement.

      They argued that the statue reflected nothing of the anti-Bourbon revolution nor the “self-determination of a woman who chooses not to go to work in order to take sides against the oppressor”.

      Stifano defended his work, writing on Facebook that if it had been up to him the statue would have been “completely naked … simply because I am a lover of the human body”. He said it was “useless” to try to explain artwork to those “who absolutely only want to see depravity”.

      Antonio Gentile, the mayor of Sapri, said that until the row erupted “nobody had criticised or distorted the work of art”.

      In photos of the ceremony, Conte, now the leader of the Five Star Movement, appeared puzzled as he looked at the statue, surrounded by a mostly male entourage.

      https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/sep/27/italy-bronze-statue-of-scantily-dressed-woman-sparks-sexism-row

  • Turkey builds a border wall to stop refugees from Afghanistan

    Fearing a new refugee crisis, Turkey is reinforcing its border with Iran to stop a potential influx of Afghans fleeing Taliban rule.

    Some refugees who fled weeks and months ago have already started to show up at the rugged border area.

    Now, three-metre-high concrete slabs are being installed to stop them.

    According to Turkish authorities, security forces have prevented the passage of over 69 thousand irregular migrants and arrested 904 suspects accused of being human traffickers.

    Local media report a 155-kilometre stretch of a planned 241-kilometre wall has already been erected at the border.

    Turkey has been a key transit point for asylum seekers heading to Europe to flee war and persecution.
    We won’t become Europe’s ’refugee warehouse’, says Erdogan

    Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s government had brushed off warnings and criticism from opposition parties about an increase in the number of migrants from Afghanistan.

    This week, he admitted that Turkey faces a new refugee wave from Afghanistan and said his cabinet would work with Pakistan to try and bring stability to the war-ravaged country.

    Erdogan also called on European nations on Thursday to shoulder the responsibility for Afghans fleeing the Taliban and warned that his country won’t become Europe’s “refugee warehouse.”

    https://www.euronews.com/2021/08/20/turkey-builds-a-border-wall-to-stop-refugees-from-afghanistan

    #murs #barrières_frontalières #Iran #asile #migrations #réfugiés #réfugiés_afghans #Turquie

    • Turkey’ eastern Iran border to be safer with modular wall system

      To ensure the safety and security of the Turkish-Iranian border, a 295-kilometer (183-mile) long wall will be constructed along the entire shared border, Emin Bilmez, the governor of the eastern province of #Van, said Tuesday. It is hoped that the wall will help to prevent illegal crossings and the trafficking of contraband and that it will also hinder terrorists from infiltrating.

      “Due to the increasing waves of migration, our land forces have dispatched two reconnaissance and two commando companies along with armed vehicles to the region. The Ministry of the Interior has allocated 35 special operations teams and 50 armed vehicles to the zone to assist the troops guarding the border,” Bilmez said.

      “We have been digging ditches for the past two years at a width of 4 meters (13 feet) and a depth of 4 meters. Barbed wire will enclose the entrance of these ditches,” Bilmez added.

      “Along the whole 295-kilometer long border, we will put up a wall. We foresee that a section of 64 kilometers will be readied by the end of the year. A tender is being prepared for an additional 63 kilometers of wall. We expect the process to be finalized within this year. The remaining sections will be finished in the upcoming years. In addition to the wall construction, there will be 58 watchtowers and 45 communication towers. Towers will be equipped with thermal cameras, radars, sensors and fire control systems,” Bilmez said.
      300 organizers arrested

      Both armed and unarmed UAVs have been deployed on the border, conducting reconnaissance missions 24/7. Gathered images are being transferred to relevant departments. 105,000 irregular migrants have been either prevented from crossing the border or apprehended on Turkish soil over the last year, Bilmez added.

      “This year alone, we have captured and processed over 55,000 irregular migrants on our borders. 783 organizers (traffickers who make arrangements for migrants to cross illegally) have been processed and around 300 of them have been arrested, from January 2021 until July 2021. The sum of all organizers processed last year was 599."

      https://www.dailysabah.com/politics/turkey-eastern-iran-border-to-be-safer-with-modular-wall-system/news
      #modules #mur_modulaire

    • La Turquie construit un mur pour bloquer les réfugiés afghans à la frontière iranienne

      Dans la région de Van située à l’Est de la Turquie, les autorités ont érigé un mur en béton de 150 kilomètres le long de la frontière avec l’Iran. Le retour au pouvoir des Taliban suscite l’inquiétude des dirigeants et de la population turque. Ces derniers craignent une nouvelle crise migratoire, dans un pays qui accueille déjà 3,7 millions de Syriens ayant fui la guerre.

      Un mur en béton haut de quatre mètres s’élève désormais entre la Turquie et l’Iran, dans la région de Van, pour empêcher les migrants de passer. Quelque 500 km de frontières séparent les deux États traversés par des milliers de migrants, principalement afghans, en route vers l’Europe.

      Depuis la chute de Kaboul tombée aux mains des Taliban, le 15 août, les autorités turques craignent une augmentation des arrivées. Le pays accueille déjà 3,7 millions de Syriens ayant fui la guerre.

      Les patrouilles se multiplient pour protéger une frontière poreuse qui s’étend à flan de montagnes. Le nouveau mur se dresse sur 150 km et Ankara affirme que d’ici la fin de l’année, 50 km supplémentaires seront construits. Une équipe de journalistes de France 24 s’est rendue sur place.

      https://www.france24.com/fr/moyen-orient/20210906-la-turquie-construit-un-mur-pour-bloquer-les-r%C3%A9fugi%C3%A9s-a

  • Six countries urge EU to continue Afghan deportations

    Stopping deportations would “motivate even more Afghan citizens to leave their home,” the six states say. Afghan authorities have asked deportations to stop until October.

    Six EU countries have asked the European Commission not to stop the deportations of unsuccessful asylum migrants back to Afghanistan as thousands flee the Taliban’s takeover.

    Ministers from Germany, Austria, Belgium, Greece, Netherlands and Denmark said “stopping returns sends the wrong signal and is likely to motivate even more Afghan citizens to leave their home.”

    The move follows a plea from the Afghan Ministry of Refugees and Repatriation on July 8 to stop EU returns of its nationals for three months during the current resurgence of the Taliban.
    What did the letter say?

    The letter signed by the six states said that more moves should be made on the ground to support Afghanistan and neighboring countries rather than halt deportation from the EU.

    “We fully recognise the sensitive situation in Afghanistan in light of the foreseen withdrawal of international troops,” said the joint statement.


    https://twitter.com/kmlvrmln/status/1424646282505822210

    It recognized that there were 4.6 million Afghans that had already been displaced by the conflict with 570,000 asylum applications from the country lodged in the EU since 2015.

    “In view of of the expected likelihood that Afghanistan will continue to be a significant source of irregular migration to the EU, we would like to underline the importance of returning home those without genuine protection needs,” said the six countries.

    They urged “the Commission to intensify talks with the Afghan government on how returns to Afghanistan can and will be continue in the coming months.”

    EU countries have come under increasing attack from human rights groups for the decision to continue returning unsuccessful asylum applicants. On August 3 the European Court for Human Rights ruled not to send one of these migrants back to Afghanistan at least until the end of August.

    “That regions of a country are not safe does not mean that each national of that country automatically is entitled to protection,” added Belgium’s secretary for asylum and migration, Sammy Mahdi.
    What has the EU said?

    A spokesman for The European Commission said: "At an EU level there isn’t a list of countries considered safe relating to asylum applications or for returns.

    “It’s up to each member state to assess... the country of origin and the

    situation of the person concerned,” he said.

    But a senior EU official said on Tuesday that it wants to avoid “a massive flow of migration from Afghanistan.”

    According to the official, 80% of deportations to the war-torn country are “voluntary.”

    The official said the situation in the Middle Eastern country is “challenging” although it is not yet “desperate” in that it still had a solid government unlike Syria and Iraq in past refugee crises.

    But the EU was concerned about fighting stifling the arrival of humanitarian aid in the country, Doctors without Borders (MSF) said on Tuesday that the situation has “deteriorated” to the point that some cities have “medical facilities on the front lines.”
    What is the situation in Afghanistan?

    By Tuesday the Taliban had taken six Afghan provincial capitals forcing thousands to move to Kabul and other safer areas.

    The insurgents, who want to establish Sharia law in the country, are now looking to take Mazar-i-Sharif, the largest city in the north of Afghanistan.

    Its fall would mean an area that has voiced strongest opposition to the Taliban could now be out of government control.

    The US, which aims to withdraw all its troops by the end of August, has sent a special envoy, Zalmay Khalilzad to Qatar to try to get a ceasefire with the Taliban.

    But Pentagon spokesman John Kirby admitted there was “not much” the US could do but trust the Afghan government forces to turn the tide.

    “Taliban forces advancing in Ghazni, Kandahar, and other Afghan provinces have summarily executed detained soldiers, police, and civilians with alleged ties to the Afghan government,” said Human Rights Watch on August 3.

    With the Taliban advancing through the country at an alarming rate, experts believe more revenge killings could be on the way.

    https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/34221/six-countries-urge-eu-to-continue-afghan-deportations

    #Afghanistan #renvois #expulsions

    Et voilà, encore une fois, apparaître la belle #rhétorique de l’#appel_d'air :

    Stopping deportations would “motivate even more Afghan citizens to leave their home,” the six states say.

    ping @isskein @karine4

    • Six EU countries want to keep forced return of Afghans despite Taliban offensive Access to the comments

      At least six EU countries insist that the forced deportation of migrants back to Afghanistan continues despite the Taliban’s alarming gains in recent weeks.

      Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Greece, and the Netherlands wrote to the European Commission claiming that halting returns "sends the wrong signal and is likely to motivate even more Afghan citizens to leave their home for the EU.’’

      Adalbert Jahnz, the Commission’s spokesman for home affairs explained that “it’s up to each member state to make an individual assessment of whether the return is possible in a specific set of circumstances, that needs to take into account the principles, notable the principle of rule of law and other fundamental rights.”

      “But it’s not something that the EU specifically regulates,” he added.

      The call by the six member states comes a week after the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) urged Austrian authorities not to proceed with the expulsion of an Afghan national until late August at the earliest because of “a clear risk of irreparable harm to the complainant”.

      Afghanistan had in July urged Europe to stop deportations for three months, as Finland, Sweden and Norway had done, due to the deteriorating security situation on the grounds.

      Taliban insurgents have captured five out of the country’s 34 provincial capitals in less than a week in a relentless campaign against government forces.

      They have been emboldened by the withdrawal of US and NATO troops from the country.

      Cities claimed by the Taliban include strategically important Kunduz in the north that has transport links to many other cities including the capital Kabul.

      Afghan security forces, which have been backed, trained, and financed with billions of dollars in a 20-year-long Western military effort that included many EU countries, appear unable to cope with the offensive.

      https://www.euronews.com/2021/08/10/six-eu-countries-want-to-keep-forced-return-of-afghans-despite-taliban-off

      #réfugiés_afghans #asile #migrations #réfugiés #retour #renvois #expulsions
      #Austriche #Belgique #Danemark #Allemagne #Grèce #Pays_Bas

      #machine_à_expulser

    • Réfugiés afghans : l’hypocrisie européenne

      La plupart des pays de l’Union européenne ont attendu le dernier moment pour suspendre les expulsions d’Afghans venus demander l’asile sur leur sol. Alors que les talibans ont pris le pouvoir à Kaboul, les vingt-sept ministres des affaires étrangères se réunissent en urgence ce mardi pour décider des suites à donner à leur action. Accueillir dignement les exilés déjà arrivés sur leur sol serait un premier pas en matière de solidarité.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/160821/refugies-afghans-l-hypocrisie-europeenne#at_medium=custom7&at_campaign=104

  • Data et nouvelles technologies, la face cachée du contrôle des mobilités

    Dans un rapport de juillet 2020, l’#Agence_européenne_pour_la_gestion_opérationnelle_des_systèmes_d’information_à_grande_échelle (#EU-Lisa) présente l’#intelligence_artificielle (#IA) comme l’une des « #technologies prioritaires » à développer. Le rapport souligne les avantages de l’IA en matière migratoire et aux frontières, grâce, entre autres, à la technologie de #reconnaissance_faciale.

    L’intelligence artificielle est de plus en plus privilégiée par les acteurs publics, les institutions de l’UE et les acteurs privés, mais aussi par le #HCR et l’#OIM. Les agences de l’UE, comme #Frontex ou EU-Lisa, ont été particulièrement actives dans l’expérimentation des nouvelles technologies, brouillant parfois la distinction entre essais et mise en oeuvre. En plus des outils traditionnels de #surveillance, une panoplie de technologies est désormais déployée aux frontières de l’Europe et au-delà, qu’il s’agisse de l’ajout de nouvelles #bases_de_données, de technologies financières innovantes, ou plus simplement de la récupération par les #GAFAM des données laissées volontairement ou pas par les migrant·e·s et réfugié∙e∙s durant le parcours migratoire.

    La pandémie #Covid-19 est arrivée à point nommé pour dynamiser les orientations déjà prises, en permettant de tester ou de généraliser des technologies utilisées pour le contrôle des mobilités sans que l’ensemble des droits des exilé·e·s ne soit pris en considération. L’OIM, par exemple, a mis à disposition des Etats sa #Matrice_de_suivi_des_déplacements (#DTM) durant cette période afin de contrôler les « flux migratoires ». De nouvelles technologies au service de vieilles obsessions…

    http://migreurop.org/article3021.html

    Pour télécharger la note :
    migreurop.org/IMG/pdf/note_12_fr.pdf

    #migrations #réfugiés #asile #frontières #mobilité #mobilités #données #technologie #nouvelles_technologies #coronavirus #covid #IOM
    #migreurop

    ping @etraces

    voir aussi :
    Migreurop | Data : la face cachée du contrôle des mobilités
    https://seenthis.net/messages/900232

    • European funds for African IDs: migration regulation tool or privacy risk?

      The first person you meet after you land at Blaise Diagne Airport in Dakar is a border guard with a digital scanner.

      The official will scan your travel document and photograph and take a digital print of your index fingers.

      It’s the most visible sign of the new state-of-the-art digital biometrics system that is being deployed in the airport with the help of EU funding.

      The aim is to combat the increasingly sophisticated fake passports sold by traffickers to refugees.

      But it also helps Senegal’s government learn more about its own citizens.

      And it’s not just here: countries across West Africa are adopting travel documentation that has long been familiar to Europeans.

      Passports, ID cards and visas are all becoming biometric, and a national enrolment scheme is underway.

      In Europe too, there are proposals to create a biometric database of over 400 million foreign nationals, including fingerprints and photographs of their faces.

      The new systems are part of efforts to battle illegal migration from West Africa to the EU.

      ‘Fool-proof’ EU passport online

      Many are still plying the dangerous route across the Sahara and the Mediterranean to reach Europe, but a growing number are turning to the criminal gangs selling forged passports to avoid the treacherous journey over desert and sea.

      There’s a burgeoning market in travel documents advertised as ‘fake but real”.

      Prices vary according to the paperwork: an EU Schengen transit visa costs €5,000, while a longer-stay visa can be twice as high.

      Some forgers have even mastered the ability to incorporate holograms and hack the biometric chips.

      “Morphing” is an image processing technique that merges two people’s photographs into a single new face that appears to contain entirely new biometric data.

      Frontex, the EU’s border guard agency, says 7,000 people were caught trying to enter the Schengen area in 2019 carrying such documents — but it admits the true figure could be much higher.

      Sending migrants back

      Last year, the largest number of travellers with fake documents arrived via Turkish and Moroccan international airports.

      Many were caught in Italy, having arrived via Casablanca from sub-Saharan countries like Ghana, Mali, Nigeria and Senegal.

      A Frontex team responsible for deporting migrants without the correct paperwork was deployed this year at Rome’s Fiumicino Airport.

      It’s the first sign of a new European Commission regulation expanding the agency’s role, which includes access to biometric data held by member states, according to Jane Kilpatrick, a researcher at the civil liberties think-tank Statewatch.

      “The agency’s growing role in the collection of data, it links overtly to the agency’s role in deporting individuals from the EU,” she said.

      Over 490,000 return decisions were issued by member states last year, but only a third were actually sent back to a country outside the EU.

      There are multiple reasons why: some countries, for example, refuse to accept responsibility for people whose identity documents were lost, destroyed or stolen.

      Legally binding readmission agreements are now in place between the EU and 18 other countries to make that process easier.
      There are no records

      But a bigger problem is the fact that many African countries know very little about their own citizens.

      The World Bank estimates the continent is home to roughly half of the estimated one billion people on the planet who are unable to prove their identities.

      An absence of digitisation means that dusty registers are piling up in storage rooms.

      The same goes for many borders: unlike the scene at Dakar’s airport, many are still without internet access, servers, scanners and cameras.

      That, the Commission says, is why EU aid funds are being used to develop biometric identity systems in West African countries.

      The EU Trust Fund for Africa has allotted €60 million to support governments in Senegal and Côte d’Ivoire in modernising their registry systems and creating a national biometric identity database.

      Much of the funding comes through Civipol, a consulting firm attached to France’s interior ministry and part-owned by Milipol, one of the most important arms trade fairs in the world.

      It describes the objective of the programme in Côte d’Ivoire as identifying “people genuinely of Ivorian nationality and organising their return more easily”.
      Data security concerns

      European sources told Euronews that the EU-funded projects in West Africa were not designed to identify potential migrants or deport existing ones.

      A Commission spokesperson insisted no European entity — neither Frontex, nor member states, nor their partners — had access to the databases set up by West African countries.

      But the systems they are funding are intimately connected to anti-migration initiatives.

      One is the Migrant Information and Data Analysis System (MIDAS), a migration database that can send automatic queries to Interpol watchlists to detect travel documents and people possibly linked to organised crime, including human trafficking.

      Connections like these, and the role of French arms giants like Thales in the growing biometric market, has led data protection experts to become worried about possible abuses of privacy.
      World’s newest biometric market

      As Africa becomes the coveted market for biometric identification providers, the watchdog Privacy International has warned it risks becoming a mere testing ground for technologies later deployed elsewhere.

      So far 24 countries on the continent out of 53 have adopted laws and regulations to protect personal data.

      A letter by Privacy International, seen by Euronews, says EU must “ensure they are protecting rights before proceeding with allocating resources and technologies which, in absence of proper oversight, will likely result in fundamental rights abuses.”

      It has published internal documents tracking the development of Senegal’s system that suggest no privacy or data protection impact assessments have been carried out.

      Civipol, the French partner, denies this: it told Euronews that the Senegalese Personal Data Commission took part in the programme and Senegalese law was respected at every stage.

      Yet members of Senegal’s independent Commission of Personal Data (CDP), which is responsible for ensuring personal data is processed correctly, admit implementation and enforcement remained a challenge — even though they are proud of their country’s pioneering role in data governance in Africa.

      For the Senegalese cyber activist Cheick Fall, the charge is more serious: “Senegal has sinned by entrusting the processing of these data to foreign companies.”

      https://www.euronews.com/2021/07/30/european-funds-for-african-ids-migration-regulation-tool-or-privacy-risk

      #biométrie #aéroport #Afrique #étrangers #base_de_données_biométrique #empreintes_digitales #passeports #visas #hologramme #Morphing #image #photographie #Frontex #EU_Trust_Fund_for_Africa #Trust_Fund #Civipol #Milipol #armes #commerce_d'armes #Côte_d’Ivoire #Afrique_de_l'Ouest #Migrant_Information_and_Data_Analysis_System (#MIDAS) #Interpol #Thales #Sénégal #Senegalese_Personal_Data_Commission #Commission_of_Personal_Data (#CDP)

  • Forget build back better - what if crisis is the new normal?
    New disasters are materialising in the form of deadly floods in Western Europe, India and China; forest fires are burning out of control around the Mediterranean, the West Coast of the USA and even Siberia; serious droughts are affecting Brazil, Madagascar and Mexico.

    High-temperature records are broken in Canada and other places. The human fatalities from these disasters may be smaller compared to those of the pandemic but the impact on lives, livelihoods and infrastructure is significant and growing.

    Polycrisia
    Welcome to “Polycrisia”, the period of human history when there is a succession of crises, one after another but also overlapping, straining the assets meant for emergency response and forcing a different kind of planning and implementation cycle on public administrations, private companies and individual households alike; or so it should.

    In Siberia, volunteers wage war on Russia’s wildfires with shovels and saws
    Spain’s emergency services hope rain will help extinguish Catalonia forest fires
    There is remarkable inertia, though, and hope against hope that the world will soon be able to get out of these continuous and interconnected crises. Thus, the talk about returning to strong GDP growth, with recovery and rehabilitation at all levels, “normalcy” eventually settling back and everybody going about their usual business like before. Comforting as this may sound, it is a fallacy and the sooner we turn our minds away from it the better.

    Political and economic thinking and decision-making are still done with a quick return to normalcy fixation in mind
    There is a huge difference between contemplating a “normal” world without pandemics, climate catastrophes and financial collapses, and a world that prepares itself for more of the above and even other calamities. In the first, “normal” world, one would try to restore global supply chains, move to industrial-scale renewable energy sources as a growth strategy, and rely again on the global financial system to provide the necessary resources with an emphasis on efficiency and profits.

    In the second world, one would ensure minimum local supply of key goods, promote energy communities that establish local energy sufficiency via locally relevant renewable energy sources, and would readjust finance to cater to the needs of small and medium enterprises, individuals and communities.

    In this second, “Polycrisian” world, there would be a lot more tolerance for positive inefficiencies, like undeveloped natural spaces and other adaptation measures to secure homes and key infrastructures against floods, local food production to minimise carbon footprint and ensure survival in case of supply cut-offs, water stocks in case of droughts.

    Adaptation would thus be on a par with mitigation, instead of remaining the neglected child of the international climate action regime and of commitments made by state and non-state actors.

    In the spirit of preparedness one should also ensure resilience against multiple other crises looming in the horizon, such as small or big telecommunication and internet disruptions, due to infrastructure problems or cyberattacks. Among the worst and most difficult potential crises to plan around are those associated with the apparent cracks in the fabric of societies, including authoritarian measures by governments, civil disobedience and “culture wars”. With the successive crises and the globalised economic system marginalising more and more people, exacerbating their precarious situation and increasing relative inequalities, the crisis of democratic governance will be a major challenge to tackle even in previously stable countries and regions.

    Unfortunately, despite the clear alarming signs and the prolific talk about resilience, the sense is that political and economic thinking and decision-making are still done with a quick return to normalcy fixation in mind.

    The assumption is that the mega-crisis we just faced (and are still facing) was a one-off phenomenon, a freak occurrence that will not repeat itself in any comparable way any time soon. So the talk about resilience is directed towards the past, dealing with unfinished business keeping us from returning to normalcy, or even “building back better”.

    Reality and the big picture, though, call for a much more cautionary approach in “building forward better”, which should be our goal. In the era of Polycrisia that has dawned, those who prepare – countries, regions, companies, people – will reap the benefits of resilience and decent survival, while the others will keep tormenting themselves and the world.

    Georgios Kostakos is Executive Director of the Brussels-based Foundation for Global Governance and Sustainability (FOGGS). He has been extensively involved in global governance, sustainability and climate-related activities with the United Nations and beyond.

    https://www.euronews.com/2021/07/27/forget-build-back-better-what-if-crisis-is-the-new-normal-view?utm


    https://pbs.twimg.com/card_img/1419979404575272963/6hiiwEkE?format=jpg&name=small

  • Revealed: 2,000 refugee deaths linked to illegal EU pushbacks

    A Guardian analysis finds EU countries used brutal tactics to stop nearly 40,000 asylum seekers crossing borders

    EU member states have used illegal operations to push back at least 40,000 asylum seekers from Europe’s borders during the pandemic, methods being linked to the death of more than 2,000 people, the Guardian can reveal.

    In one of the biggest mass expulsions in decades, European countries, supported by EU’s border agency #Frontex, has systematically pushed back refugees, including children fleeing from wars, in their thousands, using illegal tactics ranging from assault to brutality during detention or transportation.

    The Guardian’s analysis is based on reports released by UN agencies, combined with a database of incidents collected by non-governmental organisations. According to charities, with the onset of Covid-19, the regularity and brutality of pushback practices has grown.

    “Recent reports suggest an increase of deaths of migrants attempting to reach Europe and, at the same time, an increase of the collaboration between EU countries with non-EU countries such as Libya, which has led to the failure of several rescue operations,’’ said one of Italy’s leading human rights and immigration experts, Fulvio Vassallo Paleologo, professor of asylum law at the University of Palermo. ‘’In this context, deaths at sea since the beginning of the pandemic are directly or indirectly linked to the EU approach aimed at closing all doors to Europe and the increasing externalisation of migration control to countries such as Libya.’’

    The findings come as the EU’s anti-fraud watchdog, Olaf, has launched an investigation into Frontex (https://www.euronews.com/2021/01/20/eu-migration-chief-urges-frontex-to-clarify-pushback-allegations) over allegations of harassment, misconduct and unlawful operations aimed at stopping asylum seekers from reaching EU shores.

    According to the International Organization for Migration (https://migration.iom.int/europe?type=arrivals), in 2020 almost 100,000 immigrants arrived in Europe by sea and by land compared with nearly 130,000 in 2019 and 190,000 in 2017.

    Since January 2020, despite the drop in numbers, Italy, Malta, Greece, Croatia and Spain have accelerated their hardline migration agenda. Since the introduction of partial or complete border closures to halt the outbreak of coronavirus, these countries have paid non-EU states and enlisted private vessels to intercept boats in distress at sea and push back passengers into detention centres. There have been repeated reports of people being beaten, robbed, stripped naked at frontiers or left at sea.

    In 2020 Croatia, whose police patrol the EU’s longest external border, have intensified systemic violence and pushbacks of migrants to Bosnia. The Danish Refugee Council (DRC) recorded nearly 18,000 migrants pushed back by Croatia since the start of the pandemic. Over the last year and a half, the Guardian has collected testimonies of migrants who have allegedly been whipped, robbed, sexually abused and stripped naked (https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2020/oct/21/croatian-police-accused-of-sickening-assaults-on-migrants-on-balkans-tr) by members of the Croatian police. Some migrants said they were spray-painted with red crosses on their heads by officers who said the treatment was the “cure against coronavirus” (https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2020/may/28/they-made-crosses-on-our-heads-refugees-report-abuse-by-croatian-police).

    According to an annual report released on Tuesday by the Border Violence Monitoring Network (BVMN) (https://www.borderviolence.eu/annual-torture-report-2020), a coalition of 13 NGOs documenting illegal pushbacks in the western Balkans, abuse and disproportionate force was present in nearly 90% of testimonies in 2020 collected from Croatia, a 10% increase on 2019.

    In April, the Guardian revealed how a woman from Afghanistan was allegedly sexually abused (https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2021/apr/07/croatian-border-police-accused-of-sexually-assaulting-afghan-migrant) and held at knifepoint by a Croatian border police officer during a search of migrants on the border with Bosnia.

    “Despite the European Commission’s engagement with Croatian authorities in recent months, we have seen virtually no progress, neither on investigations of the actual reports, nor on the development of independent border monitoring mechanisms,” said Nicola Bay, DRC country director for Bosnia. “Every single pushback represents a violation of international and EU law – whether it involves violence or not.”

    Since January 2020, Greece has pushed back about 6,230 asylum seekers from its shores, according to data from BVMN. The report stated that in 89% of the pushbacks, “BVMN has observed the disproportionate and excessive use of force. This alarming number shows that the use of force in an abusive, and therefore illicit, way has become a normality […]

    “Extremely cruel examples of police violence documented in 2020 included prolonged excessive beatings (often on naked bodies), water immersion, the physical abuse of women and children, the use of metal rods to inflict injury.”

    In testimonies, people described how their hands were tied to the bars of cells and helmets put on their heads before beatings to avoid visible bruising.

    A lawsuit filed against the Greek state in April at the European court of human rights (https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/apr/26/greece-accused-of-shocking-pushback-against-refugees-at-sea) accused Athens of abandoning dozens of migrants in life rafts at sea, after some had been beaten. The case claims that Greek patrol boats towed migrants back to Turkish waters and abandoned them at sea without food, water, lifejackets or any means to call for help.

    BVMN said: “Whether it be using the Covid-19 pandemic and the national lockdown to serve as a cover for pushbacks, fashioning open-air prisons, or preventing boats from entering Greek waters by firing warning shots toward boats, the evidence indicates the persistent refusal to uphold democratic values, human rights and international and European law.”

    According to UNHCR data, since the start of the pandemic, Libyan authorities – with Italian support since 2017, when Rome ceded responsibility (https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jul/23/mother-and-child-drown-after-being-abandoned-off-libya-says-ngo) for overseeing Mediterranean rescue operations to Libya – intercepted and pushed back to Tripoli about 15,500 asylum seekers. The controversial strategy has caused the forced return of thousands to Libyan detention centres where, according to first hand reports, they face torture. Hundreds have drowned when neither Libya nor Italy intervened.

    “In 2020 this practice continued, with an increasingly important role being played by Frontex planes, sighting boats at sea and communicating their position to the Libyan coastguard,” said Matteo de Bellis, migration researcher at Amnesty International. “So, while Italy at some point even used the pandemic as an excuse to declare that its ports were not safe for the disembarkation of people rescued at sea, it had no problem with the Libyan coastguard returning people to Tripoli. Even when this was under shelling or when hundreds were forcibly disappeared immediately after disembarkation.”

