• Mediterranean carcerality and acts of escape

    In recent years, migrants seeking refuge in Europe have faced capture and containment in the Mediterranean – the result of experimentation by EU institutions and member states.

    About two years ago, in June 2019, a group of 75 people found themselves stranded in the central Mediterranean Sea. The migrant group had tried to escape from Libya in order to reach Europe but was adrift at sea after running out of fuel. Monitored by European aerial assets, they saw a vessel on the horizon slowly moving toward them. When they were eventually rescued by the Maridive 601, an offshore supply vessel, they did not know that it would become their floating prison for nearly three weeks. Malta and Italy refused to allocate a port of safety in Europe, and, at first, the Tunisian authorities were equally unwilling to allow them to land.

    Over 19 days, the supply vessel turned from a floating refuge into an offshore carceral space in which the situation for the rescued deteriorated over time. Food and water were scarce, untreated injuries worsened, scabies spread, as did the desperation on board. The 75 people, among them 64 Bangladeshi migrants and dozens of minors, staged a protest on board, chanting: “We don’t need food, we don’t want to stay here, we want to go to Europe.”

    Reaching Europe, however, seemed increasingly unlikely, with Italy and Malta rejecting any responsibility for their disembarkation. Instead, the Tunisian authorities, the Bangladeshi embassy, and the #International_Organisation_for_Migration (#IOM) arranged not only their landing in Tunisia, but also the removal of most of them to their countries of origin. Shortly after disembarkation in the harbour of Zarzis, dozens of the migrants were taken to the runways of Tunis airport and flown out.

    In a recently published article in the journal Political Geography, I have traced the story of this particular migrant group and their zig-zagging trajectories that led many from remote Bangladeshi villages, via Dubai, Istanbul or Alexandria, to Libya, and eventually onto a supply vessel off the Tunisian coast. Although their situation was certainly unique, it also exemplified the ways in which the Mediterranean has turned into a ‘carceral seascape’, a space where people precariously on the move are to be captured and contained in order to prevent them from reaching European shores.

    While forms of migrant capture and containment have, of course, a much longer history in the European context, the past ten years have seen particularly dramatic transformations in the central Mediterranean Sea. When the Arab Uprisings ‘re-opened’ this maritime corridor in and after 2011, crossings started to increase significantly – about 156,000 people crossed to Europe on average every year between 2014 and 2017. Since then, crossings have dropped sharply. The annual average between 2018 and 2020 was around 25,000 people – a figure resembling annual arrivals in the period before the Arab Uprisings.

    One significant reason for this steep decrease in arrivals is the refoulement industry that EU institutions and member states have created, together with third-country allies. The capture of people seeking to escape to Europe has become a cruel trade, of which a range of actors profit. Although ‘refouling’ people on the move – thus returning them to places where they are at risk of facing torture, cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment – violates international human rights laws and refugee conventions, these practices have become systemic and largely normalised, not least as the COVID pandemic has come to serve as a suitable justification to deter potential ‘Corona-spreaders’ and keep them contained elsewhere.

    That migrants face capture and containment in the Mediterranean is the result of years of experimentation on part of EU institutions and member states. Especially since 2018, Europe has largely withdrawn maritime assets from the deadliest areas but reinforced its aerial presence instead, including through the recent deployment of drones. In this way, European assets do not face the ‘risk’ of being forced into rescue operations any longer but can still monitor the sea from above and guide North African, in particular Libyan, speed boats to chase after escaping migrant boats. In consequence, tens of thousands have faced violent returns to places they sought to flee from.

    Just in 2021 alone, about 16,000 people have been caught at sea and forcibly returned to Libya in this way, already more than in the whole of 2020. In mid-June, a ‘push-back by proxy’ occurred, when the merchant vessel Vos Triton handed over 170 migrants to a Libyan coastguard vessel that then returned them to Tripoli, where they were imprisoned in a camp known for its horrendous conditions.

    The refoulment industry, and Mediterranean carcerality more generally, are underpinned by a constant flow of finances, technologies, equipment, discourses, and know-how, which entangles European and Libyan actors to a degree that it might make more sense to think of them as a collective Euro-Libyan border force.

    To legitimise war-torn and politically divided Libya as a ‘competent’ sovereign actor, able to govern the maritime expanse outside its territorial waters, the European Commission funded, and the Italian coastguard implemented, a feasibility study in 2017 to assess “the Libyan capacity in the area of Search and Rescue” (SAR). Shortly after, the Libyan ‘unity government’ declared its extensive Libyan SAR zone, a zone over which it would hold ‘geographical competence’. When the Libyan authorities briefly suspended the establishment of its SAR zone, given its inability to operate a Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre (MRCC), an Italian navy vessel was stationed within Tripoli harbour, carrying out the functions of the Libyan MRCC.

    Since 2017, €57.2m from the EU Trust Fund for Africa has funded Libya’s ‘integrated border management’, on top of which hundreds of millions of euros were transferred by EU member states to Libyan authorities through bilateral agreements. Besides such financial support, EU member states have donated speed boats and surveillance technologies to control the Libyan SAR zone while officers from EU military project Operation Sophia and from European Border Agency Frontex have repeatedly provided training to the Libyan coastguards. When out to search for escaping migrants, the Libyan speed boats have relied on Europe’s ‘eyes in the sky’, the aerial assets of Frontex and EU member states. Migrant sightings from the sky would then be relayed to the Libyan assets at sea, also via WhatsApp chats in which Frontex personnel and Libyan officers exchange.

    Thinking of the Mediterranean as a carceral space highlights these myriad Euro-Libyan entanglements that often take place with impunity and little public scrutiny. It also shows how maritime carcerality is “often underscored by mobilities”. Indeed, systematic forms of migrant capture depend on the collaboration of a range of mobile actors at sea, on land, and in the sky. Despite their incessant movements and the fact that surveillance and interception operations are predominantly characterised as rescue operations, thousands of people have lost their lives at sea over recent years. Many have been left abandoned even in situations where their whereabouts were long known to European and North African authorities, often in cases when migrant boats were already adrift and thus unable to reach Europe on their own accord.

    At the same time, even in the violent and carceral Mediterranean Sea, a range of interventions have occurred that have prevented both deaths at sea and the smooth operation of the refoulment industry. NGO rescuers, activists, fishermen and, at times, merchant vessel crews have conducted mass rescues over recent years, despite being harassed, threatened and criminalised by Euro-Libyan authorities at every turn. Through their presence, they have documented and repeatedly ruptured the operations of the Euro-Libyan border force, shedding light on what is meant to remain hidden.

    Maybe most importantly, the Mediterranean’s carceral condition has not erased the possibility of migratory acts of escape. Indeed, tactics of border subversion adapt to changing carceral techniques, with many migrant boats seeking to cross the sea without being detected and to reach European coasts autonomously. As the UNHCR notes in reference to the maritime arrival of 34,000 people in Italy and Malta in 2020: “Only approximately 4,500 of those arriving by sea in 2020 had been rescued by authorities or NGOs on the high seas: the others were intercepted by the authorities close to shore or arrived undetected.”

    While most of those stuck on the Maridive supply vessel off Tunisia’s coast in 2019 were returned to countries of origin, some tried to cross again and eventually escaped Mediterranean carcerality. Despite Euro-North African attempts to capture and contain them, they moved on stubbornly, and landed their boats in Lampedusa.

    https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/can-europe-make-it/mediterranean-carcerality-and-acts-escape

    #enfermement #Méditerranée #mer_Méditerranée #migrations #asile #réfugiés #frontières #expérimentation #OIM #Tunisie #Zarzis #externalisation #migrerrance #carcéralité #refoulement #push-backs #Libye #Vos_Triton #EU_Trust_Fund_for_Africa #Trust_Fund #carceral_space

    via @isskein

  • Qui est complice de qui ? Les #libertés_académiques en péril

    Professeur, me voici aujourd’hui menacé de décapitation. L’offensive contre les musulmans se prolonge par des attaques contre la #pensée_critique, taxée d’islamo-gauchisme. Celles-ci se répandent, des réseaux sociaux au ministre de l’Éducation, des magazines au Président de la République, pour déboucher aujourd’hui sur une remise en cause des libertés académiques… au nom de la #liberté_d’expression !

    Je suis professeur. Le 16 octobre, un professeur est décapité. Le lendemain, je reçois cette menace sur Twitter : « Je vous ai mis sur ma liste des connards à décapiter pour le jour où ça pétera. Cette liste est longue mais patience : vous y passerez. »

    C’est en réponse à mon tweet (https://twitter.com/EricFassin/status/1317246862093680640) reprenant un billet de blog publié après les attentats de novembre 2015 (https://blogs.mediapart.fr/eric-fassin/blog/161115/nous-ne-saurions-vouloir-ce-que-veulent-nos-ennemis) : « Pour combattre le #terrorisme, il ne suffit pas (même s’il est nécessaire) de lutter contre les terroristes. Il faut surtout démontrer que leurs actes sont inefficaces, et donc qu’ils ne parviennent pas à nous imposer une politique en réaction. » Bref, « nous ne saurions vouloir ce que veulent nos ennemis » : si les terroristes cherchent à provoquer un « conflit des civilisations », nous devons à tout prix éviter de tomber dans leur piège.

    Ce n’est pas la première fois que je reçois des #menaces_de_mort. Sur les réseaux sociaux, depuis des années, des trolls me harcèlent : les #insultes sont quotidiennes ; les menaces, occasionnelles. En 2013, pour Noël, j’ai reçu chez moi une #lettre_anonyme. Elle recopiait des articles islamophobes accusant la gauche de « trahison » et reproduisaient un tract de la Résistance ; sous une potence, ces mots : « où qu’ils soient, quoi qu’ils fassent, les traîtres seront châtiés. » Je l’analysais dans Libération (https://www.liberation.fr/societe/2014/01/17/le-nom-et-l-adresse_973667) : « Voilà ce que me signifie le courrier reçu à la maison : on sait où tu habites et, le moment venu, on saura te trouver. » J’ajoutais toutefois : « l’#extrême_droite continue d’avancer masquée, elle n’ose pas encore dire son nom. » Or ce n’est plus le cas. Aujourd’hui, les menaces sont signées d’une figure connue de la mouvance néonazie. J’ai donc porté #plainte. C’est en tant qu’#universitaire que je suis visé ; mon #université m’accorde d’ailleurs la #protection_fonctionnelle.

    Ainsi, les extrêmes droites s’enhardissent. Le 29 octobre, l’#Action_française déploie impunément une banderole place de la Concorde : « Décapitons la République ! »

    C’est quelques heures après un nouvel attentat islamiste à Nice, mais aussi après une tentative néofasciste avortée en Avignon. Avant d’être abattu, l’homme a menacé d’une arme de poing un commerçant maghrébin. Il se réclamait de #Génération_identitaire, dont il portait la veste avec le logo « #Defend_Europe », justifiant les actions du groupe en Méditerranée ou à la frontière franco-italienne ; un témoin a même parlé de #salut_nazi (https://france3-regions.francetvinfo.fr/provence-alpes-cote-d-azur/vaucluse/avignon/avignon-homme-arme-couteau-abattu-policiers-1889172.htm). Le procureur de la République se veut pourtant rassurant : « c’est un Français, né en France, qui n’a rien à voir avec la religion musulmane ». Et de conclure : « nous avons plus affaire à un #déséquilibré, qui semble proche de l’extrême droite et a fait des séjours en psychiatrie. Il n’y a pas de revendication ». « Comme dans le cas de l’attentat de la mosquée de Bayonne perpétré par un ancien candidat FN en octobre 2019 » (https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/281019/attentat-bayonne-l-ex-candidat-fn-en-garde-vue?onglet=full), note Mediapart, « le parquet national antiterroriste n’a pas voulu se saisir de l’affaire ». Ce fasciste était un fou, nous dit-on, pas un terroriste islamiste : l’attaque d’Avignon est donc passée presque inaperçue.

    Si les #Identitaires se pensent aux portes du pouvoir, c’est aussi que certains médias ont préparé le terrain. En une, l’#islamophobie y alterne avec la dénonciation des universitaires antiracistes (j’y suis régulièrement pointé du doigt) (https://www.lepoint.fr/politique/ces-ideologues-qui-poussent-a-la-guerre-civile-29-11-2018-2275275_20.php). Plus grave encore, l’extrême droite se sent encouragée par nos gouvernants. Le président de la République lui-même, qui a choisi il y a un an de parler #communautarisme, #islam et #immigration dans #Valeurs_actuelles, s’inspire des réseaux sociaux et des magazines. « Le monde universitaire a été coupable. Il a encouragé l’#ethnicisation de la question sociale en pensant que c’était un bon filon. Or, le débouché ne peut être que sécessionniste. » Selon Le Monde du 10 juin 2020, Emmanuel Macron vise ici les « discours racisés (sic) ou sur l’intersectionnalité. » Dans Les Inrocks (https://www.lesinrocks.com/2020/06/12/idees/idees/eric-fassin-le-president-de-la-republique-attise-lanti-intellectualisme), je m’inquiétais alors de cet #anti-intellectualisme : « Des sophistes qui corrompent la jeunesse : à quand la ciguë ? » Nous y sommes peut-être.

    Car du #séparatisme, on passe aujourd’hui au #terrorisme. En effet, c’est au tour du ministre de l’Éducation nationale de s’attaquer le 22 octobre, sur Europe 1, à « l’islamo-gauchisme » qui « fait des ravages à l’Université » : il dénonce « les #complices_intellectuels du terrorisme. » « Qui visez-vous ? », l’interroge Le JDD (https://www.lejdd.fr/Politique/hommage-a-samuel-paty-lutte-contre-lislamisme-blanquer-precise-au-jdd-ses-mesu). Pour le ministre, « il y a un combat à mener contre une matrice intellectuelle venue des universités américaines et des #thèses_intersectionnelles, qui veulent essentialiser les communautés et les identités, aux antipodes de notre #modèle_républicain ». Cette idéologie aurait « gangrené une partie non négligeable des #sciences_sociales françaises » : « certains font ça consciemment, d’autres sont les idiots utiles de cette cause. » En réalité, l’intersectionnalité permet d’analyser, dans leur pluralité, des logiques discriminatoires qui contredisent la rhétorique universaliste. La critique de cette assignation à des places racialisées est donc fondée sur un principe d’#égalité. Or, à en croire le ministre, il s’agirait « d’une vision du monde qui converge avec les intérêts des islamistes. » Ce qui produit le séparatisme, ce serait donc, non la #ségrégation, mais sa dénonciation…

    Si #Jean-Michel_Blanquer juge « complices » celles et ceux qui, avec le concept d’intersectionnalité, analysent la #racialisation de notre société pour mieux la combattre, les néofascistes parlent plutôt de « #collabos » ; mais les trolls qui me harcèlent commencent à emprunter son mot. En France, si le ministre de l’Intérieur prend systématiquement le parti des policiers, celui de l’Éducation nationale fait de la politique aux dépens des universitaires. #Marion_Maréchal peut s’en féliciter : ce dernier « reprend notre analyse sur le danger des idéologies “intersectionnelles” de gauche à l’Université. »


    https://twitter.com/MarionMarechal/status/1321008502291255300
    D’ailleurs, « l’islamo-gauchisme » n’est autre que la version actuelle du « #judéo-bolchévisme » agité par l’extrême droite entre les deux guerres. On ne connaît pourtant aucun lien entre #Abdelhakim_Sefrioui, mis en examen pour « complicité d’assassinat » dans l’enquête sur l’attentat de #Conflans, et la gauche. En revanche, le ministre ne dit pas un mot sur l’extrême droite, malgré les révélations de La Horde (https://lahorde.samizdat.net/2020/10/20/a-propos-dabdelhakim-sefrioui-et-du-collectif-cheikh-yassine) et de Mediapart (https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/221020/attentat-de-conflans-revelations-sur-l-imam-sefrioui?onglet=full) sur les liens de l’imam avec des proches de #Marine_Le_Pen. Dans le débat public, jamais il n’est question d’#islamo-lepénisme, alors même que l’extrême droite et les islamistes ont en commun une politique du « #conflit_des_civilisations ».

    Sans doute, pour nos gouvernants, attaquer des universitaires est-il le moyen de détourner l’attention de leurs propres manquements : un professeur est mort, et on en fait porter la #responsabilité à d’autres professeurs… De plus, c’est l’occasion d’affaiblir les résistances contre une Loi de programmation de la recherche qui précarise davantage l’Université. D’ailleurs, le 28 octobre, le Sénat vient d’adopter un amendement à son article premier (https://www.senat.fr/amendements/2020-2021/52/Amdt_234.html) : « Les libertés académiques s’exercent dans le respect des #valeurs_de_la_République », « au premier rang desquelles la #laïcité ». Autrement dit, ce n’est plus seulement le code pénal qui définirait les limites de la liberté d’expression des universitaires. Des collègues, désireux de régler ainsi des différends scientifiques et politiques, appuient cette offensive en réclamant dans Le Monde la création d’une « instance chargée de faire remonter directement les cas d’atteinte aux #principes _épublicains et à la liberté académique »… et c’est au nom de « la #liberté_de_parole » (https://www.lemonde.fr/idees/article/2020/10/31/une-centaine-d-universitaires-alertent-sur-l-islamisme-ce-qui-nous-menace-c-) ! Bref, comme l’annonce sombrement le blog Academia (https://academia.hypotheses.org/27401), c’est « le début de la fin. » #Frédérique_Vidal, ministre de l’Enseignement supérieur et de la recherche, le confirme sans ambages : « Les #valeurs de la laïcité, de la République, ça ne se discute pas. »


    https://twitter.com/publicsenat/status/1322076232918487040
    Pourtant, en démocratie, débattre du sens qu’on veut donner à ces mots, n’est-ce pas l’enjeu politique par excellence ? Qui en imposera la définition ? Aura-t-on encore le droit de critiquer « les faux dévots de la laïcité » (https://blogs.mediapart.fr/eric-fassin/blog/101217/les-faux-devots-de-la-laicite-islamophobie-et-racisme-anti-musulmans) ?

    Mais ce n’est pas tout. Pourquoi s’en prendre aux alliés blancs des minorités discriminées, sinon pour empêcher une solidarité qui dément les accusations de séparatisme ? C’est exactement ce que les terroristes recherchent : un monde binaire, en noir et blanc, sans « zone grise » (https://blogs.mediapart.fr/eric-fassin/blog/260716/terrorisme-la-zone-grise-de-la-sexualite), où les musulmans feraient front avec les islamistes contre un bloc majoritaire islamophobe. Je l’écrivais dans ce texte qui m’a valu des menaces de décapitation : nos dirigeants « s’emploient à donner aux terroristes toutes les raisons de recommencer. » Le but de ces derniers, c’est en effet la #guerre_civile. Qui sont donc les « #complices_intellectuels » du terrorisme islamiste ? Et qui sont les « idiots utiles » du #néofascisme ?

    En France, aujourd’hui, les #droits_des_minorités, religieuses ou pas, des réfugiés et des manifestants sont régulièrement bafoués ; et quand des ministres s’attaquent, en même temps qu’à une association de lutte contre l’islamophobie, à des universitaires, mais aussi à l’Unef (après SUD Éducation), à La France Insoumise et à son leader, ou bien à Mediapart et à son directeur, tous coupables de s’engager « pour les musulmans », il faut bien se rendre à l’évidence : la #démocratie est amputée de ses #libertés_fondamentales. Paradoxalement, la France républicaine d’Emmanuel #Macron ressemble de plus en plus, en dépit des gesticulations, à la Turquie islamiste de Recep Tayyip Erdogan, qui persécute, en même temps que la minorité kurde, des universitaires, des syndicalistes, des médias libres et des partis d’opposition.

    Pour revendiquer la liberté d’expression, il ne suffit pas d’afficher des caricatures ; l’esprit critique doit pouvoir se faire entendre dans les médias et dans la rue, et partout dans la société. Sinon, l’hommage à #Samuel_Paty serait pure #hypocrisie. Il faut se battre pour la #liberté_de_la_pensée, de l’engagement et de la recherche. Il importe donc de défendre les libertés académiques, à la fois contre les menaces des réseaux sociaux et contre l’#intimidation_gouvernementale. À l’heure où nos dirigeants répondent à la terreur par une #politique_de_la_peur, il y a de quoi trembler pour la démocratie.

    https://blogs.mediapart.fr/eric-fassin/blog/011120/qui-est-complice-de-qui-les-libertes-academiques-en-peril
    #Eric_Fassin #intersectionnalité #SHS #universalisme #Blanquer #complicité

    –—

    Pour compléter le fil de discussion commencé par @gonzo autour de :
    Jean-François Bayart : « Que le terme plaise ou non, il y a bien une islamophobie d’Etat en France »
    https://seenthis.net/messages/883974

    ping @isskein @karine4 @cede

    • Une centaine d’universitaires alertent : « Sur l’islamisme, ce qui nous menace, c’est la persistance du déni »

      Dans une tribune au « Monde », des professeurs et des chercheurs de diverses sensibilités dénoncent les frilosités de nombre de leurs pairs sur l’islamisme et les « idéologies indigénistes, racialistes et décoloniales », soutenant les propos de Jean-Michel Blanquer sur « l’islamo-gauchisme ».

      Tribune. Quelques jours après l’assassinat de Samuel Paty, la principale réaction de l’institution qui est censée représenter les universités françaises, la Conférence des présidents d’université (CPU), est de « faire part de l’émotion suscitée » par des propos de Jean-Michel Blanquer sur Europe 1 et au Sénat le 22 octobre. Le ministre de l’éducation nationale avait constaté sur Europe 1 que « l’islamo-gauchisme fait des ravages à l’université », notamment « quand une organisation comme l’UNEF cède à ce type de choses ». Il dénonçait une « idéologie qui mène au pire », notant que l’assassin a été « conditionné par des gens qui encouragent cette #radicalité_intellectuelle ». Ce sont des « idées qui souvent viennent d’ailleurs », le #communautarisme, qui sont responsables : « Le poisson pourrit par la tête. » Et au Sénat, le même jour, Jean-Michel Blanquer confirmait qu’il y a « des courants islamo-gauchistes très puissants dans les secteurs de l’#enseignement_supérieur qui commettent des dégâts sur les esprits. Et cela conduit à certains problèmes, que vous êtes en train de constater ».

      Nous, universitaires et chercheurs, ne pouvons que nous accorder avec ce constat de Jean-Michel Blanquer. Qui pourrait nier la gravité de la situation aujourd’hui en France, surtout après le récent attentat de Nice – une situation qui, quoi que prétendent certains, n’épargne pas nos universités ? Les idéologies indigéniste, racialiste et « décoloniale » (transférées des campus nord-américains) y sont bien présentes, nourrissant une haine des « Blancs » et de la France ; et un #militantisme parfois violent s’en prend à ceux qui osent encore braver la #doxa_antioccidentale et le prêchi-prêcha multiculturaliste. #Houria_Bouteldja a ainsi pu se féliciter début octobre que son parti décolonial, le #Parti_des_indigènes_de_la_République [dont elle est la porte-parole], « rayonne dans toutes les universités ».

      La réticence de la plupart des universités et des associations de spécialistes universitaires à désigner l’islamisme comme responsable de l’assassinat de Samuel Paty en est une illustration : il n’est question dans leurs communiqués que d’« #obscurantisme » ou de « #fanatisme ». Alors que le port du #voile – parmi d’autres symptômes – se multiplie ces dernières années, il serait temps de nommer les choses et aussi de prendre conscience de la responsabilité, dans la situation actuelle, d’idéologies qui ont pris naissance et se diffusent dans l’université et au-delà. L’importation des idéologies communautaristes anglo-saxonnes, le #conformisme_intellectuel, la #peur et le #politiquement_correct sont une véritable menace pour nos universités. La liberté de parole tend à s’y restreindre de manière drastique, comme en ont témoigné récemment nombre d’affaires de #censure exercée par des groupes de pression.

      « Nous demandons à la ministre de prendre clairement position contre les idéologies qui sous-tendent les #dérives_islamistes »

      Ce qui nous menace, ce ne sont pas les propos de Jean-Michel Blanquer, qu’il faut au contraire féliciter d’avoir pris conscience de la gravité de la situation : c’est la persistance du #déni. La CPU affirme dans son communiqué que « la recherche n’est pas responsable des maux de la société, elle les analyse ». Nous n’en sommes pas d’accord : les idées ont des conséquences et les universités ont aussi un rôle essentiel à jouer dans la lutte pour la défense de la laïcité et de la liberté d’expression. Aussi nous étonnons-nous du long silence de Frédérique Vidal, la ministre de l’enseignement supérieur, de la recherche et de l’innovation, qui n’est intervenue le 26 octobre que pour nous assurer que tout allait bien dans les universités. Mais nous ne sommes pas pour autant rassurés.

      Nous demandons donc à la ministre de mettre en place des mesures de #détection des #dérives_islamistes, de prendre clairement position contre les idéologies qui les sous-tendent, et d’engager nos universités dans ce combat pour la laïcité et la République en créant une instance chargée de faire remonter directement les cas d’atteinte aux principes républicains et à la liberté académique. Et d’élaborer un guide de réponses adaptées, comme cela a été fait pour l’éducation nationale.

      Premiers signataires : Laurent Bouvet, politiste, professeur des universités ; Jean-François Braunstein, philosophe, professeur des universités ; Jeanne Favret-Saada, anthropologue, directrice d’études honoraire à l’Ecole pratique des hautes études ; Luc Ferry, ancien ministre de l’éducation nationale (2002-2004) ; Renée Fregosi, politiste, maîtresse de conférences HDR en science politique ; Marcel Gauchet, philosophe, directeur d’études émérite à l’Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales ; Nathalie Heinich, sociologue, directrice de recherche au CNRS ; Gilles Kepel, politiste, professeur des universités ; Catherine Kintzler, philosophe, professeure honoraire des universités ; Pierre Nora, historien, membre de l’Académie française ; Pascal Perrineau, politiste professeur des universités ; Pierre-André Taguieff, historien des idées, directeur de recherche au CNRS ; Pierre Vermeren, historien, professeur des universités

      –---

      Liste complète des signataires :

      Signataires

      Daniel Aberdam, directeur de recherches à l’INSERM – Francis Affergan, professeur émérite des Universités – Alya Aglan, professeur des Universités – Jean-François Agnèse, directeur de recherches IRD – Joëlle Allouche-Benayoun, chargée de recherche au CNRS – Éric Anceau, maître de conférences HDR – Julie d’Andurain, professeur des Universités – Sophie Archambault de Beaune, professeur des Universités – Mathieu Arnold, professeur des Universités – Roland Assaraf, chargé de recherche au CNRS – Philippe Avril, professeur émérite des Universités – Isabelle Barbéris, maître de conférences HDR – Clarisse Bardiot, maître de conférences HDR – Patrick Barrau, maître de conférences honoraire – Christian Bassac, professeur honoraire des Universités – Myriam Benarroch, maître de conférences – Martine Benoit, professeur des Universités – Wladimir Berelowitsch, directeur d’études à l’EHESS – Florence Bergeaud-Blackler, chargée de recherche au CNRS – Maurice Berger, ancien professeur associé des Universités – Marc Bied-Charrenton, professeur émérite des Universités – Andreas Bikfalvi, professeur des Universités – Jacques Billard, maître de conférences honoraire – Jean-Cassien Billier, maître de conférences – Alain Blanchet, professeur émérite des Universités – Guillaume Bonnet, professeur des Universités – ​Laurent Bouvet, professeur des Universités – Rémi Brague, professeur des Universités – Joaquim Brandão de Carvalho, professeur des Universités – Jean-François Braunstein, professeur des Universités – Christian Brechot, professeur émérite des Universités – Stéphane Breton, directeur d’études à l’EHESS – Jean-Marie Brohm, professeur émérite des Universités – Michelle-Irène Brudny, professeur honoraire des Universités – Patrick Cabanel, directeur d’études, École pratique des hautes études – Christian Cambillau, directeur de recherches émérite au CNRS – Belinda Cannone, maître de conférences – Dominique Casajus, directeur de recherches émérite au CNRS – Sylvie Catellin, maître de conférences – Brigitte Chapelain, maître de conférences – Jean-François Chappuit, maître de conférences – Patrick Charaudeau, professeur émérite des Universités – Blandine Chelini-Pon, professeur des Universités – François Cochet, professeur émérite des Universités – Geneviève Cohen-Cheminet, professeur des Universités – Jacqueline Costa-Lascoux, directrice de recherche au CNRS – Cécile Cottenceau, PRAG Université – Philippe Crignon, maître de conférences – David Cumin, maître de conférences HDR – Jean-Claude Daumas, professeur émérite des Universités – Daniel Dayan, directeur de recherches au CNRS – Chantal Delsol, membre de l’Académie des sciences morales et politiques – Gilles Denis, maître de conférences HDR – Geneviève Dermenjian, maître de conférences HDR – Albert Doja, professeur des Universités – Michel Dreyfus, directeur de recherche au CNRS – Philippe Dupichot, professeur des Universités – Alain Ehrenberg, directeur émérite de recherche au CNRS – Marie-Claude Esposito, professeur émérite des Universités – Jean-Louis Fabiani, directeur d’études à l’EHES – Jeanne Favret-Saada, directrice d’études honoraire à l’EPHE – Laurent Fedi, maître de conférences – Rémi Ferrand, maître de conférences – Luc Ferry, ancien ministre de l’Éducation nationale – Michel Fichant, professeur émérite des Universités – Dominique Folscheid, professeur émérite des Universités – Nicole Fouché, chercheuse CNRS-EHESS - Annie Fourcaut, professeur des Universités – Renée Fregosi, maître de conférences HDR retraitée – Pierre Fresnault-Deruelle, professeur émérite des Universités – Marc Fryd, maître de conférences HDR – Alexandre Gady, professeur des Universités – Jean-Claude Galey, directeur d’études à l’EHESS – Marcel Gauchet, directeur d’études à l’EHESS – Christian Gilain, professeur émérite des Universités – Jacques-Alain Gilbert, professeur des Universités – Gabriel Gras, chargé de recherche au CEA – Yana Grinshpun, maître de conférences – Patrice Gueniffey, directeur d’études à l’EHESS – Éric Guichard, maître de conférences HDR – Jean-Marc Guislin, professeur émérite des Universités – Charles Guittard, professeur des Universités – Philippe Gumplowicz, professeur des Universités – Claude Habib, professeur émérite des Universités – François Heilbronn, professeur des Universités associé à Sciences-Po – Nathalie Heinich, directrice de recherche au CNRS – Marc Hersant, professeur des Universités – Philippe d’Iribarne, directeur de recherche au CNRS – François Jost, professeur émérite des Universités – Olivier Jouanjan, professeur des Universités – Pierre Jourde, professeur émérite des Universités – Gilles Kepel, professeur des Universités – Catherine Kintzler, professeur honoraire des Universités – Marcel Kuntz, directeur de recherche au CNRS – Bernard Labatut, maître de conférence HDR – Monique Lambert, professeur des Universités – Frédérique de La Morena, maître de conférences – Philippe de Lara, maître de conférences HDR – Philippe Larralde, PRAG Université – Dominique Legallois, professeur des Universités – Anne Lemonde, maître de conférences – Anne-Marie Le Pourhiet, professeur des Universités – Andrée Lerousseau, maître de conférences – Franck Lessay, professeur émérite des Universités – Marc Levilly, maître de conférences associé – Carlos Levy, professeur émérite des Universités – Roger Lewandowski, professeur des Universités – Philippe Liger-Belair, maître de conférences – Laurent Loty, chargé de recherche au CNRS – Catherine Louveau, professeur émérite des Universités – Danièle Manesse, professeur émérite des Universités – Jean-Louis Margolin, maître de conférences – Joseph Martinetti, maître de conférences – Céline Masson, professeur des Universités – Jean-Yves Masson, professeur des Universités – Eric Maulin, professeur des Universités – Samuel Mayol, maître de conférences – Isabelle de Mecquenem, PRAG Université – Ferdinand Mélin-Soucramanien, professeur des Universités – Marc Michel, professeur émérite des Universités –​ Jean-Baptiste Minnaert, professeur des Universités – Nathalie Mourgues, professeur émérite des Universités – Lion Murard, chercheur associé au CERMES – Franck Neveu, professeur des Universités – Jean-Pierre Nioche, professeur émérite à HEC – Pierre Nora, membre de l’Académie française – Jean-Max Noyer, professeur émérite des Universités – Dominique Ottavi, professeur émérite des Universités – Bruno Ollivier, professeur des Universités, chercheur associé au CNRS – Gilles Pages, directeur de recherche à l’INSERM – Marc Perelman, professeur des Universités – Pascal Perrineau, professeur des Universités – Laetitia Petit, maître de conférences des Universités – Jean Petitot, directeur d’études à l’EHESS – Béatrice Picon-Vallin, directrice de recherches au CNRS – René Pommier, maître de conférences – Dominique Pradelle, professeur des Universités – André Quaderi, professeur des Universités – Gérard Rabinovitch, chercheur associé au CNRS-CRPMS – Charles Ramond, professeur des Universités – Jean-Jacques Rassial, professeur émérite des Universités – François Rastier, directeur de recherche au CNRS – Philippe Raynaud, professeur émérite des Universités – Dominique Reynié, professeur des Universités – Isabelle Rivoal, directrice de recherches au CNRS – Jean-Jacques Roche, professeur des Universités – Pierre Rochette, professeur des Universités – Marc Rolland, professeur des Universités – Danièle Rosenfeld-Katz, maître de conférences – Bernard Rougier, professeur des Universités – Andrée Rousseau, maîtresse de conférences – Jean-Michel Roy, professeur des Universités – François de Saint-Chéron, maître de conférences HDR – Jacques de Saint-Victor, professeur des Universités – Xavier-Laurent Salvador, maître de conférences HDR – Jean-Baptiste Santamaria, maître de conférences – Yves Santamaria, maître de conférences – Georges-Elia Sarfati, professeur des Universités – Jean-Pierre Schandeler, chargé de recherche au CNRS – Pierre Schapira, professeur émérite des Universités – Martine Segalen, professeur émérite des Universités – Perrine Simon-Nahum, directrice de recherche au CNRS – Antoine Spire, professeur associé à l’Université – Claire Squires, maître de conférences – Marcel Staroswiecki, professeur honoraire des Universités – Wiktor Stoczkowski, directeur d’études à l’EHESS – Jean Szlamowicz, professeur des Universités – Pierre-André Taguieff, directeur de recherche au CNRS – Jean-Christophe Tainturier, PRAG Université – Jacques Tarnero, chercheur à la Cité des sciences et de l’industrie – Michèle Tauber, maître de conférences HDR – Pierre-Henri Tavoillot, maître de conférences HDR – Alain Tedgui, directeur de recherches émérite à l’INSERM – ​Thibault Tellier, professeur des Universités – Françoise Thom, maître de conférences HDR – André Tiran, professeur émérite des Universités – Antoine Triller, directeur de recherches émérite à l’INSERM – Frédéric Tristram, maître de conférences HDR – Sylvie Toscer-Angot, maître de conférences – Vincent Tournier, maître de conférences – Christophe Tournu, professeur des Universités – Serge Valdinoci, maître de conférences – Raymonde Vatinet, professeur des Universités – Gisèle Venet, professeur émérite des Universités – François Vergne, maître de conférences – Gilles Vergnon, maître de conférences HDR – Pierre Vermeren, professeur des Universités – Nicolas Weill-Parot, directeur d’études à l’EPHE – Yves Charles Zarka, professeur émérite des Universités – Paul Zawadzki, maître de conférences HDR – Françoise Zonabend, directrice d’études à l’EHESS

      https://manifestedes90.wixsite.com/monsite

      https://www.lemonde.fr/idees/article/2020/10/31/une-centaine-d-universitaires-alertent-sur-l-islamisme-ce-qui-nous-menace-c-
      #manifeste_des_cents #manifeste_des_100 #décolonial #ESR #enseignement_supérieur

    • De la liberté d’expression des « voix musulmanes » en France

      Le traumatisme né de l’assassinat de l’enseignant Samuel Paty à Conflans-Sainte-Honorine le 16 octobre 2020 impose une réflexion collective profonde, aussi sereine que possible. L’enjeu est fondamental pour la société française qui, d’attentat revendiqué par une organisation constituée en attentat mené par un « loup solitaire », de débat sur le voile en débat sur Charlie, et de loi antiterroriste en loi contre le « séparatisme » s’enferre depuis plusieurs décennies dans une polarisation extrêmement inquiétante autour des questions liées à l’islam.

      Le constat de la diffusion, au sein des composantes se déclarant musulmanes en France, de lectures « radicales » et qui survalorisent la violence est incontestable. L’idéologie dite « djihadiste » demeure certes marginale, mais possède une capacité d’adaptation manifeste, liant les enjeux propres au monde musulman avec des problématiques françaises. Internet lui offre une caisse de résonance particulière auprès des plus jeunes, générant du ressentiment, mais aussi des frustrations. La #prison et la #délinquance, sans doute autant que certaines mosquées et associations cultuelles, constituent d’autres espaces de #socialisation à cette vision mortifère du monde.

      En revanche, les interprétations des racines de cette diffusion divergent, donnant lieu à des #controverses_scientifiques et médiatiques qui n’honorent pas toujours les personnes concernées. Il est manifeste que face à un problème complexe, l’analyse ne saurait être monocausale et ne se pencher que sur une seule variable. L’obsession pour la part purement religieuse du phénomène que légitiment certains chercheurs et qui est au cœur des récentes politiques du gouvernement français fonctionne comme un #écran_de_fumée.

      S’attaquer par des politiques publiques aux « #prêcheurs_de_haine » ou exiger la réforme d’un Islam « malade » sans autre forme de réflexion ou d’action ignore la dimension relationnelle de la #violence et des tensions qui déchirent la France.

      Quand les « islamo-gauchistes » doivent rendre des comptes

      Cette perspective revient à négliger l’importance de la #contextualisation, oubliant d’expliquer pourquoi une interprétation particulière de l’islam a pu acquérir, via sa déclinaison politique la plus fermée, une capacité à incarner un rejet de la société dominante. En somme cette lecture méconnaît comment et pourquoi une interprétation radicale du #référent_islamique trouve depuis quelques années une pertinence particulière aux yeux de certains, et pourquoi ce serait davantage le cas en #France qu’ailleurs en Europe. Elle revient surtout à oublier la nature circulaire des dynamiques qui permet à un contexte et à une idéologie de s’alimenter mutuellement, désignant alors de façon simpliste celui qui « aurait commencé » ainsi que — et c’est là une funeste nouveauté des derniers mois — ses « collabos » affublés du label « islamo-gauchiste » et qui devraient rendre des comptes.

      Beaucoup a ainsi été écrit et dit, parfois trop rapidement. En tant que chercheur et citoyen, je ressens autant de la lassitude que de la tristesse, mesurant combien mon champ professionnel développe de façon croissante une sorte d’incommunicabilité, entrainant des haines tenaces et donnant de plus en plus souvent lieu à de la diffamation entre ses membres. Il m’apparait que la perspective faisant toute sa place à la #complexité des phénomènes politiques et sociaux a, d’une certaine manière, perdu la partie. Marginalisée dans les médias, elle devient manifestement de plus en plus inaudible auprès d’institutions publiques en quête de solutions rapides et brutales, faisant souvent fi du droit. L’approche nuancée des sciences sociales se trouve reléguée dans des espaces d’expression caractérisés par l’entre-soi politique, scientifique ou, il faut le reconnaitre, communautaire (ce dernier parfois prompt à tordre le discours et à le simplifier pour se rassurer).

      « Liberté d’expression », mais pas pour tout le monde

      Cette mécanique de parole complexe reléguée ne concerne pas uniquement les chercheurs. Ma frustration de « perdant » n’a au fond que peu d’importance. Elle renvoie toutefois à un enjeu beaucoup plus fondamental qui concerne l’espace de représentation et d’expression des musulmans français. Dans un contexte de fortes tensions autour de la question musulmane, il s’agit là d’un blocage récurrent dont les pouvoirs publics et une grande partie des médias se refusent à percevoir la centralité. La faiblesse des espaces offerts aux voix qui se revendiquent musulmanes et sont reconnues comme légitimes par leurs coreligionnaires constitue un angle mort que les tenants de la « liberté d’expression » auraient tout intérêt à aborder. Autant que le contrôle policier et la surveillance des appels à la haine sur Internet et dans les mosquées, c’est là un levier nécessaire pour contenir la violence et lutter contre elle.

      La liberté d’expression n’a jamais été totale, et certains tabous légitimes demeurent ou évoluent avec le temps. Pensons à la pédocriminalité dans les années 1970, ou aux caricatures sur les juifs et l’argent dans les années 1930. Parmi les tenants d’une laïcité intégrale, qui a déjà discuté avec une femme voilée ? Partons tout d’abord du principe que l’ignorance de l’Autre et de sa propre histoire constitue une racine de la #polarisation grave de la société française. Admettons ensuite qu’il est important pour chacun d’avoir une perception juste de ses concitoyens et aussi, en démocratie, de se sentir correctement et dignement représenté à une variété d’échelons.

      La figure de #Hassen_Chalghoumi, imam d’origine tunisienne d’une mosquée en Seine–Saint-Denis très fréquemment mobilisé dans les grands médias, symbolise un dysfonctionnement patent de ce mécanisme de #représentation. Sa propension à soutenir des positions politiques à rebours de ses « ouailles » supposées, en particulier sur la Palestine, mais surtout son incapacité à s’exprimer correctement en français ou même à avoir un fond de culture générale partagée ne constitue aucunement des caractéristiques rédhibitoires pour faire appel à lui quand un sujet en lien avec l’islam émerge. Pire, il semblerait même parfois que ce soit exactement le contraire comme quand Valeurs actuelles, alors accusé d’avoir caricaturé la députée Danièle Obono en esclave, a fait appel à lui pour défendre la liberté d’expression et l’a placé, détail sans doute potache, mais tellement symptomatique de mépris affiché, devant une plaque émaillée « Licence IV » (autrefois utilisée pour désigner les débits de boissons alcoolisées).

      Pour les millions de Français d’origine musulmane dont l’élocution française est parfaite et qui partagent les mêmes références culturelles populaires que la majorité des Français, reconnaissons qu’il est parfaitement humiliant d’avoir l’impression que les médias n’ont pas d’autre « modèle » à mobiliser ou à valoriser pour entendre une voix décrite comme musulmane. Comment dès lors ne pas comprendre la défiance envers les médias ou la société dans son ensemble ?

      L’ère du #soupçon

      Certes, il revient aux musulmans au premier chef de s’organiser et de faire émerger des figures représentatives, dépassant ainsi la fragmentation qui est celle de leur culte, ainsi que la mainmise exercée par les États d’origine, Maroc, Algérie et Turquie en tête. Les luttes internes sont elles-mêmes d’une grande violence, souvent fondées sur le « narcissisme des petites différences » de Sigmund Freud. Toutefois, reconnaissons que l’expérience démontre que les restrictions ne sont pas seulement internes à la « communauté ». Il y a plus de vingt ans déjà, le sociologue #Michel_Wieviorka avait pointé du doigt l’incapacité de la société française à accueillir les voix se revendiquant comme musulmanes :

      "Plutôt que d’être perçus comme des acteurs qui inventent et renouvellent la #vie_collective — avec ses tensions, ses conflits, ses négociations —, les associations susceptibles de passer pour « ethniques » ou religieuses […] sont couramment ignorées, soupçonnées de couvrir les pires horreurs ou traitées avec hostilité par les pouvoirs publics. […] À force de rejeter une association sous prétexte qu’elle serait intégriste et fermée sur elle-même, à force de lui refuser toute écoute et tout soutien, on finit par la constituer comme telle."

      De la chanteuse #Mennel (candidate d’origine syrienne à une émission sur TF1 et qui alors portait le foulard) à #Tariq_Ramadan (certes de nationalité suisse) en passant par l’humoriste #Yassine_Belattar et le #Comité_contre_l’islamophobie_en_France (CCIF), les occasions d’exclure les voix endogènes qui revendiquent une part d’#islamité dans leur discours et sont à même de servir de référence tant cultuelle que politique et culturelle ont été nombreuses. Parfois pleinement légitimes lorsque des accusations de viols ont été proférées, des dispositifs de contrôle imposent de « montrer patte blanche » au-delà de ce qui devrait légitimement être attendu. Non limités à l’évaluation de la probité, ils rendent en plus toute critique adressée à la société française et ses failles (en politique étrangère par exemple) extrêmement périlleuses, donnant le sentiment d’un traitement différencié pour les voix dites musulmanes, promptes à se voir si facilement criminalisées. Dès lors, certaines positions, pourtant parfaitement raisonnables, deviennent indicibles.

      Revendiquer la nécessité de la #lutte_contre_l’islamophobie, dont l’existence ne devrait pas faire débat par exemple quand une femme portant le foulard se fait cracher dessus par des passants fait ainsi de manière totalement absurde partie de cette liste de tabous, établie sans doute de manière inconsciente par des années d’#injonctions et de #stigmatisations, héritées de la période coloniale.

      Une telle mécanique vient enfin légitimer les logiques d’#exclusion propres au processus de #radicalisation. Elle s’avère dès lors contreproductive et donc dangereuse. Par exemple, dissoudre le CCIF dont l’action principale est d’engager des médiations et de se tourner vers les institutions publiques est à même de constituer, en acte aux yeux de certains, la démonstration de l’inutilité des #associations et donc l’impossibilité de s’appuyer sur les institutions légales. C’est une fois encore renvoyer vers les fonds invisibles de l’Internet les #espaces_d’expression et de représentation, c’est ainsi creuser des fossés qui génèrent l’#incompréhension et la violence.

      Il devient impérieux d’apprendre à s’écouter les uns les autres. Il demeure aussi nécessaire de reconnaitre que, comme l’entreprise a besoin de syndicats attentifs et représentatifs, la société dans son ensemble, diverse comme elle est, a tout à gagner à offrir des cadres d’expression sereins et ouverts à ses minorités, permettant aussi à celles-ci de revendiquer, quitte à ne pas faire plaisir à moi-même, à la majorité, ou au patron.

      https://orientxxi.info/magazine/de-la-liberte-d-expression-des-voix-musulmanes-en-france,4227
      #religion

    • « La pensée “décoloniale” renforce le narcissisme des #petites_différences »

      80 psychanalystes s’insurgent contre l’assaut des « #identitaristes » dans le champ du savoir et du social

      « Les intellectuels ont une mentalité plus totalitaire que les gens du commun » écrivait Georges Orwell (1903-1950), dans Essais, Articles et Lettres.

      Des militants, obsédés par l’#identité, réduite à l’#identitarisme, et sous couvert d’antiracisme et de défense du bien, imposent des #idéologies_racistes par des #procédés_rhétoriques qui consistent à pervertir l’usage de la langue et le sens des mots, en détournant la pensée de certains auteurs engagés dans la lutte contre le racisme qu’ils citent abondamment comme #Fanon ou #Glissant qui, au contraire, reconnaissent l’#altérité et prônent un nouvel #universalisme.

      Parmi ces militants, le Parti des indigènes de la République -dit le #PIR- qui s’inscrit dans la mouvance « décoloniale ».

      La pensée dite « décoloniale » s’insinue à l’Université et menace les sciences humaines et sociales sans épargner la psychanalyse. Ce phénomène se répand de manière inquiétante et nous n’hésitons pas à parler d’un #phénomène_d’emprise qui distille subrepticement des idées propagandistes. Ils véhiculent une idéologie aux relents totalitaires.

      Réintroduire la « #race » et stigmatiser des populations dites « blanches » ou de couleur comme coupables ou victimes, c’est dénier la #complexité_psychique, ce n’est pas reconnaître l’histoire trop souvent méconnue des peuples colonisés et les traumatismes qui empêchent la transmission.

      Une idéologie qui nie ce qui fait la singularité de l’individu, nie les processus toujours singuliers de #subjectivation pour rabattre la question de l’identité sur une affaire de #déterminisme culturel et social.

      Une idéologie qui secondarise, voire ignore la primauté du vécu personnel, qui sacrifie les logiques de l’#identification à celle de l’identité unique ou radicalisée, dénie ce qui fait la spécificité de l’humain.

