• L’#UE et le #Niger signent un nouvel accord pour lutter contre les trafiquants d’êtres humains

    Depuis 2015, le Niger a mis en place une politique de #dissuasion, en #coopération avec l’#Union_européenne, pour réduire l’#attractivité de son territoire devenu terre de transit pour les migrants, qui cherchent à rejoindre l’Europe via la Libye. Un nouvel #accord a été signé vendredi pour amplifier la #lutte_contre_l'immigration_clandestine, en protégeant mieux les frontières et en offrant des alternatives à ceux qui vivent de la migration dans le pays.

    D’après la #Commission_européenne, la coopération avec le Niger « passe à la vitesse supérieure » grâce à la signature d’un #partenariat_opérationnel pour combattre le trafic vendredi 15 juillet avec l’Union européenne (UE) doit permettre au Niger d’augmenter l’impact de l’équipe d’enquête conjointe qui a été établie dans le cadre de la #mission_civile_européenne (#EUCAP) #Sahel-Niger.

    Selon #Hamadou_Adamou_Souley, ministre nigérien de l’Intérieur, ce nouvel accord de coopération permettra à la fois de protéger les frontières et les migrants : « Tout ce que ces migrants demandent, c’est de vivre dignement, d’être traité comme des êtres humains. C’est ce que le Niger essaie de leur offrir comme opportunité. C’est pour cela que nous ouvrons nos frontières à ces migrants et nous essayons de les accompagner. »

    Pour Hamadou Adamou Souley, l’important est désormais de concrétiser les nouveaux projets évoqués par la Commissaire européenne aux Affaires intérieures lors de sa visite à Agadez, à savoir des projets de #développement_économique qui permettront de donner de nouvelles activités à ceux qui vivaient autrefois de la migration.

    https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/41962/lue-et-le-niger-signent-un-nouvel-accord-pour-lutter-contre-les-trafiq
    #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #Niger #externalisation_des_frontières #EU #Europe #coopération_au_développement #conditionnalité_de_l'aide_au_développement

    ping @rhoumour @karine4

    –-

    ajouté à la #métaliste autour de #migrations et #développement :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733358

    et notamment sur la conditionnalité de l’aide au développement à la fermeture des frontières :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733358#message768701

    • Joint press release: Strengthening cooperation in the fight against migrant smuggling: the European Union and Niger launch operational partnership to tackle migrant smuggling

      Today, the European Union and Niger are strengthening their cooperation with the launch of an operational partnership to tackle migrant smuggling. Joint efforts under this partnership will help to save lives, disrupt the business model used by criminal networks, prevent migrants from becoming victims of violence and exploitation and protect their fundamental rights.

      As highlighted in the new EU Pact on Migration and Asylum, combatting migrant smuggling is a shared challenge that requires robust cooperation and coordination with key partner countries along migration routes, in line with the EU’s overarching approach to migration. Located at the heart of the Sahel, Niger has for decades been at the crossroads of migration flows to North and West Africa and to the EU, as well as a destination country for migrants. The country has made considerable efforts to tackle migrant smuggling, helping to evacuate individuals affected from Libya and ensuring a dignified return home for irregular migrants. Niger and the European Union have worked together as trusted partners in the Sahel region and have been involved in several joint initiatives addressing wider migration and security issues, including the challenges of irregular migration, and focusing in particular on efforts to tackle criminal groups operating in the region in the pursuit of profit.

      Now, the constructive cooperation between Niger and the European Union and the strong mutual commitment to stepping up joint efforts to address migration and security risks and the consequences of irregular migration are moving up a gear, from both an operational and a political point of view. The operational partnership to tackle migrant smuggling is a response to shared needs and sets out to achieve common objectives, based on the renewed EU #Action_Plan_against_Migrant_Smuggling (2021-2025).

      Commissioner for Home Affairs, Ylva Johansson, said: ‘We are taking a crucial step in efforts to combat migrant smuggling and are making progress towards achieving the objectives set out in the New Pact on Migration and Asylum. Niger has long been a key partner in terms of addressing security challenges and managing migration and I am delighted that today we are jointly launching an operational partnership to tackle migrant smuggling in order to consolidate and ramp up our efforts. Together, we will do all we can to save migrants’ lives and prevent violations of their rights, strengthen the management and security of borders, dismantle the criminal networks that are responsible for smuggling and offer genuine economic alternatives to people seeking a better life in Niger.’

      Niger’s Minister for the Interior, Hamadou Adamou Souley, said: ‘Implementing this operational partnership to tackle migrant smuggling aligns perfectly with the actions and activities under programmes II and III of the action plan set out in our National Migration Policy. This will allow us to work together to better protect migrants, secure our borders and achieve our ultimate aim, which is to improve living conditions for migrants and their host communities.’

      Content of the operational partnership to tackle migrant smuggling

      Part of the EU’s wider efforts with Niger on migration, the Operational Partnership comprises a number of actions that could be expanded to ensure that the Partnership can adapt as the context surrounding migration and the phenomenon itself evolve.

      This will boost the success of the #Joint_Investigation_Team (#JIT) in Niger, where, with EU funding, officers from services in EU Member States and Niger are working side by side to disrupt the business model of people smugglers and criminal networks. Since 2017, over 700 criminals have been arrested and over 400 judicial proceedings have been launched. The Operational Partnership will maximise the impact of the JIT and strengthen links with other operational activities in the region to address migrant smuggling.

      New information and awareness-raising campaigns will also be launched, explaining the risks of irregular migration and migrant smuggling, as well as setting out possible alternatives. By challenging the narratives put forward by people smugglers, the campaigns set out to inform migrants and influence their decisions to migrate.

      The working arrangement between #Frontex and Niger, currently under discussion, will support the Nigerien authorities with regard to integrated border management by strengthening risk management and assessment capabilities with a view to facilitating legitimate border crossings and tackling irregular migration and cross-border crime.

      The #European_Union_Capacity_Building_Mission (EUCAP) Sahel Niger has been working with partners in Niger for nearly ten years to tackle terrorism, organised crime and criminal people-smuggling networks operating in the region. This work is part of the European Union’s commitment to security and defence efforts in the Sahel region under the responsibility of the High Representative of the EU for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, #Josep-Borrell. The signing of a working arrangement between Frontex and the EUCAP Sahel Niger will support the joint commitment by the European Union and Niger to improve border-management structures in Niger and crack down on people traffickers and smugglers and those who seek to profit from the distress of migrant men, women and children. The working arrangement will facilitate and enhance efforts to exchange information, offer targeted training activities, share best practices and advise the Nigerien authorities.

      The #Coordination_Platform_on_Migration, which is part of the office of Niger’s Minister for the Interior, working in close cooperation with the EU Delegation to Niger, will operate as a coordination and monitoring mechanism for implementing the Operational Partnership to ensure consistency across activities and coordination of stakeholders, in line with Niger’s National Migration Policy (2020-2035), the European Union’s overarching approach to migration and its work with partner countries under the New Pact on Migration and Asylum.

      The Operational Partnership will work in tandem with the two Team Europe initiatives on the Central Mediterranean route and the Atlantic and Western Mediterranean route. Projects carried out under these two initiatives will help to implement the Operational Partnership and strengthen efforts by the European Union and the Member States to tackle irregular migration and forced displacement. At the same time, EU support under the #NDICI - Global Europe instrument in terms of human development, governance and sustainable and inclusive economic growth, including through EUR 195 million in budget support, will help Niger in its efforts to implement key reforms and address security and socio-economic challenges as well as challenges related to migration management. The Operational Partnership will be complemented by projects seeking to promote economic development and improve the availability of and access to high-quality public social services for communities in Niger, particularly in the #Agadez region.

      https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/ip_22_4536

    • Actions sur les questions migratoires : L’ICMPD annonce la signature d’un accord de coopération avec les autorités nigériennes

      Le #Centre_International_pour_le_Développement_des_Politiques_Migratoires (#ICMPD, en anglais), a organisé, hier mardi 12 juillet 2022 à Niamey, un déjeuner de travail, avec les différents acteurs intervenant sur les questions migratoires. C’était une occasion pour informer les autorités, les organisations internationales et leur présenter ledit centre mais aussi pour annoncer la signature d’un accord de coopération, sur la migration, le jeudi 14 juillet prochain, avec les autorités nigériennes.

      Selon M. Vincent Marchadier, Chef de Projet au Bureau ICMPD pour l’Afrique de l’Ouest, le Niger est un pays clé tant au niveau du Sahel, qu’au niveau de la CEDEAO, confronté aux flux migratoires, qui passe de pays de transit à un pays de destination, avec les migrants irréguliers, qui ont tendance à s’installer, de plus en plus au Niger et cela pour plusieurs raisons. « D’où l’importance de rencontrer les autorités politiques et les autres structures œuvrant dans la lutte contre la migration irrégulière, pour les appuyer dans ce combat et cela à travers plusieurs projets et actions communes », a indiqué M. Marchadier. Le Niger, a-t-il précisé a été retenu, au regard de la volonté et de la disponibilité des autorités à combattre cette migration irrégulière, qui par ailleurs cause de nombreux problèmes (violence, divers trafics, insécurité, etc.). Il a ajouté que sur toutes ces questions l’ICMPD peut apporter son expertise, pour contribuer à les résoudre, que d’autres structures n’ont pas pu apporter. « Cet accord a pour but de définir le cadre de relation entre l’ICMPD et le gouvernement du Niger, afin de travailler à résoudre les difficultés qui sont posées par le phénomène migratoire, au niveau du territoire nigérien », a-t-il déclaré. Quant au Directeur Général de l’ICMPD, M. Mickael Spindelegger, il a indiqué que : « Nous allons rencontrer le Premier ministre du Niger, pour qu’il nous décline quels sont les domaines dans lesquels il veut que nous intervenions dans le domaine de cette coopération ». Selon M. Spindelegger, cet accord de siège permettra au ICMPD d’être reconnu comme organisation internationale intervenant dans le domaine migratoire, et par la même d’être capable de développer ses activités d’aide et de coopération au niveau national. « Cet accord nous permettra de développer des projets importants et porteurs pour la lutte contre la migration irrégulière mais aussi pour le développement de ce vaste pays, qui a une réelle volonté de bien s’impliquer dans le combat contre ce type de migration, en dépit de nombreux défis auxquels il fait face », a-t-il ajouté.

      « Nous allons d’abord nous renseigner sur l’état de la situation sur toutes les questions migratoires concernant le Niger et ensuite en coopération avec les autorités nationales, définir les axes d’interventions, les projets pertinents et adaptés qu’il faut mettre en œuvre en fonction de la situation. Nous comptons travailler sur un projet, qui nous tient à cœur concernant le Niger et le Nigeria, pour que ces deux pays travaillent, le plus étroitement possible sur les questions migratoires. L’ouverture d’esprit des autorités nigériennes et leur esprit coopératif, nous permettront, sans nul doute d’atteindre des bons résultats, suite à la prochaine signature de l’accord de siège », a précisé M. Spindelegger.

      Notons que l’ICMPD est une organisation internationale dont les opérations sont réparties dans 90 pays à travers le monde. Il a été créé par l’Autriche et la Suisse en 1993 et compte 19 États membres en 2022.

      https://www.lesahel.org/actions-sur-les-questions-migratoires-licmpd-annonce-la-signature-dun-accor

  • Démission de Leggeri à la tête de Frontex

    BREAKING OVERNIGHT: Frontex Director Fabrice Leggeri is quitting, POLITICO hears. The head of the EU border agency has tendered his resignation, several people in the know told us, with further details expected today. Frontex did not respond to a request for comment. Leggeri has led the agency, which has come under scrutiny for its alleged role in so-called pushbacks of migrants, since 2015. The development comes as the EU’s anti-fraud watchdog, #OLAF, is poised to present the full findings of its long-running probe into Frontex.

    https://www.politico.eu/newsletter/brussels-playbook/trouble-at-frontex-ruble-roulette-jeppes-replacement
    #Leggeri #Fabrice_Leggeri #Frontex #démission #frontières #migrations #réfugiés

    • Démission du Directeur de Frontex : une occasion à prendre pour une réorientation radicale

      Suite aux nombreuses enquêtes et rapports émanant de la société civile et d’institutions officielles européennes, tel le tout récent et explosif rapport de l’Office européen de la lutte anti-fraude (OLAF), qui mettent en cause l’agence Frontex pour ses agissements complices en matière de refoulements et de violences en vers des personnes exilées ainsi que pour sa mauvaise gestion interne (pour plus de détails, lire la récente Note politique #28 du CNCD-11.11.11 « Frontex : droits humains en danger »), le directeur de Frontex, s’est vu dans l’obligation de donner sa démission le 28 avril 2022. Cette démission a été acceptée ce 29 avril par le CA de l’agence.


      https://twitter.com/g_christides/status/1519967913066782720

      Ce 4 mai, tirant les leçons de cet épisode, le CNCD-11.11.11 encourage les membres du Parlement européen à refuser à Frontex la décharge de ses comptes pour l’exercice 2020 lors du vote en séance plénière. En effet, bloquer la décharge budgétaire est un bon levier pour exiger la réforme en profondeur de l’orientation et du fonctionnement de Frontex pour plus de transparence, de contrôle démocratique et de responsabilisation en cas de non-respect des droits humains. Les faits ayant amené à la démission du directeur doivent maintenant être analysés posément et des engagements formels pris pour garantir le respect des lois et des traités internationaux. C’est pourquoi il importe de reporter la décharge jusqu’à la démonstration de la mise en œuvre effective de mesures correctrices. Plus globalement, ce vote est l’occasion d’un signal fort pour exiger une réorientation radicale du pacte européen pour l’asile et la migration vers le respect des droits humains, la mobilité et la solidarité (pour plus de détails, lire notre récente étude « Migration et asile : analyse du pacte européen » : https://www.cncd.be/point-sud-22-migration-asile-pacte-europeen).

      https://www.cncd.be/Demission-du-Directeur-de-Frontex

    • Frontex | Faire sauter la tête ne suffira pas

      L’annonce de la démission du directeur de Frontex, Fabrizio Leggeri, vendredi 29 avril, ne représente que la première fissure dans l’édifice opaque qui s’est constitué depuis la création de l’Agence européenne des garde-frontières. Mais suffira-t-elle ? Semaine après semaine, les révélations se succèdent. D’autres membres du Conseil d’administration seraient impliqués dans la falsification de preuves de refoulements illégaux de personnes exilées. Des refoulements qui auraient conduit à la noyade de personnes migrantes, documentée par une équipe de journalistes. [1]

      Il faut rappeler que la Suisse a deux représentant·es au sein de ce conseil d’administration. L’un ou l’autre étaient-ils impliqués dans les faits reprochés à Leggeri ? Qu’en savaient-ils et qu’ont-ils communiqué au Conseil fédéral ? Alors que la Suisse est en pleine campagne de votation sur un arrêté fédéral visant à octroyer davantage de moyens financiers et de personnel à cette agence, les conseillers fédéraux concerné·es Karin Keller-Sutter et Ueli Maurer devraient répondre à cette question avant le jour du scrutin. C’est ce que demande depuis fin mars 2022 une Lettre ouverte publiée par Frontex-leaks.ch et relayée sur le site asile.ch. Une exigence de transparence légitime dans le cadre du débat démocratique.