    In April, Italy and Libya were accused of deliberately ignoring a mayday call (https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2021/apr/25/a-mayday-call-a-dash-across-the-ocean-and-130-souls-lost-at-sea) from a migrant boat in distress in Libyan waters, as waves reached six metres. A few hours later, an NGO rescue boat discovered dozens of bodies (https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2021/apr/25/a-mayday-call-a-dash-across-the-ocean-and-130-souls-lost-at-sea) floating in the waves. That day 130 migrants were lost at sea.

    In April, in a joint investigation with the Italian Rai News and the newspaper Domani, the Guardian saw documents from Italian prosecutors detailing conversations between two commanders of the Libyan coastguard and an Italian coastguard officer in Rome. The transcripts appeared to expose the non-responsive behaviour (https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/apr/16/wiretaps-migrant-boats-italy-libya-coastguard-mediterranean) of the Libyan officers and their struggling to answer the distress calls which resulted in hundreds of deaths. At least five NGO boats remain blocked in Italian ports as authorities claim administrative reasons for holding them.

    “Push- and pull-back operations have become routine, as have forms of maritime abandonment where hundreds were left to drown,’’ said a spokesperson at Alarm Phone, a hotline service for migrants in distress at sea. ‘’We have documented so many shipwrecks that were never officially accounted for, and so we know that the real death toll is much higher. In many of the cases, European coastguards have refused to respond – they rather chose to let people drown or to intercept them back to the place they had risked their lives to escape from. Even if all European authorities try to reject responsibility, we know that the mass dying is a direct result of both their actions and inactions. These deaths are on Europe.’’

    Malta, which declared its ports closed early last year, citing the pandemic, has continued to push back hundreds of migrants using two strategies: enlisting private vessels to intercept asylum seekers and force them back to Libya or turning them away with directions to Italy (https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2020/may/20/we-give-you-30-minutes-malta-turns-migrant-boat-away-with-directions-to).

    “Between 2014 and 2017, Malta was able to count on Italy to take responsibility for coordinating rescues and allowing disembarkations,” said De Bellis. “But when Italy and the EU withdrew their ships from the central Mediterranean, to leave it in Libya’s hands, they left Malta more exposed. In response, from early 2020 the Maltese government used tactics to avoid assisting refugees and migrants in danger at sea, including arranging unlawful pushbacks to Libya by private fishing boats, diverting boats rather than rescuing them, illegally detaining hundreds of people on ill-equipped ferries off Malta’s waters, and signing a new agreement with Libya to prevent people from reaching Malta.”

    Last May, a series of voice messages obtained by the Guardian (https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2020/may/19/exclusive-12-die-as-malta-uses-private-ships-to-push-migrants-back-to-l) confirmed the Maltese government’s strategy to use private vessels, acting at the behest of its armed forces, to intercept crossings and return refugees to Libyan detention centres.

    In February 2020, the European court of human rights was accused of “completely ignoring the reality” after it ruled Spain did not violate the prohibition of collective expulsion (https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/feb/13/european-court-under-fire-backing-spain-express-deportations), as asylum applications could be made at the official border crossing point. Relying on this judgment, Spain’s constitutional court upheld “border rejections” provided certain safeguards apply.

    Last week, the bodies of 24 migrants from sub-Saharan Africa were found by Spain’s maritime rescue (https://apnews.com/article/atlantic-ocean-canary-islands-coronavirus-pandemic-africa-migration-5ab68371. They are believed to have died of dehydration while attempting to reach the Canary Islands. In 2020, according to the UNHCR, 788 migrants died trying to reach Spain (https://data2.unhcr.org/en/country/esp).

    Frontex said they couldn’t comment on the total figures without knowing the details of each case, but said various authorities took action to respond to the dinghy that sunk off the coast of Libya (https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2021/apr/25/a-mayday-call-a-dash-across-the-ocean-and-130-souls-lost-at-sea) in April, resulting in the deaths of 130 people.

    “The Italian rescue centre asked Frontex to fly over the area. It’s easy to forget, but the central Mediterranean is massive and it’s not easy or fast to get from one place to another, especially in poor weather. After reaching the area where the boat was suspected to be, they located it after some time and alerted all of the Maritime Rescue and Coordination Centres (MRCCs) in the area. They also issued a mayday call to all boats in the area (Ocean Viking was too far away to receive it).”

    He said the Italian MRCC, asked by the Libyan MRCC, dispatched three merchant vessels in the area to assist. Poor weather made this difficult. “In the meantime, the Frontex plane was running out of fuel and had to return to base. Another plane took off the next morning when the weather allowed, again with the same worries about the safety of the crew.

    “All authorities, certainly Frontex, did all that was humanly possible under the circumstances.”

    He added that, according to media reports, there was a Libyan coast guard vessel in the area, but it was engaged in another rescue operation.

    https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2021/may/05/revealed-2000-refugee-deaths-linked-to-eu-pushbacks

    #push-backs #refoulements #push-back #mourir_aux_frontières #morts_aux_frontières #décès #morts #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #responsabilité #Croatie #viols #Grèce #Italie #Libye

    ping @isskein

  • Incendie dans le hotspot de Lesbos (septembre 2020)

    12.500 demandeurs d’asile fuient les flammes et errent dans la nuit tandis que le feu pourrait réduire le camp entier en cendres, voir les vidéos sur le site d’efsyn :

    Πύρινη κόλαση στο ΚΥΤ της Μόριας - Εκκενώθηκε ο καταυλισμός

    Στις φλόγες για ακόμα μια φορά ο προσφυγικός καταυλισμός. Επεισόδια μετά την ανακοίνωση των 35 θετικών κρουσμάτων κορονοϊού. Χιλιάδες πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες σε αναζήτηση στέγης.

    Μεγάλες φωτιές καίνε από τα μεσάνυχτα όλο τον προσφυγικό καταυλισμό της Μόριας. Χιλιάδες πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες βρίσκονται αυτή την ώρα άστεγοι, κυριολεκτικά μέσα στους δρόμους.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bc-mFZTobB0&feature=emb_logo

    Περίπου 12.500 κόσμος που διέμεναν στη Μόρια εγκατέλειψαν τη δομή και αρχικά κινήθηκαν προς τον οικισμό της Παναγιούδας, ενώ μέρος τους κινήθηκε και προς άλλες κατευθύνσεις. Την ίδια ώρα διμοιρίες ΜΑΤ με κλούβες δημιούργησαν φραγμό στο ύψος του Καρά Τεπέ αποτρέποντας τους από το να μπουν στην πόλη.

    Η Πυροσβεστική Υπηρεσία προς ώρας επιβεβαιώνει ότι δεν υπάρχουν αναφορές για θύματα.

    Πώς ξεκίνησε η φωτιά
    Σύμφωνα με τις πρώτες πληροφορίες, της φωτιάς προηγήθηκαν επεισόδια που ξεκίνησαν γύρω στις έντεκα το βράδυ. Η ένταση προκλήθηκε μετά την ανακοίνωση των 35 θετικών κρουσμάτων κορονοϊού στον καταυλισμό και την άρνηση κάποιων εξ αυτών να μπουν σε καραντίνα.


    https://twitter.com/Eva_Cosse/status/1303471253802582024

    Γρήγορα οι αρνητές της καραντίνας ήρθαν σε σύγκρουση με άλλους που επεσήμαναν το κίνδυνο για όλο το καμπ ενώ ομάδες προσφύγων προσπάθησαν να διαφύγουν μέσα από το ΚΥΤ φοβούμενοι την μετάδοση του ιού.

    Γύρω στις 11.00 έκαναν την εμφάνιση τους οι πρώτες φλόγες περιμετρικά του ΚΥΤ και προς τη πλευρά του Ελαιώνα.

    Γρήγορα η φωτιά πέρασε μέσα στο ΚΥΤ και εκεί ομάδα αιτούντων παρεμπόδισε την Πυροσβεστική Υπηρεσία να εισέλθει. Τότε επενέβησαν τα ΜΑΤ που με τη χρήση δακρυγόνων και κρότου-λάμψης διέλυσαν το συγκεντρωμένο πλήθος, αλλά η φωτιά είχε αρχίσει να καίει όλες τις κρίσιμες εγκαταστάσεις όπως τα γραφεία της Ευρωπαϊκής Υπηρεσίας Ασύλου κ.α

    Φόβοι εκφράζονται και για την νέα δομή υγείας που δώρισε η Ολλανδική κυβέρνηση μιας και οι φλόγες βγήκαν έξω από το ΚΥΤ και κινήθηκαν προς όλες τις κατευθύνσεις.

    Αξίζει να σημειωθεί ότι την ώρα που ξέσπασε η πυρκαγιά, όλες οι πυροσβεστικές δυνάμεις της Λέσβου ήταν σε απόσταση 70 χιλιομέτρων προσπαθώντας να ελέγξουν το διπλό πύρινο μέτωπο που είχε ξεσπάσει νωρίτερα στην Άντισσα και την Βατούσσα αφήνοντας περί τα δέκα οχήματα στο ΚΥΤ που ήταν αδύνατον να ανταπεξέλθουν.

    https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/koinonia/258965_pyrini-kolasi-sto-kyt-tis-morias-ekkenothike-o-kataylismos

    #Moria #feu #incendie #hotspot #asile #migrations #réfugiés #camps_de_réfugiés #Lesbos #Grèce

    (incendie qui a eu lieu le 9 septembre 2020, je suis en retard sur cet événement, j’essaie de mettre les nouvelles arrivées ensuite, notamment sur la mailing-list Migreurop, dans les prochains jours sur ce fil de discussion)

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur les incendies qui ont eu lieu en Grèce dans des camps de réfugiés :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/851143

    ping @karine4 @isskein

    • Moria 09/09/20

      OFFICIEL : Lesbos est en état d’urgence depuis 4 mois
      09/09/2020 12:24:00 Société, Lesbos, Immigrants, Incendie, EKTAKTO

      Par arrêté du vice-ministre de la Protection civile et de la gestion des crises, Nikos Hardalia et décision du secrétaire général de la protection civile, Vassilios Papageorgiou, l’unité régionale de Lesbos est déclarée en état d’urgence de la protection civile, pour des raisons de santé publique.

      Cette déclaration est valable à partir d’aujourd’hui 09-09-2020 et pendant quatre (4) mois.

      Les ministres de l’Intérieur T. Theodorikakos, de l’Immigration et de l’Asile N. Mitarakis et le président d’EODY Pan. Arkoumaneas se rend à Lesbos, afin d’être informé de la situation à Moria, comme l’a déclaré le porte-parole du gouvernement St. Petsas, après la fin de la réunion gouvernementale au Palais Maximos.

      Pendant ce temps, des renforts d’Athènes ont été envoyés par la police à Lesbos, afin de faire face au problème qui s’est créé depuis la nuit après les incendies qui se sont déclarés à Moria et ont détruit une très grande partie du KYT. En particulier, trois escouades MAT ont quitté Elefsina à 7 heures du matin sur un avion militaire C-130 et devraient arriver sur l’île à 9 heures.

      Comme il est devenu connu du siège de EL.AS. Il y a déjà des forces fortes sur l’île, cependant tous les étrangers qui étaient dans le KYT après les incendies sont concentrés à l’extérieur de la structure, où ils sont gardés et cherchent des solutions pour leur logement.

      La lumière du jour montre l’ampleur de la destruction du camp - « ville » de 13 000 réfugiés et migrants à Moria. La totalité de la partie extérieure du KYT a été complètement détruite, tandis qu’une grande partie à l’intérieur du camp KYT qui continue de brûler a également été détruite. Les informations indiquent que les infrastructures d’administration et d’identification n’ont pas été incendiées, mais que le service d’asile et son équipement ont été complètement incendiés. En outre, des dommages ont été causés dans la zone de l’unité de soins intensifs et de l’unité de soins intensifs et dans la climatisation de l’unité de santé qui a été faite grâce à un don du gouvernement néerlandais.

      Une grande partie de la population de Moria a fui vers les domaines environnants, tandis qu’une autre partie s’est déplacée vers la ville de Mytilène où à la hauteur de Kara Tepe, juste avant l’usine PPC, une force de police forte a été alignée qui ne leur permet pas d’entrer dans la ville.

      L’incendie s’est déclaré vers minuit, lorsque les réfugiés et les migrants qui avaient été testés positifs pour le coronavirus ou avaient été détectés comme cas de contact ont refusé d’être isolés. Des affrontements se sont ensuivis avec d’autres réfugiés et migrants qui les ont poussés hors du camp. Ce conflit a pris à un moment donné un caractère tribal avec le résultat que des incendies ont éclaté, qui bientôt, en raison du vent fort, ont pris des dimensions.

      Il est à noter que, comme indiqué, les forces des pompiers, arrivées au camp pour tenter, ont été attaquées par des groupes de demandeurs d’asile qui ont entravé leur travail. En ce moment, les pompiers opèrent dans le camp avec le renforcement des moyens aériens, afin d’éteindre complètement le feu puis de contrôler la zone.

      Source : skai.gr

      https://www.lesvospost.com/2020/09/blog-post_50.html

      On craint une propagation du coronavirus dans tout Mytilène si les quelque 12000 réfugiés et immigrants ne sont pas expulsés immédiatement et dans une zone éloignée du tissu urbain après l’incendie qui s’est déclaré peu avant minuit mardi à Moria, exprime le maire de Mytilene S.

      « Les quelque 12 000 réfugiés ne peuvent pas rester un deuxième jour à ce moment-là. Dix ans nous ont laissés seuls sur la question des réfugiés. Les immigrants doivent être expulsés ici et maintenant. "Sinon, il y aura une propagation du virus dans toute la région", a déclaré le maire de Mytilène, Stratis Kytelis, à ethnos.gr.

      12000 réfugiés et migrants restent sur la route nationale

      Les réfugiés et les migrants restent sur la route nationale à la hauteur de Panagouda et se trouve à seulement six kilomètres de Mytilène tandis que les forces de police ont créé un barrage pour les empêcher de s’y déplacer. Trois escouades MAT avec une force totale de 60 personnes sont déjà parties du Pirée à Lesbos les forces de l’île. Il est à noter qu’à partir du contrôle des échantillons de liquide pharyngien reçus les trois jours de jeudi, vendredi et samedi par les équipes d’EODY parmi 1900 résidents de l’hôpital de Moria et 100 employés, un total de 35 cas positifs pour le virus ont été trouvés, au total des réfugiés et autres demandeurs d’asile. . Il est à noter qu’en plus des 35 réfugiés en quarantaine, 100 autres personnes étaient entrées en contact avec eux.

      Reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 09.09.2020

    • Moria : “Time bomb” exploded, burned down Hotspot & “European values”


      It was short before Tuesday midnight when fires broke out in several parts in- and outside the Moria camp. The powerful winds quickly spread the flames around, through containers and tents. Total destruction. 13,000 people on the streets. The island of Lesvos has declared in “state of emergency.” Authorities investigate arson. Alarm for the 35 confirmed coronavirus cases that authorities do not know their whereabouts. No reports of fatalities or injuries.

      https://twitter.com/f_grillmeier/status/1303478067348803584

      The worst scenario happened – and while there was a scenario, plans to deal with it equaled to zero.

      https://twitter.com/th1an1/status/1303452650663370752

      A large part of the refugees and asylum seekers fled to the surrounding areas, while another part has moved to the city of Mytilene. However, strong police forces have been lined up in the area of Kara Tepe and do not allow them to enter the city.

      https://twitter.com/veramagalik/status/1303571532992712704

      Others entered the camp in the morning apparently seeking to save some of their belongings.

      https://twitter.com/KallergisK/status/1303554698083995650

      The entire camp outside the camp including thousands of olive trees have been destroyed, also a large part inside the hotspot.

      According to information the administration and identification infrastructures were not burned, but the Asylum Service and its equipment were completely burned.

      Damaged are also the area of ​​the Intensive Care Unit as wells as the new health Care unit recently donated by the Dutch Government.

      According to local media stonisi, that speaks of “uprising and fire“, clashes erupted in the camp after 35 people were confirmed positive to coronavirus on Tuesday. They, their families and their contacts refused to go in isolation in a warehouse just outside the camp. Others started to leave out of fear to contract the virus.

      The clashes “soon led to fires initially around the camp that burned all the tents outside and around the KYT and containers inside,” notes the local news website.

      https://twitter.com/SEENOTRETTUNG/status/1303445925524910086

      Three squads of riot police have been reportedly deployed from Athens to Moria.

      Authorities seek accommodation solutions for the thousands of people.

      Residents of overcrowded Moria camp have been in lockdown for several months due to the coronavirus.

      Chief of Fire Service, Konstantinos Theofilopoulos, told state broadcaster ERT on Wednesday morning, that several fires started around 10:30 at night and that they were initially hindered with thrown stones.

      He added that the fire has been largely extinguished except from the containers that are still burning inside.

      Citing sources of the National Intelligence Service, ERT reported that initially the tents outside the camp were set on fire.

      Quick are the far-right conspiracy theorists who see in the blaze “act of asymmetric warfare” against Greece and blame “Erdogan’s soldiers” for the fire.

      Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakisis currently chair an emergency meeting with the ministers of Citizen Protection, Migration Policy and Asylum and Interior, the chiefs of National Intelligence and the General Staff of Armed Forces, and the head of the Civil Protection.

      The vice president of the European Commission and Commissioner for the Promotion of the European way of Life, Margaritis Schinas, expressed the Commission’s intention to assist Greece at all levels.

      EU Commissioner for Home Affairs, Ylva Johansson, said that she had agreed to fund the immediate transfer and accommodation on the Greek mainland of the 400 unaccompanied migrant children and teenagers.

      PS The fire in Moria burned down not only the camp but also the “European values”…

      https://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2020/09/09/moria-fire-camp-burned-down-pictures-videos

    • Grèce : un important incendie ravage le camp de Moria, des milliers de personnes à évacuer

      Un énorme incendie a ravagé dans la nuit de mardi à mercredi le camp de Moria sur l’île grecque de Lesbos. Le site, qui héberge plus de 12 000 personnes, a été « détruit à 99% » selon les pompiers. La tension est à son comble sur l’île : des migrants ont empêché les pompiers de rentrer dans le camp et des membres de l’extrême droite ont « attaqué » les ONG qui tentaient de venir en aide aux exilés.

      Le camp de Moria où s’entassent plus de 12 000 migrants a pris feu dans la nuit du mardi 8 au mercredi 9 septembre. Selon les pompiers, le site a été presque entièrement détruit. « La quasi-totalité du camp est en feu, aussi bien à l’intérieur que les tentes qui se trouvent à l’extérieur dans l’oliveraie », a observé un photographe de l’AFP présent sur place. « Tout brûle », a déclaré sur Twitter une association d’aide aux migrants, Stand by me Lesvos.

      Plusieurs heures après le début de l’incendie, une fumée noire continuait à s’élever au dessus du camp. Le président du syndicat des pompiers de Lesbos, Yorgos Ntinos, a indiqué mercredi matin que le camp « a brûlé à 99% et le feu continue ».

      https://twitter.com/iwatnew/status/1303488090716205056

      Des centaines de demandeurs d’asile fuyaient à pied dans la nuit vers le port de Mytilène mais ont été bloqués par les véhicules des forces de l’ordre, raconte à InfoMigrants Alpha*, un migrant vivant dans un conteneur du camp de Moria. « On n’a pas dormi de la nuit et personne ne nous a donné à manger ou à boire. Il y a beaucoup de femmes et d’enfants », précise-t-il.

      D’autres personnes se sont abritées dans les collines environnant le camp. « Certains témoignages rapportent que des locaux bloquent le passage (des migrants) dans le village voisin », rapporte encore Stand by me Lesvos.

      Le site d’information locale Lesvospost explique que plus de 3 000 tentes, des milliers de conteneurs, des bureaux de l’administration et une clinique au sein du camp ont également été brûlés.

      https://twitter.com/dfherman/status/1303491672685318149

      Pour l’heure, les pompiers précisent qu’"il n’y a pas de victimes, mais quelques blessés légers avec des problèmes respiratoires dus à la fumée". Des rumeurs annonçaient mercredi matin le décès d’au moins cinq personnes - une information que n’a pas pu vérifier InfoMigrants."Je pense que d’autres morts seront à déplorer car Moria est à terre", souffle Alpha.
      État d’urgence déclaré

      La tension est à son comble sur l’île. Les pompiers affirment dans leur communiqué avoir « été empêchés d’entrer dans le camp pour intervenir » par certains groupes de réfugiés, et avoir fait appel aux forces de l’ordre pour pouvoir poursuivre l’opération de secours. Plusieurs associations racontent avoir été « attaquées » par des membres de l’extrême droite alors qu’elles tentaient de venir en aide aux migrants.

      « L’île de Lesbos est déclarée en état d’urgence » a affirmé sur la chaîne de télévision publique ERT, le porte-parole du gouvernement grec, Stelios Petsas. Une réunion gouvernementale, avec le Premier ministre et le chef de l’état-major, doit se tenir mercredi matin « pour examiner la situation à Moria et les mesures qui vont être prises ».

      https://twitter.com/f_grillmeier/status/1303446446734274565

      D’après l’agence de presse grecque ANA, les feux auraient été déclenchés à la suite de la révolte de certains demandeurs d’asile qui devaient être placés en isolement, ayant été testés positifs au coronavirus ou proches d’une personne détectée positive. « Il y a 35 cas positifs et ils doivent être isolés (...) pour empêcher la propagation » du virus, a déclaré Selios Petsas à la chaîne publique TV ERT. Tous les réfugiés du camp ont l’interdiction de quitter l’île, a-t-il ajouté.

      Selon Alpha, « des Afghans ont refusé que des agents procèdent à des tests de coronavirus ». La situation a rapidement dégénéré et « les forces de l’ordre ont lancé des gaz lacrymogènes ». « J’étais dans mon conteneur quand j’ai entendu du bruit à l’extérieur. Je n’ai pas voulu sortir. Mais des flammes ont commencé à entrer dans mon habitation alors je me suis enfui en courant. Le feu était juste à côté de moi, j’ai eu très peur », continue le jeune homme.

      « La zone paie le prix de l’indifférence et de l’abandon », estime sur Facebook Facebook l’association des habitants de Moria et des autres villages environnants qui appelle les autorités à agir rapidement pour trouver une solution pour les demandeurs d’asile qui se retrouvent sans abri.

      La semaine dernière, les autorités ont détecté un premier cas de coronavirus à Moria et ont mis le camp en quarantaine pour quinze jours. Après la réalisation de 2 000 tests de dépistage, 35 personnes ont été détectées positives au Covid-19 à Moria et mises à l’isolement.

      De strictes mesures de circulation ont été imposées dans les camps de migrants depuis la mi-mars. Le gouvernement n’a jamais levé ces restrictions malgré les critiques des ONG de droits de l’homme jugeant ces mesures « discriminatoires » alors que la décision a été prise de déconfiner le pays début mai. « Depuis des mois, on est bloqués à l’intérieur du camp, on ne peut pas en sortir. Cela fait un moment que la tension est palpable, les gens ont en marre d’être privés de leur liberté », dit encore Alpha.

      *Le prénom a été modifié

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/27131/grece-un-important-incendie-ravage-le-camp-de-moria-des-milliers-de-pe

    • Après l’incendie de Moria, la Commissaire appelle les autorités grecques à venir en aide à tous les sinistrés

      « Dans la nuit de mardi à mercredi, le feu a détruit en grande partie le centre d’enregistrement et d’identification de Moria et les campements informels qui l’entourent, sur l’île grecque de Lesbos. Cet incendie a considérablement dégradé les conditions de vie des plus de 12 000 demandeurs d’asile et migrants, dont plus de 4 000 enfants, qui sont retenus dans un centre d’une capacité inférieure à 2 800 places », a déclaré la Commissaire.

      « L’intervention rapide des autorités locales et des pompiers a permis d’éviter une tragédie. Toutefois, la situation reste tendue, en ce qui concerne à la fois les migrants et la population locale qui vit à proximité du camp.

      J’appelle les autorités grecques à fournir d’urgence un hébergement à toutes les personnes privées d’#abri à la suite de l’incendie, en veillant à ce qu’elles aient accès à des soins, à des installations sanitaires, à un soutien psychologique et à de la nourriture. Il faudrait accorder une attention particulière aux personnes contaminées par le coronavirus et leur dispenser les soins nécessaires.

      Il importe également que les autorités grecques de tous niveaux protègent les demandeurs d’asile et les migrants contre les agressions et s’abstiennent de tenir des propos qui pourraient attiser les tensions.

      La situation sur les autres îles grecques où sont hébergés des réfugiés, des demandeurs d’asile et des migrants n’est guère différente de celle qui prévaut à Lesbos ; sur ces autres îles aussi, les difficultés pourraient s’aggraver. Comme beaucoup, je ne cesse de répéter qu’une aggravation de la situation semble inévitable si la Grèce et les autres États membres du Conseil de l’Europe ne changent pas de stratégie. Certes, la priorité est actuellement de répondre aux besoins humanitaires des sinistrés, mais l’incendie de Moria montre l’urgence de repenser entièrement la stratégie appliquée ces dernières années, qui a conduit à la création de camps surpeuplés, caractérisés par des conditions de vie inhumaines et intenables, à Moria et sur d’autres îles de la mer Égée. Il n’est tout simplement pas possible d’héberger les demandeurs d’asile et les migrants sur des bateaux, ou de recourir à d’autres formes d’hébergement d’urgence, en attendant que le camp de Moria soit remis en état, puis de continuer comme avant.

      Les autorités grecques n’ont toujours pas réglé une série de problèmes majeurs, comme le cantonnement des demandeurs d’asile et des migrants sur les îles de la mer Égée, le manque de structures d’accueil, sur les îles et sur le continent, et les insuffisances des politiques d’intégration et d’asile. La situation catastrophique dénoncée depuis des années par de nombreuses instances nationales et internationales est cependant aussi imputable à l’attitude des autres États membres, qui n’aident guère la Grèce en matière de relocalisation, et plus largement au manque de solidarité européenne. Ce n’est pas seulement un problème grec, c’est aussi un problème européen.

      Il n’y a plus de temps à perdre. La Grèce a besoin d’une aide concrète et de grande ampleur de la part des autres États membres du Conseil de l’Europe. Si de nombreuses collectivités locales se sont déclarées prêtes à apporter leur contribution, les autorités nationales, en revanche, se montrent trop frileuses. Je me réjouis que certains États membres semblent vouloir intensifier leurs efforts de relocalisation, mais il est urgent qu’ils agissent et que d’autres gouvernements européens suivent cette voie.

      La Grèce et ses partenaires doivent enfin se décider à régler les problèmes structurels d’une politique migratoire qui a déjà causé tant de souffrances inutiles. Attendre encore, c’est prendre le risque que d’autres drames se produisent. »

      https://www.coe.int/fr/web/commissioner/-/commissioner-calls-on-the-greek-authorities-to-provide-adequate-support-to-all-

      #sans-abri #SDF

    • ’Catastrophe’ warning as thousands left homeless by Lesbos refugee camp fire

      NGOs accuse police of blocking access to hospital for families and vulnerable migrants injured in Moria blaze.

      NGOs in Lesbos have warned that a humanitarian catastrophe is unfolding on the roads around the still burning Moria camp, where thousands of migrants are allegedly being held by police without shelter or adequate medical help.

      Annie Petros, head coordinator of of the charity Becky’s Bathhouse, said she was blocked by police from taking injured people to hospital as she drove them away from the fire.

      “When we saw there was a fire we drove as fast as we could with water to the camp, intending to take sick people to hospital. I can’t describe properly the scene we saw. There were streams of people, thousands of them, walking away from the camp. They were totally silent, terrified and traumatised, walking through thick smoke and the awful smell of burning plastic,” she said.

      “We picked up some pregnant women who needed urgent help and a teenage boy with a broken leg. When we neared the town of Mytilene there were riot police blocking the way to stop anyone reaching the town. I begged the police but their commander wouldn’t let us through. We called an ambulance and it refused to come to the roadblock.”

      Petros said she was sent along back roads, that brought them into contact with a group of anti-migrant protesters.

      She learned later that some people were attacked.

      She said the people she took to the hospital were the only ones who managed to make it through. “There are many people who need help with burns, with smoke inhalation.”

      Other aid organisations in the area said urgent work was needed to get people shelter before night fell.

      Omar Alshakal, a former refugee and founder of Refugees4Refugees, said: “The situation is out of control. We were looking after minors here and the safe place for them was lost in the fire. We lost 30 children. We are looking for them now.”

      Alshakal said the Greek government was making some effort, but the situation was severe. “We now have 12,000 people with no shelter, homeless on the main road. I have been called just now by the army, they want to get food to people and masks, sanitisation.”

      He said he was concerned that the isolation unit for Covid-19 patients was now abandoned. “We had 19 positive cases all in isolation, now they have left the camp. We have the fear they will spread the virus further.”

      The cause of the fire is unclear. Alshakal believes it was started by refugees in protest at conditions.

      The overcrowded camp is known to be a dangerous space, with small fires being lit to cook and no safe distancing between ramshackle tarpaulins used as tents.

      Moira was opened at the height of the refugee crisis in 2015. It was originally intended to hold 3,000 people. The charity MSF has been pushing the Greek authorities to improve conditions at the camp for years.

      Amir, a 19-year-old migrant from Afghanistan who teaches English in the School of Peace in the camp, said: “At about 11 last night I saw people starting fires deliberately. It was refugees who were very, very angry about the situation in this camp. We have been a long time in quarantine, you know we are under a lockdown while there are no such rules or laws for Greek people. It is racist, they are treating people like we are animals. We have needs, but we can’t leave this camp to get medicine or food.”