      Le livre de Houria Bouteldja, porte-parole du PIR, intitulé Les Blancs, les Juifs et nous. Vers une politique de l’amour révolutionnaire (La Fabrique, 2016), soutenu par des universitaires et des chercheurs du CNRS, prétend défendre les #victimes - les « indigènes » - alors qu’il nous paraît en réalité raciste, antisémite, sexiste et homophobe et soutient un islamisme politique. L’ensemble du livre tourne autour de l’idée que les descendants d’immigrés maghrébins en France, du fait de leurs origines, seraient victimes d’un “#racisme_institutionnel” - voire un #racisme_d’Etat-, lequel aboutirait à véritablement constituer des “#rapports_sociaux_racistes”.

      L’auteure s’adresse aux « Juifs » : « Vous, les Juifs » : des gens qui pour une part seraient étrangers à la « blanchité », étrangers à la « race » qui, depuis 1492, dominerait le monde (raison pour laquelle elle distingue les « Juifs » des « Blancs »), mais qui pour une autre part sont pires que les « Blancs », parce qu’ils en seraient les valets criminels.

      Fanon, auquel les décoloniaux se réfèrent, ne disait-il pas : « Quand vous entendez dire du mal des Juifs, dressez l’oreille, on parle de vous ».

      Le #racialisme pousse à la #position_victimaire, au #sectarisme, à l’#exclusion, et finalement au #mépris ou à la #détestation du différent, et à son exclusion de fait. Il s’appuie sur une réécriture fallacieuse de l’histoire qui nie les notions de #progrès de #civilisation mais aussi des racismes et des rivalités tout aussi ancrés que le #racisme_colonialiste.

      C’est par le « #retournement_du_stigmate » que s’opère la transformation d’une #identité_subie en une #identité_revendiquée et valorisée qui ne permet pas de dépasser la « race.

      Il s’agit là, « d’#identités_meurtrières » (#Amin_Maalouf) qui prétendent se bâtir sur le meurtre de l’autre.

      Ne nous leurrons pas, ces revendications identitaires sont des revendications totalitaires, et ces #dérives_sectaires, communautaristes menacent nos #valeurs_démocratiques et républicaines en essentialisant les individus, en valorisant de manière obsessionnelle les #particularités_culturelles et en remettant à l’affiche une imagerie exotique méprisante que les puissances coloniales se sont évertuées à célébrer.

      Cette idéologie s’appuie sur ce courant multiculturaliste états-unien qu’est l’#intersectionnalité en vogue actuellement dans les départements des sciences humaines et sociales. Ce terme a été proposé par l’universitaire féministe américaine #Kimberlé_Crenshaw en 1989 afin de spécifier l’intersection entre le #sexisme et le #racisme subi par les femmes afro-américaines. La mouvance décoloniale peut s’associer aux « #postcolonial_studies » afin d’obtenir une légitimité académique et propager leur idéologie. Là où l’on croit lutter contre le racisme et l’oppression socio-économique, on favorise le #populisme et les #haines_identitaires. Ainsi, la #lutte_des_classes est devenue une #lutte_des_races.

      Des universitaires, des chercheurs, des intellectuels, des psychanalystes s’y sont ralliés en pensant ainsi lutter contre les #discriminations. C’est au contraire les exacerber.

      #Isabelle_de_Mecquenem, professeure agrégée de philosophie, a raison de rappeler que « emprise » a l’avantage de faire écho à l’article L. 141-6 du #code_de_l'éducation. Cet article dispose que « le service public de l’enseignement supérieur est laïque et indépendant de toute emprise politique, économique, religieuse ou idéologique (…) ». Rappelons que l’affaire Dorin à l’Université de Limoges relève d’une action sectaire (propagande envers les étudiants avec exclusion de toute critique).

      Il est impérieux que tout citoyen démocrate soit informé de la dangerosité de telles thèses afin de ne pas perdre de vue la tension irréductible entre le singulier et l’universel pour le sujet parlant. La #constitution_psychique pour Freud n’est en aucun cas un particularisme ou un communautarisme.

      Nous appelons à un effort de mémoire et de pensée critique tous ceux qui ne supportent plus ces logiques communautaristes et discriminatoires, ces processus d’#assignation_identitaire qui rattachent des individus à des catégories ethno-raciales ou de religion.

      La psychanalyse s’oppose aux idéologies qui homogénéisent et massifient.

      La psychanalyse est un universalisme, un humanisme. Elle ne saurait supporter d’enrichir tout « narcissisme des petites différences ». Au contraire, elle vise une parole vraie au profit de la singularité du sujet et de son émancipation.
      Signataires
      Céline Masson, Patrick Chemla, Rhadija Lamrani Tissot, Laurence Croix, Patricia Cotti, Laurent Le Vaguerèse, Claude Maillard, Alain Vanier, Judith Cohen-Solal, Régine Waintrater, Jean-Jacques Moscovitz, Patrick Landman, Jean-Jacques Rassial, Anne Brun, Fabienne Ankaoua, Olivier Douville, Thierry Delcourt, Patrick Belamich, Pascale Hassoun , Frédéric Rousseau, Eric Ghozlan, Danièle Rosenfeld-Katz, Catherine Saladin, Alain Abelhauser, Guy Sapriel, Silke Schauder, Kathy Saada, Marie-José Del Volgo, Angélique Gozlan, Patrick Martin-Mattera, Suzanne Ferrières-Pestureau, Patricia Attigui, Paolo Lollo, Robert Lévy, Benjamin Lévy, Houria Abdelouahed, Mohammed Ham, Patrick Guyomard, Monique Zerbib, Françoise Nielsen, Claude Guy, Simone Molina, Rachel Frouard-Guy, Françoise Neau, Yacine Amhis, Délia Kohen, Jean-Pierre Winter, Liliane Irzenski, Jean Michel Delaroche , Sarah Colin, Béatrice Chemama-Steiner, Francis Drossart, Cristina Lindenmeyer, Eric Bidaud, Eric Drouet, Marie-Frédérique Bacqué, Roland Gori, Bernard Ferry, Marie-Christine Pheulpin, Jacques Barbier, Robert Samacher, Faika Medjahed, Pierre Daviot, Laetitia Petit, David Frank Allen, Daniel Oppenheim, Marie-Claude Fourment-Aptekman, Michel Hessel, Marthe Moudiki Dubreuil, Isabelle Floch, Pierre Marie, Okba Natahi, Hélène Oppenheim-Gluckman, Daniel Sibony, Jean-Luc Gaspard, Eva Talineau, Paul Alerini, Eliane Baumfelder-Bloch, Jean-Luc Houbron, Emile Rafowicz, Louis Sciara , Fethi Benslama, Marielle David, Michelle Moreau Ricaud, Jean Baptiste Legouis, Anna Angelopoulos, Jean-François Chiantaretto , Françoise Hermon, Thierry Lamote, Sylvette Gendre-Dusuzeau, Xavier Gassmann, Guy Dana, Wladi Mamane, Graciela Prieto, Olivier Goujat, Jacques JEDWAB, Brigitte FROSIO-SIMON , Catherine Guillaume, Esther Joly , Jeanne Claire ADIDA , Christian Pierre, Jean Mirguet, Jean-Baptiste BEAUFILS, Stéphanie Gagné, Manuel Perianez, Alain Amar, Olivier Querouil, Jennifer Biget, Emmanuelle Boetsch, Michèle Péchabrier, Isabel Szpacenkopf, Madeleine Lewensztain Gagna, Michèle Péchabrier, Maria Landau, Dominique Méloni, Sylvie Quesemand Zucca

      https://www.lemonde.fr/idees/article/2019/09/25/la-pensee-decoloniale-renforce-le-narcissisme-des-petites-differences_601292

      #pensée_décoloniale #psychanalyse #totalitarisme

    • Les sciences sociales contre la République ?

      Un collectif de revues de sciences humaines et sociales (SHS) met au défi le ministre de l’éducation nationale de trouver dans ses publications des textes permettant de dire que l’intersectionnalité inspire le terrorisme islamiste.

      Dans le JDD du 25 octobre, le ministre de l’éducation nationale déclarait qu’il y avait, dans les universités, un combat à mener. Contre l’appauvrissement de l’enseignement supérieur ? Contre la précarité étudiante ? Contre les difficultés croissantes que rencontrent tous les personnels, précaires et titulaires, enseignants et administratifs, à remplir leurs missions ? Contre la loi de programmation pluriannuelle de la recherche (LPPR), qui va amplifier ces difficultés ? Non : contre « une partie non négligeable des sciences sociales françaises ». Et le ministre, téméraire : face à cette « #gangrène », il faut cesser la « #lâcheté ».

      On reste abasourdi qu’un ministre de l’#éducation_nationale s’en prenne ainsi à celles et ceux qui font fonctionner les universités. Mais pour aberrants qu’ils soient, ces propos n’étonnent pas tout à fait : déjà tenus, sur Europe 1 et au Sénat, ils prolongent ceux d’Emmanuel Macron, en juin 2020, dans Le Monde, qui accusait les universitaires d’ethniciser la question sociale et de « casser la République en deux ». Plutôt que de se porter garant des libertés académiques, attaquées de toutes parts, notamment dans le cadre du débat parlementaire actuel, Jean-Michel Blanquer se saisit de l’assassinat d’un professeur d’histoire et géographie pour déclarer la guerre aux sciences sociales, qui défendraient des thèses autorisant les violences islamistes ! Sa conviction est faite : ce qui pourrit les universités françaises, ce sont les « thèses intersectionnelles », venues des « universités américaines » et qui « veulent essentialiser » les communautés.

      Ignorance ministérielle

      Le ministre « défie quiconque » de le contredire. Puisque les revues scientifiques sont, avec les laboratoires et les universités, les lieux d’élaboration des sciences sociales, de leurs controverses, de la diffusion de leurs résultats, c’est à ce titre que nous souhaitons mener cette contradiction, ses propos révélant son ignorance de nos disciplines, de leurs débats et de leurs méthodes.

      La démarche scientifique vise à décrire, analyser, comprendre la société et non à décréter ce qu’elle doit être. Les méthodes des sciences sociales, depuis leur émergence avec Emile Durkheim dans le contexte républicain français, s’accordent à expliquer les faits sociaux par le social, précisément contre les explications par la nature ou l’essence des choses. A ce titre, elles amènent aussi à rendre visibles des divisions, des discriminations, des inégalités, même si elles contrarient. Les approches intersectionnelles ne sont pas hégémoniques dans les sciences sociales : avec d’autres approches, que, dans leur précieuse liberté, les revues font dialoguer, elles sont précisément l’un des outils critiques de la #désessentialisation du monde social. Néologisme proposé par la juriste états-unienne Kimberlé Crenshaw à la fin des années 1980, le terme « intersectionnalité » désigne en outre, dans le langage actuel des sciences sociales, un ensemble de démarches qui en réalité remontent au XIXe siècle : il s’agit d’analyser la réalité sociale en observant que les #identités_sociales se chevauchent et que les logiques de #domination sont plurielles.

      Dès 1866, Julie-Victoire Daubié, dans La Femme pauvre au XIXe siècle, montre la particularité de la situation des ouvrières, domestiques et prostituées obligées de travailler pour survivre, faisant des femmes pauvres une catégorie d’analyse pour le champ de la connaissance et de la politique, alors que lorsqu’on parlait des pauvres, on pensait surtout aux hommes ; et que lorsqu’on parlait des femmes, on pensait avant tout aux bourgeoises.

      Une politique répressive de la pensée

      Plus près de nous, l’équipe EpiCov (pour « Epidémiologie et conditions de vie »), coordonnée par la sociologue Nathalie Bajos et le démographe François Héran, vient de publier des données concernant l’exposition au Covid-19 à partir de critères multiples parmi lesquels la classe sociale, le sexe, le lieu de naissance. Une première lecture de ces données indique que les classes populaires travaillant dans la maintenance (plutôt des hommes) et dans le soin (plutôt des femmes) ont été surexposées, et que, parmi elles, on compte une surreprésentation de personnes nées hors d’Europe. Une analyse intersectionnelle cherchera à corréler ces données, entre elles et avec d’autres disponibles, pour mieux comprendre comment les #discriminations s’entrelacent dans la vie des personnes. Où sont l’essentialisation, l’encouragement au communautarisme ? Pour les chercheurs et chercheuses en sciences sociales, il s’agit simplement, à partir de données vérifiées par des méthodes scientifiques, validées entre pairs et ouvertes à la discussion, de faire leur travail.

      L’anathème que le ministre lance traduit une politique répressive de la pensée. Nous mettons M. Blanquer au défi de trouver un seul texte publié dans la bibliothèque ouverte et vivante de nos revues qui permette de dire que l’intersectionnalité inspire le #terrorisme_islamiste. Se saisir d’un mot, « intersectionnalité », pour partir en guerre contre les sciences sociales et, plus généralement, contre la liberté de penser et de comprendre la société, est une manœuvre grossière. Si elle prend, nos universités devront troquer la liberté de chercher (qui est aussi la liberté de se tromper) pour rien moins qu’une science aux ordres, un obscurantisme ministériel. On voit mal comment la République pourrait en sortir grandie.

      Le collectif des revues en lutte, constitué en janvier 2020 autour de l’opposition aux projets de LPPR et de réforme des retraites, rassemble aujourd’hui 157 revues francophones, pour l’essentiel issues des sciences humaines et sociales.

      https://www.lemonde.fr/sciences/article/2020/11/02/les-sciences-sociales-contre-la-republique_6058195_1650684.html

    • Academic freedom in the context of France’s new approach to ’separatism’

      From now on, academic freedom will be exercised within the limits of the values ​​of the Republic. Or not.

      For months, France has been severely weakened by a deepening economic crisis, violent social tensions, and a health crisis out of control. The barbaric assassination of history professor Samuel Paty on October 16 in a Paris suburb and the murder of Vincent Loquès, Simone Barreto Silva, Nadine Devillers in the Notre-Dame basilica in Nice on October 29 have now plunged the country into terror.

      Anger, bewilderment, fear and a need for protection took over French society. French people should have the right to remain united, to understand, to stay sharp, do everything possible not to fall into the trap set by terrorists who have only one objective: to divide them. It is up to politics to lead the effort of collective elaboration of the mourning, to ensure the unity of the country. But that’s not what is happening. Politics instead tries to silence any attempt at reflection tying itself in knots to point the finger at the culprit, or, better yet, the culprits.

      In the narrative of the French government, there are two direct or indirect sources responsible for the resurgence of terrorism: abroad, the foreign powers which finance mosques and organizations promoting the separatism of Islamic communities, and consequently - as is only logical on the perpetually slippery slope of Macronist propaganda - terrorism; at home, it is the academics.

      It is true that the October attacks coincided with tensions which have been increasing for months between France and Turkey on different fronts: Syria, Libya, Nagorno-Karabakh, and above all the Eastern Mediterranean. And it is also true that the relationship between international tensions and the resurgence of terrorism needs to be explored. However, the allusion to the relationship between the role of academics and these attacks is simply outrageous and instrumental, aimed only at discrediting the category of academics engaged in recent weeks in a desperate struggle to prevent the passing of a Research programming law, which violently redefines the methods of funding and management of research projects, the status, the prerogatives as well as the academic freedom of university professors.
      Regaining control?

      “A teacher died and other teachers are being blamed for it" wrote the sociologist Eric Fassin, alluding to a long series of attacks that have been reiterated in recent months on the French university community – a community guilty, according to Macron and his collaborators, of excessive indulgence in the face of “immigration, Islam and integration”.

      “I must regain control of these subjects”, said Emmanuel Macron a year ago to the extreme right-wing magazine Valeurs Actuelles. A few months later, in the midst of a worldwide struggle against racism and police violence, Macron, scandalized by the winds of revolt – rather than by racism and police violence in themselves – explained to Le Monde that "The academic world has been guilty. It has encouraged the ethnicization of social issues, thinking that this was a good path to go down. But the outcome can only be secessionist.” The Minister of National Education Jean-Michel Blanquer, presenting in June 2020 to the Senate’s commission of inquiry on Islamist radicalization, had evoked for his part, “the permeability of the academic world with theories that are at the antipodes of the values of the Republic and secularism”, citing specifically “the indigenist theories”.

      A few days after the homicide of Samuel Paty, in an interview with Europe 1, the minister accused academics of “intellectual complicity with terrorism”, adding that “Islamo-leftism wreaks havoc in the University”… “favoring an ideology that only spells trouble”. Explaining himself further in Le Journal Du Dimanche, on October 24, Blanquer reiterated these accusations, specifying: "There is a fight to be waged against an intellectual matrix coming from American universities and intersectional theses that want to essentialize communities and identities, at the antipodes of the Republican model, which postulates the equality between human beings, independently of their characteristics of origin, sex, religion. It is the breeding ground for a fragmentation of societies that converges with the Islamic model”.
      A Darwinian law

      Such accusations and interferences have provoked many reactions of indignation, including that of the Conférence of University Presidents. However, nothing was sufficient to see the attack off. On Friday evening, after the launch of a fast-track procedure that effectively muzzled the debate, the Senate approved the research programming law. In many respects, this is the umpteenth banal neo-liberal, or, more exactly, admittedly Darwinian, reform of the French university: precarisation of the work of teachers, concentration of the funds on a limited number of “excellent” poles and individuals, promotion of competition between individuals, institutions and countries, strengthening of the managerial management of research, weakening of national guarantee structures and, more generally, weakening of self-governance bodies.

      But this law also contains a clear and astounding plan to redefine the respective roles of science and politics. The article of the law currently in force, which very effectively and elegantly defined the meaning of academic freedom:

      “Teacher and researchers enjoy full independence and complete freedom of expression in the exercise of their teaching functions and their research activities, subject to the reservations imposed on them, in accordance with university traditions and the provisions of this code, the principles of tolerance and objectivity”, has been amended by the addition of this sentence:

      “Academic freedoms are exercised with respect for the values ​​of the Republic”

      This addition which is in itself an outrage against the principles of the separation of powers and academic freedom has been joined by an explicit reference to the events of these days:

      “The terrible tragedy in Conflans-Sainte-Honorine shows more than ever the need to preserve, within the Republic, the freedom to teach freely and to educate the citizens of tomorrow”, states the explanatory memorandum. "The purpose of this provision is to enshrine this in law so that these values, foremost among which is secularism, constitute the foundation on which academic freedoms are based and the framework in which they are expressed.”

      The emotion engendered by the murder of innocent people was therefore well and truly exploited in an ignoble manner to serve the anti-democratic objective of limiting academic freedoms and setting the choices of the subjects to be studied, as well as the “intellettual matrix” to be adopted under the surveillance today of the presidential majority and tomorrow, who knows?

      To confirm this reading of the priorities of the majority and the fears it arouses, on Sunday November 1, Thierry Coulhon, adviser to the President of the Republic was appointed, through a “Blitzkrieg”, head of the Haut Council for the Evaluation of Research and Higher Education (Hceres), the national body responsible for the evaluation of research.

      A few details of this law, including the amendment on the limits of research freedom, may still change in the joint committee to be held on November 9. But the support of academics, individuals, organizations, scholarly journals, for the Solemn appeal for the protection of academic freedom and the right to study is now more urgent and necessary than ever.

      https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/can-europe-make-it/academic-freedom-in-the-context-of-frances-new-approach-to-separatism

    • Les sciences sociales contre la République ?

      Le 2 novembre 2020, l’AG des Revues en Lutte a répondu dans Le Monde au ministre J.-M. Blanquer qui entend combattre « une partie non négligeable des sciences sociales françaises », au prétexte de la lutte anti-terroriste.

      Cette tribune, que nous reproduisons ci-dessous, rejoint de très nombreuses prises de position récentes, contre l’intervention de J.-M. Blanquer, mais aussi contre E. Macron qui accuse les universitaires de « casser la République en deux » et contre deux amendements ajoutés à la LPPR (déjà parfaitement délétère) au Sénat : « les libertés académiques s’exercent dans le respect des valeurs de la République » et « les trouble-fête iront en prison ».

      Voici quelques-unes de ces prises de position :

      - Appel solennel pour la protection des libertés académiques et du droit d’étudier, sur Academia : https://academia.hypotheses.org/27287
      - Libertés académiques : des amendements à la loi sur la recherche rejetés par des sociétés savantes, dans Le Monde : https://www.lemonde.fr/societe/article/2020/11/02/libertes-academiques-des-amendements-a-la-loi-sur-la-recherche-rejetes-par-d
      – Lettre ouverte aux Parlementaires, par Facs et labos en lutte, RogueESR, Sauvons l’Université et Université Ouverte : rogueesr.fr/lettre-ouverte-lpr/
      - Communiqué de presse : retrait de 3 amendements sénatoriaux à la LPR, par le collectif des sociétés savantes académiques : https://societes-savantes.fr/communique-de-presse-retrait-de-3-amendements-senatoriaux-a-la-lpr
      – « Cette attaque contre la liberté académique est une attaque contre l’État de droit démocratique », dans Le Monde : https://www.lemonde.fr/idees/article/2020/11/02/cette-attaque-contre-la-liberte-academique-est-une-attaque-contre-l-etat-de-
      - Communique de presse national, par Facs et labos en lutte, RogueESR, Sauvons l’Université et Université Ouverte : rogueesr.fr/communique_suspendre_lpr/
      - Intersectionnalité : Blanquer joue avec le feu, par Rose-Marie Lagrave : https://www.liberation.fr/debats/2020/11/03/intersectionnalite-blanquer-joue-avec-le-feu_1804309
      - Qui est complice de qui ? Les libertés académiques en péril, par Eric Fassin : https://blogs.mediapart.fr/eric-fassin/blog/011120/qui-est-complice-de-qui-les-libertes-academiques-en-peril
      - Les miliciens de la pensée et la causalité diabolique, par Seloua Luste Boulbina : https://blogs.mediapart.fr/seloua-luste-boulbina/blog/021120/les-miliciens-de-la-pensee-et-la-causalite-diabolique
      - L’islamo-gauchisme : comment (ne) naît (pas) une idéologie, par Samuel Hayat : https://www.nouvelobs.com/idees/20201027.OBS35262/l-islamo-gauchisme-comment-ne-nait-pas-une-ideologie.html
      – Après Conflans : gare aux mots de la démocratie, par Olivier Compagnon : https://universiteouverte.org/2020/10/27/apres-conflans-gare-aux-mots-de-la-democratie
      – Toi qui m’appelles islamo-gauchiste, laisse-moi te dire pourquoi le lâche, c’est toi, par Alexis Dayon : https://blogs.mediapart.fr/alexis-dayon/blog/221020/toi-qui-mappelles-islamo-gauchiste-laisse-moi-te-dire-pourquoi-le-la
      - « Que le terme plaise ou non, il y a bien une islamophobie d’État en France », par Jean-François Bayart : https://www.lemonde.fr/idees/article/2020/10/31/jean-francois-bayart-que-le-terme-plaise-ou-non-il-y-a-bien-une-islamophobie

      On peut également mentionner les nombreux numéros de revues académiques, récents ou à venir, portant sur l’intersectionnalité, cœur de l’attaque du gouvernement. Les Revues en Lutte en citent plusieurs dans un superbe fil Twitter (https://twitter.com/RevuesEnLutte/status/1321861736165711874?s=20).

      Un collectif de revues de sciences humaines et sociales (SHS) met au défi le ministre de l’éducation nationale de trouver dans ses publications des textes permettant de dire que l’intersectionnalité inspire le terrorisme islamiste.

      Tribune

      Dans le JDD du 25 octobre, le ministre de l’éducation nationale déclarait qu’il y avait, dans les universités, un combat à mener. Contre l’appauvrissement de l’enseignement supérieur ? Contre la précarité étudiante ? Contre les difficultés croissantes que rencontrent tous les personnels, précaires et titulaires, enseignants et administratifs, à remplir leurs missions ? Contre la loi de programmation pluriannuelle de la recherche (LPPR), qui va amplifier ces difficultés ? Non : contre « une partie non négligeable des sciences sociales françaises ». Et le ministre, téméraire : face à cette « gangrène », il faut cesser la « lâcheté ».

      On reste abasourdi qu’un ministre de l’éducation nationale s’en prenne ainsi à celles et ceux qui font fonctionner les universités. Mais pour aberrants qu’ils soient, ces propos n’étonnent pas tout à fait : déjà tenus, sur Europe 1 et au Sénat, ils prolongent ceux d’Emmanuel Macron, en juin 2020, dans Le Monde, qui accusait les universitaires d’ethniciser la question sociale et de « casser la République en deux ». Plutôt que de se porter garant des libertés académiques, attaquées de toutes parts, notamment dans le cadre du débat parlementaire actuel, Jean-Michel Blanquer se saisit de l’assassinat d’un professeur d’histoire et géographie pour déclarer la guerre aux sciences sociales, qui défendraient des thèses autorisant les violences islamistes ! Sa conviction est faite : ce qui pourrit les universités françaises, ce sont les « thèses intersectionnelles », venues des « universités américaines » et qui « veulent essentialiser » les communautés.
      Ignorance ministérielle

      Le ministre « défie quiconque » de le contredire. Puisque les revues scientifiques sont, avec les laboratoires et les universités, les lieux d’élaboration des sciences sociales, de leurs controverses, de la diffusion de leurs résultats, c’est à ce titre que nous souhaitons mener cette contradiction, ses propos révélant son ignorance de nos disciplines, de leurs débats et de leurs méthodes.

      La démarche scientifique vise à décrire, analyser, comprendre la société et non à décréter ce qu’elle doit être. Les méthodes des sciences sociales, depuis leur émergence avec Emile Durkheim dans le contexte républicain français, s’accordent à expliquer les faits sociaux par le social, précisément contre les explications par la nature ou l’essence des choses. A ce titre, elles amènent aussi à rendre visibles des divisions, des discriminations, des inégalités, même si elles contrarient. Les approches intersectionnelles ne sont pas hégémoniques dans les sciences sociales : avec d’autres approches, que, dans leur précieuse liberté, les revues font dialoguer, elles sont précisément l’un des outils critiques de la désessentialisation du monde social. Néologisme proposé par la juriste états-unienne Kimberlé Crenshaw à la fin des années 1980, le terme « intersectionnalité » désigne en outre, dans le langage actuel des sciences sociales, un ensemble de démarches qui en réalité remontent au XIXe siècle : il s’agit d’analyser la réalité sociale en observant que les identités sociales se chevauchent et que les logiques de domination sont plurielles.

      Dès 1866, Julie-Victoire Daubié, dans La Femme pauvre au XIXe siècle, montre la particularité de la situation des ouvrières, domestiques et prostituées obligées de travailler pour survivre, faisant des femmes pauvres une catégorie d’analyse pour le champ de la connaissance et de la politique, alors que lorsqu’on parlait des pauvres, on pensait surtout aux hommes ; et que lorsqu’on parlait des femmes, on pensait avant tout aux bourgeoises.
      Une politique répressive de la pensée

      Plus près de nous, l’équipe EpiCov (pour « Epidémiologie et conditions de vie »), coordonnée par la sociologue Nathalie Bajos et l’épidémiologiste Josiane Warszawski, vient de publier des données concernant l’exposition au Covid-19 à partir de critères multiples parmi lesquels la classe sociale, le sexe, le lieu de naissance. Une première lecture de ces données indique que les classes populaires travaillant dans la maintenance (plutôt des hommes) et dans le soin (plutôt des femmes) ont été surexposées, et que, parmi elles, on compte une surreprésentation de personnes nées hors d’Europe. Une analyse intersectionnelle cherchera à corréler ces données, entre elles et avec d’autres disponibles, pour mieux comprendre comment les discriminations s’entrelacent dans la vie des personnes. Où sont l’essentialisation, l’encouragement au communautarisme ? Pour les chercheurs et chercheuses en sciences sociales, il s’agit simplement, à partir de données vérifiées par des méthodes scientifiques, validées entre pairs et ouvertes à la discussion, de faire leur travail.

      L’anathème que le ministre lance traduit une politique répressive de la pensée. Nous mettons M. Blanquer au défi de trouver un seul texte publié dans la bibliothèque ouverte et vivante de nos revues qui permette de dire que l’intersectionnalité inspire le terrorisme islamiste. Se saisir d’un mot, « intersectionnalité », pour partir en guerre contre les sciences sociales et, plus généralement, contre la liberté de penser et de comprendre la société, est une manœuvre grossière. Si elle prend, nos universités devront troquer la liberté de chercher (qui est aussi la liberté de se tromper) pour rien moins qu’une science aux ordres, un obscurantisme ministériel. On voit mal comment la République pourrait en sortir grandie.

      https://universiteouverte.org/2020/11/03/les-sciences-sociales-contre-la-republique

    • Islamisme : où est le déni des universitaires   ?

      Dans une tribune publiée par « le Monde », une centaine de professeurs et de chercheurs dénoncent les « idéologies indigénistes, racialistes et décoloniales » de leurs pairs, lesquelles mèneraient au terrorisme. Les auteurs rejouent ainsi la rengaine du choc des cultures qui ne peut servir que l’extrême droite identitaire.

      Comment peut-on prétendre alerter sur les dangers, réels, cela va sans dire, de l’islamisme en se référant aux propos confus et injurieux de Jean-Michel Blanquer ? Or, une récente tribune du Monde (https://www.lemonde.fr/idees/article/2020/10/31/une-centaine-d-universitaires-alertent-sur-l-islamisme-ce-qui-nous-menace-c-), au lieu de contribuer à une nécessaire clarification, n’a pas d’autre fonction que de soutenir un ministre qui, loin de pouvoir se prévaloir d’une quelconque expertise sur les radicalités contemporaines, mène en outre une politique régressive pour l’école, c’est-à-dire indifférente à la reproduction des inégalités socio-culturelles dont s’accommode l’idéologie méritocratique. Faire oublier cette politique en détournant l’attention, d’autres que lui l’ont fait. Il convient seulement de ne pas être dupe.

      Car que disent les auteurs (certains d’entre eux, fort estimables, ont probablement oublié de relire) ? Que « l’islamo-gauchisme », ni défini ni corrélé au moindre auteur, est l’idéologie « qui mène au pire », soit au terrorisme. Ceux qui la propagent dans nos universités, « très puissants dans l’enseignement supérieur », commettraient d’irréparables dégâts. Et l’on invoque pêle-mêle l’indigénisme, le racialisme et le décolonialisme, sans le moindre souci de complexification, ni même de définition, souci non utile tant le symptôme de la supposée gangrène serait aisément repérable : le port du voile.

      Plus de trente ans après l’affaire de Creil, et quantité de travaux sociologiques, on n’hésite donc toujours pas à nier l’équivocité de ce signe d’appartenance pour le réduire à un outil de propagande. Chercher à comprendre, au lieu de condamner, serait une manifestation de l’esprit munichois. Que la Conférence des présidents d’université (CPU) proteste contre les déclarations du ministre, en rappelant utilement la fonction des chercheurs, passe par pertes et profits, l’instance que l’on ne peut soupçonner d’un quelconque gauchisme étant probablement noyautée par des islamistes dissimulés !

      Cette tribune rejoue, une fois encore, une vieille rengaine, celle du #choc_des_civilisations : « haine des Blancs », « doxa antioccidentale », « #multiculturalisme » (!), voilà les ennemis dont les universitaires se réclameraient, ou qu’ils laisseraient prospérer, jusqu’à saper ce qui fait le prix de notre mode de vie. Au demeurant, les signataires de la présente tribune sont profondément attachés aux principes de la République et, en l’espèce, à la liberté de conscience et d’expression. C’est au nom de celle-ci qu’ils se proposent de dénoncer les approximations de leurs collègues.

      Choisir le #débat plutôt que l’#invective

      Concernant l’#indigénisme, sa principale incarnation, le Parti des indigènes de la République (PIR) a totalement échoué dans sa volonté d’être audible dans nos enceintes universitaires. Chacun sait bien que l’écho des thèses racistes, antisémites et homophobes d’#Houria_Bouteldja est voisin de zéro. Quant au #décolonialisme, auquel l’indigénisme se rattache mais qui recouvre quantités d’autres thématiques, il représente bien un corpus structuré. Néanmoins, les études sur son influence dans nos campus concluent le plus souvent à un rôle marginal. Et, quoi qu’il en soit, ses propositions méritent débat parce qu’elles se fondent sur une réalité indiscutable : celle de l’existence d’injustices « épistémiques », c’est-à-dire d’#injustices qui se caractérisent par les #inégalités d’accès, selon l’appartenance raciale ou de genre, aux positions académiques d’autorité.

      D’une façon générale, il ne fait aucun doute que la communauté scientifique a, dans le passé, largement légitimé l’idée de la supériorité des hommes sur les femmes, des Blancs sur les Noirs, des « Occidentaux » sur les autochtones, etc. Mais, à partir de ce constat, les décoloniaux refusent la possibilité d’un point de vue universaliste et objectif au profit d’une épistémologie qui aurait « une couleur et une sexualité ». Ce faisant, ils oublient #Fanon dont pourtant ils revendiquent l’héritage : « Chaque fois qu’un homme a fait triompher la dignité de l’esprit, chaque fois qu’un homme a dit non à une tentative d’asservissement de son semblable, je me suis senti solidaire de son acte. En aucune façon je ne dois tirer du passé des peuples de couleur ma vocation originelle. […] Ce n’est pas le monde noir qui me dicte ma conduite. Ma peau noire n’est pas dépositaire de valeurs spécifiques. » Nous devons choisir le débat plutôt que l’invective.

      L’obsession antimulticulturaliste

      Quant à l’obsession antimulticulturaliste (« #prêchi-prêcha », écrivent-ils), elle est ignorante de ce qu’est vraiment ce courant intellectuel. A de nombreux égards, ce dernier propose une conception de l’#intégration différente de celle cherchant à assimiler pour égaliser. Il est donc infondé de le confondre avec une vision ethno-culturelle du lien politique. Restituer à l’égal sa différence, tel est le projet du multiculturalisme, destiné en définitive à aller plus loin dans l’instauration de l’#égalité que n’était parvenue à le faire la solution républicaine classique. Le meilleur de ce projet, mais non nécessairement sa pente naturelle, est sa contribution à ce que l’un de nous nomme la « #décolonisation_des_identités » (Alain Renaut), conciliation que les crimes de la #colonisation avaient rendue extrêmement difficile. Bref, nous sommes très éloignés du « prêchi-prêcha ».

      Enfin, un mot sur la « #haine_des_Blancs ». Cette accusation est non seulement stupéfiante si elle veut rendre compte des travaux universitaires, mais elle contribue à l’#essentialisation « racialiste » qu’elle dénonce. En effet, elle donne une consistance théorique à l’apparition d’un nouveau groupe, les Blancs, qui auparavant n’était pas reconnu, et ne se reconnaissait pas, comme tel. Dès lors, en présupposant l’existence d’une idéologie racialiste anti-française, anti-blanche, on inverse les termes victimaires en faisant de la culture dominante une culture assiégée. Ce tour de passe-passe idéologique ne peut servir que l’extrême droite identitaire.

      Toutes nos remarques critiques montrent qu’au lieu d’amorcer un nécessaire débat, la tribune ici analysée témoigne du déni dont pourtant des intellectuels non clairement identifiés sont accusés. Comment interpréter ce « manifeste » autrement que comme un appel à censurer ?

      https://www.liberation.fr/debats/2020/11/04/islamisme-ou-est-le-deni-des-universitaires_1804439

    • « Les libertés sont précisément foulées aux pieds lorsqu’on en appelle à la dénonciation d’études et de pensée »

      Environ deux mille chercheurs et chercheuses dénoncent, dans une tribune au « Monde », l’appel à la police de la pensée dans les universités signé par une centaine d’universitaires en soutien aux propos de Jean-Michel Blanquer sur « l’islamo-gauchisme ».

      https://www.lemonde.fr/idees/article/2020/11/04/les-libertes-sont-precisement-foulees-aux-pieds-lorsqu-on-en-appelle-a-la-de

    • Open Letter: the threat of academic authoritarianism – international solidarity with antiracist academics in France

      A critical response to the Manifesto signed by over 100 French academics and published in the newspaper Le Monde on 2 November 2020, after the assassination of the school teacher, Samuel Paty.

      At a time of mounting racism, white supremacism, antisemitism and violent far-right extremism, academic freedom has come under attack. The freedom to teach and research the roots and trajectories of race and racism are being perversely blamed for the very phenomena they seek to better understand. Such is the contention of a manifesto signed by over 100 French academics and published in the newspaper Le Monde on 2 November 2020. Its signatories state their agreement with French Minister of Education, Jean-Michel Blanquer, that ‘indigenist, racialist, and “decolonial” ideologies,’ imported from North America, were responsible for ‘conditioning’ the violent extremist who assassinated school teacher, Samuel Paty, on 16 October 2020.

      This claim is deeply disingenuous, and in a context where academics associated with critical race and decolonial research have recently received death threats, it is also profoundly dangerous. The scholars involved in this manifesto have readily sacrificed their credibility in order to further a manifestly false conflation between the study of racism in France and a politics of ‘Islamism’ and ‘anti-white hate’. They have launched it in a context where academic freedom in France is subject to open political interference, following a Senate amendment that redefines and limits it to being ‘exercised with respect for the values of the Republic’.

      The manifesto proposes nothing short of a McCarthyist process to be led by the French Ministry for Higher Education, Research and Innovation to weed out ‘Islamist currents’ within universities, to take a clear position on the ‘ideologies that underpin them’, and to ‘engage universities in a struggle for secularism and the Republic’ by establishing a body responsible for dealing with cases that oppose ‘Republican principles and academic freedom’. The ‘Islamogauchiste’ tag (which conflates the words ‘Islam’ and ‘leftists’) is now widely used by members of the government, large sections of the media and hostile academics. It is reminiscent of the antisemitic ‘Judeo-Bolshevism’ accusation in the 1930s which blamed the spread of communism on Jews. The ‘Islamogauchiste’ notion is particularly pernicious as it voluntarily confuses Islam (and Muslims) with Jihadist Islamists. In other words, academics who point out racism against the Muslim minority in France are branded allies of Islamist terrorists and enemies of the nation.

      This is not the only contradiction that shapes this manifesto. Its signatories appear oblivious to how its feverish tone is redolent of the antisemitic witch-hunts against so-called ‘Cultural Marxists’ that portrayed Jewish intellectuals as enemies of the state. Today’s enemies are Muslims, political antiracists, and decolonial thinkers, as well as anyone who stands with them against rampant state racism and Islamophobia.

      Further, when seen in a global context, the question of who is in fact ‘importing’ ideas from North America is worth considering. The manifesto comes on the back of the Trump administration’s executive order ‘on Combating Race and Sex Stereotyping’ which effectively bans federal government contractors or subcontractors from engaging what are characterised as ideologies that portray the United States as ‘fundamentally racist or sexist’. Quick on Trump’s heels, the British Conservative Party moved to malign Critical Race Theory as a separatist ideology that, if taught in schools, would be ‘breaking the law’.

      We are concerned about the clear double standards regarding academic freedom in the attack on critical race and decolonial scholarship mounted by the manifesto. In opposition to the actual tenets of academic freedom, the demands it makes portray any teaching and research into the history or sociology of French colonialism and institutionalised racism as an attack on academic freedom. In contrast, falsely and dangerously linking these scholarly endeavours to Islamic extremism and holding scholars responsible for brutal acts of murder, as do the signatories of the Manifesto, is presented as consistent with academic freedom.

      This is part of a global trend in which racism is protected as freedom of speech, while to express antiracist views is regarded as a violation of it. For the signatories of the manifesto – as for Donald Trump – only sanitised accounts of national histories that omit the truth about colonialism, slavery, and genocide can be antiracist. In this perverse and ahistorical vision, to engage in critical research and teaching in the interests of learning from past injustices is to engage in ‘anti-white racism’, a view that reduces racism to the thoughts of individuals, disconnecting it from the actions, laws and policies of states and institutions in societies in which racial socioeconomic inequality remains rife.

      In such an atmosphere, intellectual debate is made impossible, as any critical questioning of the role played by France in colonialism or in the current geopolitics of the Middle East or Africa, not to mention domestic state racism, is dismissed as a legitimation of Islamist violence and ‘separatism’. Under these terms, the role of political and economic elites in perpetuating racism both locally and on a global scale remains unquestioned, while those who suffer are teachers and activists attempting to improve conditions for ordinary people on the ground.

      In the interests of a real freedom, of speech and of conscience, we stand with French educators under threat from this ideologically-driven attack by politicians, commentators and select academics. It is grounded in the whitewashing of the history of race and colonialism and an Islamophobic worldview that conflates all Muslims with violence and all their defenders with so-called ‘leftist Islamism’. True academic freedom must include the right to critique the national past in the interests of securing a common future. At a time of deep polarization, spurred by elites in thrall to white supremacism, defending this freedom is more vital than ever.

      https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/can-europe-make-it/open-letter-the-threat-of-academic-authoritarianism-international-sol

    • Qui pour soutenir les « coupables de dérives intellectuelles idéologiques dans les universités » ?

      Mercredi 25 novembre 2020 : deux députés demandent la « création d’une mission d’information sur les dérives intellectuelles idéologiques dans les milieux universitaires », et le font publiquement savoir par un communiqué de presse.

      Ni la ministre de l’Enseignement supérieur, de la Recherche et de l’Innovation, ni la Conférence des présidents d’université, ni l’Udice, l’association autoproclamée des dix plus grandes « universités de recherche » françaises, ne bougent le petit doigt.

      Jeudi 26 novembre 2020 : l’un des deux députés précédents, un certain Julien Aubert, se sentant pousser des ailes, décide d’aller plus loin, et dresse une liste de sept universitaires, dont un président d’université, qui ont en commun d’avoir dit sur les réseaux sociaux le dégoût que leur inspire l’idée même de « dérives intellectuelles idéologiques ». Publiant leurs photos de profils et leurs comptes Twitter personnels, le député jubile, avec le message suivant :

      « Les coupables s’autodésignent. Alors que la privation du débat, l’ostracisation et la censure est constatée par nombre de professeurs, étudiants ou intellectuels, certains se drapent dans des accusations de fascisme et de maccarthysme. »

      La ministre de l’Enseignement supérieur, de la Recherche et de l’Innovation, la Conférence des présidents d’université et l’Udice ne bougent pas davantage le petit doigt.

      Vendredi 27 novembre 2020 : L’Auref, l’Alliance des universités de recherche et de formation, qui regroupe rien de moins que 35 universités, décide de sortir du bois, et il faut la saluer. Il faut dire, aussi, que l’un de ses membres, le président de l’université de Bordeaux Montaigne, figure par les « coupables » désigné par le député Aubert. Le communiqué choisit de rester tout en rondeur : il « appelle à plus de calme et de retenue dans les propos, de dignité et de respect de l’autre dans le légitime débat public, de mobilisation sur les vrais enjeux de la France et de son université ». Mais il a le mérite, lui, d’exister.

      L’université de Rennes 2, de son côté, annonce se réserver « le droit de donner une suite juridique à cette dérive grave ». C’est en effet une vraie question, à tout le moins sur le terrain de la diffamation.

      Du côté de la ministre de l’Enseignement supérieur, de la Recherche et de l’Innovation, de la Conférence des présidents d’université et de l’Udice, en revanche, rien. Toujours rien. Désespérément rien.

      Ils bougeront un jour, c’est sûr, il le faudra bien, comme ils avaient bougé après les propos de Jean-Michel Blanquer sur l’islamo-gauchisme. Mais bouger comme ils le font, à la vitesse d’escargots réticents, ce n’est pas un soutien résolu et indéfectible dans la défense des libertés académiques. Ces gens ne sont tout simplement pas à la hauteur de l’Université.

      https://academia.hypotheses.org/29081

    • Chasse aux sorcières. Un député contre-attaque

      Loi recherche, libertés académiques et furie parlementaire..
      Comme elles venaient cette fois de députés, j’ai demandé au Président de l’@AssembleeNat de se saisir des attaques personnelles contre des personnels de l’enseignement supérieur et de la recherche.
      Rien ne va plus.

      https://twitter.com/Sebastien_Nadot/status/1332350483437150209


      https://academia.hypotheses.org/29133

      #Sébastien_Nadot

    • La liste des coupables s’allonge. Au tour des universités ?

      Au Journal officiel de ce 3 décembre 2020, on trouve le décret portant dissolution d’un « #groupement_de_fait », l’« Association de défense des droits de l’homme – #Collectif_contre_l’islamophobie_en_France » (https://www.legifrance.gouv.fr/download/pdf?id=-nWvo0jS6QqmBjWn9EPe_u_AvWkqbw3aGTWSBldcbDg=). Cette association était plus connue sous le nom de « #CCIF ».

      Ce décret de #dissolution inhabituellement long – trois pages – a déjà largement été commenté et dénoncé1. Academia se permet néanmoins d’insister sur un point : il est important de lire avec attention l’argumentation de ce décret — ce qu’en droit, on nomme les motifs — et d’observer par quels sautillements logiques le gouvernement en arrive aux pires conclusions. C’est même crucial pour la communauté de l’ESR, dans un contexte bien particulier d’attaques contre les libertés académiques. Certes, ce n’est pas la même artillerie qui est déployée contre le CCIF, d’un côté, et contre les universités et les scientifiques, de l’autre ; mais les petits bonds logiques qui y conduisent présentent de très fortes ressemblances.

      Prenons le premier des motifs du décret :

      « En qualifiant d’islamophobes des mesures prises dans le but de prévenir des actions terroristes et de prévenir ou combattre des actes punis par la loi, [le CCIF] doit être regardé comme partageant, cautionnant et contribuant à propager de telles idées, au risque de susciter, en retour, des actes de haine, de violence ou de discrimination ou de créer le terrain d’actions violentes chez certains de ses sympathisants ».

      Et voyons à quelle conclusion ce motif conduit :

      « Considérant que par suite, [le CCIF] doit être regardé comme provoquant à la haine, à la discrimination et à la violence en raison de l’origine, de l’appartenance à une ethnie, à une race ou à une religion déterminée et comme propageant des idées ou théories tendant à justifier ou encourager cette discrimination, cette haine ou cette violence ».

      Voilà donc un raisonnement qui se déploie de manière très décomplexée. Voir de l’islamophobie dans certaines évolutions arbitraires et discriminatoires de l’action anti-terroriste, c’est, première conséquence, prendre le « risque » de susciter du terrorisme ; et dans tous les cas, cela doit, seconde conséquence, être regardé comme une provocation à la haine, à la discrimination et à la violence en raison de l’origine, de l’appartenance à une ethnie, à une race ou à une religion déterminée et comme une propagation des idées ou théories tendant à justifier ou encourager cette discrimination, cette haine ou cette violence.

      Ce mode bien particulier de raisonnement appelle deux remarques.

      La première remarque a trait au choix bien précis des mots qui sont employés dans le décret de dissolution du 2 décembre 2020. Ce décret fait référence, en réalité, à deux infractions pénales :

      - Il suggère d’abord l’infraction de provocation directe à des actes de terrorisme. Au terme de l’article 421-2-5 du code pénal, en effet, « le fait de provoquer directement à des actes de terrorisme ou de faire publiquement l’apologie de ces actes est puni de cinq ans d’emprisonnement et de 75 000€ d’amende ».
      - Il suggère ensuite l’infraction d’incitation à la haine, à la violence ou à la discrimination raciale. Au terme de l’article 24 de la loi du 29 juillet 1881 sur la liberté de la presse, en effet, « ceux qui auront provoqué à la discrimination, à la haine ou à la violence à l’égard d’une personne ou d’un groupe de personnes à raison de leur origine ou de leur appartenance ou de leur non-appartenance à une ethnie, une nation, une race ou une religion déterminée, seront punis d’un an d’emprisonnement et de 45 000 euros d’amende ou de l’une de ces deux peines seulement ».