      Au lieu de cela, c’est une crispation voire une censure que cherchent à imposer les autorités fédérales aux journalistes qui tentent de faire leur travail d’information. La RTS s’en est fait écho le 28 avril [2], évoquant même la possible intervention de Frontex dans cette interférence, alors que Le Temps dénonçait 4 jours plus tôt une censure de la part de l’Administration fédérale des douanes. Son vice-directeur Marco Benz est justement membre du conseil d’administration de Frontex.

      L’information est un outil essentiel de notre démocratie. Ce n’est que grâce au travail acharné de journalistes et d’ONG que les actes de Frontex commencent à voir le jour. L’agence a tenté par tous les moyens -y compris par des poursuites financières- d’empêcher leurs investigations. Celles-ci ont contribué au lancement de certaines enquêtes par des organes européens, notamment celle de l’Organe de lutte antifraude de l’Union européenne, dont le rapport a conduit à la démission de Leggeri. Pas plus tard que le 28 avril, l’enquête conjuguée du Monde, SRF, Republik, en collaboration avec Lighthouse report, a montré combien les refoulements illégaux pratiqués par l’agence sont « normalisés ». La question de savoir si les pushback font partie de l’ADN de Frontex reste entière.

      La justice internationale est également en train d’être activée par des ONG. Une autre façon de demander des comptes sur les pratiques de l’Agence et des États européens à leurs frontières extérieures. La dernière en date a été déposée par Sea-Watch, suite au refoulement d’un bateau vers la Libye, pays où, selon l’ONU, « ils seront placés dans des centres de détention inhumains et seront exposés à la famine, aux abus sexuels et à la torture. » [3]

      Est-ce cela que nous voulons ? Refuser aux personnes fuyant les guerres et la persécution le droit de déposer une demande de protection internationale ? Veut-on tripler les moyens financiers d’une agence qui renvoie vers la mort et la torture plusieurs milliers de personnes, ceci sans demander de comptes ?

      Refuser le 15 mai l’arrêté fédéral proposé par le Conseil fédéral et le Parlement ne met de loin pas en danger notre démocratie. Celle-ci a besoin de contre-pouvoirs forts.

      Un refus ne mettra pas davantage en danger notre participation à Schengen. Cet argument est de la poudre aux yeux. [4] Un rejet permettra de relégiférer, à la lumière des éléments qui se font jour aujourd’hui. D’ajouter des mesures d’accompagnement humanitaires qui avaient initialement été proposées lors des travaux parlementaires, pour assurer la sécurité des personnes qui sont elles-mêmes en danger et doivent être protégées.

      Le 15 mai, nous avons l’occasion de refuser d’adouber des pratiques antidémocratiques et illégales qui foulent au pied les valeurs que l’Europe essaie aujourd’hui de défendre face à la Russie de Poutine. Et de renforcer les voix européennes qui demandent un monitoring véritablement indépendant des pratiques de Frontex.

      https://asile.ch/2022/04/29/frontex-faire-sauter-la-tete-ne-suffira-pas

    • Le patron de Frontex Fabrice Leggeri démissionne sur fond d’accusations

      Le patron de Frontex, le Français Fabrice Leggeri, a présenté jeudi sa démission. Son départ fait suite à une enquête sur sa gestion de l’agence européenne de garde-côtes et de gardes-frontières.

      Directeur exécutif de Frontex depuis 2015, Fabrice Leggeri a été visé par un rapport de l’Office européen de lutte antifraude (Olaf) qui, selon Le Point, lui reproche en substance de « ne pas avoir respecté les procédures, s’être démontré déloyal vis-à-vis de l’Union européenne et un mauvais management personnel ».

      Cette enquête intervient sur fond d’accusations régulières, notamment de la part d’ONG ces dernières années, de pratiques de refoulements illégaux de migrants (dits « pushbacks ») et de complaisance envers les autorités grecques, par exemple, sur des renvois brutaux vers la Turquie.

      Mercredi encore, une enquête publiée par le quotidien Le Monde et Lighthouse Reports a démontré qu’entre mars 2020 et septembre 2021, Frontex a répertorié des renvois illégaux de migrants, parvenus dans les eaux grecques, comme de simples « opérations de prévention au départ, menées dans les eaux turques ».

      Enquête internationale

      En sept ans à la tête de Frontex, qui doit surveiller les frontières extérieures de l’UE, Fabrice Leggeri a accompagné le renforcement de l’agence qui a été considérablement musclée et dont les effectifs doivent atteindre 10’000 garde-côtes et gardes-frontières d’ici 2027 (voir encadré).

      Dans le courrier où il annonce remettre son mandat au comité de gestion de l’agence, Fabrice Leggeri affirme que depuis son élection et sa reconduction en 2019, le mandat de Frontex a été modifié « tacitement mais effectivement », ce qu’a réfuté la Commission européenne.

      La gauche du Parlement européen, en particulier, réclamait la démission de Fabrice Leggeri depuis l’automne 2020, à la suite d’une enquête journalistique internationale qui impliquait Frontex dans plusieurs refoulements en mer Egée.

      https://www.rts.ch/info/monde/13056010-le-patron-de-frontex-fabrice-leggeri-demissionne-sur-fond-daccusations.

    • Commission statement on the resignation of Fabrice Leggeri

      The Commission takes note of the resignation with immediate effect of the Executive Director of the European Border and Coastguard Agency (Frontex), Fabrice Leggeri.

      As the most senior Deputy Executive Director of Frontex, Aija Kalnaja will deputise and assume the lead of the Agency with immediate effect. To ensure full continuity of the agency, the Commission will proceed quickly with recruitment and appointment of a new Executive Director.

      It is a priority for the Commission to have in place a strong, effective, and well-functioning European Border and Coast Guard.

      Frontex fulfils a critically important task to support Member States manage common European Union external borders, and to uphold fundamental rights in doing so. For that purpose, Frontex must be a robust and well-functioning agency. The Commission will continue to fully support Frontex in this mission.

      Over the past year, the Commission has stepped up significantly its support and advice to Frontex to ensure the full implementation of its mandate. To this end, the Commission initiated several extraordinary Management Board meetings dedicated to governance issues and fundamental rights. The Commission is committed to the continuous improvement of the agency.

      https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/statement_22_2751

    • Refoulement de migrants aux frontières : Fabrice Leggeri, directeur de Frontex, démissionne

      Les accusations de renvois illégaux de migrants aux frontières de l’Union européenne se succèdent depuis plusieurs années à l’égard de l’agence européenne de gardes-côtes. La teneur d’une enquête de l’Office européen de lutte anti-fraude, pas encore rendue publique, a poussé Fabrice Leggeri, directeur controversé de l’institution, à démissionner.

      Fabrice Leggeri, directeur exécutif de l’agence de gardes-frontières et de gardes-côtes Frontex, a finalement jeté l’éponge. La pression qui s’exerce sur ses épaules n’a cessé de croître à mesure que les allégations de refoulements de demandeurs d’asile, couverts ou effectués par Frontex, se sont multipliées ces dernières années.

      Dernier scandale en date, révélé le 27 avril par Lighthouse Report, Der Spiegel et Le Monde : Frontex aurait volontairement « maquillé » des renvois illégaux de migrants vers la Turquie, à partir de la Grèce, les privant ainsi de leur droit à demander l’asile.

      Les nombreux rapports compilant les violations de droits fondamentaux de migrants aux frontières de l’Europe ont toujours été reçus par le silence ou les dénégations de Fabrice Leggeri, dont les arrières ont été protégés au Conseil d’administration de Frontex, composé de représentants des États membres.

      Les manquements organisationnels de Frontex – l’inefficacité des mécanismes de plaintes, de rapport d’incidents et de contrôle interne des violations des droits fondamentaux – sont pourtant dans le collimateur de nombreuses institutions. La médiatrice européenne et le Parlement ont publié des rapports pointant des #dysfonctionnements_majeurs. Même la Commission européenne s’y est mise. Le 18 décembre 2020, Monique Pariat, directrice générale chargée des migrations et des affaires intérieures pointait, dans une lettre envoyée à Fabrice Leggeri, la manière « trompeuse » dont le directeur de Frontex présentait les faits au Parlement européen.

      L’enquête de l’Olaf et la « gravité des faits »

      C’est surtout l’enquête menée par l’Office européen de lutte anti-fraude (Olaf) qui a fait vaciller Fabrice Leggeri et l’a poussé à la démission.

      Cela fait plus d’un an que l’Olaf scrute les agissements de la direction de Frontex. Deux enquêtes sont menées en parallèle et touchent trois personnalités de haut rang, dont le directeur exécutif. La première enquête, clôturée le 15 février dernier, porte sur les allégations de refoulement aux frontières extérieures de l’Union européenne et de violations des droits fondamentaux, notamment à la frontière gréco-turque.

      Frontex a-t-elle couvert des actions illégales de la part des gardes-côtes grecs ? Dans quelle mesure Frontex est-elle impliquée dans ces refoulements ? Comment l’agence et ses dirigeants ont-ils réagi face aux incidents qui leur étaient rapportés ? La seconde enquête, dont les conclusions sont attendues avant l’été, devrait faire la lumière sur des cas supposés de #harcèlement de travailleurs de l’agence.

      Ces enquêtes sont encore confidentielles. Mais quelques députés de la commission du contrôle budgétaire du Parlement européen ont pu prendre connaissance de leurs grandes lignes, lors d’une audition à huis clos du directeur général de l’Olaf, en mars dernier. Ils ont été convaincus, le 31 mars, « au vu de la gravité des faits », de suspendre la décharge budgétaire de Frontex. « Entre le rapport de l’Olaf et les dernières allégations de refoulement, la position de Fabrice Leggeri devenait intenable. Il était jusqu’à présent protégé par des États membres, dont la France, mais l’image de Frontex devenait trop abîmée », commente Tineke Strik, eurodéputée écologiste néerlandaise membre du groupe de contrôle de Frontex au Parlement européen. Pour la députée, le départ de Fabrice Leggeri est « un premier pas. L’organisation, la structure, la culture de Frontex devront changer ». Dans sa lettre de démission, Fabrice Leggeri, amer, regrettait que le mandat de Frontex ait « silencieusement, mais effectivement changé ».

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/290422/refoulement-de-migrants-aux-frontieres-fabrice-leggeri-directeur-de-fronte

    • Leggeri est parti, mais c’est Frontex qu’il faut renvoyer !

      Le directeur exécutif de l’Agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes vient de démissionner suite à des accusations de refoulements illégaux. Il est temps d’en finir avec l’approche restrictive et militarisée de l’UE envers les migrants.

      Fabrice Leggeri vient de présenter sa démission en tant que directeur exécutif de Frontex, l’agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes. Cette démission survient après des mois de révélations successives concernant l’implication de Frontex dans les violations des droits humains, en particulier dans le cadre de ses opérations aux frontières de l’Europe de l’Est et en Grèce. Ayant focalisé mes recherches sur la Méditerranée centrale pendant plus de dix ans, ces révélations ne me surprennent absolument pas. Dans le cadre d’une des enquêtes que j’ai menées au sein du projet Forensic Oceanography (Death by Rescue, 2016), j’ai démontré qu’au cours de l’été 2014 Frontex a mené une véritable campagne pour que l’opération militaire et humanitaire italienne Mare Nostrum soit stoppée. Alors que l’opération déployée en 2013-2014 avait permis de secourir de manière proactive un grand nombre de migrant·e·s fuyant la Libye dans des conditions dramatiques, Frontex l’a accusée de constituer un « appel d’air » menant à plus de traversées.

      Dans le but de dissuader les migrant·e·s de rejoindre le continent européen, l’agence a mis tout en œuvre pour que soit mis fin à l’opération Mare Nostrum et que celle-ci soit remplacée par une opération de Frontex, Triton, bien plus éloignée des côtes libyennes, et dont l’objectif était le contrôle des frontières et non le secours en mer. Ce changement opérationnel a été mis en place malgré l’unanimité des acteurs défendant les droits des migrant·e·s, et même des évaluations internes à Frontex qui prévoyaient que la fin de Mare Nostrum ne mènerait pas à moins de traversées mais à plus de morts en mer.

      C’est bien cette réalité qui s’est tragiquement matérialisée, notamment avec le naufrage du 18 avril 2015, le plus meurtrier de l’histoire récente de la Méditerranée avec plus de 950 morts. A la suite de cette catastrophe, le président de la Commission européenne, Jean-Claude Juncker, a admis que « cela a été une sérieuse erreur que de mettre fin à Mare Nostrum. Cela a coûté des vies » (1). On aurait pu s’attendre à ce qu’à la suite de cette reconnaissance, Frontex soit sanctionnée pour son rôle dans ce changement opérationnel meurtrier. Il n’en a rien été : l’opération de Frontex fut renforcée et son budget augmenté. Et le vide de secours mortel laissé par la fin de Mare Nostrum n’a jamais été comblé.

      Du dédain à l’#impunité

      Tout cela peut sembler lointain. Mais aujourd’hui, des avions et drones de Frontex informent les garde-côtes libyens de la présence de migrant·e·s pour qu’ils et elles soient intercepté·e·s et ramené·e·s en Libye, et ce malgré tout ce que nous savons des conditions inhumaines qui leur sont réservées. Pourtant, cet épisode plus ancien mérite d’être rappelé car il démontre clairement le rôle de Frontex dans la construction des migrant·e·s comme une menace, la mise en place d’opérations de contrôle des frontières toujours plus coûteuses et militarisées, le dédain pour les vies et des droits des migrant·e·s qui anime l’agence, et l’impunité qui a été organisée autour de ses activités. Malgré la pression publique et politique dont Frontex fait aujourd’hui l’objet, cet état de fait n’est pas fondamentalement remis en cause, et le départ de Fabrice Leggeri ne changera pas significativement la donne.

      Mais il y a plus. L’Union européenne applique depuis deux mois une politique d’ouverture sélective face aux migrant·e·s fuyant l’Ukraine. Pour un groupe de personnes (trop) limité, un changement de paradigme a été opéré : celui de permettre la mobilité des personnes en quête de refuge et de reconnaître leurs droits plutôt que de chercher à les bloquer à tout prix. Cette brèche ouverte rend aujourd’hui évident pour le plus grand nombre ce qui l’a été depuis longtemps pour nombre de chercheurs, chercheuses, acteurs et actrices de la société civile : l’approche restrictive et militarisée de l’UE n’est pas une fatalité, une politique plus ouverte et respectueuse des droits est possible, et celle-ci rendrait des acteurs comme Frontex superflus.