      He added: “The situation will now be worse for refugees. Our school is completely burned down. We had started to have hope that we could continue our learning but all that is gone now.”

      Aid groups are meeting on Wednesday evening to discuss an urgent response. They want people moved from the roadside immediately.

      Philippa Kempson of the Hope Project, said a government-ordered 3.5-mile (6km) cordon around the camp meant she couldn’t get to her supplies.

      “We have a building full of aid, nappies, water, very near Moria,” she said. “People can’t reach the city, they are out on an exposed road in 32C with children and babies. These people left the camp with what they had. We are 10km away and I had an asthma attack this morning due to the toxic smoke. Everything in there is plastic: the tents, the temporary housing blocks. And fires are still breaking out, the fire helicopter is still overhead.”

      She said the only light in the dark situation was that in two months the camp was due to be completely locked down. “Can you imagine if the fire had started in a couple of months when they had fenced it in with razor wire as they were planning to do? You would have had 12,000 people trapped in an inferno.”

      The UNHCR is working with the authorities to move people to safety. The agency said the authorities have blocked the road to stop uncontrolled movement but that vulnerable groups were being prioritised for shelter across the island and in accommodation in Mytilene, the island’s capital.

      Ylva Johansson, EU commissioner for home affairs, tweeted she had “agreed to finance the immediate transfer and accommodation on the mainland of the remaining 400 unaccompanied children and teenagers. The safety and shelter of all people in Moria is the priority.”

      The police have been approached for comment.


      https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2020/sep/09/catastrophe-warning-as-thousands-left-homeless-by-lesbos-refugee-camp-f

    • FIRE DESTROYS MUCH OF MORIA CAMP, FOLLOWING FOUR YEARS’ EUROPEAN TOLERANCE OF FATAL RISKS TO MIGRANTS

      In the early hours of this morning, a large fire broke out in Moria Refugee Camp, which has left much of the camp destroyed, and many of the approximately 13, 000 residents displaced.

      This comes a week after the first person tested positive for COVID-19 in the camp, which was immediately followed by the government’s official initiation of works to transform Moria refugee camp to a closed controlled centre. In the days that followed, at least 30 other people have tested positive for COVID-19 – in a camp that is currently at four times’ its stated capacity, where basic preventative measures are a practical impossibility and where there was no functioning COVID-19 isolation clinic.

      The dehumanisation of migrants at the European border and apparent indifference to the impact of this protracted, unsustainable situation on the local population have had repeatedly devastating consequences. Migrants have been consistently confined to overcrowded, insecure and fundamentally inhuman conditions, where fires – often fatal – are a regular occurrence. This was not the first fire in Moria camp; it was not even the first fire in the camp this year. Such fatal risks to – and loss of – migrant lives are instead tolerated as part of the European border regime.

      Following the near destruction of Moria Camp, this morning the Greek government placed the island of Lesvos under a four month state of emergency. The police and army have been on the streets around Moria camp since the fire broke out, and three riot police squads (known as the Units for the Reinstatement of Order) were flown in from Athens this morning. As far as we know, no additional medical capacity or humanitarian aid has been mobilised or provided. The government’s immediate dispatch of security forces, before or without humanitarian assistance, continues their policy of framing migrants as a question of public order – and prioritising their securitisation as opposed to the provision of urgent assistance.

      The Greek authorities’ main priority so far seems to be the prevention of migrants’ access to Mytiline: a police blockade was established next to Kara Tepe camp in the early hours of this morning, to prevent migrants who had fled the fire from reaching the city, and it remains there to this point. Police units have also blocked the main access road to Moria camp. People who had been living in the camp are spread out on the roads around Moria camp, in the surrounding forests, and in the car park of a nearby supermarket. From what migrants have told us, there have been no state provisions – whether of essentials such as food or water, or other necessities such as hygiene facilities – in those locations.

      There has never been an evacuation plan for Moria Camp residents, and when the fire broke out last night, people were left to flee on their own – including those who had been held in the pre-removal detention centre inside Moria Camp (PRO.KE.KA.). Some of those living in the sections for vulnerable people (including unaccompanied children and single women) were woken up by police, but given no instruction of where they could or should go. At present, there remains a profound lack of information regarding the safeguarding or protection response for such groups. When we spoke with vulnerable individuals supported by Legal Centre Lesvos in the early hours of this morning, they were scattered in the forests and roads surrounding the camp, without any state support.

      There is still no official confirmation of casualties, or even hospitalisations.

      Those who have returned to Moria camp this morning have sent photos of the destroyed camp, including the remains of their tents and shelters. Residents have emphasised that the many of the facilities – including toilets and sanitation spaces – have been burnt. The already-inadequate provisions to prevent or slow the spread of COVID-19 among the camp’s population have now been destroyed, and given that over thirty residents of the camp have tested positive for the virus in recent days, a failure to implement a rapid and health-oriented response for displaced residents will no doubt increase the number of cases – and will likely overwhelm the stretched public healthcare system.

      “This fire is a visceral manifestation of European policies, which have for years tolerated the containment of migrants in dangerous, overcrowded and insecure conditions,” said Amelia Cooper, of the Legal Centre Lesvos. “Repeated fatal incidents – including the death of a seven-year-old child in a fire in Moria camp, just six months ago – have not been enough to prompt the evacuation of Moria refugee camp; neither has been the outbreak of a global pandemic, nor the detection of positive cases, nor the Greek government’s instrumentalisation of these facts to impose mass detention on camp residents. Residents of Moria camp, and migrants in hotspots across Europe, are in situations of manufactured and state-sanctioned vulnerability. This fire was not an accident, it was an inevitability.”

      https://legalcentrelesvos.org/2020/09/09/fire-destroys-much-of-moria-camp-following-four-years-european-to

    • Joint statement of 31 NGOs regarding the fire at the Registration and Identification Centre at Moria

      Greece: Transfer Refugees and Asylum seekers to Safety on Mainland

      Respect for Human Rights should Prevail over Use of Force

      Following yesterday’s fire in Moria, on Lesvos, which destroyed the Reception and Identification Centre, 31 civil society organizations call on the Greek Government to immediately provide assistance to people who lost their shelter. Those affected, among them many children and at-risk groups, must be carefully transferred to safety on the mainland.

      The transfer of at-risk groups, including unaccompanied children, pregnant women, people with disabilities, people with medical and mental health conditions, and older people should be prioritized. People who tested positive for Covid-19 should be given safe housing for the quarantine period, healthcare, and hospitalization if necessary.

      Moving people from Lesvos to mainland Greece requires finding urgent solutions to address the fact that many current housing facilities for refugees and asylum seekers are at full capacity. We urge the Greek authorities to work on a coherent plan that maximises all available resources including those from the EU and we renew our call to European leaders to share the responsibility for the reception and support of asylum seekers now more than ever.

      In these difficult times, it is of outmost importance that respect for human rights is at the centre of the response to the fire at Moria, and that authorities do not resort to use of force or inflammatory language, but take appropriate steps to de-escalate any risk of violence.

      ActionAid Hellas

      Amnesty International

      Boat Refugee Foundation

      CRWI Diotima

      ECHO100PLUS

      ELIX

      Equal Rights Beyond Borders

      Fenix - Humanitarian Legal Aid

      Greek Council for Refugees (GCR)

      Hellenic League for Human Rights

      Hellenic Platform for Development (Ελληνική Πλατφόρμα για την Ανάπτυξη)

      Help Refugees

      Hias Greece

      HumanRights360

      Humanitarian Legal Aid

      Human Rights Watch

      International Rescue Committee (IRC)

      INTERSOS Hellas

      Legal Centre Lesvos

      Médecins Sans Frontières

      Melissa

      Network for Children’s Rights

      Omnes

      Refugee Legal Support (RLS)

      Refugee Rights Europe (RRE)

      Refugee Support Aegean (RSA)

      Refugee Trauma Initiative

      Solidarity Now

      Symbiosis-School of Political Studies in Greece

      Terre des hommes Hellas

      The HOME Project

      https://www.gcr.gr/en/news/press-releases-announcements/item/1499-joint-statement-of-31-ngos-regarding-moria-refugee-camp-fire

    • New fire breaks out in Moria camp on Wed evening

      A new large fire broke out at the Reception and Identification Center in Moria early Wednesday evening, just hours after the overcrowded hotspot on the island of Lesvos was largely destroyed by the fire the previous night.

      The fire is reportedly burning in the area of ​​Eleonas, the olive grove, outside the camp, where thousands of people of who do fit in live in tents.

      https://twitter.com/g_christides/status/1303744178053165056

      Media report that the fire started in some of the 200 tents that were not burned down on Tuesday night. Explosion sounds were heard, and they probably came form the cooking devices the refugees used.

      https://twitter.com/th_voulgarakis/status/1303738169729441795

      Hundreds of people among them many families with children, were leaving the area.

      https://twitter.com/g_christides/status/1303737094704070657

      Firefighters have rushed to the scene but the blaze went out of control due to the strong winds.

      https://twitter.com/News247gr/status/1303739366179835906

      STAR TV reported from the spot that the firefighters are now trying to protect the nearby forest.

      Thousands left the camp that hosted 12,800 people.

      It remains unclear whether it is a new fire or a resurgence of the one that already destroyed much of the Moria hotspot the other night.

      https://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2020/09/09/moria-new-fire-wednesday-evening

    • All people in Moria camp must be evacuated to safety in wake of destructive fire

      Nearly 12,000 men, women and children have been forced to evacuate Moria refugee camp, on the island of Lesbos, Greece, after a fire tore through the camp during the night of 8 September. While the fire is not believed to have caused any deaths, the camp was almost completely burned down, and people are now on the streets, with nowhere to stay. Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) urges Greek and EU authorities to immediately evacuate people off the island to safety.

      “Our teams saw the fire spread across Moria and rage all night long. The whole place was engulfed in flames, we saw an exodus of people from a burning hell with no direction,” says Marco Sandrone, MSF field coordinator in Lesbos. “Children were scared, and parents are in shock. We are relieved that there seem to be no victims and we are working now to address the immediate needs of the people.”

      All medical services available for the refugees and asylum seekers have been interrupted, including services at the MSF paediatric clinic.

      Almost five years of trapping people in dire conditions has led to tensions and despair. This has only increased over the last five months due to restricted movements in the camp, hastily justified as a public health measure amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. Following the recent confirmation of positive cases of COVID-19 among the camp’s residents, the increasing restrictions on people have made the situation unbearable.

      MSF has been pushing the Greek health and migration authorities to set up an adequate COVID-19 response plan for Moria, that counts on people’s collaboration and which offers dignity to the sick and to those who are infectious.

      “The Greek authorities have failed to put such a response in place, and the EU and other EU member states have disclaimed responsibility and have done close to nothing to resolve this situation,” says Aurelie Ponthieu, MSF Humanitarian Advisor on Displacement. “The years-long orchestration of human suffering and violence produced by European and Greek migration policies are to blame for the fire, and we can only hope that the same system of inhumane containment will not be reborn from the ashes in Moria.”

      MSF calls on the Greek authorities to immediately adopt an emergency response plan and to evacuate all these people to a safe place on the mainland or to other European countries. We are ready to provide the support that is needed during the emergency response.

      https://www.msf.org/refugees-moria-must-be-evacuated-wake-destructive-fire

      #MSF

    • Incendie à Moria - Evacuer MAINTENANT !

      Incendie à Moria - Evacuer MAINTENANT !

      La nuit dernière, un incendie a détruit le camp de réfugié.e.s surpeuplé de Moria. Près de 13 000 personnes vivaient dans le camp dont la capacité officielle n’est que de 2 757 personnes. Suite à ces incendies, aucune évacuation n’a été organisée. Par ailleurs, il n’y a jamais eu de plan d’évacuation pour l’ensemble du camp malgré les dangers et les conditions inhumaines. Au printemps 2020, l’Europe et la Suisse n’ont pas réussi à réaliser l’évacuation des camps et la redistribution des personnes entre les différents États européens, alors que la situation l’exigeait et malgré les mobilisations.

      Le 2 septembre, une première personne a été testée positive au Covid-19 à Moria. Au lieu d’identifier de manière systématique les possibilités d’infection, le camp entier a été mis en quarantaine. Toutes les personnes ont donc été fortement exposées au risque d’infection. La seule réponse a été leur enfermement aux frontières de l’Europe.

      Le 23 juin 2020, plus de 50 000 personnes ont demandé au Conseil fédéral de participer à des opérations d’accueil humanitaire pour évacuer les camps des îles grecques. Le 16 juin 2020, le Conseil national a approuvé la motion visant à accepter des réfugiés de Grèce et les huit plus grandes villes de Suisse ont accepté d’accueillir des réfugié.e.s directement de Grèce. Nous demandons une nouvelle fois au Conseil fédéral, à Karin Keller-Sutter en tant que cheffe du département du DFJP et au SEM d’accueillir les réfugié.e.s de Grèce et de fournir une aide d’urgence immédiate sur le terrain.

      https://www.sosf.ch/fr/sujets/schengen-europe/informations-articles/incendie-a-moria.html?zur=41

    • Thousands Moria refugees on the streets, locals set blockades, new fires

      The situation on the island of Lesvos remain tense on Thursday, with thousands of refugees and asylum-seekers to have spent the night on roadsides, fields and even cemeteries, waiting for aid and a provisional shelter. Led by the Mayor of Mytilene, locals have set blockades to hinder the government from repairing fire damages in the Moria camp or embark the vulnerable among the homeless on a ferry.

      “People that lost their shelters in #MoriaCamp due to the fires are finding shade and temporary resting ground between graves in a Greek orthodox cemetery.” via @daphnetolis.

      At the same time, new fires broke out in the camp also early Thursday afternoon to burn down what was not damage din the last two days.

      While signs hind to an “arson plan,” so far, no perpetrators have been captured, no report by the Fire Service has been issued.

      The government desperate tries to find solutions to the crisis that has emerged on the island but it is extremely difficult without the support by the local authorities and the people.

      Refugees and locals seem to agree on one point: This is “hell on earth” for both sides.

      The island has been declared a state of emergency for four months.

      New fires show “arson plan”

      Fires broke out again inside the camp early Thursday afternoon. According to state news agency amna, the fire broke οut simultaneously in three different points of the hotspot.

      The fires broke in a camp section that was not damaged by the fires on Tuesday and Wednesday, and where refugees were still living.

      The latest fire shows that despite the fact that the government has deployed several squads of police there, there is not policing in the area, which is an arson crime scene, after all, as the government says.

      According to local media stonisi, “the new fires today now prove the existence of an organized arson plan by unknown centers and for reasons currently unknown. A plan that the Police seems to not be able to deal with.”

      Refugees for a second time

      Over 12,000 people spend the second night on the streets, slept next to garbage bins and police buses. Some found no other place to spend the night other than between graves of a cemetery.

      Helpless without shelter and food, after the fire damage, they grabbed their children, helped their elderly, packed whatever they could save and left again for the Unknown and a new nightmare.

      Tear gas against children

      Riot police does not allow the refugees to reach the island capital Mytiline and set blockades at the road to Kara Tepe, where another camp operates.

      In the early morning hours of Thursday, the crowd threw stones at the police forces that responded with tear gas.

      Among the tear gas target are also children that scream in fear.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xYUwNV-0oJw&feature=emb_logo

      Locals set up blockades

      At the same time, residents and members of local authorities are opposing the government’s attempt to repair the damage in the camp and make it available again for the refugees and asylum seekers.

      Local authorities of East Lesvos had repeatedly called for de-congestion of the camp. They belive that the new situation that emerged after the fire will have them relocate to the mainland.

      They reject any government proposals to have the refugees accommodated in two military camps or in the area surrounding the Moria camp.

      Trucks and other machinery deployed by the municipality hinders the cleaning of Moria by the Armed forces, while the mayor reportedly keeps calling on locals to strengthen the blockades.

      Mayor of Mytilene, Stratis Kytelis has been reiterating that he does not accept the reopening of Moria, the establishment creation of any other accommodation structure, even a temporary one.

      He demands “the immediate refugees’ and migrants’ departure from the island in any way.”

      “We have been insisting for a long time that there should be an immediate and massive de-congestion of the camp. It is not possible for a structure designed for 2,800 people to accommodate 12,000 people,” he repeated.

      406 minors relocated to northern Greece

      With three separate flights, 406 unaccompanied refugee children were transferred from the destroyed Moria center to Thessaloniki over night.

      The children are temporary accommodated in hotels. Some of them will be transferred to other structures and some will be relocated to European countries in accordance with the relevant program.

      Before their departure form Lesvos, all minors were tested for Covid-19. For precautionary reasons, they ill stay in quarantine for 10 days. facilities in which they will be housed will be quarantined for 10 days.

      The flights were organized by the International Organization for Migration, funded by the European Commission and coordinated by the Special Secretariat for Unaccompanied Minors at the Ministry of Migration.

      Gov’t housing plan about to fail

      The ferry donated by the shipping company Blue Star Ferries for the accommodation of some 1,000 vulnerable groups docked at the port of Sigri and not at the port of Mytilene on Thursday morning. Immediately locals called for a blockade of the road.

      The two Navy landing ships for the temporary accommodation of another 1,000 vulnerable people may never come. The Defense ministry has allegedly refused to deploy them amid a Greek standoff with Turkey.

      The government is in an extreme difficult situation and is looking for other solutions.

      The Migration Ministry said in a statement on Thursday that “all the necessary actions for the immediate housing of vulnerable people and families of the Moria hotspot in specially designed areas will be carried out within the day.”, a migration and asylum ministry announcement said on Thursday.

      “The primary concern of the government is the safety of all concerned,” the announcement added, and concluded that “Behavior aiming to blackmail will not be tolerated.”

      https://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2020/09/10/moria-greece-refugees-locals-new-fires-housing

    • Incendies à Lesbos : « Nous créons une zone de guerre au milieu de l’Europe »

      #Efi_Latsoudi s’insurge contre le gouvernement grec, la situation dans le camp de Moria étant prévisible selon elle. L’humanitaire appelle à une réaction de la communauté internationale.

      Le camp de Moria, à Lesbos, a été en grande partie détruit par un incendie dans la nuit de mardi à mercredi. Efi Latsoudi, figure de proue de l’aide humanitaire sur l’île et lauréate du prix humanitaire Nansen Refugee Award 2016 du Haut-Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (HCR), craint que la situation des 13 000 candidats à l’asile qui y vivaient se dégrade.
      L’incendie qui ravage Moria était-il prévisible ?

      Il fallait s’y attendre. Politiquement, on se dirigeait vers ça. On opérait sans plan d’action depuis des mois. Le gouvernement grec présente la situation migratoire dans les camps comme une réussite depuis que les chiffres d’arrivées sur les îles sont en baisse. Mais les conditions de vie des migrants sont toujours aussi désastreuses. Elles ne sont que les conséquences des politiques mises en place par Athènes.
      Vous êtes actuellement à Lesbos. Que s’est-il passé hier soir ?

      C’était la guerre. Il y a eu des manifestations de migrants dans le camp en réaction au confinement total, la police a usé de gaz lacrymogène. On s’attendait à de tels mouvements de contestation : voilà six mois que les forces de l’ordre ont enfermé ces gens dans ce camp. C’est de la discrimination ! Pour essayer de protéger les mineurs face aux manifestations, ils ont été placés dans une partie isolée du camp. Et quand le feu s’est déclaré [les causes de l’incendie ne sont pas encore clairement connues, ndlr], personne n’arrivait à les sortir de là. La porte a dû être défoncée pour les évacuer.
      Comment se présente la situation au lendemain du drame ?

      Les migrants sont encerclés par les policiers sur la route qui va de Moria à la ville. Ils sont dehors, sans rien. Les autorités sont en train d’acheminer trois troupes de policiers antiémeutes d’Athènes en bateau. Le ministre a parlé des émeutes, on craint que ces événements le poussent à créer des camps totalement fermés. Il y a aussi beaucoup de réactions de la part des groupes fascistes, qui pensent que Moria est une « bombe sanitaire » [35 cas de Covid-19 ont officiellement été déclarés à Moria, ndlr] alors qu’il y a plus de contaminations au sein de la population locale que chez les migrants. Certains médias enveniment la situation. Nous sommes en train de créer une zone de guerre au milieu de l’Europe.
      Comment imaginez-vous les prochains jours ?

      Tout le monde va envoyer de l’argent et des ressources sans aucune organisation. La situation ne va pas s’améliorer et tout cela ira alimenter la rhétorique des fascistes. Nous ferons au mieux pour aider les migrants. S’il n’y a pas de réaction de la part de la communauté internationale, la population locale et les groupes xénophobes vont nous tomber dessus.

      A lire aussiLesbos, le confinement sans fin

      Le gouvernement ne considère à aucun instant que la situation puisse être le résultat de sa politique. Il a pointé du doigt les ONG internationales : c’est hypocrite. Toute l’organisation des camps comme celui de Moria ne tient que grâce aux humanitaires. Les vrais victimes de ces drames à répétition, ce sont les migrants psychologiquement traumatisés et qui ne se sentent plus humains.

      https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2020/09/09/incendies-a-lesbos-nous-creons-une-zone-de-guerre-au-milieu-de-l-europe_1

    • Four face criminal charges over Moria blaze, two minors to return to Lesvos

      Four Afghan migrants linked to the catastrophic fires that razed the Moria reception center on Lesvos last week were charged on Wednesday with arson and membership of a criminal organization and given until Saturday to prepare their defense before an investigating magistrate.

      Another two Afghans implicated in the same incident, both unaccompanied minors who were transferred to the mainland the day after the first blaze, are to return to Lesvos where they are to face a magistrate on Monday.

      The six suspects were identified on video footage of the fires that circulated on social media.

      Meanwhile most of the 13 suspects detained in connection with a fire that broke out late on Tuesday near a migrant reception center on Samos have been released due to a lack of evidence linking them to the blaze, which was extinguished before it could affect the camp.

      On Wednesday, 20 officers who are to form part of a special police service on Lesvos for a temporary camp that has been set up there arrived on the island. Although the new camp has the capacity to host up to 8,000 people, only around 1,200 had moved in by Wednesday night.

      Thousands of former Moria residents continued to sleep on the streets and in olive groves on Wednesday.

      https://www.ekathimerini.com/257058/article/ekathimerini/news/four-face-criminal-charges-over-moria-blaze-two-minors-to-return-to-le

    • Communique from the Working Group mobilisation on 45th Session of the PPT

      MORIA burns, again. This documented horror in the heart of Europe, has been denounced from its beginning (2015) by dozens of reports from human rights, humanitarian and other non-governmental organisations. Almost 20,000 (at peak last February) and at the time of the fire, 13,000 human beings were parked in a prison of mud, rubbish and violence, behind barbed wire. MORIA is a planned limbo, where refugees are being denied their right to asylum, freedom and dignity, unable to perform even the most basic daily activities, such as sleeping, eating or communicating. It was a place where health care and education were denied to 4,000 children – left without dreams; adolescents whom the abnormal rates of suicide attempts should have been an alert of the level of despair in the camp (MSF); women terrorized by daily rapes, lack of hygiene and rampant violence. Hundreds of testimonies revealing the levels of unbearable “non-life” in MORIA, were kept unheard for years.

      Now the fenced camp, which was about to be closed, has burned to the ground. But how could this construction – the abandonment of human beings reduced to “numbers and bodies” – re-emerge as an island-lager in the heart of 20th Century Europe? How has this apartheid andsuffering as planned management of the “other”, of the “migrant” been accepted and tolerated in the long silence of 5 years? This inhumane “containment” had been erected as a model for migration policies by the European Commission and the EU Member States. MORIA has been the essence of the deterrence model aimed at discouraging the flight of potential asylum seekers from countries at war and to push them back to the ruins, sealed by the EU-Turkey agreement in 2016. It is documented that on Greek islands, the Geneva Convention was being constantly violated on a daily basis. Has it been buried in Lesbos?

      The most disturbing reality of all is that MORIA is not exceptional – but part of a chain of Camps and Hotspots across Europe constructed as sites “without rights” and a systematic planned annihilation of the “other”, psychically destroyed in camps, where they could have even burned alive. The EU borders, as well as the maritime routes have also become sites of death where thousands have drowned. This situation is indicative of the overall policy of necropolitics practiced by the European Union and its member states towards migrant and refugee peoples and is combined with the policy of militarised externalisation of borders. And inside the Fortress Europe – as is graphically shown in this time of COVID-19 – the migrant workers who make up a big part of the “essential workers’ in agriculture, care and domestic work – are also denied fundamental rights, subjected to daily racism and deprived of the conditions to live a decent human life.

      As part of that Europe that still recognizes itself first of all as “human”, and joining all the movements that in these hours are making their voice heard, we, the signatories, who have been witnessing for years the tragic fate of the migrant and refugee peoples, denounce even more the fire of MORIA as a symbolic and highly visible expression of the silent, permanent, planned crime against humanity for which the European Commission the European States are responsible, as highlighted by the Permanent People’s Tribunal sentence (Hearings 2017-2019). The humanitarian interventions of these hours – already minimal in itself – can only appear as a saving face operation. Once again these pronouncements refer to a time without deadlines, and therefore confirm the existing genocidal policy – as the European Commission, and the EU governments, opt for an identity that declares itself exempt from the obligations of the civilization of law. These obligations were meant to be consistent with the ‘never again’ commitment against the extermination camps and had made Europe a place of welcome and an indicator of its own development project.

      We therefore call on the EC and all the European States:

      To urgently evacuate the island and re-locate to safety and dignity the MORIA migrant and refugee peoples.
      To end the criminalisation of migrants and refugees and the criminalisation of solidarity.

      It is Not a Crime to Migrate or to seek Asylum! It is a Human Right!

      September 14, 2020
      The movements & oganisations convening the 45th PPT Migrant & Refugee Session

      https://transnationalmigrantplatform.net/campaigns-advocacy

    • Questions arise as Greece vows to “empty Lesvos of all refugees by Easter”

      Questions arise as Greece’s Citizens Protection Minister has vowed to empty the island of Lesvos of all refugees by Easter.One main question is, of course, that if all 12,000 refugees leave in the next 6 months, why does Greece build a permanent camp on the island, expected to be in operation until 2025 and it looks as if it is going to be “the largest in Greece” if not in the whole European Union? Where will these 12,000 people stay when they leave Lesvos? How about the refugees and asylum-seekers in overcrowded camps on other islands? At the same time, it looks as if the hastily set up temporary camp in Kara Tepe, hastily due to the Moria fires, is violating rules of constructions and other issues.

      In an exclusive interview with UK’s daily The Guardian, Minister Michalis Chrysochoidis said following the fires that destroyed the overcrowded Moria camp last week, that plans would be accelerated to decongest the outpost.
      Minister: Lesvos will be empty of all refugees by Easter”

      “They will all leave,” Citizens protection Minister Michalis Chrysochoidis told UK’s daily the Guardian on Tuesday. “Of the roughly 12,000 refugees here currently, I foresee 6,000 being transferred to the mainland by Christmas and the rest by Easter. The people of this island have gone through a lot. They’ve been very patient.”

      About 70% of asylum seekers on the island were Afghans who would be awarded refugee status and given travel papers, he said. Recognised refugees can move to another EU member state for up to three months using the documents.

      Chrysochoidis, who flew into Lesbos to help oversee relief efforts, welcomed reports that Germany was prepared to take in as many as 1,500 people from Moria.

      “It’s very generous, very brave,” Chrysochoidis said of the goodwill gesture. “All over Europe, countries have their own internal political problems around this issue but I also think they [EU states] can see we are protecting the bloc’s borders, we have greatly minimised flows.”

      On the problem that stranded refugees and asylum-seekers refuse to settle in the new temporary tents camp in Kara Tepe, Chrysochoidis blamed Afghan asylum-seekers and even some NGOs.

      “There are groups of Afghans and I am afraid even some human rights organisations who are encouraging thousands of people not to go in,” said Chrysochoidis.

      “It’s non-negotiable. They will leave the island but they have to go through this new facility and get the requisite legal documents first,” the minister stressed speaking to the Guardian.

      If refugees go, why a permanent refugee camp?

      Of course, in order to have 6,000 refugees relocated to the mainland by Christmas, that is in 3 months, you have to have structures to host them. Where are they? Where are the government plans for them? And where will the remaining 6,000 people go “by Easter”? Most likely, they will also found themselves on the mainland – because so far, the famous “EU solidarity” was never strong enough to take some burden from Greece’s shoulders – and neither will it be, I’m afraid.

      And how about the refugees and asylum-seekers in the overcrowded camps on the islands like Samos and Chios and Kos? Will they be transferred to the new camp on the island where “the people have gone through a lot and have be very patient,” as the Minister said?

      Minister Chrysochoidis and the government is general is proud to have minimized the refugees flows – even though often with questionable means such as “pushbacks” that are illegal.

      So the question that arises is near: If the plan is to have all 12,000 refugees relocated away from Lesvos within the next six months, then why does Greece build a new permanent camp –the largest in the EU! – on the island of Lesvos and thus with the assistance of the European Commission?

      Will the new camp host refugees currently on the other islands and also display Greece’s readiness should an influx turn into a problem again?

      President Ursula von der Leyen said on Wednesday during her speech at the European Palriament speech that “the Commission is now working on a plan, for a joint plan with the Greek authorities for a new camp in Lesvos. We can help with asylum and return procedures and significantly improve conditions for refugees.”