      Mais le décret ne fait que suggérer ces infractions : il en reprend des formules, mais il ne dit pas qu’elles ont été commises par le CCIF. Il ne le dit pas parce que ces infractions n’ont pas été commises. Si elles l’avaient été, des poursuites pénales auraient immédiatement été engagées. Les outils de la police administrative — ici la dissolution d’une association — viennent donc suppléer les outils de la répression pénale, en singeant ces derniers : puisque le CCIF n’était pas sérieusement attaquable devant le juge pénal, le pouvoir exécutif choisit de l’attaquer par la voie administrative, et pour cela, il mime le vocabulaire pénal, tout en s’affranchissant, évidemment, de toutes les garanties qui caractérisent le procès pénal.

      La seconde remarque est, pour les universités, la plus importante. La dissolution du CCIF est largement justifiée par des propos tenus par l’association et ses dirigeants, au titre de leur liberté d’expression et sans qu’aucune infraction pénale n’ait été commise. La Ligue des droits de l’homme l’a bien identifié dans son communiqué : avec ce décret « le gouvernement s’engage sur la voie du délit d’opinion », un délit qui, précisément, n’existe pas. Un des motifs retenus dans le décret est, de ce point de vue, significatif :

      « sous couvert de dénoncer les actes de discriminations commis contre les musulmans, [le CCIF] défend et promeut une notion d’islamophobie particulièrement large, n’hésitant pas à comptabiliser au titre des ‘actes islamophobes‘ des mesures de police administrative, voire des décisions judiciaires, prises dans le cadre de la lutte contre le terrorisme ».

      Ainsi donc, qualifier des pans de la lutte contre le terrorisme d’actes « islamophobes » est désormais interdit. Ce n’est pas interdit sur le plan pénal ; mais c’est sanctionné par le pouvoir exécutif, qui use pour cela de ses outils de police administrative.
      Quels enseignements pour l’enseignement supérieur et la recherche ?

      Ces petits bonds logiques grâce auxquels Emmanuel Macron, Jean Castex et Gérald Darmanin, les trois signataires du décret, justifient des atteintes à la libre expression sont évidemment inquiétants quant à l’état général des droits et libertés en France. Or, on observe quelques tressaillements du même ordre du côté de l’enseignement supérieur et de la recherche, et c’est sur ce point que nous aimerions insister à présent. Bien sûr, la situation du CCIF et celle de l’ESR restent incomparables, dans la mesure où, du côté de l’ESR, la grande machinerie de la police administrative n’a pas été mise en branle comme elle l’a été pour le CCIF. En revanche, des petits bonds logiques du même ordre que ceux dont le CCIF a été victime se multiplient jusqu’au sein des plus prestigieux établissements d’enseignement supérieur et de recherche. Plus inquiétant encore, ils se diffusent dans des cercles de plus en plus officiels au parlement et au gouvernement.

      L’établissement de relations entre des recherches scientifiques, d’un côté, et des qualifications pénales, de l’autre, sans pour autant que le moindre début de délit ne puisse être établi, se retrouve désormais couramment sous la plume de certain·es universitaires. Nathalie Heinich, directrice de recherche CNRS (classe exceptionnelle), membre du Centre de recherches sur les arts et le langage (CNRS/ EHESS), s’y prête allègrement par exemple : comme elle l’a récemment déclaré au Times Higher Education2, « les affirmations des universitaires sur le ‘racisme systématique’ et le ‘racisme d’État’ sont un encouragement direct au terrorisme ». Un encouragement direct au terrorisme, dit-elle : la référence à l’article 421-2-5 du code pénal, évoqué plus haut, est à nouveau explicite. À l’instar de ce que fait le pouvoir exécutif dans le décret de dissolution du CCIF, le vocabulaire du droit pénal est appelé à la rescousse pour attaquer certaines formes d’expression, sans, pour autant, qu’aucun début d’infraction pénale ne puisse être mobilisé.

      Ces références mal contrôlées au droit pénal auxquelles se livrent certain·es universitaires ne sont pas sans effets. Elles sont désormais reprises non sans opportunisme par certaines des plus hautes autorités de l’État. C’est le cas du député Julien Aubert qui, après avoir appelé avec le président du groupe des Républicains de l’Assemblée nationale à la mise en place d’une « mission d’information sur les dérives intellectuelles idéologiques dans les milieux universitaires », dresse des listes d’universitaires qu’il désigne comme « coupables ». C’est le cas, aussi, du ministre de l’Éducation nationale Jean-Michel Blanquer lorsqu’il parle, à propos des universités, de « complicité intellectuelle du terrrorisme ».

      Quand un parlementaire et un ministre, l’un et l’autre de premier plan, décident de mobiliser du vocabulaire pénal et de parler de « culpabilité » et de « complicité » à propos d’universitaires, il y a lieu d’être inquiet·es. Pour Jean-Michel Blanquer, agrégé de droit public, ces références pénales se font en toute connaissance de cause, d’ailleurs, si l’on veut bien se souvenir que, dans son autre vie, il a publié des travaux très sérieux au sujet des relations entre responsabilité pénale et responsabilité politique. Notons que l’un de ses ouvrages s’appelait La responsabilité des gouvernants, ce qui, c’est le moins qu’on puisse dire, est un titre qui résonne aujourd’hui étrangement concernant le ministre Blanquer.

      Dans un tel contexte, le décret de dissolution du CCIF est riche d’enseignements et justifie ce long billet d’Academia. Résumons les choses : si le CCIF a été dissout, ce n’est pas sur la base d’infractions pénales, puisqu’il n’était pas sérieusement possible d’actionner ces infractions, alors même qu’on n’a cessé d’en étendre le champ depuis vingt ans. Si le CCIF a été dissout, c’est par des références abusives à des infractions pénales, sur la base de quoi des mesures de police administrative ont été actionnées par le pouvoir exécutif, dont les motifs, nous l’avons vu, se situent d’abord et avant tout sur le terrain de la liberté d’expression.

      Que peut-on dans ces conditions craindre pour l’enseignement supérieur et la recherche ? Dès lors que l’on observe, aujourd’hui, que des collègues et du personnel politique de premier plan singent eux aussi des infractions pénales pour critiquer des recherches scientifiques, on peut légitimement craindre qu’un mouvement de terrain du même ordre que celui dont le CCIF a été la victime se réalise s’agissant des universités. Tout y mène.

      L’exclusion du champ académique

      Ce risque ne viendra sans doute pas du droit pénal lui-même, en tout cas pas dans un premier temps. Certes, on se souvient que la loi de programmation de la recherche a déjà étendu brusquement le champ du droit pénal universitaire, avec le nouveau délit d’atteinte au bon ordre et à la tranquillité des établissements. Mais on peut espérer que ce délit ne sorte pas sans dommage du contrôle du Conseil constitutionnel ; surtout, il ne suffira pas pour attaquer les recherches qui représentent « un encouragement direct au terrorisme », pas plus que la législation pénale anti-terroriste n’a suffi pour s’attaquer aux propos du CCIF. C’est donc vers de nouvelles formes juridiques de contraintes, autres que celles que propose le droit pénal, que le débat est en train de se déplacer plus ou moins consciemment, comme il s’est déplacé pour le CCIF. La voie la plus simple, pour cela, consiste à inventer de nouvelles limites à la libre expression des enseignant·es et des chercheur·ses, afin d’exclure du champ académique, et donc du champ des libertés académiques, certains propos et certain·es collègues.

      Cette démarche d’exclusion hors du champ des libertés académiques, dont les fondements épistémologiques ne sont pas neufs3, a pris une dimension professionnelle particulière depuis quelques années. Épistémologiquement, il s’agit de « faire coupure » entre ce qui est bonne science et mauvaise science, selon un principe médical de l’amputation pour éviter la propagation de la gangrène au corps entier : certain·es rappellent ainsi régulièrement que les sciences sociales critiques ne sont pas des sciences militantes, l’invocation du « militantisme » disqualifiant la légitimité épistémologique des travaux menés par des hommes et des femmes engagé∙es. Olivier Beaud, voix écoutée et reconnue de l’association Qualité de la science française, s’exprimait ainsi dans Le Monde du 2 décembre :

      « Je refuse l’inquisition politique mais je refuse aussi le silence qui serait de la lâcheté intellectuelle et reviendrait à cautionner des universitaires dont la pratique serait de surdéterminer leurs recherches censément scientifiques (donc objectives) par des considérations lourdement idéologiques, fût-ce au motif de défendre telle ou telle minorité ».

      L’article du Monde précise ensuite les propos d’Olivier Beaud : selon lui, des universitaires « radicaux » auraient délaissé la distinction opérée par Max Weber entre le « jugement de fait », qui fonde leurs recherches, et le « jugement de valeur », qui fonde leurs opinions.

      En se référant ainsi à la « neutralité axiologique » de Max Weber, Olivier Beaud tord la pensée d’un homme profondément engagé dans la construction de l’État prussien par les sciences économiques et sociales. Par chance pour notre démonstration, la traduction commandée à Julien Freund par Raymond Aron et parue en 1963 dans un contexte de guerre froide, a fait récemment l’objet de plusieurs éditions critiques qui retraduisent en français le texte original Du métier de savant (Wissenschaft als Beruf, 1917)4. Pour celles et ceux qui ont eu accès au texte de Weber par la seule traduction française, la lecture de cette traduction révisée est très éclairante : l’universitaire, pour faire science, a besoin d’une « inspiration », qui donne un sens à son travail, notamment ses tâches calculatoires ; cette inspiration a partie liée avec une question éthique, intime et indispensable : « quelle est la vocation de la science pour l’ensemble de la vie de l’humanité ? Quelle en est la valeur ? ».

      De nos jours, il est fréquent que l’on parle d’une « sciences sans présupposés, écrit Max Weber. Une telle science existe-t-elle ? Tout dépend ce que l’on entend par là. Tout travail scientifique présuppose la validité des règles de la logique et de la méthode, ces fondements universels de notre orientation dans le monde. Ces présupposés-là sont les moins problématiques du moins pour la question particulière qui nous occupe. Mais on présuppose aussi que le résultat du travail scientifique est important au sens où il mérite d’être connu. Et c’est de là que découlent, à l’évidence, tous nos problèmes. Car ce présupposé, à son tour, ne peut être démontré par les moyens de la science. On ne peut qu’en interpréter le sens ultime, et il faut le refuser ou l’accepter selon les positions ultimes que l’on adopte à l’égard de la vie
      — Weber, 1917 [2005], p. 36

      Les problèmes que Max Weber5 repérait hier sont les nôtres aujourd’hui : certains ou certaines disqualifient le travail scientifique de leurs collègues, non à l’aune de leur qualité scientifique intrinsèque, reposant sur la qualité de la réflexion, de la documentation, de l’analyse, mais par les présupposés qui ont initié la recherche.

      Ces derniers mois, les choses sont devenues très claires de ce point de vue : il y a des recherches dont certain·es ne veulent plus.

      C’est leur scientificité même qui est déniée : ces recherches sont renvoyées à de la pure « idéologie », sans qu’aucune explication précise ne soit jamais donnée, si ce n’est la référence à une autre idéologie, qu’il s’agisse des « valeurs de la République » ou de « l’unité de la nation ». « L’unité de la nation », c’est ce à quoi renvoyait l’association Qualité de la science française dans un récent communiqué : « il fait peu de doute que se développent dans certains secteurs de l’université des mouvances différentialistes plus ou moins agressives, qui mettent en cause l’unité de la nation, et dont l’attitude envers les fondamentalismes est ambiguë ». La comparaison sémantique avec les textes académiques prônant le maccarthysme est à ce titre très éclairante, même si leur rédaction doit être replacée dans le contexte de la guerre froide6 : le caractère scandaleux de toute opération de « chasse aux sorcières » se mesure, considère-t-on alors, à l’aune des risques encourus par la nation.

      Quelle va être la suite ? Va-t-on exclure ces savant∙es contemporain∙es de l’université, qui repose pourtant sur le principe de la pluralité et du dissensus ? Va-t-on les exclure en leur déniant tout travail de production et de transmission des connaissances scientifiques, pour les rejeter du côté de la simple expression des opinions ? Le risque, derrière ce feu qu’allument certain∙es universitaires, est connu : c’est évidemment que le pouvoir politique s’en saisisse, pour en tirer des conséquences juridiques.

      Nous nous trouvons très précisément au seuil d’un mouvement de ce type aujourd’hui en France. On y a échappé de peu lors des débats sur la loi de programmation de la recherche, avec l’amendement subordonnant les libertés académiques au respect des valeurs de la République auquel la ministre Vidal avait donné, on ne le rappellera jamais assez, un « avis extrêmement favorable ».

      Dans un contexte aussi pesant, c’est avec beaucoup d’appréhension, désormais, que l’on attend, du côté de la rédaction d’Academia, l’examen du « projet de loi renforçant les principes républicains » (plus connu sous le nom de « projet de loi Séparatismes »). Plusieurs collègues ont en particulier alerté Academia sur le fait qu’un collectif dénommé Vigilance Universités échange à propos de ce projet de loi avec la ministre déléguée auprès du ministre de l’Intérieur, chargée de la Citoyenneté, pour introduire les universités dans le champ de celui-ci. Nous craignons le pire. Cela fait plusieurs années maintenant que ces mêmes collègues propagent le sentiment d’une immense insécurité physique et de grands dangers intellectuels dans les universités, sans vouloir reconnaître qu’en conséquence de leurs propos, des personnalités politiques de premier rang, à droite et à l’extrême droite, appellent désormais à combattre les « dérives intellectuelles idéologiques » et dresse des listes de « coupables ».

      Peut-être est-il temps maintenant, pour elles et eux, de prendre conscience de leur responsabilité historique dans le mouvement de rétraction des libertés académiques en cours, à défaut d’avoir accepté de prendre la moindre position critique, lors des débats sur la loi de programmation de la recherche, sur la pénalisation des universités à laquelle ils et elles ont directement contribué par leurs propos et leurs actions.

      Il est surtout temps que l’ensemble des collègues prennent la juste mesure du danger. Il est temps que nous prenions, collectivement et clairement, position sur ce que défendre l’université veut dire.

      https://academia.hypotheses.org/29291

    • Antiracisme : la guerre des facs n’aura pas lieu

      Depuis la fin de l’automne 2018, par poussées de fièvre belliqueuse, surgissent périodiquement les tribunes, appels, articles qui mettent en garde contre un nouvel ennemi de la République : les « décoloniaux », qui « mènent la guerre des facs », écrit par exemple Étienne Girard dans Marianne, le 12 avril 2019. Des dizaines d’autres intellectuels, journalistes, personnalités publiques, ont pris la plume pour dénoncer « les obsédés de la race à la Sorbonne » (Charlie Hebdo 23 janvier 2019), les « énervés de la race » qui « martèlent leurs fameuses théories sur la race » (Le Canard Enchaîné, 24 juin 2020). Ils mettent en accusation la « stratégie hégémonique » du « décolonialisme » (Le Point, 28 novembre 2018) qui se lance « à l’assaut de l’université » (Le Nouvel Obs, 30 novembre 2018), qui « menace la liberté académique » (Le Monde, 12 avril 2019) et qui, « nouveau terrorisme intellectuel », « infiltre les universités » (La Revue des deux Mondes, 18 avril 2019) par une « grande offensive médiatique et institutionnelle » (L’Express, 26 décembre 2019), traduisant « une stratégie décoloniale de radicalité » (Le Monde, blog, 06 juillet 2020) en même temps qu’une « quête de respectabilité académique » (L’Express, 26 décembre 2019).

      La rhétorique est guerrière – et l’ennemi, puissant, organisé, déterminé, mobilisant des méthodes de guérilla, voire de « terrorisme », est déjà en passe de l’emporter, au point qu’il faut « appeler les autorités publiques, les responsables d’institutions culturelles, universitaires, scientifiques et de recherche, mais aussi la magistrature, au ressaisissement » (Le Point, 28 novembre 2018) et « sanctionner la promotion de l’idéologie coloniale » (Marianne, 26 juin 2020).

      Mais de quoi parle-t-on exactement ? Comme cela a déjà été souligné, si stratégie hégémonique il y a, elle est remarquablement peu efficace : aucun poste ni aucune chaire, dans aucun domaine de sciences humaines et sociales, n’a jamais été profilé « études postcoloniales ou décoloniales » à l’université ; pas de revue spécialisée, pas de maison d’édition ni même de collection de presses universitaires dans le domaine. Une analyse sociologique fine menée en termes de « correspondances multiples » sur plusieurs années et croisant plusieurs variables (publications, visibilité, lieux institutionnels, etc.) démontre que

      « les travaux sur la question minoritaire, la racialisation ou le postcolonial demeurent des domaines de niche […] bénéficiant d’une faible audience dans le champ académique comme dans l’espace public »
      — Inès Bouzelmat, « Le sous-champ de la question raciale dans les sciences sociales », Mouvements, 12 février 2019.

      Si guerre il y a, les deux camps en présence témoignent d’un « rapport de forces inégal » où la puissance, sinon l’hégémonie, est bien du côté du savoir contesté par « la mouvance post ou décoloniale » (L’Obs, 11 janvier 2020), qui fait figure de David contre le Goliath de l’universalisme républicain.

      De plus, il est remarquable que les combats de l’université, comme récemment contre la Loi de Programmation Pluriannuelle de la Recherche, dont le projet a été rendu public le 7 juin et qui est sur le point d’être adoptée en dépit de l’opposition explicite, massive et continue de la communauté universitaire, troublent généralement bien peu les penseurs institutionnels et les personnalités publiques. On compte sur les doigts d’une main les journalistes qui ont relayé les inquiétudes des universitaires : la vraie guerre est ailleurs. Pour les gardiens du temple, les « décoloniaux » menacent bien davantage l’université que la remise en cause des statuts des enseignants-chercheurs, la précarisation des personnels, la diminution accrue de financement récurrent et la mise en concurrence généralisée des institutions, des laboratoires et des individus. Ce n’est pas la disparition programmée du service public qui doit appeler « à la plus grande mobilisation » de la communauté universitaire (Marianne, 26 juin 2020), c’est la diffusion de « l’idéologie décoloniale ».

      C’est que cette guerre-là ne touche pas seulement l’université – sinon, qui s’en soucierait ? Comme l’a affirmé Emmanuel Macron dans des propos rapportés le 10 juin 2020 dans Le Monde, « le monde universitaire a été coupable », « il a encouragé l’ethnicisation de la question sociale en pensant que c’était un bon filon » et une telle stratégie « revient à casser la République en deux ». Voilà le véritable enjeu : les décoloniaux, par opportunisme et sens du « postcolonial business » (L’Express, 26 dec. 2019) ou par désir de promouvoir la haine et la division de la communauté politique, ou peut-être enfin par incompréhension et ignorance des vraies fractures sociales – par cynisme, par gauchisme ou par bêtise -, sont accusés de chercher à provoquer une « guerre des races » qui brisera la République. Ils sont ceux qui guident « les jeunes » dans les manifestations contre le racisme et les violences policières, ceux qui suscitent le déboulonnage des statues et les changements de noms des rues et places qui rendent hommage aux héros du colonialisme, ceux qui plaident pour l’introduction de statistiques ethniques afin de visibiliser les phénomènes de discrimination… C’est pourquoi, dans ces lignes de front qui se tracent, c’est bien eux qu’on prend à partie via ce « vous » populaire qu’ils incarnent comme une avant-garde : « J’exige de vous le respect. Sinon ce sera la guerre » (Marianne, 9 juillet 2020).
      Cette déclaration de guerre repose sur une confusion, un renversement et un double mensonge.

      La confusion est évidente : sont rassemblés sous une étiquette mal taillée des chercheurs et chercheuses aux positions épistémologiques précises et parfois en désaccord, qui travaillent depuis des années sur des objets dont l’importance n’est pas encore vraiment reconnue. Leur recherche, selon les règles d’usage de la discussion académique, exige de se confronter lors de séminaires, colloques et conférences où entrent en conversation les tenants de positions différentes avec les outils académiques de l’argumentation logique, de la distinction conceptuelle et de l’érudition textuelle. La « mouvance post ou décoloniale » n’existe pas. Et pour cause : les études décoloniales sont d’abord menées par des chercheuses et chercheurs latino-américains, parfois caribéens, qui diffèrent des courants postcoloniaux indiens ou, surtout, étasuniens, selon trois critères désormais bien établis : géopolitique, disciplinaire et généalogique1. Décoloniaux et postcoloniaux ne partagent ni les mêmes influences intellectuelles ni les mêmes contextes socio-économiques et culturels ; ils et elles mobilisent des outils méthodologiques différents pour poser des problèmes théoriques ou normatifs différents. Les désaccords scientifiques traversent aussi les disciplines, y compris entre celles et ceux qui sont persuadés de l’importance de s’intéresser au passé colonial pour comprendre le présent : historiens de l’esclavage et de la colonisation s’affrontent sur les aires géographiques pertinentes, sur les méthodologies de l’histoire globale ou locale, sur les sources archivistiques ou leur absence, etc. Bien loin de mettre en place des stratégies hégémoniques de domination académique, les universitaires échangent du savoir, de la connaissance, du raisonnement, avec humilité, rigueur et ténacité. Ils et elles travaillent et soumettent leurs hypothèses au test de l’évaluation par les pairs : ils font leur métier.

      Le renversement de perspective est tout aussi massif. Tout se passe comme si s’efforcer de mettre au jour les effets de domination historiquement fondés sur des rapports de race traduits dans l’organisation coloniale du monde, puis hérités de cet ordre sans être réellement déconstruits, revenait à créer ces effets de domination. Lorsque les chercheuses et chercheurs parlent de racialisation ou racisation, on leur oppose que le mot est « épouvantable » (Jean-Michel Blanquer, dans Libération, 21 novembre 2017). C’est un néologisme qui, selon la critique, ne permet pas de révéler une réalité sociale, mais qui produit, dans un geste performatif, la réalité qu’il prétend désigner.

      Or parler de groupe racisé consiste bien à nommer une réalité sociale : la catégorisation et la hiérarchisation de groupes sociaux, dans des contextes précis, en raison de facteurs visuels ou généalogiques réels ou fantasmés2. Il s’agit de chercher à expliquer, et non pas excuser, la construction, les mécanismes, les processus de reproduction de cette réalité. Parler de racialisation permet précisément de souligner que la race n’existe pas en tant que réalité biologique, de l’historiciser, la désessentialiser et la dénaturaliser. Il s’agit de produire de nouvelles ressources épistémiques pour dénoncer la hiérarchisation et l’inégalité raciales tout en évitant de reproduire les interprétations obsolètes et racistes du monde social.

      Sous la plume de ceux qui veulent « sanctionner » « l’idéologie coloniale », « supprimer les références racialistes », effacer la « nuée de concepts » qui traitent de la question raciale — non seulement dans la législation et la Constitution, mais aussi à l’université — une telle mise sous silence permettrait de supprimer le mal. Ces mots « réactivent l’idée de race » et « détournent des valeurs de liberté, égalité, fraternité qui fondent notre démocratie », affirment-ils (Le Point, 28 novembre 2018) : cessons d’utiliser ces mots abominables, et la « question sociale » sera enfin désethnicisée, la République réparée. Ils estiment sans doute qu’en France régnait l’égalité réelle jusqu’à ce que certains se mettent à dénoncer la domination raciale dont ils font l’expérience, et d’autres parviennent à admettre le privilège racial dont ils bénéficient.

      C’est là nier le travail des chercheuses et chercheurs qui, décrivant et évaluant les dominations raciales, s’efforçant de poser un diagnostic clair sur la nature et l’ampleur des inégalités qui traversent notre société, non seulement ne les créent pas, mais espèrent même contribuer à les faire disparaître. Vouloir les faire taire, c’est contribuer au racisme ordinaire en lui permettant d’avancer sous la « cape d’invisibilité » que procure l’étendard du républicanisme bafoué.

      Enfin le mensonge est double : d’une part, il consiste à faire semblant de croire qu’une poignée d’universitaires peut entraîner à elle seule les mouvements sociaux d’ampleur inédite qui ont vu le jour après le confinement pour dénoncer le racisme institutionnel et réclamer justice. C’est trop d’honneur. Trop de mépris, aussi, pour le travail de terrain des mouvements antiracistes et les associations de défense des droits qui mènent la lutte au quotidien auprès des victimes de stigmatisation et discrimination raciales. C’est enfin, surtout, être aveugle à la lame de fond qui nous emporte, à la transformation sociale massive que vit notre vieux modèle. Car d’autre part, le mensonge réside dans l’accusation selon laquelle les manifestant·es qui protestent contre le racisme et les discriminations, et réclament une participation égale et un statut paritaire dans le récit national, veulent « casse[r] la République en deux ». Or cela a été amplement souligné : les hommes et femmes, jeunes et moins jeunes, racisé·es ou non, qui défilaient pour condamner les violences policières racistes en juin dernier3 chantaient ensemble La Marseillaise ; celles et ceux qui proposent de déplacer les statues des héros de la colonisation pour les muséifier le font au nom d’un hommage que la république pourrait rendre, sur ses places publiques, à d’autres héroïnes et d’autres héros français oubliés ou trop longtemps traités en objets et non en sujets politiques. La république peut être inclusive et réparée ; l’universel peut être visé — un universel concret, construit à partir des particularités et non pas en négation de celles-ci. Ce sont les fondations d’un nouvel universalisme possible qui sont en train d’être posées. Le mensonge consiste à prétendre que Cassandre veut la guerre.
      Et si ce n’était pas une guerre, mais une révolution ?

      Ce à quoi on assiste, et qui provoque la panique morale des puissants, peut se comprendre, c’est l’hypothèse faite ici, à la fois comme une révolution scientifique et comme une révolution politique, parce que les deux sont indissociables dans les sciences humaines et sociales. C’est à la fois un tournant copernicien ou changement de paradigme4, une nouvelle manière de façonner les problèmes et les solutions dans un processus discontinu de production du savoir, et le mouvement du « passage de l’idée dans l’expérience historique », la « tentative pour modeler l’acte sur une idée, pour façonner le monde dans un cadre théorique »5.

      L’ancien modèle théorique s’essouffle : les énigmes se multiplient, les exceptions ou anomalies ne confirment plus la règle mais s’accumulent pour miner l’autorité du vieux cadre interprétatif colorblind de notre monde social. Trop d’injustices sociales débordent le modèle de la lutte des classes, les inégalités socio-économiques à elles seules n’expliquent pas toutes les différences de trajectoire collective ou individuelle, les différences culturelles se naturalisent, l’écart se creuse et se visibilise entre les idéaux de la république et la réalité sociologique de leur mise en œuvre – y compris institutionnelle. L’épaisseur de l’histoire esclavagiste et coloniale pèse sur le mythe du contrat social républicain établi entre des partenaires égaux consentant librement à « faire peuple », ensemble. Ce qui est requis, ce n’est donc pas simplement une nouvelle grille de lecture à appliquer sur des données par ailleurs bien connues : c’est la manière même de voir le monde qui change, ce sont de nouveaux positionnements, de nouvelles perspectives, de nouvelles perceptions, la mise au jour de nouvelles archives, les témoignages de nouvelles voix, qui produisent des données jusque là méconnues ou ignorées, et qui entraînent l’exigence de renouveler le paradigme.

      La résistance de la vieille garde est d’autant plus désespérée que les sujets producteurs de ces nouvelles connaissances sont aussi des agents usuellement dominés et discrédités dans les circonstances « normales » du discours public. Ce sont des agents dont les idées, les ressources théoriques, les productions cognitives, souffrent d’un déficit de crédibilité dû soit à des biais ou stéréotypes négatifs qui conduisent à mettre en doute leur capacité à produire un discours valide, rationnel et raisonnable, sur leurs expériences singulières, soit à un excès de crédibilité accordé à d’autres agents dissonants, au témoignage ou à l’analyse desquels on a tendance à accorder une confiance supérieure. Racialisation, discrimination systémique, privilège blanc, stigmatisation raciale, parmi d’autres, sont des concepts et des ressources épistémiques précieuses pour décrire des expériences sociales, les partager, les interpréter, les évaluer, et peut-être transformer le monde où elles ont cours. Le monde universitaire n’est pas une armée de terroristes qui infiltre les lieux de savoir et casse la République en deux : le monde universitaire est l’espace institutionnel inclusif où ces agents producteurs de connaissance inédits et inaudibles peuvent participer à la production de savoirs qui nous concernent tous parce que tous, nous sommes la république. La guerre des facs n’aura pas lieu, parce que le monde d’après est déjà là : les monstres, et leurs derniers gémissements, disparaissent avec le clair-obscur.

      https://academia.hypotheses.org/29341

    • Academic Freedom Under Attack in France

      For many years, in what now seems the distant past, France was known as the nation that welcomed refugees from authoritarian countries; revolutionary activists, artists, exiled politicians, dissident students, could find sustenance and support in the land of liberty, equality, and fraternity. It is also the country whose philosophers gave us many of the tools of critical thinking, including perhaps the very word critique. In recent years—at least since the bicentennial of the French Revolution in 1989—that image has been replaced by a more disturbing one: a nation unable to decently cope (and increasingly at war) with people of color from its former colonies (black, Arab, Muslim) as well as Roma; a nation whose leaders are condemning critical studies of racial discrimination and charges of “Islamophobia” in the name of “the values of the Republic.”

      The years since the bicentennial have seen a dramatic increase in discrimination against a number of groups, but Arab/Muslims, many of them citizens (according to the settlement that ended the Algerian War) have been singled out. The charge against them has been that they practice their religion publicly, in violation of laïcité, the French version of secularism, the separation of church and state. Enshrined in a 1905 law, laïcité calls for state neutrality in matters of religion and protects individual rights of private religious conscience. Although the state is extremely supportive of Catholic religious practices (state funds support churches as a matter of preserving the national heritage, and religious schools, the majority of them Catholic, in the name of freedom of educational choice; the former president, Nicolas Sarkozy has insisted that Catholicism is an integral aspect of laïcité), Islam has been deemed a threat to the “values” upon which national unity is based.

      National unity is a peculiar concept in France, at least from an American perspective. The nation “one and indivisible” is imagined as culturally homogeneous. Anything that suggests division is scrupulously avoided. Thus there is no exact calculation of the numbers of Muslims in the French population because no official statistics are kept on racial, ethnic, or religious difference. To make those very real differences visible is thought to introduce unacceptable divisions in the representation of the unity of the national body.

      The presence of an estimated 6 to 10 million Muslims (in a country of some 67 million) has become a potent political weapon. Initially claimed by the far Right National Front party (now renamed the Rally for the Republic), the “Muslim problem” has become a concern of parties across the spectrum (in differing degrees from Right to Left). In 2003, in the face of increasing electoral success on the far Right, the conservative government of Jacques Chirac commissioned a report that redefined laïcité for the twenty-first century’s “clash of civilizations.” Titled “The New Laïcité, “ it extended the demand for neutrality from the state to its individual citizens, forbidding any display of religious affiliation in public space. Although said to be universally applicable, everyone understood this to be a policy aimed at Muslims. Thus the hijab (the Islamic headscarf) is prohibited in public schools; women are fined for wearing the niqab (the full face covering) on the streets of their towns; veiled women are prevented from serving as witnesses at weddings conducted in city halls; burkini clad women were forced to undress on some beaches in the summer of 2016….the list goes on. Women were the target of these rules and regulations (for reasons I have analyzed in my The Politics of the Veil (2007), but men, too, experience economic and social discrimination, as well as violent police surveillance in their homes and on the streets.

      In the wake of a number of horrific terrorist attacks in the name of Islam in French cities—the assassinations of the Charlie Hebdo journalists and the murders at the Bataclan theater in 2015, and most recently, in 2020, the beheading of a school teacher, Samuel Paty—all Muslims are increasingly defined as a threat to the security of the nation. The Interior Minister, Gérald Darmanin, has effectively declared war, defining not religion but Islamist ideology as “an enemy within.” Despite this careful distinction, a wartime, ethno-nationalist mentality has identified Muslims as a dangerous class. Antipathy to Muslims has become evidence of patriotism; those who argue that not all Muslims are terrorists and that discrimination against them might contribute to their radicalization, have been met with denunciations and vehement attacks. University professors are among these groups, and they have faced particularly nasty accusations of treason. The campaigns being mounted against them don’t just target individuals; in their insistence that teaching cannot deviate from “the values of the Republic,” the charges amount to a sustained attack on academic freedom.

      The call to rally around the Republic has come not only from the expected quarters—politicians and publicists on the Right—but also from the current (neo-) liberal administration and from within the academy itself. Historians, sociologists, and anthropologists who work on the history of colonialism, on issues of ethnic and racial discrimination, and who seek to account, within the problematics of their disciplines, for the inequalities evident in French society, have been labelled “islamo-gauchistes” for their presumed support for or identification with Muslims. The term is used as an insult, and it is employed regularly by intellectuals such as the philosopher Elisabeth Badinter and the feminist writer Caroline Fourest, neither of whom are considered to be on the Right. In 2018, following a conference at the University of Paris, 7, on “Racism and racial discrimination in the university,” some 80 intellectuals signed a letter condemning as “ideological” the increasing number of “racialist” university events and they called upon “the authorities” to put an end to their “use against the Republic.”

      The “authorities” have responded. In 2020, the Minister of Education, Jean-Michel Blanquer declared that anti-racist intellectuals were “complicit” in Samuel Paty’s murder. He accused “islamo-gauchistes” of “wreaking havoc” in the university. Those employing ideas of “intersectionality,” he denounced as “intellectual accomplices of terrorism.” He deemed intersectionality a pernicious import from multicultural America that “essentializes communities and identities, the antithesis of our model of the Republic.” If Muslims were “separatists,” these intellectuals were too. President Emmanuel Macron charged that “The academy is guilty. It has encouraged the ethnicization of the social question, thinking it’s a good subject to study. But, the outcome can only be secessionist. It will rebound to split the Republic in two.” In October, a bill was proposed in the Senate stating that “academic freedom must respect the values of the Republic.” And Frédérique Vidal, the Minister of Higher Education and Research, whose portfolio most directly pertains to the academy, asserted that “the values of laïcité, of the Republic, are not open for debate.”

      Although no one has yet been fired from a university position, the warning signs are clear. If the nation is at war with Islam, those who struggle to find alternatives to this divisiveness are, ironically, accused of dividing the nation. When professor of sociology (University of Paris 8) Eric Fassin was threatened on Twitter with decapitation for his “islamo-gauchiste views” by a right-wing extremist, his university president offered support (as did academic collectives from Turkey to Brazil), but there was no comment from those higher up in the education ministries. [Fassin sued and won a ruling against the man, but the court treated him not as member of a domestic, neo-Nazi, terrorist network (which he is), but as a lone aberrant individual.] Calls to rein in teachers who address racism and discrimination are widespread, and the threats of disciplinary action are particularly severe against the still relatively rare academics of color, many of whom hold junior, therefore vulnerable positions. State surveillance of research can make it difficult for those studying discrimination, as well as aspects of Islamic culture, to get access to the archives and repositories of data that they need. And then there is the self-policing that inevitably accompanies state surveillance and disapproval.

      But the resistance is impressive. There is no national organization equivalent to the AAUP in France, yet faculty have nonetheless mobilized. Courses continue to be taught, books and articles published, and conferences held on race and discrimination, and these are rightly justified as realizing the values of the Republic—those that stand for liberty and equality above all. There is a site, Université Ouverte where information on protests and other activities can be found, as well as the blog Academia with in-depth critical analyses. In response to a denunciation of their work by 100 intellectuals as “racializing” (racialiste) because it allegedly taught students to “hate whites and France,” more than 2000 academics replied this way in Le Monde: “To call the approach that examines, among other things, the impact of social, sexist, and racist oppression, ‘racialist,’ is despicable. [Racialist] signifies racist thought and regimes based on a supposed hierarchy of race….[But our] sociological and critical approach to racial questions, as the intersectional approaches so often attacked, do the opposite by exposing oppression in order to combat it.” An international letter of support for these efforts was circulated in November, 2020. It makes the case very clear: an increasingly ethno-nationalist politics is posing a dire threat to French academic freedom.

      As I write this in early 2021, the old slogan from May ’68 in France sums up the state of things: La lutte continue (the struggle goes on).

      https://academeblog.org/2021/01/05/academic-freedom-under-attack-in-france
      #Joan_Scott

    • Comment les militants décoloniaux prennent le pouvoir dans les universités
      https://seenthis.net/messages/900839

      ... où on parle notamment de ce nouveau site web :
      L’#Observatoire_du_décolonialisme_et_des_idéologies_identitaires :

      Ce site propose un regard critique, tantôt profond et parfois humoristique, sur l’émergence d’une nouvelle tendance de l’Université et de la Recherche visant à « décoloniser » les sciences qui s’enseignent. Il dénonce la déconstruction revendiquée visant à présenter des Institutions (la langue, l’école, la République, la laïcité) comme les entraves des individus. Le lecteur trouvera outre une série d’analyses et de critiques, une base de données de textes décoloniaux interrogeable en ligne, un générateur de titre de thèses automatique à partir de formes de titres, des liens d’actualités et des données sur la question et un lexique humoristique des notions-clés.

      Cet observatoire n’a pas pour but de militer, ni de prendre des positions politiques. Il a pour but d’observer et d’aider à comprendre, à lire la production littéraire, scientifique et éditoriale des études en sciences humaines ou prétendument scientifiques orientées vers le décolonialisme. Il veut surtout aider à comprendre la limite entre science et propagande.

      L’équipe :


      http://decolonialisme.fr

    • La France contaminée par les idées venues des campus américains

      Entre l’Élysée et la presse outre-Atlantique, la controverse ne s’arrête plus : « Les idées américaines menacent-elles la cohésion française ?? » s’interroge le New York Times. Le prestigieux quotidien américain revient sur une série d’observations et de déclarations entendues en France à la suite du discours d’Emmanuel Macron contre les séparatismes le 2 octobre.

      Ce jour-là, le président français avait mis en garde les universités contre « certaines théories en sciences sociales totalement importées des États-Unis d’Amérique ». L’Hexagone, affirme le New York Times, se sentirait menacé par « les idées progressistes américaines - notamment sur la race, le genre, le post-colonialisme ». Certains « politiciens, d’éminents intellectuels et nombre de journalistes français » craignent qu’elles soient « en train de saper leur société ».

      Il y a eu les déclarations de Jean-Michel Blanquer, ministre de l’Éducation nationale, qui avait parlé d’un « combat à mener contre une #matrice_intellectuelle venue des universités américaines », et aussi le livre de deux éminents spécialistes des sciences sociales françaises, #Stéphane_Beaud et #Gérard_Noiriel, critiquant le principe d’#études_raciales. La virulence des réactions antiaméricaines étonne le NYT. Il note cependant :

      D’une certaine manière, c’est un combat par procuration autour de questions qui sont parmi les plus brûlantes au sein de la société française, celles notamment de l’#identité_nationale et du #partage_du_pouvoir."

      Car si, dans les universités françaises, la jeune génération de chercheurs n’est plus sur la même ligne que la précédente, la contestation de certains volets du #modèle_français est arrivée dans la société. Le journaliste américain cite plusieurs exemples, à commencer par les manifestations contre les violences policières suscitées par l’assassinat de George Floyd de juin 2020.

      [Celles-ci] remettaient en cause la non-reconnaissance institutionnelle de la race et le racisme systémique. Une génération #MeToo de féministes s’est dressée à la fois contre le pouvoir masculin et contre les féministes plus âgées. La répression qui a suivi une série d’attaques islamistes a soulevé des interrogations sur le modèle français de laïcité et l’intégration des immigrés des anciennes colonies de la France."

      Il se peut bien, estime le NYT en citant le chercheur français Éric Fassin, que derrière les attaques du gouvernement contre les universités américaines « se cachent les tensions d’une société où le pouvoir établi est bousculé ».

      https://www.courrierinternational.com/article/vu-des-etats-unis-la-france-contaminee-par-les-idees-venues-d

    • Will American Ideas Tear France Apart? Some of Its Leaders Think So

      Politicians and prominent intellectuals say social theories from the United States on race, gender and post-colonialism are a threat to French identity and the French republic.

      The threat is said to be existential. It fuels secessionism. Gnaws at national unity. Abets Islamism. Attacks France’s intellectual and cultural heritage.

      The threat? “Certain social science theories entirely imported from the United States,’’ said President Emmanuel Macron.

      French politicians, high-profile intellectuals and journalists are warning that progressive American ideas — specifically on race, gender, post-colonialism — are undermining their society. “There’s a battle to wage against an intellectual matrix from American universities,’’ warned Mr. Macron’s education minister.

      Emboldened by these comments, prominent intellectuals have banded together against what they regard as contamination by the out-of-control woke leftism of American campuses and its attendant cancel culture.

      Pitted against them is a younger, more diverse guard that considers these theories as tools to understanding the willful blind spots of an increasingly diverse nation that still recoils at the mention of race, has yet to come to terms with its colonial past and often waves away the concerns of minorities as identity politics.

      Disputes that would have otherwise attracted little attention are now blown up in the news and social media. The new director of the Paris Opera, who said on Monday he wants to diversify its staff and ban blackface, has been attacked by the far-right leader, Marine Le Pen, but also in Le Monde because, though German, he had worked in Toronto and had “soaked up American culture for 10 years.”

      The publication this month of a book critical of racial studies by two veteran social scientists, Stéphane Beaud and Gérard Noiriel, fueled criticism from younger scholars — and has received extensive news coverage. Mr. Noiriel has said that race had become a “bulldozer’’ crushing other subjects, adding, in an email, that its academic research in France was questionable because race is not recognized by the government and merely “subjective data.’’

      The fierce French debate over a handful of academic disciplines on U.S. campuses may surprise those who have witnessed the gradual decline of American influence in many corners of the world. In some ways, it is a proxy fight over some of the most combustible issues in French society, including national identity and the sharing of power. In a nation where intellectuals still hold sway, the stakes are high.

      With its echoes of the American culture wars, the battle began inside French universities but is being played out increasingly in the media. Politicians have been weighing in more and more, especially following a turbulent year during which a series of events called into question tenets of French society.

      Mass protests in France against police violence, inspired by the killing of George Floyd, challenged the official dismissal of race and systemic racism. A #MeToo generation of feminists confronted both male power and older feminists. A widespread crackdown following a series of Islamist attacks raised questions about France’s model of secularism and the integration of immigrants from its former colonies.

      Some saw the reach of American identity politics and social science theories. Some center-right lawmakers pressed for a parliamentary investigation into “ideological excesses’’ at universities and singled out “guilty’’ scholars on Twitter.

      Mr. Macron — who had shown little interest in these matters in the past but has been courting the right ahead of elections next year — jumped in last June, when he blamed universities for encouraging the “ethnicization of the social question’’ — amounting to “breaking the republic in two.’’

      “I was pleasantly astonished,’’ said Nathalie Heinich, a sociologist who last month helped create an organization against “decolonialism and identity politics.’’ Made up of established figures, many retired, the group has issued warnings about American-inspired social theories in major publications like Le Point and Le Figaro.

      For Ms. Heinich, last year’s developments came on top of activism that brought foreign disputes over cultural appropriation and blackface to French universities. At the Sorbonne, activists prevented the staging of a play by Aeschylus to protest the wearing of masks and dark makeup by white actors; elsewhere, some well-known speakers were disinvited following student pressure.

      “It was a series of incidents that was extremely traumatic to our community and that all fell under what is called cancel culture,’’ Ms. Heinich said.

      To others, the lashing out at perceived American influence revealed something else: a French establishment incapable of confronting a world in flux, especially at a time when the government’s mishandling of the coronavirus pandemic has deepened the sense of ineluctable decline of a once-great power.

      “It’s the sign of a small, frightened republic, declining, provincializing, but which in the past and to this day believes in its universal mission and which thus seeks those responsible for its decline,’’ said François Cusset, an expert on American civilization at Paris Nanterre University.

      France has long laid claim to a national identity, based on a common culture, fundamental rights and core values like equality and liberty, rejecting diversity and multiculturalism. The French often see the United States as a fractious society at war with itself.

      But far from being American, many of the leading thinkers behind theories on gender, race, post-colonialism and queer theory came from France — as well as the rest of Europe, South America, Africa and India, said Anne Garréta, a French writer who teaches literature at universities in France and at Duke.

      “It’s an entire global world of ideas that circulates,’’ she said. “It just happens that campuses that are the most cosmopolitan and most globalized at this point in history are the American ones.’’

      The French state does not compile racial statistics, which is illegal, describing it as part of its commitment to universalism and treating all citizens equally under the law. To many scholars on race, however, the reluctance is part of a long history of denying racism in France and the country’s slave-trading and colonial past.

      “What’s more French than the racial question in a country that was built around those questions?’’ said Mame-Fatou Niang, who divides her time between France and the United States, where she teaches French studies at Carnegie Mellon University.

      Ms. Niang has led a campaign to remove a fresco at France’s National Assembly, which shows two Black figures with fat red lips and bulging eyes. Her public views on race have made her a frequent target on social media, including of one of the lawmakers who pressed for an investigation into “ideological excesses’’ at universities.

      Pap Ndiaye, a historian who led efforts to establish Black studies in France, said it was no coincidence that the current wave of anti-American rhetoric began growing just as the first protests against racism and police violence took place last June.

      “There was the idea that we’re talking too much about racial questions in France,’’ he said. “That’s enough.’’

      Three Islamist attacks last fall served as a reminder that terrorism remains a threat in France. They also focused attention on another hot-button field of research: Islamophobia, which examines how hostility toward Islam in France, rooted in its colonial experience in the Muslim world, continues to shape the lives of French Muslims.

      Abdellali Hajjat, an expert on Islamophobia, said that it became increasingly difficult to focus on his subject after 2015, when devastating terror attacks hit Paris. Government funding for research dried up. Researchers on the subject were accused of being apologists for Islamists and even terrorists.

      Finding the atmosphere oppressive, Mr. Hajjat left two years ago to teach at the Free University of Brussels, in Belgium, where he said he found greater academic freedom.

      “On the question of Islamophobia, it’s only in France where there is such violent talk in rejecting the term,’’ he said.

      Mr. Macron’s education minister, Jean-Michel Blanquer, accused universities, under American influence, of being complicit with terrorists by providing the intellectual justification behind their acts.

      A group of 100 prominent scholars wrote an open letter supporting the minister and decrying theories “transferred from North American campuses” in Le Monde.

      A signatory, Gilles Kepel, an expert on Islam, said that American influence had led to “a sort of prohibition in universities to think about the phenomenon of political Islam in the name of a leftist ideology that considers it the religion of the underprivileged.’’

      Along with Islamophobia, it was through the “totally artificial importation’’ in France of the “American-style Black question” that some were trying to draw a false picture of a France guilty of “systemic racism’’ and “white privilege,’’ said Pierre-André Taguieff, a historian and a leading critic of the American influence.

      Mr. Taguieff said in an email that researchers of race, Islamophobia and post-colonialism were motivated by a “hatred of the West, as a white civilization.’’

      “The common agenda of these enemies of European civilization can be summed up in three words: decolonize, demasculate, de-Europeanize,’’ Mr. Taguieff said. “Straight white male — that’s the culprit to condemn and the enemy to eliminate.”

      Behind the attacks on American universities — led by aging white male intellectuals — lie the tensions in a society where power appears to be up for grabs, said Éric Fassin, a sociologist who was one of the first scholars to focus on race and racism in France, about 15 years ago.

      Back then, scholars on race tended to be white men like himself, he said. He said he has often been called a traitor and faced threats, most recently from a right-wing extremist who was given a four-month suspended prison sentence for threatening to decapitate him.

      But the emergence of young intellectuals — some Black or Muslim — has fueled the assault on what Mr. Fassin calls the “American boogeyman.’’

      “That’s what has turned things upside down,’’ he said. “They’re not just the objects we speak of, but they’re also the subjects who are talking.’’

      https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/09/world/europe/france-threat-american-universities.html?searchResultPosition=5

    • Le manifeste des 100 repris par la tribune des généraux qui appellent Macron à défendre le #patriotisme...