      Le 15 mai, les citoyen·ne·s suisses se prononceront concernant le financement de Frontex. Ce référendum donne une opportunité à la population suisse de cesser d’être complice d’une agence dont les activités de plus en plus coûteuses n’ont jamais mis fin à la « menace migratoire » que Frontex a contribué à construire, et qui se soldent par la violation des droits des migrant·e·s et des milliers de morts en toute impunité. Un « non » des Suisse·sse·s au financement de Frontex pourrait avoir une résonance européenne et contribuer non seulement à une remise en cause de l’agence mais à une réorientation fondamentale des politiques migratoires européennes.

      (1) European Commission, « Speech by President Jean-Claude Juncker at the debate in the European Parliament on the conclusions of the Special European Council on 23 April : Tackling the migration crisis », 29 avril 2015, http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_SPEECH-15-4896_en.htm (dernier accès le 12 April 2016).

      https://www.liberation.fr/idees-et-debats/tribunes/leggeri-est-parti-mais-cest-frontex-quil-faut-renvoyer-20220503_P4AJ6XWWU

    • Frontex’s evolution from the undisputable to the untenable EU border agency

      Fabrice Leggeri, the Executive Director of the European Union border agency “Frontex”, resigned on 29th April 2022 following the release of the initial findings of an anti-fraud investigation. Last February the EU anti-fraud watchdog “OLAF” closed a year-long probe into Leggeri’s management over allegations of harassment, misconduct and migrant pushbacks. The investigation reveals how the agency’s own reporting system is used to cover-up pushbacks in the Aegean and its direct involvement. The resignations came after constant scrutiny by NGOs, journalists and the European Parliament in 2020 and 2021, claiming that the massive expansion of the EU border agency had not been matched by a corresponding increase in transparency and accountability. At the end of 2019, Leggeri, a 51-year-old French official who hails from the Alsace region, declared that his organization would not face the same troubles as the European Asylum Support Office (EASO). In June 2018, EASO’s executive director had resigned after an investigation by the same OLAF over alleged misconduct in procurement procedures, irregularities in management of human resources and possible breaches of data protection. 17 years after its foundation, Frontex faced the same process. How did it come to this?

      Frontex and the accountability problem

      The European Agency for the Management of Operational Cooperation at the External Borders of the Member States of the European Union (from the french Frontières extérieures, Frontex) was established by Council Regulation (EC) 2007/2004 in 2004, expanded with Regulation (EU) No 1168/2011. In September 2016, the founding regulation was amended and expanded by Regulation 2016/1624/EU creating the ‘European Border and Coast Guard Agency’. Less than two years after, the fourth revision of Frontex regulation was launched, and the new Regulation 2019/1896 entered into force on 4 December 2019. The new Frontex mandate stipulated that the number of EU border guards should double from 1,500 to 3,000 following an evaluation in 2024. Together with the forces of the Member States, Frontex is to reach its full strength of 10,000 border guards by 2027 (Bossong 2019). At the same time, Frontex has experienced a particularly significant growth in its budget, which has risen from merely 6.2 million euros (2005) to 395.6 million euros (2020) (Loschi, Slominski 2022).

      The Regulation 2019/1896 and all the narratives that led to its approval granted Frontex the power of resorting to crisis and securitisation narrative to justify the lack of transparency in its work. Since 2015, crises and security rationales have been often exploited by Frontex Executive Director to hamper access to documents, personnel and premises. Often, addressing requests of access by members of the European Parliament during the hearings, Frontex avoided commitments and cooperation, or, if put under pressure, it released documents that were extensively redacted on the ground of exceptions permitted on the basis of public security concerns.

      While according to Regulation 2019/1896 Frontex would be subjected to more oversight and legal obligations to uphold fundamental rights, holding Frontex accountable, in particular on grounds of fundamental rights, is the actual issue at stake. While European Member States can be held accountable before their own national courts and before international courts, in particular the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR), this does not apply with Frontex. As an EU body, neither of these options is viable. It can be brought before the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) to account for the conformity of its conduct with EU law (Fink 2020). The nature of Frontex’s activities, however, poses a particular challenge. The operational support in border management provided by the Agency occurs in the form of “factual” conduct, coordination, and under formal request by Member States, which are the first responsible and does not entail the adoption of legally binding texts. In other terms, legal responsibility is often shared between several member states as well as Frontex, which makes it difficult for individuals to lodge a complaint before a court. Hence, until 2021, cases that have been handled by the Court of Justice of the EU do not deal with Frontex operations but with refusals of access to documents or procurement actions and public services. Academics, in particular legal scholars, as well as members of the European parliament have advocated for the establishment of stronger accountability mechanisms, for example specific mechanism that allows individuals to hold Frontex to account (Fink 2020; Gkliati 2021).

      Frontex: from undisputable to untenable border agency

      Frontex’s expansion of financial and operational resources over the years and especially the increasing operational profile introduced with Regulations 2016/1624 and 2019/1896 set the clock in motion for a long tug of war between Frontex on one side and European parliament, NGOs, and watchdogs on the other side, leading to Leggeri’s resignation. Especially after the 2015 so-called migration crisis, the operational profile of the agency has been under strict scrutiny by humanitarian organizations and in particular from members of the European Parliament’s Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE).

      In 2015, against increasing migrations flows at the EU external borders and the reinstitution of border checks by member states throughout 2015 (Guild et alii), Frontex became the main instrument of the European Commission to avoid the collapse of the entire Schengen acquis. Frontex missions already deployed in Italy and Greece were expanded in both mandates and resources. As a leading agency of hotspots operations established with the European agenda in migration in 2015, Frontex monitored that frontline member states authorities were adequately implementing EURODAC regulation and fingerprinting third-country nationals, to ensure compliance with the Dublin regime and avoid uncontrolled secondary movements (Loschi, Slominski 2022). In this frame, the agency served not only as an operational device but also as the legal instrument through which introducing sensitive reform in national administrative and police procedures at the borders. The EU Commission included the legal definition of hotspots in Frontex Regulation 2016/1624, an act that allowed the European Commission to avoid parliamentary scrutiny on the establishment of hotspot operations. However, this strict cooperation and indirect protection from Commission to the agency had an expiration date.

      Indeed, Leggeri’s resignation comes after a series of important processes toward Frontex accountability. Especially after Regulation 2019/1896, Frontex has been under intense and constant scrutiny. Back in 2016, several human rights groups as well as the internal body of Frontex the Consultative Forum for human rights, flagged the risks and unclear support by Frontex at the Hungarian Serbian border. Hungary passed new border control measures in 2016 which, amongst others, obliged officers to return migrants apprehended within 8 km of the border back to the fence with Serbia. The new restrictive border measures along with Hungarian asylum laws passed on 2015 deterring access to asylum, raised several concerns with regard to the compatibility of Frontex operations with international and European law on fundamental rights. Frontex, despite increasing requests to revise and suspend activities to avoid complicity, decided to continue with operational support. It suspended its activities only in 2021, in the context of strong criticism emerging against the agency. Moreover, the first lawsuit against Frontex brought in 2018 by two activists to the Court of Justice of the EU did not deal with Frontex operations but with refusals of access to documents related to Search and Rescue operations in the Mediterranean, and was not successful (Case T-31/88 Izuzquiza and Semsrott v. Frontex). Frontex indeed claimed that “disclosure of details related to technical equipment deployed in the current and ongoing operations would undermine public security”.

      However, since 2020, a number of investigations and accountability actions had created the background for OLAF probe and Leggeri’s quitting. Here follows a list of most the relevant steps of this process.

      In March 2020, attention has particularly been focused on the modus operandi of the Greek authorities. According to reports related to Greece, pushbacks, sometimes undertaken by unidentified forces wearing uniforms and masks and carrying weapons, have expanded to migrants after arrival on the islands or the mainland. However, direct participation by Frontex in these alleged actions could not be proven. In late 2020, a joint investigation by Bellingcat, Lighthouse Reports, Der Spiegel, ARD and TV Asahi (also known as the Bellingcat report) stated that Frontex planes were near the maritime Greek-Turkish border where alleged pushback operations were ongoing. The reporters claimed to have found evidence that Frontex had knowledge of the pushbacks, did nothing to ensure compliance with legal obligations, and in some cases even cooperated with the authorities carrying out the illegal pushbacks and collective expulsions.

      In December 2020, the watchdog Border Violence Monitoring Network (BVMN) compiled a 1,500-page “black book” documenting hundreds of illegal pushbacks by authorities on Europe’s external borders. The same month, the Court of Justice of the European Union ruled that Hungary’s legislation on the rules and practice in the transit zones situated at the Serbian-Hungarian border was contrary to EU law. And that the procedure for granting international protection in so far as third-country nationals […] were in practice confronted with the virtual impossibility of making their application” (Case C-808/18, Commission v Hungary).

      Against this context, in late 2020 the Parliament’s Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE) decided to investigate the allegations and in January 2021 established the Frontex Scrutiny Working Group (FSWG) to monitor all aspects of the functioning of the agency, including compliance with fundamental rights and accountability towards Parliament. In its first hearing on 4 March, the Working Group questioned Commissioner for Home Affairs Johansson and Leggeri about the implementation of the fundamental rights provisions included in the Regulation 2019/1896 (among which the obligations to appoint fundamental rights monitors); the investigation related to the agency’s activities in the Aegean Sea; the interpretation of applicable rules for the surveillance of the external sea borders and inquired about the political scrutiny role of the European Commission over the agency. According to the Working Group, Commissioner Johansson appeared eager to listen to the scrutiny activity and criticized the ‘reluctance of compliance’ with the fundamental rights mandate from Leggeri. A preliminary report flagged out that five push-back incidents have not been clarified due to unclear data provided by Frontex, and stressed the general unsatisfactory attitude and documents provided by the Agency. On Wednesday 28 April 2021, the European Parliament decided to postpone the discharge to the 2019 budget of Frontex, as long as the OLAF investigation and the parliamentary inquiry were still ongoing.

      Meanwhile, other investigations were pending or concluded. In April 2021, der Spiegel claimed that Frontex was coordinating with the Libyan Coast Guard to engage in illegal pullbacks. Albeit ED Leggeri claimed during EP hearings Frontex does not work with the Libyan Coast Guard and only informs sea rescue control centres about sea rescue cases, a joint investigation by Lighthouse-Report, Der Spiegel, Libération, and ARD claimed the contrary. Drawing on a variety of data, including available sources from flight and vessel trackers, data from international and NGOs, eyewitness accounts and testimonies from survivors, the reporting parties concluded that Frontex plays a crucial role in the interceptions and return of people fleeing Libya by the Libyan coastguard. The report identified a number of cases in which Frontex planes were present in the vicinity, and likely aware, of boats in distress that were later incepted by Libyan patrol boats, despite data showing that commercial or NGO vessels were present in the area.

      Establishment of first accountability procedures against Frontex

      Under an administrative accountability action, in November 2020, the European Ombudsman started an own-initiative inquiry on the functioning of the complaint mechanism, which was released on 15 June 2021 and which recommended the creation of an independent mechanism for handling complaints about Frontex operations, while the system established with Regulation (EU) 2016/1624 is an internal mechanism (European Ombudsman, Case OI/5/2020/MHZ). On 7 June 2021, the European Court of Auditors, released its report on the limited effectiveness of Frontex’s support to external border management.

      The agency reacted by trying to dissimulate cooperation. To address investigations by journalists regarding the alleged involvement of Frontex with pushbacks in the Eastern Mediterranean, in November 2020, Frontex Management Board established a Working Group on Fundamental Rights and Legal Operational Aspects of Operations (WG FRaLO). In its final report of 1 March 2021, the Management Board concluded that out of the 13 incidents put forward by the Bellingcat report, eight cases had not caused a violation of the Frontex Regulation, and five examined incidents were not yet, or could not yet be clarified. At its extraordinary meeting in May 2021, the Management Board concluded that “the strong belief that the presented facts support an allegation of possible violation of fundamental rights or international protection obligations such as the principle of non-refoulement, and that it cannot be excluded that the incident has characteristics of a case of unprocessed return and violation of the principle of non-refoulement”.

      At the level of legal accountability, in May 2021, a relevant change occurred. In the first human rights case against Frontex, two applicants brought an action against the agency to the European Court of Justice (CJEU), on the grounds that the agency had ’failed to act’ in accordance with Article 265 TFEU (Case T-282/21). This represented a legal precedent with relevant implications. The action is supported by three pleas in law. The first is about ‘serious or persisting violations of fundamental rights and international protection obligations in the Aegean Sea Region’, which resulted in a ‘policy of systematic and widespread attack directed against civilian populations seeking asylum in the EU’. The second is about the agency’s failure to fulfil ‘its positive obligations under the Charter of Fundamental Rights’ or take any action to prevent fundamental rights violations in the context of its operation. The third involves the applicants’ claim of having been directly and individually affected by Frontex operations, which resulted in ‘unlawful refoulement, collective expulsion, and prevention of access to asylum’ (EPRS Study 2021). The case is still under evaluation.

      At the level of political accountability, in July 2021, the Frontex Scrutiny Working Group (FSWG) of the European Parliament’s LIBE Committee delivered its final report with recommendations. These were focusing mainly on ED responsibilities; division of responsibilities between the Agency and Member States in relation to fundamental rights; the importance of strengthening internal mechanisms already existing, namely the Fundamental Rights Officer and the Consultative Forum for fundamental rights; the role of the Management board which has been weak supporter of fundamental rights protection in agency’s activities; and finally recommending to the European Commission to engage more proactively to ensure adequate compliance with fundamental rights principles, vis-à-vis the management board, member states, and to apply conditional financial support on bases of humanitarian principles compliance. The report allows for the comprehensive steps for the judicial and non-judicial accountability of the agency and set the framework for the definition of agency’s responsility. This responsibility can be indirect, through assisting Greece or Hungary in the commission of violations, either actively (e.g., technical and financial support) or by omission due to the agency’s positive obligations (e.g., failure to suspend or terminate an operation).

      All these processes, together with the OLAF probe, created the conditions for Fabrice Leggeri’s resignation and the formal and informal condemnation of his management.

      What’s next?
      In a press release on 29th April, Frontex confirmed Leggeri’s departure, adding that since he had already stepped down, it “is not necessary anymore” to launch further disciplinary procedures. Aija Kalnaja, Deputy Executive Director for Standing Corps Management will lead the Agency until the Frontex Management Board appoints the Executive Director ad interim in June 2022. However, the question emerging now is: what happens next? Frontex is still under scrutiny, but the Ukrainian crisis will keep the attention of the European Commission and the Parliament elsewhere than a new legislative initiative to reorganize Frontex profile. At the same time, Leggeri’s resignation comes not only after OLAF probe ended, but also during the French presidency of the European Union (ending on 30th June) and Macron re-election last 22nd April. Beginning of February, Macron, shortly before the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the reformulation of the international political agenda, was advancing the idea of a more operational “Schengen Council” which would evaluate how the border-free area was working but would also take joint decisions and facilitate coordination in times of crisis. One may speculate on the forthcoming political destiny of Leggeri, which could also be considered by the French administration. Leggeri comes from France’s ministry of the interior where he has been heading the division on irregular migration. At the same time, Macron has a history of grandiose statements in denial of reality, from being a supporter of Libyan political reconciliation while violating the UN arms embargo, to peace talks with Putin right before the latter launched the invasion of Ukraine. It would be wise to wait before advancing any speculation. However, French representatives in Brussels do not hide their aspiration for a practical and operational solution to long-standing issues in European Justice and Home Affairs, including the creation of external border buffer zones that should allow for ’third-country nationals processing’ without being paralyzed by NGOs or civil society actors (phone interview with French representative of Justice and Home Affairs, Vienna, March 2019). Leggeri himself declared to Die Welt in 2017 that ’By rescuing migrants off the North African coasts, non-governmental organisations are playing into the hands of human traffickers’.