      Permanent camp until 2025

      With two decisions on September 14, the Ministry for Migration and Asylum has secured the amount for the lease of land plots on Lesvos for the permanent camp until 2025.

      According to an exclusive report by local media stonisi, the Ministry uploaded on state website for public expenditures Diavgeia, the amounts needed to be paid for the lease from September 2020 until 31. December 2025. The total price to be paid is 2.9 million euros.

      €142,051 for the lease of the land plots for the operation of the temporary camp in Kara Tepe until 31. December 2020.

      €2,750,000 (550,000 euros per year) for the lease of the same land plots in Kara Tepe from 2021 until 2025.

      According to the exclusive story, the size of the whole area, extending over several hundreds of acres and including the area of ​​the Ministry of National Defense [the firing range where the temporary camp is], shows the new refugee center will be much larger than that of Moria, the largest in Greece and in the whole European Union.”

      The camp will be in direct contact with residential areas and many dozens of businesses, a few hundred meters from the village of Panagiouda, the news website notes.

      Camp set up without necessary approvals

      At he same time, regarding the temporary camp, the Technical Chamber of Northern Aegean region (TEE) denounces “massive arbitrariness” and violations of construction and others laws.

      The Mavrovouni Firing Range (Kara Tepe) for the temporary settlement of refugees and immigrants belong to the Ministry of Defense but not the coastline and the shore lines, the TEE says among others..

      In an announcement, the TEE says that the concession of the area for a camp needed approval by Environmental services, by the Marine Antiquities Authority, the Forest Service and General Staff of the Navy as well as some other departments of the state.

      The TEE raises the issue of the “highest National Security” and of the “defense of the island” that is closed to the Turkish coast.

      https://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2020/09/16/greece-refugees-lesvos-permanent-camp

    • Greece vows to empty Lesbos of all refugees by Easter after fire

      Exclusive: minister says island ‘has been through a lot’ as he welcomes new German offer.

      The island of Lesbos will be emptied of refugees by next Easter, the Greek government has vowed, as it welcomed Germany’s offer to take in 1,500 people left without shelter.

      Following the devastating fires that destroyed the notoriously overcrowded Moria facility last week, Greece’s top public order official said plans would be accelerated to decongest the outpost.

      “They will all leave,” the civil protection minister, Michalis Chrysochoidis, told the Guardian. “Of the roughly 12,000 refugees here currently, I foresee 6,000 being transferred to the mainland by Christmas and the rest by Easter. The people of this island have gone through a lot. They’ve been very patient.”

      About 70% of asylum seekers on Lesbos were Afghans who would be awarded refugee status and given travel papers, he said. Recognised refugees can move to another EU member state for up to three months using the documents.

      Greek police detained five people on Tuesday in connection with the blazes at the camp, and are searching for one other. No more details were given but from the outset officials have attributed the fires to camp residents pressuring authorities to leave.

      Chrysochoidis, who flew into Lesbos to help oversee relief efforts, welcomed reports that Germany was prepared to take in as many as 1,500 people from Moria.

      The German coalition government on Tuesday agreed to take in a total of 1,553 people from 408 families whose protected status has been confirmed by Greek authorities, Angela Merkel’s spokesperson said.

      Last Friday, Germany said it would take up to 150 out of approximately 400 unaccompanied minors from the camp, where more than 12,000 people were left homeless by the fire in the early hours of 9 September.

      “It’s very generous, very brave,” Chrysochoidis said of the goodwill gesture. “All over Europe, countries have their own internal political problems around this issue but I also think they [EU states] can see we are protecting the bloc’s borders, we have greatly minimised flows.”

      Merkel insisted on Monday any transfer of migrants to Germany would need to go hand-in-hand with a broader European initiative, emphasising her support for Greek plans for a new reception centre on Lesbos.

      Apart from Luxembourg, no other country has so far showed a willingness to partake in a pan-European solution to the crisis in Moria.

      Some countries, such as Austria, have categorically rejected taking in people from the destroyed camp. “If we give in to this pressure now, then we risk making the same mistake we made in 2015,” said chancellor, Sebastian Kurz, referring to Merkel’s decision to take in large numbers of refugees five years ago.

      Germany’s leader faces domestic pressure from two sides on the issue. Members of her own party, the Christian Democratic Union (CDU), have warned that any resettlement programme must be carried out in a way as to avoid chaotic scenes akin to those at the height of the 2015 refugee crisis. “We must not go alone,” said CDU delegate Mathias Middelberg.

      From the other side, Merkel faces calls from her coalition partner, the centre-left Social Democratic party (SPD), and a number of federal states and city mayors across Germany for Europe’s largest economy to step up its humanitarian efforts.

      The leadership of the SPD, which will need to approve Merkel and Seehofer’s decision, has pressured its senior coalition to take in more than 5,000 people to alleviate the situation in Greece.

      German calls for resettlement schemes have until now also faced resistance from Greece, where prime minister, Kyriakos Mitsotakis, accused some residents of Moria for trying to blackmail his government by deliberately setting the fires that destroyed their camp.

      Chrysochoidis insisted it was crucial Moria’s erstwhile occupants move into a temporary camp, close to Mytilene, the island’s port capital, that the government, with the aid of the army had rushed to build. Opposition is such that seven days after the first blaze, only 1,000 had so far agreed to enter the new facility.

      Athens’ centre-right government has enlisted NGOs and distributed multi-lingual notices in a bid to encourage relocation, saying the new site provides a safe place for asylum seekers to complete applications. Many have denounced the facility as “a new Moria, another prison.”

      As tensions mounted, the Greek migration minister Notis Mitarachi alluded to the possible use of force if the displaced migrants refused to go voluntarily.

      Nine riot police units and water cannon have been dispatched to the island. “If this is not possible through discussion, then the police will have to be used,” he told Mega TV. “It is their obligation to move to the new site,” he said acknowledging for the first time that families would likely spend the winter in tents.

      The Greek government has pledged to build a new structure on the island that will be co-managed by EU agencies but says construction of the camp in a place that has yet to be decided will require at least six months.

      Concerns over Covid-19 – more than 21 asylum seekers since the fires have tested positive for the virus in addition to 35 who were diagnosed with it before – have made resettlement even more pressing.

      Close to 12,500 men, women and children have been living out in the open, often in makeshift tents of tarps and bamboo reeds. Some 406 lone migrant children, also in the camp, were flown to the mainland immediately before continuing on to European states that have agreed to accept them.

      “There are groups of Afghans and I am afraid even some human rights organisations who are encouraging thousands of people not to go in,” said Chrysochoidis, who is seen as the face of the centre-right government’s tough public order policies. “It’s non-negotiable. They will leave the island but they have to go through this new facility and get the requisite legal documents first.”

      Efforts will be launched in the coming days to clear the charred remains of what had once been Europe’s largest refugee camp. Designed to host no more than 3,000, Moria accommodated almost 10 times that number at its height and was regularly condemned by aid groups for its deplorable conditions.

      “It was a camp of shame,” the politician admitted, denying that the government was also forcibly pushing back other refugees who were trying to get to Greece . “Now it belongs to history. It will be cleared up and replaced by olive groves.”

      https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/sep/15/after-fire-greece-vows-to-empty-lesbos-of-all-refugees-by-easter

    • Six arrested over Lesvos camp blaze

      Greek police have detained six migrants over a fire that razed the Moria refugee camp to the ground, the government said on Tuesday, as thousands of displaced people refused to move to a new facility and demanded to leave Lesbos island.

      More than 12,000 people, mostly refugees from Afghanistan, Africa and Syria, were left without shelter, proper sanitation or access to food and water after a fire tore through the overcrowded Moria migrant camp last Wednesday.

      Greek authorities believe the fire was deliberately lit by camp occupants after quarantine measures were imposed following the discovery of COVID cases on the site, but the incident has put the migrant issue firmly back on the European agenda.

      Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis repeated a call for more help from the European Union, which has struggled to find a unified approach to the migrant crisis at its borders, saying it was time for “tangible solidarity” from Europe.

      European Council President Charles Michel who visited Lesbos said the challenge was European not just Greek and urged for more commitment by EU members for a new migration policy to be effective.

      “This is difficult, a very complex situation, but on behalf of the European Union, I would want to say that I refuse to paper over this migration challenge. This is a common European challenge,” Michel said.

      Government officials in Berlin said Germany could take in up to 1,500 people stranded by the fire, in addition to 100-150 Berlin has already agreed to take in. But a wider solution has remained elusive.

      Mitsotakis said a permanent new reception facility would be built on Lesbos with EU support and that the notoriously overcrowded and squalid Moria camp “belongs to the past”.

      On the ground in Lesbos, however, thousands, including children, were still sleeping rough a week after the blaze.

      Officials were struggling to overcome resistance from migrants hoping to be allowed to leave the island who fear that life in temporary shelters being erected would be no better than the conditions they endured in Moria.

      Migrants wearing masks as a precaution against the coronavirus queued outside the camp gates to receive water, food and blankets from aid workers. The task was complicated by the need for COVID-19 tests, with at least 25 positive cases found among the displaced.

      “The big concern is that even though many thousands of places are available and will continue to be expanded, there are still less than 1,000 that have been occupied,” said Luciano Calestini, head of the Greece office of the United Nations childrens organisation UNICEF.

      Only a few hundred migrants, mainly unaccompanied minors, have been moved off Lesbos. Greek officials have said there will be no mass transfers and all asylum seekers will have to go into the new shelter.

      https://www.ekathimerini.com/257005/article/ekathimerini/news/six-arrested-over-lesvos-camp-blaze

      #arrestation

    • Reportage : une semaine après l’incendie de Moria, les migrants vivent toujours dans l’enfer de la rue

      Depuis une semaine, les quelque 13 000 personnes qui ont fui les incendies du camp de Moria, sur l’île de Lesbos, dorment à la rue. Au bord de la route de Mytilène, elles n’ont ni eau, ni nourriture, ni couverture.

      Il est environ 15h, le soleil écrase de toutes ses forces le camp qui s’est formé le long de la route qui mène de Moria à Mytilène, sur l’île grecque de Lesbos. Soudainement, des centaines de personnes cessent leurs activités, quittent leur abri et forment, en l’espace de quelques secondes, une queue qui s’étend à perte de vue. Au bout de la file, des bénévoles d’un collectif d’ONG débutent une distribution de nourriture.

      Treize mille repas vont être servis. Il risque de ne pas y en avoir pour tout le monde. « Les distributions n’ont lieu qu’une fois par jour et pour avoir à manger, il faut être costaud. Il y a un problème d’organisation », déplore Michaël, originaire de République démocratique du Congo (RDC).

      Lundi 14 septembre, sur la route de Mytilène, les migrants ont faim depuis près d’une semaine. Lorsque les résidents de Moria ont fui les flammes qui ont dévoré le camp dans la nuit du 8 au 9 septembre et qu’ils ont été bloqués par la police sur cette route, certains ont pu acheter de quoi manger au grand magasin Lidl, en bord de mer.

      Mais les policiers ont rapidement exigé du gérant qu’il tire le rideau. Les stations services ont fermé, elles aussi, ainsi que tous les autres commerces le long de cette route qui mène au centre-ville de Mytilène.

      Pour se nourrir, certains rescapés de Moria demandent à d’autres migrants qui vivent dans Mytilène de leur acheter de la nourriture et de la leur apporter au camp informel qui a vu le jour. D’autres ont réussi à sauver des flammes quelques aliments qu’ils avaient achetés à Moria, souvent des paquets de pâtes.

      Gertrude et Naomi préparent un plat de légumes dans une grande marmite posée sur un feu. Ces deux Congolaises ont tenté quelques fois de récupérer de la nourriture lors des distributions mais être servi relève du combat. « Pour avoir de la nourriture, il faut se bagarrer », affirme Naomi.
      « Aidez-nous ! »

      Assises sur une grande couverture grise flanquée du logo du HCR, deux jeunes Afghanes qui s’appellent toutes les deux Zahra donnent le biberon à leurs bébés de 5 et 7 mois. « On a ramené le lait de Moria », explique l’une d’elles, en brandissant un petit sac en plastique à moitié rempli de lait en poudre.

      Les deux jeunes mères manquent de nourriture et d’eau ainsi que de vêtements pour leurs enfants. C’est ce que dit aussi une autre jeune Afghane en montrant le foulard dans lequel elle a dû emmailloter sa fille de quelques mois. « Aidez-nous ! », supplie-t-elle.

      Le seul point d’eau du camp improvisé se trouve à quelques dizaines de mètres de là et n’a rien d’officiel. Dans une rue qui remonte vers les oliveraies, les tuyaux destinés à l’irrigation ont été percés. Autour de chaque trou, plusieurs personnes se pressent pour remplir des bouteilles vides, laver un vêtement ou se rincer le visage. L’eau ruisselle en permanence dans la petite rue en pente et charrie des ordures.

      Couvertures et sacs de couchage sont également très recherchés sur le camp car les nuits sont déjà fraîches. Michaël n’a que son sweat-shirt bleu pour dormir. Le Congolais guette la route car il a entendu dire que des bénévoles distribuaient quelques sacs de couchage dans le camp. Mais tellement de personnes en manquent qu’il n’y en a sûrement déjà plus. Cependant, « ce qui nous préoccupe le plus c’est de ne pas pouvoir se doucher et aller aux toilettes », explique Michaël.

      Le seul moyen de se laver, c’est d’aller dans la mer. La plage n’est qu’à quelques minutes de marche du parking Lidl. Michaël aimerait aller se laver mais il n’a pas de savon.
      Un tiers d’enfants

      Cet après-midi, des dizaines d’enfants jouent dans la mer. La chaleur étouffante a aussi poussé quelques adultes à se mettre à l’eau.

      Azim shampouine énergiquement la tête de son fils Moustapha, 3 ans, pendant que sa fille Rokhoya rayonne de bonheur en barbotant autour de lui. Après cinq mois de confinement dans le camp de Moria, c’est la première fois qu’ils peuvent approcher la mer.

      Le camp compte plus de 4 000 enfants, selon l’Unicef, soit un tiers des migrants de Lesbos. À la nuit tombée, quand les bruits des machines de chantier qui construisent le camp provisoire sur un terrain militaire en bord de mer se taisent, on n’entend plus que les cris des enfants qui jouent. Le parking du Lidl prend des airs de cour de récréation.

      Les parents s’inquiètent de voir leurs enfants ne pas aller à l’école. La vie dans les conditions indignes du camp de Moria, puis au bord de cette route, pourrait aussi avoir des conséquences psychologiques à long terme sur ces enfants, met en garde Dimitra Chasioti, psychologue pour Médecins sans frontières (MSF).

      L’environnement dans lequel ils ont grandi pourrait affecter « la manière dont ils gèrent les difficultés mais aussi leurs interactions avec les autres », décrit-elle devant la clinique mobile installée par l’ONG à deux pas des tentes.

      Parmi les adultes, c’est l’angoisse de ne pas avoir d’information sur leur avenir – et notamment sur le nouveau camp provisoire en construction - qui est le plus difficile à gérer.

      Dimanche matin, Notis Mitarachi, le ministre grec de la Migration a déclaré que « tous les demandeurs d’asile y seraient transférés ». Selon son ministère, quelque 800 exilés sont désormais logés dans ce camp temporaire, fermé à la presse. L’AFP a recueilli des témoignages de personnes à l’intérieur qui ont affirmé n’avoir ni douche, ni matelas.

      Naomi semble aussi terrifiée à l’idée d’aller dans ce nouveau camp que de rester à la rue. Cette mère d’une fille de 5 ans et d’un garçon de 7 mois interroge : « Comment est le camp là-bas ? Est-ce que nous devrions y aller ? »

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/27269/reportage-une-semaine-apres-l-incendie-de-moria-les-migrants-vivent-to

    • Une intervention intéressante sur Lesbos de la présidente de la Commission européenne ainsi que de la chancelière allemande en réponse aux journalistes lors d’une conférence de presse portant initialement sur un sommet UE-Chine...il faut vraiment faire du suivi sur tout pour avoir les informations ! 😉

      La chancelière a eu une parole que je trouve politiquement extrêmement forte en disant la chose suivante : « la #concentration des nombres n’est pas la bonne approche ». Ce qui est remarquable c’est qu’elle a parlé en allemand, et qu’elle a utilisé le mot « #Konzentration » ("Ich glaube, dass die Konzentration auf einer Zahl der falsche Ansatz ist"). Cette phrase porte en elle quelque chose de très fort que Migreurop dénonce depuis sa fondation, l’#encampement, la stratégie des #nasses. Ce genre de #terminologie reste, en allemand, évidemment très délicat vu l’usage du terme par le régime nazi, et je doute fort que l’on puisse imaginer la chancelière d’avoir omis cet élément l’espace d’un instant. Je pencherais plutôt pour une remarque volontaire, appelant les choses par leur nom. Nos ami.es allemand.es sur cette liste auront peut-être une autre lecture, je serais heureuse de les lire à ce sujet.

      Cela n’empêchera, en suite de cette intervention, ni la chancelière, ni la présidente de la Commission européenne, de justifier de la création à venir d’un « #centre_d'accueil_européen » géré par les agences européennes et les autorités grecques en lieu et place des #hotspots actuels en Grèce (un « projet pilote » selon Van der Layen)...Ce qui finalement correspondait au plan initial comme le dénonce Migreurop depuis le départ.

      Vidéo à partir de la minute 25 et 50 secondes (question du journaliste) : prise de parole #Merkel puis #Van_der_Layen. tout est doublé en anglais
      https://www.euronews.com/2020/09/14/watch-live-eu-chiefs-update-on-summit-with-china

      Message de Marie Martin reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 15.09.2020

      #Angela_Merkel

    • For many migrants, the dream of freedom ends in Lesbos

      After the devastating fires in the Moria migrant camp on Lesbos, Muhammad spent days on a sealed-off section of road with thousands of others. His most fervent wish is to leave the island, as DW’s Max Zander reports.

      “We had some hope, but we have lost it. We thought the government would take us to Athens now,” says Muhammad Sator Massi. Muhammad, who is 19, is sitting alone on a curb in the blazing sun, looking down at the ground in resignation.

      Near him, Greek garbage collectors are at work, loading one blue garbage bag after the other onto their truck with a crane. Today, they have started getting rid of the traces left by the past week. The road leading from Lesbos’ capital, Mytilene, past the Moria migrant camp is littered with plastic bottles, packaging and the remnants of temporary shelters. The bushes at the side are full of rubbish. Even though the sea is just a few steps away, there is a terrible stench.

      Muhammad has fled from Afghanistan with his aunt and uncle and their six children. They have already been on Lesbos for nine months. He says that it has been a terrible time that has left deep marks on him. After the fires last week, he set off for the capital with the other camp residents. Police stopped them and sealed off the section of road they were on. Muhammad and his family were among those forced to sleep in the open air, some on cardboard cartons on the bare ground.

      They spent more than a week under these conditions, then the police began clearing the improvised camp bit by bit. This morning, they arrived at Muhammad’s tent. The family was eating at the time, he says. A police officer threw their belongings all over the place and yelled at them, then began demolishing their shelter, Muhammad says.

      Doubtful about conditions in the new camp

      Now there is a new camp, called Kara Tepe. “They are forcing us to go there. We don’t have a choice. I don’t think it will be better than Moria; it will just be a repeat,” says Muhammad.

      Like most people here, he is afraid that the conditions there will be just as unbearable or even more so than in Moria: thousands of people in a confined space without enough toilets and showers, too little to eat, barely any medical care and violence every night.

      A spokesman for the Greek Migration Ministry insists that the conditions in the new camp are good, with toilets, running water and electricity. And he says its capacities are being expanded.

      But people who are already in the camp have reported the opposite, saying that there are far too few toilets, meals just once a day and no mattresses or blankets in the big white tents provided by the UNHCR and the Red Cross. Many are also worried because the camp, set up in haste on a former army drill ground, is likely to be situated on soil full of toxic substances and munitions. While it was being constructed, soldiers with metal detectors could be seen searching the area around the tents. But the Migration Ministry spokesman declares that “everything is safe.”

      For refugees like Muhammad, the biggest problem is the uncertainty about whether they will be allowed to leave the camp later. Greek officials have announced that it is initially to be put under quarantine, after more than 200 cases of coronavirus infection were recorded in the past few days. After two weeks, residents will be allowed to leave the camp during the day, they say. But that is not certain, and Muhammad and others are worried.

      “We came here looking for protection. We aren’t prisoners. I have been on Lesbos, in Moria, for a year. I can’t bear it any longer,” he says.

      Lost time

      Muhammad slowly gets up, because he wants to go down the road to his aunt’s family and register in the new camp with them. He seems tired and worn out. The road around him is almost deserted. Apart from the Greek garbage collectors, only a few people occasionally come by: a family from Afghanistan laden with plastic bags, a young man from Congo carrying an old, dirty tent. Muhammad sets off in the same direction and walks slowly toward the new camp.

      He is smoking a cigarette. “I never used to do that; I was sporty and kept away from people who smoke. But now it calms me down,” he says.

      He says he has changed a lot in the time here and that he is mentally exhausted. “We are losing a part of our lives here. It doesn’t feel as if we are alive,” he says while going past a police bus.

      In Afghanistan, he was well-off financially, he says. His father is a member of the provincial council in Wardak province and owns a water company. His family had money but no security. One day, Muhammad recounts, he was on his way home from school when he was stopped by some men in a car. They said they were friends of his father and asked him to get in. When he refused, they tried to drag him into the car, but he was able to pull free and run away. “When you go to school, you don’t know if you will come home alive,” he says.

      He decided to flee to Europe with his aunt. But he has given up hopes of starting a new life here, perhaps in Germany. He wanted to learn the language, study medicine and play football, his great passion.

      Rather be deported than be a prisoner

      By now, Muhammad has arrived at the new camp. Next to the road, there are groups, mostly of men, sitting and waiting in the shade of low bushes. For the moment, only families are being allowed to join the queue before the entrance. They are standing tightly packed. The police, equipped with protective clothing and masks, keep at a distance. Each person is registered and given a coronavirus test.

      Muhammad said earlier on that he would rather be deported back to Afghanistan and die there than go to this prison. But now he has no choice. He sees his aunt standing at the front of the queue. Slowly, his head bowed, Muhammad pushes his way past the other families and disappears in the crowd.

      https://www.dw.com/en/for-many-migrants-the-dream-of-freedom-ends-in-lesbos/a-54989158?maca=en-rss_top_news-13961-xml-mrss

    • Menschenrechtsverletzungen bei Rückkehrprogrammen

      Immer wieder gibt es Berichte über eklatante Verstöße gegen die humanitären Bedingungen bei den Rückkehrprogrammen der IOM. Eine neue Studie von Brot für die Welt und medico international belegt die Vorwürfe.

      Die EU lagert seit Jahren Grenzkontrollen aus und setzt innerhalb von Herkunfts- und Transitregionen auf die Förderung „freiwilliger“ Rückkehr, damit Migrantinnen und Migranten erst gar nicht Europas Außengrenzen erreichen. Eine neue Studie von Brot für die Welt und medico international weist nach, dass die EU dabei Menschenrechtsverletzungen an den Außengrenzen und in den Transitländern Libyen, Niger und Algerien in Kauf nimmt.

      Die EU-Kommission hatte 2015 den Nothilfe-Treuhandfonds für Afrika aufgelegt. Eine gemeinsame Taskforce aus Europäischer Union, Afrikanischer Union und Vereinten Nationen beauftragte die Internationale Organisation für Migration (IOM), ein humanitäres Rückkehrprogramm für Migrantinnen und Migranten durchzuführen.Tatsächlich aber gibt es immer wieder Berichte über eklatante Verstöße gegen die humanitären Bedingungen.In ihrer Studie kann die Autorin Jill Alpes nun belegen, dass die Teilnahme an den Rückkehrprogrammen oftmals unfreiwillig erfolgt und teils erheblicher psychischer und in Einzelfällen auch physischer Druck auf die Migrantinnen und Migranten ausgeübt wird, damit sie der Rückführung zustimmen.

      Zusammenfassung der Studie

      Eine neue von Brot für die Welt und medico international herausgegebene Studie untersuchtbestehende Rückkehrprogramme für Migrantinnen und Migranten in Libyen und Niger entlang der Frage: Sind die Programme tatsächlich geeignete Instrumente zum Schutz der Menschen? Oder werden sie nach ihrer Rückkehr neuen Gefahren ausgesetzt?

      Im November 2017 alarmierte ein Beitrag des Nachrichtensenders CNN die Öffentlichkeit. Die Reporter berichteten über sklavenähnliche und zutiefst menschenunwürdige Verhältnisse in libyschen Internierungslagern. Europäische und afrikanische Regierungen, die zur gleichen Zeit ihr Gipfeltreffen in Abidjan abhielten, sahen sich daraufhin gezwungen, geeignete Schritte zum Schutz und zur Rettung der internierten Migranten und Flüchtlinge zu präsentieren.

      Doch statt eine Evakuierung der Menschen in sichere europäische Länder zu organisieren oder in Erwägung zu ziehen, die Unterstützung der für Menschenrechtsverletzungen verantwortlichen libyschen Küstenwache zu beenden, wurde die Rückführung von Flüchtlingen und Migranten aus Libyen in ihre Herkunftsländer beschlossen. Eine gemeinsame Taskforce aus Europäischer Union, Afrikanischer Union und Vereinten Nationen beauftragte die Internationale Organisation für Migration (IOM) damit, ein humanitäres Rückkehrprogramm aus Libyen durchzuführen.

      Doch in ihrer Studie kann nun die Autorin Jill Alpes belegen, dass es bei der Umsetzung der Rückkehrprogramme teilweise zu erheblichen Verstößen gegen humanitäre und menschenrechtliche Prinzipien kommt. So legen Berichte von Betroffenen nahe, dass die Beteiligung an den Rückkehrprogrammen keineswegs immer freiwillig erfolgt, wie von IOM behauptet, sondern teils erheblicher psychischer und in Einzelfällen auch physischer Druck auf die Migrantinnen und Migranten ausgeübt wird, damit sie ihrer eigenen Rückführung zustimmen. Vielfach erscheint ihnen eine Rückkehr in ihr Herkunftsland angesichts in Libyen drohender Folter und Gewalt als das kleinere Übel, nicht jedoch als eine geeignete Maßnahme, um tatsächlich in Sicherheit und Schutz zu leben. In Niger akzeptierten interviewte Migrantinnen und Migranten ihre Rückführung nach schweren Menschenrechtsverletzungen und einer lebensbedrohlichen Abschiebung in die Wüste durch die algerischen Behörden. Häufig finden sich Migrantinnen und Migranten nach ihrer Rückführung mit neuen Gefahren konfrontiert, bzw. genau jenen Gefahren wieder ausgesetzt, die sie einst zur Flucht bewegten.

      Auch die zur Verfügung gestellten Reintegrationshilfen, für die u.a. über den EU Trust Fund for Africa (EUTF) erhebliche finanzielle Mittel aufgewendet werden, bewertet die Autorin kritisch. Libyen allein hat seit 2015 mehr als 280 Millionen Euro für die Rückkehrprogramme bekommen. Offizielle Zahlen bestätigen, dass nur ein Teil der Rückkehrerinnen und Rückkehrer überhaupt Zugang zu den Programmen erhält. Viele scheitern bereits daran, die Kosten für den Transport zum Büro der IOM aufzubringen, um dort Unterstützung zu beantragen. Empfängerinnen und Empfänger von Reintegrationshilfen kritisieren, dass die angebotenen Hilfsmaßnahmen, bspw. Seminare zur Unternehmensgründung, häufig an ihrem eigentlichen Bedarf vorbeigingen und dem formulierten Ziel, nämlich nachhaltige Lebensperspektiven zu entwickeln, nicht ausreichend gerecht werden würden.

      Um tatsächlich zum Schutz von Migrantinnen und Migranten in Nord- und Westafrika beizutragen, zeigt die Autorin politische Handlungsempfehlungen auf. Eine Neuausrichtung der Flüchtlings- und Migrationspolitik müsse sich orientieren an Schadensvermeidung und -verhinderung, Befähigung der Menschen, ihre Rechte einzufordern, Unterstützung der Entwicklung von Selbstschutzkapazitäten und bedarfsgerechter Hilfe.

