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  • Twitter Users in China Face Detention and Threats in New Beijing Crackdown - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/10/business/china-twitter-censorship-online.html

    SHANGHAI — One man spent 15 days in a detention center. The police threatened another’s family. A third was chained to a chair for eight hours of interrogation. Their offense : posting on Twitter. The Chinese police, in a sharp escalation of the country’s online censorship efforts, are questioning and detaining a growing number of Twitter users even though the social media platform is blocked in China and the vast majority of people in the country cannot see it. The crackdown is the latest (...)

    #Google #Facebook #LinkedIn #Twitter #WeChat #activisme #censure #corruption #surveillance (...)

    ##HumanRightsWatch

  • The Callout
    https://www.npr.org/2018/04/13/601971617/the-callout
    A lot of communities today are taking a hard stand against sexual harassment and assault. Using social media shaming, ostracism, professional excommunication, whatever punishment is painful enough to shift the moral code by brute force. Through one incident in the Richmond, Va. hardcore music scene, we chronicle a social media callout and ask what pain can accomplish.

    The Cruelty of Call-Out Culture. How not to do social change.
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/14/opinion/call-out-social-justice.html

    #denonciation #enligne #callout #radio #npr #social_media #punk #communautés #justicier #vindicte #hardcore

  • Do You Take This Robot …
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/19/style/sex-robots.html

    Today we fall in love through our phones. Maybe your phone itself could be just as satisfying ? When Akihiko Kondo, a 35-year-old school administrator in Tokyo, strolled down the aisle in a white tuxedo in November, his mother was not among the 40 well-wishers in attendance. For her, he said, “it was not something to celebrate.” You might see why. The bride, a songstress with aquamarine twin tails named Hatsune Miku, is not only a world-famous recording artist who fills up arenas throughout (...)

    #robotique #smartphone #solutionnisme

  • How Huawei Wooed Europe With Sponsorships, Investments and Promises
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/22/technology/huawei-europe-china.html

    When new employees join Huawei, they are given books about the Chinese telecommunications company’s achievements. One featured accomplishment is how the company has thrived in Europe. A chapter in one of the books describes the hard work of Huawei employees to win over European telecom providers and sell them equipment that forms the backbone of mobile wireless networks. It says little about how the company has also subtly lobbied, promised jobs and made research investments to ingratiate (...)

    #British_Telecom_(BT) #Deutsche_Telekom #Huawei #MI6 #surveillance #concurrence #lobbying (...)

    ##British_Telecom__BT_ ##backdoor

  • The Gay Penguins of Australia - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/15/style/gay-penguins-australia.html

    It was a young penguin colony, and all but one of the couples were pretty bad parents.

    They would get distracted from their nests, go for a swim or play, and so neglected eggs were getting cold, likely never to hatch. This was normal for inexperienced penguins, and the aquarium managers didn’t worry. Next mating season would be better.

    One couple, though, was extraordinary. Not because they were the colony’s only gay penguins, though they were, but because Sphen and Magic looked like they would make great, diligent, careful egg-warming parents. They made the biggest nest, and they sat on it constantly.

    Curious, the aquarium managers gave the two males a dummy egg. They took to it. And so then, when a particularly negligent heterosexual penguin couple looked to be leaving an egg exposed (females lay two, but usually only one survives), the aquarium workers figured they would give it to Sphen and Magic.

    In October, that egg hatched. Now the chick of a gay penguin union is waddling around an ice enclosure by the touristy docks in Sydney.

  • Opioid Lawsuits Are Headed to Trial. Here’s Why the Stakes Are Getting Uglier. - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/30/health/opioid-lawsuits-settlement-trial.html

    Uncontested: The devastation from prescription opioids has been deadly and inordinately expensive.

    Contested: Who should foot the bill?

    Just over a year ago, opioid lawsuits against makers and distributors of the painkillers were proliferating so rapidly that a judicial panel bundled all the federal cases under the stewardship of a single judge. On a January morning, Judge Dan Aaron Polster of the Northern District of Ohio made his opening remarks to lawyers for nearly 200 municipal governments gathered in his Cleveland courtroom. He wanted the national opioid crisis resolved with a meaningful settlement within a year, proclaiming, “We don’t need briefs and we don’t need trials.”

    That year is up.