      The first comprehensive steps for the judicial and non-judicial accountability of the agency have been taken. Frontex cannot ignore new and unprecedented legal, political and administrative accountability procedures now set in motion. The risk for their repeal and weakening may come from new and urgent needs and rationales linked to the war in Ukraine.

      https://securitypraxis.eu/frontex-evolution-from-the-undisputable-to-the-untenable-border-agenc

    • Frontex, la chute d’une « affaire française »

      D’après une note du ministère de l’intérieur, récupérée par « Le Monde » et le média collaboratif « Lighthouse Reports », un rapport accuse le directeur de Frontex, le Français Fabrice Leggeri, d’avoir « fermé les yeux » sur des refoulements illégaux de migrants en mer Egée, de s’être entendu avec les autorités grecques pour fournir une version concordante à la Commission européenne et d’avoir « commis un parjure » devant le Parlement européen.

      Dans les couloirs du Parlement européen, à Strasbourg, Fabrice Leggeri est venu prendre un café, mercredi 4 mai. Certains croient savoir qu’il se trouvait dans la région pour des raisons personnelles, lui qui est natif de Mulhouse (Haut-Rhin). Celui qui a dirigé l’Agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes, Frontex, jusqu’au 29 avril aurait saisi l’occasion pour échanger avec des eurodéputés, notamment les anciens ministres de Nicolas Sarkozy, Nadine Morano et Brice Hortefeux (Les Républicains), mais aussi le porte-parole de Reconquête ! et transfuge du Rassemblement national (RN), Nicolas Bay. Des figures parmi celles qui l’ont publiquement soutenu depuis qu’il a été poussé à la démission, après sept ans à la tête de la plus riche agence européenne.

      « Il a un raisonnement assez solide même s’il n’est pas très satisfait d’être contraint à la démission », rapporte #Brice_Hortefeux. « Je l’ai croisé rapidement dans les couloirs », témoigne, à son tour, #Nicolas_Bay, qui se dit convaincu que M. Leggeri est « l’objet d’une cabale très politique ». Le patron de Frontex est « persécuté », avait aussi twitté, le 29 avril, l’eurodéputé et président par intérim du RN, #Jordan_Bardella. « Cette crise doit être l’occasion de lever certaines ambiguïtés sur le rôle de Frontex, ajoute M. Hortefeux. Est-ce que son rôle est de protéger les frontières ou ceux qui veulent venir ? »

      Tous reprennent à leur compte la défense de M. Leggeri, détaillée dans un courrier adressé à ses équipes, le 29 avril : « Au cours des deux dernières années, discrètement mais efficacement, une narration a pris le dessus [selon laquelle] Frontex devrait être transformée en une sorte d’organisme de défense des droits fondamentaux contrôlant ce que les Etats membres font à leurs frontières extérieures (…). Ma vision est et a toujours été que Frontex est, au travers de son corps opérationnel de gardes-frontières, une agence qui soutient les Etats membres. (…) Cette vision n’est plus soutenue au niveau politique. C’est pourquoi j’ai pris hier la décision de démissionner. »

      Un récit qui heurte certains observateurs. « M. Leggeri présente les choses comme une espèce de lutte philosophique sur le rôle de l’agence et on peut difficilement l’entendre », estime une source gouvernementale française. « A Frontex, on ne peut choisir entre les droits fondamentaux et la protection des frontières », affirme, de son côté, Anna Garphult, représentante suédoise au conseil d’administration de l’agence.

      « Manque de loyauté »

      Cela fait déjà de nombreux mois que des enquêtes journalistiques ou des ONG, et même la gauche parlementaire européenne, accusent le patron de Frontex de fermer les yeux sur des refoulements illégaux de migrants aux frontières de l’Union européenne (UE), voire d’en être complice. Pas de quoi entamer jusque-là le soutien de Paris, qui estimait qu’« il n’y avait pas de responsabilité avérée de l’agence ».

      La bascule aurait eu lieu à l’issue d’une enquête de l’Office européen de lutte antifraude (OLAF), lancée en novembre 2020. Pendant plus d’un an, ses agents ont entendu près d’une vingtaine de personnes, perquisitionné les bureaux de Fabrice Leggeri et de son directeur de cabinet, le 7 décembre 2020, saisi des téléphones et des ordinateurs… Un premier rapport est clôturé le 15 février 2022. Communiqué aussitôt au conseil d’administration de Frontex et à la Commission européenne, il « porte sur la façon dont la direction exécutive a géré [en mer Egée, à la frontière gréco-turque] les “pushbacks” [les refoulements illégaux de migrants], indique la source gouvernementale française. Il évoque notamment le manque de loyauté et de transparence vis-à-vis de la Commission et du Parlement, un style de management opaque et le manquement à certaines procédures de signalement sur les droits fondamentaux ».

      « Fabrice Leggeri a voulu de façon notable concentrer entre ses mains le pouvoir de décision », selon Gil Arias-Fernandez, directeur adjoint de Frontex

      Le 28 février, lors d’une présentation orale de l’enquête devant des parlementaires européens, le patron de l’OLAF, le Finlandais Ville Itälä prévient : « Nous avons beaucoup de preuves. » « Il était évident pour tout le monde que Fabrice Leggeri ne pouvait pas rester », avance un ancien membre du conseil d’administration. La France estime qu’« il n’y a plus de confiance ». La Commission européenne adopte la même ligne.

      Une note du ministère de l’intérieur français, datée du 29 avril, que Le Monde et ses partenaires – le média à but non lucratif Lighthouse Reports et l’hebdomadaire allemand Der Spiegel – ont pu consulter, rapporte que l’OLAF reproche au directeur « d’avoir fermé les yeux sur des “pushbacks” commis par les gardes-frontières grecs en 2019 sur les îles de Samos et Lesbos » et de « s’être accordé avec les autorités grecques, dont le représentant au conseil d’administration de l’agence, pour rendre les mêmes conclusions sur les demandes d’explication de la Commission européenne ». M. Leggeri aurait même « commis un parjure lors de son audition devant le Parlement européen en niant les accusations de manière formelle ». Interrogé à ce sujet, ce dernier n’a pas répondu à nos questions.

      Deux autres volets d’investigation sont toujours ouverts, indiquent des sources concordantes au sein du conseil d’administration de l’agence et au ministère de l’intérieur français. L’une porterait sur des faits de harcèlement moral visant la direction de Frontex et le cabinet du directeur exécutif, l’autre sur des irrégularités financières.

      « Il ne rendait de compte à personne »

      Malgré cela, M. Leggeri aurait « tout fait pour éviter la démission », rapporte la source gouvernementale française. Le 28 avril, au cours d’une audition organisée par le conseil d’administration de l’agence, une heure durant, il tente de défendre son bilan face aux représentants des Etats membres, mais sa stratégie n’opère pas. Il se résout à présenter sa démission dans la foulée, afin d’éviter l’ouverture d’une procédure disciplinaire à son encontre. Son directeur de cabinet, Thibauld de la Haye Jousselin, l’a précédé dans cette démarche dès le 22 avril.

      C’est ainsi que s’achèvent sept années pendant lesquelles Frontex a été considérée aux yeux de beaucoup comme une « affaire française ». En obtenant la nomination de M. Leggeri à la tête de l’institution, dont le siège se situe à Varsovie, fin 2014, la France décroche un poste stratégique au sein des institutions européennes à un moment où son influence décroît. Polyglotte, normalien, énarque, rattaché au ministère de l’intérieur tout en étant passé par celui de la défense, puis détaché à la Commission européenne, M. Leggeri « remplissait toutes les cases » : « C’est un type brillant », estime un haut fonctionnaire à l’époque en poste au cabinet de Manuel Valls, alors ministre de l’intérieur.

      M. Leggeri arrive à Frontex avec un mandat : renforcer les pouvoirs de l’agence. « Face à la crise des réfugiés, il y avait une pression politique élevée, de la Commission, du Conseil et du Parlement, pour donner à l’agence beaucoup d’argent et de moyens humains », se souvient l’Espagnol Gil Arias-Fernandez, directeur adjoint de Frontex entre 2014 et 2015.

      Le budget explose, 10 000 gardes-frontières doivent être recrutés. Frontex est sommée de se transformer en machine à protéger les frontières extérieures de l’UE. Nombreux sont ceux qui estiment que la montée en puissance a été trop rapide. Même la Cour des comptes européenne s’étonne, dans un rapport de juin 2021, que le budget soit planifié à 900 millions d’euros par an « sans même chercher à déterminer les besoins de Frontex » et « sans aucune évaluation de son impact sur les Etats membres ».

      « En externe, [M. Leggeri] pouvait donner l’impression que Frontex était une agence indépendante de la Commission. Il ne rendait compte à personne, négociait en bilatéral avec les Etats membres », dit un haut fonctionnaire français qui a beaucoup œuvré au sein des institutions européennes.

      Voix dissonantes ignorées

      « Il a voulu de façon notable concentrer entre ses mains le pouvoir de décision, ajoute Gil Arias-Fernandez. Par exemple, les compétences qui m’avaient été déléguées par son prédécesseur, comme l’évaluation des directeurs, m’ont été retirées. » Il s’appuie sur une équipe restreinte, composée en grande partie de francophones, dont son directeur de cabinet Thibauld de la Haye Jousselin. Ce dernier est membre de la préfectorale, passé notamment par le cabinet de Brice Hortefeux, place Beauvau, et officier de réserve. « Il est travailleur, organisé et il a le sens de l’autorité, ajoute l’ancien ministre sarkozyste. Il est clair que ce n’est pas un écolo-libertaire ».

      En 2019, malgré des réticences au sein de la Commission, le mandat de M. Leggeri est renouvelé. Les voix dissonantes auraient été ignorées. Inmaculada Arnaez Fernandez, la responsable des droits fondamentaux de l’époque, censée contrôler l’action de l’agence et son respect des traités, en fait l’amère expérience. Gil Arias-Fernandez se souvient de la « marginalisation » de cette avocate espagnole, arrivée en 2012. « Dès le début, Fabrice Leggeri n’a pas considéré ses tâches comme importantes, dit-il. Nombre de ses rapports sur des violations potentielles des droits fondamentaux n’ont pas été pris en compte. »

      En 2019, à la suite d’un congé maladie de Mme Arnaez, le directeur annonce l’ouverture de son poste et tente de la remplacer, en vain. La même année, le recrutement de quarante observateurs des droits de l’homme prend du retard, au point que, fin 2021, il n’a toujours pas été finalisé.

      M. Leggeri quitte l’agence dans une crise profonde, politique mais aussi opérationnelle. C’est la Lettone Aija Kalnaja, directrice adjointe avec le plus d’ancienneté, qui a été nommée à la tête de l’agence jusqu’au conseil d’administration des 7 et 8 juin, à Paris. Affable, pratiquant un anglais parfait, cette ancienne fonctionnaire de police présente un profil idoine. « [Sa] désignation n’est pas forcément très réjouissante », estime pourtant une note diplomatique française du jour de son arrivée.

      Le document épingle notamment sa gestion d’une « situation dramatique » dans laquelle des dizaines d’agents de Frontex déployés aux frontières se trouvent actuellement. Certains ont dû avancer plusieurs milliers d’euros pour leurs frais de déplacement et d’hébergement. Sur ce dossier, Mme Kalnaja « n’a pris aucune décision forte », poursuit la note. A Varsovie, le temps des tempêtes n’est pas encore passé. Mercredi 4 mai, le Parlement européen a décidé de suspendre le vote du budget de l’agence, « jusqu’à la publication complète du rapport d’enquête de l’OLAF ».

      https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2022/05/06/frontex-la-chute-d-une-affaire-francaise_6125052_3210.html

    • Il ne suffit pas de changer le Directeur, c’est Frontex qu’il faut supprimer !

      L’UE et ses Etats membres doivent sanctionner les pratiques illégales de Frontex et mettre fin à l’#impunité !

      Le 29 avril 2022, Le Directeur exécutif de l’agence de garde-côtes et garde-frontières européens Frontex, Fabrice Leggeri (en poste depuis 2015) a remis sa démission.

      Depuis octobre 2020 [1], Frontex fait face à de nombreuses accusations de complaisance ou de complicité dans des opérations de refoulements en mer Egée et en Europe de l’Est, mais aussi de graves #dysfonctionnements et de #mauvaise_gouvernance. Au point que de nombreuses enquêtes ont été menées par les institutions européennes (Parlement européen, médiatrice européenne, Cour des comptes de l’UE, Office européen anti-fraude OLAF), et que la décharge budgétaire de Frontex pour l’année 2020 a été bloquée par le Parlement européen, le 4 mai 2022, signe évident de défiance [2] . Les conclusions du rapport de l’OLAF [3], et les dernières révélations de refoulements maquillés en « préventions au départ » en mer Egée dans les rapports de Frontex [4], ont sans doute accéléré la chute de son Directeur, qui paraissait jusqu’ici intouchable.

      Mais Leggeri n’a pas été licencié, il a démissionné. Non pas car il assume sa responsabilité dans les violations avérées des droits commises ou couvertes par Frontex aux frontières [5], mais car le rôle de l’agence prend selon lui une orientation qu’il désapprouve. Son mandat et la vision politique des institutions auraient ainsi « silencieusement mais effectivement été modifiés » durant les deux dernières années, et il existerait selon lui une contradiction manifeste entre le mandat de contrôle et de protection des frontières européennes qui lui a été confié en 2015, et le respect des droits des personnes tentant d’atteindre ces frontières, les deux n’étant pas compatibles. Il démissionne donc car « il ne peut rester pour mettre en œuvre ce qui n’est pas le mandat de l’Agence » [6]. Dans son communiqué du 29 avril, le Conseil d’administration de Frontex a, lui, balayé tout dilemme en affirmant au contraire « qu’un contrôle efficace des frontières et la protection des droits fondamentaux sont pleinement compatibles » … Ce que la société civile réfute, documents à l’appui, depuis plus de dix ans [7].

      Et de fait, Leggeri évincé, rien ne change. Ni l’incompatibilité effective du mandat et des activités de Frontex avec le respect des droits fondamentaux, ni l’impunité structurelle dont elle jouit. Car il ne s’agit pas de la responsabilité d’un (seul) homme, mais bien de celle d’un système à l’échelle européenne qui a permis depuis des décennies la multiplication en toute impunité des violations des droits des personnes exilées aux frontières maritimes et terrestres de l’Europe.