      Konkret:

      Die Europäische Union und die EU-Mitgliedstaaten müssen die Finanzierung der libyschen Küstenwache einstellen. Stattdessen sollten sie für proaktive Such- und Rettungsaktionen im zentralen Mittelmeer sorgen, Ausschiffungs- und faire Verteilungsmechanismen sowie besseren Zugang zu Asylverfahren schaffen, die Rechte von Migrantinnen, Migranten und Flüchtlingen in der migrations-politischen Zusammenarbeit mit Libyen schützen und sich zu einer globalen Teilung der Verantwortung und zur Förderung regulärer Migrationswege verpflichten.
      Die derzeitige Abschiebepraxis von Staatsangehörigen aus Subsahara-Ländern von Algerien nach Niger stellt eine eklatante Verletzung des Völkerrechts dar und macht Migrantinnen und Migranten extrem verwundbar. Internationale Organisationen, die Europäische Union und die Regierung von Niger müssen eine entschlossene und öffentliche Haltung gegen diese Praktiken einnehmen und die potentiell negativen Auswirkungen der in Niger verfügbaren Rückkehrprogramme auf die Abschiebepraxis aus Algerien kritisch untersuchen.
      Rückkehrprogramme müssen den Rechten von Menschen, die vor oder während ihrer Migration intern vertrieben, gefoltert oder Opfer von Menschenhandel geworden sind, mehr Aufmerksamkeit schenken. Opfer von Menschenhandel und Folter sollten Zugang zu einem Asylverfahren oder einem Umsiedlungsmechanismus in ein Drittland als Alternative zur Rückkehr in die Herkunftsländer haben.
      Humanitäre Akteure (und ihre Geldgeber) sollten die Begünstigten von Programmen ausschließlich auf der Grundlage humanitärer Bedürfnisse definieren und sich nicht von Logiken des Migrationsmanagements beeinflussen lassen. Nur ein kleiner Teil der afrikanischen Migrationsbewegungen hat Europa zum Ziel. Der Entwicklungsbeitrag von Rückkehrerinnen und Rückkehrern ist dann am stärksten, wenn sich die Migrantinnen und Migranten freiwillig zu einer Rückkehr entschlossen haben.
      Gelder der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit sollten nur dann für Rückkehr- und Reintegrationsprogramme verwendet werden, wenn eine positive Verbindung zu Entwicklung hergestellt werden kann. Die entwicklungspolitischen Auswirkungen der Reintegrationshilfe müssen untersucht und mit dem Nutzen und den Auswirkungen der Rücküberweisungen von Migrantinnen und Migranten verglichen werden.

      https://www.medico.de/menschenrechtsverletzungen-bei-rueckkehrprogrammen-17805

    • Paying for migrants to go back home: how the EU’s Voluntary Return scheme is failing the desperate

      By the time James boarded a flight from Libya to Nigeria at the end of 2018, he had survived a Mediterranean shipwreck, travelled through a half dozen African states, been shot and spent two years being abused and tortured in Libya’s brutal detention centres.

      In 2020, back home in Benin City, Edo State, James has been evicted from his house after failing to cover his rent and sleeps on the floor of his barbershop.

      He has been shunned by his family and friends for his failure to reach Europe.

      “There’s no happiness that you are back. No one seems to care about you [...]. You came back empty-handed,” he told Euronews.

      James was one of around 81,000 African migrants returned to their home nation with the aid of the UN’s International Organization for Migration (IOM) and paid for by the European Union, as part of the €357 million Joint Initiative. As well as a seat on a flight out of Libya and a number of other transit nations, migrants are also promised cash, support and counselling to allow them to reintegrate in their home countries once they return.

      But a Euronews investigation across seven African nations has revealed massive failings in the programme, considered to be the EU’s flagship response to stopping migrants trying to get to Europe.

      Dozens of migrants that have been through the programme told Euronews that once they returned, no support was forthcoming. Even those who did receive financial support - like James - said it was insufficient.

      Many are considering making a new break for Europe as soon as the chance arises.

      “I feel I don’t belong here,” James said. “If the opportunity comes, I’m taking it. I’m leaving the country.”

      Of the 81,000 migrants returned since 2017, almost 33,000 were flown back from Libya, many of whom have suffered detention, abuse and violence at the hands of people smugglers, militias and criminal gangs. Conditions are so bad in the north African country that the programme is called Voluntary Humanitarian Return (VHR), rather than the Assisted Voluntary Return (AVR) programme elsewhere in Africa.

      Mohi, 24, who spent three years in Libya, accepted the offer of a flight back home in 2019. But, once there, his reintegration package never materialised. “Nothing has been provided to us, they keep telling us tomorrow,” he told Euronews from north Darfur, Sudan.

      Mohi is not alone. IOM’s own statistics on returnees to Sudan reveal that only 766 out of over 2,600 have received economic support. It blames high rates of inflation and a shortage of both goods and cash in the market.

      But Kwaku Arhin-Sam, who evaluates development projects as director of the Friedensau Institute for Evaluation, estimates that half of the IOM reintegration programmes fail.

      “Most people are lost after a few days”, he said.
      Two-thirds of migrants don’t complete the reintegration programmes

      The IOM itself lowers this estimate even further: the UN agency told Euronews that so far only one-third of the migrants who have started reintegration assistance have completed the process. A spokesperson said that as the joint initiative is a voluntary process, “migrants can decide to pull out at any time, or not to join at all”.

      He said that reintegrating migrants once they return home goes far beyond the organisation’s mandate, and “requires strong leadership from national authorities”, as well as “active contributions at all levels of society”.

      Between May 2017 and February 2019, IOM had helped over 12,000 people return to Nigeria. Of them, 9,000 were “reachable” when they returned home, 5,000 received business training and 4,300 received “reintegration aid”. If access to counselling or health services is included, IOM Nigeria says, a total of 7,000 out of 12,000 returnees - or 58% - received reintegration support.

      But the number of people classified as having completed the reintegration assistance programme was just 1,289, and research by Jill Alpes, a migration expert and research associate at the Nijmegen Centre for Border Research, found that surveys to check the effectiveness of these packages were conducted with only 136 returnees.

      Meanwhile, a Harvard study on Nigerian returnees from Libya estimates that 61.3% of the respondents were not working after their return, and an additional 16.8% only worked for a short period of time, not long enough to generate a stable source of income. Upon return, the vast majority of returnees, 98.3%, were not in any form of regular education.

      The European Commissioner for home affairs, Ylva Johansson, admitted to Euronews that “this is one area where we need improvements.” Johansson said it was too early to say what those improvements might be but maintained the EU have a good relationship with the IOM.

      Sandrine, Rachel and Berline, from Cameroon, agreed to board an IOM flight from Misrata, Libya, to Yaounde, Cameroon’s capital in September 2018.

      In Libya, they say they suffered violence and sexual abuse and had already risked their lives in the attempt at crossing the Mediterranean. On that occasion, they were intercepted by the Libyan coastguard and sent back to Libya.

      Once back home, Berline and Rachel say they received no money or support from IOM. Sandrine was given around 900,000 cfa francs (€1,373.20) to pay for her children’s education and start a small business - but it didn’t last long.

      “I was selling chicken by the roadside in Yaounde, but the project didn’t go well and I left it,” she said.

      Sandrine, from Cameroon, recalled giving birth in a Tripoli detention centre to the sound of gunfire.

      All three said that they had no idea where they would sleep when they returned to Cameroon, and they had no money to even call their families to inform them of their journey.

      “We left the country, and when we came back we found the same situation, sometimes even worse. That’s why people decide to leave again,” Berline says.

      In November 2019, fewer than half of the 3,514 Cameroonian migrants who received some form of counselling from IOM were reported as “effectively integrated”.

      Seydou, a Malian returnee, received money from IOM to pay his rent for three months and the medical bills for his sick wife. He was also provided with business training and given a motorbike taxi.

      But in Mali he takes home around €15 per day, compared to the more than €1,300 he was able to send home when he was working illegally in Algeria, which financed the construction of a house for his brother in the village.

      He is currently trying to arrange a visa that would enable him to join another of his brothers in France.

      Seydou is one of the few lucky Malians, though. .Alpes’ forthcoming research, published by Brot für die Welt (the relief agency of the Protestant Churches in Germany) and Medico International, found that only 10% of migrants returned to Mali up to January 2019 had received any kind of support from IOM.

      IOM, meanwhile, claims that 14,879 Malians have begun the reintegration process - but the figure does not reveal how many people completed it.
      The stigma of return

      In some cases the money migrants receive is used to fund another attempt to reach Europe.

      In one case, a dozen people who had reached Europe and been sent home were discovered among the survivors of a 2019 shipwreck of a boat headed to the Canary Islands. “They had returned and they had decided to take the route again,” said Laura Lungarotti, IOM chief mission in Mauritania.

      Safa Msehli, a spokeswoman for the IOM, told Euronews that it could not prevent individuals from attempting to reach Europe again once they had been returned.

      “It is however in the hands of people to decide whether or not they migrate and in its different programme IOM doesn’t plan to prevent people from re-migrating”, she said.

      What is the IOM?

      From 2016, the IOM rebranded itself as the UN Migration Agency, and its budget has ballooned from US$242.2 million (€213 million) in 1998 to exceed US$2 billion (€1.7 billion) for the first time in the autumn of 2019 - an eightfold increase. Though not part of the UN, the IOM is now a “related organisation”, with a relationship similar to that of a private contractor.

      The EU and its member states collectively are the largest contributors to IOM’s budget, accounting for nearly half of its operational funding.

      IOM has been keen to highlight cases of when its voluntary return programme has been successful on its website, including that of Khadeejah Shaeban, a Sudanese returnee from Libya who was able to set up a tailoring shop.

      https://www.euronews.com/2020/06/19/paying-for-migrants-to-go-back-home-how-the-eu-s-voluntary-return-scheme-i

    • Abschottung statt Entwicklung

      Brot für die Welt und medico international kritisieren das EU-Programm zur Rückführung von Flüchtlingen in ihre Heimatländer und fordern eine Neuausrichtung in der Europäischen Flüchtlings- und Migrationspolitik.

      Fünf Jahre nachdem die EU den EU-Nothilfe-Treuhandfonds (EUTF) in Afrika ins Leben rief, ziehen Brot für die Welt und medico international in einer aktuellen Studie eine kritische Zwischenbilanz. Im Zentrum der Untersuchung steht die 2016 mit Mitteln des EUTF ins Leben gerufene Gemeinsame Initiative der EU und der Internationalen Organisation für Migration (IOM) für den Schutz und die Wiedereingliederung von Migranten. Ziel des Programms war es insbesondere in Libyen gestrandeten Flüchtlingen eine Rückkehr in ihre Heimatländer zu ermöglichen.
      Insgesamt erfolgreich

      Das zuständige Auswärtige Amt bewertet die EU-IOM Initiative gegenüber dem SWR insgesamt als erfolgreich. Brot für die Welt und medico international kommen in ihrer aktuellen Studie aber zu einem anderen Ergebnis. Demnach ginge es bei der „freiwilligen Rückkehr“ vor allem darum, dass weniger Flüchtlinge und Migranten aus Afrika nach Europa kommen: „Migrationswege zu schließen und Menschen in ihre Herkunftsländer zurückzuschicken, lindert jedoch keine Not und hat daher nichts mit Entwicklungszusammenarbeit zu tun. Häufig werden hierdurch sogar neue und größere Probleme für die betroffenen Menschen und Gesellschaften geschaffen, wie die Studie von Jill Alpes zeigt“, erklärt medico international gegenüber dem SWR.

      Drei Monate lang suchte die Migrations-Expertin Jill Alpes im Niger, Nigeria und Mali nach Rückkehrern. Sie sprach auch mit den Vertretern der Hilfsorganisationen und den Verantwortlichen der IOM. Sie traf viele Zurückgekehrte, die bereits mehrfach einen Fluchtversuch unternommen hatten. „Von den Männern wollen die meisten eigentlich wieder raus,“ beschrieb Alpes gegenüber dem SWR die Situation vor Ort. Ihre Perspektive im Heimatland habe sich meist nicht verbessert, sondern verschlimmert, denn viele hätten Schulden aufgenommen, um die gefährliche Flucht anzutreten oder würden nach der Rückkehr stigmatisiert.

      „Während der Feldforschung war es so, dass auch die IOM Schwierigkeiten hatte, mit den Menschen, die sie bei der Rückkehr unterstützt hatte, wieder Kontakt aufzunehmen – kann sein, dass viele von ihnen wieder losgezogen sind.“ Für die meisten von Alpes befragten Betroffenen stelle sich die Notfallrückführung de facto als Abschiebung dar.

      Im Falle der „Rückkehr“ aus Algerien hatten einige Betroffene offenbar sogar bereits einen Flüchtlingsstatus oder hätten aufgrund ihrer Staatsangehörigkeit nicht aus Algerien ausgewiesen werden dürften.
      Ergebnisse der Studie

      Brot für die Welt kommentiert die Ergebnisse der Studie: „Die EU nimmt Menschenrechtsverletzungen in Kauf, insbesondere an den Außengrenzen Europas und den Transitländern wie Libyen, Niger und Algerien sind die Zustände eklatant.“

      Medico international kritisiert zudem, dass mit dem Nothilfe-Treuhandfonds für Afrika „Mittel der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit eingeflossen sind, um so genannte irreguläre Migration zu unterbinden“.

      SWR Recherchen zeigen: Über den EU-Haushalt fließen Entwicklungsmittelgelder in die umstrittene Mission. Von den insgesamt 5 Milliarden Euro des Treuhandfond kommt mit 4.4 Milliarden der größte Anteil aus der Europäischen Entwicklungshilfe (EDF). Aus den Protokollen der Board Meetings des EUTF geht hervor, dass Deutschland darauf drängt, die Gelder vor allem im Bereich „Migrationsmanagement“ einzusetzen. „Hierbei geht es eher darum, innenpolitisch Handlungsfähigkeit zu beweisen – auf Kosten der Betroffenen. Eine Entwicklungszusammenarbeit, der es um Menschenrechte und die Bekämpfung von Armut geht, darf sich dafür nicht vereinnahmen lassen,“ kritisiert medico international.

      Brot für die Welt fordert darum einen grundlegenden Kurswechsel und eine Neuausrichtung in der Europäischen Flüchtlings- und Migrationspolitik: „Im Vordergrund müssen die Rechte der Migrant*innen und deren Schutz vor Ausbeutung und Folter stehen. Um tatsächlich zum Schutz beizutragen, müssen die Europäischen Mitgliedstaaten die Finanzierung der libyschen Küstenwache einstellen und für eine proaktive Such – und Rettungsaktion, vorhersehbare Ausschiffungs- und faire Verteilungsmechanismen sowie besseren Zugang zu Asylverfahren sorgen.“

      Die Bundesregierung setzt sich dagegen für eine Fortführung der Gemeinsamen Initiative ein, heißt es aus dem Auswärtigen Amt. Die Finanzierung ist aktuell Gegenstand der noch laufenden Verhandlungen zum mehrjährigen EU-Finanzrahmen.

      Die Studie liegt bisher dem SWR exklusiv vor.

      https://www.swr.de/report/swr-recherche-unit/studie-zur-eu-fluechtlingspolitik/-/id=24766532/did=25311586/nid=24766532/1rbvj1t/index.html

    • Studie: Rückkehrprogramme für Migranten verstoßen oft gegen Menschenrechte

      Die Teilnahme sei oft unfreiwillig, teils werde erheblicher Druck ausgeübt, kritisieren „Brot für die Welt“ und „Medico International“. Die EU, die auf solche Programme setze, nehme das in Kauf.

      Bei Rückkehrprogrammen für Migranten nimmt die EU schwere Menschenrechtsverletzungen an den Außengrenzen und in Transitländern in Kauf. Zu diesem Fazit kommt eine Studie von „Brot für die Welt“ und „Medico International“. Immer wieder gebe es Berichte über eklatante Verstöße gegen die humanitären Bedingungen, erklärten die beiden Organisationen. Die neue Studie belege diese Vorwürfe: Die Teilnahme an solchen Programmen erfolge oftmals unfreiwillig, teils werde erheblicher psychischer und in Einzelfällen auch physischer Druck auf die Migrantinnen und Migranten ausgeübt.

      Die EU lagere seit Jahren Grenzkontrollen aus und setze innerhalb von Herkunfts- und Transitregionen auf die Förderung „freiwilliger“ Rückkehr, erklärten die Entwicklungsorganisationen. Bei der Umsetzung von Rückkehrprogrammen komme es jedoch teilweise zu erheblichen Verstößen gegen humanitäre und menschenrechtliche Prinzipien. So sei etwa die Beteiligung keineswegs immer freiwillig - anders als von der Internationalen Organisation für Migration (IOM) behauptet, die von der EU für ein humanitäres Rückführprogramm aus Libyen beauftragt worden sei.

      Für die Studie befragte Autorin Jill Alpes den Angaben zufolge Rückkehrer aus Libyen sowie Migranten in Niger und Mali, weiter sprach sie mit Vertretern von IOM, Nichtregierungsorganisationen, nationalen staatlichen Institutionen, EU, UNHCR und europäischen Entwicklungsagenturen.

      Vielfach erscheine den Menschen angesichts drohender Folter und Gewalt in Libyen eine Rückkehr in ihr Herkunftsland letztlich als das kleinere Übel, nicht jedoch als geeignete Maßnahme, um tatsächlich in Sicherheit und Schutz zu leben. Im Niger hätten interviewte Migranten ihre Rückführung nach schweren Menschenrechtsverletzungen und einer lebensbedrohlichen Abschiebung in die Wüste durch algerische Behörden akzeptiert. „Häufig finden sich Migrantinnen und Migranten nach ihrer Rückführung mit neuen Gefahren konfrontiert beziehungsweise genau jenen Gefahren wieder ausgesetzt, die sie einst zur Flucht bewegten“, betonen die Entwicklungsorganisationen.

      Die zur Verfügung gestellten Reintegrationshilfen bewertet Studienautorin Alpes ebenfalls kritisch: Libyen allein habe seit 2015 mehr als 280 Millionen Euro für die Rückkehrprogramme bekommen, nur ein Teil der Rückkehrerinnen und Rückkehrer habe aber überhaupt Zugang zu den Programmen erhalten. Von den Empfängern hätten viele bemängelt, dass die Hilfen am Bedarf vorbeigingen und nicht das Ziel erfüllten, nachhaltige Lebensperspektiven zu entwickeln.

      „Wir fordern einen grundlegenden Kurswechsel und eine Neuausrichtung in der europäischen Flüchtlings- und Migrationspolitik“, erklärte Katherine Braun, Referentin für Migration und Entwicklung bei „Brot für die Welt“. Im Vordergrund müssten die Rechte der Migrantinnen und Migranten und der Schutz vor Ausbeutung und Folter stehen.

      https://www.sueddeutsche.de/politik/fluechtlinge-rueckkehr-studie-1.4961909

  • Are slaughterhouses turning into #coronavirus factories? | Euronews
    https://www.euronews.com/2020/06/24/are-slaughterhouses-turning-into-coronavirus-factories

    Experts say meat processing plants are ripe for the virus to spread, as they’re often cold, damp, and keep employees in close contact. But much of the #transmission of the virus may occur away from work: where employees live and share meals.

    “It’s very important to realise that workers in these plants – and this is unpopular work – are often #migrant workers, foreign workers who will live in dormitories. And they live and travel very closely together,” Professor James Wood, the head of Cambridge University’s Veterinary School, told Euronews.

    “So transmission, where #clusters occur, maybe occurring both in the home environment from travelling to work, as well as actually in the workplace itself.”

    #migrants #dortoirs

  • Analysis: Will COVID-19 usher in a new wave of populism in Europe? | Euronews
    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#Europe#populisme#xenophobie

    https://www.euronews.com/2020/06/05/analysis-will-covid-19-usher-in-a-new-wave-of-populism-in-europe

    In the decade that followed the global financial crash of 2008, a wave of protest and populism battered and challenged many of the perceived norms of Europe’s political discourse.

    Coupled with the subsequent Eurozone and migrations crises, politicians were branded as an elite, out of touch with mass public opinion. The fire took hold. From anti-austerity measures in Greece, to the rise of the far-right in Germany, to increasing authoritarianism in Central Europe. Nationalism in Spain, populism in Italy, the Yellow Vest protesters in France and, of course, Brexit in Britain. European politics was upended.

    But Europe in many ways now faces a much bigger crisis. The economic shock from the lockdown of almost the entire continent will lead to a recession far deeper than the one we saw 10 years ago. Millions more could lose their jobs, more businesses could go bust. Could we also see more political turmoil?

  • As coronavirus sweeps Europe, unaccompanied refugee children are becoming more vulnerable - Euronews

    Today, Syrian refugee children and parents crowd into the same Greek camps I hear about in more personal accounts shared by refugee children and mothers seeking asylum near my expat home in Zürich, Switzerland. There, over 1,600 unaccompanied minors (children) wait for a passage to safety.

    #Covid-19#Grèce#Turquie#Syriens#rapatriement#Enfant#UE#DAESH#migrant#migration

    https://www.euronews.com/2020/05/04/as-coronavirus-sweeps-europe-unaccompanied-refugee-children-becoming-more-

  • Countries are suspending immigration detention due to coronavirus. Let’s keep it that way ǀ View | Euronews
    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#Espagne#Europe#centrederetention#liberation

    https://www.euronews.com/2020/04/29/countries-suspending-immigration-detention-due-to-coronavirus-let-s-keep-i

    Perhaps one of the most forward-thinking elements of Spain’s response to COVID-19 was the decision to empty immigration detention centres. Spain has one of the highest death tolls in the world, and the country has recorded over 200,000 confirmed cases. On 14 March, the Spanish government declared a state of emergency and the population was ordered inside. Within a month, most of Spain’s immigration detention centres were empty and, at the time of writing, the immigrant detainee population on the Spanish mainland stood at just three.

  • Ι. Γιόχανσον : Δεν είναι δυνατόν να ανασταλούν οι διαδικασίες ασύλου

    Την επανεκκίνηση των διαδικασιών ασύλου στην Ελλάδα ζήτησε η Επίτροπος Μετανάστευσης Ίλβα Γιόχανσον. Μιλώντας στο Euronews, η Επίτροπος επισήμανε ότι έθεσε το ζήτημα και στον Έλληνα πρωθυπουργό Κυριακο Μητσοτάκη.

    « Δεν είναι δυνατόν να ανασταλούν οι διαδικασίες ασύλου. Όλοι οι μετανάστες που φθάνουν θα πρέπει να έχουν δικαίωμα ασύλου. Μπορώ να καταλάβω ότι εάν υπάρξει μια ιδιαίτερη ένταση, μπορεί να υπάρξουν κάποιες ημέρες ή εβδομάδες για να δεχθούν οι αρχές την αίτηση ασύλου. Ημουν στην Ελλάδα την περασμένη εβδομάδα και συναντήθηκα τόσο με τον πρωθυπουργό όσο και με τον αρμόδιο υπουργό και το κατέστησα σαφές : είναι ένα θεμελιώδες δικαίωμα να ζητήσει κανείς άσυλο και να αξιολογηθεί το αίτημά του », τόνισε η Επίτροπος Μετανάστευσης.

    Την ίδια στιγμή, προχωράει η πρωτοβουλία της Κομισιόν για μετεγκατάσταση ανηλίκων από την Ελλάδα στην υπόλοιπη Ευρώπη. Σύμφωνα με την Επίτροπο, η μετεγκατάσταση θα γίνει ακόμη και εν καιρώ κορονοϊού, αφού ληφθούν ωστόσο όλα τα απαραίτητα μέτρα.

    « Υπήρξε μια πολύ θετική απάντηση από πολλά κράτη-μέλη να προχωρήσουν στην μετεγκατάσταση ασυνόδευτων ανηλίκων από την Ελλάδα, ειδικά από τις υπερπλήρεις δομές στα νησιά. Εργαζόμαστε σκληρά με τα κράτη-μέλη, τις ελληνικές Αρχές και τις αρμόδιες υπηρεσίες και οργανώσεις της ΕΕ και προσπαθούμε να το κάνουμε αυτό, παρόλο που ενδέχεται να υπάρξουν πρόσθετα μέτρα που πρέπει να ληφθούν για την αντιμετώπιση του κορονοϊού, ώστε τα επιλεγμένα άτομα να μην είναι θετικά για να μην μεταδώσουν τον ιό. Αυτό που περιμένουμε τώρα είναι οι ελληνικές αρχές να κάνουν εκτίμηση της ηλικίας των επιλεγμένων, ώστε να είναι βέβαιο ότι είναι παιδιά που πρόκειται να μετεγκατασταθούν », τόνισε η Επίτροπος Ίλβα Γιόχανσον.

    Προς το παρόν, πάντως, το επείγον ζήτημα είναι να θωρακιστούν οι μετανάστες και οι πρόσφυγες αλλά και οι κάτοικοι των νησιών από τον κορονοϊό.
    Έκκληση από 21 ΜΚΟ να μετακινηθούν αιτούντες άσυλο από τα νησιά

    Έκκληση προς την κυβέρνηση να μετακινήσει τους αιτούντες άσυλο και τους μετανάστες άμεσα από τα Κέντρα Υποδοχής και Ταυτοποίησης στα νησιά σε ασφαλή τοποθεσία, ώστε να αποφευχθεί μία κρίση δημόσιας υγείας εν μέσω πανδημίας κορονοϊού, απευθύνουν σήμερα 21 ανθρωπιστικές οργανώσεις με κοινή τους ανακοίνωση.

    Όπως σημειώνουν, χιλιάδες άτομα, συμπεριλαμβανομένων ηλικιωμένων, πασχόντων από χρόνιες παθήσεις, παιδιών, εγκύων, νέων μητέρων και ατόμων με αναπηρία, « είναι παγιδευμένα υπό άθλιες συνθήκες επικίνδυνου συνωστισμού στα νησιά εν μέσω πανδημίας ».

    Την ίδια ώρα υπενθυμίζουν ότι οι διαμένοντες στις εγκαταστάσεις έρχονται αντιμέτωποι με « εξαιρετικά περιορισμένη πρόσβαση σε τρεχούμενο νερό, τουαλέτες και ντουζιέρες, καθώς και πολύωρη αναμονή σε ουρές για τη διανομή τροφίμων και ανεπάρκεια ιατρικού και νοσηλευτικού προσωπικού », συνθήκες που « καθιστούν αδύνατη τη συμμόρφωση με τις κατευθυντήριες οδηγίες για την προστασία από τον κορονοϊό, θέτοντας τους ανθρώπους σε σημαντικά αυξημένο κίνδυνο εν όψει της αυξανόμενης απειλής ευρείας μετάδοσης του COVID-19 ».

    Οι οργανώσεις ζητούν από την κυβέρνηση να υιοθετήσει μέτρα για να παρεμποδίσει την εξάπλωση και να ετοιμάσει ένα σχέδιο ανταπόκρισης προς άμεση εφαρμογή μόλις ανιχνευτεί το πρώτο κρούσμα σε κέντρο υποδοχής. Μεταξύ άλλων ζητούν να μετακινηθούν τα άτομα εκτός κέντρων υποδοχής σε κατάλληλα κέντρα μικρότερης κλίμακας στην ηπειρωτική χώρα, όπως ξενοδοχεία και διαμερίσματα, λαμβάνοντας όλες τις απαραίτητες προφυλάξεις για την ασφαλή μετακίνηση, με προτεραιότητα στους ηλικιωμένους, σε άτομα με χρόνιες ασθένειες και με σοβαρές υποκείμενες παθήσεις, άτομα με αναπηρία, εγκύους, νέες μητέρες και τα παιδιά τους και παιδιά, συμπεριλαμβανομένων των ασυνόδευτων.

    Επίσης, να υιοθετηθούν ειδικά μέτρα για την εγγύηση της καθολικής και δωρεάν απρόσκοπτης πρόσβασης στο δημόσιο σύστημα υγείας για αιτούντες άσυλο, πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες χωρίς διακρίσεις, συμπεριλαμβανομένων των ελέγχων και της θεραπείας για τον COVID-19, και να λάβουν οι αιτούντες άσυλο χωρίς καθυστέρηση τον Προσωρινό Αριθμό Ασφάλισης και Υγειονομικής Περίθαλψης Αλλοδαπού (ΠΑΑΥΠΑ), όπως ορίζεται από τη σχετική κοινή υπουργική απόφαση. Τέλος, να παρασχεθούν στα κέντρα υποδοχής επαρκή προϊόντα προσωπικής καθαριότητας και υγιεινής, να διασφαλιστεί το τρεχούμενο νερό προκειμένου οι διαμένοντες να είναι σε θέση να ακολουθούν τις κατευθυντήριες οδηγίες του ΕΟΔΥ και του Παγκόσμιου Οργανισμού Υγείας αναφορικά με την προστασία από τον ιό, και να διασφαλιστεί η τακτική απολύμανση στους κοινόχρηστους χώρους.

    Την ανακοίνωση συνυπογράφουν οι οργανώσεις : Action Aid Hellas, Διεθνής Αμνηστία, ΑΡΣΙΣ, Defence for Children International, ELIX, Ελληνικό Φόρουμ Προσφύγων, Help Refugees, HIAS Ελλάδος, HumanRights360, Human Rights Watch, International Rescue Committee, JRS Ελλάδας, Legal Centre Lesvos, Γιατροί του Κόσμου Ελλάδας, Δίκτυο για τα Δικαιώματα του Παιδιού, Praksis, Refugee Legal Support, Refugee Rights Europe, Refugee Support Aegean, Solidarity Now και Terre des hommes Hellas.

    https://gr.euronews.com/2020/03/24/ilva-johanson-den-einai-dynaton-na-anastaloun-oi-diadikasies-asyloy

    –-> commentaire de Vicky Skoumbi, reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 25.03.2020 :

    Il n’est pas possible de suspendre les procédures d’asile, a déclaré sur Euronews Mme Ylva Johansson, Commissaire à l’Immigration. Elle a demandé au gouvernement grec la réouverture de procédures selon les règles internationales.

    La commissaire de l’Immigration a souligné que : « Il n’est possible de suspendre les procédures d’asile. Tous les migrants qui arrivent doivent avoir accès à la procédure. Je peux comprendre que dans une situation de tension particulière, il peut y avoir quelques jours ou quelques semaines de retard pour que les autorités enregistrent la demande d’asile. J’ai été en Grèce la semaine dernière et j’ai rencontré tant le PM que le Ministre compétent, et je leur ai dit clairement que c’est un droit fondamental de demander l’asile et d’avoir sa demande être examiné selon les règles »

    #suspension #procédure_d'asile #migrations #asile #réfugiés #Grèce #coronavirus #covid-19

    ping @thomas_lacroix

    • Grèce : recours en justice contre la suspension de la procédure d’octroi d’asile

      Le conseil grec des réfugiés (GCR), ONG grecque de défense du droit d’asile, a annoncé mardi avoir formulé un recours devant le Conseil d’Etat contre une ordonnance de l’exécutif qui en suspend temporairement la procédure.