    Far from being settled, the litigation has ballooned to 1,548 federal court cases, brought on behalf of cities and counties, 77 tribes, hospitals, union benefit funds, infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome and others — in total, millions of people. With a potential payday amounting to tens of billions of dollars, it has become one of the most complicated and gargantuan legal battles in American history.

    With settlement talks sputtering, the judge has signed off on a parallel track involving, yes, briefs, focused on, yes, trial. He will preside over three consolidated Ohio lawsuits in what is known as a “bellwether,” or test case. The array of defendants include Purdue Pharma, Mallinckrodt PLC, CVS RX Services Inc. and Cardinal Health, Inc. That jury’s verdict could determine whether the parties will then negotiate in earnest or keep fighting.

    The plaintiffs have long said that the companies deliberately looked the other way at the improbable quantities. But the lawyers did not have the hard numbers in hand to bolster their claims.

    Now they do.

    For the time being, the judge will not release the data to the public. But a passage from a congressional report gives a sense of the granular information in the data: during 10 months in 2007, one distributor, McKesson, shipped three million prescription opioids to a single pharmacy in a West Virginia town with 400 residents.

    Typically, patients who sue for medical malpractice or product liability must turn over their own medical records as proof. They forfeit conventional privacy rights.

    Here, the overwhelming majority of plaintiffs are government entities, not individuals. They are seeking to be reimbursed for the accumulated costs of drug addiction and its collateral damage. The defendants want them to produce precise evidence showing how those costs are calculated, including the chain of events — for example, from a drug’s development, to its delivery, to a pharmacy-filled prescription to, eventually, bills from hospitals and others.
    What on Earth Is Going On?

    That means the drug industry is asking for patients’ records and for every prescription the plaintiffs deemed medically “suspicious.” The plaintiffs are pushing back, saying that the depleted municipal budgets for health, social services and law enforcement paint a more telling picture.

    Why drug companies could have an upper hand

    Lawyers on both sides agree: This litigation presents a slew of novel legal issues.

    If the bellwether ends in a victory for plaintiffs, appeals courts, increasingly filled with conservative judges, would be unlikely to uphold all of Judge Polster’s rulings on these untested legal questions, much less a whopping, emotional jury award. Complexity favors the defense.

    And in settlement negotiations, the long game is the defense’s best friend: they can afford to drag this out. Typically, the longer it slogs on, the more the final tab gets driven down.

    #Opioides #Procès

  • Are Police Lineups Always Fair? See for Yourself
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/29/nyregion/police-lineups-fair-unfair.html

    The robbery suspect had a birthmark on his face. So when detectives placed him in a lineup, they made sure to cover it up with a bandage. Then they put matching bandages on the faces of the five decoys — or “fillers” — who sat alongside him, so as not to single out the suspect.

    But even as New York City detectives strove to make the lineup more fair by concealing one identifying feature, they left another clue in plain sight: It is lying on the floor, next to the ankle of the man in the No. 5 position.


    #tapissage
    https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parade_d%27identification

  • https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/28/world/europe/france-yellow-vests-police.html#commentsContainer

    https://www.youscribe.com/BookReader/Index/3036744/?documentId=3427531

    C’est plus qu’une tactique policière mas il s’agit d’un stratégie de l’Élysée . D’ailleurs, il y aura ,le mois prochain,une grève générale dans toute la France ,initiée par les syndicats.

    Les gens ont droit de manifester leur colère ,cela fait partie de la démocratie à la française mais par contre qu’un président de la république ment à Sissi c’est une faute grave . Sissi est un dictateur que cela y va de soi de mentir mais Macron n’a pas le droit car il existe plusieurs manifestants qui sont cadenassés et pourtant ils n’ont rien cassé.

    Et puis d’un autre côté, quand la police s’arme et tire des projectiles y compris de caoutchouc, c’est un interdit par la loi française . Et j’ajouterai que la police s’arme et les policiers qui cachent leur visage , c’est sur ordre de l’Élysée ou exactement les lobbys qui ont fait élire Macron . On pourrait facilement imaginer que parmi les visages cachés il y a un certain Alexandre Benalla ou carrément un BHL (Henri Levy) .