      Qui sont donc les ennemis que ces militaires appellent à combattre pour sauver « la Patrie » ? Qui sont les agents du « délitement de la France » ? Le premier ennemi désigné reprend mot pour mot les termes de l’appel des universitaires publié le 1 novembre 2020 sous le titre de « Manifeste des 100 » : « un certain antiracisme » qui veut « la guerre raciale » au travers du « racialisme », « l’indigénisme » et les « théories décoloniales ». Le second ennemi est « l’islamisme et les hordes de banlieue » qui veulent soumettre des territoires « à des dogmes contraires à notre constitution ». Le troisième ennemi est constitué par « ces individus infiltrés et encagoulés saccagent des commerces et menacent ces mêmes forces de l’ordre » dont ils veulent faire des « boucs émissaires ».

      https://seenthis.net/messages/912643
      Et plus précisément : https://seenthis.net/messages/912643#message913950

    • « Islamo-gauchisme » à l’université : la ministre Frédérique Vidal accusée d’abus de pouvoir devant le Conseil d’Etat

      Six enseignants-chercheurs ont déposé en avril un #recours devant le #Conseil_d’Etat. La ministre de l’enseignement supérieur va devoir justifier sa décision d’ouvrir une enquête sur l’« islamo-gauchisme à l’université ».

      Qu’est devenue l’enquête sur l’ « islamo-gauchisme à l’université » voulue par la ministre de l’enseignement supérieur ? Le 14 février, Frédérique Vidal annonçait sur CNews qu’elle allait demander, « notamment au CNRS », de mener une enquête portant sur « l’ensemble des courants de recherche » en lien avec « l’islamo-gauchisme » à l’université. Deux jours plus tard, à l’Assemblée nationale, elle confirmait la mise en place d’ « un bilande l’ensemble des recherches » en vue de « distinguer ce qui relève de la recherche académique et ce qui relève du militantisme et de l’opinion .

      Quatre mois ont passé et c’est le silence complet. Sollicité par Le Monde à de multiples reprises, l’entourage de la ministre refuse d’indiquer si une enquête a été lancée et, le cas échéant, à qui a été confié le soin de la mener, le CNRS ayant décliné la demande.

      C’est désormais sur le terrain juridique que se joue l’affaire, six enseignants-chercheurs attaquant la ministre pour #abus_de_pouvoir. Une procédure de référé et un recours en annulation ont été introduits le 13 avril devant le Conseil d’Etat par les avocats William Bourdon et Vincent Brengarth. Les requérants demandent à Frédérique Vidal de renoncer officiellement et définitivement à cette enquête « qui bafoue les libertés académiques et menace de soumettre à un contrôle politique, au-delà des seules sciences sociales, la recherche dans son ensemble .

      Le 7 mai, le Conseil d’Etat qui a rejeté le référé a transmis la requête en annulation au ministère pour l’interroger sur sa position. « La ministre de l’enseignement supérieur dispose désormais de deux mois pour démontrer que sa décision ne constitue pas un détournement des pouvoirs et des attributions qui lui sont confiés », indiquent MM. Bourdon et Brengarth. « Info ou intox ? Les masques vont tomber. Quand on a suscité un tel émoi, il est essentiel que la ministre assume soit la décision, soit le rétropédalage », ajoute William Bourdon.

      « Police de la pensée »

      Si le Conseil d’Etat s’est déclaré incompétent, il demande au ministère des explications, souligne Fabien Jobard, l’un des requérants, chercheur au CNRS, spécialiste des questions pénales. « Il agit comme une commission d’accès aux documents administratifs en demandant à Mme Vidal de nous dire ce qu’il en est. Soit oui, une commission existe avec tel et tel membre, soit non c’est le plus probable , il n’y a pas de commission d’enquête », projette-t-il.

      Pour la requérante Fanny Gallot, maîtresse de conférences en histoire à l’université Paris-Est-Créteil, « ce recours marque le fait que les bornes ont été largement dépassées. Aujourd’hui, l’offensive est très forte et elle est autorisée par Frédérique Vidal . Ainsi, « mener des recherches sur les discriminations ethnoraciales quand on est soi-même racisé est d’emblée considéré comme se faire le porte-parole des minorités. Mener des recherches quand on est féministe, comme moi, peut être utilisé par certains pour remettre en question la scientificité de mes recherches », illustre-t-elle.

      Des étudiants de deuxième année de master qui voulaient s’inscrire en thèse hésitent à travailler sur certains sujets, notamment liés à l’intersectionnalité (qui consiste à croiser divers mécanismes de domination, liés au genre, à l’âge ou encore à la couleur de peau). « C’est une #intimidation, même s’il n’y a pas eu véritablement de commission d’enquête. Pour pouvoir assumer de parler de certains sujets, il faut être un enseignant en poste, sinon c’est trop risqué », confirme Caroline Ibos, maîtresse de conférences en science politique à l’université Rennes-II.

      Les effets sont donc « très concrets » et vont « dans le sens d’une #police_de_la_pensée », alors que sont en question des savoirs déjà marginalisés en France. « Il y a peu d’endroits où l’on peut se former en études de genre et un seul Paris-VIII qui décerne des doctorats en études de genre en France, décrit la chercheuse. Il n’y a pas de section au CNRS, ni au CNU [Conseil national des universités], c’est un champ particulièrement sous-financé et aujourd’hui le gouvernement décide de le livrer à la vindicte populaire ? »

      Fanny Gallot décrit « un climat d’angoisse » depuis les déclarations de la ministre. « Il y a des moments d’échanges académiques qui sont empêchés », comme lors d’une table ronde au mois de mars consacrée à l’intersectionnalité qui s’est déroulée dans une ambiance « électrique », rapporte-t-elle. « Je pense que je n’ai pas dit exactement ce que j’aurais dit si nous n’avions pas été trois semaines après les propos de Frédérique Vidal. Nous nous autocensurons dans une certaine mesure parce que nous avons #peur. Dans des conférences Zoom où on ne sait pas toujours qui est présent, on redoute des trolls. On ne sait plus ce que l’on peut dire en classe ou dans les séminaires », confie Fanny Gallot.

      Une #suspicion constante

      « Nous souhaitions mettre la ministre face à ses responsabilités, explique Nacira Guénif, professeure de sociologie à Paris-VIII, également requérante. On ne peut pas faire n’importe quelle déclaration sans que cela ait des implications. » Née en France de parents algériens, Nacira Guénif « travaille depuis longtemps dans ces conditions de suspicion.

      « J’ai eu un procès en imposture avant même d’avoir mon poste à l’université », narre-t-elle. Dans les années 1990, auprès de la direction des populations et des migrations, qui finançait une recherche obtenue par la jeune chercheuse après un appel d’offres, elle fait face à une « curée générale . « Je ne collais pas aux stéréotypes de la beurette, qui était précisément le sujet de ma thèse. On me reprochait de ne pas dire ce qu’on attendait de moi et cela s’est transformé en déloyauté de ma part », poursuit Nacira Guénif.

      Depuis, la suspicion de militance est constante, les promesses non tenues d’invitations dans des colloques se poursuivent et les prises à partie également. Dans la volonté de la ministre, Fabien Jobard voit « au mieux un doublon inutile et au pire, une volonté du gouvernement de substituer ou d’ajouter aux procédures scientifiques habituelles une procédure dérogatoire .

      Car, pour faire des enquêtes, il existe des commissions dans chacun des établissements, tel le comité national au CNRS, chargé d’évaluer les collègues et de recruter les nouveaux chercheurs. « C’est le principe de l’évaluation de l’action scientifique par les pairs, rappelle-t-il. Si un collègue au CNRS présente un projet visant à nous dire que le prolétariat nouveau est constitué d’islamistes et exige que le politique mette genou à terre devant lui, alors je suis suffisamment grand pour émettre un avis d’alerte sur ce collègue », illustre celui qui a siégé au comité national dans la section science politique entre 2004 et 2008.

      Lui aussi témoin d’effets concrets après l’annonce de Mme Vidal, Fabien Jobard cite le cas d’une collègue chargée de suivre plusieurs sujets pour le compte du gouvernement. « Dans le cadre de ses missions, elle travaille avec des militaires et, alors qu’elle voulait organiser un colloque, l’un d’eux s’est opposé à ce qu’il se tienne à La Sorbonne, "à cause des problèmes d’islamo-gauchisme" », relate Fabien Jobard, qui s’inquiète du discrédit jeté sur les travaux de recherche. « J’essaye de maintenir une crédibilité, mais si mes interlocuteurs habituels que sont les procureurs, les policiers et les gendarmes s’effraient de mon travail, ma relation en sera-t-elle grillée ? Vont-ils travailler uniquement avec des universités et organismes qui feront le voeu de ne pas être islamo-gauchistes ? »

      https://www.lemonde.fr/societe/article/2021/06/10/islamo-gauchisme-a-l-universite-la-ministre-frederique-vidal-accusee-d-abus-

    • Ces attaques répétées contre le monde universitaire sont un chiffon rouge agité devant une opinion surchauffée par le #confusionnisme d’extrême droite qui se nourrit des frustrations sociales en les exacerbant « en même temps » avec des fantasmes identitaires et une volonté de renouer avec une certaine « grandeur » tout aussi fantasmée, lesquels fantasmes ont malheureusement contaminé une partie de la gauche nostalgique de « l’esprit des lumières » et d’une vision biaisée de la #laïcité. C’est une logique hégémonique de #reconquista pour conforter les « valeurs » mortifères héritées de l’occident gréco-romain puis chrétien. Cette logique hégémonique procède des mêmes intentions que le nazisme avec l’antisémitisme et le fantasme « judéo-bolchevique ». Quelques années après le deuxième conflit mondial, on a pu voir outre-atlantique se développer un anti-communisme propulsé par le sénateur Joseph McCarthy et plus récemment, cette logique était également à la manœuvre pendant le mandat de Trump avec pour conséquence la résurgence des mouvances issues du #suprémacisme_blanc.

      Make the Christian Occident great again ! ...

      #propagande_d'état

      (Mon propos est certainement synthétique mais c’est pourtant cela qu’évoquent les analyses d’ #Éric_Fassin)

    • #Caroline_Fourest sur LCP, 02.07.2021 :

      Journaliste : La société se racialise. A ce point-là ?
      Caroline Fourest : « En France, je peux vous dire, dans nos universités, à commencer par nos universités... regardez la façon dont les chercheurs ont réagi à une interpellation, certes peut-être trop directe et pas tout à fait bien choisie de la ministre de l’enseignement supérieur, mais il y a un corporatisme violent qui est en train de protéger le déni. D’abord, aujourd’hui quand on parle de questions qui fâchent ceux qui vous attaquent le plus violemment ce sont des chercheurs du CNRS. C’est un problème que l’alerte soit interdite. Que le fait de penser soit interdit de la part de gens qui sont des chercheurs du CNRS. Et puis il y a une très forte attraction du modèle américain qui passe évidemment par toutes les plateformes culturelles de ce modèle-là et aussi qui attire à l’université qui manque de moyen. »
      Journaliste : « Donc il y a vraiment une perméabilité »
      Caroline Fourest : « Tout le monde s’identitarise. »
      Journaliste : « Les combats idéologiques sont toujours menés par des minorités, mais est-ce que c’est toute la société ? »
      Caroline Fourest : « Toute la société s’identitarise. Version d’extrême droite évidemment ça peut donner des jeunes blancs déclassés qui vont désormais dire blancs au lieu de se dire pauvres et de se mettre ne mouvement pour essayer de lutter contre les inégalités. ça va donner des jeunes qu’au lieu de se dire ’On va lutter contre les inégalités’ se mettent à lutter par identité à l’extrême gauche »

      https://twitter.com/LCP/status/1411024030296064004

    • Un article d’avril 2021 :

      #Stéphane_Troussel : ’La République ne sait que faire des différences physiques ou des couleurs de peau multiples’

      Refusant l’affrontement qu’imposent la droite et l’extrême droite sur les réunions non mixtes, le président (PS) du conseil départemental de Seine-Saint-Denis appelle, dans une tribune au « Monde », la gauche à s’extraire d’une polémique stérile et dangereuse pour lutter véritablement contre les discriminations qui fracturent la société.

      La polémique est repartie, le brouhaha médiatique ne retombe pas. Après les outrances et les manipulations de la droite et de l’extrême droite, c’est maintenant au Sénat de surenchérir en adoptant un amendement à l’exposé des motifs caricatural au projet de loi dit « contre les #séparatismes » [celui-ci permettrait de dissoudre les associations qui organisent des réunions non mixtes racisées]. A en croire certains, sommant tous les autres de choisir leur camp, la République pourrait bien vaciller.

      Au fond, de quoi s’agit-il ? Des personnes se rassemblent pour échanger sur leurs expériences sociales douloureuses, les #discriminations vécues à partir d’un critère physique, d’une #orientation personnelle... Caractéristiques qui leur sont régulièrement renvoyées en pleine face comme une insulte : #sexisme, #racisme, #homophobie, etc. Il s’agit de paroles de victimes de racisme, de discrimination, d’inégalités. Il faut les prendre comme telles et, bien évidemment, je refuse que cela enferme les personnes concernées dans une « #victimisation » et que cela devienne une #parole_politique autrement que par son intégration unifiée contre toutes les formes de discrimination.

      Mais peu importe pour celles et ceux (Jean-Michel Blanquer, des députés et sénateurs LR, l’extrême droite...) qui ont lancé, puis alimenté la polémique. Toutes celles et tous ceux qui expriment, même avec nuance ou avec des réserves, une quelconque approbation de ces démarches, de ces expérimentations militantes, souvent transitoires, consistant à permettre de libérer la parole, sont accusés de « #dérive_séparatiste », « racialisante ».

      Artifices antiracistes

      Les gros mots sont de sortie. Les voilà lancés, jetés à une foule de commentateurs qui les voient comme un affront fait à une République censée être aveugle à la #couleur_de_peau, à la religion réelle ou supposée, au sexe... L’affrontement est en place, les camps bien délimités, chacun est sommé de choisir le sien et de laisser les nuances au vestiaire : les #racialistes d’une part, les #universalistes de l’autre. « Il faut choisir son camp, crient les repus de la haine », écrivait Albert Camus, dans son Pour une trêve civile, en 1956, en pleine guerre d’Algérie, condamnant à égalité les massacres de civils du FLN et les massacres répressifs de l’armée française.

      Cela semble ne poser de problème à personne que cette #polémique permette, à un an de la présidentielle, à la chef de l’extrême droite de se parer d’artifices antiracistes et de tenter de cohabiter, avec d’autres, dans le camp universaliste. Ici se situerait donc le débat politique de notre temps, la nouvelle #fracture : je m’y refuse. Je m’y refuse, parce que, si nous en sommes là, c’est que la gauche est tombée dans le piège tendu par la droite la plus réactionnaire et l’extrême droite qui, désormais, fixent les termes du débat et l’agenda politiques de notre pays.

      Je m’y refuse parce que, justement, la bonne question, celle qui devrait animer unanimement une gauche solidaire, droite dans ses bottes, fière de ses valeurs, cette question-là, la gauche française n’a pas su, ou pas suffisamment su, quelle réponse y apporter. Pourquoi, en France, les dispositifs républicains de lutte concrète contre les discriminations et les inégalités qui fracturent notre société piétinent ou ne s’imposent qu’au forceps (#loi_SRU [Solidarité et renouvellement urbain], #testing, #CV_anonyme, récépissé de contrôle d’identité, #droit_de_vote des étrangers aux élections locales, conventions ZEP-Sciences Po, mariage pour tous, droits des femmes...) ? Celles et ceux qui, à droite et à l’extrême droite, hurlent avec les loups ont combattu chacune de ces avancées.

      Pourtant, il n’y a qu’à se baisser pour constater le chemin qu’il reste à parcourir dans la lutte contre les #inégalités_femmes-hommes, le racisme, l’homophobie ou le #passé_colonial et ses conséquences pour les descendants des ex-pays colonisés.

      Il faudrait interdire les organisations qui reprendraient à leur compte des solutions avancées par la gauche libérale américaine, fondée sur le multiculturalisme et la valorisation des identités plurielles ? Ou bien faut-il se demander pourquoi n’opposer qu’un discours « il faut réduisons les inégalités socio-économiques pour que tout le monde ait sa chance » - ou qu’un slogan « la République, rien que la République » ? qui sonne de plus en plus creux aux oreilles de celles et ceux qui restent au bord du chemin, alors que les inégalités sociales et territoriales explosent dans notre société.

      L’#égalité_réelle

      Voilà mon explication. Oui, sans aucun doute, la République a un problème avec le #corps des individus, elle ne sait que faire de ces #différences_physiques, de ces #couleurs multiples, de ces orientations diverses, parce qu’elle a affirmé que pour traiter chacun et chacune également, elle devait être #aveugle.

      Mais, sans aucun doute également, d’autres dans la République ont détourné cette promesse d’une #égalité_républicaine, politique et donc sociale, pour exclure. Exclure les #femmes d’abord, les #pauvres ensuite, les #ouvriers, ces « classes laborieuses donc classes dangereuses », puis les #étrangers, la « #racaille » et ses « #sauvageons », venus d’ailleurs, emmenant leurs religions, leurs mémoires et leurs histoires. Et la gauche ne verrait pas cela. Elle passerait à côté de ce détournement, voire y inscrirait ses pas, au lieu de saisir le problème à bras-le-corps.

      Au lieu d’affirmer que dans ce pays, où a été défendue la République, puis la République sociale, il faut maintenant défendre la #République_citoyenne_et_universelle, la #République_métissée, la #République_de_l'égalité_réelle, en tentant de comprendre son passé, ses erreurs et ses oublis, pour regarder ensemble, tous et toutes ensemble, plus sereinement son avenir.

      Note(s) :

      Stéphane Troussel est président du conseil départemental de la Seine-Saint-Denis.

      https://www.lemonde.fr/idees/article/2021/04/07/stephane-troussel-la-republique-a-un-probleme-avec-le-corps-des-individus-el

      #non-mixité

  • Migrants: le règlement de Dublin va être supprimé

    La Commission européenne doit présenter le 23 septembre sa proposition de réforme de sa politique migratoire, très attendue et plusieurs fois repoussée.

    Cinq ans après le début de la crise migratoire, l’Union européenne veut changer de stratégie. La Commission européenne veut “abolir” le règlement de Dublin qui fracture les Etats-membres et qui confie la responsabilité du traitement des demandes d’asile au pays de première entrée des migrants dans l’UE, a annoncé ce mercredi 16 septembre la cheffe de l’exécutif européen Ursula von der Leyen dans son discours sur l’Etat de l’Union.

    La Commission doit présenter le 23 septembre sa proposition de réforme de la politique migratoire européenne, très attendue et plusieurs fois repoussée, alors que le débat sur le manque de solidarité entre pays Européens a été relancé par l’incendie du camp de Moria sur lîle grecque de Lesbos.

    “Au coeur (de la réforme) il y a un engagement pour un système plus européen”, a déclaré Ursula von der Leyen devant le Parlement européen. “Je peux annoncer que nous allons abolir le règlement de Dublin et le remplacer par un nouveau système européen de gouvernance de la migration”, a-t-elle poursuivi.
    Nouveau mécanisme de solidarité

    “Il y aura des structures communes pour l’asile et le retour. Et il y aura un nouveau mécanisme fort de solidarité”, a-t-elle dit, alors que les pays qui sont en première ligne d’arrivée des migrants (Grèce, Malte, Italie notamment) se plaignent de devoir faire face à une charge disproportionnée.

    La proposition de réforme de la Commission devra encore être acceptée par les Etats. Ce qui n’est pas gagné d’avance. Cinq ans après la crise migratoire de 2015, la question de l’accueil des migrants est un sujet qui reste source de profondes divisions en Europe, certains pays de l’Est refusant d’accueillir des demandeurs d’asile.

    Sous la pression, le système d’asile européen organisé par le règlement de Dublin a explosé après avoir pesé lourdement sur la Grèce ou l’Italie.

    Le nouveau plan pourrait notamment prévoir davantage de sélection des demandeurs d’asile aux frontières extérieures et un retour des déboutés dans leur pays assuré par Frontex. Egalement à l’étude pour les Etats volontaires : un mécanisme de relocalisation des migrants sauvés en Méditerranée, parfois contraints d’errer en mer pendant des semaines en attente d’un pays d’accueil.

    Ce plan ne résoudrait toutefois pas toutes les failles. Pour le patron de l’Office français de l’immigration et de l’intégration, Didier Leschi, “il ne peut pas y avoir de politique européenne commune sans critères communs pour accepter les demandes d’asile.”

    https://www.huffingtonpost.fr/entry/migrants-le-reglement-de-dublin-tres-controverse-va-etre-supprime_fr_

    #migrations #asile #réfugiés #Dublin #règlement_dublin #fin #fin_de_Dublin #suppression #pacte #Pacte_européen_sur_la_migration #new_pact #nouveau_pacte #pacte_sur_la_migration_et_l'asile

    –---

    Documents officiels en lien avec le pacte:
    https://seenthis.net/messages/879881

    ping @reka @karine4 @_kg_ @isskein

    • Immigration : le règlement de Dublin, l’impossible #réforme ?

      En voulant abroger le règlement de Dublin, qui impose la responsabilité des demandeurs d’asile au premier pays d’entrée dans l’Union européenne, Bruxelles reconnaît des dysfonctionnements dans l’accueil des migrants. Mais les Vingt-Sept, plus que jamais divisés sur cette question, sont-ils prêts à une refonte du texte ? Éléments de réponses.

      Ursula Von der Leyen en a fait une des priorités de son mandat : réformer le règlement de Dublin, qui impose au premier pays de l’UE dans lequel le migrant est arrivé de traiter sa demande d’asile. « Je peux annoncer que nous allons [l’]abolir et le remplacer par un nouveau système européen de gouvernance de la migration », a déclaré la présidente de la Commission européenne mercredi 16 septembre, devant le Parlement.

      Les États dotés de frontières extérieures comme la Grèce, l’Italie ou Malte se sont réjouis de cette annonce. Ils s’estiment lésés par ce règlement en raison de leur situation géographique qui les place en première ligne.

      La présidente de la Commission européenne doit présenter, le 23 septembre, une nouvelle version de la politique migratoire, jusqu’ici maintes fois repoussée. « Il y aura des structures communes pour l’asile et le retour. Et il y aura un nouveau mécanisme fort de solidarité », a-t-elle poursuivi. Un terme fort à l’heure où l’incendie du camp de Moria sur l’île grecque de Lesbos, plus de 8 000 adultes et 4 000 enfants à la rue, a révélé le manque d’entraide entre pays européens.

      Pour mieux comprendre l’enjeu de cette nouvelle réforme européenne de la politique migratoire, France 24 décrypte le règlement de Dublin qui divise tant les Vingt-Sept, en particulier depuis la crise migratoire de 2015.

      Pourquoi le règlement de Dublin dysfonctionne ?

      Les failles ont toujours existé mais ont été révélées par la crise migratoire de 2015, estiment les experts de politique migratoire. Ce texte signé en 2013 et qu’on appelle « Dublin III » repose sur un accord entre les membres de l’Union européenne ainsi que la Suisse, l’Islande, la Norvège et le Liechtenstein. Il prévoit que l’examen de la demande d’asile d’un exilé incombe au premier pays d’entrée en Europe. Si un migrant passé par l’Italie arrive par exemple en France, les autorités françaises ne sont, en théorie, pas tenu d’enregistrer la demande du Dubliné.
      © Union européenne | Les pays signataires du règlement de Dublin.

      Face à l’afflux de réfugiés ces dernières années, les pays dotés de frontières extérieures, comme la Grèce et l’Italie, se sont estimés abandonnés par le reste de l’Europe. « La charge est trop importante pour ce bloc méditerranéen », estime Matthieu Tardis, chercheur au Centre migrations et citoyennetés de l’Ifri (Institut français des relations internationales). Le texte est pensé « comme un mécanisme de responsabilité des États et non de solidarité », estime-t-il.

      Sa mise en application est aussi difficile à mettre en place. La France et l’Allemagne, qui concentrent la majorité des demandes d’asile depuis le début des années 2000, peinent à renvoyer les Dublinés. Dans l’Hexagone, seulement 11,5 % ont été transférés dans le pays d’entrée. Outre-Rhin, le taux ne dépasse pas les 15 %. Conséquence : nombre d’entre eux restent « bloqués » dans les camps de migrants à Calais ou dans le nord de Paris.

      Le délai d’attente pour les demandeurs d’asile est aussi jugé trop long. Un réfugié passé par l’Italie, qui vient déposer une demande d’asile en France, peut attendre jusqu’à 18 mois avant d’avoir un retour. « Durant cette période, il se retrouve dans une situation d’incertitude très dommageable pour lui mais aussi pour l’Union européenne. C’est un système perdant-perdant », commente Matthieu Tardis.

      Ce règlement n’est pas adapté aux demandeurs d’asile, surenchérit-on à la Cimade (Comité inter-mouvements auprès des évacués). Dans un rapport, l’organisation qualifie ce système de « machine infernale de l’asile européen ». « Il ne tient pas compte des liens familiaux ni des langues parlées par les réfugiés », précise le responsable asile de l’association, Gérard Sadik.

      Sept ans après avoir vu le jour, le règlement s’est vu porter le coup de grâce par le confinement lié aux conditions sanitaires pour lutter contre le Covid-19. « Durant cette période, aucun transfert n’a eu lieu », assure-t-on à la Cimade.

      Le mécanisme de solidarité peut-il le remplacer ?

      « Il y aura un nouveau mécanisme fort de solidarité », a promis Ursula von der Leyen, sans donné plus de précision. Sur ce point, on sait déjà que les positions divergent, voire s’opposent, entre les Vingt-Sept.

      Le bloc du nord-ouest (Allemagne, France, Autriche, Benelux) reste ancré sur le principe actuel de responsabilité, mais accepte de l’accompagner d’un mécanisme de solidarité. Sur quels critères se base la répartition du nombre de demandeurs d’asile ? Comment les sélectionner ? Aucune décision n’est encore actée. « Ils sont prêts à des compromis car ils veulent montrer que l’Union européenne peut avancer et agir sur la question migratoire », assure Matthieu Tardis.

      En revanche, le groupe dit de Visegrad (Hongrie, Pologne, République tchèque, Slovaquie), peu enclin à l’accueil, rejette catégoriquement tout principe de solidarité. « Ils se disent prêts à envoyer des moyens financiers, du personnel pour le contrôle aux frontières mais refusent de recevoir les demandeurs d’asile », détaille le chercheur de l’Ifri.

      Quant au bloc Méditerranée (Grèce, Italie, Malte , Chypre, Espagne), des questions subsistent sur la proposition du bloc nord-ouest : le mécanisme de solidarité sera-t-il activé de façon permanente ou exceptionnelle ? Quelles populations sont éligibles au droit d’asile ? Et qui est responsable du retour ? « Depuis le retrait de la Ligue du Nord de la coalition dans le gouvernement italien, le dialogue est à nouveau possible », avance Matthieu Tardis.

      Un accord semble toutefois indispensable pour montrer que l’Union européenne n’est pas totalement en faillite sur ce dossier. « Mais le bloc de Visegrad n’a pas forcément en tête cet enjeu », nuance-t-il. Seule la situation sanitaire liée au Covid-19, qui place les pays de l’Est dans une situation économique fragile, pourrait faire évoluer leur position, note le chercheur.

      Et le mécanisme par répartition ?

      Le mécanisme par répartition, dans les tuyaux depuis 2016, revient régulièrement sur la table des négociations. Son principe : la capacité d’accueil du pays dépend de ses poids démographique et économique. Elle serait de 30 % pour l’Allemagne, contre un tiers des demandes aujourd’hui, et 20 % pour la France, qui en recense 18 %. « Ce serait une option gagnante pour ces deux pays, mais pas pour le bloc du Visegrad qui s’y oppose », décrypte Gérard Sadik, le responsable asile de la Cimade.

      Cette doctrine reposerait sur un système informatisé, qui recenserait dans une seule base toutes les données des demandeurs d’asile. Mais l’usage de l’intelligence artificielle au profit de la procédure administrative ne présente pas que des avantages, aux yeux de la Cimade : « L’algorithme ne sera pas en mesure de tenir compte des liens familiaux des demandeurs d’asile », juge Gérard Sadik.

      Quelles chances pour une refonte ?

      L’Union européenne a déjà tenté plusieurs fois de réformer ce serpent de mer. Un texte dit « Dublin IV » était déjà dans les tuyaux depuis 2016, en proposant par exemple que la responsabilité du premier État d’accueil soit définitive, mais il a été enterré face aux dissensions internes.

      Reste à savoir quel est le contenu exact de la nouvelle version qui sera présentée le 23 septembre par Ursula Van der Leyen. À la Cimade, on craint un durcissement de la politique migratoire, et notamment un renforcement du contrôle aux frontières.

      Quoi qu’il en soit, les négociations s’annoncent « compliquées et difficiles » car « les intérêts des pays membres ne sont pas les mêmes », a rappelé le ministre grec adjoint des Migrations, Giorgos Koumoutsakos, jeudi 17 septembre. Et surtout, la nouvelle mouture devra obtenir l’accord du Parlement, mais aussi celui des États. La refonte est encore loin.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/27376/immigration-le-reglement-de-dublin-l-impossible-reforme

      #gouvernance #Ursula_Von_der_Leyen #mécanisme_de_solidarité #responsabilité #groupe_de_Visegrad #solidarité #répartition #mécanisme_par_répartition #capacité_d'accueil #intelligence_artificielle #algorithme #Dublin_IV

    • Germany’s #Seehofer cautiously optimistic on EU asylum reform

      For the first time during the German Presidency, EU interior ministers exchanged views on reforms of the EU asylum system. German Interior Minister Horst Seehofer (CSU) expressed “justified confidence” that a deal can be found. EURACTIV Germany reports.

      The focus of Tuesday’s (7 July) informal video conference of interior ministers was on the expansion of police cooperation and sea rescue, which, according to Seehofer, is one of the “Big Four” topics of the German Council Presidency, integrated into a reform of the #Common_European_Asylum_System (#CEAS).

      Following the meeting, the EU Commissioner for Home Affairs, Ylva Johansson, spoke of an “excellent start to the Presidency,” and Seehofer also praised the “constructive discussions.” In the field of asylum policy, she said that it had become clear that all member states were “highly interested in positive solutions.”

      The interior ministers were unanimous in their desire to further strengthen police cooperation and expand both the mandates and the financial resources of Europol and Frontex.

      Regarding the question of the distribution of refugees, Seehofer said that he had “heard statements that [he] had not heard in years prior.” He said that almost all member states were “prepared to show solidarity in different ways.”

      While about a dozen member states would like to participate in the distribution of those rescued from distress at the EU’s external borders in the event of a “disproportionate burden” on the states, other states signalled that they wanted to make control vessels, financial means or personnel available to prevent smuggling activities and stem migration across the Mediterranean.

      Seehofer’s final act

      It will probably be Seehofer’s last attempt to initiate CEAS reform. He announced in May that he would withdraw completely from politics after the end of the legislative period in autumn 2021.

      Now it seems that he considers CEAS reform as his last great mission, Seehofer said that he intends to address the migration issue from late summer onwards “with all I have at my disposal.” adding that Tuesday’s (7 July) talks had “once again kindled a real fire” in him. To this end, he plans to leave the official business of the Interior Ministry “in day-to-day matters” largely to the State Secretaries.

      Seehofer’s shift of priorities to the European stage comes at a time when he is being sharply criticised in Germany.

      While his initial handling of a controversial newspaper column about the police published in Berlin’s tageszeitung prompted criticism, Seehofer now faces accusations of concealing structural racism in the police. Seehofer had announced over the weekend that, contrary to the recommendation of the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance (ECRI), he would not commission a study on racial profiling in the police force after all.

      Seehofer: “One step is not enough”

      In recent months, Seehofer has made several attempts to set up a distribution mechanism for rescued persons in distress. On several occasions he accused the Commission of letting member states down by not solving the asylum question.

      “I have the ambition to make a great leap. One step would be too little in our presidency,” said Seehofer during Tuesday’s press conference. However, much depends on when the Commission will present its long-awaited migration pact, as its proposals are intended to serve as a basis for negotiations on CEAS reform.

      As Johansson said on Tuesday, this is planned for September. Seehofer thus only has just under four months to get the first Council conclusions through. “There will not be enough time for legislation,” he said.

      Until a permanent solution is found, ad hoc solutions will continue. A “sustainable solution” should include better cooperation with the countries of origin and transit, as the member states agreed on Tuesday.

      To this end, “agreements on the repatriation of refugees” are now to be reached with North African countries. A first step towards this will be taken next Monday (13 July), at a joint conference with North African leaders.

      https://www.euractiv.com/section/justice-home-affairs/news/germany-eyes-breakthrough-in-eu-migration-dispute-this-year

      #Europol #Frontex

    • Relocation, solidarity mandatory for EU migration policy: #Johansson

      In an interview with ANSA and other European media outlets, EU Commissioner for Home Affairs #Ylva_Johansson explained the new migration and asylum pact due to be unveiled on September 23, stressing that nobody will find ideal solutions but rather a well-balanced compromise that will ’’improve the situation’’.

      European Home Affairs Commissioner Ylva Johansson has explained in an interview with a group of European journalists, including ANSA, a new pact on asylum and migration to be presented on September 23. She touched on rules for countries of first entry, a new mechanism of mandatory solidarity, fast repatriations and refugee relocation.

      The Swedish commissioner said that no one will find ideal solutions in the European Commission’s new asylum and migration proposal but rather a good compromise that “will improve the situation”.

      She said the debate to change the asylum regulation known as Dublin needs to be played down in order to find an agreement. Johansson said an earlier 2016 reform plan would be withdrawn as it ’’caused the majority’’ of conflicts among countries.

      A new proposal that will replace the current one and amend the existing Dublin regulation will be presented, she explained.

      The current regulation will not be completely abolished but rules regarding frontline countries will change. Under the new proposal, migrants can still be sent back to the country responsible for their asylum request, explained the commissioner, adding that amendments will be made but the country of first entry will ’’remain important’’.

      ’’Voluntary solidarity is not enough," there has to be a “mandatory solidarity mechanism,” Johansson noted.

      Countries will need to help according to their size and possibilities. A member state needs to show solidarity ’’in accordance with the capacity and size’’ of its economy. There will be no easy way out with the possibility of ’’just sending some blankets’’ - efforts must be proportional to the size and capabilities of member states, she said.
      Relocations are a divisive theme

      Relocations will be made in a way that ’’can be possible to accept for all member states’’, the commissioner explained. The issue of mandatory quotas is extremely divisive, she went on to say. ’’The sentence of the European Court of Justice has established that they can be made’’.

      However, the theme is extremely divisive. Many of those who arrive in Europe are not eligible for international protection and must be repatriated, she said, wondering if it is a good idea to relocate those who need to be repatriated.

      “We are looking for a way to bring the necessary aid to countries under pressure.”

      “Relocation is an important part, but also” it must be done “in a way that can be possible to accept for all member states,” she noted.

      Moreover, Johansson said the system will not be too rigid as the union should prepare for different scenarios.
      Faster repatriations

      Repatriations will be a key part of the plan, with faster bureaucratic procedures, she said. The 2016 reform proposal was made following the 2015 migration crisis, when two million people, 90% of whom were refugees, reached the EU irregularly. For this reason, the plan focused on relocations, she explained.

      Now the situation is completely different: last year 2.4 million stay permits were issued, the majority for reasons connected to family, work or education. Just 140,000 people migrated irregularly and only one-third were refugees while two-thirds will need to be repatriated.

      For this reason, stressed the commissioner, the new plan will focus on repatriation. Faster procedures are necessary, she noted. When people stay in a country for years it is very hard to organize repatriations, especially voluntary ones. So the objective is for a negative asylum decision “to come together with a return decision.”

      Also, the permanence in hosting centers should be of short duration. Speaking about a fire at the Moria camp on the Greek island of Lesbos where more than 12,000 asylum seekers have been stranded for years, the commissioner said the situation was the ’’result of lack of European policy on asylum and migration."

      “We shall have no more Morias’’, she noted, calling for well-managed hosting centers along with limits to permanence.

      A win-win collaboration will instead be planned with third countries, she said. ’’The external aspect is very important. We have to work on good partnerships with third countries, supporting them and finding win-win solutions for readmissions and for the fight against traffickers. We have to develop legal pathways to come to the EU, in particular with resettlements, a policy that needs to be strengthened.”

      The commissioner then rejected the idea of opening hosting centers in third countries, an idea for example proposed by Denmark.

      “It is not the direction I intend to take. We will not export the right to asylum.”

      The commissioner said she was very concerned by reports of refoulements. Her objective, she concluded, is to “include in the pact a monitoring mechanism. The right to asylum must be defended.”

      https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/27447/relocation-solidarity-mandatory-for-eu-migration-policy-johansson

      #relocalisation #solidarité_obligatoire #solidarité_volontaire #pays_de_première_entrée #renvois #expulsions #réinstallations #voies_légales

    • Droit d’asile : Bruxelles rate son « #pacte »

      La Commission européenne, assurant vouloir « abolir » le règlement de Dublin et son principe du premier pays d’entrée, doit présenter ce mercredi un « pacte sur l’immigration et l’asile ». Qui ne bouleverserait rien.

      C’est une belle victoire pour Viktor Orbán, le Premier ministre hongrois, et ses partenaires d’Europe centrale et orientale aussi peu enclins que lui à accueillir des étrangers sur leur sol. La Commission européenne renonce définitivement à leur imposer d’accueillir des demandeurs d’asile en cas d’afflux dans un pays de la « ligne de front » (Grèce, Italie, Malte, Espagne). Certes, le volumineux paquet de textes qu’elle propose ce mercredi (10 projets de règlements et trois recommandations, soit plusieurs centaines de pages), pompeusement baptisé « pacte sur l’immigration et l’asile », prévoit qu’ils devront, par « solidarité », assurer les refoulements vers les pays d’origine des déboutés du droit d’asile, mais cela ne devrait pas les gêner outre mesure. Car, sur le fond, la Commission prend acte de la volonté des Vingt-Sept de transformer l’Europe en forteresse.
      Sale boulot

      La crise de 2015 les a durablement traumatisés. A l’époque, la Turquie, par lassitude d’accueillir sur son sol plusieurs millions de réfugiés syriens et des centaines de milliers de migrants économiques dans l’indifférence de la communauté internationale, ouvre ses frontières. La Grèce est vite submergée et plusieurs centaines de milliers de personnes traversent les Balkans afin de trouver refuge, notamment en Allemagne et en Suède, parmi les pays les plus généreux en matière d’asile.

      Passé les premiers moments de panique, les Européens réagissent de plusieurs manières. La Hongrie fait le sale boulot en fermant brutalement sa frontière. L’Allemagne, elle, accepte d’accueillir un million de demandeurs d’asile, mais négocie avec Ankara un accord pour qu’il referme ses frontières, accord ensuite endossé par l’UE qui lui verse en échange 6 milliards d’euros destinés aux camps de réfugiés. Enfin, l’Union adopte un règlement destiné à relocaliser sur une base obligatoire une partie des migrants dans les autres pays européens afin qu’ils instruisent les demandes d’asile, dans le but de soulager la Grèce et l’Italie, pays de premier accueil. Ce dernier volet est un échec, les pays d’Europe de l’Est, qui ont voté contre, refusent d’accueillir le moindre migrant, et leurs partenaires de l’Ouest ne font guère mieux : sur 160 000 personnes qui auraient dû être relocalisées, un objectif rapidement revu à 98 000, moins de 35 000 l’ont été à la fin 2017, date de la fin de ce dispositif.

      Depuis, l’Union a considérablement durci les contrôles, notamment en créant un corps de 10 000 gardes-frontières européens et en renforçant les moyens de Frontex, l’agence chargée de gérer ses frontières extérieures. En février-mars, la tentative d’Ankara de faire pression sur les Européens dans le conflit syrien en rouvrant partiellement ses frontières a fait long feu : la Grèce a employé les grands moyens, y compris violents, pour stopper ce flux sous les applaudissements de ses partenaires… Autant dire que l’ambiance n’est pas à l’ouverture des frontières et à l’accueil des persécutés.
      « Usine à gaz »

      Mais la crise migratoire de 2015 a laissé des « divisions nombreuses et profondes entre les Etats membres - certaines des cicatrices qu’elle a laissées sont toujours visibles aujourd’hui », comme l’a reconnu Ursula von der Leyen, la présidente de la Commission, dans son discours sur l’état de l’Union du 16 septembre. Afin de tourner la page, la Commission propose donc de laisser tomber la réforme de 2016 (dite de Dublin IV) prévoyant de pérenniser la relocalisation autoritaire des migrants, désormais jugée par une haute fonctionnaire de l’exécutif « totalement irréaliste ».

      Mais la réforme qu’elle propose, une véritable « usine à gaz », n’est qu’un « rapiéçage » de l’existant, comme l’explique Yves Pascouau, spécialiste de l’immigration et responsable des programmes européens de l’association Res Publica. Ainsi, alors que Von der Leyen a annoncé sa volonté « d’abolir » le règlement de Dublin III, il n’en est rien : le pays responsable du traitement d’une demande d’asile reste, par principe, comme c’est le cas depuis 1990, le pays de première entrée.

      S’il y a une crise, la Commission pourra déclencher un « mécanisme de solidarité » afin de soulager un pays de la ligne de front : dans ce cas, les Vingt-Sept devront accueillir un certain nombre de migrants (en fonction de leur richesse et de leur population), sauf s’ils préfèrent « parrainer un retour ». En clair, prendre en charge le refoulement des déboutés de l’asile (avec l’aide financière et logistique de l’Union) en sachant que ces personnes resteront à leur charge jusqu’à ce qu’ils y parviennent. Ça, c’est pour faire simple, car il y a plusieurs niveaux de crise, des exceptions, des sanctions, des délais et l’on en passe…

      Autre nouveauté : les demandes d’asile devront être traitées par principe à la frontière, dans des camps de rétention, pour les nationalités dont le taux de reconnaissance du statut de réfugié est inférieur à 20% dans l’Union, et ce, en moins de trois mois, avec refoulement à la clé en cas de refus. « Cette réforme pose un principe clair, explique un eurocrate. Personne ne sera obligé d’accueillir un étranger dont il ne veut pas. »

      Dans cet ensemble très sévère, une bonne nouvelle : les sauvetages en mer ne devraient plus être criminalisés. On peut craindre qu’une fois passés à la moulinette des Etats, qui doivent adopter ce paquet à la majorité qualifiée (55% des Etats représentant 65% de la population), il ne reste que les aspects les plus répressifs. On ne se refait pas.


      https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2020/09/22/droit-d-asile-bruxelles-rate-son-pacte_1800264

      –—

      Graphique ajouté au fil de discussion sur les statistiques de la #relocalisation :
      https://seenthis.net/messages/605713

    • Le pacte européen sur l’asile et les migrations ne tire aucune leçon de la « crise migratoire »

      Ce 23 septembre 2020, la nouvelle Commission européenne a présenté les grandes lignes d’orientation de sa politique migratoire à venir. Alors que cinq ans plutôt, en 2015, se déroulait la mal nommée « crise migratoire » aux frontières européennes, le nouveau Pacte Asile et Migration de l’UE ne tire aucune leçon du passé. Le nouveau pacte de l’Union Européenne nous propose inlassablement les mêmes recettes alors que les preuves de leur inefficacité, leur coût et des violences qu’elles procurent sont nombreuses et irréfutables. Le CNCD-11.11.11, son homologue néerlandophone et les membres du groupe de travail pour la justice migratoire appellent le parlement européen et le gouvernement belge à un changement de cap.

      Le nouveau Pacte repose sur des propositions législatives et des recommandations non contraignantes. Ses priorités sont claires mais pas neuves. Freiner les arrivées, limiter l’accueil par le « tri » des personnes et augmenter les retours. Cette stratégie pourtant maintes fois décriée par les ONG et le milieu académique a certes réussi à diminuer les arrivées en Europe, mais n’a offert aucune solution durable pour les personnes migrantes. Depuis les années 2000, l’externalisation de la gestion des questions migratoires a montré son inefficacité (situation humanitaires dans les hotspots, plus de 20.000 décès en Méditerranée depuis 2014 et processus d’encampement aux frontières de l’UE) et son coût exponentiel (coût élevé du contrôle, de la détention-expulsion et de l’aide au développement détournée). Elle a augmenté le taux de violences sur les routes de l’exil et a enfreint le droit international en toute impunité (non accès au droit d’asile notamment via les refoulements).

      "ll est important que tous les États membres développent des systèmes d’accueil de qualité et que l’UE s’oriente vers une protection plus unifiée"

      La proposition de mettre en place un mécanisme solidaire européen contraignant est à saluer, mais celui-ci doit être au service de l’accueil et non couplé au retour. La possibilité pour les États européens de choisir à la carte soit la relocalisation, le « parrainage » du retour des déboutés ou autre contribution financière n’est pas équitable. La répartition solidaire de l’accueil doit être permanente et ne pas être actionnée uniquement en cas « d’afflux massif » aux frontières d’un État membre comme le recommande la Commission. Il est important que tous les États membres développent des systèmes d’accueil de qualité et que l’UE s’oriente vers une protection plus unifiée. Le changement annoncé du Règlement de Dublin l’est juste de nom, car les premiers pays d’entrée resteront responsables des nouveaux arrivés.

      Le focus doit être mis sur les alternatives à la détention et non sur l’usage systématique de l’enfermement aux frontières, comme le veut la Commission. Le droit de demander l’asile et d’avoir accès à une procédure de qualité doit être accessible à tous et toutes et rester un droit individuel. Or, la proposition de la Commission de détenir (12 semaines maximum) en vue de screener (5 jours de tests divers et de recoupement de données via EURODAC) puis trier les personnes migrantes à la frontière en fonction du taux de reconnaissance de protection accordé en moyenne à leur pays d’origine (en dessous de 20%) ou de leur niveau de vulnérabilité est contraire à la Convention de Genève.

      "La priorité pour les personnes migrantes en situation irrégulière doit être la recherche de solutions durables (comme l’est la régularisation) plutôt que le retour forcé, à tous prix."

      La priorité pour les personnes migrantes en situation irrégulière doit être la recherche de solutions durables (comme l’est la régularisation) plutôt que le retour forcé, à tous prix, comme le préconise la Commission.

      La meilleure façon de lutter contre les violences sur les routes de l’exil reste la mise en place de plus de voies légales et sûres de migration (réinstallation, visas de travail, d’études, le regroupement familial…). Les ONG regrettent que la Commission reporte à 2021 les propositions sur la migration légale. Le pacte s’intéresse à juste titre à la criminalisation des ONG de sauvetage et des citoyens qui fournissent une aide humanitaire aux migrants. Toutefois, les propositions visant à y mettre fin sont insuffisantes. Les ONG se réjouissent de l’annonce par la Commission d’un mécanisme de surveillance des droits humains aux frontières extérieures. Au cours de l’année écoulée, on a signalé de plus en plus souvent des retours violents par la Croatie, la Grèce, Malte et Chypre. Toutefois, il n’est pas encore suffisamment clair si les propositions de la Commission peuvent effectivement traiter et sanctionner les refoulements.

      Au lendemain de l’incendie du hotspot à Moria, symbole par excellence de l’échec des politiques migratoires européennes, l’UE s’enfonce dans un déni total, meurtrier, en vue de concilier les divergences entre ses États membres. Les futures discussions autour du Pacte au sein du parlement UE et du Conseil UE seront cruciales. Les ONG membres du groupe de travail pour la justice migratoire appellent le Parlement européen et le gouvernement belge à promouvoir des ajustements fermes allant vers plus de justice migratoire.

      https://www.cncd.be/Le-pacte-europeen-sur-l-asile-et

    • The New Pact on Migration and Asylum. A Critical ‘First Look’ Analysis

      Where does it come from?

      The New Migration Pact was built on the ashes of the mandatory relocation scheme that the Commission tried to push in 2016. And the least that one can say, is that it shows! The whole migration plan has been decisively shaped by this initial failure. Though the Pact has some merits, the very fact that it takes as its starting point the radical demands made by the most nationalist governments in Europe leads to sacrificing migrants’ rights on the altar of a cohesive and integrated European migration policy.