      Le conseil grec des réfugiés (GCR), ONG grecque de défense du droit d’asile, a annoncé mardi avoir formulé un recours devant le Conseil d’Etat contre une ordonnance de l’exécutif qui en suspend temporairement la procédure.

      Adoptée le 1er mars, à effet immédiat et valable un mois, cette ordnnance, qui permet aussi le refoulement des demandeurs d’asile, a été la réponse d’Athènes à la décision d’Ankara d’ouvrir fin février les frontières aux migrants qui souhaitaient passer en Europe.

      De violents incidents avaient alors eu lieu à Kastanies, l’un des deux postes frontaliers grecs avec la Turquie, où des milliers de demandeurs d’asile avaient alors afflué à destination de l’Europe.

      Le recours du GCR a été déposé lundi pour le compte de demandeurs d’asile que cette ONG assiste dans leurs démarches.

      « Trois femmes qui accompagnent leurs enfants sont menacées d’expulsion immédiate vers Afghanistan ou la Turquie alors que leur vie, leur santé et leurs droits fondamentaux sont en danger », prévient dans u communiqué l’ONG, qui souligne que la suspension de l’octroi du droit d’asile « a été fortement critiquée par des organisations nationales et internationales, y compris la Commission nationale des droits de l’homme et l’Agence onusienne du Haut commissariat des réfugiés ».

      L’ONG rappelle que ce droit est prévu par « le droit international » et qu’« on ne peut pas le suspendre ».

      Elle exhorte la présidente de la République hellénique, Katerina Sakellaropoulou, à « annuler cet acte législatif illégal et le Parlement grec à ne pas le ratifier pour que la Grèce ne soit pas le premier pays après la Seconde guerre mondiale à violer le principe international du non refoulement ».

      De nombreux demandeurs d’asile entrés en Grèce après le 1er mars ont été arrêtés et transférés dans des camps fermés avant leur expulsion prévue en vertu de cette ordonnance malgré les critiques des ONG de défense des droits de l’homme, comme Amnesty International.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/fil-dactualites/240320/grece-recours-en-justice-contre-la-suspension-de-la-procedure-d-octroi-d-a

    • Procédures pour le droit d’asile gelées

      « De quel crime se sont rendus coupables, ces gens pour être confinés dans cette situation inhumaine ? », s’est ému cette semaine le quotidien Efimerida Ton Syntakton (« Le journal des rédacteurs »), l’un des rares médias grecs à avoir dénoncé cet #enfermement qui ne respecte ni la convention de Genève, ni la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme. Qui s’en soucie ? Bruxelles se tait. Et le gouvernement grec du Premier ministre, Kyriákos Mitsotákis, a de toute façon gelé toutes les procédures de droit d’asile depuis le 1er mars, réagissant alors à la décision du président turc, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, d’ouvrir les frontières aux réfugiés et migrants qui se trouvaient en Turquie. La menace d’un afflux massif depuis la Turquie a permis à la Grèce de faire jouer une clause d’urgence, bloquant provisoirement le droit d’asile, tout en négligeant de consulter ses partenaires européens, comme le veut pourtant la règle.

      Et dans l’immédiat, la mise entre parenthèses du droit d’asile permet désormais de considérer de facto comme des migrants illégaux promis à la déportation, tous ceux qui ont accosté depuis mars sur les îles grecques. Avant même de quitter Lesbos, les 189 réfugiés transportés à Klidi avaient d’ailleurs été sommés de signer un document en grec. Sans savoir qu’ils acceptaient ainsi leur future déportation. Le coronavirus (et les mauvaises relations actuelles entre la Grèce et la Turquie) retarde dans l’immédiat ces rapatriements forcés. Mais le confinement dans un camp quasi militaire au nord de la Grèce risque de générer de nouvelles souffrances pour ces réfugiés jugés indésirables.

      https://seenthis.net/messages/825871#message834430

    • Europe must act to stop coronavirus outbreak in Lesbos, say MEPs

      NGOs have raised concerns over asylum procedures being frozen. According to the Commissioner for Home Affairs, processing applications must not be stopped.

      “People arriving at the borders still have the right to apply for asylum and cannot be sent away without their claim being assessed,” explains Professor Philippe De Bruycker, Institute for European Studies, Université Libre de Bruxelles. “This does not mean that nothing can be done regarding the protection of health: People requiring asylum maybe tested to see if they are sick or not, and if they are it can be applied measures such as quarantine, or even detention or restrictions of movement within the territory of the states.”

      Restrictions on travel and social distancing measures means delays in the asylum process are inevitable.

      “A lot of member states are making the decision that the interviews with asylum seekers should not take place right now because they would like to limit the social interaction,” says Commissioner Johansson. “So there will be delays in the processes of asylum, but I think that member states are taking measures to deal with the risk of the virus being spread.”

      MEPs have called for an “immediate European response” to avoid a humanitarian crisis spiralling into a public health crisis. NGOs warn there is little chance of not getting infected living in such conditions.

      https://www.euronews.com/2020/03/24/europe-must-act-to-stop-coronavirus-outbreak-in-lesbos-say-meps

    • Grèce : un nouveau projet de loi encore plus restrictif pour l’asile en cours d’élaboration

      Le quotidien grec Efimerida tôn syntaktôn (Journal des Rédacteurs) (https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/dikaiomata/237741_etoimazoyn-nomoshedio-eytelismoy-tis-diadikasias-asyloy) révèle le nouveau projet du ministère de l’Immigration pour la procédure d’asile

      Un nouveau projet de loi est en cours d’élaboration avec des dispositions problématiques en termes de finalité, d’efficacité et de légalité.

      Ce projet de loi vient à peine cinq mois après la loi sur la protection internationale, dont les dispositions restrictives ont été dénoncées par plusieurs organisations.

      Le nouveau projet en élaboration comprend les dispositions suivantes, très problématiques du point de vue de leur opportunité, de leur applicabilité, mais surtout de leur conformité au droit européen, international et national :

      • la possibilité d’omettre l’entretien personnel, pierre angulaire de la procédure d’asile, s’il s’avère impossible de trouver un interprète dans la langue choisie par l’interviewé, dans le cas où celle-ci est différente de la langue officielle de son pays d’origine

      • L’aide juridique, lors de l’examen en deuxième instance de la demande d’asile sera fournie uniquement à la demande de l’intéressé dans les deux jours qui suivent la notification de la décision de première instance. La demande d’aide juridique ne sera pas satisfaite automatiquement, mais sera examinée par le président de la commission de recours et ne sera accordée que si celui-ci juge probable une issue favorable à l’intéressé de l’appel. L’absence d’assistance judiciaire ne constituera pas une raison valable pour un report du réexamen de la demande d’asile, à moins que la Commission de recours ne considère que cette absence puisse provoquer un préjudice irréparable au demandeur d’asile, et que l’appel ait de fortes chances d’aboutir à l’annulation de la décision en première instance.

      • si le demandeur d’asile a déjà séjourné dans un autre pays pendant plus que de deux mois, sans être menacé de poursuite individuelle pour des raisons de race, de religion, de nationalité, d’appartenance à un groupe social particulier ou de convictions politiques, alors ce pays est considéré comme offrant une protection adéquate et sa demande d’asile en Grèce est irrecevable

      • en cas de rejet en deuxième instance de la demande d’asile, le demandeur sera maintenu en centre de détention jusqu’à son expulsion ou jusqu’à ce que la procédure arrive à son terme, sans qu’il puisse être libéré, s’il dépose une demande d’annulation du rejet ou une demande de suspension de son expulsion.

      Ce nouveau projet réduit à moins que rien, voire annule des garanties de la procédure d’asile ; il est introduit quelques jours après l’expiration de la loi sans précédent qui suspendait le dépôt de nouvelles demandes d’asile pendant un mois et prévoyait l’expulsion immédiate vers les pays d’origine des nouveaux arrivants. Il s’agissait d’une suspension de la Convention de Genève, qui n’est pas prévue par celle-ci même en temps de guerre. Il faudrait ajouter que la fin de la période de suspension ne se traduit pas par une réouverture de la procédure car le service d’asile reste fermé jusqu’au 10 avril à cause de mesures de protection sanitaire. Et tout laisse croire que la fermeture du service, sera prolongée pour au moins un mois.

      Enfin, le projet de loi réduit de plus que de moitié le temps prévu pour l’examen et l’adoption d’une décision en appel, en introduisant de nouveaux délais impossible à tenir : un mois pour la décision en appel contre trois actuellement, vingt jours pour la procédure accélérée appliquée aux frontières contre 40 jours en vigueur aujourd’hui, dix jours pour l’audition de l’appel si l’intéressé est en détention.

      L’expulsion en application du décret de suspension de la procédure d’asile de deux femmes vulnérables d’origine afghane, a été stoppée par le Conseil d’État, qui a ordonné leur maintien dans le territoire. Le sort d’une troisième femme afghane sera décidée en séance plénière du Conseil d’Etat en septembre.

      Source (en grec)

      https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/dikaiomata/237741_etoimazoyn-nomoshedio-eytelismoy-tis-diadikasias-asyloy

      https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/dikaiosyni/237450_stamatiste-tis-ameses-apelaseis

      –-> reçu de Vicky Skoumbi, via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 04.04.2020

    • GCR’s comments on the draft law amending asylum legislation

      Athens, 27 April 2020—The Greek Council for Refugees (GCR) expresses its deep concern over the new draft law that inter alia amends asylum legislation[1], which was submitted for public consultation amidst a public health crisis, at a time when the main concern is the protection of asylum seekers and the entire population from the risks and effects of the pandemic, and while concerns for asylum seekers who remain in overcrowded sites and/or in administrative detention in the midst of the pandemic are increasing.

      The Ministry’s of Migration and Asylum new draft law comes within less than 4 months since the entry into force (January 1, 2020) of L. 4636/2019 "On International Protection”, i.e. the law that entailed extensive changes of the Greek asylum law, which in itself is not an example of good law-making, and which in practice invalidates the invoked purpose of systematizing and codifying the relevant legislation (see explanatory memorandum law 4636/2019).

      In addition, despite the fact that L. 4636/2019 has been consistently and substantively criticized by all national and international bodies and civil society organisations, due its numerous problematic regulations having led to deregulating the Greek asylum system, weakening the safeguards of refugee protection in Greece and “placing people in need of international protection in danger”,[2] the proposed amendments do not, in any part, restore the extremely problematic provisions of L. 4636/2019.

      On the contrary, the introduced amendments are once more and in many respects contrary to the EU acquis in the field of asylum, and in this sense constitute a direct violation of EU law and of the Asylum and Return Directives, weakening basic guarantees for persons in need of protection, introducing additional procedural obstacles and reflecting, at the legislative level, the repeatedly stated intention to generalize detention and to increase returns, by preventing actual access to international protection. Accordingly, the draft law’s title “Improving Legislation on Migration, etc.” can only be considered as a euphemism.

      Amongst a set of extremely problematic provisions, the following are indicatively highlighted:

      The possibility for a non-competent Service (Regional Reception and Identification Services), which unlike the Asylum Service does not have the status of an independent Agency, to register requests for international protection, without even ensuring that this procedure can be completed by properly trained staff or compliance with the necessary guarantees for properly completing the procedure (Article 5 of the draft law)

      The deviation from the obligation to provide interpretation in a language that the applicant understands and the limitation of the obligation to conduct a personal interview with the applicant prior to a decision on a request for international protection (articles 7 & 11 of the draft law), in direct violation of the Procedures’ Directive (Directive 2013/32/ EU).

      The proposed amendments derogate from the minimum guarantees provided by the Procedures’ Directive, allowing for a personal interview to be conducted in the official language of the applicant’s country of origin “if it proves impossible to provide interpretation in the language of his/her choice" and for a decision to be issued without having previously conducted a personal interview, “if the applicant does not wish to conduct the interview in the official language of his/her country of origin", irrespective of whether the applicant is in fact able to understand this language. It is recalled that the competent Commissioner of the European Commission recently reiterated that “as far as interpretation is concerned, the Asylum Procedure Directive provides that communication takes place in the language preferred by the applicant, unless there is another language which the applicant understands and in which he/she can communicate in a clear and concise manner”,[3] while the Directive does not, under any circumstances, infer that the language understood by the applicant is the official language of their country of origin. Syrian Kurds, who constitute the largest minority in Syria and who largely do not speak/understand the official language of their state (Arabic), but only the Kurdish dialect kurmanji, are a typical such case. It is further noted that the cases under which a first instance asylum decision can be issued without conducting a personal interview are restrictively regulated under Article 14 of Directive 2013/32/EU. The proposed omission of the personal interview, under Article 11 of the draft law, does not constitute one of the cases provided in the Directive, nor is it left at the Member States’ discretion to foresee additional exceptions to the obligation to conduct a personal interview. In any case, the possibility of issuing a decision without conducting a personal interview with the applicant places asylum seekers at increased risk of return, in violation of the principle of non-refoulement.

      The obstruction of the right to legal aid and the right to effective remedies (article 9 of the draft law). As has been repeatedly documented, to date, the Greek authorities have yet to ensure real access to free legal aid at second instance, as is enshrined in EU law. On the contrary, in 2019 only 33% of asylum seekers who appealed a negative decision were able to benefit from free legal aid at second instance, and only 21% in 2018. [4] A fact that demonstrates “an administrative practice that is incompatible with EU law, and which to an extent is of a permanent and genera nature”. [5]

      However and instead of taking all necessary measures to ensure the right to free legal aid, the proposed amendment introduces an additional restriction on this right, requiring for applicants to submit, within a very short and exclusive period of two days, after the notification of their negative decision, an application for legal aid, which is granted by the President of the Appeals Committee “only if it is considered probable for the appeal to succeed.” In this case, and in order to provide legal assistance to the applicant, the appointed lawyer has the opportunity to submit a memorandum, which can exclusively include “belated (οψιφανείς and και οψιγενείς)” claims.

      Specifically, it is noted that a) The amendment reverses the rule and standard of proof set out in Article 20 (3) of Directive 2013/32/EU, which states that “Member States may provide that free legal assistance and representation not be granted where the applicant’s appeal is considered by a court or tribunal or other competent authority to have no tangible prospect of success", instead providing that legal assistance is restricted not in case where the appeal “has no tangible prospects of success”, but in case it is merely “presumed that the appeal has no prospects of success”.

      b) The amendment of article 9 of the draft law introduces an additional procedural obstacle to accessing legal aid and the right to an effective remedy, in what concerns the applicants, as well as added workload in what concerns the Appeals Committees. Applicants are required to submit a request in Greek (and for that matter, within a deadline of only two days from the moment the decision has been notified), following which the existence of the substantial preconditions for the provision of free legal aid shall be examined. Without the assistance of a lawyer, without specialized legal knowledge and without knowledge of the language, it is obvious that this request, in the oumost favorable event, will necessarily be limited to a standardised form, essentially depriving the applicant of the opportunity to develop the reasons his/her meeting, in the specific case, the substantial reasons for being granted legal aid.

      (c) In the proposed amendment it is stated that the request for legal aid is “examined by the President of the Committee, before which the appeal is pending” and “is granted only if the appeal is presumed likely to be successful”, whereas if the request is granted, the lawyer that represents the applicant, in the context of legal aid, can only "submit a memorandum on the appeal, with which they can make “belated and posterior (οψιφανείς and και οψιγενείς) claims”. Based on this, it appears as if the provision indicates that the request for legal aid is submitted after the appeal has already been lodged (as, otherwise, neither a determination of the appeal can take place, nor can the probability of success of an appeal that has yet to be lodged be examined). However, it is recalled that in accordance with Article 93 (c) L. 4636/2019, the appeal must inter alia cite the “specific reasons on which the appeal is based”, which in itself requires the drafting of a legal document in Greek, [6] unless the appeal is to be rejected as inadmissible; i.e. rejected without previously having examined the substance of the appeal. Consequently, even in the event that the request for free legal aid is ultimately granted, the content of the legal aid ends up being devoid of meaning, in violation of Article 20 (1) of Directive 2013/32/ EU, which provides that free legal assistance “shall include, at least, the preparation of the required procedural documents […]“. By contrast, in accordance with the introduced amendment, the lack of “specific reasons” in the initial appeal cannot be remedied by the appointed lawyer, nor is a possibility to develop any potential claims in the memorandum even provided, as currently provided by article 99 L. 4636/2019; instead, the lawyer can only make “belated (οψιφανείς και οψιγενείς) claims” that is new or subsequent arguments, under an obvious and actual fear that, even after granting free legal aid, the appeal can be rejected as inadmissible; i.e. without examining the merits of the applicant’s claims at second instance, practically depriving the applicant of actual access to an effective remedy, in violation of Directive 2013/33/EU and article 47 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights.

      The retroactive abolition of the possibility for the applicant to be referred for the issuance of a residence permit on humanitarian grounds, in case their application for international protection is rejected (Article 33). The possibility of referral for the issuance of a residence permit on humanitarian grounds is to this day an important safeguard and complements the Greek state’s obligations in view of its international commitments to protect individuals who, although not recognized as beneficiaries of international protection, fall under the non-refoulement principle (eg. unaccompanied minors, persons with special connection with the country - right to private or family life under Article 8 of the ECHR, serious health reasons) that prevent their removal. The abolition of the relevant provision contributes to creating a significant group of persons who cannot be removed from the country, yet whom being deprived fundamental rights, remain in a prolonged state of insecurity and peril.

      The generalization of the possibility to impose detention measures and the reduction of basic guarantees when imposing such a measure (articles 2, 21 and 52 of the draft law). The proposed amendments attempt a further strictening of legislation with respect to the imposition of detention measures, in violation of fundamental guarantees enshrined in EU law and international human rights law. Indicatively, article 2 proposes the abolition of the obligation to provide “full and thorough reasoning” when ordering the detention of asylum seekers. The provision of article 52 attempts to reverse the rule that administrative detention in view of return is applied, exclusively, as an exceptional measure, and only if the possibility of implementing alternatives to detention has been exhausted, while at the same time attempts to limit the control of legality. In view of CJEU case law, based on which the Return Directive foresees “a gradation of the measures to be taken in order to enforce the return decision, a gradation which goes from the measure which allows the person concerned the most liberty, namely granting a period for his voluntary departure, to measures which restrict that liberty the most, namely detention in a specialised facility",[7] the proposed provision is in check for compliance with the minimum standards of protection guaranteed by the EU.

      [1] “Improvements on the Legislation on Migration, amendments of provisions of laws 4636/2019 (A ’169), 4375/2016 (A’ 51), 4251/2014 (A ’80) and other provisions”.

      [2] See UNHCR, UNHCR urges Greece to strengthen safeguards in draft asylum law, 24 October 2019, available at: https://www.unhcr.org/gr/en/13170-unhcr-urges-greece-to-strengthen-safeguards-in-draft-asylum-law.html; GNCHR Observations [in Greek] on the Draft Law of the Ministry of Citizen Protection: “On International Protection: provisions on the recognition and status of third-country nationals or stateless persons as beneficiaries of international protection, on a single status for refugees or for persons entitled to subsidiary protection and on the content of the protection provided, unification of provisions on the reception of applicants for international protection, the procedure for granting and revoking the status of international protection, restructuring of judicial protection for asylum seekers and other provisions”, 24 October 2019, available at: http://www.nchr.gr/images/pdf/apofaseis/prosfuges_metanastes/Paratiriseis%20EEDA%20sto%20nomosxedio%20gia%20Asylo%2024.10.2019.pdf; GCR, GCR’s comments on the draft bill “On International Protection, 22 October 2019, available at: https://www.gcr.gr/media/k2/attachments/GCR_on_bill_about_International_Protection_en.pdf.

      [3] P-004017/2019, Commissioner Johansson’s reply on behalf of the European Commission, 5 February 2020, available at: https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/P-9-2019-004017-ASW_EL.pdf

      [4] AIDA Report on Greece, Update 2019, forthcoming and AIDA Report on Greece, Update 2018, March 2019, available at: https://www.asylumineurope.org/reports/country/greece.

      [5] See case C‑525/14, Commission v Czech Republic, EU C 2016 714, recital 14.

      [6] Indicatively, see GCR, GCR’s comments on the draft bill “On International Protection”, op. cit.

      [7] CJEU, El Dridi, C-61/11, recital 41.

      https://www.gcr.gr/en/news/press-releases-announcements/item/1434-gcr-s-comments-on-the-draft-law-amending-asylum-legislation

    • Asylum-seekers in Evros center protest asylum procedures delays

      Young asylum-seekers rioted on Tuesday morning in the Reception and Identification Center of #Fylakio in northern Evros. They set mattresses in the ward for unaccompanied minors on fire and it needed the intervention of the fire service extinguish the blaze.

      The riots started short before 10 o’ clock. Police forces rushed to the center to restore the order..

      Nobody was injured, yet significant material damage was reportedly caused.

      According to state broadcaster ERT TV, the protest was staged against the delays in asylum procedures and the extension of the lockdown in refugees centers until May 21.

      Local media report adds also the living conditions as one of the reasons for the protest.


      https://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2020/05/12/evros-asylum-seekers-riot
      #résistance #protestation #Evros

    • Grèce : prison ferme pour deux demandeurs d’asile accusés de violences dans un camp

      Deux demandeurs d’asile afghans ont été condamnés jeudi 14 mai par la justice grecque à six ans et huit mois de prison ferme pour des violences commises lors d’une manifestation dans le camp de Fylakio, au nord du pays.

      Ils réclamaient l’accélération du traitement de leur demande d’asile, ils ont obtenu de la prison ferme.

      Deux demandeurs d’asile originaires d’Afghanistan, âgés de 22 et 23 ans, ont écopé jeudi en Grèce de peines de six ans et huit mois de prison pour violences, trouble à l’ordre public, possession et utilisation illégale d’armes.

      Mardi 12 mai, des migrants avaient exprimé leur mécontentement en mettant le feu à des matelas et en agressant des policiers présents dans le camp de Fylakio (https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/24711/grece-des-demandeurs-d-asile-manifestent-contre-la-lenteur-du-traiteme), à la frontière gréco-turque. Selon les forces de l’ordre appelées à la barre lors de l’audience de jeudi, plusieurs personnes les ont attaquées avec des tournevis, des lames métalliques et des haches.

      Vingt-six autres demandeurs d’asile, qui avaient également été interpellés par la police grecque lors de cette manifestation, seront jugés ultérieurement.

      La centaine de migrants, dont des mineurs isolés, hébergés dans le centre de Fylakio y sont détenus le temps du traitement de leur dossier d’asile. Certains attendent depuis plus de six mois l’examen de leur demande.

      La pandémie de coronavirus a aggravé les retards déjà existants dans le traitement des dossiers, les services d’asile fonctionnant au ralenti ces dernières semaines.

      Athènes a été critiqué à plusieurs reprises par des ONG de défense des droits de migrants et réfugiés pour les défaillances chroniques de son système d’octroi d’asile et les conditions de vie épouvantables dans les camps de réfugiés surpeuplés.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/24782/grece-prison-ferme-pour-deux-demandeurs-d-asile-accuses-de-violences-d

    • Au moment où culminent les craintes qu’une épidémie Covid 19 dans les camps de réfugiés et plus particulièrement au hot-spot de Moria à Lesbos ne pourrait que tourner à une catastrophe humanitaire sans précédent, des jeunes demandeurs d’asile, parlant plusieurs langues, ont organisé une équipe, « #MORIA_AWARENESS_CORONA_TEAM » (#ΜΑCT), pour essayer de faire face à la situation ? MACT explique aux résidents les règles d’hygiène et la nécessité absolue de limiter les contacts avec le monde extérieur, et s’est chargé de régler la circulation à distance de sécurité des réfugiés dans le supermarché le plus proche. La même équipe a construit avec l’aides des organisations solidaires, un atelier de fabrication de masques de protection en tissu.

      Voir: https://standbymelesvos.gr/2020/creation-of-corona-awareness-team-in-moria-camp

      Reçu de Vicky Skoumbi, via la mailing-list migreurop, le 22.03.2020
      #Moria #Lesbos #Grèce

    • Fears of catastrophe as Greece puts migrant camps into lockdown

      Doctors say coronavirus outbreak could be disastrous amid ‘horrific’ conditions.

      As the Schengen area closed its external borders last week, in a move designed to replace the closing of member states’ national borders against imported Covid-19 infection, some internal barriers still went up in Europe. The day after the European commission’s announcement, the Greek government introduced a set of measures that would apply to the migrant camps in the Greek islands.

      As of Wednesday, the camps have been locked down from 7pm to 7am. In the daytime, only one person is allowed out per family, and the police control their movements. Some camps, on the islands of Leros and Kos, have been closed entirely.

      Meanwhile, visits to the camps’ reception centres have been temporarily suspended, except for those who work there, and arrivals are being subjected to compulsory fever screening. The measures only apply to the camps, not to the resident population of the islands.

      In the five Greek island “hotspots” that are sheltering about 42,000 people, one case of Covid-19 has been recorded. The affected person is a resident of the island of Lesbos. There have been no cases in the camps so far.

      In Greece as a whole, 464 cases of Covid-19 have been recorded and six deaths. The government has banned mass gatherings and is urging Greeks to practise social distancing. Thirteen hospitals on the mainland have been turned over to the treatment of Covid-19.

      “The imposition of this restriction of movement on the people of the camps and not for anyone else on the islands is unacceptable and discriminatory,” said Apostolos Veizis, director of the medical operational support unit for Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) in Greece. “You are locking children, women and men into severely overcrowded camps where the sanitation and hygiene conditions are horrific.”

      The largest camp, Moria on Lesbos, is temporary home to about 20,000 people but was built for just over 6,000. In parts of Moria, there is one water tap for 1,300 people, one toilet for 167 people and one shower for 242 people.

      Up to six people may be sleeping in 3 sq metres (32 sq feet), a quarter of the size of an average parking space. “They do not have enough water or soap to regularly wash their hands and they do not have the luxury of being able to self-isolate,” Veizis said.

      Over a third of the migrants are children, just under a half of whom are unaccompanied. Their principal countries of origin are Afghanistan, Syria, Iraq, Palestine and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and their average stay in the camp is between five months and a year.

      There are already high levels of health problems among the migrants, due to the unsanitary conditions, and high levels of stress. Veizis calls the situation “a chronic emergency”. “If we had an outbreak in these camps, it would be disastrous,” he said.

      The Greek National Public Health Organisation, which is responsible for health in the camps, did not respond to requests for comment. However, a European commission spokesperson, Ciara Bottomley, wrote in an email that the commission was funding the deployment of doctors and other medical staff to the hotspots. “The healthcare response in case of an incident on a hotspot island foresees first treatment at the local island hospital followed by air evacuation to one of the specialised hospitals in the mainland,” she went on.

      Those measures appear to apply to local residents only. Since last July, all arrivals to the camps have been excluded from the Greek healthcare system. Three government-funded doctors are conducting vulnerability screening in Moria, but the only medical care is being provided there by NGOs and voluntary groups.

      Veizis said MSF had been in contact with the government to discuss case management in the camps as part of the government’s evolving Covid-19 strategy, in case of an outbreak there.

      Meanwhile, he fears the new regime will add to the migrants’ stress while fanning tensions between them and local residents. Violence directed at NGOs forced some of them to temporarily suspend operations this month.

      The new measures, Veizis says, are just “one more element to pit the people of the islands against the asylum seekers”.

      https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2020/mar/21/fears-catastrophe-greece-migrant-camps-lockdown-coronavirus
      #confinement

    • Coronavirus auf Lesbos: Wie junge Geflüchtete gegen die Krise kämpfen

      Das neuartige Coronavirus hat Europa fest im Griff. Homeoffice, Ausgangssperren, Grenzschließungen, Hamsterkäufe. Einige Regionen bereiten sich noch auf die Pandemie vor, andere stecken bereits mittendrin.

      Wie aber bereitet man sich an einem Ort auf das Virus vor, an dem schon im Normalzustand kaum ein menschenwürdiges Leben möglich ist?

      Etwa 20.000 Menschen leben im Camp Moria auf Lesbos. Das Lager für Geflüchtete ist überfüllt, die hygienischen Bedingungen sind katastrophal. Immer wieder kommt es zu Bränden, erst am Montag starb dabei mindestens ein Kind.

      Spätestens seit es auf Lesbos den ersten bestätigten Corona-Fall gibt, wächst die Sorge darüber, was passiert, wenn das Virus das Lager erreicht. Das Krankenhaus im nahegelegenen Mytilini wäre mit einem Ausbruch komplett überfordert. Wegen in letzter Zeit aufgetretener Angriffe von Rechtsradikalen haben Hilfsorganisationen im Camp ihre Arbeit reduziert (bento). „Gesundheitsversorgung existiert nicht in Moria“, sagte Apostolos Veizis von „Ärzte ohne Grenzen“ kürzlich dem SPIEGEL.
      „Vor allem Informationen verbreiten“

      Eine Gruppe junger Geflüchteter will dabei nicht tatenlos zusehen. Mit Unterstützung der Hilfsorganisation „Stand by me Lesvos“ haben sie das „Moria Corona Awareness Team“ gegründet und versuchen, mit den ihnen zu Verfügung stehenden Mitteln die Menschen im Lager über das Virus aufzuklären. Mit dabei sind Vertreterinnen und Vertreter verschiedenster Nationalitäten, die in Moria leben.