    La doléance des manifestants est juste ,à savoir la démission de Macron car ce dernier est dans l’incapacité de trouver une solution plus globale . Pour la simple raison, Macron paye les pots cassés de tous ces prédécesseurs (au moins depuis Mitterrand !). Et puis, que fait la déontologie de la police avec ce service ’’la police de la police’’. Il ne faut pas oublier que tous les tués depuis le début des manifestations c’est la police qui est responsable et si démocratie existe en France il faut traduire ces policiers en justice et par voie de conséquence, les donneurs d’ordre et donc cela mènerait automatiquement à la démission de Macron.

    Ce dernier est aller donne des aides financière à l’Égypte de Sissi et donc de s’inspirer de la police égyptienne qui est partout dans la TV et publique et privée en Egypte et dans les entreprises...une omniprésence ; des écoutes et des cameras chez tous les dissidents égyptiens...

    On est alors en mesure de dire que Macron est venu au Caire pour chercher des conseils de la police égyptienne et de coloniser l’Égypte de Sissi car ce dernier sait que Macron peut le protéger car ils sont dans le même bateau...

    Les ’’gilets jaunes’’ ont droit d’étendre leur mouvement aux syndicats ,aux mouvements politiques de tout bord,ont le droit d’exiger des élections anticipées et ont droit finalement de faire appel à l’armée de terre pour rétablir l’ordre et de contrer cette police qui croit tout permis, avec une sixième république, comme cela fut en 1958 avec un général de brigade à la retraite du nom Charles De Gaulle

    Et au passage, il y a beaucoup d’officiers militaires français à la retraite ou en activité qui sont près à assumer la responsabilité de l’État français.

    Le groupe de pression derrière Macron sait pertinemment,tout cela mais préfère attendre’’wait and see’’ qui fait partie de leur système de pensée. Les policiers français ressemble de plus en plus à leurs collègues marocains,algériens,égyptiens...car il ne faut pas oublier non plus, la grande crainte de l’Élysée est que les 4 millions d’immigrés marocains et autant d’algériens et d’égyptiens rentrent dans la danse et se font inviter dans ce beau mouvement des gilets jaunes .

    L’une des tractations de Macron avec Sissi est que ce dernier puisse accepter tous les immigrés égyptiens expulsés de France car si Sissi refuse ,il y aura effusion de sang et avec les égyptiens, les marocains, les algériens...il s’agit en effet d’une véritable guerre civile.

    Et Macron est déjà en négociation, me semble-t-il avec les autres pays arabes. Car c’est la logique politique même . Il est un fait que Macron trouve le besoin(quand je dis Macron c’est le groupe de pression qui est derrière, qui dicte à Macron les prorogatifs …) d’ouvrir un nouveau champ celui de la colonisation de l’Égypte ; il y a tant de chose à faire si ce n’est l’exploitation en pétrole du Sahara de Sinaï ...

  • Use of Force in France’s ‘Yellow Vest’ Protests Fuels Anger
    The New York Times - By Elian Peltier - Jan. 28, 2019
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/28/world/europe/france-yellow-vests-police.html

    (...) Since violent clashes began in November, 11 people have died, and 1,900 protesters and 1,200 law enforcement officers have been injured, according to the Interior Ministry. Independent counts by the newspaper Libération and the journalist David Dufresne say that 109 protesters have been seriously injured, including 18 who have become blind in one eye and four who have lost a hand. (...)

    @davduf

  • Why Vietnam Appeals as Possible Host for Trump-Kim Summit - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/21/world/asia/trump-kim-summit-vietnam.html

    Vietnam, a former enemy of South Korea and the United States, has joined the global economy and become a strategic ally and robust trading partner for both countries.

    Vietnam and South Korea normalized relations in 1992, and Hanoi is now Seoul’s fourth-largest trading partner after China, the United States and Japan, with two-way trade valued last year at $62.6 billion.

    Vietnam and the United States normalized relations in 1995, two decades after North Vietnam defeated the American-backed South Vietnamese regime to end the Vietnam War. From 1995 to 2016 — a period of heady economic growth in Vietnam — trade between the United States and Vietnam grew to nearly $52 billion from $451 million. Hanoi is now among Washington’s fastest-growing export markets.

  • The Real Wall Isn’t at the Border. It’s everywhere, and we’re fighting against the wrong one.