      Back in 2016, the vigorous manoeuvring of the Commission to find a way out of the European asylum dead-end resulted in a bittersweet victory for the European institution. Though the Commission was able to find a qualified majority of member states willing to support a fair distribution of the asylum seekers among member states through a relocation scheme, this new regulation remained dead letter. Several eastern European states flatly refused to implement the plan, other member states seized this opportunity to defect on their obligations and the whole migration policy quickly unravelled. Since then, Europe is left with a dysfunctional Dublin agreement exacerbating the tensions between member states and 27 loosely connected national asylum regimes. On the latter point, at least, there is a consensus. Everyone agrees that the EU’s migration regime is broken and urgently needs to be fixed.

      Obviously, the Commission was not keen to go through a new round of political humiliation. Having been accused of “bureaucratic hubris” the first time around, the commissioners Schinas and Johansson decided not to repeat the same mistake. They toured the European capitals and listened to every side of the entrenched migration debate before drafting their Migration Pact. The intention is in the right place and it reflects the complexity of having to accommodate 27 distinct democratic debates in one single political space. Nevertheless, if one peers a bit more extensively through the content of the New Plan, it is complicated not to get the feelings that the Visegrad countries are currently the key players shaping the European migration and asylum policies. After all, their staunch opposition to a collective reception scheme sparked the political process and provided the starting point to the general discussion. As a result, it is no surprise that the New Pact tilts firmly towards an ever more restrictive approach to migration, beefs up the coercive powers of both member states and European agencies and raises many concerns with regards to the respect of the migrants’ fundamental rights.
      What is in this New Pact on Migration and Asylum?

      Does the Pact concede too much ground to the demands of the most xenophobic European governments? To answer that question, let us go back to the bizarre metaphor used by the commissioner Schinas. During his press conference, he insisted on comparing the New Pact on Migration and Asylum to a house built on solid foundations (i.e. the lengthy and inclusive consultation process) and made of 3 floors: first, some renewed partnerships with the sending and transit states, second, some more effective border procedures, and third, a revamped mandatory – but flexible ! – solidarity scheme. It is tempting to carry on with the metaphor and to say that this house may appear comfortable from the inside but that it remains tightly shut to anyone knocking on its door from the outside. For, a careful examination reveals that each of the three “floors” (policy packages, actually) lays the emphasis on a repressive approach to migration aimed at deterring would-be asylum seekers from attempting to reach the European shores.
      The “new partnerships” with sending and transit countries, a “change in paradigm”?

      Let us add that there is little that is actually “new” in this New Migration Pact. For instance, the first policy package, that is, the suggestion that the EU should renew its partnerships with sending and transit countries is, as a matter of fact, an old tune in the Brussels bubble. The Commission may boast that it marks a “change of paradigm”, one fails to see how this would be any different from the previous European diplomatic efforts. Since migration and asylum are increasingly considered as toxic topics (for, they would be the main factors behind the rise of nationalism and its corollary, Euroscepticism), the European Union is willing to externalize this issue, seemingly at all costs. The results, however, have been mixed in the past. To the Commission’s own admission, only a third of the migrants whose asylum claims have been rejected are effectively returned. Besides the facts that returns are costly, extremely coercive, and administratively complicated to organize, the main reason for this low rate of successful returns is that sending countries refuse to cooperate in the readmission procedures. Neighbouring countries have excellent reasons not to respond positively to the Union’s demands. For some, remittances sent by their diaspora are an economic lifeline. Others just do not want to appear complicit of repressive European practices on their domestic political scene. Furthermore, many African countries are growing discontent with the forceful way the European Union uses its asymmetrical relation of power in bilateral negotiations to dictate to those sovereign states the migration policies they should adopt, making for instance its development aid conditional on the implementation of stricter border controls. The Commission may rhetorically claim to foster “mutually beneficial” international relation with its neighbouring countries, the emphasis on the externalization of migration control in the EU’s diplomatic agenda nevertheless bears some of the hallmarks of neo-colonialism. As such, it is a source of deep resentment in sending and transit states. It would therefore be a grave mistake for the EU to overlook the fact that some short-term gains in terms of migration management may result in long-term losses with regards to Europe’s image across the world.

      Furthermore, considering the current political situation, one should not primarily be worried about the failed partnerships with neighbouring countries, it is rather the successful ones that ought to give us pause and raise concerns. For, based on the existing evidence, the EU will sign a deal with any state as long as it effectively restrains and contains migration flows towards the European shores. Being an authoritarian state with a documented history of human right violations (Turkey) or an embattled government fighting a civil war (Lybia) does not disqualify you as a partner of the European Union in its effort to manage migration flows. It is not only morally debatable for the EU to delegate its asylum responsibilities to unreliable third countries, it is also doubtful that an increase in diplomatic pressure on neighbouring countries will bring major political results. It will further damage the perception of the EU in neighbouring countries without bringing significant restriction to migration flows.
      Streamlining border procedures? Or eroding migrants’ rights?

      The second policy package is no more inviting. It tackles the issue of the migrants who, in spite of those partnerships and the hurdles thrown their way by sending and transit countries, would nevertheless reach Europe irregularly. On this issue, the Commission faced the daunting task of having to square a political circle, since it had to find some common ground in a debate bitterly divided between conflicting worldviews (roughly, between liberal and nationalist perspectives on the individual freedom of movement) and competing interests (between overburdened Mediterranean member states and Eastern member states adamant that asylum seekers would endanger their national cohesion). The Commission thus looked for the lowest common denominator in terms of migration management preferences amongst the distinct member states. The result is a two-tier border procedure aiming to fast-track and streamline the processing of asylum claims, allowing for more expeditious returns of irregular migrants. The goal is to prevent any bottleneck in the processing of the claims and to avoid the (currently near constant) overcrowding of reception facilities in the frontline states. Once again, there is little that is actually new in this proposal. It amounts to a generalization of the process currently in place in the infamous hotspots scattered on the Greek isles. According to the Pact, screening procedures would be carried out in reception centres created across Europe. A far cry from the slogan “no more Moria” since one may legitimately suspect that those reception centres will, at the first hiccup in the procedure, turn into tomorrow’s asylum camps.

      According to this procedure, newly arrived migrants would be submitted within 5 days to a pre-screening procedure and subsequently triaged into two categories. Migrants with a low chance of seeing their asylum claim recognized (because they would come from a country with a low recognition rate or a country belonging to the list of the safe third countries, for instance) would be redirected towards an accelerated procedure. The end goal would be to return them, if applicable, within twelve weeks. The other migrants would be subjected to the standard assessment of their asylum claim. It goes without saying that this proposal has been swiftly and unanimously condemned by all human rights organizations. It does not take a specialized lawyer to see that this two-tiered procedure could have devastating consequences for the “fast-tracked” asylum seekers left with no legal recourse against the initial decision to submit them to this sped up procedure (rather than the standard one) as well as reduced opportunities to defend their asylum claim or, if need be, to contest their return. No matter how often the Commission repeats that it will preserve all the legal safeguards required to protect migrants’ rights, it remains wildly unconvincing. Furthermore, the Pact may confuse speed and haste. The schedule is tight on paper (five days for the pre-screening, twelve weeks for the assessment of the asylum claim), it may well prove unrealistic to meet those deadlines in real-life conditions. The Commission also overlooks the fact that accelerated procedures tend to be sloppy, thus leading to juridical appeals and further legal wrangling and eventually amounting to processes far longer than expected.
      Integrating the returns, not the reception

      The Commission talked up the new Pact as being “balanced” and “humane”. Since the two first policy packages focus, first, on preventing would-be migrants from leaving their countries and, second, on facilitating and accelerating their returns, one would expect the third policy package to move away from the restriction of movement and to complement those measures with a reception plan tailored to the needs of refugees. And here comes the major disappointment with the New Pact and, perhaps, the clearest indication that the Pact is first and foremost designed to please the migration hardliners. It does include a solidarity scheme meant to alleviate the burden of frontline countries, to distribute more fairly the responsibilities amongst member states and to ensure that refugees are properly hosted. But this solidarity scheme is far from being robust enough to deliver on those promises. Let us unpack it briefly to understand why it is likely to fail. The solidarity scheme is mandatory. All member states will be under the obligation to take part. But there is a catch! Member states’ contribution to this collective effort can take many shapes and forms and it will be up to the member states to decide how they want to participate. They get to choose whether they want to relocate some refugees on their national soil, to provide some financial and/or logistical assistance, or to “sponsor” (it is the actual term used by the Commission) some returns.

      No one expected the Commission to reintroduce a compulsory relocation scheme in its Pact. Eastern European countries had drawn an obvious red line and it would have been either naïve or foolish to taunt them with that kind of policy proposal. But this so-called “flexible mandatory solidarity” relies on such a watered-down understanding of the solidarity principle that it results in a weak and misguided political instrument unsuited to solve the problem at hand. First, the flexible solidarity mechanism is too indeterminate to prove efficient. According to the current proposal, member states would have to shoulder a fair share of the reception burden (calculated on their respective population and GDP) but would be left to decide for themselves which form this contribution would take. The obvious flaw with the policy proposal is that, if all member states decline to relocate some refugees (which is a plausible scenario), Mediterranean states would still be left alone when it comes to dealing with the most immediate consequences of migration flows. They would receive much more financial, operational, and logistical support than it currently is the case – but they would be managing on their own the overcrowded reception centres. The Commission suggests that it would oversee the national pledges in terms of relocation and that it would impose some corrections if the collective pledges fall short of a predefined target. But it remains to be seen whether the Commission will have the political clout to impose some relocations to member states refusing them. One could not be blamed for being highly sceptical.

      Second, it is noteworthy that the Commission fails to integrate the reception of refugees since member states are de facto granted an opt-out on hosting refugees. What is integrated is rather the return policy, once more a repressive instrument. And it is the member states with the worst record in terms of migrants’ rights violations that are the most likely to be tasked with the delicate mission of returning them home. As a commentator was quipping on Twitter, it would be like asking a bully to walk his victim home (what could possibly go wrong?). The attempt to build an intra-European consensus is obviously pursued at the expense of the refugees. The incentive structure built into the flexible solidarity scheme offers an excellent illustration of this. If a member state declines to relocate any refugee and offers instead to ‘sponsor’ some returns, it has to honour that pledge within a limited period of time (the Pact suggests a six month timeframe). If it fails to do so, it becomes responsible for the relocation and the return of those migrants, leading to a situation in which some migrants may end up in a country where they do not want to be and that does not want them to be there. Hardly an optimal outcome…
      Conclusion

      The Pact represents a genuine attempt to design a multi-faceted and comprehensive migration policy, covering most aspects of a complex issue. The dysfunctions of the Schengen area and the question of the legal pathways to Europe have been relegated to a later discussion and one may wonder whether they should not have been included in the Pact to balance out its restrictive inclination. And, in all fairness, the Pact does throw a few bones to the more cosmopolitan-minded European citizens. For instance, it reminds the member states that maritime search and rescue operations are legal and should not be impeded, or it shortens (from five to three years) the waiting period for refugees to benefit from the freedom of movement. But those few welcome additions are vastly outweighed by the fact that migration hardliners dominated the agenda-setting in the early stage of the policy-making exercise and have thus been able to frame decisively the political discussion. The end result is a policy package leaning heavily towards some repressive instruments and particularly careless when it comes to safeguarding migrants’ rights.

      The New Pact was first drafted on the ashes of the mandatory relocation scheme. Back then, the Commission publicly made amends and revised its approach to the issue. Sadly, the New Pact was presented to the European public when the ashes of the Moria camp were still lukewarm. One can only hope that the member states will learn from that mistake too.

      https://blog.novamigra.eu/2020/09/24/the-new-pact-on-migration-and-asylum-a-critical-first-look-analysis

    • #Pacte_européen_sur_la_migration : un “nouveau départ” pour violer les droits humains

      La Commission européenne a publié aujourd’hui son « Nouveau Pacte sur l’Asile et la Migration » qui propose un nouveau cadre règlementaire et législatif. Avec ce plan, l’UE devient de facto un « leader du voyage retour » pour les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s en Méditerranée. EuroMed Droits craint que ce pacte ne détériore encore davantage la situation actuelle pour au moins trois raisons.

      Le pacte se concentre de manière obsessionnelle sur la politique de retours à travers un système de « sponsoring » : des pays européens tels que l’Autriche, la Pologne, la Hongrie ou la République tchèque – qui refusent d’accueillir des réfugié.e.s – pourront « sponsoriser » et organiser la déportation vers les pays de départ de ces réfugié.e.s. Au lieu de favoriser l’intégration, le pacte adopte une politique de retour à tout prix, même lorsque les demandeurs.ses d’asile peuvent être victimes de discrimination, persécution ou torture dans leur pays de retour. A ce jour, il n’existe aucun mécanisme permettant de surveiller ce qui arrive aux migrant.e.s et réfugié.e.s une fois déporté.e.s.

      Le pacte proposé renforce la sous-traitance de la gestion des frontières. En termes concrets, l’UE renforce la coopération avec les pays non-européens afin qu’ils ferment leurs frontières et empêchent les personnes de partir. Cette coopération est sujette à l’imposition de conditions par l’UE. Une telle décision européenne se traduit par une hausse du nombre de refoulements dans la région méditerranéenne et une coopération renforcée avec des pays qui ont un piètre bilan en matière de droits humains et qui ne possèdent pas de cadre efficace pour la protection des droits des personnes migrantes et réfugiées.

      Le pacte vise enfin à étendre les mécanismes de tri des demandeurs.ses d’asile et des migrant.e.s dans les pays d’arrivée. Ce modèle de tri – similaire à celui utilisé dans les zones de transit aéroportuaires – accentue les difficultés de pays tels que l’Espagne, l’Italie, Malte, la Grèce ou Chypre qui accueillent déjà la majorité des migrant.e.s et réfugié.e.s. Placer ces personnes dans des camps revient à mettre en place un système illégal d’incarcération automatique dès l’arrivée. Cela accroîtra la violence psychologique à laquelle les migrant.e.s et réfugié.e.s sont déjà soumis. Selon ce nouveau système, ces personnes seront identifié.e.s sous cinq jours et toute demande d’asile devra être traitée en douze semaines. Cette accélération de la procédure risque d’intensifier la détention et de diviser les arrivant.e.s entre demandeurs.ses d’asile et migrant.e.s économiques. Cela s’effectuerait de manière discriminatoire, sans analyse détaillée de chaque demande d’asile ni possibilité réelle de faire appel. Celles et ceux qui seront éligibles à la protection internationale seront relocalisé.e.s au sein des États membres qui acceptent de les recevoir. Les autres risqueront d’être déportés immédiatement.

      « En choisissant de sous-traiter davantage encore la gestion des frontières et d’accentuer la politique de retours, ce nouveau pacte conclut la transformation de la politique européenne en une approche pleinement sécuritaire. Pire encore, le pacte assimile la politique de “retour sponsorisé” à une forme de solidarité. Au-delà des déclarations officielles, cela démontre la volonté de l’Union européenne de criminaliser et de déshumaniser les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s », a déclaré Wadih Al-Asmar, Président d’EuroMed Droits.

      https://euromedrights.org/fr/publication/pacte-europeen-sur-la-migration-nouveau-depart-pour-violer-les-droits

    • Whose Pact? The Cognitive Dimensions of the New EU Pact on Migration and Asylum

      This Policy Insight examines the new Pact on Migration and Asylum in light of the principles and commitments enshrined in the United Nations Global Compact on Refugees (UN GCR) and the EU Treaties. It finds that from a legal viewpoint the ‘Pact’ is not really a Pact at all, if understood as an agreement concluded between relevant EU institutional parties. Rather, it is the European Commission’s policy guide for the duration of the current 9th legislature.

      The analysis shows that the Pact has intergovernmental aspects, in both name and fundamentals. It does not pursue a genuine Migration and Asylum Union. The Pact encourages an artificial need for consensus building or de facto unanimity among all EU member states’ governments in fields where the EU Treaties call for qualified majority voting (QMV) with the European Parliament as co-legislator. The Pact does not abolish the first irregular entry rule characterising the EU Dublin Regulation. It adopts a notion of interstate solidarity that leads to asymmetric responsibilities, where member states are given the flexibility to evade participating in the relocation of asylum seekers. The Pact also runs the risk of catapulting some contested member states practices’ and priorities about localisation, speed and de-territorialisation into EU policy.

      This Policy Insight argues that the Pact’s priority of setting up an independent monitoring mechanism of border procedures’ compliance with fundamental rights is a welcome step towards the better safeguarding of the rule of law. The EU inter-institutional negotiations on the Pact’s initiatives should be timely and robust in enforcing member states’ obligations under the current EU legal standards relating to asylum and borders, namely the prevention of detention and expedited expulsions, and the effective access by all individuals to dignified treatment and effective remedies. Trust and legitimacy of EU asylum and migration policy can only follow if international (human rights and refugee protection) commitments and EU Treaty principles are put first.

      https://www.ceps.eu/ceps-publications/whose-pact

    • First analysis of the EU’s new asylum proposals

      This week the EU Commission published its new package of proposals on asylum and (non-EU) migration – consisting of proposals for legislation, some ‘soft law’, attempts to relaunch talks on stalled proposals and plans for future measures. The following is an explanation of the new proposals (not attempting to cover every detail) with some first thoughts. Overall, while it is possible that the new package will lead to agreement on revised asylum laws, this will come at the cost of risking reduced human rights standards.

      Background

      Since 1999, the EU has aimed to create a ‘Common European Asylum System’. A first phase of legislation was passed between 2003 and 2005, followed by a second phase between 2010 and 2013. Currently the legislation consists of: a) the Qualification Directive, which defines when people are entitled to refugee status (based on the UN Refugee Convention) or subsidiary protection status, and what rights they have; b) the Dublin III Regulation, which allocates responsibility for an asylum seeker between Member States; c) the Eurodac Regulation, which facilitates the Dublin system by setting up a database of fingerprints of asylum seekers and people who cross the external border without authorisation; d) the Asylum Procedures Directive, which sets out the procedural rules governing asylum applications, such as personal interviews and appeals; e) the Reception Conditions Directive, which sets out standards on the living conditions of asylum-seekers, such as rules on housing and welfare; and f) the Asylum Agency Regulation, which set up an EU agency (EASO) to support Member States’ processing of asylum applications.

      The EU also has legislation on other aspects of migration: (short-term) visas, border controls, irregular migration, and legal migration – much of which has connections with the asylum legislation, and all of which is covered by this week’s package. For visas, the main legislation is the visa list Regulation (setting out which non-EU countries’ citizens are subject to a short-term visa requirement, or exempt from it) and the visa code (defining the criteria to obtain a short-term Schengen visa, allowing travel between all Schengen states). The visa code was amended last year, as discussed here.

      For border controls, the main legislation is the Schengen Borders Code, setting out the rules on crossing external borders and the circumstances in which Schengen states can reinstate controls on internal borders, along with the Frontex Regulation, setting up an EU border agency to assist Member States. On the most recent version of the Frontex Regulation, see discussion here and here.

      For irregular migration, the main legislation is the Return Directive. The Commission proposed to amend it in 2018 – on which, see analysis here and here.

      For legal migration, the main legislation on admission of non-EU workers is the single permit Directive (setting out a common process and rights for workers, but not regulating admission); the Blue Card Directive (on highly paid migrants, discussed here); the seasonal workers’ Directive (discussed here); and the Directive on intra-corporate transferees (discussed here). The EU also has legislation on: non-EU students, researchers and trainees (overview here); non-EU family reunion (see summary of the legislation and case law here) and on long-term resident non-EU citizens (overview – in the context of UK citizens after Brexit – here). In 2016, the Commission proposed to revise the Blue Card Directive (see discussion here).

      The UK, Ireland and Denmark have opted out of most of these laws, except some asylum law applies to the UK and Ireland, and Denmark is covered by the Schengen and Dublin rules. So are the non-EU countries associated with Schengen and Dublin (Norway, Iceland, Switzerland and Liechtenstein). There are also a number of further databases of non-EU citizens as well as Eurodac: the EU has never met a non-EU migrant who personal data it didn’t want to store and process.

      The Refugee ‘Crisis’

      The EU’s response to the perceived refugee ‘crisis’ was both short-term and long-term. In the short term, in 2015 the EU adopted temporary laws (discussed here) relocating some asylum seekers in principle from Italy and Greece to other Member States. A legal challenge to one of these laws failed (as discussed here), but in practice Member States accepted few relocations anyway. Earlier this year, the CJEU ruled that several Member States had breached their obligations under the laws (discussed here), but by then it was a moot point.

      Longer term, the Commission proposed overhauls of the law in 2016: a) a Qualification Regulation further harmonising the law on refugee and subsidiary protection status; b) a revised Dublin Regulation, which would have set up a system of relocation of asylum seekers for future crises; c) a revised Eurodac Regulation, to take much more data from asylum seekers and other migrants; d) an Asylum Procedures Regulation, further harmonising the procedural law on asylum applications; e) a revised Reception Conditions Directive; f) a revised Asylum Agency Regulation, giving the agency more powers; and g) a new Resettlement Regulation, setting out a framework of admitting refugees directly from non-EU countries. (See my comments on some of these proposals, from back in 2016)

      However, these proposals proved unsuccessful – which is the main reason for this week’s attempt to relaunch the process. In particular, an EU Council note from February 2019 summarises the diverse problems that befell each proposal. While the EU Council Presidency and the European Parliament reached agreement on the proposals on qualification, reception conditions and resettlement in June 2018, Member States refused to support the Presidency’s deal and the European Parliament refused to renegotiate (see, for instance, the Council documents on the proposals on qualification and resettlement; see also my comments on an earlier stage of the talks, when the Council had agreed its negotiation position on the qualification regulation).

      On the asylum agency, the EP and Council agreed on the revised law in 2017, but the Commission proposed an amendment in 2018 to give the agency more powers; the Council could not agree on this. On Eurodac, the EP and Council only partly agreed on a text. On the procedures Regulation, the Council largely agreed its position, except on border procedures; on Dublin there was never much prospect of agreement because of the controversy over relocating asylum seekers. (For either proposal, a difficult negotiation with the European Parliament lay ahead).

      In other areas too, the legislative process was difficult: the Council and EP gave up negotiating amendments to the Blue Card Directive (see the last attempt at a compromise here, and the Council negotiation mandate here), and the EP has not yet agreed a position on the Returns Directive (the Council has a negotiating position, but again it leaves out the difficult issue of border procedures; there is a draft EP position from February). Having said that, the EU has been able to agree legislation giving more powers to Frontex, as well as new laws on EU migration databases, in the last few years.

      The attempted relaunch

      The Commission’s new Pact on asylum and immigration (see also the roadmap on its implementation, the Q and As, and the staff working paper) does not restart the whole process from scratch. On qualification, reception conditions, resettlement, the asylum agency, the returns Directive and the Blue Card Directive, it invites the Council and Parliament to resume negotiations. But it tries to unblock the talks as a whole by tabling two amended legislative proposals and three new legislative proposals, focussing on the issues of border procedures and relocation of asylum seekers.

      Screening at the border

      This revised proposals start with a new proposal for screening asylum seekers at the border, which would apply to all non-EU citizens who cross an external border without authorisation, who apply for asylum while being checked at the border (without meeting the conditions for legal entry), or who are disembarked after a search and rescue operation. During the screening, these non-EU citizens are not allowed to enter the territory of a Member State, unless it becomes clear that they meet the criteria for entry. The screening at the border should take no longer than 5 days, with an extra 5 days in the event of a huge influx. (It would also be possible to apply the proposed law to those on the territory who evaded border checks; for them the deadline to complete the screening is 3 days).

      Screening has six elements, as further detailed in the proposal: a health check, an identity check, registration in a database, a security check, filling out a debriefing form, and deciding on what happens next. At the end of the screening, the migrant is channelled either into the expulsion process (if no asylum claim has been made, and if the migrant does not meet the conditions for entry) or, if an asylum claim is made, into the asylum process – with an indication of whether the claim should be fast-tracked or not. It’s also possible that an asylum seeker would be relocated to another Member State. The screening is carried out by national officials, possibly with support from EU agencies.

      To ensure human rights protection, there must be independent monitoring to address allegations of non-compliance with human rights. These allegations might concern breaches of EU or international law, national law on detention, access to the asylum procedure, or non-refoulement (the ban on sending people to an unsafe country). Migrants must be informed about the process and relevant EU immigration and data protection law. There is no provision for judicial review of the outcome of the screening process, although there would be review as part of the next step (asylum or return).

      Asylum procedures

      The revised proposal for an asylum procedures Regulation would leave in place most of the Commission’s 2016 proposal to amend the law, adding some specific further proposed amendments, which either link back to the screening proposal or aim to fast-track decisions and expulsions more generally.

      On the first point, the usual rules on informing asylum applicants and registering their application would not apply until after the end of the screening. A border procedure may apply following the screening process, but Member States must apply the border procedure in cases where an asylum seeker used false documents, is a perceived national security threat, or falls within the new ground for fast-tracking cases (on which, see below). The latter obligation is subject to exceptions where a Member State has reported that a non-EU country is not cooperating on readmission; the process for dealing with that issue set out under the 2019 amendments to the visa code will then apply. Also, the border process cannot apply to unaccompanied minors or children under 12, unless they are a supposed national security risk. Further exceptions apply where the asylum seeker is vulnerable or has medical needs, the application is not inadmissible or cannot be fast-tracked, or detention conditions cannot be guaranteed. A Member State might apply the Dublin process to determine which Member State is responsible for the asylum claim during the border process. The whole border process (including any appeal) must last no more than 12 weeks, and can only be used to declare applications inadmissible or apply the new ground for fast-tracking them.

      There would also be a new border expulsion procedure, where an asylum application covered by the border procedure was rejected. This is subject to its own 12-week deadline, starting from the point when the migrant is no longer allowed to remain. Much of the Return Directive would apply – but not the provisions on the time period for voluntary departure, remedies and the grounds for detention. Instead, the border expulsion procedure would have its own stricter rules on these issues.

      As regards general fast-tracking, in order to speed up the expulsion process for unsuccessful applications, a rejection of an asylum application would have to either incorporate an expulsion decision or entail a simultaneous separate expulsion decision. Appeals against expulsion decisions would then be subject to the same rules as appeals against asylum decisions. If the asylum seeker comes from a country with a refugee recognition rate below 20%, his or her application must be fast-tracked (this would even apply to unaccompanied minors) – unless circumstances in that country have changed, or the asylum seeker comes from a group for whom the low recognition rate is not representative (for instance, the recognition rate might be higher for LGBT asylum-seekers from that country). Many more appeals would be subject to a one-week time limit for the rejected asylum seeker to appeal, and there could be only one level of appeal against decisions taken within a border procedure.

      Eurodac

      The revised proposal for Eurodac would build upon the 2016 proposal, which was already far-reaching: extending Eurodac to include not only fingerprints, but also photos and other personal data; reducing the age of those covered by Eurodac from 14 to 6; removing the time limits and the limits on use of the fingerprints taken from persons who had crossed the border irregularly; and creating a new obligation to collect data of all irregular migrants over age 6 (currently fingerprint data for this group cannot be stored, but can simply be checked, as an option, against the data on asylum seekers and irregular border crossers). The 2020 proposal additionally provides for interoperability with other EU migration databases, taking of personal data during the screening process, including more data on the migration status of each person, and expressly applying the law to those disembarked after a search and rescue operation.

      Dublin rules on asylum responsibility

      A new proposal for asylum management would replace the Dublin regulation (meaning that the Commission has withdrawn its 2016 proposal to replace that Regulation). The 2016 proposal would have created a ‘bottleneck’ in the Member State of entry, requiring that State to examine first whether many of the grounds for removing an asylum-seeker to a non-EU country apply before considering whether another Member State might be responsible for the application (because the asylum seeker’s family live there, for instance). It would also have imposed obligations directly on asylum-seekers to cooperate with the process, rather than only regulate relations between Member States. These obligations would have been enforced by punishing asylum seekers who disobeyed: removing their reception conditions (apart from emergency health care); fast-tracking their substantive asylum applications; refusing to consider new evidence from them; and continuing the asylum application process in their absence.

      It would no longer be possible for asylum seekers to provide additional evidence of family links, with a view to being in the same country as a family member. Overturning a CJEU judgment (see further discussion here), unaccompanied minors would no longer have been able to make applications in multiple Member States (in the absence of a family member in any of them). However, the definition of family members would have been widened, to include siblings and families formed in a transit country. Responsibility for an asylum seeker based on the first Member State of irregular entry (a commonly applied criterion) would have applied indefinitely, rather than expire one year after entry as it does under the current rules. The ‘Sangatte clause’ (responsibility after five months of living in a second Member State, if the ‘irregular entry’ criterion no longer applies) would be dropped. The ‘sovereignty clause’, which played a key part in the 2015-16 refugee ‘crisis’ (it lets a Member State take responsibility for any application even if the Dublin rules do not require it, cf Germany accepting responsibility for Syrian asylum seekers) would have been sharply curtailed. Time limits for detention during the transfer process would be reduced. Remedies for asylum seekers would have been curtailed: they would only have seven days to appeal against a transfer; courts would have fifteen days to decide (although they could have stayed on the territory throughout); and the grounds of review would have been curtailed.

      Finally, the 2016 proposal would have tackled the vexed issue of disproportionate allocation of responsibility for asylum seekers by setting up an automated system determining how many asylum seekers each Member State ‘should’ have based on their size and GDP. If a Member State were responsible for excessive numbers of applicants, Member States which were receiving fewer numbers would have to take more to help out. If they refused, they would have to pay €250,000 per applicant.

      The 2020 proposal drops some of the controversial proposals from 2016, including the ‘bottleneck’ in the Member State of entry (the current rule, giving Member States an option to decide if a non-EU country is responsible for the application on narrower grounds than in the 2016 proposal, would still apply). Also, the sovereignty clause would now remain unchanged.

      However, the 2020 proposal also retains parts of the 2016 proposal: the redefinition of ‘family member’ (which could be more significant now that the bottleneck is removed, unless Member States choose to apply the relevant rules on non-EU countries’ responsibility during the border procedure already); obligations for asylum seekers (redrafted slightly); some of the punishments for non-compliant asylum-seekers (the cut-off for considering evidence would stay, as would the loss of benefits except for those necessary to ensure a basic standard of living: see the CJEU case law in CIMADE and Haqbin); dropping the provision on evidence of family links; changing the rules on responsibility for unaccompanied minors; retaining part of the changes to the irregular entry criterion (it would now cease to apply after three years; the Sangatte clause would still be dropped; it would apply after search and rescue but not apply in the event of relocation); curtailing judicial review (the grounds would still be limited; the time limit to appeal would be 14 days; courts would not have a strict deadline to decide; suspensive effect would not apply in all cases); and the reduced time limits for detention.

      The wholly new features of the 2020 proposal are: some vague provisions about crisis management; responsibility for an asylum application for the Member State which issued a visa or residence document which expired in the last three years (the current rule is responsibility if the visa expired less than six months ago, and the residence permit expired less than a year ago); responsibility for an asylum application for a Member State in which a non-EU citizen obtained a diploma; and the possibility for refugees or persons with subsidiary protection status to obtain EU long-term resident status after three years, rather than five.

      However, the most significant feature of the new proposal is likely to be its attempt to solve the underlying issue of disproportionate allocation of asylum seekers. Rather than a mechanical approach to reallocating responsibility, the 2020 proposal now provides for a menu of ‘solidarity contributions’: relocation of asylum seekers; relocation of refugees; ‘return sponsorship’; or support for ‘capacity building’ in the Member State (or a non-EU country) facing migratory pressure. There are separate rules for search and rescue disembarkations, on the one hand, and more general migratory pressures on the other. Once the Commission determines that the latter situation exists, other Member States have to choose from the menu to offer some assistance. Ultimately the Commission will adopt a decision deciding what the contributions will be. Note that ‘return sponsorship’ comes with a ticking clock: if the persons concerned are not expelled within eight months, the sponsoring Member State must accept them on its territory.

      Crisis management

      The issue of managing asylum issues in a crisis has been carved out of the Dublin proposal into a separate proposal, which would repeal an EU law from 2001 that set up a framework for offering ‘temporary protection’ in a crisis. Note that Member States have never used the 2001 law in practice.

      Compared to the 2001 law, the new proposal is integrated into the EU asylum legislation that has been adopted or proposed in the meantime. It similarly applies in the event of a ‘mass influx’ that prevents the effective functioning of the asylum system. It would apply the ‘solidarity’ process set out in the proposal to replace the Dublin rules (ie relocation of asylum seekers and other measures), with certain exceptions and shorter time limits to apply that process.

      The proposal focusses on providing for possible exceptions to the usual asylum rules. In particular, during a crisis, the Commission could authorise a Member State to apply temporary derogations from the rules on border asylum procedures (extending the time limit, using the procedure to fast-track more cases), border return procedures (again extending the time limit, more easily justifying detention), or the time limit to register asylum applicants. Member States could also determine that due to force majeure, it was not possible to observe the normal time limits for registering asylum applications, applying the Dublin process for responsibility for asylum applications, or offering ‘solidarity’ to other Member States.

      Finally, the new proposal, like the 2001 law, would create a potential for a form of separate ‘temporary protection’ status for the persons concerned. A Member State could suspend the consideration of asylum applications from people coming from the country facing a crisis for up to a year, in the meantime giving them status equivalent to ‘subsidiary protection’ status in the EU qualification law. After that point it would have to resume consideration of the applications. It would need the Commission’s approval, whereas the 2001 law left it to the Council to determine a situation of ‘mass influx’ and provided for the possible extension of the special rules for up to three years.

      Other measures

      The Commission has also adopted four soft law measures. These comprise: a Recommendation on asylum crisis management; a Recommendation on resettlement and humanitarian admission; a Recommendation on cooperation between Member States on private search and rescue operations; and guidance on the applicability of EU law on smuggling of migrants – notably concluding that it cannot apply where (as in the case of law of the sea) there is an obligation to rescue.

      On other issues, the Commission plan is to use current legislation – in particular the recent amendment to the visa code, which provides for sticks to make visas more difficult to get for citizens of countries which don’t cooperate on readmission of people, and carrots to make visas easier to get for citizens of countries which do cooperate on readmission. In some areas, such as the Schengen system, there will be further strategies and plans in the near future; it is not clear if this will lead to more proposed legislation.

      However, on legal migration, the plan is to go further than relaunching the amendment of the Blue Card Directive, as the Commission is also planning to propose amendments to the single permit and long-term residence laws referred to above – leading respectively to more harmonisation of the law on admission of non-EU workers and enhanced possibilities for long-term resident non-EU citizens to move between Member States (nb the latter plan is separate from this week’s proposal to amend this law as regards refugees and people with subsidiary protection already). Both these plans are relevant to British citizens moving to the EU after the post-Brexit transition period – and the latter is also relevant to British citizens covered by the withdrawal agreement.

      Comments

      This week’s plan is less a complete restart of EU law in this area than an attempt to relaunch discussions on a blocked set of amendments to that law, which moreover focusses on a limited set of issues. Will it ‘work’? There are two different ways to answer that question.

      First, will it unlock the institutional blockage? Here it should be kept in mind that the European Parliament and the Council had largely agreed on several of the 2016 proposals already; they would have been adopted in 2018 already had not the Council treated all the proposals as a package, and not gone back on agreements which the Council Presidency reached with the European Parliament. It is always open to the Council to get at least some of these proposals adopted quickly by reversing these approaches.

      On the blocked proposals, the Commission has targeted the key issues of border procedures and allocation of asylum-seekers. If the former leads to more quick removals of unsuccessful applicants, the latter issue is no longer so pressing. But it is not clear if the Member States will agree to anything on border procedures, or whether such an agreement will result in more expulsions anyway – because the latter depends on the willingness of non-EU countries, which the EU cannot legislate for (and does not even address in this most recent package). And because it is uncertain whether they will result in more expulsions, Member States will be wary of agreeing to anything which either results in more obligations to accept asylum-seekers on their territory, or leaves them with the same number as before.

      The idea of ‘return sponsorship’ – which reads like a grotesque parody of individuals sponsoring children in developing countries via charities – may not be appealing except to those countries like France, which have the capacity to twist arms in developing countries to accept returns. Member States might be able to agree on a replacement for the temporary protection Directive on the basis that they will never use that replacement either. And Commission threats to use infringement proceedings to enforce the law might not worry Member States who recall that the CJEU ruled on their failure to relocate asylum-seekers after the relocation law had already expired, and that the Court will soon rule on Hungary’s expulsion of the Central European University after it has already left.

      As to whether the proposals will ‘work’ in terms of managing asylum flows fairly and compatibly with human rights, it is striking how much they depend upon curtailing appeal rights, even though appeals are often successful. The proposed limitation of appeal rights will also be maintained in the Dublin system; and while the proposed ‘bottleneck’ of deciding on removals to non-EU countries before applying the Dublin system has been removed, a variation on this process may well apply in the border procedures process instead. There is no new review of the assessment of the safety of non-EU countries – which is questionable in light of the many reports of abuse in Libya. While the EU is not proposing, as the wildest headbangers would want, to turn people back or refuse applications without consideration, the question is whether the fast-track consideration of applications and then appeals will constitute merely a Potemkin village of procedural rights that mean nothing in practice.

      Increased detention is already a feature of the amendments proposed earlier: the reception conditions proposal would add a new ground for detention; the return Directive proposal would inevitably increase detention due to curtailing voluntary departure (as discussed here). Unfortunately the Commission’s claim in its new communication that its 2018 proposal is ‘promoting’ voluntary return is therefore simply false. Trump-style falsehoods have no place in the discussion of EU immigration or asylum law.

      The latest Eurodac proposal would not do much compared to the 2016 proposal – but then, the 2016 proposal would already constitute an enormous increase in the amount of data collected and shared by that system.

      Some elements of the package are more positive. The possibility for refugees and people with subsidiary protection to get EU long-term residence status earlier would be an important step toward making asylum ‘valid throughout the Union’, as referred to in the Treaties. The wider definition of family members, and the retention of the full sovereignty clause, may lead to some fairer results under the Dublin system. Future plans to improve the long-term residents’ Directive are long overdue. The Commission’s sound legal assessment that no one should be prosecuted for acting on their obligations to rescue people in distress at sea is welcome. The quasi-agreed text of the reception conditions Directive explicitly rules out Trump-style separate detention of children.

      No proposals from the EU can solve the underlying political issue: a chunk of public opinion is hostile to more migration, whether in frontline Member States, other Member States, or transit countries outside the EU. The politics is bound to affect what Member States and non-EU countries alike are willing to agree to. And for the same reason, even if a set of amendments to the system is ultimately agreed, there will likely be continuing issues of implementation, especially illegal pushbacks and refusals to accept relocation.

      https://eulawanalysis.blogspot.com/2020/09/first-analysis-of-eus-new-asylum.html?spref=fb

    • Pacte européen sur les migrations et l’asile : Le rendez-vous manqué de l’UE

      Le nouveau pacte européen migrations et asile présenté par la Commission ce 23 septembre, loin de tirer les leçons de l’échec et du coût humain intolérable des politiques menées depuis 30 ans, s’inscrit dans la continuité des logiques déjà largement éprouvées, fondées sur une approche répressive et sécuritaire au service de l’endiguement et des expulsions et au détriment d’une politique d’accueil qui s’attache à garantir et à protéger la dignité et les droits fondamentaux.

      Des « nouveaux » camps européens aux frontières pour filtrer les personnes arrivées sur le territoire européen et expulser le plus grand nombre

      En réaction au drame des incendies qui ont ravagé le camp de Moria sur l’île grecque de Lesbos, la commissaire européenne aux affaires intérieures, Ylva Johansson, affirmait le 17 septembre devant les députés européens qu’« il n’y aurait pas d’autres Moria » mais de « véritables centres d’accueil » aux frontières européennes.

      Si le nouveau pacte prévoie effectivement la création de « nouveaux » camps conjuguée à une « nouvelle » procédure accélérée aux frontières, ces derniers s’apparentent largement à l’approche hotspot mise en œuvre par l’Union européenne (UE) depuis 2015 afin d’organiser la sélection des personnes qu’elle souhaite accueillir et l’expulsion, depuis la frontière, de tous celles qu’elle considère « indésirables ».

      Le pacte prévoie ainsi la mise en place « d’un contrôle préalable à l’entrée sur le territoire pour toutes les personnes qui se présentent aux frontières extérieures ou après un débarquement, à la suite d’une opération de recherche et de sauvetage ». Il s’agira, pour les pays situés à la frontière extérieure de l’UE, de procéder – dans un délai de 5 jours et avec l’appui des agences européennes (l’agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes – Frontex et le Bureau européen d’appui en matière d’asile – EASO) – à des contrôles d’identité (prise d’empreintes et enregistrement dans les bases de données européennes) doublés de contrôles sécuritaires et sanitaires afin de procéder à un tri préalable à l’entrée sur le territoire, permettant d’orienter ensuite les personne vers :

      Une procédure d’asile accélérée à la frontière pour celles possédant une nationalité pour laquelle le taux de reconnaissance d’une protection internationale, à l’échelle de l’UE, est inférieure à 20%
      Une procédure d’asile normale pour celles considérées comme éligibles à une protection.
      Une procédure d’expulsion immédiate, depuis la frontière, pour toute celles qui auront été rejetées par ce dispositif de tri, dans un délai de 12 semaines.

      Pendant cette procédure de filtrage à la frontière, les personnes seraient considérées comme n’étant pas encore entrées sur le territoire européen ce qui permettrait aux Etats de déroger aux conventions de droit international qui s’y appliquent.

      Un premier projet pilote est notamment prévu à Lesbos, conjointement avec les autorités grecques, pour installer un nouveau camp sur l’île avec l’appui d’une Task Force européenne, directement placée sous le contrôle de la direction générale des affaires intérieure de la Commission européenne (DG HOME).

      Difficile de voir où se trouve l’innovation dans la proposition présentée par la Commission. Si ce n’est que les États européens souhaitent pousser encore plus loin à la fois la logique de filtrage à ces frontières ainsi que la sous-traitance de leur contrôle. Depuis l’été 2018, l’Union européenne défend la création de « centres contrôlés au sein de l’UE » d’une part et de « plateformes de débarquement dans les pays tiers » d’autre part. L’UE, à travers ce nouveau mécanisme, vise à organiser l’expulsion rapide des migrants qui sont parvenus, souvent au péril de leur vie, à pénétrer sur son territoire. Pour ce faire, la coopération accrue avec les gardes-frontières des États non européens et l’appui opérationnel de l’agence Frontex sont encore et toujours privilégiés.
      Un « nouvel écosystème en matière de retour »

      L’obsession européenne pour l’amélioration du « taux de retour » se retrouve au cœur de ce nouveau pacte, en repoussant toujours plus les limites en matière de coopération extérieure et d’enfermement des personnes étrangères jugées indésirables et en augmentant de façon inédite ses moyens opérationnels.

      Selon l’expression de Margaritis Schinas, commissaire grec en charge de la « promotion du mode de vie européen », la nouvelle procédure accélérée aux frontières s’accompagnera d’« un nouvel écosystème européen en matière de retour ». Il sera piloté par un « nouveau coordinateur de l’UE chargé des retours » ainsi qu’un « réseau de haut niveau coordonnant les actions nationales » avec le soutien de l’agence Frontex, qui devrait devenir « le bras opérationnel de la politique de retour européenne ».

      Rappelons que Frontex a vu ses moyens décuplés ces dernières années, notamment en vue d’expulser plus de personnes migrantes. Celle-ci a encore vu ses moyens renforcés depuis l’entrée en vigueur de son nouveau règlement le 4 décembre 2019 dont la Commission souhaite accélérer la mise en œuvre effective. Au-delà d’une augmentation de ses effectifs et de la possibilité d’acquérir son propre matériel, l’agence bénéficie désormais de pouvoirs étendus pour identifier les personnes « expulsables » du territoire européen, obtenir les documents de voyage nécessaires à la mise en œuvre de leurs expulsions ainsi que pour coordonner des opérations d’expulsion au service des Etats membres.

      La Commission souhaite également faire aboutir, d’ici le second trimestre 2021, le projet de révision de la directive européenne « Retour », qui constitue un recul sans précédent du cadre de protection des droits fondamentaux des personnes migrantes. Voir notre précédente actualité sur le sujet : L’expulsion au cœur des politiques migratoires européennes, 22 mai 2019
      Des « partenariats sur-mesure » avec les pays d’origine et de transit

      La Commission étend encore redoubler d’efforts afin d’inciter les Etats non européens à participer activement à empêcher les départs vers l’Europe ainsi qu’à collaborer davantage en matière de retour et de réadmission en utilisant l’ensemble des instruments politiques à sa disposition. Ces dernières années ont vu se multiplier les instruments européens de coopération formelle (à travers la signature, entre autres, d’accords de réadmission bilatéraux ou multilatéraux) et informelle (à l’instar de la tristement célèbre déclaration entre l’UE et la Turquie de mars 2016) à tel point qu’il est devenu impossible, pour les États ciblés, de coopérer avec l’UE dans un domaine spécifique sans que les objectifs européens en matière migratoire ne soient aussi imposés.

      L’exécutif européen a enfin souligné sa volonté de d’exploiter les possibilités offertes par le nouveau règlement sur les visas Schengen, entré en vigueur en février 2020. Celui-ci prévoie d’évaluer, chaque année, le degré de coopération des Etats non européens en matière de réadmission. Le résultat de cette évaluation permettra d’adopter une décision de facilitation de visa pour les « bon élèves » ou à l’inverse, d’imposer des mesures de restrictions de visas aux « mauvais élèves ». Voir notre précédente actualité sur le sujet : Expulsions contre visas : le droit à la mobilité marchandé, 2 février 2020.

      Conduite au seul prisme des intérêts européens, cette politique renforce le caractère historiquement déséquilibré des relations de « coopération » et entraîne en outre des conséquences désastreuses sur les droits des personnes migrantes, notamment celui de quitter tout pays, y compris le leur. Sous couvert d’aider ces pays à « se développer », les mesures « incitatives » européennes ne restent qu’un moyen de poursuivre ses objectifs et d’imposer sa vision des migrations. En coopérant davantage avec les pays d’origine et de transit, parmi lesquelles des dictatures et autres régimes autoritaires, l’UE renforce l’externalisation de ses politiques migratoires, sous-traitant la gestion des exilées aux Etats extérieurs à l’UE, tout en se déresponsabilisant des violations des droits perpétrées hors de ses frontières.
      Solidarité à la carte, entre relocalisation et expulsion

      Le constat d’échec du système Dublin – machine infernale de l’asile européen – conjugué à la volonté de parvenir à trouver un consensus suite aux profonds désaccords qui avaient mené les négociations sur Dublin IV dans l’impasse, la Commission souhaite remplacer l’actuel règlement de Dublin par un nouveau règlement sur la gestion de l’asile et de l’immigration, liant étroitement les procédures d’asile aux procédures d’expulsion.

      Les quotas de relocalisation contraignants utilisés par le passé, à l’instar du mécanisme de relocalisation mis en place entre 2015 et 2017 qui fut un échec tant du point de vue du nombre de relocalisations (seulement 25 000 relocalisations sur les 160 000 prévues) que du refus de plusieurs Etats d’y participer, semblent être abandonnés.

      Le nouveau pacte propose donc un nouveau mécanisme de solidarité, certes obligatoire mais flexible dans ses modalités. Ainsi les Etats membres devront choisir, selon une clé de répartition définie :

      Soit de participer à l’effort de relocalisation des personnes identifiées comme éligibles à la protection internationale depuis les frontières extérieures pour prendre en charge l’examen de leur demande d’asile.
      Soit de participer au nouveau concept de « parrainage des retours » inventé par la Commission européenne. Concrètement, il s’agit d’être « solidaire autrement », en s’engageant activement dans la politique de retour européenne par la mise en œuvre des expulsions des personnes que l’UE et ses Etats membres souhaitent éloigner du territoire, avec la possibilité de concentrer leurs efforts sur les nationalités pour lesquelles leurs perspectives de faire aboutir l’expulsion est la plus élevée.