      A call for support from the Moria Corona Camp Team in Lesvos for solidarity and help. Lesvos is facing a huge crisis....
      Posted by Stand by me Lesvos on Thursday, March 12, 2020

      Einer von ihnen ist der 19-jährige Masi aus Afghanistan. „Wir wollen vor allem Informationen verbreiten“, sagt er im Telefon-Interview mit bento. Darüber, wie Menschen sich im Camp vor dem Coronavirus schützen könnten. Überall im Camp haben sie handgeschriebene Plakate mit Informationen aufgehängt. Hände waschen, Abstand halten, das Virus ernst nehmen. In vier Sprachen: Farsi, Arabisch, Französisch und Englisch.

      „Zusätzlich fahren wir durchs Camp und informieren die Menschen über Megafone, die wir besorgen konnten“, erzählt Masi.
      Pragmatisch, nicht verzweifelt

      Das Team wurde binnen weniger Tage zusammengetrommelt, immer mehr Menschen schließen sich der Gruppe an. Dass es viel zu tun gibt, merkt man: Mitten im Interview reicht Masi das Telefon weiter, irgendwo wird er gerade gebraucht.

      Fereshte, 17, soll übernehmen. „Am Wichtigsten ist, dass wir den Menschen Hoffnung geben, dass wir sie beruhigen“, sagt sie. Ihrer Erfahrung nach funktioniere das im persönlichen Gespräch oder über die Megafone am besten. Die relevanten Informationen hätten sie vorher auf offiziellen Seiten im Internet recherchiert.

      Ein großes Problem bei ihrer Arbeit seien im Camp kursierende Gerüchte, die Panik schüren. „Es gab in den letzten Tagen zwei Tote im Camp. Viele erzählten, sie seien an Corona gestorben, aber das stimmt nicht, es waren Herzinfarkte.“

      Fereshte klingt pragmatisch. „Die griechischen Behörden machen wenig, also müssen wir selbst anpacken“, sagt sie.
      Geflüchtete regeln den Lidl-Einkauf

      Immer mehr Geflüchtete beteiligen sich am Corona Awareness Team. „Inzwischen sind wir mehr als 50 Freiwillige. Wir hoffen, das in den nächsten Tagen mindestens noch verdoppeln zu können“, sagt der 30-jährige Apotheker Omid, der ebenfalls mithilft.

      Die Aufgaben beschränken sich nicht mehr auf das Verbreiten von Informationen. Mit Hilfe von Hilfsorganisationen hat das Team eine kleine Fabrik aus dem Boden gestampft, in der Geflüchtete Atemschutzmasken nähen.

      Auch im knapp fünf Kilometer vom Camp entfernten Lidl ist das Corona Awareness Team mittlerweile im Einsatz. In Absprache mit der Geschäftsleitung habe man einen Dienst organisiert, der den Einlass in den Markt regelt, damit nicht zu viele Menschen gleichzeitig auf engem Raum einkaufen. „Wir rufen die Leute auch dazu auf, in der Schlange vor dem Markt Abstand zu halten“, erzählt Omid.

      Auch die lokalen Griechinnen und Griechen, die im Lidl einkaufen, fänden diese Maßnahme gut. „Sie sind sehr freundlich und freuen sich darüber, dass wir etwas tun“, sagt Omid. Er erzählt, dass sie hoffen, eine ähnliche Aufsicht auch an der Nahrungsausgabestelle im Camp etablieren zu können.
      Forderungen nach Evakuierung

      Wie hart das Virus Moria treffen würde, ist schwer abzusehen. Zwar leben laut dem Leiter des Camps Dimitris Vafeas nur 178 Menschen in Moria, die über 65 Jahre alt sind und damit aufgrund des Alters zur Risikogruppe gehören. Durch die schlechten hygienischen Bedingungen und die mangelhafte medizinische Versorgung sind aber auch viele jüngere Menschen stark geschwächt.

      Deshalb häufen sich angesichts der Coronakrise die internationalen Forderungen, Moria endlich zu evakuieren. "Ärzte ohne Grenzen“ warnt: „Die entsetzlichen Lebensbedingungen in den überfüllten Hotspots auf den Inseln sind ein idealer Nährboden für COVID-19.“

      Der SPD-Bundestagsabgeordnete Lars Castelluci fordert, dass die Geflüchteten aufs griechische Festland gebracht werden. Ähnlich äußerte sich Grünen-Parteichefin Annalena Baerbock.

      Under dem Motto #LeaveNoOneBehind haben Menschen aus Politik, Kultur und Zivilgesellschaft eine Petition für den Schutz der Geflüchteten gestartet. Zu den Erstunterzeichnerinnen und -unterzeichnern gehören unter anderem die Influencerin Louisa Dellert, der Moderator Joko Winterscheidt und der Musiker Henning May. Mehr als 20.000 Menschen haben die Petition bisher unterschrieben. „Das Virus unterscheidet nicht nach Hautfarbe, Religion oder Geschlecht. Corona betrifft uns alle“, heißt es da. Wer jetzt nicht handle, mache sich mitschuldig für die Katastrophe, die den Menschen in Not drohe.

      Auch Omid wünscht sich Hilfe und Solidarität: „An die europäischen Staaten: Bitte kommt und steht an unserer Seite. Wir tun, was wir können. Aber wir brauchen mehr.“

      https://www.bento.de/politik/coronavirus-auf-lesbos-wie-junge-gefluechtete-gegen-die-krise-kaempfen-a-0fd09

    • Coronavirus : des eurodéputés appellent à évacuer les migrants les plus vulnérables des camps grecs

      La commission des libertés civiles du Parlement européen a appelé lundi à l’évacuation d’urgence par l’UE des migrants les plus vulnérables au coronavirus des camps surpeuplés en Grèce, mettant en garde contre le « risque de nombreux décès ».

      La commission des libertés civiles du Parlement européen a appelé lundi à l’évacuation d’urgence par l’UE des migrants les plus vulnérables au coronavirus des camps surpeuplés en Grèce, mettant en garde contre le « risque de nombreux décès ».

      Dans une lettre adressée au commissaire européen chargé de la gestion des crises, Janez Lenarcic, le président de la commission parlementaire LIBE, Juan Fernando Lopez Aguilar, a alerté sur la situation des 42.000 demandeurs d’asile entassés sur les îles grecques, où il n’y a « aucune possibilité de distanciation sociale » et où « l’équipement médical nécessaire n’est pas disponible ».

      « C’est une urgence et l’UE doit réagir en conséquence avec un plan d’action qui devrait au moins inclure une évacuation préventive de la population à haut risque, notamment les plus de 60 ans et les personnes souffrant de problèmes respiratoires, de diabète ou d’autres maladies qui augmentent le risque de symptômes sévères », écrit-il au nom de la commission LIBE qui rassemble tous les partis.

      « Si l’UE échoue à agir immédiatement, la situation sur les îles grecques deviendra ingérable, avec le risque de nombreux décès », avertit-il.

      Les eurodéputés demandent aussi pour les demandeurs d’asile un effort coordonné accru de la part des systèmes de santé des Etats membres, et davantage d’aide financière pour augmenter les capacités d’hospitalisation et de soins intensifs.

      Alors que sept pays de l’UE se sont engagés à la mi-mars à accueillir quelque 1.600 enfants des îles grecques, ces eurodéputés appellent « à continuer » d’agir pour leur « relocalisation rapide ».

      Deux cas de coronavirus ont été diagnostiqués sur l’île de Lesbos mais pour l’heure, aucun n’a été détecté dans les camps grecs.

      Afin d’éviter une propagation de l’épidémie, Athènes a imposé de strictes restrictions à la liberté de mouvement des migrants sur les îles égéennes. Les visites dans les camps sont également réduites au minimum.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/fil-dactualites/230320/coronavirus-des-eurodeputes-appellent-evacuer-les-migrants-les-plus-vulner

    • Europe must act to stop coronavirus outbreak in Lesbos, say MEPs

      As the coronavirus pandemic spreads across Europe, refugees and migrants living in overcrowded camps remain extremely vulnerable.

      On the island of Lesbos, one suspected coronavirus case would be enough to raise concerns in the Moria camp. Human rights organisations are concerned asylum seekers won’t have access to resources needed to prevent and then treat the outbreak.

      “It will be a very difficult situation if the virus comes to Moria or any other overcrowded reception centres or hotspots on the Greek islands,” admits Ylva Johansson, Commissioner Home Affairs.

      “That’s why it is necessary to take a lot of measures right now … So far, there is no detected virus in the camps.”

      NGOs have raised concerns over asylum procedures being frozen. According to the Commissioner for Home Affairs, processing applications must not be stopped.

      “People arriving at the borders still have the right to apply for asylum and cannot be sent away without their claim being assessed,” explains Professor Philippe De Bruycker, Institute for European Studies, Université Libre de Bruxelles. “This does not mean that nothing can be done regarding the protection of health: People requiring asylum maybe tested to see if they are sick or not, and if they are it can be applied measures such as quarantine, or even detention or restrictions of movement within the territory of the states.”

      Restrictions on travel and social distancing measures means delays in the asylum process are inevitable.

      “A lot of member states are making the decision that the interviews with asylum seekers should not take place right now because they would like to limit the social interaction,” says Commissioner Johansson. “So there will be delays in the processes of asylum, but I think that member states are taking measures to deal with the risk of the virus being spread.”

      MEPs have called for an “immediate European response” to avoid a humanitarian crisis spiralling into a public health crisis. NGOs warn there is little chance of not getting infected living in such conditions.

      https://www.euronews.com/2020/03/24/europe-must-act-to-stop-coronavirus-outbreak-in-lesbos-say-meps

    • Αυτοψία του « Ν » στο λιμανάκι της Πέτρας

      Βρίσκονται εκεί 56 μετανάστες, από το Αφγανιστάν και το Κογκό, ανάμεσά τους και πολλά παιδιά.

      Παραπλεύρως του λιμανιού της Πέτρας βρίσκονται από την περασμένη Δευτέρα ως και σήμερα 56 συνολικά μετανάστες, στην πλειοψηφία τους από το Αγφανιστάν και 6 από το Κογκό.

      Πρόκειται για νεοαφιχθέντες στη Λέσβο, που βγήκαν με βάρκα από τα τουρκικά παράλια στην περιοχή του Γαβαθά. Ανάμεσα τους βρίσκονται αρκετές γυναίκες και παιδιά. Σύμφωνα με το νέο νομοθετικό πλαίσιο, κανείς τους δεν έχει δικαίωμα κατάθεσης αιτήματος για χορήγηση ασύλου, παραμένοντας ουσιαστικά στην παραλία, όπου έχουν δημιουργήσει κάποιες πρόχειρες κατασκευές μαζί με κάποιες σκηνές, αφού οι αρχές τους έχουν βάλει σε καραντίνα για 14 ημέρες, λόγω της πανδημίας του κορονοϊού.

      https://www.stonisi.gr/post/8007/aytopsia-toy-n-sto-limanaki-ths-petras-pics-video

      –—

      Commentaire de Vicky Skoumbi, reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 29.03.2020 :

      Regardez dans quelles conditions de ‘confinement’ sont obligés de vivre 56 réfugiés, originaires la plupart d’Afghanistan et 6 du Congo, dont plusieurs femmes et enfants à Petra de Lesbos. Ils sont arrivés lundi dernier près du port de Petra, au nord de Lesbos. Le nouveau cadre législatif leur interdit l’accès à la procédure d’asile et les autorités les obligent de rester en quarantaine sur place ( !!!) pendant 14 jours dans des abris de fortune que vous voyez au milieu de nulle part. C’est une pratique systématique depuis deux semaines à Lesbos : les nouveaux arrivants ne peuvent plus accéder à Moria et la seule « alternative » adoptée par les autorités est de les maintenir sur place à l’endroit même où ils ont débarqués sans aucune infrastructure d’accueil, jusqu’à leur transfert aux centres de détention fermés comme le camp sinistre de Klidi au nord de la Grèce voir

    • Les camps de migrants, une bombe sanitaire à l’heure de la pandémie

      A l’heure où l’on demande à chacun·e d’entre nous de respecter scrupuleusement les mesures de distanciation sociale afin d’endiguer l’expansion du COVID-19, la Grèce préconise l’enfermement collectif de milliers de personnes migrantes sur ses îles comme mesure de lutte contre l’extension de la pandémie dans le pays. Pourtant, si on souhaite préserver la santé d’un maximum de personnes, ces camps de premier enregistrement et de tri des personnes migrantes (hotspots) devraient être évacués de toute urgence et leur résident.e.s accueilli.e.s dans des hébergements où la distanciation sociale est possible et où les mesures d’hygiène de base et les soins de santé sont accessibles. Préserver la santé des exilé.e.s, c’est préserver notre santé à tous et toutes.

      Les appels qui demandent l’évacuation des milliers de personnes résidant dans les hotspots en Grèce fusent [1] à mesure que les témoignages terribles se multiplient. Pétition d’ONG, de médecins et de collectifs citoyens mais aussi indignation d’eurodéputés et de la commissaire aux Droits de l’Homme du Conseil de l’Europe au sujet de la dangerosité sanitaire des centres de détention. Pourtant, rien n’y fait. Actuellement, la Grèce, quand elle n’empêche pas complètement les entrées et sorties de ses hotspots, déplace des centaines de personnes depuis ces lieux de détention pour les emmener sur d’autres îles ou dans des centres fermés sur le continent éloignés de tout, comme dans le no man’s land de Klidi au nord du pays. Pas d’accès correct aux services de base (eau, nourriture, logement, mesures d’hygiène et soins de santé), pas de recours possible à un avocat, peu d’accès aux informations et possibilités de communication vers l’extérieur. Médecins Sans Frontières estime la population des cinq camps insulaires en Grèce à 42 000 personnes, alors que la capacité totale de ces derniers est de 6 000 personnes.
      Déni d’accueil, déni d’asile

      S’ajoute à cette situation de non accès aux mesures sanitaires préconisées par l’OMS e en temps de coronavirus (la distanciation sociale, lavage des mains réguliers, etc.), l’impossibilité temporaire de demander l’asile en Grèce et dans nombre d’Etats européens. En Belgique, l’Office des étrangers a fermé ses bureaux, ce qui empêche la prise en charge des nouveaux arrivants dans son réseau d’accueil coordonné par Fedasil. Le CGRA a, lui, suspendu ses auditions en présentiel.

      L’UE propose aux Etats membres des mesures qui ne sont pas à la hauteur des enjeux humanitaires de ces centres de détention. A la mi-mars, face à la situation de crise à la frontière gréco-turque, elle avait proposé aux Etats membres de relocaliser minimum 1 600 mineurs non accompagnés et de participer à la mise en œuvre de 5 000 retours dits volontaires. Depuis, ces propositions dérisoires face à l’ampleur du problème ont été bloquées avec l’arrivée du coronavirus. Actuellement, pour désengorger les camps, elle suggère à la Grèce de déplacer les personnes les plus vulnérables sur le continent (en Grèce) ou dans d’autres îles.
      Le COVID-19 n’a pas de frontières

      Il est difficile d’avoir des informations fiables sur la situation des hotspots italiens, les « jungles » informelles aux frontières ou sur les camps surpeuplés situés au-delà des frontières européennes et qui accueillent 80 % des personnes actuellement déplacées. Ces derniers jours, des premiers cas ont été détectée dans le hotspot de Lesbos et Moria, un autre dans les camps de fortune en Syrie et d’autres dans les villes proches du plus grand camp de réfugiés au monde, le camp de Cox’s Bazar au Bangladesh. En Libye, les personnes migrantes craignent la contagion au sein des centres où elles croupissent.

      Alors que l’UE se tait, l’ONU, via la voix du Haut-commissariat aux réfugiés, appelle les États à ne pas fermer les voies vers l’asile, mais à adopter des tests de dépistage et le placement en quarantaine des réfugié.e.s si un risque sanitaire est identifié lors du passage des frontières. Elle suspend cependant les programmes de réinstallation. Les Nations Unies ont lancé également un nouveau fonds d’urgence pour contrer l’impact du coronavirus dans les pays en développement, en Afrique notamment, afin de s’assurer que les personnes les plus vulnérables (y compris les personnes exilées) ne soient pas abandonnées à leur sort dans la lutte contre le coronavirus.

      Face à l’abandon, certains résident.e.s des camps en Grèce ont pris les choses en main. A Moria, des personnes migrantes réunies au sein de la Team Humanity ont commencé à coudre leurs propres masques. Et dans le camp de Vathy à Samos, des enfants ont réalisé des affiches éducatives sur le lavage des mains et l’hygiène [2].
      Bombe sanitaire comme héritage de l’externalisation

      La pandémie du COVID-19 révèle une nouvelle fois l’impact des politiques inadéquates et violentes mises en place vis-à-vis des personnes migrantes, qu’elles soient en demande de protection internationale ou pas.

      Résultats de cette mise à l’écart des personnes migrantes ? Des camps d’exilé.es surpeuplés devenus insalubres dans les pays du Sud, faute de véritables mécanismes permanent et solidaire d’accueil en Europe ; l’émergence de routes et campements informels aux frontières, faute de voies légales et sûres de migrations. Ces camps surpeuplés sont de véritables bombes à retardement sanitaires. Ils sont l’héritage de politiques migratoires européennes de mise à l’écart des personnes migrantes vers le continent. Croire que la préservation de la santé de certain.e.s se fera au détriment de celles des autres est cependant une erreur criminelle. La pandémie nous concerne tous et toutes et c’est en ne laissant personne de côté que nous en viendrons à bout. A court terme, à l’image du Portugal qui a annoncé samedi 28 mars la régularisation temporaire de plusieurs personnes migrantes, des solutions rapides et efficaces sont possibles. A long terme, cela implique un changement de politiques migratoires dont les objectifs centraux doivent être un accueil solidaire et des voies légales et sûres de migrations.

      L’impasse dans laquelle l’Europe s’est enfermée, en basant ses politiques sur la répression, l’externalisation des frontières et le refus de la solidarité entre Etats membres, se retourne aujourd’hui contre elle-même, aggravant le risque sanitaire au détriment de sa propre population. Cette alerte devrait créer l’opportunité de refonder les politiques migratoires, sur une approche solidaire, la seule qui puisse permettre de sortir l’Union européenne de l’ornière.

      https://www.cncd.be/covid-19-coronavirus-camps-refugies-migrants-bombe-sanitaire-europe-grece-pande

      signalé ici aussi :
      https://seenthis.net/messages/838434

    • Chronique d’un désastre annoncé : l’enfermement criminel des réfugiés en Grèce

      La situation des demandeurs d’asile retenus dans les îles grecques est catastrophique d’un point de vue sanitaire. On n’ose à peine imaginer ce qu’il pourrait s’y passer si l’épidémie de Covid-19 s’y déclarait.

      Par ces temps si troubles, où l’immunité grégaire obtenue par la vaccination généralisée est détournée en immunisation de troupeau résultante de l’exposition de tous et toutes au Covid-19 – ce qui ne manquera pas d’entraîner l’élimination des plus vulnérables –,

      par ces temps de détresse où les médecins en Italie, en Espagne et même en France sont sommés de faire le tri entre ceux à qui ils donneront une chance d’être sauvés et les autres qu’on laissera mourir,

      par ces temps si obscurs où les demandeurs d’asile aux frontières de l’Europe sont traités comme des ennemis à repousser et, si besoin, à abattre, tandis que ceux qui réussissent à passer en Grèce sont traités comme des criminels de droit commun, étant condamnés à des peines de prison ferme,

      il y a une partie de la population qui est condamnée à la contagion généralisée : en premier lieu, les réfugiés et les migrants vivant partout en Europe et surtout en Grèce dans des conditions sanitaires déplorables dans des « hotspots », ou bien détenus dans de centres de rétention administrative (CRA), puis les sans-abri et enfin les personnes incarcérées. Pour l’instant, aucune mesure de vraie protection sanitaire n’est prévue pour ces trois catégories. Les plus exposés parmi eux sont les réfugiés vivant dans les hotspots, centres dits de réception et d’identification, à Lesbos, Samos, Chios, Cos et Leros. Ces camps fonctionnent actuellement cinq, sept voire onze fois au-dessus de leur capacité d’accueil. Dans les îles grecques, 37 000 personnes sont actuellement enfermées dans des conditions abjectes dans des hotspots prévus pour accueillir 6 000 personnes au grand maximum. Les demandeurs d’asile sont obligés d’y vivre dans une très grande promiscuité et dans des conditions sanitaires qui suscitaient déjà l’effroi bien avant l’épidémie de coronavirus. Dans la jungle de l’oliveraie, extension « hors les murs » du hotspot de Moria, à Lesbos, il y a des quartiers où il n’existe qu’un seul robinet d’eau pour 1 500 personnes, ce qui rend le respect de règles d’hygiène absolument impossible.
      Conditions sordides

      Or la seule réponse envisagée par le gouvernement grec est de transformer Moria en un centre fermé, en restreignant drastiquement les déplacements de réfugiés. Les rares fois où un effort est fait pour la « décongestion » du camp, celle-ci est effectuée au compte-gouttes. Mise à part l’installation d’un conteneur médical par les autorités régionales à l’entrée du camp, aucun renforcement du dispositif sanitaire avec des effectifs médicaux suffisant pour traiter les 20 000 habitants actuels de Moria n’est prévu. Au contraire, le gouvernement Mitsotákis mise sur la peur d’une épidémie dans les camps pour imposer aux sociétés locales la création de centres fermés, censés garantir la sécurité, non pas tant de leurs résidents mais des riverains. Ou bien le coronavirus, ou bien les centres fermés de détention, avait déclaré sans détours il y a une dizaine de jours le ministre de la Migration, Notis Mitarachi. Quant à ceux qui sont arrivés après le 1er mars, lorsqu’ils ne sont pas condamnés à des peines de quatre ans de prison ferme pour entrée illégale dans le territoire ils sont détenus dans des conditions sordides en vue d’une expulsion plus qu’improbable vers leur pays d’origine ou d’un renvoi forcé vers la Turquie, « Etat tiers supposé sûr ». Pendant une dizaine de jours, 450 nouveaux arrivants ont été séquestrés dans des conditions inimaginables dans un navire militaire, où ils ont été obligés de vivre littéralement les uns sur les autres, sans même qu’on ne leur fournisse du savon pour se laver les mains.

      Une telle exposition à des conditions insalubres de personnes fragilisées par des voyages longs et éprouvants pourrait-elle être mise sur le compte de la simple impréparation ? Ces conditions sont presque aussi inhumaines dans les centres fermés de Malakassa et de Serrès, où les nouveaux arrivants sont détenus. Pour les 1 300 détenus de Malakassa, en Attique, l’accès à l’eau courante se limite à quelques heures par jour, tandis que la dernière distribution de produits d’hygiène remonte à deux semaines. A Serrès, l’accès à l’eau se limite à deux heures par jour, tandis que la seule visite médicale a été faite par un médecin qui n’a examiné que quelques enfants.
      Scénario terrifiant

      De telles conditions de détention ne laissent pas de doute sur la stratégie du gouvernement : cette population ne doit pas être protégée mais exposée. La stratégie d’enfermement et de refoulement qui a été jusqu’alors la politique migratoire de l’Europe se révèle à présent être une véritable « thanato-politique ». Aux refoulements illégaux et de plus en plus violents à la frontière (voir ici et ici) s’est ajoutée par temps de pandémie l’exposition des populations entières à des conditions si insalubres qu’elles mettent en danger leur santé et ne manquerons pas de conduire inévitablement à l’élimination physique d’une partie considérable d’entre eux. Sommes-nous face à un scénario terrifiant d’élimination de populations superflues ? Cette question ne saurait être contournée.

      Pourrions-nous fermer les yeux devant ces crimes de masses qui se préparent en silence et dont les conditions sont mises en place déjà à Moria (Lesbos), à Vathy (Samos), à Malakassa en Attique, au centre fermé, à Klidi ? Ce dernier, destiné à ceux qui sont arrivés en Grèce après le 1er mars (date de la suspension de la procédure d’asile) est un véritable camp de concentration, « un camp quasi militaire », écrit à juste titre Maria Malagardis. Les réfugiés et les migrants seront détenus dans ce camp pour un temps indéterminé, en attente d’un renvoi vers la Turquie, plus qu’improbable dans les conditions actuelles. Le choix de cet endroit désolé et à haut risque d’inondation, la très grande promiscuité obligatoire, ainsi que l’absence de toute prise en charge médicale, ont suscité de réactions, y compris au sein de la police locale et des sapeurs-pompiers. On n’ose à peine imaginer ce qu’il pourrait s’y passer si l’épidémie Covid-19 s’y déclarait.

      Et que se passera-t-il si l’épidémie se déclare dans des endroits si surpeuplés et si dépourvus d’infrastructures sanitaires que sont les hotspots des îles ? « En cas d’épidémie, une quarantaine qui enfermerait des dizaines de milliers de personnes en bonne santé ainsi que des personnes infectées par Covid-19 dans les camps surpeuplés, accompagnée d’un manque de préparation et de réponse médicale adéquate et appropriée, entraînerait presque certainement la mort inévitable de nombreuses personnes », ont déclaré 21 organisations qui ont lancé un appel pour l’évacuation immédiate des hotspots.
      Désastre sanitaire imminent

      Aux multiples appels (1) à évacuer immédiatement les camps surpeuplés, et même aux exhortations venant des instances européennes, le gouvernement grec continue à faire la sourde oreille, prétendant que l’enfermement des demandeurs d’asile dans des lieux comme le hotspot de Mória assure leur propre sécurité ! Le ministre de la Migration ne cesse de brandir comme solution miracle la création des centres fermés dans les îles. Entre-temps, les nouveaux arrivants, y compris les femmes enceintes et les enfants, restent bloqués à l’endroit même où ils débarquent, pour un supposé « confinement en plein air », sous des abris de fortunes ou même sans aucun abri, pendant au moins une période de quatorze jours ! Les appels répétés (voir ici et ici) de la commissaire Ylva Johansson de transférer les réfugiés des hotspots, ainsi que les exhortations de la commissaire Dunja Mijatović de libérer les migrants détenus en CRA, résonnent comme de simples protestations pour la forme. Dans la mesure où elles ne sont pas suivies de mesures concrètes, elles ne servent qu’à dédouaner la Commission européenne de toute responsabilité d’un désastre sanitaire imminent.

      Un tel désastre ne saurait toucher uniquement les réfugiés, mais l’ensemble de la population des îles. L’Union européenne, si elle veut vraiment agir pour mettre les demandeurs d’asile en sécurité, doit à la fois exercer des pressions réelles sur le gouvernement grec et prendre de mesures concrètes pour l’aider à évacuer les réfugiés et les migrants et à les installer dans un confinement sécurisé à domicile. Dans l’immédiat, elle peut réorienter l’aide exceptionnelle de 700 millions d’euros octroyée à la Grèce pour assurer l’étanchéité des frontières européennes, afin de mettre en sécurité des réfugiés et des migrants.

      Appliquer sur une population affaiblie et mal nourrie la méthode de « l’immunisation du troupeau » reviendrait à mettre en œuvre une politique d’élimination de populations superflues. Un tel choix politique ne saurait laisser intacte notre société tout entière. Ce n’est pas une question d’humanisme, c’est une question qui touche aux fondements de notre vivre-ensemble : dans quel type de société voulons-nous vivre ? Dans une société qui non seulement laisse mourir mais qui fait mourir ceux et celles qui sont les plus vulnérables ? Serions-nous à l’abri dans un monde transformé en une énorme colonie pénitentiaire, même si le rôle qui nous y est réservé serait celui, relativement privilégié, de geôliers ? Il est grand temps de se ressaisir : l’épidémie de Covid-19 a démontré, si besoin était, que nous vivons toutes et tous dans le même monde et que le sort des uns affecte celui des autres. Ne laissons pas les demandeurs d’asile subir un enfermement qui pourrait s’avérer mortel, mais faisons en sorte qu’ils partagent avec nous les conditions d’un confinement protecteur et salutaire. Il faudrait leur offrir en toute urgence un abri digne de ce nom dans des conditions sanitaires décentes. C’est une priorité absolue si nous voulons éviter une catastrophe humanitaire et sociétale.
      Sans précédent

      Face au choix de traiter des êtres humains comme des miasmes, nous pouvons opposer une politique qui combine diverses propositions : les résidents de hotspots et ceux qui se trouvent en détention administrative pourraient être transférés en Grèce continentale en bateaux de croisière, et y être hébergés provisoirement en logements touristiques vides, afin d’être par la suite répartis entre les pays européens.

      L’extrême urgence de la situation impose de faire vite, il n’y a plus une minute à perdre (2). Exigeons du gouvernement grec et des dirigeants européens une action immédiate qui mettra en sécurité les demandeurs d’asile et les migrants. Ne pas le faire aujourd’hui nous rend complice d’une stratégie criminelle qui mènera inévitablement à une catastrophe humanitaire sans précédent.

      Contre les politiques d’exclusion et de criminalisations des arrivants, il nous faudra construire un monde « un », commun à toutes et à tous. Sinon, chacun de nous risque à n’importe quel moment de se retrouver du mauvais côté de la frontière.

      https://www.liberation.fr/debats/2020/04/04/chronique-d-un-desastre-annonce-l-enfermement-criminel-des-refugies-en-gr

    • A Hard Lesson for Migrants Who Give Up: There May Be No Welcome Mat Back Home

      Jessica Kablan, 27, came back to Ivory Coast seven months pregnant by a man she had turned to for protection on the road.Credit...Yagazie Emezi for The New York Times

      THIAROYE-SUR-MER, Senegal — The fishing village has long sent its men to sea, but after foreign trawlers scraped the bottom clean, the men began coming back empty-handed. It has long sent its men abroad for work, too, but their luck is often no better.