      Car le mandat de Frontex et ses activités, tout comme la politique sécuritaire et mortifère de lutte contre l’immigration de l’Union, demeurent. Frontex continuera de « sécuriser » les frontières européennes, avec violence et au mépris des droits et de la vie des personnes [8], en procédant à des vols collectifs d’expulsion [9], en entravant le droit d’asile, en prévenant les pseudo garde-côtes libyens (qu’elle forme par ailleurs) de venir intercepter les bateaux d’exilé.e.s avant qu’ils ne franchissement les eaux territoriales européennes [10], et continuera d’ériger les personnes désireuses de rejoindre le territoire européens en « menaces » dont il faudrait se protéger. En somme, Frontex continuera d’entraver les mobilités - en violation du droit international [11] -, et à contraindre les personnes à emprunter des voies de passages risquées et mortelles, car tel est bien son mandat, et ce quel que soit le nom de son Directeur.

      Et tandis que la société civile n’a eu de cesse depuis une décennie de documenter et dénoncer ces dérives, Frontex n’a jamais été sanctionnée pour ses agissements attentatoires aux droits. En 2014, Migreurop évoquait déjà des refoulements entre la Grèce et la Turquie, dans le cadre de l’opération Poséidon de Frontex, ayant été rapportés à la chargée des droits fondamentaux de l’agence, sans qu’il n’y soit donné suite [12]. En décembre 2020, son Directeur avait déjà admis devant le Parlement européen que l’agence procédait à des « opérations de prévention au départ », assimilables à des refoulements [13]. Malgré cela, aucune décision officielle n’a jamais été prise pour faire cesser les opérations de l’agence dans cette zone, aucun de ses agents n’a été mis en cause, et il n’a pas été mis un terme aux responsabilités de son Directeur, qui n’a jamais été sanctionné, et qui est démissionnaire.

      Lorsque les accusations ne peuvent plus être dissimulées et que les pratiques illégales de l’agence Frontex ne peuvent plus être ignorées ni remises en cause, l’unique conséquence semblerait donc être la démission (et non le licenciement) d’un Directeur, qui ne fera par ailleurs l’objet d’aucune sanction disciplinaire ou judiciaire. Face à l’accumulation de preuves, lorsque les institutions de contrôle démocratique ne peuvent plus se taire, elles ne sont donc capables que de produire des changements cosmétiques.

      Frontex s’est vue renforcée à chaque révision de mandat (2011, 2016, 2019) malgré les « rapports d’incidents » internes, les rapports d’ONG et les enquêtes médiatiques, et est de plus en plus rétive à rendre des comptes, tant aux institutions qu’aux citoyen.ne.s [14]. Quel que soit son Directeur, l’agence a, en de trop nombreuses occasions, prouvé qu’elle pouvait en toute impunité s’affranchir du droit européen pour satisfaire une politique sécuritaire de lutte contre l’immigration, qui a démontré ne pouvoir être respectueuse des droits.

      En acceptant le départ volontaire de Leggeri, les institutions européennes lui font indirectement porter la responsabilité des dérives de l’agence, une façon également de faire silence sur celles-ci et de ne pas remettre en cause les fondements mêmes de Frontex, tout en prétendant reprendre les choses en main et « assainir » une entité « abîmée ». Mais les bases sur lesquelles s’appuie Frontex n’ont pas changé d’un iota, et Frontex est irrécupérable.

      Remplacer le Directeur ne modifiera pas le mandat ni les activités de Frontex. Il ne s’agit plus désormais d’apporter des changements cosmétiques, mais de supprimer enfin l’agence Frontex pour faire cesser les violations des droits aux frontières, perpétrées impunément au nom de leur protection.

      https://migreurop.org/article3102.html

    • Inside the Final Days of the Frontex Chief

      Radical views, internal resistance, merciless investigators: Why Frontex chief Fabrice Leggeri had to go – and what his resignation means for the future of the EU border agency.

      In the end, once it was all over, it looked as though Fabrice Leggeri wanted to sneak out through the back door. Close advisers urged the Frontex chief to address his staff one last time after his resignation. “You were these people’s boss for many years. They’ve earned the right to know what is going on,” his advisers argued. But Leggeri refused to budge. It was a sad thing to watch, says one of those who had worked with Leggeri for many years.

      On Friday afternoon, at 3:22 p.m., once everybody had learned of his resignation, Leggeri did ultimately send a farewell message to his staff. In the email, the outgoing Frontex chief thanked the employees for their efforts – and fired a last parting shot at his critics. Frontex, Leggeri wrote, has been accused of either being involved in pushbacks or of having covered them up. He, too, was personally targeted by such accusations, he wrote, claiming that such allegations were unjust. There is still, he claimed, no proof. “I could rebuke all of them,” he wrote. Just that, in the end, nobody believed him any longer.

      Fabrice Leggeri was the head of Frontex for seven years. During his tenure, he was able to transform a meaningless EU authority into one of the bloc’s largest agencies, with an annual budget of 750 million euros. Leggeri created a cabinet suited to his tastes, concentrating almost all the power in his own hands. In the end, he ran the agency like a monarch – until he was pushed off the throne.

      Leggeri’s resignation was not widely expected. Even many Frontex staff members didn’t think they would be getting a new boss any time soon. To be sure, he was faced with an entire catalogue of accusations: DER SPIEGEL, Lighthouse Reports and several other media outlets had clearly demonstrated
      over the past 18 months that Frontex was involved in legal violations committed by Greece. Frontex units would intercept rickety refugee vessels on the Aegean and turn the asylum-seekers over to the Greek coast guard, which would then abandon the men, women and children at sea – frequently on life rafts with no motor.

      Human rights activists call such operations “pushbacks,” and they are not legal under European law. According to its own codex, Frontex should have been doing all it could to stop such pushbacks. But instead, the agency helped out: It was involved in illegal pushbacks affecting hundreds of asylum-seekers.

      Leggeri, though, has consistently rejected all such accusations. And for quite some time, it looked as though EU member states were wiling to simply accept the situation, as though the assistance Frontex provided to the pushbacks was actually in their interest. There were demands that he resign, but they mostly came from left-wing and center-left European parliamentarians – and not from EU heads of state and government, who control Frontex via the Management Board.

      What, then, led to Leggeri’s resignation? What happened behind closed doors in those decisive moments? And what does it mean for the future of the border protection agency?

      A team of reporters from DER SPIEGEL, Lighthouse Reports and the French daily Le Monde spoke with more than a dozen Frontex employees and European officials for this article. Some of them worked closely with Leggeri, while others were responsible for oversight of his agency. Leggeri himself declined to be interviewed.

      Taken together, the comments from confidants and employees produce the image of a man whose views grew increasingly radical as time passed, and whose shortcomings ultimately became so conspicuous that EU member states no longer had much of an option other than pushing him out of office. Fabrice Leggeri didn’t lose his job because of pushbacks as such, but more because he had become a PR problem for the EU.
      The Oracle of Delphi

      When seeking to understand Leggeri’s downfall, Delphi is a good place to start. On a warm day in April, Leggeri found himself in a stuffy conference center in the small Greek town, which takes its name from the Oracle of Delphi, who once predicted the future for petitioners. “Know thyself” was thought to have been inscribed at the entrance to the temple.

      The trip to Delphi was to become one of Leggeri’s final official journeys. Next to him on the stage of the Delphi Economic Forum was Greek Minister of Migration Notis Mitarachi. A noted hardliner, nobody defends the Greek approach to cross-Aegean migration as passionately as he does. Indeed, between the lines, it frequently sounds as though he finds pushbacks to be not such a bad idea.

      Leggeri gets along well with Mitarachi, and recently even received a medal from the Greek minister for his service on the EU external border. For Frontex, Greece is more important than any other European country. One of the most important migration routes to Europe leads from Turkey to the Greek islands across the Aegean Sea, and nowhere does Frontex have as many agents stationed. Leggeri dreamed of an even larger agency, and without a significant presence in Greece, such a vision would have been impossible.

      On stage in Delphi, Leggeri said that he was proud that Frontex under his leadership had always stood at Greece’s side. Not everybody can be allowed in, he said, that’s just a fact. Rather astounding sentences coming from somebody accused of covering up for Greek legal violations.

      A close parsing of Leggeri’s comments in Delphi reveals the broader motifs with which he would seek to defend himself from his critics a short time later. Frontex, he said, is a law enforcement authority and not an immigration agency, not showing much empathy for the women and children that had been abandoned at sea in the Aegean. He wrote something similar in his email to Frontex staff following his resignation. Frontex, Leggeri contended, is to be transformed into a sort of fundamental rights body, with a narrative to that effect spreading “discretely, but efficiently.” Such sentiments make it sound as though Leggeri believes in some kind of large-scale conspiracy. Even in Delphi, many listeners found themselves wondering how long Leggeri would be able to last with his impertinent bluster.

      Leggeri didn’t always sound so extreme. When he took over the position of Frontex director in 2015, he was considered to be an able technocrat. The Frenchman’s fluent command of German and excellent English were the qualities that initially stuck out for many. He was reputed to be consistently meticulously prepared for his meetings.

      In 2016, shortly after the apex of the refugee crisis, Leggeri emphasized in an interview with the influential German weekly Die Zeit that Europe had the obligation to provide protection to asylum-seekers. “We don’t reject anybody and we aren’t allowed to do so,” he said.

      Since then, the use of force on the EU’s external borders has escalated. Some EU member states, with Greece leading the way, are now in favor of turning pushbacks into standard practice. Leggeri put himself at the front of that movement, becoming a mouthpiece of the most radical camp within the EU in the process – and assumed that the other member states would tolerate it.

      Leggeri’s transformation didn’t go unnoticed within Frontex. One staff member who worked with him for several years says that his boss became more and more uncompromising over time. He increasingly adopted a black-and-white view of the world with no gray areas apparent, the staff member says, adding that Leggeri completely lost any kind of balance. At some point, says an additional staff member, Leggeri would only speak to members of his innermost circle.

      Towards the end of his tenure, there was a significant amount of grumbling at Frontex. Support for Leggeri within the agency began eroding while leaks to the outside world increased. Staffers at the Frontex Situation Center, who saw on their computer screens what was going on in the Aegean every day, grew defiant. In at least one case in which a Frontex aircraft recorded video of a pushback from above, a staff member explicitly wrote of a suspected human rights violation. Leggeri, though, ignored it.
      Leggeri’s Final Battle

      When EU anti-corruption officials get involved, the situation for those concerned tends to grow serious. Investigators from the European Anti-Fraud Office, known as OLAF for short, operate independently and are charged with uncovering rules violations committed by EU officials. Very little about their investigations tends to make it into the press.

      On Dec. 7, 2020, a few weeks after DER SPIEGEL published the initial revelations, investigators searched Leggeri’s office in Warsaw along with that of his then chief-of-staff, Thibauld de la Haye Jousselin. The investigators apparently also confiscated their mobile phones. In early March 2022, they presented a more than 200-page investigative report, which still hasn’t been made available to the public.

      Essentially, the report works through what DER SPIEGEL and its media partners have already reported: Leggeri covered up the Greek pushbacks and thus violated the regulations of his own agency. He then lied to the European Parliament when confronted with specific questions. Furthermore, according to a summary of the OLAF report compiled by French officials, which DER SPIEGEL has acquired, he coordinated with the Greek government before responding to growing questions.

      The investigators documented each lapse. And they recommended that disciplinary measures be taken against Leggeri and two additional senior Frontex leaders. The report essentially forced the overseers of Frontex to take a stand. And with that, Leggeri was never able to shake the detailed accusations documented in the OLAF report.

      The Management Board of Frontex is primarily made up of representatives from Schengen member states. Border protection agents and senior officials from European interior ministries supervise the Frontex chief. Their meetings take place behind closed doors and leaks are rare. Even the brief meeting summaries are classified.

      On the morning of April 28, members came together virtually for the decisive meeting. The German Management Board chair Alexander Fritsch led the proceedings. Leggeri joined from France – together with his lawyer.

      It immediately became apparent that Leggeri had no intention of giving up. The Frontex chief had had two months to prepare his defense, and according to sources who took part in the meeting, he repeated what he had said in Delphi and what he would later write in his final email to staff: namely that he sees Frontex as a law enforcement agency and not as a pro-migration NGO. It’s not his fault, he says, that the agency’s mandate had been changed.

      Later in the meeting, the Management Board considered the situation without Leggeri’s participation. And it quickly became clear that there was a majority against the Frontex chief, with many apparently concerned that Leggeri could pull the agency into the abyss along with him. “Because of the OLAF report, we wanted to do something,” says one meeting participant. Now that EU investigators had also leveled accusations against Leggeri, says the participant, the situation had simply become untenable.

      Leggeri had long since lost the trust of European Commissioner for Home Affairs Ylva Johannson. Now, Leggeri’s supporters also realized that he had to go. Even the French government, shortly after the re-election of President Emmanuel Macron, distanced itself from the Frontex chief. The Greek representative on the Board was one of the few who continued to support Leggeri.

      That same evening, Leggeri gave in. He contacted Alexander Fritsch, the German chairman of the Management Board, and announced he was stepping down. The next day, a broad majority of the board voted to accept Leggeri’s resignation. The board decided not to implement disciplinary measures as OLAF had recommended, but only because Leggeri was no longer a Frontex employee. It is ultimately a compromise that allowed Leggeri to save face, but nothing more.

      In a press released, the Management Board made clear that border control and the protection of human rights are not mutually exclusive. The press release also clarified that the agency’s mandate, which Leggeri had claimed was being changed “discretely and efficiently,” is clearly described in Frontex documents. The statement essentially amounted to a final slap in the face for Leggeri, and the beginning of the effort to limit the amount of damage to the agency’s reputation.
      A New Beginning?

      The woman who is now to take over from Leggeri is named Aija Kalnaja. The Management Board installed the Latvian as interim chief on the day of Leggeri’s resignation. A career police officer, she had been deputy executive director of Frontex. In her very first email to agency staff, Kalnaja distanced herself from Leggeri. The rights of asylum-seekers, she wrote, must be protected, and Frontex must set an example.

      It is going to be a long road to becoming an exemplary EU agency. Leggeri left behind a fair amount of chaos, and Kalnaja, as deputy director, wasn’t entirely uninvolved. Currently, for example, Frontex officials must pay for their lodgings at the EU’s external border out of their own pockets because the agency isn’t able to arrange official trips. Frontex cancelled its contract with a travel agency because costs were skyrocketing, and a replacement hasn’t yet been found.

      Many in the agency believe that Kalnaja would like to remain in the top spot. In contrast to Leggeri, she is thought to have good relations with the European Commission. The final decision on her status will be made in early June, which is when the Management Board will gather to elect a new director.