    President Trump wants $5.7 billion to build a wall at the southern border of the United States. Nancy Pelosi thinks a wall is “immoral.” The fight over these slats or barriers or bricks shut down the government for more than a month and may do so again if Mr. Trump isn’t satisfied with the way negotiations unfold over the next three weeks.

    But let’s be clear: This is a disagreement about symbolism, not policy. Liberals object less to aggressive border security than to the wall’s xenophobic imagery, while the administration openly revels in its political incorrectness. And when this particular episode is over, we’ll still have been fighting about the wrong thing. It’s true that immigrants will keep trying to cross into the United States and that global migration will almost certainly increase in the coming years as climate change makes parts of the planet uninhabitable. But technology and globalization are complicating the idea of what a border is and where it stands.

    Not long from now, it won’t make sense to think of the border as a line, a wall or even any kind of imposing vertical structure. Tearing down, or refusing to fund, border walls won’t get anyone very far in the broader pursuit of global justice. The borders of the future won’t be as easy to spot, build or demolish as the wall that Mr. Trump is proposing. That’s because they aren’t just going up around countries — they’re going up around us. And they’re taking away our freedom.

    In “The Jungle,” a play about a refugee camp in Calais, France, a Kurdish smuggler named Ali explains that his profession is not responsible for the large numbers of migrants making the dangerous journeys to Europe by sea. “Once, I was the only way a man could ever dream of arriving on your shore,” the smuggler says. But today, migrants can plan out the journeys using their phones. “It is not about this border. It’s the border in here,” Ali says, pointing to his head — “and that is gone, now.”

    President Trump is obsessed with his border wall because technology has freed us from the walls in our heads.

    For people with means and passports, it’s easy to plot exotic itineraries in a flash and book flights with just a glance at a screen. Social feeds are an endless stream of old faces in new places: a carefree colleague feeding elephants in Thailand; a smug college classmate on a “babymoon” in Tahiti; that awful ex hanging off a cliff in Switzerland; a friend’s parents enjoying retirement in New Zealand.

    Likewise, a young person in Sana, Yemen, or Guatemala City might see a sister in Toronto, a neighbor in Phoenix, an aunt in London or a teacher in Berlin, and think that he, too, could start anew. Foreign places are real. Another country is possible.

    If you zoom out enough in Google Earth, you’ll see the lines between nations begin to disappear. Eventually, you’ll be left staring at a unified blue planet. You might even experience a hint of what astronauts have called the “overview effect”: the sense that we are all on “Spaceship Earth,” together. “From space I saw Earth — indescribably beautiful with the scars of national boundaries gone,” recalled Muhammed Faris, a Syrian astronaut, after his 1987 mission to space. In 2012, Mr. Faris fled war-torn Syria for Turkey.

    One’s freedom of movement used to be largely determined by one’s citizenship, national origin and finances. That’s still the case — but increasingly, people are being categorized not just by the color of their passports or their ability to pay for tickets but also by where they’ve been and what they’ve said in the past.
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    This is what is happening on that front already:

    A 2017 executive order barred people from seven countries, including five with Muslim majorities, from entering the country. An older rule put in place during the Obama administration compelled anyone who’d even just visited seven blacklisted nations to obtain additional clearance before traveling to the United States. Even as the Trump administration’s policy has met with legal challenges, it means that the barrier to entering the United States, for many, begins with their data and passport stamps, and is thousands of miles away from this country.

    The Trump administration would also like to make it harder for immigrants who’ve received public assistance to obtain citizenship or permanent residence by redefining what it means to be a “public charge.” If the administration succeeds, it will have moved the border into immigrants’ living rooms, schools and hospital beds.

    The walls of the future go beyond one administration’s policies, though. They are growing up all around us, being built by global technology companies that allow for constant surveillance, data harvesting and the alarming collection of biometric information. In 2017, the United States announced it would be storing the social media profiles of immigrants in their permanent file, ostensibly to prevent Twitter-happy terrorists from slipping in. For years, Customs and Border Protection agents have asked travelers about their social media, too.

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation has said these practices can “chill and deter the free speech and association of immigrants to the United States, as well as the U.S. persons who communicate with them.” In other words, it’s no longer enough to have been born in the right place, at the right time, to the right parents. The trail of bread crumbs you leave could limit your movements.