      De nouvelles règles pour les « situations de crise et de force majeure »

      Le pacte prévoie d’abroger la directive européenne relative à des normes minimales pour l’octroi d’une protection temporaire en cas d’afflux massif de personnes déplacées, au profit d’un nouveau règlement européen relatif aux « situations de crise et de force majeure ». L’UE et ses Etats membres ont régulièrement essuyé les critiques des acteurs de la société civile pour n’avoir jamais activé la procédure prévue par la directive de 2001, notamment dans le cadre de situation exceptionnelle telle que la crise de l’accueil des personnes arrivées aux frontières sud de l’UE en 2015.

      Le nouveau règlement prévoie notamment qu’en cas de « situation de crise ou de force majeure » les Etats membres pourraient déroger aux règles qui s’appliquent en matière d’asile, en suspendant notamment l’enregistrement des demandes d’asile pendant un durée d’un mois maximum. Cette mesure entérine des pratiques contraires au droit international et européen, à l’instar de ce qu’a fait la Grèce début mars 2020 afin de refouler toutes les personnes qui tenteraient de pénétrer le territoire européen depuis la Turquie voisine. Voir notre précédente actualité sur le sujet : Frontière Grèce-Turquie : de l’approche hotspot au scandale de la guerre aux migrant·e ·s, 3 mars 2020

      Cette proposition représente un recul sans précédent du droit d’asile aux frontières et fait craindre de multiples violations du principe de non refoulement consacré par la Convention de Genève.

      Bien loin d’engager un changement de cap des politiques migratoires européennes, le nouveau pacte européen migrations et asile ne semble n’être qu’un nouveau cadre de plus pour poursuivre une approche des mouvements migratoires qui, de longue date, s’est construite autour de la volonté d’empêcher les arrivées aux frontières et d’organiser un tri parmi les personnes qui auraient réussi à braver les obstacles pour atteindre le territoire européen, entre celles considérées éligibles à la demande d’asile et toutes les autres qui devraient être expulsées.

      De notre point de vue, cela signifie surtout que des milliers de personnes continueront à être privées de liberté et à subir les dispositifs répressifs des Etats membres de l’Union européenne. Les conséquences néfastes sur la dignité humaine et les droits fondamentaux de cette approche sont flagrantes, les personnes exilées et leurs soutiens y sont confrontées tous les jours.

      Encore une fois, des moyens très importants sont consacrés à financer l’érection de barrières physiques, juridiques et technologiques ainsi que la construction de camps sur les routes migratoires tandis qu’ils pourraient utilement être redéployés pour accueillir dignement et permettre un accès inconditionnel au territoire européen pour les personnes bloquées à ses frontières extérieures afin d’examiner avec attention et impartialité leurs situations et assurer le respect effectif des droits de tou∙te∙s.

      Nous appelons à un changement radical des politiques migratoires, pour une Europe qui encourage les solidarités, fondée sur la protection des droits humains et la dignité humaine afin d’assurer la protection des personnes et non pas leur exclusion.

      https://www.lacimade.org/pacte-europeen-sur-les-migrations-et-lasile-le-rendez-vous-manque-de-lue

    • EU’s new migrant ‘pact’ is as squalid as its refugee camps

      Governments need to share responsibility for asylum seekers, beyond merely ejecting the unwanted

      One month after fires swept through Europe’s largest, most squalid refugee camp, the EU’s migration policies present a picture as desolate as the blackened ruins of Moria on the Greek island of Lesbos. The latest effort at overhauling these policies is a European Commission “pact on asylum and migration”, which is not a pact at all. Its proposals sharply divide the EU’s 27 governments.

      In an attempt to appease central and eastern European countries hostile to admitting asylum-seekers, the commission suggests, in an Orwellian turn of phrase, that they should operate “relocation and return sponsorships”, dispatching people refused entry to their places of origin. This sort of task is normally reserved for nightclub bouncers.

      The grim irony is that Hungary and Poland, two countries that would presumably be asked to take charge of such expulsions, are the subject of EU disciplinary proceedings due to alleged violations of the rule of law. It remains a mystery how, if the commission proposal moves forward, the EU will succeed in binding Hungary and Poland into a common asylum policy and bend them into accepting EU definitions of the rule of law.

      Perhaps the best thing to be said of the commission’s plan is that, unlike the UK government, EU policymakers are not toying with hare-brained schemes of sending asylum-seekers to Ascension Island in the south Atlantic. Such options are the imagined privilege of a former imperial power not divested of all its far-flung possessions.

      Yet the commission’s initiative still reeks of wishful thinking. It foresees a process in which authorities swiftly check the identities, security status and health of irregular migrants, before returning them home, placing them in the asylum system or putting them in temporary facilities. This will supposedly decongest EU border zones, as governments will agree how to relocate new arrivals. But it is precisely the lack of such agreement since 2015 that led to Moria’s disgraceful conditions.

      The commission should not be held responsible for governments failing to shoulder their responsibilities. It is also justified in emphasising the need for a strong EU frontier. This is a precondition for free movement inside the bloc, vital for a flourishing single market.

      True, the Schengen system of border-free internal travel is curtailed at present because of the pandemic, not to mention restrictions introduced in some countries after the 2015 refugee and migrant crisis. But no government wants to abandon Schengen. Where they fall out with each other is over the housing of refugees and migrants.

      Europe’s overcrowded, unhygienic refugee camps, and the paralysis that grips EU policies, are all the more shameful in that governments no longer face a border emergency. Some 60,800 irregular migrants crossed into the EU between January and August, 14 per cent less than the same period in 2019, according to the EU border agency.

      By contrast, there were 1.8m illegal border crossings in 2015, a different order of magnitude. Refugees from conflicts in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria made desperate voyages across the Mediterranean, with thousands drowning in ramshackle boats. Some countries, led by Germany and Sweden, were extremely generous in opening their doors to refugees. Others were not.

      The roots of today’s problems lie in the measures devised to address that crisis, above all a 2016 accord with Turkey. Irregular migrants were kept on Moria and other Greek islands, designated “hotspots”, in the expectation that failed asylum applicants would be smoothly returned to Turkey, its coffers replenished by billions of euros in EU assistance. In practice, few went back to Turkey and the understaffed, underfunded “hotspots” became places of tension between refugees and locals.

      Unable to agree on a relocation scheme among themselves, EU governments lapsed into a de facto policy of deterrence of irregular migrants. The pandemic provided an excuse for Italy and Malta to close their ports to people rescued at sea. Visiting the Greek-Turkish border in March, Ursula von der Leyen, the commission president, declared: “I thank Greece for being our European aspida [shield].”

      The legitimacy of EU refugee policies depends on adherence to international law, as well the bloc’s own rules. Its practical success requires all governments to share a responsibility for asylum-seekers that goes beyond ejecting unwanted individuals. Otherwise the EU will fall into the familiar trap of cobbling together unsatisfactory half-measures that guarantee more trouble in the future.

      https://www.ft.com/content/c50c6b9c-75a8-40b1-900d-a228faa382dc?segmentid=acee4131-99c2-09d3-a635-873e61754

    • The EU’s pact against migration, Part One

      The EU Commission’s proposal for a ‘New Pact for Migration and Asylum’ offers no prospect of ending the enduring mobility conflict, opposing the movements of illegalised migrants to the EU’s restrictive migration policies.

      The ’New Pact for Migration and Asylum’, announced by the European Commission in July 2019, was finally presented on September 23, 2020. The Pact was eagerly anticipated as it was described as a “fresh start on migration in Europe”, acknowledging not only that Dublin had failed, but also that the negotiations between European member states as to what system might replace it had reached a standstill.

      The fire in Moria that left more than 13.000 people stranded in the streets of Lesvos island offered a glaring symbol of the failure of the current EU policy. The public outcry it caused and expressions of solidarity it crystallised across Europe pressured the Commission to respond through the publication of its Pact.

      Considering the trajectory of EU migration policies over the last decades, the particular position of the Commission within the European power structure and the current political conjuncture of strong anti-migration positions in Europe, we did not expect the Commission’s proposal to address the mobility conflict underlying its migration policy crisis in a constructive way. And indeed, the Pact’s main promise is to manage the diverging positions of member states through a new mechanism of “flexible solidarity” between member states in sharing the “burden” of migrants who have arrived on European territory. Perpetuating the trajectory of the last decades, it however remains premised on keeping most migrants from the global South out at all cost. The “New Pact” then is effectively a pact between European states against migrants. The Pact, which will be examined and possibly adopted by the European Parliament and Council in the coming months, confirms the impasse to which three decades of European migration and asylum policy have led, and an absence of any political imagination worthy of the name.
      The EU’s migration regime’s failed architecture

      The current architecture of the European border regime is based on two main and intertwined pillars: the Schengen Implementing Convention (SIC, or Schengen II) and the Dublin Convention, both signed in 1990, and gradually enforced in the following years.[1]

      Created outside the EC/EU context, they became the central rationalities of the emerging European border and migration regime after their incorporation into EU law through the Treaty of Amsterdam (1997/99). Schengen instituted the EU’s territory as an area of free movement for its citizens and, as a direct consequence, reinforced the exclusion of citizens of the global South and pushed control towards its external borders.

      However this profound transformation of European borders left unchanged the unbalanced systemic relations between Europe and the Global South, within which migrants’ movements are embedded. As a result, this policy shift did not stop migrants from reaching the EU but rather illegalised their mobility, forcing them to resort to precarious migration strategies and generating an easily exploitable labour force that has become a large-scale and permanent feature of EU economies.

      The more than 40,000 migrant deaths recorded at the EU’s borders by NGOs since the end of the 1980s are the lethal outcomes of this enduring mobility conflict opposing the movements of illegalised migrants to the EU’s restrictive migration policies.

      The second pillar of the EU’s migration architecture, the Dublin Convention, addressed asylum seekers and their allocation between member-states. To prevent them from filing applications in several EU countries – derogatively referred to as “asylum shopping” – the 2003 Dublin regulation states that the asylum seekers’ first country of entry into the EU is responsible for processing their claims. Dublin thus created an uneven European geography of (ir)responsibility that allowed the member states not directly situated at the intersection of European borders and routes of migration to abnegate their responsibility to provide shelter and protection, and placed a heavier “burden” on the shoulders of states located at the EU’s external borders.

      This unbalanced architecture, around which the entire Common European Asylum System (CEAS) was constructed, would begin to wobble as soon as the number of people arriving on the EU’s shores rose, leading to crisis-driven policy responses to prevent the migration regime from collapsing under the pressure of migrants’ refusal to be assigned to a country that was not of their choosing, and conflicts between member states.

      As a result, the development of a European border, migration and asylum policy has been driven by crisis and is inherently reactive. This pattern particularly holds for the last decade, when the large-scale movements of migrants to Europe in the wake of the Arab Uprisings in 2011 put the EU migration regime into permanent crisis mode and prompted hasty reforms. As of 2011, Italy allowed Tunisians to move on, leading to the re-introduction of border controls by states such as France, while the same year the 2011 European Court of Human Rights’ judgement brought Dublin deportations to Greece to a halt because of the appalling reception and living conditions there. The increasing refusal by asylum seekers to surrender their fingerprints – the core means of implementing Dublin – as of 2013 further destabilized the migration regime.

      The instability only grew when in April 2015, more then 1,200 people died in two consecutive shipwrecks, forcing the Commission to publish its ‘European Agenda for Migration’ in May 2015. The 2015 agenda announced the creation of the hotspot system in the hope of re-stabilising the European migration regime through a targeted intervention of European agencies at Europe’s borders. Essentially, the hotspot approach offered a deal to EU member states: comprehensive registration in Europeanised structures (the hotspots) by so-called “front-line states” – thus re-imposing Dublin – in exchange for relocation of part of the registered migrants to other EU countries – thereby alleviating front-line states of part of their “burden”.

      This plan however collapsed before it could ever work, as it was immediately followed by the large-scale summer arrivals of 2015 as migrants trekked across Europe’s borders. It was simultaneously boycotted by several member states who refused relocations and continue to lead the charge in fomenting an explicit anti-migration agenda in the EU. While border controls were soon reintroduced, relocations never materialised in a meaningful manner in the years that followed.

      With the Dublin regime effectively paralysed and the EU unable to agree on a new mechanism for the distribution of asylum seekers within Europe, the EU resorted to the decades-old policies that had shaped the European border and migration regime since its inception: keeping migrants out at all cost through border control implemented by member states, European agencies or outsourced to third countries.

      Considering the profound crisis the turbulent movements of migrants had plunged the EU into in the summer of 2015, no measure was deemed excessive in achieving this exclusionary end: neither the tacit acceptance of violent expulsions and push-backs by Spain and Greece, nor the outsourcing of border control to Libyan torturers, nor the shameless collaboration with dictatorial regimes such as Turkey.

      Under the guise of “tackling the root causes of migration”, development aid was diverted and used to impose border externalisation and deportation agreements. But the external dimension of the EU’s migration regime has proven just as unstable as its internal one – as the re-opening of borders by Turkey in March 2020 demonstrates. The movements of illegalised migrants towards the EU could never be entirely contained and those who reached the shores of Europe were increasingly relegated to infrastructures of detention. Even if keeping thousands of migrants stranded in the hell of Moria may not have been part of the initial hotspot plan, it certainly has been the outcome of the EU’s internal blockages and ultimately effective in shoring up the EU’s strategy of deterrence.

      The “New Pact” perpetuating the EU’s failed policy of closure

      Today the “New Pact”, promised for Spring 2020 and apparently forgotten at the height of the Covid-19 pandemic, has been revived in a hurry to address the destruction of Moria hotspot. While detailed analysis of the regulations that it proposes are beyond the scope of this article,[2] the broad intentions of the Pact’s rationale are clear.

      Despite all its humane and humanitarian rhetoric and some language critically addressing the manifest absence of the rule of law at the border of Europe, the Commission’s pact is a pact against migration. Taking stock of the continued impasse in terms of internal distribution of migrants, it re-affirms the EU’s central objective of reducing, massively the number of asylum seekers to be admitted to Europe. It promises to do so by continuing to erect chains of externalised border control along migrants’ entire trajectories (what it refers to as the “whole-of-route approach”).

      Those who do arrive should be swiftly screened and sorted in an infrastructure of detention along the borders of Europe. The lucky few who will succeed in fitting their lives into the shrinking boxes of asylum law are to be relocated to other EU countries in function of a mechanism of distribution based on population size and wealth of member states.

      Whether this will indeed undo the imbalances of the Dublin regime remains an open question[3], nevertheless, this relocation key is one of the few positive steps offered by the Pact since it comes closer to migrants’ own “relocation key” but still falls short of granting asylum seekers the freedom to choose their country of protection and residence.[4] The majority of rejected asylum seekers – which may be determined on the basis of an extended understanding of the “safe third country” notion – is to be funnelled towards deportations operated by the EU states refusing relocation. The Commission hopes deportations will be made smoother after a newly appointed “EU Return Coordinator” will have bullied countries of origin into accepting their nationals using the carrot of development aid and the stick of visa sanctions. The Commission seems to believe that with fewer expected arrivals and fewer migrants ending up staying in Europe, and with its mechanism of “flexible solidarity” allowing for a selective participation in relocations or returns depending on the taste of its member states, it can both bridge the gap between member states’ interests and push for a deeper Europeanisation of the policy field in which its own role will become more central.

      Thus, the EU Commission’s attempt to square the circle of member states’ conflicting interests has resulted in a European pact against migration, which perpetuates the promises of the EU’s (anti-)migration policy over the last three decades: externalisation, enhanced borders, accelerated asylum procedures, detention and deportations to prevent and deter migrants from the global South. It seeks to strike yet another deal between European member states, without consulting – and at the expense of – migrants themselves. Because most of the policy means contained in the pact are not new, and have always failed to durably end illegalised migration – instead they have created a large precaritised population at the heart of Europe – we do not see how they would work today. Migrants will continue to arrive, and many will remain stranded in front-line states or other EU states as they await deportation. As such, the outcome of the pact (if it is agreed upon) is likely a perpetuation and generalisation of the hotspot system, the very system whose untenability – glaringly demonstrated by Moria’s fire – prompted the presentation of the New Pact in the first place. Even if the Commission’s “no more Morias” rhetoric would like to persuade us of the opposite,[5] the ruins of Moria point to the past as well as the potential future of the CEAS if the Commission has its way.

      We are dismayed at the loss of yet another opportunity for Europe to fundamentally re-orient its policy of closure, one which is profoundly at odds with the reality of large-scale displacement in an unequal and interconnected world. We are dismayed at the prospect of more suffering and more political crises that can only be the outcome of this continued policy failure. Clearly, an entirely different approach to how Europe engages with the movements of migration is called for. One which actually aims to de-escalate and transform the enduring mobility conflict. One which starts from the reality of the movements of migrants and offers a frame for it to unfold rather than seeks to suppress and deny it.

      Notes and references

      [1] We have offered an extensive analysis of the following argument in previous articles. See in particular : Bernd Kasparek. 2016. “Complementing Schengen: The Dublin System and the European Border and Migration Regime”. In Migration Policy and Practice, edited by Harald Bauder and Christian Matheis, 59–78. Migration, Diasporas and Citizenship. Houndmills & New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Charles Heller and Lorenzo Pezzani. 2016. “Ebbing and Flowing: The EU’s Shifting Practices of (Non-)Assistance and Bordering in a Time of Crisis”. Near Futures Online. No 1. Available here.

      [2] For first analyses see Steve Peers. 2020. “First analysis of the EU’s new asylum proposals”, EU Law Analysis, 25 September 2020; Sergio Carrera. 2020. “Whose Pact? The Cognitive Dimensions of the New EU Pact on Migration and Asylum”, CEPS, September 2020.

      [3] Carrera, ibid.

      [4] For a discussion of migration of migrants’ own relocation key, see Philipp Lutz, David Kaufmann and Anna Stütz. 2020. “Humanitarian Protection as a European Public Good: The Strategic Role of States and Refugees”, Journal of Common Market Studies 2020 Volume 58. Number 3. pp. 757–775. To compare the actual asylum applications across Europe over the last years with different relocations keys, see the tool developed by Etienne Piguet.

      https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/can-europe-make-it/the-eus-pact-against-migration-part-one

      #whole-of-route_approach #relocalisation #clé_de_relocalisation #relocation_key #pays-tiers_sûrs #EU_Return_Coordinator #solidarité_flexible #externalisation #new_pact

    • Towards a European pact with migrants, Part Two

      We call for a new Pact that addresses the reality of migrants’ movements, the systemic conditions leading people to flee their homes as well as the root causes of Europe’s racism.

      In Part One, we analysed the EU’s new Pact against migration. Here, we call for an entirely different approach to how Europe engages with migration, one which offers a legal frame for migration to unfold, and addresses the systemic conditions leading people to flee their homes as well as the root causes of Europe’s racism.Let us imagine for a moment that the EU Commission truly wanted, and was in a position, to reorient the EU’s migration policy in a direction that might actually de-escalate and transform the enduring mobility conflict: what might its pact with migrants look like?

      The EU’s pact with migrants might start from three fundamental premises. First, it would recognize that any policy that is entirely at odds with social practices is bound to generate conflict, and ultimately fail. A migration policy must start from the social reality of migration and provide a frame for it to unfold. Second, the pact would acknowledge that no conflict can be brought to an end unilaterally. Any process of conflict transformation must bring together the conflicting parties, and seek to address their needs, interests and values so that they no longer clash with each other. In particular, migrants from the global South must be included in the definition of the policies that concern them. Third, it would recognise, as Tendayi Achiume has put it, that migrants from the global South are no strangers to Europe.[1] They have long been included in the expansive webs of empire. Migration and borders are embedded in these unequal relations, and no end to the mobility conflict can be achieved without fundamentally transforming them. Based on these premises, the EU’s pact with migrants might contain the following four core measures:
      Global justice and conflict prevention

      Instead of claiming to tackle the “root causes” of migration by diverting and instrumentalising development aid towards border control, the EU’s pact with migrants would end all European political and economic relations that contribute to the crises leading to mass displacement. The EU would end all support to dictatorial regimes, would ban all weapon exports, terminate all destabilising military interventions. It would cancel unfair trade agreements and the debts of countries of the global South. It would end its massive carbon emissions that contribute to the climate crisis. Through these means, the EU would not claim to end migration perceived as a “problem” for Europe, but it would contribute to allowing more people to live a dignified life wherever they are and decrease forced migration, which certainly is a problem for migrants. A true commitment to global justice and conflict prevention and resolution is necessary if Europe wishes to limit the factors that lead too many people onto the harsh paths of exile in their countries and regions, a small proportion of whom reach European shores.
      Tackling the “root causes” of European racism

      While the EU’s so-called “global approach” to migration has in fact been one-sided, focused exclusively on migration as “the problem” rather then the processes that drive the EU’s policies of exclusion, the EU’s pact with migrants would boldly tackle the “root causes” of racism and xenophobia in Europe. Bold policies designed to address the EU’s colonial past and present and the racial imaginaries it has unleashed would be proposed, a positive vision for living in common in diverse societies affirmed, and a more inclusive and fair economic system would be established in Europe to decrease the resentment of European populations which has been skilfully channelled against migrants and racialised people.
      Universal freedom of movement

      By tackling the causes of large-scale displacement and of exclusionary migration policies, the EU would be able to de-escalate the mobility conflict, and could thus propose a policy granting all migrants legal pathways to access and stay in Europe. As an immediate outcome of the institution of right to international mobility, migrants would no longer resort to smugglers and risk their lives crossing the sea – and thus no longer be in need of being rescued. Using safe and legal means of travel would also, in the time of Covid-19 pandemic, allow migrants to adopt all sanitary measures that are necessary to protect migrants and those they encounter. No longer policed through military means, migration could appear as a normal process that does not generate fear. Frontex, the European border agency, would be defunded, and concentrate its limited activities on detecting actual threats to the EU rather then constructing vulnerable populations as “risks”. In a world that would be less unequal and in which people would have the possibly to lead a dignified life wherever they are, universal freedom of movement would not lead to an “invasion” of Europe. Circulatory movement rather then permanent settlement would be frequent. Migrants’ legal status would no longer allow employers to push working conditions down. A European asylum system would continue to exist, to grant protection and support to those in need. The vestiges of the EU’s hotspots and detention centres might be turned into ministries of welcome, which would register and redirect people to the place of their choice. Registration would thus be a mere certification of having taken the first step towards European citizenship, transforming the latter into a truly post-national institution, a far horizon which current EU treaties only hint at.
      Democratizing borders

      Considering that all European migration policies to date have been fundamentally undemocratic – in that they were imposed on a group of people – migrants – who had no say in the legislative and political process defining the laws that govern their movement – the pact would instead be the outcome of considerable consultative process with migrants and the organisations that support them, as well the states of the global South. The pact, following from Étienne Balibar’s suggestion, would in turn propose to permanently democratise borders by instituting “a multilateral, negotiated control of their working by the populations themselves (including, of course, migrant populations),” within “new representative institutions” that “are not merely ‘territorial’ and certainly not purely national.”[2] In such a pact, the original promise of Europe as a post-national project would finally be revived.

      Such a policy orientation may of course appear as nothing more then a fantasy. And yet it appears evident to us that the direction we suggest is the only realistic one. European citizens and policy makers alike must realise that the question is not whether migrants will exercise their freedom to cross borders, but at what human and political cost. As a result, it is far more realistic to address the processes within which the mobility conflict is embedded, than seeking to ban human mobility. As the Black Lives Matter’s slogan “No justice no peace!” resonating in the streets of the world over recent months reminds us, without mobility justice, [3] their can be no end to mobility conflict.
      The challenges ahead for migrant solidarity movements

      Our policy proposals are perfectly realistic in relation to migrants’ movements and the processes shaping them, yet we are well aware that they are not on the agenda of neoliberal and nationalist Europe. If the EU Commission has squandered yet another opportunity to reorient the EU’s migration policy, it is simply that this Europe, governed by these member states and politicians, has lost the capacity to offer bold visions of democracy, freedom and justice for itself and the world. As such, we have little hope for a fundamental reorientation of the EU’s policies. The bleak prospect is of the perpetuation of the mobility conflict, and the human suffering and political crises it generates.

      What are those who seek to support migrants to do in this context?

      We must start by a sobering note addressed to the movement we are part of: the fire of Moria is not only a symptom and symbol of the failures of the EU’s migration policies and member states, but also of our own strategies. After all, since the hotspots were proposed in 2015 we have tirelessly denounced them, and documented the horrendous living conditions they have created. NGOs have litigated against them, but efforts have been turned down by a European Court of Human Rights that appears increasingly reluctant to position itself on migration-related issues and is thereby contributing to the perpetuation of grave violations by states.

      And despite the extraordinary mobilisation of civil society in alliance with municipalities across Europe who have declared themselves ready to welcome migrants, relocations never materialised on any significant scale. After five years of tireless mobilization, the hotspots still stand, with thousands of asylum seekers trapped in them.

      While the conditions leading to the fire are still being clarified, it appears that the migrants held hostage in Moria took it into their own hands to try to get rid of the camp through the desperate act of burning it to the ground. As such, while we denounce the EU’s policies, our movements are urgently in need of re-evaluating their own modes of action, and re-imagining them more effectively.

      We have no lessons to give, as we share these shortcomings. But we believe that some of the directions we have suggested in our utopian Pact with migrants can guide migrant solidarity movements as well , as they may be implemented from the bottom-up in the present and help reopen our political imagination.

      The freedom to move is not, or not only, a distant utopia, that may be instituted by states in some distant future. It can also be seen as a right and freedom that illegalised migrants seize on a day-to-day basis as they cross borders without authorisation, and persist in living where they choose.

      Freedom of movement can serve as a useful compass to direct and evaluate our practices of contestation and support. Litigation remains an important tool to counter the multiple forms of violence and violations that migrants face along their trajectories, even as we acknowledge that national and international courts are far from immune to the anti-migrant atmosphere within states. Forging infrastructures of support for migrants in the course of their mobility (such as the WatchTheMed Alarm Phone and the civilian rescue fleet) – and their stay (such as the many citizen platforms for housing )– is and will continue to be essential.

      While states seek to implement what they call an “integrated border management” that seeks to manage migrants’ unruly mobilities before, at, and after borders, we can think of our own networks as forming a fragmented yet interconnected “integrated border solidarity” along the migrants’ entire trajectory. The criminalisation of our acts of solidarity by states is proof that we are effective in disrupting the violence of borders.

      Solidarity cities have formed important nodes in these chains, as municipalities do have the capacity to enable migrants to live in dignity in urban spaces, and limit the reach of their security forces for example. Their dissonant voices of welcome have been important in demonstrating that segments of the European population, which are far from negligible, refuse to be complicit with the EU’s policies of closure and are ready to embody an open relation of solidarity with migrants and beyond. However we must also acknowledge that the prerogative of granting access to European states remains in the hands of central administrations, not in those of municipalities, and thus the readiness to welcome migrants has not allowed the latter to actually seek sanctuary.

      While humanitarian and humanist calls for welcome are important, we too need to locate migration and borders in a broader political and economic context – that of the past and present of empire – so that they can be understood as questions of (in)justice. Echoing the words of the late Edouard Glissant, as activists focusing on illegalised migration we should never forget that “to have to force one’s way across borders as a result of one’s misery is as scandalous as what founds that misery”.[4] As a result of this framing, many more alliances can be forged today between migrant solidarity movements and the global justice and climate justice movements, as well as anti-racist, anti-fascist, feminist and decolonial movements. Through such alliances, we may be better equipped to support migrants throughout their entire trajectories, and transform the conditions that constrain them today.

      Ultimately, to navigate its way out of its own impasses, it seems to us that migrant solidarity movements must address four major questions.

      First, what migration policy do we want? The predictable limits of the EU’s pact against migration may be an opportunity to forge our own alternative agenda.

      Second, how can we not only oppose the implementation of restrictive policies but shape the policy process itself so as to transform the field on which we struggle? Opposing the EU’s anti-migrant pact over the coming months may allow us to conduct new experiments.

      Third, as long as policies that deny basic principles of equality, freedom, justice, and our very common humanity, are still in place, how can we lead actions that disrupt them effectively? For example, what are the forms of nongovernmental evacuations that might support migrants in accessing Europe, and moving across its internal borders?

      Fourth, how can struggles around migration and borders be part of the forging of a more equal, free, just and sustainable world for all?

      The next months during which the EU’s Pact against migration will be discussed in front of the European Parliament and Council will see an uphill battle for all those who still believe in the possibility of a Europe of openness and solidarity. While we have no illusions as to the policy outcome, this is an opportunity we must seize, not only to claim that another Europe and another world is possible, but to start building them from below.

      Notes and references

      [1] Tendayi Achiume. 2019, “The Postcolonial Case for Rethinking Borders.” Dissent 66.3: pp.27-32.

      [2] Etienne Balibar. 2004. We, the People of Europe? Reflections on Transnational Citizenship. Princeton: University Press, p. 108 and 117.

      [3] Mimi Sheller. 2018. Mobility Justice: The Politics of Movement in an Age of Extremes. London: Verso.

      [4] Edouard Glissant. 2006. “Il n’est frontière qu’on n’outrepasse”. Le Monde diplomatique, October 2006.

      https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/can-europe-make-it/towards-pact-migrants-part-two

    • Pacte européen sur la migration et l’asile : Afin de garantir un nouveau départ et d’éviter de reproduire les erreurs passées, certains éléments à risque doivent être reconsidérés et les aspects positifs étendus.

      L’engagement en faveur d’une approche plus humaine de la protection et l’accent mis sur les aspects positifs et bénéfiques de la migration avec lesquels la Commission européenne a lancé le Pacte sur la migration et l’asile sont les bienvenus. Cependant, les propositions formulées reflètent très peu cette rhétorique et ces ambitions. Au lieu de rompre avec les erreurs de la précédente approche de l’Union européenne (UE) et d’offrir un nouveau départ, le Pacte continue de se focaliser sur l’externalisation, la dissuasion, la rétention et le retour.

      Cette première analyse des propositions, réalisée par la société civile, a été guidée par les questions suivantes :

      Les propositions formulées sont-elles en mesure de garantir, en droit et en pratique, le respect des normes internationales et européennes ?
      Participeront-elles à un partage plus juste des responsabilités en matière d’asile au niveau de l’UE et de l’international ?
      Seront-elles susceptibles de fonctionner en pratique ?

      Au lieu d’un partage automatique des responsabilités, le Pacte introduit un système de Dublin, qui n’en porte pas le nom, plus complexe et un mécanisme de « parrainage au retour »

      Le Pacte sur la migration et l’asile a manqué l’occasion de réformer en profondeur le système de Dublin : le principe de responsabilité du premier pays d’arrivée pour examiner les demandes d’asile est, en pratique, maintenu. De plus, le Pacte propose un système complexe introduisant diverses formes de solidarité.

      Certains ajouts positifs dans les critères de détermination de l’Etat membre responsable de la demande d’asile sont à relever, par exemple, l’élargissement de la définition des membres de famille afin d’inclure les frères et sœurs, ainsi qu’un large éventail de membres de famille dans le cas des mineurs non accompagnés et la délivrance d’un diplôme ou d’une autre qualification par un Etat membre. Cependant, au regard de la pratique actuelle des Etats membres, il sera difficile de s’éloigner du principe du premier pays d’entrée comme l’option de départ en faveur des nouvelles considérations prioritaires, notamment le regroupement familial.

      Dans le cas d’un nombre élevé de personnes arrivées sur le territoire (« pression migratoire ») ou débarquées suite à des opérations de recherche et de sauvetage, la solidarité entre Etats membres est requise. Les processus qui en découlent comprennent une série d’évaluations, d’engagements et de rapports devant être rédigés par les États membres. Si la réponse collective est insuffisante, la Commission européenne peut prendre des mesures correctives. Au lieu de promouvoir un mécanisme de soutien pour un partage prévisible des responsabilités, ces dispositions tendent plutôt à créer des formes de négociations entre États membres qui nous sont toutes devenues trop familières. La complexité des propositions soulève des doutes quant à leur application réelle en pratique.

      Les États membres sont autorisés à choisir le « parrainage de retour » à la place de la relocalisation de personnes sur leur territoire, ce qui indique une attention égale portée au retour et à la protection. Au lieu d’apporter un soutien aux Etats membres en charge d’un plus grand nombre de demandes de protection, cette proposition soulève de nombreuses préoccupations juridiques et relatives au respect des droits de l’homme, en particulier si le transfert vers l’Etat dit « parrain » se fait après l’expiration du délai de 8 mois. Qui sera en charge de veiller au traitement des demandeurs d’asile déboutés à leur arrivée dans des Etats qui n’acceptent pas la relocalisation ?

      Le Pacte propose d’étendre l’utilisation de la procédure à la frontière, y compris un recours accru à la rétention

      A défaut de rééquilibrer la responsabilité entre les États membres de l’UE, la proposition de règlement sur les procédures communes exacerbe la pression sur les États situés aux frontières extérieures de l’UE et sur les pays des Balkans occidentaux. La Commission propose de rendre, dans certains cas, les procédures d’asile et de retour à la frontière obligatoires. Cela s’appliquerait notamment aux ressortissants de pays dont le taux moyen de protection de l’UE est inférieur à 20%. Ces procédures seraient facultatives lorsque les Etats membres appliquent les concepts de pays tiers sûr ou pays d’origine sûr. Toutefois, la Commission a précédemment proposé que ceux-ci deviennent obligatoires pour l’ensemble des Etats membres. Les associations réitèrent leurs inquiétudes quant à l’utilisation de ces deux concepts qui ont été largement débattus entre 2016 et 2019. Leur application obligatoire ne doit plus être proposée.

      La proposition de procédure à la frontière repose sur deux hypothèses erronées – notamment sur le fait que la majorité des personnes arrivant en Europe n’est pas éligible à un statut de protection et que l’examen des demandes de protection peut être effectué facilement et rapidement. Ni l’une ni l’autre ne sont correctes. En effet, en prenant en considération à la fois les décisions de première et de seconde instance dans toute l’UE il apparaît que la plupart des demandeurs d’asile dans l’UE au cours des trois dernières années ont obtenu un statut de protection. En outre, le Pacte ne doit pas persévérer dans cette approche erronée selon laquelle les procédures d’asile peuvent être conduites rapidement à travers la réduction de garanties et l’introduction d’un système de tri. La durée moyenne de la procédure d’asile aux Pays-Bas, souvent qualifiée d’ « élève modèle » pour cette pratique, dépasse un an et peut atteindre deux années jusqu’à ce qu’une décision soit prise.

      La proposition engendrerait deux niveaux de standards dans les procédures d’asile, largement déterminés par le pays d’origine de la personne concernée. Cela porte atteinte au droit individuel à l’asile et signifierait qu’un nombre accru de personnes seront soumises à une procédure de deuxième catégorie. Proposer aux Etats membres d’émettre une décision d’asile et d’éloignement de manière simultanée, sans introduire de garanties visant à ce que les principes de non-refoulement, d’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant, et de protection de la vie privée et familiale ne soient examinés, porte atteinte aux obligations qui découlent du droit international. La proposition formulée par la Commission supprime également l’effet suspensif automatique du recours, c’est-à-dire le droit de rester sur le territoire dans l’attente d’une décision finale rendue dans le cadre d’une procédure à la frontière.

      L’idée selon laquelle les personnes soumises à des procédures à la frontière sont considérées comme n’étant pas formellement entrées sur le territoire de l’État membre est trompeuse et contredit la récente jurisprudence de l’UE, sans pour autant modifier les droits de l’individu en vertu du droit européen et international.

      La proposition prive également les personnes de la possibilité d’accéder à des permis de séjour pour des motifs autres que l’asile et impliquera très probablement une privation de liberté pouvant atteindre jusqu’à 6 mois aux frontières de l’UE, c’est-à-dire un maximum de douze semaines dans le cadre de la procédure d’asile à la frontière et douze semaines supplémentaires en cas de procédure de retour à la frontière. En outre, les réformes suppriment le principe selon lequel la rétention ne doit être appliquée qu’en dernier recours dans le cadre des procédures aux frontières. En s’appuyant sur des restrictions plus systématiques des mouvements dans le cadre des procédures à la frontière, la proposition restreindra l’accès de l’individu aux services de base fournis par des acteurs qui ne pourront peut-être pas opérer à la frontière, y compris pour l’assistance et la représentation juridiques. Avec cette approche, on peut s’attendre aux mêmes échecs rencontrés dans la mise en œuvre des « hotspot » sur les îles grecques.

      La reconnaissance de l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant comme élément primordial dans toutes les procédures pour les États membres est positive. Cependant, la Commission diminue les garanties de protection des enfants en n’exemptant que les mineurs non accompagnés ou âgés de moins de douze ans des procédures aux frontières. Ceci est en contradiction avec la définition internationale de l’enfant qui concerne toutes les personnes jusqu’à l’âge de dix-huit ans, telle qu’inscrite dans la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant ratifiée par tous les États membres de l’UE.

      Dans les situations de crise, les États membres sont autorisés à déroger à d’importantes garanties qui soumettront davantage de personnes à des procédures d’asile de qualité inférieure

      La crainte d’iniquité procédurale est d’autant plus visible dans les situations où un État membre peut prétendre être confronté à une « situation exceptionnelle d’afflux massif » ou au risque d’une telle situation.

      Dans ces cas, le champ d’application de la procédure obligatoire aux frontières est considérablement étendu à toutes les personnes en provenance de pays dont le taux moyen de protection de l’UE est inférieur à 75%. La procédure d’asile à la frontière et la procédure de retour à la frontière peuvent être prolongées de huit semaines supplémentaires, soit cinq mois chacune, ce qui porte à dix mois la durée maximale de privation de liberté. En outre, les États membres peuvent suspendre l’enregistrement des demandes d’asile pendant quatre semaines et jusqu’à un maximum de trois mois. Par conséquent, si aucune demande n’est enregistrée pendant plusieurs semaines, les personnes sont susceptibles d’être exposées à un risque accru de rétention et de refoulement, et leurs droits relatifs à un accueil digne et à des services de base peuvent être gravement affectés.

      Cette mesure permet aux États membres de déroger à leur responsabilité de garantir un accès à l’asile et un examen efficace et équitable de l’ensemble des demandes d’asile, ce qui augmente ainsi le risque de refoulement. Dans certains cas extrêmes, notamment lorsque les États membres agissent en violation flagrante et persistante des obligations du droit de l’UE, le processus de demande d’autorisation à la Commission européenne pourrait être considéré comme une amélioration, étant donné qu’actuellement la loi est ignorée, sans consultation et ce malgré les critiques de la Commission européenne. Toutefois, cela ne peut être le point de départ de l’évaluation de cette proposition de la législation européenne. L’impact à grande échelle de cette dérogation offre la possibilité à ce qu’une grande majorité des personnes arrivant dans l’UE soient soumises à une procédure de second ordre.

      Pré-filtrage à la frontière : risques et opportunités

      La Commission propose un processus de « pré-filtrage à l’entrée » pour toutes les personnes qui arrivent de manière irrégulière aux frontières de l’UE, y compris à la suite d’un débarquement dans le cadre des opérations de recherche et de sauvetage. Le processus de pré-filtrage comprend des contrôles de sécurité, de santé et de vulnérabilité, ainsi que l’enregistrement des empreintes digitales, mais il conduit également à des décisions impactant l’accès à l’asile, notamment en déterminant si une personne doit être sujette à une procédure d’asile accélérée à la frontière, de relocalisation ou de retour. Ce processus peut durer jusqu’à 10 jours et doit être effectué au plus près possible de la frontière. Le lieu où les personnes seront placées et l’accès aux conditions matérielles d’accueil demeurent flous. Le filtrage peut également être appliqué aux personnes se trouvant sur le territoire d’un État membre, ce qui pourrait conduire à une augmentation de pratiques discriminatoires. Des questions se posent également concernant les droits des personnes soumises au filtrage, tels que l’accès à l’information, , l’accès à un avocat et au droit de contester la décision prise dans ce contexte ; les motifs de refus d’entrée ; la confidentialité et la protection des données collectées. Etant donné que les États membres peuvent facilement se décharger de leurs responsabilités en matière de dépistage médical et de vulnérabilité, il n’est pas certain que certains besoins seront effectivement détectés et pris en considération.

      Une initiative à saluer est la proposition d’instaurer un mécanisme indépendant des droits fondamentaux à la frontière. Afin qu’il garantisse une véritable responsabilité face aux violations des droits à la frontière, y compris contre les éloignements et les refoulements récurrents dans un grand nombre d’États membres, ce mécanisme doit être étendu au-delà de la procédure de pré-filtrage, être indépendant des autorités nationales et impliquer des organisations telles que les associations non gouvernementales.

      La proposition fait de la question du retour et de l’expulsion une priorité

      L’objectif principal du Pacte est clair : augmenter de façon significative le nombre de personnes renvoyées ou expulsées de l’UE. La création du poste de Coordinateur en charge des retours au sein de la Commission européenne et d’un directeur exécutif adjoint aux retours au sein de Frontex en sont la preuve, tandis qu’aucune nomination n’est prévue au sujet de la protection de garanties ou de la relocalisation. Le retour est considéré comme un élément admis dans la politique migratoire et le soutien pour des retours dignes, en privilégiant les retours volontaires, l’accès à une assistance au retour et l’aide à la réintégration, sont essentiels. Cependant, l’investissement dans le retour n’est pas une réponse adaptée au non-respect systématique des normes d’asile dans les États membres de l’UE.

      Rien de nouveau sur l’action extérieure : des propositions irréalistes qui risquent de continuer d’affaiblir les droits de l’homme

      La tension entre l’engagement rhétorique pour des partenariats mutuellement bénéfiques et la focalisation visant à placer la migration au cœur des relations entre l’UE et les pays tiers se poursuit. Les tentatives d’externaliser la responsabilité de l’asile et de détourner l’aide au développement, les mécanismes de visa et d’autres outils pour inciter les pays tiers à coopérer sur la gestion migratoire et les accords de réadmission sont maintenues. Cela ne représente pas seulement un risque allant à l’encontre de l’engagement de l’UE pour ses principes de développement, mais cela affaiblit également sa posture internationale en générant de la méfiance et de l’hostilité depuis et à l’encontre des pays tiers. De plus, l’usage d’accords informels et la coopération sécuritaire sur la gestion migratoire avec des pays tels que la Libye ou la Turquie risquent de favoriser les violations des droits de l’homme, d’encourager les gouvernements répressifs et de créer une plus grande instabilité.

      Un manque d’ambition pour des voies légales et sûres vers l’Europe

      L’opportunité pour l’UE d’indiquer qu’elle est prête à contribuer au partage des responsabilités pour la protection au niveau international dans un esprit de partenariat avec les pays qui accueillent la plus grande majorité des réfugiés est manquée. Au lieu de proposer un objectif ambitieux de réinstallation de réfugiés, la Commission européenne a seulement invité les Etats membres à faire plus et a converti les engagements de 2020 en un mécanisme biennal, ce qui résulte en la perte d’une année de réinstallation européenne.

      La reconnaissance du besoin de faciliter la migration de main-d’œuvre à travers différents niveaux de compétences est à saluer, mais l’importance de cette migration dans les économies et les sociétés européennes ne se reflète pas dans les ressources, les propositions et les actions allouées.

      Le soutien aux activités de recherche et de sauvetage et aux actions de solidarité doit être renforcé

      La tragédie humanitaire dans la mer Méditerranée nécessite encore une réponse y compris à travers un soutien financier et des capacités de recherches et de sauvetage. Cet enjeu ainsi que celui du débarquement sont pris en compte dans toutes les propositions, reconnaissant ainsi la crise humanitaire actuelle. Cependant, au lieu de répondre aux comportements et aux dispositions règlementaires des gouvernements qui obstruent les activités de secours et le travail des défendeurs des droits, la Commission européenne suggère que les standards de sécurité sur les navires et les niveaux de communication avec les acteurs privés doivent être surveillés. Les acteurs privés sont également requis d’adhérer non seulement aux régimes légaux, mais aussi aux politiques et pratiques relatives à « la gestion migratoire » qui peuvent potentiellement interférer avec les obligations de recherches et de sauvetage.

      Bien que la publication de lignes directrices pour prévenir la criminalisation de l’action humanitaire soit la bienvenue, celles-ci se limitent aux actes mandatés par la loi avec une attention spécifique aux opérations de sauvetage et de secours. Cette approche risque d’omettre les activités humanitaires telles que la distribution de nourriture, d’abris, ou d’information sur le territoire ou assurés par des organisations non mandatées par le cadre légal qui sont également sujettes à ladite criminalisation et à des restrictions.

      Des signes encourageants pour l’inclusion

      Les changements proposés pour permettre aux réfugiés d’accéder à une résidence de long-terme après trois ans et le renforcement du droit de se déplacer et de travailler dans d’autres Etats membres sont positifs. De plus, la révision du Plan d’action pour l’inclusion et l’intégration et la mise en place d’un groupe d’experts pour collecter l’avis des migrants afin de façonner la politique européenne sont les bienvenues.

      La voie à suivre

      La présentation des propositions de la Commission est le commencement de ce qui promet d’être une autre longue période conflictuelle de négociations sur les politiques européennes d’asile et de migration. Alors que ces négociations sont en cours, il est important de rappeler qu’il existe déjà un régime d’asile européen et que les Etats membres ont des obligations dans le cadre du droit européen et international.

      Cela requiert une action immédiate de la part des décideurs politiques européens, y compris de la part des Etats membres, de :

      Mettre en œuvre les standards existants en lien avec les conditions matérielles d’accueil et les procédures d’asile, d’enquêter sur leur non-respect et de prendre les mesures disciplinaires nécessaires ;
      Sauver des vies en mer, et de garantir des capacités de sauvetage et de secours, permettant un débarquement et une relocalisation rapide ;
      Continuer de s’accorder sur des arrangements ad-hoc de solidarité pour alléger la pression sur les Etats membres aux frontières extérieures de l’UE et encourager les Etats membres à avoir recours à la relocalisation.

      Concernant les prochaines négociations sur le Pacte, nous recommandons aux co-législateurs de :

      Rejeter l’application obligatoire de la procédure d’asile ou de retour à la frontière : ces procédures aux standards abaissés réduisent les garanties des demandeurs d’asile et augmentent le recours à la rétention. Elles exacerbent le manque de solidarité actuel sur l’asile dans l’UE en plaçant plus de responsabilité sur les Etats membres aux frontières extérieures. L’expérience des hotspots et d’autres initiatives similaires démontrent que l’ajout de procédures ou d’étapes dans l’asile peut créer des charges administratives et des coûts significatifs, et entraîner une plus grande inefficacité ;
      Se diriger vers la fin de la privation de liberté de migrants, et interdire la rétention de mineurs conformément à la Convention internationale des droits de l’enfant, et de dédier suffisamment de ressources pour des solutions non privatives de libertés appropriées pour les mineurs et leurs familles ;
      Réajuster les propositions de réforme afin de se concentrer sur le maintien et l’amélioration des standards des droits de l’homme et de l’asile en Europe, plutôt que sur le retour ;
      Œuvrer à ce que les propositions réforment fondamentalement la façon dont la responsabilité des demandeurs d’asile en UE est organisée, en adressant les problèmes liés au principe de pays de première entrée, afin de créer un véritable mécanisme de solidarité ;
      Limiter les possibilités pour les Etats membres de déroger à leurs responsabilités d’enregistrer les demandes d’asile ou d’examiner les demandes, afin d’éviter de créer des incitations à opérer en mode gestion de crise et à diminuer les standards de l’asile ;
      Augmenter les garanties pendant la procédure de pré-filtrage pour assurer le droit à l’information, l’accès à une aide et une représentation juridique, la détection et la prise en charge des vulnérabilités et des besoins de santé, et une réponse aux préoccupations liées à l’enregistrement et à la protection des données ;
      Garantir que le mécanisme de suivi des droits fondamentaux aux frontières dispose d’une portée large afin de couvrir toutes les violations des droits fondamentaux à la frontière, qu’il soit véritablement indépendant des autorités nationales et dispose de ressources adéquates et qu’il contribue à la responsabilisation ;
      S’opposer aux tentatives d’utiliser l’aide au développement, au commerce, aux investissements, aux mécanismes de visas, à la coopération sécuritaire et autres politiques et financements pour faire pression sur les pays tiers dans leur coopération étroitement définie par des objectifs européens de contrôle migratoire ;
      Evaluer l’impact à long-terme des politiques migratoires d’externalisation sur la paix, le respect des droits et le développement durable et garantir que la politique extérieure migratoire ne contribue pas à la violation de droits de l’homme et prenne en compte les enjeux de conflits ;
      Développer significativement les voies légales et sûres vers l’UE en mettant en œuvre rapidement les engagements actuels de réinstallation, en proposant de nouveaux objectifs ambitieux et en augmentant les opportunités de voies d’accès à la protection ainsi qu’à la migration de main-d’œuvre et universitaire en UE ;
      Renforcer les exceptions à la criminalisation lorsqu’il s’agit d’actions humanitaires et autres activités indépendantes de la société civile et enlever les obstacles auxquels font face les acteurs de la société civile fournissant une assistance vitale et humanitaire sur terre et en mer ;
      Mettre en place une opération de recherche et de sauvetage en mer Méditerranée financée et coordonnée par l’UE ;
      S’appuyer sur les propositions prometteuses pour soutenir l’inclusion à travers l’accès à la résidence à long-terme et les droits associés et la mise en œuvre du Plan d’action sur l’intégration et l’inclusion au niveau européen, national et local.

      https://www.forumrefugies.org/s-informer/positions/europe/774-pacte-europeen-sur-la-migration-et-l-asile-afin-de-garantir-un-no

    • Nouveau Pacte européen  : les migrant.e.s et réfugié.e.s traité.e.s comme des « # colis à trier  »

      Le jour même de la Conférence des Ministres européens de l’Intérieur, EuroMed Droits présente son analyse détaillée du nouveau Pacte européen sur l’asile et la migration, publié le 23 septembre dernier (https://euromedrights.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Analysis-of-Asylum-and-Migration-Pact_Final_Clickable.pdf).