      The German government is now stressing that Leggeri’s departure presents an opportunity for a new beginning. That, though, wouldn’t just require a new Frontex chief, but also a policy shift in the EU member states that Leggeri spent so long protecting. A first test is on the horizon: The Frontex Fundamental Rights Officer could soon recommend that the agency withdraw from the Aegean. And then, nobody could hide behind Fabrice Leggeri any longer.

      https://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/fabrice-leggeri-s-resignation-the-final-days-of-the-frontex-chief-a-a238224a

  • Schengen : de nouvelles règles pour rendre l’espace sans contrôles aux #frontières_intérieures plus résilient

    La Commission propose aujourd’hui des règles actualisées pour renforcer la gouvernance de l’espace Schengen. Les modifications ciblées renforceront la coordination au niveau de l’UE et offriront aux États membres des outils améliorés pour faire face aux difficultés qui surviennent dans la gestion tant des frontières extérieures communes de l’UE que des frontières intérieures au sein de l’espace Schengen. L’actualisation des règles vise à faire en sorte que la réintroduction des #contrôles_aux_frontières_intérieures demeure une mesure de dernier recours. Les nouvelles règles créent également des outils communs pour gérer plus efficacement les frontières extérieures en cas de crise de santé publique, grâce aux enseignements tirés de la pandémie de COVID-19. L’#instrumentalisation des migrants est également prise en compte dans cette mise à jour des règles de Schengen, ainsi que dans une proposition parallèle portant sur les mesures que les États membres pourront prendre dans les domaines de l’asile et du retour dans une telle situation.

    Margaritis Schinas, vice-président chargé de la promotion de notre mode de vie européen, s’est exprimé en ces termes : « La crise des réfugiés de 2015, la vague d’attentats terroristes sur le sol européen et la pandémie de COVID-19 ont mis l’espace Schengen à rude épreuve. Il est de notre responsabilité de renforcer la gouvernance de Schengen et de faire en sorte que les États membres soient équipés pour offrir une réaction rapide, coordonnée et européenne en cas de crise, y compris lorsque des migrants sont instrumentalisés. Grâce aux propositions présentées aujourd’hui, nous fortifierons ce “joyau” si emblématique de notre mode de vie européen. »

    Ylva Johansson, commissaire aux affaires intérieures, a quant à elle déclaré : « La pandémie a montré très clairement que l’espace Schengen est essentiel pour nos économies et nos sociétés. Grâce aux propositions présentées aujourd’hui, nous ferons en sorte que les contrôles aux frontières ne soient rétablis qu’en dernier recours, sur la base d’une évaluation commune et uniquement pour la durée nécessaire. Nous dotons les États membres des outils leur permettant de relever les défis auxquels ils sont confrontés. Et nous veillons également à gérer ensemble les frontières extérieures de l’UE, y compris dans les situations où les migrants sont instrumentalisés à des fins politiques. »

    Réaction coordonnée aux menaces communes

    La proposition de modification du code frontières Schengen vise à tirer les leçons de la pandémie de COVID-19 et à garantir la mise en place de mécanismes de coordination solides pour faire face aux menaces sanitaires. Les règles actualisées permettront au Conseil d’adopter rapidement des règles contraignantes fixant des restrictions temporaires des déplacements aux frontières extérieures en cas de menace pour la santé publique. Des dérogations seront prévues, y compris pour les voyageurs essentiels ainsi que pour les citoyens et résidents de l’Union. L’application uniforme des restrictions en matière de déplacements sera ainsi garantie, en s’appuyant sur l’expérience acquise ces dernières années.

    Les règles comprennent également un nouveau mécanisme de sauvegarde de Schengen destiné à générer une réaction commune aux frontières intérieures en cas de menaces touchant la majorité des États membres, par exemple des menaces sanitaires ou d’autres menaces pour la sécurité intérieure et l’ordre public. Grâce à ce mécanisme, qui complète le mécanisme applicable en cas de manquements aux frontières extérieures, les vérifications aux frontières intérieures dans la majorité des États membres pourraient être autorisées par une décision du Conseil en cas de menace commune. Une telle décision devrait également définir des mesures atténuant les effets négatifs des contrôles.

    De nouvelles règles visant à promouvoir des alternatives effectives aux vérifications aux frontières intérieures

    La proposition vise à promouvoir le recours à d’autres mesures que les contrôles aux frontières intérieures et à faire en sorte que, lorsqu’ils sont nécessaires, les contrôles aux frontières intérieures restent une mesure de dernier recours. Ces mesures sont les suivantes :

    - Une procédure plus structurée pour toute réintroduction des contrôles aux frontières intérieures, comportant davantage de garanties : Actuellement, tout État membre qui décide de réintroduire des contrôles doit évaluer le caractère adéquat de cette réintroduction et son incidence probable sur la libre circulation des personnes. En application des nouvelles règles, il devra en outre évaluer l’impact sur les régions frontalières. Par ailleurs, tout État membre envisageant de prolonger les contrôles en réaction à des menaces prévisibles devrait d’abord évaluer si d’autres mesures, telles que des contrôles de police ciblés et une coopération policière renforcée, pourraient être plus adéquates. Une évaluation des risques devrait être fournie pour ce qui concerne les prolongations de plus de 6 mois. Lorsque des contrôles intérieurs auront été rétablis depuis 18 mois, la Commission devra émettre un avis sur leur caractère proportionné et sur leur nécessité. Dans tous les cas, les contrôles temporaires aux frontières ne devraient pas excéder une durée totale de 2 ans, sauf dans des circonstances très particulières. Il sera ainsi fait en sorte que les contrôles aux frontières intérieures restent une mesure de dernier recours et ne durent que le temps strictement nécessaire.
    – Promouvoir le recours à d’autres mesures : Conformément au nouveau code de coopération policière de l’UE, proposé par la Commission le 8 décembre 2021, les nouvelles règles de Schengen encouragent le recours à des alternatives effectives aux contrôles aux frontières intérieures, sous la forme de contrôles de police renforcés et plus opérationnels dans les régions frontalières, en précisant qu’elles ne sont pas équivalentes aux contrôles aux frontières.
    - Limiter les répercussions des contrôles aux frontières intérieures sur les régions frontalières : Eu égard aux enseignements tirés de la pandémie, qui a grippé les chaînes d’approvisionnement, les États membres rétablissant des contrôles devraient prendre des mesures pour limiter les répercussions négatives sur les régions frontalières et le marché intérieur. Il pourra s’agir notamment de faciliter le franchissement d’une frontière pour les travailleurs frontaliers et d’établir des voies réservées pour garantir un transit fluide des marchandises essentielles.
    - Lutter contre les déplacements non autorisés au sein de l’espace Schengen : Afin de lutter contre le phénomène de faible ampleur mais constant des déplacements non autorisés, les nouvelles règles créeront une nouvelle procédure pour contrer ce phénomène au moyen d’opérations de police conjointes et permettre aux États membres de réviser ou de conclure de nouveaux accords bilatéraux de réadmission entre eux. Ces mesures complètent celles proposées dans le cadre du nouveau pacte sur la migration et l’asile, en particulier le cadre de solidarité contraignant, et doivent être envisagées en liaison avec elles.

    Aider les États membres à gérer les situations d’instrumentalisation des flux migratoires

    Les règles de Schengen révisées reconnaissent l’importance du rôle que jouent les États membres aux frontières extérieures pour le compte de tous les États membres et de l’Union dans son ensemble. Elles prévoient de nouvelles mesures que les États membres pourront prendre pour gérer efficacement les frontières extérieures de l’UE en cas d’instrumentalisation de migrants à des fins politiques. Ces mesures consistent notamment à limiter le nombre de points de passage frontaliers et à intensifier la surveillance des frontières.

    La Commission propose en outre des mesures supplémentaires dans le cadre des règles de l’UE en matière d’asile et de retour afin de préciser les modalités de réaction des États membres en pareilles situations, dans le strict respect des droits fondamentaux. Ces mesures comprennent notamment la possibilité de prolonger le délai d’enregistrement des demandes d’asile jusqu’à 4 semaines et d’examiner toutes les demandes d’asile à la frontière, sauf en ce qui concerne les cas médicaux. Il convient de continuer à garantir un accès effectif à la procédure d’asile, et les États membres devraient permettre l’accès des organisations humanitaires qui fournissent une aide. Les États membres auront également la possibilité de mettre en place une procédure d’urgence pour la gestion des retours. Enfin, sur demande, les agences de l’UE (Agence de l’UE pour l’asile, Frontex, Europol) devraient apporter en priorité un soutien opérationnel à l’État membre concerné.

    Prochaines étapes

    Il appartient à présent au Parlement européen et au Conseil d’examiner et d’adopter les deux propositions.

    Contexte

    L’espace Schengen compte plus de 420 millions de personnes dans 26 pays. La suppression des contrôles aux frontières intérieures entre les États Schengen fait partie intégrante du mode de vie européen : près de 1,7 million de personnes résident dans un État Schengen et travaillent dans un autre. Les personnes ont bâti leur vie autour des libertés offertes par l’espace Schengen, et 3,5 millions d’entre elles se déplacent chaque jour entre des États Schengen.

    Afin de renforcer la résilience de l’espace Schengen face aux menaces graves et d’adapter les règles de Schengen aux défis en constante évolution, la Commission a annoncé, dans son nouveau pacte sur la migration et l’asile présenté en septembre 2020, ainsi que dans la stratégie de juin 2021 pour un espace Schengen pleinement opérationnel et résilient, qu’elle proposerait une révision du code frontières Schengen. Dans son discours sur l’état de l’Union de 2021, la présidente von der Leyen a également annoncé de nouvelles mesures pour contrer l’instrumentalisation des migrants à des fins politiques et pour assurer l’unité dans la gestion des frontières extérieures de l’UE.

    Les propositions présentées ce jour viennent s’ajouter aux travaux en cours visant à améliorer le fonctionnement global et la gouvernance de Schengen dans le cadre de la stratégie pour un espace Schengen plus fort et plus résilient. Afin de favoriser le dialogue politique visant à relever les défis communs, la Commission organise régulièrement des forums Schengen réunissant des membres du Parlement européen et les ministres de l’intérieur. À l’appui de ces discussions, la Commission présentera chaque année un rapport sur l’état de Schengen résumant la situation en ce qui concerne l’absence de contrôles aux frontières intérieures, les résultats des évaluations de Schengen et l’état d’avancement de la mise en œuvre des recommandations. Cela contribuera également à aider les États membres à relever tous les défis auxquels ils pourraient être confrontés. La proposition de révision du mécanisme d’évaluation et de contrôle de Schengen, actuellement en cours d’examen au Parlement européen et au Conseil, contribuera à renforcer la confiance commune dans la mise en œuvre des règles de Schengen. Le 8 décembre, la Commission a également proposé un code de coopération policière de l’UE destiné à renforcer la coopération des services répressifs entre les États membres, qui constitue un moyen efficace de faire face aux menaces pesant sur la sécurité dans l’espace Schengen et contribuera à la préservation d’un espace sans contrôles aux frontières intérieures.

    La proposition de révision du code frontières Schengen qui est présentée ce jour fait suite à des consultations étroites auprès des membres du Parlement européen et des ministres de l’intérieur réunis au sein du forum Schengen.

    Pour en savoir plus

    Documents législatifs :

    – Proposition de règlement modifiant le régime de franchissement des frontières par les personnes : https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/proposal-regulation-rules-governing-movement-persons-across-borders-com-20

    – Proposition de règlement visant à faire face aux situations d’instrumentalisation dans le domaine de la migration et de l’asile : https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/proposal-regulation-situations-instrumentalisation-field-migration-and-asy

    – Questions-réponses : https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/qanda_21_6822

    – Fiche d’information : https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/fs_21_6838

    https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/fr/ip_21_6821

    #Schengen #Espace_Schengen #frontières #frontières_internes #résilience #contrôles_frontaliers #migrations #réfugiés #asile #crise #pandémie #covid-19 #coronavirus #crise_sanitaire #code_Schengen #code_frontières_Schengen #menace_sanitaire #frontières_extérieures #mobilité #restrictions #déplacements #ordre_public #sécurité #sécurité_intérieure #menace_commune #vérifications #coopération_policière #contrôles_temporaires #temporaire #dernier_recours #régions_frontalières #marchandises #voies_réservées #déplacements_non_autorisés #opérations_de_police_conjointes #pacte #surveillance #surveillance_frontalière #points_de_passage #Frontex #Europol #soutien_opérationnel

    –—

    Ajouté dans la métaliste sur les #patrouilles_mixtes ce paragraphe :

    « Lutter contre les déplacements non autorisés au sein de l’espace Schengen : Afin de lutter contre le phénomène de faible ampleur mais constant des déplacements non autorisés, les nouvelles règles créeront une nouvelle procédure pour contrer ce phénomène au moyen d’opérations de police conjointes et permettre aux États membres de réviser ou de conclure de nouveaux accords bilatéraux de réadmission entre eux. Ces mesures complètent celles proposées dans le cadre du nouveau pacte sur la migration et l’asile, en particulier le cadre de solidarité contraignant, et doivent être envisagées en liaison avec elles. »

    https://seenthis.net/messages/910352

    • La Commission européenne propose de réformer les règles de Schengen pour préserver la #libre_circulation

      Elle veut favoriser la coordination entre États membres et adapter le code Schengen aux nouveaux défis que sont les crise sanitaires et l’instrumentalisation de la migration par des pays tiers.