    It’s possible to get a glimpse of where a digital border might lead from China. Look at its continuing experiment with social-credit scoring, where a slip of the tongue or an unpaid debt could one day jeopardize someone’s ability to board a train or apply for a job. When your keystrokes and text messages become embedded in your legal identity, you create a wall around yourself without meaning to.

    The Berkeley political theorist Wendy Brown diagnoses the tendency to throw up walls as a classic symptom of a nation-state’s looming impotence in the face of globalization — the flashy sports car of what she calls a “waning sovereignty.” In a recent interview for The Nation, Professor Brown told me that walls fulfill a desire for greater sovereign control in times when the concept of “bounded territory itself is in crisis.” They are signifiers of a “loss of a national ‘we’ and national control — all the things we’ve seen erupt in a huge way.”

    Walls are a response to deep existential anxiety, and even if the walls come down, or fail to be built in brick and stone, the world will guarantee us little in the way of freedom, fairness or equality. It makes more sense to think of modern borders as overlapping and concentric circles that change size, shape and texture depending on who — or what — is trying to pass through.
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    It’s far too easy to imagine a situation where our freedom of movement still depends entirely on what has happened to us in the past and what kind of information we’re willing to give up in return. Consider the expedited screening process of the Global Entry Program for traveling to the United States. It’s a shortcut — reserved for people who can get it — that doesn’t do away with borders. It just makes them easier to cross, and therefore less visible.

    That serves the modern nation-state very well. Because in the end, what are borders supposed to protect us from? The answer used to be other states, empires or sovereigns. But today, relatively few land borders exist to physically fend off a neighboring power, and countries even cooperate to police the borders they share. Modern borders exist to control something else: the movement of people. They control us.

    Those are the walls we should be fighting over.


    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/26/opinion/sunday/border-wall-immigration-trump.html#click=https://t.co/BWNDIXplPK
    #mobile_borders #frontières_mobiles #ligne #ligne_frontalière #frontières #ubiquité

  • Scientists Are Teaching the Body to Accept New Organs - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/22/health/organ-transplants-immune-system.html

    #Greffe d’organes sans recours aux (ou arrêt à terme des) #immunosuppresseurs.

    The idea is to isolate regulatory T cells from a patient about to have a liver or kidney transplant. Then scientists attempt to grow them in the lab along with cells from the donor.

    Then the T cells are infused back to the patient. The process, scientists hope, will teach the immune system to accept the donated organ as part of the patient’s body.

    “The new T cells signal the rest of the immune system to leave the organ alone,” said Angus Thomson, director of transplant immunology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

    Dr. Markmann, working with liver transplant patients, and Dr. Leventhal, working with kidney transplant patients, are starting studies using regulatory T cells.

    At Pittsburgh, the plan is to modify a different immune system cell, called regulatory dendritic cells. Like regulatory T cells, they are rare and enable the rest of the immune system to distinguish self from non-self.

    One advantage of regulatory dendritic cells is that researchers do not have to isolate them and grow them in sufficient quantities. Instead, scientists can prod a more abundant type of cell — immature white blood cells — to turn into dendritic cells in petri dishes.

    “It takes one week to generate dendritic cells,” Dr. Thomson said. In contrast, it can take weeks to grow enough regulatory T cells.

    The regulatory T cells also have to remain in the bloodstream to control the immune response, while dendritic cells need not stay around long — they control the immune system during a brief journey through the circulation.

    “Each of us is taking advantage of a different approach,” Dr. Markmann said. “It is not clear yet which is best. But the field is at a fascinating point.”

  • Venezuela Military Backs Maduro, as Moscow Warns U.S. Not to Intervene - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/24/world/americas/russia-venezuela-trump-pence.html

    CARACAS, Venezuela — The leader of Venezuela’s armed forces declared loyalty to President Nicolás Maduro on Thursday and said the opposition’s effort to replace him with a transitional government amounted to an attempted coup.

    The pronouncement by the defense minister, Vladimir Padrino López, came a day after an opposition lawmaker proclaimed himself the country’s rightful leader during nationwide antigovernment protests and pleaded with the armed forces to abandon Mr. Maduro.

    The defense minister’s declaration was a setback for the opposition leader, Juan Guaidó, whose claim to legitimacy has been backed by a number of countries, including the United States. In a further blow to the opposition, Russia warned the United States on Thursday against meddling in Venezuela, a longtime Kremlin ally.