      Last November, when El Hadji Macoura Diop, a 37-year-old fisherman, failed to reach Europe by boat, he could not bring himself to call his wife and tell her he was giving up. “I knew it would just destroy her,” he said.

      Hard as it is to leave home for an unknown land and an uncertain future, coming back, migrants say, can be even harder. Often, they feel ashamed to admit defeat, especially to families that may have scrimped to raise money for their trip. And they struggle to reintegrate into the societies they left behind.

      In 2010, when he was 19, Yaya Guindo fled his life herding cattle in a small farming village in Ivory Coast. Last winter, after eight years on the road working in construction and at restaurants, he returned, broken and defeated, from a detention center in Libya.

      He tried to go home, he said, but his friends mocked him. “I didn’t have anything,” he said. “I was embarrassed.”

      The experiences of Mr. Diop and Mr. Guindo are far from unusual. Researchers estimate that one out of four people who migrate in search of opportunity return to their country of birth — some by choice, others not.

      Just since 2017, the International Organization for Migration has helped more than 62,000 migrants return to 13 countries in West and Central Africa, transported on charter flights and buses arranged by the agency. Many said they wanted to go home after being detained in abysmal conditions in Libyan detention centers, like one in Tajoura that was bombed in early July, killing more than 50 people.

      Once back, they are offered help reintegrating, including temporary shelter, pocket money, job training and psychological counseling.

      “These people left for a reason, and if you don’t address that, they will keep dying at sea,” said Florence Kim, a spokeswoman for the International Organization for Migration, which runs the program. “If you give people what they needed in the first place, they don’t need to take the risks.”

      The organization placed Mr. Guindo in a training program as a restaurant worker in a trendy neighborhood of Abidjan, the largest city in Ivory Coast. Other returning migrants have been given training as carpenters, tailors or shopkeepers.

      But after the initial support, the migrants are on their own.

      “We’re trying not to create a parallel system where migrants who are coming back to their country would have better service than Ivorians who chose not to leave,” Lavinia Prati, a reintegration officer for the International Organization for Migration.

      The transition can be rocky.

      Mr. Guindo, for example, has angered his employers by skipping work to play basketball for a local club. He says he needs to maintain good relations with the club because it is giving him housing in exchange for playing.

      Yet as hard as it is to adjust, Mr. Guindo said he was staying put.

      “I saw people dying of hunger, I saw women raped, men beheaded,” he said. “What I saw, what I lived, what I heard — I would not leave again.”

      Another returnee to Ivory Coast, Jessica Kablan, 27, came back seven months pregnant by a man she had turned to for protection on the road. Although the nature of the relationship was intrinsically coercive, it seemed to her the best choice she could make under the circumstances. When her boyfriend back home — who had helped pay for her trip — realized she was pregnant, he ended the relationship.

      She does not blame him.

      “I came back with a child,” she said. “How could he accept that?”

      Meliane Lorng, a psychologist who counsels returning migrants through the International Organization for Migration, says the women with children often don’t tell their families that they are back, “because the infant is the living testimony that they were raped.”

      Uncounted other migrants, like the fisherman, have returned on their own, without the help of humanitarian agencies.

      Thiaroye-sur-Mer has been a major source of migration for more than a decade. Hundreds of men have tried to reach Europe — mainly Spain. Everyone knows the migrant motto, “Barca ou barzakh”: Wolof for “Barcelona or die.”

      Some make it. Some die trying. And some return, said Moustapha Diouf, himself a returned migrant, who created a community center for them.

      To the outsider, Thiaroye-sur-Mer can seem like an idyllic place, not somewhere people would be eager to leave: Men sit on the beach, mending their nets, while children play in the surf. But when they do come back home, migrants often get a stark reminder of why they left in the first place.

      One recent day, Mr. Diop, the fisherman who abandoned his attempt to reach Europe, and his five partners came back to shore with about 100 small silver fish called sardinella in their nets. Once the owner of the boat got his share, they would earn about a dollar each, he said.

      There was a time when some migrants setting off in hopes of a better life left right from the shores of the village by pirogue, the colorfully painted wooden canoes used for fishing. More recently, the grapevine has advised them to go by air to Morocco, where Senegalese do not need visas, and then catch passage across the Mediterranean with a smuggler.

      From the roofs of the village houses, the view of the ocean goes on forever. It is easy to imagine that Europe might be just beyond the horizon. And it is possible to forget, if only for a moment, the many dangers of the journey.

      Often, it is the women who encourage the men to migrate.

      Mr. Diop’s mother, Fatou Ndaw, 55, chose him to go because he was the oldest of three brothers, and a fisherman. “He was the one who knows how to read the signs of the ocean,” she said.

      Mr. Diop tried twice.

      On his first attempt, in 2006, he headed for the Canary Islands. Along the way, he watched as six people from his village died after bouts of vomiting and dehydration, their bodies tossed overboard with a prayer.

      Mr. Diop landed, but he was deported two days before an uncle living in Spain arrived to claim him, he said.

      To pay for his second attempt, last fall, Mr. Diop’s mother sold her jewelry; his wife, Mbayang Hanne, saved the money that she earned frying doughnuts under a tent on the beach and selling them with coffee.

      Mr. Diop bought a round-trip plane ticket to Casablanca, where he did not need a visa and could stay with a childhood friend. From there, he took a bus to Tangier and boarded a boat for Spain.

      This time, his boat was stopped before it reached international waters. Mr. Diop says he was fingerprinted and dropped at the Algerian border. He walked 16 hours with other migrants until a car picked them up and took them to Casablanca.

      In Casablanca, the weather was bad and the boats were not running. He slept on the street in the rain. His round-trip ticket on Royal Air Maroc was expiring in two days. Homesick and miserable, Mr. Diop called his parents. They advised him to use the ticket to return home.

      He spent some sleepless nights agonizing over whether to call his wife, and decided not to.

      At the airport back in Dakar, he did not even have enough money for a taxi. A stranger took pity on him and drove him home.

      To Mr. Diop’s relief, his wife was out when he got there — but all that did was put off the inevitable. When she returned, she was shocked to find him in the house.

      It was hard to explain why he had failed when so many others had succeeded. Some of his neighbors, Mr. Diop felt, were judging him. But others told him it was not his fault.

      “Europe doesn’t belong to anybody,” he recalled their telling him. “If God decides, one day you’ll have breakfast in Europe. Never give up.”

      And he has not. Mr. Diop says he is not discouraged by deaths he has seen on the migrant path. It is simply part of the risk, he says.

      He and his family are saving for him to leave again.

      https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/15/world/africa/africa-migrants-return-home.html

    • Video: Sent back to Ivory Coast, illegal migrants face stigma, rejection

      https://youtu.be/n3moMpBDD64

      It’s the contradiction of Ivory Coast. While its economy is one of the most dynamic in Africa, more and more of its people are setting out into the desert towards the Mediterranean in a bid to reach Europe. Some succeed, but for others, the journey is cut short and they are sent back to Ivory Coast. Returning home is often difficult as it comes with a sense of failure and rejection from their loved ones. Our Abidjan correspondents report.

      https://www.france24.com/en/20180905-focus-ivory-coast-returnees-illegal-migrants-europe-libya-mediter

    • Ivory Coast: the migration challenge

      Ivory Coast is one of the major departure points for migrants travelling illegally to Europe. Without a job or a tangible future in their country, many risk their lives seeking a better one abroad. To combat this pattern, the European Union is working in conjunction with the International Organization for Migration (IOM). Collective reintegration projects, such as business partnerships between returning migrants and members of their community, aim to discourage risky irregular migration through sustainable work and dialogue at home. To see how it works, Euronews travels to Ivory Coast, which recently hosted the African Union-European Union summit.

      Abidjan, Ivory Coast’s economic capital, is one of West Africa’s most highly urbanised cities. But behind its apparent success story, and despite being among the world’s biggest exporters of cacao, coffee and bananas, Ivory Coast is still plagued by poverty, which affected nearly half the population in 2015. Many young people faced with unemployment try to reach Europe. According to the IOM and the EU, among the 155.000 migrants who reached Europe between January and November 2017, most came from West Africa.

      Europe isn’t the Eldorado

      We meet Jean-Marie in the capital Abidjan. He is one of many who was seduced by the prospect of a better life beyond his country’s borders. A promising football talent, he was lured to Tunisia by a so-called “sports agent” who took his money and disappeared.

      “In the first weeks everything went well, I only understood it was a scam after a while because I never saw that person again, he disappeared with the 2.500 euros I gave him,” Jean-Marie Gbougouri tells us. “So, in the end, I was stuck over there, I had nothing left. So for me, Eldorado is not necessarily Europe. Of course, we all dream of going to Europe, but not in those conditions. I’m in good shape, but taking a boat to Italy isn’t going to change my situation. So I’d rather go home and invest my energy in my own country and see what happens.”

      The IOM helped Jean-Marie return home and set up a business as a chicken farmer. Voluntary return and its follow-up are priorities for the EU, which funds the IOM’s projects. According to the EU’s foreign policy chief, Federica Mogherini, interviewed by Euronews, the EU has helped 14,000 people return home this year.

      Once home, the migrants need assistance says the IOM’s director in Ivory Coast, Marina Schramm: “There is this point of failure which is why it is extremely important for us to work on the psychological and psychosocial support, create an identity again, build self-confidence. And I think therefore training is extremely important, having a diploma makes someone out of you again, not just someone that came back with nothing.”

      Boosting cacao revenue

      To prevent Ivory Coast’s youth from leaving, there need to be jobs for them. The country is the world’s biggest producer of cacao, most of which is consumed as chocolate in Europe and North America. But cocoa farmers in Africa are deeply affected by the fluctuating prices of cocoa. Overproduction this year caused prices to drop.

      Moreover, what Ivory Coast lacks, says Euronews’ Isabel Marques da Silva, is the processing industry.

      “A cooperative working in the fair trade business gets better prices for its cacao. But the added value is in the transformation process, which does not takes place in Ivory Coast. So in the end, the farmers get less than 10 percent of the price of a chocolate bar made and sold in Europe,” she says.

      There are exceptions like the Société Coopérative Equitable du Bandama, in the town of M’Brimbo, northeast of Abidjan. It brings together Ivory Coast’s first certified organic and fair trade cocoa producers.

      Thanks to this certification they have developed their own trade channels and are therefore spared the price fluctuations of the regular market. The next step would be to make the chocolate locally.

      “We’ll need funding, or at least someone to help train us locally so that we can make the chocolate here,” says SCEB president Jean Evariste Salo. “In Europe, people are tired of eating toxic food, they’re starting to ask for organic produce: organic is the future.”

      Boosting digital growth

      Entrepreneurship in Africa is booming as is the digital economy.

      Computer engineer Guiako Obin is the co-founder of Babylab, a Fab Lab where local children in the deprived neighbourhood of Abobo in Abidjan can come and learn about computers, upcycling and coding.

      “What we need is to lobby local authorities in order to copy what’s being done in other parts of Ivory Coast and Africa,” Guiako tells us.

      The development of digital opportunities was at the heart of the recent EU-Africa Business Forum in Abidjan.

      According to Stefano Manservisi, head of International Cooperation and Development at the EU, “(The priority is) interconnectivity, access to basic information, and access to services which are more transparent, more affordable, in terms also of the relationships between people and the administration, but also people and the market.”

      The forum took place ahead of the EU-African summit, where leaders agreed on four key priorities for the coming years including economic opportunities for youth, peace and security, mobility and migration, and cooperation on governance.

      –-> #vidéo on:

      https://www.euronews.com/2017/12/05/ivory-coast-the-migration-challenge

    • Migrants de retour en Côte d’Ivoire (1/6) : Ibrahim raconte l’enfer libyen

      Des migrants dans un centre de détention, en Libye, avant d’être rapatriés dans leur pays, le 2 décembre 2017

      RFI vous propose une série de reportages sur ces Ivoiriens qui ont tenté de migrer vers l’Europe en partant de la grande ville de l’ouest de la Côte d’Ivoire, Daloa. Si le phénomène a ralenti aujourd’hui, il y a encore deux ans, ce sont des centaines de jeunes hommes, de jeunes femmes et même d’enfants qui tentaient chaque mois de prendre la très dangereuse route de la Libye dans l’espoir d’embarquer sur un radeau en direction de l’Italie. Ibrahim Doumbia, 31 ans, est l’un d’entre eux. Pour lui, l’enfer a duré plus d’un an.
      Publicité

      Dans son petit atelier de couture en bord de route à Daloa, Ibrahim Doumbia raconte un rêve d’Europe qui a viré au cauchemar, dès le désert nigérien. « Tu sais, les gens parlent beaucoup de la mer, la mer. Mais là où les gens restent beaucoup, c’est dans le désert. Le désert, c’est un cimetière, confie-t-il. S’il y a un problème d’eau qui arrive à un moment, même à ton frère, le peu d’eau qu’il te reste, tu ne peux pas lui donner. Celui qui nous transporte, souvent, il veut même sortir avec une de nos sœurs, mais la fille ne peut pas refuser, parce que si elle refuse, nous restons tous bloqués dans le désert. »

      En Libye, l’enfer continue. A Bani Walid d’abord. La captivité, le travail forcé, les coups, le viol pour les femmes. Puis une évasion. Arrivé à Tripoli, il tente la traversée vers l’Italie avec des dizaines d’autres, sur deux radeaux de fortune. « Il y avait la tempête. Ce n’était pas facile. Il y avait trop de vagues. Et ils ont commencé à couler. Nous, on était obligés de nous éloigner un peu. Parce que, si d’autres essayaient de plonger dans la mer pour les remonter, nous tous risquions de couler. On les a regardés mourir. On ne pouvait pas. »

      Neuf mois dans un camp pour migrants assimilé à une « prison »

      Après cet échec : de nouveau la détention dans un camp pour migrants. « Moi, je suis resté dans cette prison pendant neuf mois. Chaque jour que Dieu fait, on voyait l’un de nos frères qui mourait. Souvent, vers trois heures du matin, ils venaient et frappaient tout le monde. Chacun essayait d’appeler ses parents, pour qu’ils essaient de tout faire pour les libérer de cette prison-là. »

      Rapatrié il y a deux ans, Ibrahim est un survivant. Hanté chaque nuit par les images de cette aventure dramatique, il s’estime chanceux de s’en être sorti. Aujourd’hui, il tente de dissuader les candidats au départ.

      http://www.rfi.fr/fr/afrique/20190313-migrants-retour-cote-ivoire-16-ibrahim-raconte-conditions-periple-libye

    • Migrants de retour en Côte d’Ivoire (2/6) : une réinsertion incertaine


      Des migrants ivoiriens venus de Libye, de retour au pays, le 20 novembre 2017

      RFI vous propose une série de reportages sur ces Ivoiriens qui ont tenté de migrer vers l’Europe en partant de la grande ville de l’ouest de la Côte d’Ivoire, Daloa. Chaque mois, des jeunes hommes, des jeunes femmes et même des enfants décident de prendre la très dangereuse route de la Libye dans l’espoir d’embarquer sur un radeau en direction de l’Europe. Des jeunes qui travaillent pour économiser un pécule pour partir, souvent avec l’aide de leur famille. Malheur à ceux qui doivent rentrer au pays où l’emploi stable se fait rare.
      Publicité

      Jean Martial vient d’obtenir un petit local ou il peut vendre ses fripes. A 35 ans, il a déjà tenté une fois de « partir à l’aventure », mais il s’est cassé les dents en Libye. Pour prendre la route, Jean Martial avait travaillé afin d’économiser 800 000 francs CFA, environ 1 200 euros. Et pour lui permettre de revenir, sa famille lui a envoyé de l’argent.

      Pour autant, cet échec n’a pas fait disparaître son envie d’Europe. « L’Europe, c’est le rêve de chaque personne ici. Si vous voyiez la misère et la souffrance que nous traversons. Aujourd’hui, si tu es en Europe, par la grâce de Dieu tu trouves un petit boulot, tu peux t’occuper de ta famille. Là-bas, au moins, le fonctionnaire est bien payé, le petit débrouillard est bien payé. »

      « Ce qui manque ici, ce sont les opportunités pour les jeunes »

      L’ONG italienne CeVi (Centro di volontariato internazionale) est arrivée en 2006 à Daloa, ville considérée il y a encore deux ou trois ans commela plaque tournante ivoirienne des départs vers l’Europe. CeVi fait notamment de la sensibilisation, auprès des populations et des autorités, et aide ceux qui sont revenus, les « retournés » à se réinsérer.

      « Ce qui manque ici, ce sont les opportunités pour les jeunes et surtout une perspective de stabilité. Parce que, quand on est commerçant, on ne sait jamais combien on va gagner dans le mois, si on va pouvoir envoyer les enfants à l’école, explique Laura Visentin de CeVi. Daloa, c’est vrai, est une grande ville. Mais au final, c’est comme si c’était un village, parce qu’il n’y a pas d’usine. Au-delà de la fonction publique, il n’y a pas d’entreprises. Et le problème c’est que, si un enfant demande un million pour partir, la famille cotise. Mais si un enfant demande un million pour commencer un petit business ici, la famille ne donne pas. »

      Ces dernières années, les stratégies des ONG, des autorités ou des grandes agences semblent porter leurs fruits. Les départs de Daloa ont manifestement baissé, mais le phénomène existe toujours.

      http://www.rfi.fr/fr/afrique/20190314-migrants-retour-cote-ivoire-26-reinsertion-avenir-cevi

    • Migrants de retour en Côte d’Ivoire (3/6) : le récit de Junior, 9 ans

      Migrants au large des côtes libyennes, le 19 juin 2017.

      RFI vous propose une série de reportages sur ces Ivoiriens qui ont tenté de migrer vers l’Europe en partant de la grande ville de l’Ouest de la Côte d’Ivoire, Daloa. Si le phénomène a un peu ralenti aujourd’hui, il y a encore deux ans, ce sont des centaines de personnes qui tentaient chaque mois de prendre la très dangereuse route de la Libye dans l’espoir d’embarquer sur un radeau en direction de l’Italie. Des hommes, des femmes, et même des enfants, souvent seuls. Junior avait neuf ans quand il a tenté de rejoindre l’Europe avec le rêve de devenir ingénieur.
      Publicité

      Junior a désormais onze ans et un regard d’acier. Dans son quartier, tout le monde le considère comme un petit génie de l’électronique. Quand il est parti, il n’avait que neuf ans. L’aventure a duré douze mois. Son âge ne lui a pas épargné la faim, la soif, les coups ou la captivité. Ni même d’assister à des meurtres pour rien ou presque. « Il y a le désert, pour le traverser aussi c’était dur. On peut venir là, prendre une lame, te tuer parce que tu as bu l’eau ou bien parce que tu as payé le pain et mangé. On peut arracher ton argent, prendre une lame, te tuer... »

      Un beau matin, Junior a volé l’argent que cachait son père et est parti sans le dire à personne. Direction l’Europe pour devenir ingénieur. « Si j’avais réussi, j’aurais pu aider ma famille, parce que j’ai des petits frères. Il y a beaucoup de mes amis qui sont partis, c’est pour ça que j’ai pris la route. Je peux partir, si je vois que ça ne va pas encore. Je peux retenter. Ou bien je prends une autre route, si je vois qu’il y a une autre route, je peux prendre ça. Ma famille n’a rien, je peux l’aider. »

      « Tu partais pour aller faire quoi là-bas, à ton âge ? »

      Vendeur de pneus rechapés, M. Amossa, le père de junior, a des yeux pleins d’admiration pour ce petit garçon qui lui a donné des mois d’angoisse. « Quand il est revenu, je lui ai demandé : "Tu partais pour aller faire quoi là-bas, à ton âge ?" Il m’a répondu qu’il partait pour développer sa connaissance. Comme lui-même, il aime faire les fabrications. S’il y a délestage, il y a des trucs qu’il fabrique, il donne à sa grand-mère et puis ça alimente la maison. Je ne sais pas comment il a fabriqué tout ça. Au début, c’est vrai, je lui ai dit de rester tranquille, de continuer son étude… S’il veut aller à l’aventure pour se chercher, ça viendra avec le temps. »

      http://www.rfi.fr/fr/afrique/20190315-migrants-retour-cote-ivoire-3-6-junior-9-ans-recit

    • Migrants de retour en Côte d’Ivoire (4/6) : la honte et la gêne après l’échec

      Migrants ivoiriens rapatriés de Libye à leur arrivée à l’aéroport d’Abidjan, lundi 20 novembre 2017.

      Toute la semaine, RFI vous propose une série de reportages sur ces Ivoiriens qui ont tenté de migrer vers l’Europe, en partant de Daloa. Cette ville, la troisième du pays, est la plus grande de l’ouest de la Côte d’Ivoire. Elle a longtemps été considérée comme un point de départ majeur des Ivoiriens vers l’Europe mais, pour beaucoup, le voyage s’est arrêté avant, souvent en Libye. Pour ces hommes et ces femmes, le retour à Daloa est alors synonyme de honte.
      Publicité

      Elle souhaite se faire appeler Mimi. Partie pour la Libye afin de gagner l’Europe, elle n’a jamais pu traverser la Méditerranée. Au bout de sept mois de calvaire, elle a été rapatriée à Abidjan par l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM).

      « La manière dont tu rentres au pays, ce n’est pas celle que tu as décidée, ce n’est pas cette manière-là que tu as voulue. On est rentré avec désespoir. On s’est dit qu’on a vraiment perdu du temps, notre argent… On a perdu plein, plein de choses. On n’a vraiment pas le moral. Je me disais que je préférais encore la mort que de revenir comme ça », se confie-t-elle.

      La honte d’avoir menti à sa mère et d’avoir pris son argent. La honte de l’échec, aussi. Les premières semaines, Mimi se cache chez une de ses sœurs, à Abidjan. Puis elle fait un accident vasculaire cérébral (AVC). « Trop de pensées », dit-elle.

      Soignée, elle finira, plusieurs mois après, par retourner à Daloa garder la maison de sa mère qui, à son tour, est partie à Abidjan suivre des soins. A Daloa, le sentiment de honte est encore plus fort et elle ne quitte quasiment pas sa cour.

      « Comme je suis moi-même de Daloa, c’est mon voyage qui m’empêchait de venir m’installer ici à cause de la honte, de la gêne. Le fait de partir et de ne pas avoir réussi le voyage, les gens vont mal l’interpréter. Voilà pourquoi je suis dans mon coin. Je suis là, je ne fais rien pour le moment et tout cela me stresse encore plus. Je suis malade depuis mon retour. Je prends des médicaments pour éviter trop de stress et, par conséquent, je suis renfermée, trop renfermée. Avant, ce n’était pas ça ma vie », témoigne-t-elle.

      Malgré tout, Mimi a un projet, celui d’ouvrir une échoppe de jus de fruits sur la rue qui passe devant sa cour. Plus une thérapie qu’un business.

      http://www.rfi.fr/fr/afrique/20190316-cote-ivoire-migrants-retour-libye-daloa-mediterranee-oim-europe-echec-h

    • Migrants de retour en Côte d’Ivoire (5/6) : sensibilisation auprès des « mamans »

      Des migrants africains secourus au large de la Libye en août 2018.

      Toute la semaine RFI vous propose une série de reportages sur ces Ivoiriens qui ont tenté de migrer vers l’Europe en partant de Daloa. Cette ville, la troisième du pays, est la plus grande de l’ouest de la Côte d’Ivoire a longtemps été considérée comme un point de départ majeur des Ivoiriens vers l’Europe. Aujourd’hui, du constat de tous, le phénomène a fortement ralenti. La répression de quelques passeurs et la sensibilisation de masse sont passées par là. Sensibilisation mieux ciblée aussi, notamment envers les « mamans ».
      Publicité

      Dans cette cour du quartier Orly, de Daloa, comme chaque mercredi, une douzaine de mamans du quartier se retrouvent pour discuter, boire le thé et manger des bonbons. Parmi ces femmes, Awa Touré.

      « Il y a beaucoup de mamans dont les enfants sont partis. Toutes les mamans se décarcassent pour avoir l’argent pour donner aux enfants qui s’en vont. Mais, moi, mon enfant n’est pas parti. C’est mon seul garçon. Il est commerçant et vend des pneus. Je lui ai dit : « il ne faut pas partir ». Il est resté. Je veux qu’il reste à côté de moi et puis, je me débrouille. L’argent que je touche, je le lui donne. Je veux qu’il ait un magasin à lui », raconte-t-elle.

      La famille, et les mères en particulier, sont souvent pourvoyeuses de fonds pour les candidats au départ. Du coup, ces mamans sont, depuis quelque temps, la cible de la sensibilisation de la part d’ONG. Laura Visentin de l’organisation italienne CeVi, est présente à Daloa, depuis douze ans.

      « On faisait de la sensibilisation avec les jeunes parce que l’on pensait que c’était nos cibles dans la mesure où ce sont eux qui partent. Mais après, on a compris que souvent, ce sont les mamans elles-mêmes qui poussent les enfants à partir et là, nous avons commencé à faire de la sensibilisation avec elles, à montrer des documentaires sur le désert et sur la traversée de la mer. Il y a beaucoup de mamans qui ont commencé à pleurer. Elles ont dit : « Mais moi, j’ai envoyé mon enfant comme ça. Je ne savais pas que c’était comme ça. Personne ne nous a dit ». Et c’est à partir de là que la pression de la famille a diminué un peu et aujourd’hui, les mamans, au lieu d’encourager, elles découragent », explique Laura Visentin.

      Si ce facteur n’est pas le seul qui explique la baisse du nombre de départs de Daloa depuis deux ans, « c’en est un », estiment les acteurs sur le terrain.

      http://www.rfi.fr/fr/afrique/20190317-cote-ivoire-migrants-retour-daloa-ong-cevi-laura-visentin-sensibilisati

    • Migrants de retour en Côte d’Ivoire (6/6) : la lutte contre les passeurs

      Une centaine de migrants ivoiriens rapatriés de Libye, le 20 novembre 2017 (photo d’illustration).

      RFI vous propose une série de reportages sur ces Ivoiriens qui ont tenté de migrer vers l’Europe en partant de Daloa. Cette ville, la troisième du pays, est la plus grande de l’ouest de la Cote d’Ivoire a longtemps été considérée comme un point de départ majeur des Ivoiriens vers l’Europe. Aujourd’hui, du constat de tous, le phénomène a fortement ralenti. La sensibilisation est passée par là. Mais la répression aussi. Aujourd’hui selon le gouvernement, une cinquantaine de passeurs dans tout le pays ont été condamnés.
      Publicité

      Adama est un repenti. Arrivé d’Abidjan il y a environ cinq ans, il a été pendant deux ans et demi un passeur. Lui préfère le terme de « démarcheur », qui aidait les candidats au départ à atteindre l’Europe, en moyenne une quinzaine par mois.

      « A cette époque-là, j’étais à Daloa. Quand je prenais quelqu’un, bien avant qu’il décolle, je discutais avec la famille. Si on finissait par tomber d’accord, on donnait le chemin au niveau des différents correspondants qu’on avait dans les différentes villes. Quand il arrivait à Agadez, la famille payait le restant d’argent. A l’époque, de la Côte d’Ivoire à la Libye, on prenait 600 000 francs CFA. De la Côte d’Ivoire en Italie, on prenait 900-950 000. »

      Adama a passé un an en prison à cause de son activité. Aujourd’hui, il fait de la sensibilisation lorsqu’il n’est pas dans sa petite menuiserie ouverte aux quatre vents. Il y a quelques années encore, Daloa comptait une trentaine de passeurs, selon lui. La plupart se serait volatilisée.

      La migration ralentit. Conséquence de la politique des autorités, estime Yaya Sylla, premier adjoint au maire, à commencer par la lutte contre ces passeurs.

      « Dans un premier temps, il s’agit de récupérer celui qui le fait. C’est plus facile de le repérer s’il n’est pas de Daloa. Ensuite, nous jouons au niveau de la sensibilisation. Et en tant qu’autorité, nous faisons en sorte de pouvoir mettre la jeunesse au travail. Parce que tout part de là. Nous avons mis beaucoup de programmes en place pour l’emploi des jeunes. »

      Depuis des années, ce sont les ONG et les organisations de jeunesse qui sont en première ligne pour dissuader les candidats au départ de prendre la route, et leurs familles de les soutenir.

      http://www.rfi.fr/fr/afrique/20190318-cote-ivoire-serie-migrants-passeurs-daloa

    • Côte d’Ivoire : retour de Libye de migrants ivoiriens

      Migrants ivoiriens rapatriés de Libye à leur arrivée à l’aéroport d’Abidjan, lundi 20 novembre 2017.

      Quelque 155 migrants ivoiriens en Libye ont été rapatriés lundi soir à Abidjan. Ces candidats à l’émigration en Europe, dont le voyage s’est arrêté en Libye, ont été accueillis par la direction des Ivoiriens de l’étranger et l’Organisation internationale pour les Migrations.
      Publicité

      Dans la zone charter de l’aéroport d’Abidjan les enfants courent et s’amusent sur les tapis à bagages à l’arrêt. Les parents souvent épuisés par leur périple, parfois gênés de revenir sous les objectifs des appareils photos ou de caméras de télévision, aimeraient que les formalités d’enregistrement soient expédiées pour pouvoir aller se reposer.

      http://www.rfi.fr/fr/afrique/20171121-cote-ivoire-migrants-libye-retour-abidjan-reportage