      Ces dernières années, les attaques terroristes, les mouvements migratoires et la pandémie de Covid-19 ont ébranlé le principe de libre circulation en vigueur au sein de l’espace Schengen. Pour faire face à ces événements et phénomènes, les pays Schengen (vingt-deux pays de l’Union européenne et la Suisse, le Liechtenstein, la Norvège et l’Islande) ont réintroduit plus souvent qu’à leur tour des contrôles aux frontières internes de la zone, en ordre dispersé, souvent, et, dans le cas de l’Allemagne, de l’Autriche, de la France, du Danemark, de la Norvège et de la Suède, de manière « provisoirement permanente ».
      Consciente des risques qui pèsent sur le principe de libre circulation, grâce à laquelle 3,5 millions de personnes passent quotidiennement d’un État membre à l’autre, sans contrôle, la Commission européenne a proposé mardi de revoir les règles du Code Schengen pour les adapter aux nouveaux défis. « Nous devons faire en sorte que la fermeture des frontières intérieures soit un ultime recours », a déclaré le vice-président de la Commission en charge de la Promotion du mode de vie européen, Margaritis Schinas.
      Plus de coordination entre États membres

      Pour éviter le chaos connu au début de la pandémie, la Commission propose de revoir la procédure en vertu de laquelle un État membre peut réintroduire des contrôles aux frontières internes de Schengen. Pour les événements « imprévisibles », les contrôles aux frontières pourraient être instaurés pour une période de trente jours, extensibles jusqu’à trois mois (contre dix jours et deux mois actuellement) ; pour les événements prévisibles, elle propose des périodes renouvelables de six mois jusqu’à un maximum de deux ans… ou plus si les circonstances l’exigent. Les États membres devraient évaluer l’impact de ces mesures sur les régions frontalières et tenter de le minimiser - pour les travailleurs frontaliers, au nombre de 1,7 million dans l’Union, et le transit de marchandises essentielle, par exemple - et et envisager des mesures alternatives, comme des contrôles de police ciblés ou une coopération policière transfrontalières.
      Au bout de dix-huit mois, la Commission émettrait un avis sur la nécessité et la proportionnalité de ces mesures.
      De nouvelles règles pour empêcher les migrations secondaires

      L’exécutif européen propose aussi d’établir un cadre légal, actuellement inexistant, pour lutter contre les « migrations secondaires ». L’objectif est de faire en sorte qu’une personne en situation irrégulière dans l’UE qui traverse une frontière interne puisse être renvoyée dans l’État d’où elle vient. Une mesure de nature à satisfaire les pays du Nord, dont la Belgique, qui se plaignent de voir arriver ou transiter sur leur territoire des migrants n’ayant pas déposé de demandes d’asile dans leur pays de « première entrée », souvent situé au sud de l’Europe. La procédure réclame des opérations de police conjointes et des accords de réadmission entre États membres. « Notre réponse la plus systémique serait un accord sur le paquet migratoire », proposé par la Commission en septembre 2020, a cependant insisté le vice-président Schengen. Mais les États membres ne sont pas en mesure de trouver de compromis, en raison de positions trop divergentes.
      L’Europe doit se préparer à de nouvelles instrumentalisations de la migration

      La Commission veut aussi apporter une réponse à l’instrumentalisation de la migration telle que celle pratiquée par la Biélorussie, qui a fait venir des migrants sur son sol pour les envoyer vers la Pologne et les États baltes afin de faire pression sur les Vingt-sept. La Commission veut définir la façon dont les États membres peuvent renforcer la surveillance de leur frontière, limiter les points d’accès à leur territoire, faire appel à la solidarité européenne, tout en respectant les droits fondamentaux des migrants.
      Actuellement, « la Commission peut seulement faire des recommandations qui, si elles sont adoptées par le Conseil, ne sont pas toujours suivies d’effet », constate la commissaire aux Affaires intérieures Ylva Johansson.
      Pour faire face à l’afflux migratoire venu de Biélorussie, la Pologne avait notamment pratiqué le refoulement, contraire aux règles européennes en matière d’asile, sans que l’on donne l’impression de s’en émouvoir à Bruxelles et dans les autres capitales de l’Union. Pour éviter que cela se reproduise, la Commission propose des mesures garantissant la possibilité de demander l’asile, notamment en étendant à quatre semaines la période pour qu’une demande soit enregistrée et traitée. Les demandes pourront être examinée à la frontière, ce qui implique que l’État membre concerné devrait donner l’accès aux zones frontalières aux organisations humanitaires.

      La présidence française du Conseil, qui a fait de la réforme de Schengen une de ses priorités, va essayer de faire progresser le paquet législatif dans les six mois qui viennent. « Ces mesures constituent une ensemble nécessaire et robuste, qui devrait permettre de préserver Schengen intact », a assuré le vice-président Schinas. Non sans souligner que la solution systémique et permanente pour assurer un traitement harmonisé de l’asile et de la migration réside dans le pacte migratoire déposé en 2020 par la Commission et sur lequel les États membres sont actuellement incapables de trouver un compromis, en raison de leurs profondes divergences sur ces questions.

      https://www.lalibre.be/international/europe/2021/12/14/face-aux-risques-qui-pesent-sur-la-libre-circulation-la-commission-europeenn
      #réforme

  • En Pologne, le tribunal constitutionnel juge une partie des traités européens incompatible avec la Constitution
    https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2021/10/07/pologne-le-tribunal-constitutionnel-juge-une-partie-des-traites-europeens-in

    La plus haute juridiction du pays a ainsi affirmé la primauté du droit polonais sur le droit européen. L’Union européenne s’est dite prête à recourir « à tous les outils » pour préserver celle du droit européen.

    Le tribunal constitutionnel polonais a décidé, jeudi 7 octobre, que certains articles des traités européens sont incompatibles avec sa Constitution nationale et sapent la souveraineté du pays. « Des organes européens agissent au-delà de leurs compétences », a ainsi déclaré la présidente du tribunal, Julia Przylebska.

    Cette décision est le dernier rebondissement d’un long affrontement entre la Pologne et l’Union européenne (UE) au sujet de réformes judiciaires controversées introduites par le parti conservateur nationaliste au pouvoir Droit et justice (PiS). Dans son arrêt, Mme Przylebska a énuméré plusieurs articles du traité de l’UE qui, selon elle, sont incompatibles avec la loi suprême polonaise, dénonçant en outre « l’ingérence de la Cour de justice de l’UE dans le système juridique polonais ».

  • Questions – réponses : Stratégie en matière de traitements contre la COVID-19 — Liste de 5 candidats traitements europa.eu
    https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/fr/qanda_21_3301

    Pourquoi avons-nous besoin d’une liste des cinq traitements les plus prometteurs contre la COVID-19 ?
    Tandis que la campagne de vaccination contre la COVID-19 progresse à un bon rythme en Europe, la disponibilité de traitements pour les patients atteints reste limitée, avec jusqu’à présent un seul produit, le #remdesivir, autorisé au niveau de l’UE. Le 6 mai 2021, la Commission européenne a publié la stratégie de l’Union européenne en matière de traitements contre la COVID-19, qui couvre les thèmes de la recherche, du développement, de l’autorisation, de la fabrication et du déploiement des traitements. . . . .
    La Commission prépare également une plateforme de promotion de l’innovation thérapeutique concernant la COVID-19 (un « booster d’innovation ») afin de faire le point et de brosser un tableau clair des projets de traitement contre la COVID-19 qui sont en phase précoce de développement, le but étant de mieux soutenir la mise au point de traitements potentiels.
    Quels sont les critères de sélection des cinq premiers traitements ?
    . . . . .
    Comment passerez-vous de la liste des cinq à un portefeuille de traitements plus large (liste de dix) ?
    . . . . . .

    Quel sera l’avantage de l’inscription d’un médicament sur la liste des traitements ?
    . . . . . . .
    Le mécanisme du portefeuille appuiera l’ambition de la stratégie d’autoriser trois nouveaux traitements d’ici octobre 2021, et éventuellement deux autres d’ici la fin de l’année. Il facilitera par ailleurs la sélection de candidats appropriés pour la passation conjointe de marchés.

    Que se passe-t-il si un médicament n’est pas inscrit sur la liste des cinq traitements ?
    . . . . . .
    Quand les cinq traitements figurant sur la liste seront-ils autorisés ?
    Étant donné que ces médicaments sont à un stade avancé de développement (dans le cadre de la procédure d’évaluation en continu), ils sont très susceptibles de figurer parmi les trois nouveaux traitements contre la COVID-19 qui recevront une autorisation (d’ici octobre 2021), pour autant que les données finales démontrent leur innocuité, leur qualité et leur efficacité.

    Pourquoi la majorité des cinq traitements consistent-ils en des anticorps monoclonaux ?
    En raison de la complexité de la maladie COVID-19, une multitude d’agents sont en cours de développement, tels que des #antiviraux, des #immunomodulateurs et des #anti-inflammatoires. Les candidats traitements se fondent sur les petites molécules, les #anticorps_monoclonaux de même que sur les thérapies cellulaires.
    Les essais cliniques en cours permettent d’examiner l’innocuité et l’efficacité des médicaments en cours de développement à différents stades de la maladie (par exemple, dans le cadre de symptômes précoces, légers, modérés ou sévères de la maladie) et dans différentes sous-populations de patients (ambulatoires et hospitalisés), de même que parmi les personnes exposées à l’infection ou celles qui en souffrent depuis longtemps.
    Quatre des traitements faisant actuellement l’objet d’une évaluation en continu par l’EMA sont effectivement des anticorps monoclonaux antiviraux qui ciblent une protéine (la #protéine_spike) située à la surface du virus SARS-CoV-2 responsable de la COVID-19, empêchant ainsi le virus d’entrer dans les cellules de l’organisme. L’application de la procédure d’évaluation en continu à leur égard a été décidée sur la base de leurs résultats préliminaires prometteurs en études cliniques. Contrairement aux anticorps monoclonaux, le #baricitinib est un #immunosuppresseur (un médicament qui réduit l’activité du système immunitaire) actuellement autorisé pour une utilisation chez l’adulte atteint d’arthrite rhumatoïde modérée à sévère ou de dermatite atopique.

    Que faites-vous en matière de passation conjointe de marchés ?
    Le 8 octobre 2020, la Commission a signé un contrat-cadre de passation conjointe de marché avec l’entreprise pharmaceutique #Gilead pour la fourniture d’un maximum de 500 000 traitements au remdesivir, le seul médicament bénéficiant d’une autorisation de mise sur le marché conditionnelle à l’échelle de l’UE pour le traitement des patients atteints de COVID-19 nécessitant un apport d’oxygène. Tous les pays participants ont pu passer commande pour se procurer directement du remdesivir. La Commission a également acheté et distribué des doses aux États membres pour un montant total de 70 millions d’euros. Depuis la fin du mois d’octobre 2020, elle a signé plus de 70 contrats de passation conjointe de marché pour 19 médicaments (analgésiques, antibiotiques, relaxants musculaires, anesthésiques, médicaments de réanimation), y compris de la dexaméthasone, pour traiter les cas plus graves de COVID-19 dans les services de soins intensifs.

    Un marché groupé a été signé en avril 2021 pour le produit d’association du #casirivimab et de l’ #imdevimab, et des négociations relatives à l’acquisition conjointe d’autres anticorps monoclonaux sont en cours.

    #virus_arn #covid-19 #santé #coronavirus #confinement #crise_sanitaire #pandémie #pass_sanitaire #variant #médicament

    Une information Batia : https://www.facebook.com/groups/batiamourtsou/posts/10159461935001125/?__cft__[0]=AZX_fYQs7RR-6VthhetnRkhGfZIWbNJl-UBAJ3YMEwFj76fp6kbFSSLa-xjoOO

  • A ne pas oublier...

    „I thank #Greece for being our European #shield

    Dixit #Ursula_von_der_Leyen, March 2020.

    Phrase complète:

    Those who seek to test Europe’s unity will be disappointed. We will hold the line and our unity will prevail. Now is the time for concerted action and cool heads and acting based on our values. Turkey is not an enemy and people are not just means to reach a goal. We would all do well to remember both in the days to come. I thank Greece for being our European #ασπίδα [English: #shield] in these times.

    Source:
    https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/statement_20_380

    voir aussi:
    https://seenthis.net/messages/830355

    #bouclier #internal_externalization #Grèce #asile #migrations #frontières #EU #UE #Union_européenne #réfugiés #von_der_Leyen

    ping @isskein @karine4

    • –-> 05.06.2021 :

      Link here of the speech [in Greek, google translation OK] of #Margaritis_Schinas in Komotini yesterday.
      Among other things: ’Evros, thrace, are now the symbol of the “European shield”...

      https://twitter.com/lk2015r/status/1401198056603856896

      –—

      Σχοινάς : Σύμβολο της “ευρωπαϊκής ασπίδας” ο Έβρος και η Θράκη

      Ο αντιπρόεδρος της Ευρωπαϊκής Επιτροπής, Μαργαρίτης Σχοινάς, πραγματοποίησε χθες βράδυ ομιλία σε εκδήλωση στο Αρχαιολογικό Μουσείο Κομοτηνής, με τη συμμετοχή εκπροσώπων των τοπικών φορέων.

      Ο κ.Σχοινάς, που συνεχίζει σήμερα την διήμερη περιοδεία του στην Θράκη και χθες επισκέφθηκε το νομό Έβρου, συνοδευόμενος από τον Περιφερειάρχη Ανατολικής Μακεδονίας και Θράκης Χρήστο Μέτιο, τόνισε ότι :

      “Η Θράκη της ισότητας είναι πρότυπο κοινής συμβίωσης χριστιανών και μουσουλμάνων, για όλη την Ευρώπη, διαπολιτισμικής και διαθρησκευτικής συνεργασίας, πολιτικής και κοινωνικής αντιπροσώπευσης στη δημόσια ζωή”, υπογράμμισε ο αντιπρόεδρος της Ευρωπαϊκής Επιτροπής, Μαργαρίτης Σχοινάς.

      “Η Θράκη είναι η καρδιά του πολιτικού, δημοκρατικού και κοινωνικού, κοινού ευρωπαϊκού στοιχείου, καθρεφτίζει το σπουδαίο πολυπολιτισμικό μας ψηφιδωτό, αλλά και την σπουδαιότητα των κοινωνικών μας κατακτήσεων, τον ευρωπαϊκό τρόπο ζωής που αποτελείται από ένα μοναδικό πλαίσιο αρχών και αξιών που μόνο εδώ, στην Ευρώπη, μπορεί κάποιος να τις βρει συγκεντρωμένες, όλες μαζί.”, είπε ο κ. Σχοινάς και συνέχισε : “Ο ευρωπαϊκός τρόπος ζωής είναι οι κατακτήσεις που πετύχαμε όλοι μαζί οι Ευρωπαίοι διαχρονικά για να δημιουργήσουμε το αρτιότερο πολιτικό σύστημα, το πιο σύγχρονο δημοκρατικό πλαίσιο που γνώρισε ποτέ ο κόσμος και που η Ελλάδα έκανε κτήμα της τα τελευταία 40 χρόνια της ένταξης της στην Ενωμένη Ευρώπη, που περήφανα γιορτάζουμε φέτος όλοι οι Έλληνες μαζί”.

      Η Θράκη στην καρδιά του Ευρωπαϊκού Τρόπου Ζωής
      Όπως σημείωσε, ο ευρωπαϊκός τρόπος ζωής περιλαμβάνει την ασφάλεια, τη δημόσια υγεία, το μεταναστευτικό, την εκπαίδευση, τις δεξιότητες, την ενσωμάτωση, τον Πολιτισμό, τον διαθρησκευτικό διάλογο και την συνύπαρξη, την ανεκτικότητα στο διαφορετικό και την καταπολέμηση του ρατσισμού, της μισαλλοδοξίας, του αντισημιτισμού ή κάθε άλλης μορφής θρησκευτικού εξτρεμισμού – που δεν ταιριάζουν με την ποικιλόμορφη ευρωπαϊκή μας ταυτότητα, τις αξίες, τις ευκαιρίες, την κινητικότητα, τον σεβασμό στην ιστορική μας ταυτότητα αλλά και τα ανθρώπινα δικαιώματα.

      “Τα τελευταία σαράντα χρόνια αποτελούν τη μακρύτερη περίοδο ειρήνης, δημοκρατίας και ευημερίας που γνώρισαν οι Έλληνες, κάθε θρησκεύματος, κάθε φύλου, κάθε καταγωγής ή κοινωνικής τάξης”, τόνισε και για τη Θράκη σημείωσε πως αν και βρίσκεται στα σύνορα της Ευρώπης, “είναι η καρδιά της Ευρώπης, ζωτική της περιφέρεια και φάρος ελπίδας για πολλές άλλες περιοχές με συναφή χαρακτηριστικά. Η Θράκη είναι στη καρδιά του ευρωπαϊκού τρόπου ζωής και χάρις στα ευρωπαϊκά εργαλεία για την εκπαίδευση, την ενσωμάτωση, την συνεργασία, την κινητικότητα, την πολιτιστική δημιουργία είναι σήμερα υπόδειγμα ισονομίας και ισοπολιτείας”.