    “Any external intervention is very dangerous,” Dmitri S. Peskov, the spokesman for President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia, told reporters in Moscow. “We consider the attempt to usurp the top power in Venezuela as going against the foundations and principles of the international law.”

  • Opinion | There’s Nothing Wrong With Open Borders - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/16/opinion/open-borders-immigration.html

    The internet expands the bounds of acceptable discourse, so ideas considered out of bounds not long ago now rocket toward widespread acceptability. See: cannabis legalization, government-run health care, white nationalism and, of course, the flat-earthers.

    #migration #asile #états-unis

  • Incroyable, encore une fois, le New-York Times va à l’encontre de ses positions sioniste (peut-être est-ce que c’est fait pour faire chier Trump ?) et publie cette tribune :

    Time to Break the Silence on Palestine
    Michelle Alexander, The New-York Times, le 19 janvier 2019
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/19/opinion/sunday/martin-luther-king-palestine-israel.html

    And so, if we are to honor King’s message and not merely the man, we must condemn Israel’s actions: unrelenting violations of international law, continued occupation of the West Bank, East Jerusalem, and Gaza, home demolitions and land confiscations. We must cry out at the treatment of Palestinians at checkpoints, the routine searches of their homes and restrictions on their movements, and the severely limited access to decent housing, schools, food, hospitals and water that many of them face.

    We must not tolerate Israel’s refusal even to discuss the right of Palestinian refugees to return to their homes, as prescribed by United Nations resolutions, and we ought to question the U.S. government funds that have supported multiple hostilities and thousands of civilian casualties in Gaza, as well as the $38 billion the U.S. government has pledged in military support to Israel.

    And finally, we must, with as much courage and conviction as we can muster, speak out against the system of legal discrimination that exists inside Israel, a system complete with, according to Adalah, the Legal Center for Arab Minority Rights in Israel, more than 50 laws that discriminate against Palestinians — such as the new nation-state law that says explicitly that only Jewish Israelis have the right of self-determination in Israel, ignoring the rights of the Arab minority that makes up 21 percent of the population.

    Michelle Alexander est une avocate, professeure, spécialiste du racisme aux Etats-Unis. En 2017, elle a reçu le Prix Martin Luther King de l’Université de l’Ohio. Dans cet article elle revient justement sur Martin Luther King qui eut le courage de dénoncer la guerre du Vietnam, pour dire qu’il est temps aujourd’hui de dénoncer la situation en Palestine...

    #Palestine #USA #Michelle_Alexander #Guerre #Martin_Luther_King #Occupation #Droit_au_retour #Apartheid #BDS #New-York_Times

  • A Rift Over Power and Privilege in the Women’s March - The New York Times / The Daily
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/18/podcasts/the-daily/womens-march-anti-semitism.html?rref=vanity

    After the divisiveness of the 2016 election, the Women’s March became a major symbol of unity. But two years later, a rift in the movement has grown.

    *Accusations of anti-Semitism against leaders of the Women’s March organization are overshadowing plans for more marches.

    *Much of the recent controversy has centered on one leader’s ties with Louis Farrakhan, the head of the Nation of Islam.

    *As a result of the conflict, two competing protests of the Trump administration will be held in New York City on Saturday.

  • Khashoggi Killing Detailed in New Book: ‘We Came to Take You to Riyadh’ - The New York Times

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/17/world/middleeast/khashoggi-killing-book.html

    By Carlotta Gall

    Jan. 17, 2019

    ISTANBUL — A new book written by three Turkish reporters and drawing on audio recordings of the killing of a Saudi expatriate, Jamal Khashoggi, offers new details about an encounter that began with a demand that he return home and ended in murder and dismemberment.

    “First we will tell him ‘We are taking you to Riyadh,’” one member of a Saudi hit team told another, the book claims. “If he doesn’t come, we will kill him here and get rid of the body.”

    Turkish officials have cited the recordings, saying they captured the death of Mr. Khashoggi, a journalist, in his Oct. 2 visit to the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul. And intelligence officials leaked some details in a campaign to force Saudi Arabia to own up to the crime.