      On peut résumer les plus de 500 pages de documents comme suit  : le nouveau Pacte européen sur l’asile et la migration déshumanise les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s, les traitant comme des «  #colis à trier  » et les empêchant de se déplacer en Europe. Ce Pacte soulève de nombreuses questions en matière de respect des droits humains, dont certaines sont à souligner en particulier  :

      L’UE détourne le concept de solidarité. Le Pacte vise clairement à «  rétablir la confiance mutuelle entre les États membres  », donnant ainsi la priorité à la #cohésion:interne de l’UE au détriment des droits des migrant.e.s et des réfugié.e.s. La proposition laisse le choix aux États membres de contribuer – en les mettant sur un pied d’égalité – à la #réinstallation, au #rapatriement, au soutien à l’accueil ou à l’#externalisation des frontières. La #solidarité envers les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s et leurs droits fondamentaux sont totalement ignorés.

      Le pacte promeut une gestion «  sécuritaire  » de la migration. Selon la nouvelle proposition, les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s seront placé.e.s en #détention et privé.e.s de liberté à leur arrivée. La procédure envisagée pour accélérer la procédure de demande d’asile ne pourra se faire qu’au détriment des lois sur l’asile et des droits des demandeur.se.s. Il est fort probable que la #procédure se déroulera de manière arbitraire et discriminatoire, en fonction de la nationalité du/de la demandeur.se, de son taux de reconnaissance et du fait que le pays dont il/elle provient est «  sûr  », ce qui est un concept douteux.

      L’idée clé qui sous-tend cette vision est simple  : externaliser autant que possible la gestion des frontières en coopérant avec des pays tiers. L’objectif est de faciliter le retour et la réadmission des migrant.e.s dans le pays d’où ils/elles sont parti.es. Pour ce faire, l’Agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes (Frontex) verrait ses pouvoirs renforcés et un poste de coordinateur.trice européen.ne pour les retours serait créé. Le pacte risque de facto de fournir un cadre juridique aux pratiques illégales telles que les refoulements, les détentions arbitraires et les mesures visant à réduire davantage la capacité en matière d’asile. Des pratiques déjà en place dans certains États membres.

      Le Pacte présente quelques aspects «  positifs  », par exemple en matière de protection des enfants ou de regroupement familial, qui serait facilité. Mais ces bonnes intentions, qui doivent être mises en pratique, sont noyées dans un océan de mesures répressives et sécuritaires.

      EuroMed Droits appelle les Etats membres de l’UE à réfléchir en termes de mise en œuvre pratique (ou non) de ces mesures. Non seulement elles violent les droits humains, mais elles sont impraticables sur le terrain  : la responsabilité de l’évaluation des demandes d’asile reste au premier pays d’arrivée, sans vraiment remettre en cause le Règlement de Dublin. Cela signifie que des pays comme l’Italie, Malte, l’Espagne, la Grèce et Chypre continueront à subir une «  pression  » excessive, ce qui les encouragera à poursuivre leurs politiques de refoulement et d’expulsion. Enfin, le Pacte ne répond pas à la problématique urgente des «  hotspots  » et des camps de réfugié.e.s comme en Italie ou en Grèce et dans les zones de transit à l’instar de la Hongrie. Au contraire, cela renforce ce modèle dangereux en le présentant comme un exemple à exporter dans toute l’Europe, alors que des exemples récents ont démontré l’impossibilité de gérer ces camps de manière humaine.

      https://euromedrights.org/fr/publication/nouveau-pacte-europeen%e2%80%af-les-migrant-e-s-et-refugie-e-s-traite

      #paquets_de_la_poste #paquets #poste #tri #pays_sûrs

    • A “Fresh Start” or One More Clunker? Dublin and Solidarity in the New Pact

      In ongoing discussions on the reform of the CEAS, solidarity is a key theme. It stands front and center in the New Pact on Migration and Asylum: after reassuring us of the “human and humane approach” taken, the opening quote stresses that Member States must be able to “rely on the solidarity of our whole European Union”.

      In describing the need for reform, the Commission does not mince its words: “[t]here is currently no effective solidarity mechanism in place, and no efficient rule on responsibility”. It’s a remarkable statement: barely one year ago, the Commission maintained that “[t]he EU [had] shown tangible and rapid support to Member States under most pressure” throughout the crisis. Be that as it may, we are promised a “fresh start”. Thus, President Von der Leyen has announced on the occasion of the 2020 State of the Union Address that “we will abolish the Dublin Regulation”, the 2016 Dublin IV Proposal (examined here) has been withdrawn, and the Pact proposes a “new solidarity mechanism” connected to “robust and fair management of the external borders” and capped by a new “governance framework”.

      Before you buy the shiny new package, you are advised to consult the fine print however. Yes, the Commission proposes to abolish the Dublin III Regulation and withdraws the Dublin IV Proposal. But the Proposal for an Asylum and Migration Management Regulation (hereafter “the Migration Management Proposal”) reproduces word-for-word the Dublin III Regulation, subject to amendments drawn … from the Dublin IV Proposal! As for the “governance framework” outlined in Articles 3-7 of the Migration Management Proposal, it’s a hodgepodge of purely declamatory provisions (e.g. Art. 3-4), of restatements of pre-existing obligations (Art. 5), of legal bases authorizing procedures that require none (Art. 7). The one new item is a yearly monitoring exercise centered on an “European Asylum and Migration Management Strategy” (Art. 6), which seems as likely to make a difference as the “Mechanism for Early Warning, Preparedness and Crisis Management”, introduced with much fanfare with the Dublin III Regulation and then left in the drawer before, during and after the 2015/16 crisis.

      Leaving the provisions just mentioned for future commentaries – fearless interpreters might still find legal substance in there – this contribution focuses on four points: the proposed amendments to Dublin, the interface between Dublin and procedures at the border, the new solidarity mechanism, and proposals concerning force majeure. Caveat emptor! It is a jungle of extremely detailed and sometimes obscure provisions. While this post is longer than usual – warm thanks to the lenient editors! – do not expect an exhaustive summary, nor firm conclusions on every point.
      Dublin, the Undying

      To borrow from Mark Twain, reports of the death of the Dublin system have been once more greatly exaggerated. As noted, Part III of the Migration Management Proposal (Articles 8-44) is for all intents and purposes an amended version of the Dublin III Regulation, and most of the amendments are lifted from the 2016 Dublin IV Proposal.

      A first group of amendments concerns the responsibility criteria. Some expand the possibilities to allocate applicants based on their “meaningful links” with Member States: Article 2(g) expands the family definition to include siblings, opening new possibilities for reunification; Article 19(4) enlarges the criterion based on previous legal abode (i.e. expired residence documents); in a tip of the hat to the Wikstroem Report, commented here, Article 20 introduces a new criterion based on prior education in a Member State.

      These are welcome changes, but all that glitters is not gold. The Commission advertises “streamlined” evidentiary requirements to facilitate family reunification. These would be necessary indeed: evidentiary issues have long undermined the application of the family criteria. Unfortunately, the Commission is not proposing anything new: Article 30(6) of the Migration Management Proposal corresponds in essence to Article 22(5) of the Dublin III Regulation.

      Besides, while the Commission proposes to expand the general definition of family, the opposite is true of the specific definition of family applicable to “dependent persons”. Under Article 16 of the Dublin III Regulation, applicants who e.g. suffer from severe disabilities are to be kept or brought together with a care-giving parent, child or sibling residing in a Member State. Due to fears of sham marriages, spouses have been excluded and this is legally untenable and inhumane, but instead of tackling the problem the Commission proposes in Article 24 to worsen it by excluding siblings. The end result is paradoxical: persons needing family support the most will be deprived – for no apparent reason other than imaginary fears of “abuses” – of the benefits of enlarged reunification possibilities. “[H]uman and humane”, indeed.

      The fight against secondary movements inspires most of the other amendments to the criteria. In particular, Article 21 of the Proposal maintains and extends the much-contested criterion of irregular entry while clarifying that it applies also to persons disembarked after a search and rescue (SAR) operation. The Commission also proposes that unaccompanied children be transferred to the first Member State where they applied if no family criterion is applicable (Article 15(5)). This would overturn the MA judgment of the ECJ whereby in such cases the asylum claim must be examined in the State where the child last applied and is present. It’s not a technical fine point: while the case-law of the ECJ is calculated to spare children the trauma of a transfer, the proposed amendment would subject them again to the rigours of Dublin.

      Again to discourage secondary movements, the Commission proposes – as in 2016 – a second group of amendments: new obligations for the applicants (Articles 9-10). Applicants must in principle apply in the Member State of first entry, remain in that State for the duration of the Dublin procedure and, post-transfer, remain in the State responsible. Moving to the “wrong” State entails losing the benefits of the Reception Conditions Directive, subject to “the need to ensure a standard of living in accordance with” the Charter. It is debatable whether this is a much lesser standard of reception. More importantly: as reception conditions in line with the Directive are seldom guaranteed in several frontline Member States, the prospect of being treated “in accordance with the Charter” elsewhere will hardly dissuade applicants from moving on.

      The 2016 Proposal foresaw, as further punishment, the mandatory application of accelerated procedures to “secondary movers”. This rule disappears from the Migration Management Proposal, but as Daniel Thym points out in his forthcoming contribution on secondary movements, it remains in Article 40(1)(g) of the 2016 Proposal for an Asylum Procedures Regulation. Furthermore, the Commission proposes deleting Article 18(2) of the Dublin III Regulation, i.e. the guarantee that persons transferred back to a State that has meanwhile discontinued or rejected their application will have their case reopened, or a remedy available. This is a dangerous invitation to Member States to reintroduce “discontinuation” practices that the Commission itself once condemned as incompatible with effective access to status determination.

      To facilitate responsibility-determination, the Proposal further obliges applicants to submit relevant information before or at the Dublin interview. Late submissions are not to be considered. Fairness would demand that justified delays be excused. Besides, it is also proposed to repeal Article 7(3) of the Dublin III Regulation, whereby authorities must take into account evidence of family ties even if produced late in the process. All in all, then, the Proposal would make proof of family ties harder, not easier as the Commission claims.

      A final group of amendments concern the details of the Dublin procedure, and might prove the most important in practice.

      Some “streamline” the process, e.g. with shorter deadlines (e.g. Article 29(1)) and a simplified take back procedure (Article 31). Controversially, the Commission proposes again to reduce the scope of appeals against transfers to issues of ill-treatment and misapplication of the family criteria (Article 33). This may perhaps prove acceptable to the ECJ in light of its old Abdullahi case-law. However, it contravenes Article 13 ECHR, which demands an effective remedy for the violation of any Convention right.
      Other procedural amendments aim to make it harder for applicants to evade transfers. At present, if a transferee absconds for 18 months, the transfer is cancelled and the transferring State becomes responsible. Article 35(2) of the Proposal allows the transferring State to “stop the clock” if the applicant absconds, and to resume the transfer as soon as he reappears.
      A number of amendments make responsibility more “stable” once assigned, although not as “permanent” as the 2016 Proposal would have made it. Under Article 27 of the Proposal, the responsibility of a State will only cease if the applicant has left the Dublin area in compliance with a return decision. More importantly, under Article 26 the responsible State will have to take back even persons to whom it has granted protection. This would be a significant extension of the scope of the Dublin system, and would “lock” applicants in the responsible State even more firmly and more durably. Perhaps by way of compensation, the Commission proposes that beneficiaries of international protection obtain “long-term status” – and thus mobility rights – after three years of residence instead of five. However, given that it is “very difficult in practice” to exercise such rights, the compensation seems more theoretical than effective and a far cry from a system of free movement capable of offsetting the rigidities of Dublin.

      These are, in short, the key amendments foreseen. While it’s easy enough to comment on each individually, it is more difficult to forecast their aggregate impact. Will they – to paraphrase the Commission – “improv[e] the chances of integration” and reduce “unauthorised movements” (recital 13), and help closing “the existing implementation gap”? Probably not, as none of them is a game-changer.

      Taken together, however, they might well aggravate current distributive imbalances. Dublin “locks in” the responsibilities of the States that receive most applications – traditional destinations such as Germany or border States such as Italy – leaving the other Member States undisturbed. Apart from possible distributive impacts of the revised criteria and of the now obligations imposed on applicants, first application States will certainly be disadvantaged combination by shortened deadlines, security screenings (see below), streamlined take backs, and “stable” responsibility extending to beneficiaries of protection. Under the “new Dublin rules” – sorry for the oxymoron! – effective solidarity will become more necessary than ever.
      Border procedures and Dublin

      Building on the current hotspot approach, the Proposals for a Screening Regulation and for an Asylum Procedures Regulation outline a new(ish) “pre-entry” phase. This will be examined in a forthcoming post by Lyra Jakuleviciene, but the interface with infra-EU allocation deserves mention here.

      In a nutshell, persons irregularly crossing the border will be screened for the purpose of identification, health and security checks, and registration in Eurodac. Protection applicants may then be channelled to “border procedures” in a broad range of situations. This will be mandatory if the applicant: (a) attempts to mislead the authorities; (b) can be considered, based on “serious reasons”, “a danger to the national security or public order of the Member States”; (c) comes from a State whose nationals have a low Union-wide recognition rate (Article 41(3) of the Asylum Procedure Proposal).

      The purpose of the border procedure is to assess applications “without authorising the applicant’s entry into the Member State’s territory” (here, p.4). Therefore, it might have seemed logical that applicants subjected to it be excluded from the Dublin system – as is the case, ordinarily, for relocations (see below). Not so: under Article 41(7) of the Proposal, Member States may apply Dublin in the context of border procedures. This weakens the idea of “seamless procedures at the border” somewhat but – from the standpoint of both applicants and border States – it is better than a watertight exclusion: applicants may still benefit from “meaningful link” criteria, and border States are not “stuck with the caseload”. I would normally have qualms about giving Member States discretion in choosing whether Dublin rules apply. But as it happens, Member States who receive an asylum application already enjoy that discretion under the so-called “sovereignty clause”. Nota bene: in exercising that discretion, Member States apply EU Law and must observe the Charter, and the same principle must certainly apply under the proposed Article 41(7).

      The only true exclusion from the Dublin system is set out in Article 8(4) of the Migration Management Proposal. Under this provision, Member States must carry out a security check of all applicants as part of the pre-entry screening and/or after the application is filed. If “there are reasonable grounds to consider the applicant a danger to national security or public order” of the determining State, the other criteria are bypassed and that State becomes responsible. Attentive readers will note that the wording of Article 8(4) differs from that of Article 41(3) of the Asylum Procedure Proposal (e.g. “serious grounds” vs “reasonable grounds”). It is therefore unclear whether the security grounds to “screen out” an applicant from Dublin are coextensive with the security grounds making a border procedure mandatory. Be that as it may, a broad application of Article 8(4) would be undesirable, as it would entail a large-scale exclusion from the guarantees that applicants derive from the Dublin system. The risk is moderate however: by applying Article 8(4) widely, Member States would be increasing their own share of responsibilities under the system. As twenty-five years of Dublin practice indicate, this is unlikely to happen.
      “Mandatory” and “flexible” solidarity under the new mechanism

      So far, the Migration Management Proposal does not look significantly different from the 2016 Dublin IV Proposal, which did not itself fundamentally alter existing rules, and which went down in flames in inter- and intra-institutional negotiations. Any hopes of a “fresh start”, then, are left for the new solidarity mechanism.

      Unfortunately, solidarity is a difficult subject for the EU: financial support has hitherto been a mere fraction of Member State expenditure in the field; operational cooperation has proved useful but cannot tackle all the relevant aspects of the unequal distribution of responsibilities among Member States; relocations have proved extremely beneficial for thousands of applicants, but are intrinsically complex operations and have also proven politically divisive – an aspect which has severely undermined their application and further condemned them to be small scale affairs relative to the needs on the ground. The same goes a fortiori for ad hoc initiatives – such as those that followed SAR operations over the last two years– which furthermore lack the predictability that is necessary for sharing responsibilities effectively. To reiterate what the Commission stated, there is currently “no effective solidarity mechanism in place”.

      Perhaps most importantly, the EU has hitherto been incapable of accurately gauging the distributive asymmetries on the ground, to articulate a clear doctrine guiding the key determinations of “how much solidarity” and “what kind(s) of solidarity”, and to define commensurate redistributive targets on this basis (see here, p.34 and 116).

      Alas, the opportunity to elaborate a solidarity doctrine for the EU has been completely missed. Conceptually, the New Pact does not go much farther than platitudes such as “[s]olidarity implies that all Member States should contribute”. As Daniel Thym aptly observed, “pragmatism” is the driving force behind the Proposal: the Commission starts from a familiar basis – relocations – and tweaks it in ways designed to convince stakeholders that solidarity becomes both “compulsory” and “flexible”. It’s a complicated arrangement and I will only describe it in broad strokes, leaving the crucial dimensions of financial solidarity and operational cooperation to forthcoming posts by Iris Goldner Lang and Lilian Tsourdi.

      The mechanism operates according to three “modes”. In its basic mode, it is to replace ad hoc solidarity initiatives following SAR disembarkations (Articles 47-49 of the Migration Management Proposal):

      The Commission determines, in its yearly Migration Management Report, whether a State is faced with “recurring arrivals” following SAR operations and determines the needs in terms of relocations and other contributions (capacity building, operational support proper, cooperation with third States).
      The Member States are “invited” to notify the “contributions they intend to make”. If offers are sufficient, the Commission combines them and formally adopts a “solidarity pool”. If not, it adopts an implementing act summarizing relocation targets for each Member State and other contributions as offered by them. Member States may react by offering other contributions instead of relocations, provided that this is “proportional” – one wonders how the Commission will tally e.g. training programs for Libyan coastguards with relocation places.
      If the relocations offered fall 30% short of the target indicated by the Commission, a “critical mass correction mechanism” will apply: each Member States will be obliged to meet at least 50% of the quota of relocations indicated by the Commission. However, and this is the new idea offered by the Commission to bring relocation-skeptics onboard, Member States may discharge their duties by offering “return sponsorships” instead of relocations: the “sponsor” Member State commits to support the benefitting Member State to return a person and, if the return is not carried out within eight months, to accept her on its territory.

      If I understand correctly the fuzzy provision I have just summarized – Article 48(2) – it all boils down to “half-compulsory” solidarity: Member States are obliged to cover at least 50% of the relocation needs set by the Commission through relocations or sponsorships, and the rest with other contributions.

      After the “solidarity pool” is established and the benefitting Member State requests its activation, relocations can start:

      The eligible persons are those who applied for protection in the benefitting State, with the exclusion of those that are subject to border procedures (Article 45(1)(a)).Also excluded are those whom Dublin criteria based on “meaningful links” – family, abode, diplomas – assign to the benefitting State (Article 57(3)). These rules suggest that the benefitting State must carry out identification, screening for border procedures and a first (reduced?) Dublin procedure before it can declare an applicant eligible for relocation.
      Persons eligible for return sponsorship are “illegally staying third-country nationals” (Article 45(1)(b)).
      The eligible persons are identified, placed on a list, and matched to Member States based on “meaningful links”. The transfer can only be refused by the State of relocation on security grounds (Article 57(2)(6) and (7)), and otherwise follows the modalities of Dublin transfers in almost all respects (e.g. deadlines, notification, appeals). However, contrary to what happens under Dublin, missing the deadline for transfer does not entail that the relocation is cancelled it (see Article 57(10)).
      After the transfer, applicants will be directly admitted to the asylum procedure in the State of relocation only if it has been previously established that the benefitting State would have been responsible under criteria other than those based on “meaningful links” (Article 58(3)). In all the other cases, the State of relocation will run a Dublin procedure and, if necessary, transfer again the applicant to the State responsible (see Article 58(2)). As for persons subjected to return sponsorship, the State of relocation will pick up the application of the Return Directive where the benefitting State left off (or so I read Article 58(5)!).

      If the Commission concludes that a Member State is under “migratory pressure”, at the request of the concerned State or of its own motion (Article 50), the mechanism operates as described above except for one main point: beneficiaries of protection also become eligible for relocation (Article 51(3)). Thankfully, they must consent thereto and are automatically granted the same status in the relocation State (see Articles 57(3) and 58(4)).

      If the Commission concludes that a Member State is confronted to a “crisis”, rules change further (see Article 2 of the Proposal for a Migration and Asylum Crisis Regulation):

      Applicants subject to the border procedure and persons “having entered irregularly” also become eligible for relocation. These persons may then undergo a border procedure post-relocation (see Article 41(1) and (8) of the Proposal for an Asylum Procedures Regulation).
      Persons subject to return sponsorship are transferred to the sponsor State if their removal does not occur within four – instead of eight – months.
      Other contributions are excluded from the palette of contributions available to the other Member States (Article 2(1)): it has to be relocation or return sponsorship.
      The procedure is faster, with shorter deadlines.

      It is an understatement to say that the mechanism is complex, and your faithful scribe still has much to digest. For the time being, I would make four general comments.

      First, it is not self-evident that this is a good “insurance scheme” for its intended beneficiaries. As noted, the system only guarantees that 50% of the relocation needs of a State will be met. Furthermore, there are hidden costs: in “SAR” and “pressure” modes, the benefitting State has to screen the applicant, register the application, and assess whether border procedures or (some) Dublin criteria apply before it can channel the applicant to relocation. It is unclear whether a 500 lump sum is enough to offset the costs (see Article 79 of the Migration Management Proposal). Besides, in a crisis situation, these preliminary steps might make relocation impractical – think of the Greek registration backlog in 2015/6. Perhaps, extending relocation to persons “having entered irregularly” when the mechanism is in “crisis mode” is meant precisely to take care of this. Similar observations apply to return sponsorship. Under Article 55(4) of the Migration Management Proposal, the support offered by the sponsor to the benefitting State can be rather low key (e.g. “counselling”) and there seems to be no guarantee that the benefitting State will be effectively relieved of the political, administrative and financial costs associated to return. Moving from costs to risks, it is clear that the benefitting State bears all the risks of non implementation – in other words, if the system grinds to a halt or breaks down, it will be Moria all over again. In light of past experience, one can only agree with Thomas Gammelthoft-Hansen that it’s a “big gamble”. Other aspects examined below – the vast margins of discretion left to the Commission, and the easy backdoor opened by the force majeure provisions – do not help either to create predictability.
      Second, as just noted the mechanism gives the Commission practically unlimited discretion at all critical junctures. The Commission will determine whether a Member States is confronted to “recurring arrivals”, “pressure” or a “crisis”. It will do so under definitions so open-textured, and criteria so numerous, that it will be basically the master of its determinations (Article 50 of the Migration Management Proposal). The Commission will determine unilaterally relocation and operational solidarity needs. Finally, the Commission will determine – we do not know how – if “other contributions” are proportional to relocation needs. Other than in the most clear-cut situations, there is no way that anyone can predict how the system will be applied.
      Third: the mechanism reflects a powerful fixation with and unshakable faith in heavy bureaucracy. Protection applicants may undergo up to three “responsibility determination” procedures and two transfers before finally landing in an asylum procedure: Dublin “screening” in the first State, matching, relocation, full Dublin procedure in the relocation State, then transfer. And this is a system that should not “compromise the objective of the rapid processing of applications”(recital 34)! Decidedly, the idea that in order to improve the CEAS it is above all necessary to suppress unnecessary delays and coercion (see here, p.9) has not made a strong impression on the minds of the drafters. The same remark applies mutatis mutandis to return sponsorships: whatever the benefits in terms of solidarity, one wonders if it is very cost-effective or humane to drag a person from State to State so that they can each try their hand at expelling her.
      Lastly and relatedly, applicants and other persons otherwise concerned by the relocation system are given no voice. They can be “matched”, transferred, re-transferred, but subject to few exceptions their aspirations and intentions remain legally irrelevant. In this regard, the “New Pact” is as old school as it gets: it sticks strictly to the “no choice” taboo on which Dublin is built. What little recognition of applicants’ actorness had been made in the Wikstroem Report is gone. Objectifying migrants is not only incompatible with the claim that the approach taken is “human and humane”. It might prove fatal to the administrative efficiency so cherished by the Commission. Indeed, failure to engage applicants is arguably the key factor in the dismal performance of the Dublin system (here, p.112). Why should it be any different under this solidarity mechanism?

      Framing Force Majeure (or inviting defection?)

      In addition to addressing “crisis” situations, the Proposal for a Migration and Asylum Crisis Regulation includes separate provisions on force majeure.

      Thereunder, any Member State may unilaterally declare that it is faced with a situation making it “impossible” to comply with selected CEAS rules, and thus obtain the right – subject to a mere notification – to derogate from them. Member States may obtain in this way longer Dublin deadlines, or even be exempted from the obligation to accept transfers and be liberated from responsibilities if the suspension goes on more than a year (Article 8). Furthermore, States may obtain a six-months suspension of their duties under the solidarity mechanism (Article 9).

      The inclusion of this proposal in the Pact – possibly an attempt to further placate Member States averse to European solidarity? – beggars belief. Legally speaking, the whole idea is redundant: under the case-law of the ECJ, Member States may derogate from any rule of EU Law if confronted to force majeure. However, putting this black on white amounts to inviting (and legalizing) defection. The only conceivable object of rules of this kind would have been to subject force majeure derogations to prior authorization by the Commission – but there is nothing of the kind in the Proposal. The end result is paradoxical: while Member States are (in theory!) subject to Commission supervision when they conclude arrangements facilitating the implementation of Dublin rules, a mere notification will be enough to authorize them to unilaterally tear a hole in the fabric of “solidarity” and “responsibility” so painstakingly – if not felicitously – woven in the Pact.
      Concluding comments

      We should have taken Commissioner Ylva Johansson at her word when she said that there would be no “Hoorays” for the new proposals. Past the avalanche of adjectives, promises and fancy administrative monikers hurled at the reader – “faster, seamless migration processes”; “prevent the recurrence of events such as those seen in Moria”; “critical mass correction mechanism” – one cannot fail to see that the “fresh start” is essentially an exercise in repackaging.

      On responsibility-allocation and solidarity, the basic idea is one that the Commission incessantly returns to since 2007 (here, p. 10): keep Dublin and “correct” it through solidarity schemes. I do sympathize to an extent: realizing a fair balance of responsibilities by “sharing people” has always seemed to me impracticable and undesirable. Still, one would have expected that the abject failure of the Dublin system, the collapse of mutual trust in the CEAS, the meagre results obtained in the field of solidarity – per the Commission’s own appraisal – would have pushed it to bring something new to the table.

      Instead, what we have is a slightly milder version of the Dublin IV Proposal – the ultimate “clunker” in the history of Commission proposals – and an ultra-bureaucratic mechanism for relocation, with the dubious addition of return sponsorships and force majeure provisions. The basic tenets of infra-EU allocation remain the same – “no choice”, first entry – and none of the structural flaws that doomed current schemes to failure is fundamentally tackled (here, p.107): solidarity is beefed-up but appears too unreliable and fuzzy to generate trust; there are interesting steps on “genuine links”, but otherwise no sustained attempt to positively engage applicants; administrative complexity and coercive transfers reign on.

      Pragmatism, to quote again Daniel Thym’s excellent introductory post, is no sin. It is even expected of the Commission. This, however, is a study in path-dependency. By defending the status quo, wrapping it in shiny new paper, and making limited concessions to key policy actors, the Commission may perhaps carry its proposals through. However, without substantial corrections, the “new” Pact is unlikely to save the CEAS or even to prevent new Morias.

      http://eumigrationlawblog.eu/a-fresh-start-or-one-more-clunker-dublin-and-solidarity-in-the-ne

      #Francesco_Maiani

      #force_majeure

    • European Refugee Policy: What’s Gone Wrong and How to Make It Better

      In 2015 and 2016, more than 1 million refugees made their way to the European Union, the largest number of them originating from Syria. Since that time, refugee arrivals have continued, although at a much slower pace and involving people from a wider range of countries in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East.

      The EU’s response to these developments has had five main characteristics.

      First, a serious lack of preparedness and long-term planning. Despite the massive material and intelligence resources at its disposal, the EU was caught completely unaware by the mass influx of refugees five years ago and has been playing catch-up ever since. While the emergency is now well and truly over, EU member states continue to talk as if still in the grip of an unmanageable “refugee crisis.”

      Second, the EU’s refugee policy has become progressively based on a strategy known as “externalization,” whereby responsibility for migration control is shifted to unstable states outside Europe. This has been epitomized by the deals that the EU has done with countries such as Libya, Niger, Sudan, and Turkey, all of which have agreed to halt the onward movement of refugees in exchange for aid and other rewards, including support to the security services.

      Third, asylum has become increasingly criminalized, as demonstrated by the growing number of EU citizens and civil society groups that have been prosecuted for their roles in aiding refugees. At the same time, some frontline member states have engaged in a systematic attempt to delegitimize the NGO search-and-rescue organizations operating in the Mediterranean and to obstruct their life-saving activities.

      The fourth characteristic of EU countries’ recent policies has been a readiness to inflict or be complicit in a range of abuses that challenge the principles of both human rights and international refugee law. This can be seen in the violence perpetrated against asylum seekers by the military and militia groups in Croatia and Hungary, the terrible conditions found in Greek refugee camps such as Moria on the island of Lesvos, and, most egregiously of all, EU support to the Libyan Coastguard that enables it to intercept refugees at sea and to return them to abusive detention centers on land.

      Fifth and finally, the past five years have witnessed a serious absence of solidarity within the EU. Frontline states such as Greece and Italy have been left to bear a disproportionate share of the responsibility for new refugee arrivals. Efforts to relocate asylum seekers and resettle refugees throughout the EU have had disappointing results. And countries in the eastern part of the EU have consistently fought against the European Commission in its efforts to forge a more cooperative and coordinated approach to the refugee issue.

      The most recent attempt to formulate such an approach is to be found in the EU Pact on Migration and Asylum, which the Commission proposed in September 2020.

      It would be wrong to entirely dismiss the Pact, as it contains some positive elements. These include, for example, a commitment to establish legal pathways to asylum in Europe for people who are in need of protection, and EU support for member states that wish to establish community-sponsored refugee resettlement programs.

      In other respects, however, the Pact has a number of important, serious flaws. It has already been questioned by those countries that are least willing to admit refugees and continue to resist the role of Brussels in this policy domain. The Pact also makes hardly any reference to the Global Compacts on Refugees and Migration—a strange omission given the enormous amount of time and effort that the UN has devoted to those initiatives, both of which were triggered by the European emergency of 2015-16.

      At an operational level, the Pact endorses and reinforces the EU’s externalization agenda and envisages a much more aggressive role for Frontex, the EU’s border control agency. At the same time, it empowers member states to refuse entry to asylum seekers on the basis of very vague criteria. As a result, individuals may be more vulnerable to human smugglers and traffickers. There is also a strong likelihood that new refugee camps will spring up on the fringes of Europe, with their residents living in substandard conditions.

      Finally, the Pact places enormous emphasis on the involuntary return of asylum seekers to their countries of origin. It even envisages that a hardline state such as Hungary could contribute to the implementation of the Pact by organizing and funding such deportations. This constitutes an extremely dangerous new twist on the notions of solidarity and responsibility sharing, which form the basis of the international refugee regime.

      If the proposed Pact is not fit for purpose, then what might a more constructive EU refugee policy look like?

      It would in the first instance focus on the restoration of both EU and NGO search-and-rescue efforts in the Mediterranean and establish more predictable disembarkation and refugee distribution mechanisms. It would also mean the withdrawal of EU support for the Libyan Coastguard, the closure of that country’s detention centers, and a substantial improvement of the living conditions experienced by refugees in Europe’s frontline states—changes that should take place with or without a Pact.

      Indeed, the EU should redeploy the massive amount of resources that it currently devotes to the externalization process, so as to strengthen the protection capacity of asylum and transit countries on the periphery of Europe. A progressive approach on the part of the EU would involve the establishment of not only faster but also fair asylum procedures, with appropriate long-term solutions being found for new arrivals, whether or not they qualify for refugee status.

      These changes would help to ensure that those searching for safety have timely and adequate opportunities to access their most basic rights.

      https://www.refugeesinternational.org/reports/2020/11/5/european-refugee-policy-whats-gone-wrong-and-how-to-make-it-b

    • The New Pact on Migration and Asylum: Turning European Union Territory into a non-Territory

      Externalization policies in 2020: where is the European Union territory?

      In spite of the Commission’s rhetoric stressing the novel elements of the Pact on Migration and Asylum (hereinafter: the Pact – summarized and discussed in general here), there are good reasons to argue that the Pact develops and consolidates, among others, the existing trends on externalization policies of migration control (see Guild et al). Furthermore, it tries to create new avenues for a ‘smarter’ system of management of immigration, by additionally controlling access to the European Union territory for third country nationals (TCNs), and by creating different categories of migrants, which are then subject to different legal regimes which find application in the European Union territory.

      The consolidation of existing trends concerns the externalization of migration management practices, resort to technologies in developing migration control systems (further development of Eurodac, completion of the path toward full interoperability between IT systems), and also the strengthening of the role of the European Union executive level, via increased joint management involving European Union agencies: these are all policies that find in the Pact’s consolidation.

      This brief will focus on externalization (practices), a concept which is finding a new declination in the Pact: indeed, the Pact and several of the measures proposed, read together, are aiming at ‘disentangling’ the territory of the EU, from a set of rights which are related with the presence of the migrant or of the asylum seeker on the territory of a Member State of the EU, and from the relation between territory and access to a jurisdiction, which is necessary to enforce rights which otherwise remain on paper.

      Interestingly, this process of separation, of splitting between territory-law/rights-jurisdiction takes place not outside, but within the EU, and this is the new declination of externalization which one can find in the measures proposed in the Pact, namely with the proposal for a Screening Regulation and the amended proposal for a Procedure Regulation. It is no accident that other commentators have interpreted it as a consolidation of ‘fortress Europe’. In other words, this externalization process takes place within the EU and aims at making the external borders more effective also for the TCNs who are already in the territory of the EU.

      The proposal for a pre-entry screening regulation

      A first instrument which has a pivotal role in the consolidation of the externalization trend is the proposed Regulation for a screening of third country nationals (hereinafter: Proposal Screening Regulation), which will be applicable to migrants crossing the external borders without authorization. The aim of the screening, according to the Commission, is to ‘accelerate the process of determining the status of a person and what type of procedure should apply’. More precisely, the screening ‘should help ensure that the third country nationals concerned are referred to the appropriate procedures at the earliest stage possible’ and also to avoid absconding after entrance in the territory in order to reach a different state than the one of arrival (recital 8, preamble of proposal). The screening should contribute as well to curb secondary movements, which is a policy target highly relevant for many northern and central European Union states.

      In the new design, the screening procedure becomes the ‘standard’ for all TCNs who crossed the border in irregular manner, and also for persons who are disembarked following a search and rescue (SAR) operation, and for those who apply for international protection at the external border crossing points or in transit zones. With the screening Regulation, all these categories of persons shall not be allowed to enter the territory of the State during the screening (Arts 3 and 4 of the proposal).

      Consequently, different categories of migrants, including asylum seekers which are by definition vulnerable persons, are to be kept in locations situated at or in proximity to the external borders, for a time (up to 5 days, which can become 10 at maximum), defined in the Regulation, but which must be respected by national administrations. There is here an implicit equation between all these categories, and the common denominator of this operation is that all these persons have crossed the border in an unauthorized manner.

      It is yet unclear how the situation of migrants during the screening is to be organized in practical terms, transit zones, hotspot or others, and if this can qualify as detention, in legal terms. The Court of Justice has ruled recently on Hungarian transit zones (see analysis by Luisa Marin), by deciding that Röszke transit zone qualified as ‘detention’, and it can be argued that the parameters clarified in that decision could find application also to the case of migrants during the screening phase. If the situation of TCNs during the screening can be considered detention, which is then the legal basis? The Reception Conditions Directive or the Return Directive? If the national administrations struggle to meet the tight deadlines provided for the screening system, these questions will become more urgent, next to the very practical issue of the actual accommodation for this procedure, which in general does not allow for access to the territory.

      On the one side, Article 14(7) of the proposal provides a guarantee, indicating that the screening should end also if the checks are not completed within the deadlines; on the other side, the remaining question is: to which procedure is the applicant sent and how is the next phase then determined? The relevant procedure following the screening here seems to be determined in a very approximate way, and this begs the question on the extent to which rights can be protected in this context. Furthermore, the right to have access to a lawyer is not provided for in the screening phase. Given the relevance of this screening phase, also fundamental rights should be monitored, and the mechanism put in place at Article 7, leaves much to the discretion of the Member States, and the involvement of the Fundamental Rights Agency, with guidance and support upon request of the MS can be too little to ensure fundamental rights are not jeopardized by national administrations.

      This screening phase, which has the purpose to make sure, among other things, that states ‘do their job’ as to collecting information and consequently feeding the EU information systems, might therefore have important effects on the merits of the individual case, since border procedures are to be seen as fast-track, time is limited and procedural guarantees are also sacrificed in this context. In the case the screening ends with a refusal of entry, there is a substantive effect of the screening, which is conducted without legal assistance and without access to a legal remedy. And if this is not a decision in itself, but it ends up in a de-briefing form, this form might give substance to the next stage of the procedure, which, in the case of asylum, should be an individualized and accurate assessment of one’s individual circumstances.

      Overall, it should be stressed that the screening itself does not end up in a formal decision, it nevertheless represents an important phase since it defines what comes after, i.e., the type of procedure following the screening. It must be observed therefore, that the respect of some procedural rights is of paramount importance. At the same time, it is important that communication in a language TCNs can understand is effective, since the screening might end in a de-briefing form, where one or more nationalities are indicated. Considering that one of the options is the refusal of entry (Art. 14(1) screening proposal; confirmed by the recital 40 of the Proposal Procedure Regulation, as amended in 2020), and the others are either access to asylum or expulsion, one should require that the screening provides for procedural guarantees.

      Furthermore, the screening should point to any element which might be relevant to refer the TCNs into the accelerated examination procedure or the border procedure. In other words, the screening must indicate in the de-briefing form the options that protect asylum applicants less than others (Article 14(3) of the proposal). It does not operate in the other way: a TCN who has applied for asylum and comes from a country with a high recognition rate is not excluded from the screening (see blog post by Jakuleviciene).

      The legislation creates therefore avenues for disentangling, splitting the relation between physical presence of an asylum applicant on a territory and the set of laws and fundamental rights associated to it, namely a protective legal order, access to rights and to a jurisdiction enforcing those rights. It creates a sort of ‘lighter’ legal order, a lower density system, which facilitates the exit of the applicant from the territory of the EU, creating a sort of shift from a Europe of rights to the Europe of borders, confinement and expulsions.

      The proposal for new border procedures: an attempt to create a lower density territory?

      Another crucial piece in this process of establishing a stronger border fence and streamline procedures at the border, creating a ‘seamless link between asylum and return’, in the words of the Commission, is constituted by the reform of the border procedures, with an amendment of the 2016 proposal for the Regulation procedure (hereinafter: Amended Proposal Procedure Regulation).

      Though border procedures are already present in the current Regulation of 2013, they are now developed into a “border procedure for asylum and return”, and a more developed accelerated procedure, which, next to the normal asylum procedure, comes after the screening phase.

      The new border procedure becomes obligatory (according to Art. 41(3) of the Amended Proposal Procedure Regulation) for applicants who arrive irregularly at the external border or after disembarkation and another of these grounds apply:

      – they represent a risk to national security or public order;

      – the applicant has provided false information or documents or by withholding relevant information or document;

      – the applicant comes from a non-EU country for which the share of positive decisions in the total number of asylum decisions is below 20 percent.

      This last criterion is especially problematic, since it transcends the criterion of the safe third country and it undermines the principle that every asylum application requires a complex and individualized assessment of the particular personal circumstances of the applicant, by introducing presumptive elements in a procedure which gives fewer guarantees.

      During the border procedure, the TCN is not granted access to the EU. The expansion of the new border procedures poses also the problem of the organization of the facilities necessary for the new procedures, which must be a location at or close to the external borders, in other words, where migrants are apprehended or disembarked.

      Tellingly enough, the Commission’s explanatory memorandum describes as guarantees in the asylum border procedure all the situations in which the border procedure shall not be applied, for example, because the necessary support cannot be provided or for medical reasons, or where the ‘conditions for detention (…) cannot be met and the border procedure cannot be applied without detention’.

      Also here the question remains on how to qualify their stay during the procedure, because the Commission aims at limiting resort to detention. The situation could be considered de facto a detention, and its compatibility with the criteria laid down by the Court of Justice in the Hungarian transit zones case is questionable.

      Another aspect which must be analyzed is the system of guarantees after the decision in a border procedure. If an application is rejected in an asylum border procedure, the “return procedure” applies immediately. Member States must limit to one instance the right to effective remedy against the decision, as posited in Article 53(9). The right to an effective remedy is therefore limited, according to Art. 53 of the Proposed Regulation, and the right to remain, a ‘light’ right to remain one could say, is also narrowly constructed, in the case of border procedures, to the first remedy against the negative decision (Art. 54(3) read together with Art. 54(4) and 54(5)). Furthermore, EU law allows Member States to limit the right to remain in case of subsequent applications and provides that there is no right to remain in the case of subsequent appeals (Art. 54(6) and (7)). More in general, this proposal extends the circumstances where the applicant does not have an automatic right to remain and this represents an aspect which affects significantly and in a factual manner the capacity to challenge a negative decision in a border procedure.

      Overall, it can be argued that the asylum border procedure is a procedure where guarantees are limited, because the access to the jurisdiction is taking place in fast-track procedures, access to legal remedies is also reduced to the very minimum. Access to the territory of the Member State is therefore deprived of its typical meaning, in the sense that it does not imply access to a system which is protecting rights with procedures which offer guarantees and are therefore also time-consuming. Here, efficiency should govern a process where the access to a jurisdiction is lighter, is ‘less dense’ than otherwise. To conclude, this externalization of migration control policies takes place ‘inside’ the European Union territory, and it aims at prolonging the effects of containment policies because they make access to the EU territory less meaningful, in legal terms: the presence of the person in the territory of the EU does not entail full access to the rights related to the presence on the territory.

      Solidarity in cooperating with third countries? The “return sponsorship” and its territorial puzzle

      Chapter 6 of the New Pact on Migration and Asylum proposes, among other things, to create a conditionality between cooperation on readmission with third countries and the issuance of visas to their nationals. This conditionality was legally established in the 2019 revision of the Visa Code Regulation. The revision (discussed here) states that, given their “politically sensitive nature and their horizontal implications for the Member States and the Union”, such provisions will be triggered once implementing powers are conferred to the Council (following a proposal from the Commission).

      What do these measures entail? We know that they can be applied in bulk or separately. Firstly, EU consulates in third countries will not have the usual leeway to waive some documents required to apply for visas (Art. 14(6), visa code). Secondly, visa applicants from uncooperative third countries will pay higher visa fees (Art. 16(1) visa code). Thirdly, visa fees to diplomatic and service passports will not be waived (Art. 16(5)b visa code). Fourthly, time to take a decision on the visa application will be longer than 15 days (Art. 23(1) visa code). Fifthly, the issuance of multi-entry visas (MEVs) from 6 months to 5 years is suspended (Art. 24(2) visa code). In other words, these coercive measures are not aimed at suspending visas. They are designed to make the procedure for obtaining a visa more lengthy, more costly, and limited in terms of access to MEVs.

      Moreover, it is important to stress that the revision of the Visa Code Regulation mentions that the Union will strike a balance between “migration and security concerns, economic considerations and general external relations”. Consequently, measures (be they restrictive or not) will result from an assessment that goes well beyond migration management issues. The assessment will not be based exclusively on the so-called “return rate” that has been presented as a compass used to reward or blame third countries’ cooperation on readmission. Other indicators or criteria, based on data provided by the Member States, will be equally examined by the Commission. These other indicators pertain to “the overall relations” between the Union and its Member States, on the one hand, and a given third country, on the other. This broad category is not defined in the 2019 revision of the Visa Code, nor do we know what it precisely refers to.

      What do we know about this linkage? The idea of linking cooperation on readmission with visa policy is not new. It was first introduced at a bilateral level by some member states. For example, fifteen years ago, cooperation on redocumentation, including the swift delivery of laissez-passers by the consular authorities of countries of origin, was at the centre of bilateral talks between France and North African countries. In September 2005, the French Ministry of the Interior proposed to “sanction uncooperative countries [especially Morocco, Tunisia and Algeria] by limiting the number of short-term visas that France delivers to their nationals.” Sanctions turned out to be unsuccessful not only because of the diplomatic tensions they generated – they were met with strong criticisms and reaction on the part of North African countries – but also because the ratio between the number of laissez-passers requested by the French authorities and the number of laissez-passers delivered by North African countries’ authorities remained unchanged.

      At the EU level, the idea to link readmission with visa policy has been in the pipeline for many years. Let’s remember that, in October 2002, in its Community Return Policy, the European Commission reflected on the positive incentives that could be used in order to ensure third countries’ constant cooperation on readmission. The Commission observed in its communication that, actually, “there is little that can be offered in return. In particular visa concessions or the lifting of visa requirements can be a realistic option in exceptional cases only; in most cases it is not.” Therefore, the Commission set out to propose additional incentives (e.g. trade expansion, technical/financial assistance, additional development aid).

      In a similar vein, in September 2015, after years of negotiations and failed attempt to cooperate on readmission with Southern countries, the Commission remarked that the possibility to use Visa Facilitation Agreements as an incentive to cooperate on readmission is limited in the South “as the EU is unlikely to offer visa facilitation to certain third countries which generate many irregular migrants and thus pose a migratory risk. And even when the EU does offer the parallel negotiation of a visa facilitation agreement, this may not be sufficient if the facilitations offered are not sufficiently attractive.”

      More recently, in March 2018, in its Impact Assessment accompanying the proposal for an amendment of the Common Visa Code, the Commission itself recognised that “better cooperation on readmission with reluctant third countries cannot be obtained through visa policy measures alone.” It also added that “there is no hard evidence on how visa leverage can translate into better cooperation of third countries on readmission.”

      Against this backdrop, why has so much emphasis been put on the link between cooperation on readmission and visa policy in the revised Visa Code Regulation and later in the New Pact? The Commission itself recognised that this conditionality might not constitute a sufficient incentive to ensure the cooperation on readmission.