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    But the new book offers the most comprehensive description to date of what is on those recordings. It sets the scene as a team of Saudi operatives lay their plans before Mr. Khashoggi arrives, and then recounts what happened next.
    A security guard at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul after Mr. Khashoggi was killed there.CreditChris Mcgrath/Getty Images
    Image
    A security guard at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul after Mr. Khashoggi was killed there.CreditChris Mcgrath/Getty Images

    The three journalists, Abdurrahman Simsek, Nazif Karaman and Ferhat Unlu, work for an investigative unit at the pro-government newspaper Sabah, and are known for their close ties to Turkish intelligence. They said that they did not have access to the audio recordings but were briefed by intelligence officials who did.

    A Turkish security official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, confirmed separately that the details described in the book were accurate. The book, “Diplomatic Atrocity: The Dark Secrets of the Jamal Khashoggi Murder,” is written in Turkish and went on sale in December.

  • 3 Officers Acquitted of Covering Up for Colleague in Laquan McDonald Killing - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/17/us/laquan-mcdonald-officers-acquitted.html

    CHICAGO — Three Chicago police officers were acquitted on Thursday of charges that they had conspired and lied to protect a white police officer who fired 16 deadly shots into a black teenager, a contentious verdict in a case over what many viewed as a “code of silence” in the Police Department.

    The judgment, rendered in a tense, cramped courtroom overflowing with spectators, was delivered by a judge and not a jury. Speaking from the bench for close to an hour, Associate Judge Domenica Stephenson rejected the prosecutors’ arguments that the officers had shooed away witnesses and then created a narrative to justify the 2014 shooting, which prompted citywide protests, the firing of the police chief and a wide-ranging federal investigation into the police force.

    The ruling came more than three months after Officer Jason Van Dyke was convicted in October of the second-degree murder of Laquan McDonald, and on the afternoon before he was scheduled to be sentenced for a killing that was captured on an infamous police dashboard camera video.

    The three police officers — David March, Joseph Walsh and Thomas Gaffney — contradicted what the video showed. In it, Mr. Van Dyke fires repeatedly at Laquan, who is wielding a knife, as he moves slightly away from the officers and even as he lies crumpled on the ground. Prosecutors cited that footage repeatedly as they built a case against the officers, who are white, on charges of conspiracy, official misconduct and obstruction of justice.

    Et cette merveilleuse pénétration des « faits alternatifs » dans le domaine de la preuve juridique :

    Judge Stephenson said that even though the officers’ accounts of the shooting differed from the video, that did not amount to proof that they were lying. “Two people with two different vantage points can witness the same event,” she said, and still describe it differently.

    La mafia (FOP ?) attend le jugement d’une complice dans l’appareil (ou de quelqu’un tenu) :

    It was “undisputed and undeniable,” Judge Stephenson said, that Laquan had ignored officers’ commands to drop his knife. While she spoke, the three officers sat silently, sometimes staring down at the carpet or nervously jiggling a leg. After she read the verdict, several people broke into applause.

    On croit rêver !!! Police partout, justice nulle part. Des applaudissements dans un tribunal !. La mafia...

    “There was clearly evidence from the video that Laquan McDonald was not attacking or seeking to attack any of the law enforcement officers,” Mr. Finney said. “How could they all three make up a story indicating that Laquan was threatening their lives?”

    Si cela ne vous rappelle pas les excuses de ce policier de Toulon qui vient d’être décoré de la légion d’honneur, et l’attitude du procureur en France, c’est que vous passez à côté d’un phénomène majeur : l’autonomisation de la police dans le monde entier, avec l’Amérique et son soft power (livres, films,...) comme modèle.

    There were no protests after the verdicts were read, and William Calloway, a prominent Chicago activist who is running for City Council, urged Chicagoans to refrain. “To the black community, I know this hurts,” he said on Twitter. “We know this was a cover-up. I’m not saying take to the streets anymore. It’s time for us to take to the polls.”

    “That blue code of silence is just not with the Chicago Police Department: It expands to the judicial system,” Mr. Calloway said at a news conference.

    On Friday morning, the courts are scheduled for the final chapter in the Laquan case — a killing that came amid national protests and a spate of police shootings of black people. A Facebook group implored a “call to action”: “In room 500 at 9 a.m., show up to stand in solidarity with organizers and the family of Laquan McDonald as we demand, again, #Justice4Laquan.”

    #faits_alternatifs #Police #Justice