      To reply to this question, we need first to question the oft-cited reference to third countries’ “reluctance”[n1] to cooperate on readmission in order to understand that, cooperation on readmission is inextricably based on unbalanced reciprocities. Moreover, migration, be it regular or irregular, continues to be viewed as a safety valve to relieve pressure on unemployment and poverty in countries of origin. Readmission has asymmetric costs and benefits having economic social and political implications for countries of origin. Apart from being unpopular in Southern countries, readmission is humiliating, stigmatizing, violent and traumatic for migrants,[n2] making their process of reintegration extremely difficult, if not impossible, especially when countries of origin have often no interest in promoting reintegration programmes addressed to their nationals expelled from Europe.

      Importantly, the conclusion of a bilateral agreement does not automatically lead to its full implementation in the field of readmission, for the latter is contingent on an array of factors that codify the bilateral interactions between two contracting parties. Today, more than 320 bilateral agreements linked to readmission have been concluded between the 27 EU Member States and third countries at a global level. Using an oxymoron, it is possible to argue that, over the past decades, various EU member states have learned that, if bilateral cooperation on readmission constitutes a central priority in their external relations (this is the official rhetoric), readmission remains peripheral to other strategic issue-areas which are detailed below. Finally, unlike some third countries in the Balkans or Eastern Europe, Southern third countries have no prospect of acceding to the EU bloc, let alone having a visa-free regime, at least in the foreseeable future. This basic difference makes any attempt to compare the responsiveness of the Balkan countries to cooperation on readmission with Southern non-EU countries’ impossible, if not spurious.

      Today, patterns of interdependence between the North and the South of the Mediterranean are very much consolidated. Over the last decades, Member States, especially Spain, France, Italy and Greece, have learned that bringing pressure to bear on uncooperative third countries needs to be evaluated cautiously lest other issues of high politics be jeopardized. Readmission cannot be isolated from a broader framework of interactions including other strategic, if not more crucial, issue-areas, such as police cooperation on the fight against international terrorism, border control, energy security and other diplomatic and geopolitical concerns. Nor can bilateral cooperation on readmission be viewed as an end in itself, for it has often been grafted onto a broader framework of interactions.

      This point leads to a final remark regarding “return sponsorship” which is detailed in Art. 55 of the proposal for a regulation on asylum and migration management. In a nutshell, the idea of the European Commission consists in a commitment from a “sponsoring Member State” to assist another Member State (the benefitting Member State) in the readmission of a third-country national. This mechanism foresees that each Member State is expected to indicate the nationalities for which they are willing to provide support in the field of readmission. The sponsoring Member State offers an assistance by mobilizing its network of bilateral cooperation on readmission, or by opening a dialogue with the authorities of a given third country where the third-country national will be deported. If, after eight months, attempts are unsuccessful, the third-country national is transferred to the sponsoring Member State. Note that, in application of Council Directive 2001/40 on mutual recognition of expulsion decisions, the sponsoring Member State may or may not recognize the expulsion decision of the benefitting Member State, just because Member States continue to interpret the Geneva Convention in different ways and also because they have different grounds for subsidiary protection.

      Viewed from a non-EU perspective, namely from the point of view of third countries, this mechanism might raise some questions of competence and relevance. Which consular authorities will undertake the identification process of the third country national with a view to eventually delivering a travel document? Are we talking about the third country’s consular authorities located in the territory of the benefitting Member State or in the sponsoring Member State’s? In a similar vein, why would a bilateral agreement linked to readmission – concluded with a given ‘sponsoring’ Member State – be applicable to a ‘benefitting’ Member State (with which no bilateral agreement or arrangement has been signed)? Such territorially bounded contingencies will invariably be problematic, at a certain stage, from the viewpoint of third countries. Additionally, in acting as a sponsoring Member State, one is entitled to wonder why an EU Member State might decide to expose itself to increased tensions with a given third country while putting at risk a broader framework of interactions.

      As the graph shows, not all the EU Member States are equally engaged in bilateral cooperation on readmission with third countries. Moreover, a geographical distribution of available data demonstrates that more than 70 per cent of the total number of bilateral agreements linked to readmission (be they formal or informal[n3]) concluded with African countries are covered by France, Italy and Spain. Over the last decades, these three Member States have developed their respective networks of cooperation on readmission with a number of countries in Africa and in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region.

      https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8eUfaXQlFZY/X8UGriAC8tI/AAAAAAAARVQ/8JLNd24XJQkk5L6YOCbtDJtNLfnIjDUjQCLcBGAsYHQ/w451-h247/Graph%2B1%2BNov%2B30%2B2020.jpg

      Given the existence of these consolidated networks, the extent to which the “return sponsorship” proposed in the Pact will add value to their current undertakings is objectively questionable. Rather, if the “return sponsorship” mechanism is adopted, these three Member States might be deemed to act as sponsoring Member States when it comes to the expulsion of irregular migrants (located in other EU Member States) to Africa and the MENA region. More concretely, the propensity of, for example, Austria to sponsor Italy in expelling from Italy a foreign national coming from the MENA region or from Africa is predictably low. Austria’s current networks of cooperation on readmission with MENA and African countries would never add value to Italy’s consolidated networks of cooperation on readmission with these third countries. Moreover, it is unlikely that Italy will be proactively “sponsoring” other Member States’ expulsion decisions, without jeopardising its bilateral relations with other strategic third countries located in the MENA region or in Africa, to use the same example. These considerations concretely demonstrate that the European Commission’s call for “solidarity and fair sharing of responsibility”, on which its “return sponsorship” mechanism is premised, is contingent on the existence of a federative Union able to act as a unitary supranational body in domestic and foreign affairs. This federation does not exist in political terms.

      Beyond these practical aspects, it is important to realise that the cobweb of bilateral agreements linked to readmission has expanded as a result of tremendously complex bilateral dynamics that go well beyond the mere management of international migration. These remarks are crucial to understanding that we need to reflect properly on the conditionality pattern that has driven the external action of the EU, especially in a regional context where patterns of interdependence among state actors have gained so much relevance over the last two decades. Moreover, given the clear consensus on the weak correlation between cooperation on readmission and visa policy (the European Commission being no exception to this consensus), linking the two might not be the adequate response to ensure third countries’ cooperation on readmission, especially when the latter are in position to capitalize on their strategic position with regard to some EU Member States.

      Conclusions

      This brief reflection has highlighted a trend which is taking shape in the Pact and in some of the measures proposed by the Commission in its 2020 package of reforms. It has been shown that the proposals for a pre-entry screening and the 2020 amended proposal for enhanced border procedures are creating something we could label as a ‘lower density’ European Union territory, because the new procedures and arrangements have the purpose of restricting and limiting access to rights and to jurisdiction. This would happen on the territory of a Member State, but in a place at or close to the external borders, with a view to confining migration and third country nationals to an area where the territory of a state, and therefore, the European territory, is less … ‘territorial’ than it should be: legally speaking, it is a ‘lower density’ territory.

      The “seamless link between asylum and return” the Commission aims to create with the new border procedures can be described as sliding doors through which the third country national can enter or leave immediately, depending on how the established fast-track system qualifies her situation.

      However, the paradox highlighted with the “return sponsorship” mechanism shows that readmission agreements or arrangements are no panacea, for the vested interests of third countries must also be taken into consideration when it comes to cooperation on readmission. In this respect, it is telling that the Commission never consulted third states on the new return sponsorship mechanism, as if their territories were not concerned by this mechanism, which is far from being the case. For this reason, it is legitimate to imagine that the main rationale for the return sponsorship mechanism may be another one, and it may be merely domestic. In other words, the return sponsorship, which transforms itself into a form of relocation after eight months if the third country national is not expelled from the EU territory, subtly takes non-frontline European Union states out of their comfort-zone and engage them in cooperating on expulsions. If they fail to do so, namely if the third-country national is not expelled after eight months, non-frontline European Union states are as it were ‘forcibly’ engaged in a ‘solidarity practice’ that is conducive to relocation.

      Given the disappointing past experience of the 2015 relocations, it is impossible to predict whether this mechanism will work or not. However, once one enters sliding doors, the danger is to remain stuck in uncertainty, in a European Union ‘no man’s land’ which is nothing but another by-product of the fortress Europe machinery.

      http://eulawanalysis.blogspot.com/2020/11/the-new-pact-on-migration-and-asylum.html

    • Le nouveau Pacte européen sur la migration et l’asile

      Ce 23 septembre 2020, la Commission européenne a présenté son très attendu nouveau Pacte sur la migration et l’asile.

      Alors que l’Union européenne (UE) traverse une crise politique majeure depuis 2015 et que les solutions apportées ont démontré leur insuffisance en matière de solidarité entre États membres, leur violence à l’égard des exilés et leur coût exorbitant, la Commission européenne ne semble pas tirer les leçons du passé.

      Au menu du Pacte : un renforcement toujours accru des contrôles aux frontières, des procédures expéditives aux frontières de l’UE avec, à la clé, la détention généralisée pour les nouveaux arrivants, la poursuite de l’externalisation et un focus sur les expulsions. Il n’y a donc pas de changement de stratégie.

      Le Règlement Dublin, injuste et inefficace, est loin d’être aboli. Le nouveau système mis en place changera certes de nom, mais reprendra le critère tant décrié du “premier pays d’entrée” dans l’UE pour déterminer le pays responsable du traitement de la demande d’asile. Quant à un mécanisme permanent de solidarité pour les États davantage confrontés à l’arrivée des exilés, à l’instar des quotas de relocalisations de 2015-2017 – relocalisations qui furent un échec complet -, la Commission propose une solidarité permanente et obligatoire mais… à la carte, où les États qui ne veulent pas accueillir de migrants peuvent choisir à la place de “parrainer” leur retour, ou de fournir un soutien opérationnel aux États en difficulté. La solidarité n’est donc cyniquement pas envisagée pour l’accueil, mais bien pour le renvoi des migrants.

      Pourtant, l’UE fait face à beaucoup moins d’arrivées de migrants sur son territoire qu’en 2015 (1,5 million d’arrivées en 2015, 140.00 en 2019)

      Fin 2019, l’UE accueillait 2,6 millions de réfugiés, soit l’équivalent de 0,6% de sa population. À défaut de voies légales et sûres, les personnes exilées continuent de fuir la guerre, la violence, ou de rechercher une vie meilleure et doivent emprunter des routes périlleuses pour rejoindre le territoire de l’UE : on dénombre plus de 20.000 décès depuis 2014. Une fois arrivées ici, elles peuvent encore être détenues et subir des mauvais traitements, comme c’était le cas dans le camp qui a brûlé à Moria. Lorsqu’elles poursuivent leur route migratoire au sein de l’UE, elles ne peuvent choisir le pays où elles demanderont l’asile et elles font face à la loterie de l’asile…

      Loin d’un “nouveau départ” avec ce nouveau Pacte, la Commission propose les mêmes recettes et rate une opportunité de mettre en œuvre une tout autre politique, qui soit réellement solidaire, équitable pour les États membres et respectueuse des droits fondamentaux des personnes migrantes, avec l’établissement de voies légales et sûres, des procédures d’asile harmonisées et un accueil de qualité, ou encore la recherche de solutions durables pour les personnes en situation irrégulière.

      Dans cette brève analyse, nous revenons sur certaines des mesures phares telles qu’elles ont été présentées par la Commission européenne et qui feront l’objet de discussions dans les prochains mois avec le Parlement européen et le Conseil européen. Nous expliquerons également en quoi ces mesures n’ont rien d’innovant, sont un échec de la politique migratoire européenne, et pourquoi elles sont dangereuses pour les personnes migrantes.

      https://www.cire.be/publication/le-nouveau-pacte-europeen-sur-la-migration-et-lasile

      Pour télécharger l’analyse :
      https://www.cire.be/wp-admin/admin-ajax.php?juwpfisadmin=false&action=wpfd&task=file.download&wpfd_category_

    • New pact on migration and asylum. Perspective on the ’other side’ of the EU border

      At the end of September 2020, and after camp Moria on Lesvos burned down leaving over 13,000 people in an even more precarious situation than they were before, the European Commission (EC) introduced a proposal for the New Pact on Migration and Asylum. So far, the proposal has not been met with enthusiasm by neither member states or human rights organisations.

      Based on first-hand field research interviews with civil society and other experts in the Balkan region, this report provides a unique perspective of the New Pact on Migration and Asylum from ‘the other side’ of the EU’s borders.

      #Balkans #route_des_Balkans #rapport #Refugee_rights #militarisation

    • Impakter | Un « nouveau » pacte sur l’asile et les migrations ?

      Le média en ligne Impakter propose un article d’analyse du Pacte sur l’asile et les migrations de l’Union européenne. Publié le 23 septembre 2020, le pacte a été annoncé comme un “nouveau départ”. En réalité, le pacte n’est pas du tout un nouveau départ, mais la même politique avec un ensemble de nouvelles propositions. L’article pointe l’aspect critique du projet, et notamment des concepts clés tels que : « processus de pré-selection », « le processus accélérée » et le « pacte de retour ». L’article donne la parole à plusieurs expertises et offre ainsi une meilleure compréhension de ce que concrètement ce pacte implique pour les personnes migrantes.

      L’article de #Charlie_Westbrook “A “New” Pact on Migration and Asylum ?” a été publié le 11 février dans le magazine en ligne Impakter (sous licence Creative Commons). Nous vous en proposons un court résumé traduisant les lignes directrices de l’argumentaire, en français ci-dessous. Pour lire l’intégralité du texte en anglais, vous pouvez vous rendre sur le site de Impakter.

      –---

      Le “Nouveau pacte sur la migration et l’asile”, a été publié le 23 septembre, faisant suite à l’incendie du camp surpeuplé de Moria. Le pacte a été annoncé comme un “nouveau départ”. En réalité, le pacte n’est pas du tout un nouveau départ, mais la même politique avec un ensemble de nouvelles propositions sur lesquelles les États membres de l’UE devront maintenant se mettre d’accord – une entreprise qui a déjà connu des difficultés.

      Les universitaires, les militants et les organisations de défense des droits de l’homme de l’UE soulignent les préoccupations éthiques et pratiques que suscitent nombre des propositions suggérées par la Commission, ainsi que la rhétorique axée sur le retour qui les anime. Charlie Westbrook la journaliste, a contacté Kirsty Evans, coordinatrice de terrain et des campagnes pour Europe Must Act, qui m’a fait part de ses réactions au nouveau Pacte.

      Cet essai vise à présenter le plus clairement possible les problèmes liés à ce nouveau pacte, en mettant en évidence les principales préoccupations des experts et des ONG. Ces préoccupations concernent les problèmes potentiels liés au processus de présélection, au processus accéléré (ou “fast-track”) et au mécanisme de parrainage des retours.

      Le processus de présélection

      La nouvelle proposition est d’instaurer une procédure de contrôle préalable à l’entrée sur le territoire européen. L’ONG Human Rights Watch, dénonce la suggestion trompeuse du pacte selon laquelle les personnes soumises à la procédure frontalière ne sont pas considérées comme ayant formellement pénétré sur le territoire. Ce processus concerne toute personne extra-européenne qui franchirait la frontière de manière irrégulière. Ce manque de différenciation du type de besoin inquiète l’affirme l’avocate et professeur Lyra Jakulevičienė, car cela signifie que la politique d’externalisation sera plus forte que jamais. Ce nouveau règlement brouille la distinction entre les personnes demandant une protection internationale et les autres migrants “en plaçant les deux groupes de personnes sous le même régime juridique au lieu de les différencier clairement, car leurs chances de rester dans l’UE sont très différentes”. Ce processus d’externalisation, cependant, “se déroule “à l’intérieur” du territoire de l’Union européenne, et vise à prolonger les effets des politiques d’endiguement parce qu’elles rendent l’accès au territoire de l’UE moins significatif”, comme l’expliquent Jean-Pierre Cassarino, chercheur principal à la chaire de la politique européenne de voisinage du Collège d’Europe, et Luisa Marin, professeur adjoint de droit européen. En d’autres termes, les personnes en quête de protection n’auront pas pleinement accès aux droits européens en arrivant sur le territoire de l’UE. Il faudra d’abord déterminer ce qu’elles “sont”. En outre, les recherches universitaires montrent que les processus d’externalisation “entraînent le contournement des normes fondamentales, vont à l’encontre de la bonne gouvernance, créent l’immobilité et contribuent à la crise du régime mondial des réfugiés, qui ne parvient pas à assurer la protection”. Les principales inquiétudes de ces deux expert·es sont les suivantes : la rapidité de prise de décision (pas plus de 5 jours), l’absence d’assistance juridique, Etat membre est le seul garant du respect des droits fondamentaux et si cette période de pré-sélection sera mise en œuvre comme une détention.

      Selon Jakulevičienė, la proposition apporte “un grand potentiel” pour créer davantage de camps de style “Moria”. Il est difficile de voir en quoi cela profiterait à qui que ce soit.

      Procédure accélérée

      Si un demandeur est orienté vers le système accéléré, une décision sera prise dans un délai de 12 semaines – une durée qui fait craindre que le système accéléré n’aboutisse à un retour injuste des demandeurs. En 2010, Human Rights Watch a publié un rapport de fond détaillant comment les procédures d’asile accélérées étaient inadaptées aux demandes complexes et comment elles affectaient négativement les femmes demandeurs d’asile en particulier.
      Les personnes seront dirigées vers la procédure accélérée si : l’identité a été cachée ou que de faux documents ont été utilisés, si elle représente un danger pour la sécurité nationale, ou si elle est ressortissante d’un pays pour lesquels moins de 20% des demandes ont abouti à l’octroi d’une protection internationale.

      Comme l’exprime le rapport de Human Rights Watch (HRW), “la procédure à la frontière proposée repose sur deux hypothèses erronées – que la majorité des personnes arrivant en Europe n’ont pas besoin de protection et que l’évaluation des demandes d’asile peut être faite facilement et rapidement”.

      Essentiellement, comme l’écrivent Cassarino et Marin, “elle porte atteinte au principe selon lequel toute demande d’asile nécessite une évaluation complexe et individualisée de la situation personnelle particulière du demandeur”.

      Tout comme Jakulevičienė, Kirsty Evans s’inquiète de la manière dont le pacte va alimenter une rhétorique préjudiciable, en faisant valoir que “le langage de l’accélération fait appel à la “protection” de la rhétorique nationale évidente dans la politique et les médias en se concentrant sur le retour des personnes sur leur propre territoire”.

      Un pacte pour le retour

      Désormais, lorsqu’une demande d’asile est rejetée, la décision de retour sera rendue en même temps.

      Le raisonnement présenté par la Commission pour proposer des procédures plus rapides et plus intégrées est que des procédures inefficaces causent des difficultés excessives – y compris pour ceux qui ont obtenu le droit de rester.

      Les procédures restructurées peuvent en effet profiter à certains. Cependant, il existe un risque sérieux qu’elles aient un impact négatif sur le droit d’asile des personnes soumises à la procédure accélérée – sachant qu’en cas de rejet, il n’existe qu’un seul droit de recours.

      La proposition selon laquelle l’UE traitera désormais les retours dans leur ensemble, et non plus seulement dans un seul État membre, illustre bien l’importance que l’UE accorde aux retours. À cette fin, l’UE propose la création d’un nouveau poste de coordinateur européen des retours qui s’occupera des retours et des réadmissions.

      Décrite comme “la plus sinistre des nouvelles propositions”, et assimilée à “une grotesque parodie de personnes parrainant des enfants dans les pays en développement par l’intermédiaire d’organisations caritatives”, l’option du parrainage de retour est également un signe fort de l’approche par concession de la Commission.

      Pour M. Evans, le fait d’autoriser les pays à opter pour le “retour” comme moyen de “gérer la migration” semble être une validation du comportement illégal des États membres, comme les récentes expulsions massives en Grèce. Alors, qu’est-ce que le parrainage de retour ? Eh bien, selon les termes de l’UE, le parrainage du retour est une option de solidarité dans laquelle l’État membre “s’engage à renvoyer les migrants en situation irrégulière sans droit de séjour au nom d’un autre État membre, en le faisant directement à partir du territoire de l’État membre bénéficiaire”.

      Les États membres préciseront les nationalités qu’ils “parraineront” en fonction, vraisemblablement, des relations préexistantes de l’État membre de l’UE avec un État non membre de l’UE. Lorsque la demande d’un individu est rejetée, l’État membre qui en est responsable s’appuiera sur ses relations avec le pays tiers pour négocier le retour du demandeur.

      En outre, en supposant que les réadmissions soient réussies, le parrainage des retours fonctionne sur la base de l’hypothèse qu’il existe un pays tiers sûr. C’est sur cette base que les demandes sont rejetées. La manière dont cela affectera le principe de non-refoulement est la principale préoccupation des organisations des droits de l’homme et des experts politiques, et c’est une préoccupation qui découle d’expériences antérieures. Après tout, la coopération avec des pays tiers jusqu’à présent – à savoir l’accord Turquie-UE et l’accord Espagne-Maroc – a suscité de nombreuses critiques sur le coût des droits de l’homme.

      Mais en plus des préoccupations relatives aux droits de l’homme, des questions sont soulevées sur les implications ou même les aspects pratiques de l’”incitation” des pays tiers à se conformer, l’image de l’UE en tant que champion des droits de l’homme étant déjà corrodée aux yeux de la communauté internationale.

      Il s’agira notamment d’utiliser la délivrance du code des visas comme méthode d’incitation. Pour les pays qui ne coopèrent pas à la réadmission, les visas seront plus difficiles à obtenir. La proposition visant à pénaliser les pays qui appliquent des restrictions en matière de visas n’est pas nouvelle et n’a pas conduit à une amélioration des relations diplomatiques. Guild fait valoir que cette approche est injuste pour les demandeurs de visa des pays “non coopérants” et qu’elle risque également de susciter des sentiments d’injustice chez les voisins du pays tiers.

      L’analyse de Guild est que le nouveau pacte est diplomatiquement faible. Au-delà du financement, il offre “peu d’attention aux intérêts des pays tiers”. Il faut reconnaître, après tout, que la réadmission a des coûts et des avantages asymétriques pour les pays qui les acceptent, surtout si l’on considère que la migration, comme le soulignent Cassarino et Marin, “continue d’être considérée comme une soupape de sécurité pour soulager la pression sur le chômage et la pauvreté dans les pays d’origine”.

      https://asile.ch/2021/03/02/impakter-un-nouveau-pacte-sur-lasile-et-les-migrations

      L’article original :
      A “New” Pact on Migration and Asylum ?
      https://impakter.com/a-new-pact-on-migration-and-asylum

    • The EU Pact on Migration and Asylum in light of the United Nations Global Compact on Refugees. International Experiences on Containment and Mobility and their Impacts on Trust and Rights

      In September 2020, the European Commission published what it described as a New Pact on Migration and Asylum (emphasis added) that lays down a multi-annual policy agenda on issues that have been central to debate about the future of European integration. This book critically examines the new Pact as part of a Forum organized by the Horizon 2020 project ASILE – Global Asylum Governance and the EU’s Role.

      ASILE studies interactions between emerging international protection systems and the United Nations Global Compact for Refugees (UN GCR), with particular focus on the European Union’s role and the UN GCR’s implementation dynamics. It brings together a new international network of scholars from 13 institutions examining the characteristics of international and country specific asylum governance instruments and arrangements applicable to people seeking international protection. It studies the compatibility of these governance instruments’ with international protection and human rights, and the UN GCR’s call for global solidarity and responsibility sharing.

      https://www.asileproject.eu/the-eu-pact-on-migration-and-asylum-in-light-of-the-united-nations-glob

  • Farmers charter flights to bring fruit-pickers to UK as travel shutdown causes shortage of foreign workers

    Farmers charter flights to bring fruit-pickers to UK as travel shutdown causes shortage of foreign workers

    Nearly 200 Romanian agricultural workers flown from Bucharest to London Stansted in first of series of flights to plug gap in workforce

    With scheduled aviation almost completely shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic, UK farmers are chartering planes to bring in workers to pick fruit and vegetables.

    Nearly 200 Romanian agricultural workers will fly from Bucharest to London Stansted on Thursday aboard the first of a series of charter flights.

    The Country Land and Business Association (CLA) claims travel restrictions and illness could leave a shortage of up to 80,000 agricultural workers. While some of those posts will be filled by British workers, the CLA said it is “almost impossible for farmers to access the labour they need”.

    Scheduled flights between Romania and the UK have been suspended since 5 April, and terrestrial journeys are impossible because of closed frontiers across Europe.

    So with crops ripening and a shortage of seasonal labour, a group of farmers approached the London firm Air Charter Service (ACS) to lay on special flights.

    Matt Purton, the firm’s commercial director, said: “There’s still a need for people from eastern Europe to come to do that work.

    ”It’s impossible to get here by normal means.”

    Passengers booked on the first flight from Romania will undergo health checks before departure. Anyone who displays symptoms of Covid-19 will not be allowed on board.

    To limit the spread of coronavirus onboard planes, the aviation industry is studying the concept of “de-densification” – leaving the middle seat empty in each row.

    On a Boeing 737-800 such as the one being used for the first charter, that would reduce the maximum capacity from 189 to 126.

    But The Independent understands that the Boeing 737 being used for the first flight has every seat booked. The cost per person is around £200 for the one-way flight.
    Daily coronavirus briefing

    No hype, just the advice and analysis you need

    On arrival at the Essex airport, the workers will be bussed to farms in the east of England.

    Further missions from Romania and Bulgaria are planned by ACS.

    The company has also organised missions from the two Balkan countries to a range of German airports.

    Meanwhile, the Scottish airline Loganair is operating charters to and from Poland and Latvia on behalf of the oil industry based northeast Scotland.

    The airline is using an Embraer regional jet to connect Aberdeen, Gdansk and Riga.

    Loganair chief executive Jonathan Hinkles said: “There are still a lot of essential oil workers who need to move.”

    The carrier is also operating “lifeline” flights to Scotland’s islands, as well as Royal Mail services and a new passenger link between Heathrow and the Isle of Man on behalf of British Airways.

    “With half the fleet flying, we’re probably flying more of our aircraft than any other UK airline,” said Mr Hinkles.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/coronavirus-farmers-charter-flights-fruit-pickers-foreign-workers-rom

    #UK #Angleterre #charter #travailleurs_étrangers #agriculture #Roumanie #migrations #travail #coronavirus #covid-19 #récolte

    –------

    Ajouté à la métaliste migrations et coronavirus:
    https://seenthis.net/messages/836693

    ping @thomas_lacroix @karine4

    • Eastern Europeans to be flown in to pick fruit and veg

      Eastern European farm workers are being flown to the UK on charter flights to pick fruit and vegetable crops.

      Air Charter Service has told the BBC that the first flight will land on Thursday in Stansted carrying 150 Romanian farm workers.

      The firm told the BBC that the plane is the first of up to six set to operate between mid-April and the end of June.

      Government department Defra said it was encouraging people across the UK “to help bring the harvest in”.

      British farmers recently warned that crops could be left to rot in the field because of a shortage of seasonal workers from Eastern Europe. Travel restrictions due to the coronavirus lockdown have meant most workers have stayed at home.

      Several UK growers have launched a recruitment drive, calling for local workers to join the harvest to prevent millions of tonnes of fruit and vegetables going to waste. However, concerns remain that they won’t be able to fulfil the demand on farms.

      One of the UK’s biggest fresh food producers, G’s Fresh, based in Cambridgeshire, confirmed it chartered two out of the six flights carrying Eastern European farm workers from Romania.

      Derek Wilkinson, managing director of G’s Fresh’s Sandfield Farms division, told the BBC that the 150 workers arriving at Stansted from eastern Romania on Thursday will be taken by bus to farms in East Anglia to pick lettuce.

      The firm said the group will be screened on arrival in the UK, will be socially distanced, and anyone found to have a temperature will be quarantined.

      Mr Wilkinson said his business needed 3,000 seasonal workers, with the greatest need in May at the start of the spring onion harvest, followed by the pea and bean crop in June.

      He added that the company had had a good response to a recruitment campaign aimed at local workers. So far, 500 British people have registered their interest.

      The Air Charter Service, a private firm, has already arranged flights for seasonal workers in other countries. It flew 1,000 farm workers to Germany from Bulgaria and Romania in recent weeks.

      The workers will board in Iasi, eastern Romania, after having their temperatures taken and filling out a health questionnaire. The BBC understands that they will be taken from the airport by minibuses to farms in the South East and the Midlands.
      Seasonal worker shortage

      The National Farmers’ Union (NFU) said up to 70,000 fruit and vegetable pickers were needed. It is calling for a modern-day “land army” of UK workers.

      NFU vice president Tom Bradshaw told the BBC: “Growers that rely on seasonal workers to grow, pick and pack our fresh fruit, veg and flowers are extremely concerned about the impact coronavirus restrictions may have on their ability to recruit this critical workforce this season.”

      “In the meantime, I would encourage anyone who is interested in helping pick for Britain this summer to contact one of the approved agricultural recruiters.”

      A national campaign is appealing to students and those who have lost their jobs in bars, cafes and shops to help with the harvest.

      Several schemes have been set up to recruit new workers. They include one by the charity Concordia, which typically helps young people arrange experiences abroad, and another by the industry bodies British Summer Fruit and British Apples and Pears.

      Data released to the BBC last week by job search engines suggested that those recruitment efforts might be paying off.

      Totaljobs said it had seen 50,000 searches for farming jobs in one week alone. It added that searches for terms such as “fruit picker” or “farm worker” had surged by 338% and 107% respectively.

      Indeed.co.uk said that there had been a huge spike in interest for fruit picker jobs in particular. Between 18 March and 1 April, there was an increase of more than 6,000% in searches for these roles on its website.

      Meanwhile, Monster said the number of UK users searching for “farm” or “farm worker” jobs had nearly tripled.

      https://www.bbc.com/news/business-52293061

    • The only frequent flyers left: migrant workers in the EU in times of Covid-19

      In a bizarre twist of fate, migrant workers from eastern Europe have remained the only mobile segment of Europe’s population.

      As many European countries have closed their borders and imposed stringent quarantine measures, there is a group of people that continues crossing borders, exposing themselves to risk, often because they hardly have another choice – migrant workers from eastern Europe.

      “Immediate departure - England”, “The Netherlands – Picking up Asparagus”, “Soft Fruits – Scotland”, “Germany Bochum, factory”. These are the titles of some of the 60 job ads published in April, amidst the Corona lockdown, on a Bulgarian jobs website for working abroad. As Romanian workers gather at crowded terminals waiting for their charter flights to Germany, the persistent inequalities within the EU are exposed more clearly than ever. We are all in this together, but some are more in than others.
      “De-facto quarantine with simultaneous work opportunity”

      Governments and businesses in western Europe have pushed for travel exemptions for eastern Europeans, in order to tackle the dire shortages of seasonal labour for planting and harvesting crops at this time of the year. On March 30, the European Commission released new “practical advice” to ensure that cross-border and frontier workers within the EU, in particular those with critical professions, can reach their workplace. The definition of “critical professions” is extremely flexible: “This includes but is not limited to [emphasis added] those working in the health care and food sectors, and other essential services like childcare, elderly care, and critical staff for utilities”.

      Germany is making plans to fly in tens of thousands of eastern Europeans for harvesting – keeping the system of seasonal work alive despite the crisis. It is illustrative that, in Frankfurt, incoming Romanians were welcomed with chocolate Easter bunnies by the German agricultural minister – not an accolade they normally receive. In Austria, care-workers were flown in from Bulgaria, Croatia, and Romania, and more are supposed to follow – even though the Romanian government recently prevented another flight. Whereas two years ago the then right-wing Austrian government introduced measures that reduced the family allowance of many of these eastern European workers, now there are even bonus payments for those care-workers who stay longer. Two Austrian regions have also flown in agricultural workers from Romania.

      The economic logic is clear. While for western standards, eastern Europeans provide cheap labour, the wages these workers receive in the West are still much higher than what they would get for the same work at home. In addition, long hours of gruelling and low-paid work under the spring and summer sun is not something many westerners are keen on doing. It is telling that, despite soaring unemployment rates at home, western and southern European governments, from Spain to Sweden, are nonetheless alarmed over the shortages of farm workers. This has included calling on local citizens to help in the fields. But it should come as no surprise if these calls fall short of expectations, in light of the dire working and living conditions of farm work, on top of the current health hazard.
      No choice

      For many eastern Europeans, though, this is their only way to make ends meet. Lack of proper health care insurance, social protection, and adequate working conditions for eastern European workers have already been a serious problem in the past. But these problems have been exacerbated even further by the pandemic. According to a recent ad for warehouse work in the UK, workers are expected to work 12-hours day and night shifts and receive between 8.35 and 12 GBP per hour depending on achieving set targets. The costs for travel are paid by the workers themselves, in addition to up to 85 GBP per week for accommodation. Workers are also expected to pay two weeks of rent in advance upon arrival and a tax for the housing agency.

      In the meantime in Germany, eastern European agricultural workers are expected to undergo a “de-facto quarantine with simultaneous work opportunity”. That is, they should stay in quarantine while working and sharing accommodation with half-as-many people as usual. Taking into account that accommodations sometimes house up to a dozen workers, this is hardly a strict protection measure. On April 11, a 57-year old Romanian agricultural worker was found dead in German Baden-Württemberg. He had gotten infected with Covid-19 while harvesting asparagus, one of German’s favourite veggies.

      In an open letter from of March 31, the Bulgarian trade union Podkrepa demanded that the Bulgarian government either stops workers from leaving the country – by providing them with minimal basic income during the crisis – or pressurises receiving countries into protecting the economic rights and health of workers, and not sending them back to Bulgaria before the crisis ends. So far, neither of these routes has been taken.
      Open borders without proper social protection serve the interest of employers

      The number of infections in many eastern European countries is still low, in part due to the quick introduction of restrictive measures of “social distancing”. Still, any potential increase could be fatal, given the austerity-stricken decrepit state of the health systems of many of these countries. The municipal hospital of the small town Bulgarian town of Provadia, for example, has no ventilators and counts on an 84-years old pulmonologist and a 60-years old anaesthesiologist, – in a country where many young medical graduates have emigrated to the West and are now helping to tackle the pandemic elsewhere.

      Yet, this should not be interpreted in simplistic moral frames pitting the exploitative West versus the innocent East. Instead of increasing the wages of workers in Bulgaria, Bulgarian employers lobbied actively in the past to “import” cheap labour from third countries such as Moldova and Ukraine. Many of the Bulgarian job ads for work abroad in fact advertise jobs in Czechia, another Central and Eastern European country.

      There has been an important debate on workers’ rights taking place also within southern European countries that have long relied on the inflow of seasonal cheap labour from eastern Europe but also from north and sub-Saharan Africa. The Italian Agriculture Minister recently sparked debate when suggesting that undocumented immigrants from third countries should be given work permits to fill those gaps. This would at the same time provide greater protection to a highly vulnerable sector of the population and avoid shortages of fresh food and the rise in prices. Unsurprisingly, her proposal has been met with fierce resistance by the far right.

      What all this comes to show is that the underlying problem is a systemic one concerning the way employers exploit wage differences across borders. Open borders without proper social protection serve first and foremost the interest of employers. The labour force of sending countries becomes nothing but a labour reserve for receiving countries, contributing to social dumping abroad and labour shortage at home.

      In practical terms, now is the moment to push for unionization of migrant workers and legal measures to guarantee their rights, not only now, when it is urgent to have them, but also in the future. In addition, more cooperation between eastern European trade unions and trade unions in western countries such as Germany and the UK is direly needed.

      Now, it is more important than ever to focus on the consequences of emigration, especially seasonal and short-term labour, both on the individual health and wellbeing of workers and on the economy and public health in the sending countries. Behind the asparagus and strawberries that we eat this spring, while self-isolating, there are the lives of those who cannot afford to stay home, including those who have to take charter flights to work in “semi-quarantine” conditions in foreign countries, at their own risk.

      https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/can-europe-make-it/only-frequent-flyers-left-migrant-workers-eu-times-covid-19

  • What happens to freedom of movement during a pandemic ?

    Restrictions are particularly problematic for those who need to move in order to find safety, but whose elementary freedom to move had been curtailed long before the Covid-19 outbreak.

    The severe consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic dominate headlines around the globe and have drawn the public’s attention unlike any other issue or event. All over the world, societies struggle to respond and adapt to rapidly changing scenarios and levels of threat. Emergency measures have come to disrupt everyday life, international travel has largely been suspended, and many state borders have been closed. State leaders liken the fight against the virus to engaging in warfare – although it is clear that the parallel is misleading and that those involved in the “war” are not soldiers but simply citizens. The situation is grim, and it would be a serious mistake to underestimate the obvious danger of infection, loss of life, the collapse of health services and the economy. Nonetheless, there is a need to stress that this phase of uncertainty entails also the risk of normalising ‘exceptional’ policies that restrict freedoms and rights in the name of crisis and public safety - and not only in the short term.

    “Of all the specific liberties which may come into mind when we hear the word “freedom””, philosopher Hannah Arendt once wrote, the “freedom of movement is historically the oldest and also the most elementary.” However, in times of a pandemic, human movements turn increasingly into a problem. The elementary freedom to move is said to be curtailed for the greater good, particularly for the elderly and others in high-risk groups. (Self-)confinement appears key – “inessential” movements and contact with others are to be avoided. In China, Italy and elsewhere, hard measures have been introduced and their violation can entail severe penalties. Movements from A to B need (state) authorisation and unsanctioned movements can be punished. There are good reasons for that, no doubt. Nevertheless, there is a need to take stock of the wider implications of our current predicament.

    In this general picture, current restrictions on movement are problematic for people who do not have a home and for whom self-quarantine is hardly an option, for people with disability who remain without care, and for people, mostly women, whose home is not a safe haven but the site of insecurity and domestic abuse. Restrictions are also particularly problematic for those whose elementary freedom to move had been curtailed long before the Covid-19 outbreak but who need to move in order to find safety. Migrants embody in the harshest way the contradictions and tensions surrounding the freedom of movement and its denial today. It is not surprising that in the current climate, they tend to become one of the first targets of the most restrictive measures.
    Migrant populations who moved, or still seek to move, across borders without authorisation in order to escape danger are subjected to confinement and deterrence measures that are legitimized by often spurious references to public safety and global health. Discriminatory practices that segregate in the name of safety turn those at risk into a risk. “We are fighting a two-front war”, Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban declared, “one front is called migration, and the other one belongs to the coronavirus, there is a logical connection between the two, as both spread with movement.” The danger of conflating the declared war on the pandemic with a war on migration is great, and the human costs are high. Restrictive border measures endanger the lives of vulnerable populations for whom movement is a means of survival.

    About two weeks ago, it was documented that the Greek coastguard opened fire on migrants trying to escape via the Aegean Sea and the land border between Turkey and Greece. Some people died while many were injured in a hyperbolic deployment of border violence. The European reaction, as embodied in the person of European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen, was to refer to Greece as Europe’s “shield”. About a week ago, it was uncovered that a migrant boat with 49 people on board which had already reached a European search and rescue zone was returned to Libya through coordinated measures taken by the EU border agency Frontex, the Armed Forces of Malta, and Libyan authorities. In breach of international law and of the principle of non-refoulement, the people were returned to horrid migrant camps in Libya, a country still at war. With no NGO rescuers currently active in the Mediterranean due to the effects of the Coronavirus, more than 400 people were intercepted at sea and forcibly returned to Libya over the past weekend alone, over 2,500 this year.

    Such drastic migration deterrence and containment measures endanger the lives of those ‘on the move’ and exacerbate the risk of spreading the virus. In Libyan camps, in conditions that German diplomats once referred to as “concentration-camp-like”, those imprisoned often have extremely weakened immune systems, often suffering from illnesses like tuberculosis. A Coronavirus outbreak here would be devastating. Doctors without Borders have called for the immediate evacuation of the hotspot camps on the Greek Islands, highlighting that the cramped and unhygienic conditions there would “provide the perfect storm for a COVID-19 outbreak”. This is a more general situation in detention camps for migrants throughout Europe and elsewhere, as it is in ‘regular’ prisons worldwide.

    Together with the virus, a politics of fear spreads across the world and prompts ever-more restrictive measures. Besides the detrimental consequences of curtailing the freedom to move already experienced by the most vulnerable, the worry is that many of these measures will continue to undermine rights and freedoms even long after the pandemic has been halted. And yet, while, as Naomi Klein notes, “a pandemic shock doctrine” may allow for the enactment of “all the most dangerous ideas lying around, from privatizing Social Security to locking down borders to caging even more migrants”, we agree with her that “the end of this story hasn’t been written yet.”

    The situation is volatile – how it ends depends also on us and how we collectively mobilize against the now rampant authoritarian tendencies. All around us, we see other reactions to the current predicament with new forms of solidarity emerging and creative ways of taking care of “the common”. The arguments are on our side. The pandemic shows that a global health crisis cannot be solved through nationalistic measures but only through international solidarity and cooperation – the virus does not respect borders.

    Its devastating effects strengthen the call to universal health care and the value of care work, which continues to be disproportionately women’s work. The pandemic gives impetus to those who demand the right to shelter and affordable housing for all and provides ammunition to those who have long struggled against migrant detention camps and mass accommodations, as well as against migrant deportations. It exposes the ways that the predatory capitalist model, often portrayed as commonsensical and without alternatives, provides no answers to a global health crisis while socialist models do. It shows that resources can be mobilized if the political will exists and that ambitious policies such the Green New Deal are far from being ‘unrealistic’. And, the Coronavirus highlights how important the elementary freedom of movement continues to be.
    The freedom of movement, of course, also means having the freedom not to move. And, at times, even having the freedom to self-confine. For many, often the most vulnerable and disenfranchised, this elementary freedom is not given. This means that even during a pandemic, we need to stand in solidarity with those who take this freedom to move, who can no longer remain in inhumane camps within Europe or at its external borders and who try to escape to find safety. Safety from war and persecution, safety from poverty and hunger, safety from the virus. In this period in which borders multiply, the struggle around the elementary freedom of movement will continue to be both a crucial stake and a tool in the fight against global injustice, even, or particularly, during a global health crisis.


    https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/can-europe-make-it/what-happens-freedom-movement-during-pandemic

    #liberté_de_circulation #liberté_de_mouvement #coronavirus #épidémie #pandémie #frontières #virus #mobilité #mobilité_humaine #migrations #confinement #autorisation #restrictions_de_mouvement #guerre #guerre_aux_migrants #guerre_au_virus #danger #fermeture_des_frontières #pandemic_shock_doctrine #stratégie_du_choc #autoritarisme #solidarité #solidarité_internationale #soins_de_santé_universels #universalisme #nationalisme #capitalisme #socialisme #Green_New_Deal #immobilité #vulnérabilité #justice #Sandro_Mezzadra #Maurice_Stierl

    via @isskein
    ping @karine4

  • Post-democracy : there’s plenty familiar about what is happening in Bulgaria | openDemocracy
    https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/can-europe-make-it/bulgaria-post-communism-post-democracy

    par Anna Krasteva, une vision de l’évolution depuis la chute du mur en Bulgarie. Très intéressant. Ca recoupe pas mal des choses dites par Gorbatchev dans son dernier livre sur le rôle du néo-libéralisme et des médias dans le retour de l’extrême droite.

    Six months, six years, six decades – this is how Ralf Dahrendorf (1990) summed up, in a remarkably succinct way, the post-democratic transition: creating the institutions of parliamentary democracy, laying the foundations of a market economy, building civil society.

    The future looked clear and bright as a single three-dimensional transformation joining the ‘end of history’. I want to offer a different idea of the three transformations taking place over the last three decades: post-communist, (national) populist, post-democratic.

    Democratic transformation

    “And it should be considered that nothing is more difficult to handle, more doubtful of success, nor more dangerous to manage, than to put oneself at the head of introducing new orders,” Machiavelli tells us. What is amazing about post-communist democratization is the exact opposite – how easily the democratic discourse became dominant and how quickly its symbolic-ideological hegemony was established and claimed as an “unparalleled success story.” Democratization was an explicitly formulated and designated political project realized with the consensus and contribution both of elites and citizens.

    National-populist transformation

    “In … its frontal attack on the liberal-democratic order and its protagonists, the radical right becomes a transformative force, and can indeed be said to be transforming the transformation” – this is how Мichael Minkenberg diagnosed the reversal of the democratic transformation. National-populism emerged on the Bulgarian political scene in the form of a democratic paradox: in the 1990s, democracy was fragile, but there were no strong radical far right parties; once democracy was consolidated, radical right-wing parties appeared, such as Ataka in 2005, and immediately achieved success. Thereafter we see a multiplication and diversification of far-right political actors, on the one hand, but a single enduring symbolic cartography on the other: identitarianism, post-secularism and statism. The identitarian pole concentrates on the overproduction of Othering (Roma, immigrants, LGBT, etc.) giving rise to a politics of fear.

    Another aspect of this mainstreaming of rightwing populism is the transformation of civil society into an uncivil society through the media’s aesthetic glorification of extremist “bad guys.” Vigilantes who catch refugees along the borders, leaders of football hooligans, and young people attending torch-lit marches commemorating fascist leaders have become the darlings of the Bulgarian media. Here, two opposing processes interfere with and intensify each other: ordinary extremists are turned into media heroes; media celebrities are transformed into attractive bad guys.

    Post-democratic transformation

    This is based on Colin Crouch’s concept of post-democracy as a process in which the democratic institutions continue to exist but increasingly turn into a hollow shell, as the engine of development and change shifts away from them and the democratic agora, and towards narrow private non-transparent economic-political circles.

    One characteristic manifestation of this third transformation, and a key actor, is the post-democratic party: in it, activists are replaced by lobbyists and campaigns by capital. The post-democratic party maintains close contacts less with the inside circle of its activists than with the “ellipse” of its “rings of firms”. The post-democratic party is an ideal type whose manifestations can be found in a number of parties

    An institutional vacuum has been created and it has been filled by non-public (corruption) regulations. The institutions are inactive, except when they are used for resource distribution or private score-settling among rival clientelistic networks (oligarchic circles). These networks, which include criminals, businessmen, politicians, police officers, judges, prosecutors, public figures and religious persons,[1] create a parallel regulatory order. The centre of power in this type of state is outside its institutions. The informal prevails over the public at all levels and in the private lives of people.

    This “absent” state, in which institutions formally exist but have been emptied of the common interest and captured by narrow private interests, and in which the different branches of government do not control each other but are intertwined in informal networks which have appropriated the true centre of power, is the manifestation par excellence of post-democratic transformation.

    High income inequalities expose the existence of social deficits and imbalances. But abstentionism – both as a protest vote and as self-exclusion from a political process which is perceived as excluding people – is a clear political manifestation of the disengagement of citizens. Since 1990, voter turnout in parliamentary elections has declined both in percentage and absolute numbers: from 1990 to 2017 the total population in Bulgaria declined from 8.7 million to 7 million, while the number of people who voted in parliamentary elections decreased from 6.1 million to 3.4 million.

    Post-democracy is the latest wave of post-communist transformation. It is the result of state capture and the alienation of citizens from the democratic project – socially through inequalities and politically through voter abstentionism. Yet the post-democratic transformation is the most invisible because it does not propose a new political project, but leaches away from democracy attractiveness, content, a horizon, a “metaphysic of hope”.

    Could the citizens who have constituted themselves as active and engaged citizens in the post-communist period ever succeed in reversing the tendency of erosion of democratization and in opening up a horizon for a fourth, positive, transformation? This remains to be seen.

    #Post_démocratie #Anna_Krasteva #Post_communisme #Bulgarie #Médias #Extrême_droite

  • Welfare surveillance on trial in the Netherlands
    https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/can-europe-make-it/welfare-surveillance-trial-netherlands

    Courts held hearings on a lawsuit by a number of groups concerned at the draconian Dutch system in late October, with a decision awaited in January. The Netherlands is consistently ranked as one of the world’s strongest democracies. You might be surprised to learn that it is also home to one of the most intrusive surveillance systems that automates tracking and profiling of the poor. On 29 October, the District Court of the Hague held hearings on the legality of Systeem Risico Indicatie (...)

    #algorithme #SyRI #pauvreté #surveillance

    ##pauvreté