      Ανέφερε πως από την αρχή της θητείας της η νέα Ευρωπαϊκή Επιτροπή εργάζεται σκληρά για να εμπλουτίσει το κεκτημένο της Ευρώπης που δημιουργεί ευκαιρίες για όλους. Κάνει χρήση πρωτοβουλιών, όπως το νέο Θεματολόγιο για τις δεξιότητες, που κατατέθηκε το καλοκαίρι, και μέσω αυτού θέλουμε να βοηθήσει όλους τους Eυρωπαίους πολίτες να προετοιμαστούν για την επανάσταση δεξιοτήτων που θα φέρει η πράσινη και ψηφιακή εποχή.

      Προγράμματα που προωθεί η Κομισιόν στην Ανατολική Μακεδονία – Θράκη
      Αυτό θα γίνει, μεταξύ άλλων, και μέσω του προγράμματος Erasmus του οποίου διπλασίασε τους πόρους και μιας νέας οικογένειας υποστηρικτικών μέσων, τον Ενιαίο Ευρωπαϊκό Χώρο Εκπαίδευσης, που φιλοδοξεί να συγκροτήσουμε μαζί με τα κράτη μέλη, ως ένα εξαιρετικό οικοσύστημα μάθησης και αριστείας, προσβάσιμο και ανοιχτό σε όλους, που θα διευκολύνει την κινητικότητα στην εκπαίδευση, την κατάρτιση, τις επαγγελματικές συνεργασίες, την κοινωνική ένταξη και ενσωμάτωση.

      Παρέθεσε αναλυτικά στοιχεία, σύμφωνα με τα οποία :

      Περισσότερες από 2.500 υποτροφίες κινητικότητας έχουν χορηγηθεί μέσω του Δημοκρίτειου Πανεπιστημίου Θράκης (ΔΠΘ), του Διεθνούς Πανεπιστημίου και του ΤΕΙ Καβάλας σε φοιτητές, διδακτικό προσωπικό και εργαζόμενους σε προγράμματα στην Ελλάδα, την Γαλλία, την Γερμανία, την Ισπανία, την Ιταλία, την Κύπρο, την Πολωνία, την Ρουμανία, την Τσεχία, την Βουλγαρία, την Τουρκία.
      Το Δημοκρίτειο Πανεπιστήμιο συμμετέχει στα προγράμματα Καινοτομίας και Έξυπνης Εξειδίκευσης για τα οποία σκοπεύουμε να εκδώσουμε σχετική έκθεση το ερχόμενο καλοκαίρι.
      Η Ελλάδα, κυρίως στα προγράμματα του Ορίζοντα 2020, έχει να επιδείξει μια ακόμη ιστορία επιτυχίας μιας και είναι στην πρώτη δεκάδα απορροφητικότητας με 1,62 δισ. ευρώ στους 27 συν το Ηνωμένο Βασίλειο.

      Η Ανατολική Μακεδονία και Θράκη συμμετέχει μέσω του ΔΠΘ, των ΟΤΑ αλλά και ιδιωτών και τη νέα προγραμματική περίοδο, με το διευρυμένο πρόγραμμα Ορίζοντας Ευρώπη όπου θα υπάρχουν ακόμη μεγαλύτερες δυνατότητες για την χρηματοδότηση της Καινοτομίας και της Έρευνας με περισσότερα κονδύλια για όλη την χώρα αλλά και την δική σας περιφέρεια. Μέχρι στιγμής η Ανατολική Μακεδονία και Θράκη έχει προσελκύσει κεφάλαια 6,4 εκατ. ευρώ που είμαι σίγουρος ότι θα πολλαπλασιαστούν.
      Συστατικό κομμάτι της πολιτικής μας που απαντά στην ενίσχυση των δεξιοτήτων και της εκπαίδευσης καλύπτουμε με το Σχέδιο Δράσης για την Ψηφιακή Εκπαίδευση, που εγκρίναμε τον περασμένο Σεπτέμβριο, και μπορεί να υποστηρίξει την χώρα στην ανάπτυξη των ψηφιακών δεξιοτήτων και υποδομών.

      Με τα άλματα που έχει κάνει η χώρα τους τελευταίους μήνες στην ψηφιοποίηση και την αποτελεσματικότητα των υπηρεσιών μπορεί να εκμεταλλευτεί πλήρως τα νέα αυτά ευρωπαϊκά εργαλεία για τη χορήγηση βασικών – αλλά και πιο εξειδικευμένων – ψηφιακών δεξιοτήτων στους συμπολίτες μας. Για να επιτύχουμε μια πραγματική ψηφιακή επανάσταση δεν αρκεί να επενδύσουμε μόνο σε τεχνολογίες και υποδομές, αλλά – πρωτίστως – σε ανθρώπους. Όλους τους ανθρώπους, χωρίς αποκλεισμούς, ενδιάμεσους και ημέτερους.
      Εκτός από την ψηφιακή μετάβαση, την ασφάλεια και το μεταναστευτικό που αποτελούν δομικά συστατικά του δικού του χαρτοφυλακίου, ο κ. Σχοινάς είπε ότι η Πράσινη Συμφωνία αποτελεί μια εξίσου σπουδαία προτεραιότητα που παρέμεινε ψηλά στη ατζέντα παρά το ηλεκτρικό σοκ που επέφερε η πρωτοφανής πανδημία που χτύπησε την ανθρωπότητα. Επίσης, μέσα από την ενίσχυση του μοναδικού φυσικού κάλους της Θράκης μπορούν να προκύψουν επιπλέον ευκαιρίες παράλληλα με την προστασία της βιοποικιλότητας για την οποία έχουμε ήδη συγχρηματοδοτήσει 42,8 εκατομμύρια ευρώ από το πρόγραμμα LIFE.Σε λίγο καιρό, πιθανότατα εντός του Ιουνίου θα ανοίξει και για νέες συμμετοχές-ανοιχτές και σε προτάσεις που αφορούν την ενέργεια. Μέσα από συνέργειες με τα συναφή εκπαιδευτικά ιδρύματα του ΔΠΘ που παράγουν σπουδαίο ερευνητικό έργο, αλλά και ΣΔΙΤ, με την δική μας χρηματοδότηση μπορεί να δοθεί περαιτέρω έμφαση σε δράσεις για τον αγροτοδιατροφικό κλάδο, την έξυπνη και αειφόρο γεωργία και δασοκομία, το θαλάσσιο και παράκτιο περιβάλλον, τη βιοοικονομία, τα ποτάμια και τους υδροφόρους ορίζοντες της περιοχής.

      Μέσω του προγράμματος αγροτικής ανάπτυξης έχουμε ήδη στηρίξει 586.000 αγρότες και γεωργικές επιχειρήσεις, 29.000 νέους ενώ 25.000 αγρότες έχουν καταρτιστεί ή επιμορφωθεί. Το 9,8% των εγκεκριμένων προγραμμάτων και το 10,9% των συνολικών πληρωμών αφορούν την Ανατολική Μακεδονία και Θράκη. Ενώ έχουμε φροντίσει να προστατεύσουμε δεκάδες τοπικά προϊόντα της πατρίδας μας πολλά από τα οποία δικά σας όπως το Ούζο Θράκης, κρασιά από τους αμπελώνες όλων των νομών της περιφέρειας, τον Ίσμαρο την Δράμα, ελιές από την Θάσο, τις περίφημες πατάτες και τα φασόλια Νευροκοπίου και άλλα πολλά που προσθέτουν σημαντικά οφέλη στην τοπική παραγωγή και οικονομία. Για την περίοδο 2021-2027, η Ελλάδα θα επωφεληθεί από συνολική κατανομή της 19,4 δισεκατομμυρίων ευρώ που έχουμε αποφασίσει για την Κοινή Γεωργική Παραγωγή στην Ευρώπη και ήδη δουλεύουμε ως Ευρωπαϊκή Επιτροπή στενά με τις εθνικές αρχές για την κατάρτιση και την έγκριση της νέας περιόδου.

      Σχετικά με την Περιφέρεια Ανατολικής Μακεδονίας και Θράκης είπε ότι διαθέτει ένα μοναδικό σύνολο ιδιαιτεροτήτων που μπορούν να συνδράμουν ουσιαστικά στην εξέλιξη και τον εκσυγχρονισμό της περιοχής, όπως :

      Η μεταποιητική της παράδοση από την ιστορική μεταξουργία στο Σουφλί.
      Η γεωστρατηγική και οικονομική σημασία των ενεργειακών δικτύων που τέμνουν την περιοχή αλλά και οι προοπτικές των λιμανιών της Αλεξανδρούπολης και της Καβάλας – με την δεδομένη στήριξη της Ευρώπης – μπορούν να εκτοξεύσουν τον παραγωγικό ιστό όχι μόνο της Περιφέρειας αλλά της ευρύτερης περιοχής εντός και εκτός συνόρων. Όλα αυτά μαζί με τον δυναμισμό των επιχειρήσεων που έχουν ήδη επενδύσει στην περιοχή κι έχουν δημιουργήσει σημαντικές παραγωγικές δομές, με τα πανεπιστημιακά ιδρύματα και τα εργαστήρια που τονώνονται συνεχώς με το δυναμισμό των νέων που σπουδάζουν και δημιουργούν εδώ.

      Η Ευρώπη αποδεδειγμένα βρίσκεται στο πλευρό της περιφέρειας, των δήμων και των επιχειρήσεων της περιοχής και σχεδόν 460 εκατομμύρια ευρώ κατευθύνθηκαν στην Ανατολική Μακεδονία και Θράκη την περίοδο 2014-2020 από τα Ευρωπαϊκά Διαρθρωτικά Ταμεία και αλλάζουν τη φυσιογνωμία του τόπου.

      άλλαξε ουσιαστικά τις ζωές μας, την πορεία του κόσμου, όπως τον γνωρίζαμε, οδήγησε σε τομές στην ευρωπαϊκή πολιτική που ποτέ ξανά δεν τολμήσαμε και τόνισε πως “στην τωρινή δύσκολη συγκυρία ίσως τη κρισιμότερη σε βάθος γενεών, χτίζουμε το κοινό μας μέλλον σε τέσσερα κρίσιμα ευρωπαϊκά εργοτάξια”.

      Στην Υγεία. Στην πρώτη γραμμή της μάχης μεα ασφαλή και προσβάσιμα σε όλους ακόμη και εκτός Ευρώπης μιας και η ΕΕ είναι η μοναδική έως σήμερα που εξάγει σχεδόν τον ίδιο αριθμό εμβολίων που έχει εξασφαλισμένα ήδη έως το 2023 για τους πολίτες της και στον υπόλοιπο κόσμο.

      Με τη νέα Ευρωπαϊκή Ένωση Υγείας που το εν εξελίξει εμβολιαστικό πρόγραμμα – το μεγαλύτερο στην ιστορία της ανθρωπότητας με εμβόλιθα μας θωρακίσει στις υγειονομικές προκλήσεις του αύριο, αλλά και την επέκταση της κοινής προμήθειας σε θεραπευτικά σκευάσματα κατά του COVID-19 που ήδη εγκρίναμε πριν λίγες εβδομάδες. Από τον ευρωπαϊκό προϋπολογισμό σήμερα υποστηρίζουμε κινητές μονάδες υγείας, τα εμβολιαστικά κέντρα, τα διαγνωστικά testcenters.

      Στο σημείο αυτό έκανε ειδική αναφορά στο Πανεπιστημιακό Νοσοκομείο Αλεξανδρούπολης που επισκέφθηκε το μεσημέρι και υπογράμμισε : “Όλα τα νοσοκομεία της περιφέρειας και ιδιαίτερα το Πανεπιστημιακό της Αλεξανδρούπολης που επισκέφτηκα νωρίτερα ως το κέντρο αναφοράς για την πανδημία έχουν ενισχυθεί σημαντικά από τις έκτακτες ενισχύσεις ενώ είναι το μοναδικό δημόσιο νοσοκομείο στη Βόρεια Ελλάδα (περίπου 3,1 εκατομμύρια πολίτες) με δυνατότητες ενδοαγγειακής θεραπείας, με αποτέλεσμα τη περίθαλψη ασθενών από όλους τους νομούς της Μακεδονίας και της Θράκης χάρις στη διαχρονική του χρηματοδότηση από τα εργαλεία της Ευρωπαϊκής Επιτροπής”.

      Μίλησε για το Πιστοποιητικό Κινητικότητας, το χαρακτήρισε “ένα νέο πακέτο για την ασφαλή επανέναρξη των μετακινήσεων, στο οποίο η Ελλάδα και ο πρωθυπουργός της πρωτοστάτησαν” και συμπλήρωσε : “Δεν πρόκειται μόνο για ένα πιστοποιητικό εμβολιασμού, αλλά ένα κλειδί ασφαλείας για την επάνοδο στην κανονικότητα, τον τουρισμό και την κινητικότητα. Την προηγούμενη εβδομάδα εγκαινιάσαμε μαζί με τον πρωθυπουργό και τον Σαρλ Μισέλ, τον πρόεδρο του Ευρωπαϊκού Συμβουλίου, και τον αρμόδιο υπουργό την ελληνική του έκδοση στο Υπουργείο Ψηφιακής Διακυβέρνησης στην Αθήνα. Ένα κλειδί ασφαλείας για την δημόσια υγεία αλλά και τις μετακινήσεις και τον τουρισμό. Μάλιστα, όταν συνήθως η νομοθετική διαδικασία στην ευρωπαϊκή γραφειοκρατία ολοκληρώνεται περίπου σε 2 χρόνια, το συγκεκριμένο fasttrack πιστοποιητικό – χωρίς εκπτώσεις στα προσωπικά δεδομένα – το ολοκληρώσαμε μόλις σε 2 μήνες”.

      Στη θωράκιση της οικονομίας με ιστορικά νέα εργαλεία και αποφάσεις. Μαθαίνοντας από τα λάθη της προηγούμενης κρίσης, αναστείλαμε τους δημοσιονομικούς περιορισμούς του Συμφώνου Σταθερότητας για τρία χρόνια, δίνοντας στα κράτη μέλη πλήρη ευελιξία να στηρίξουν τις οικονομίες τους όσο χρειάζονται μέχρι να γυρίσουν στα προ-κρίσης επίπεδα.
      Δημιουργήσαμε σε χρόνο ρεκόρ ένα νέο χρηματοδοτικό εργαλείο αξίας 100 δισ. ευρώ για την στήριξη της απασχόλησης (SURE) το οποίο παρέχει στην Ελλάδα άνω των 5 δισ. ευρώ μέσω του προγράμματος Συν-Εργασία. Η Ευρωπαϊκή Κεντρική Τράπεζα ενίσχυσε τις προσπάθειες των χωρών μας με τεράστιο πρόγραμμα αγορών ομολόγων αξίας 1.8 τρισ. ευρώ, μειώνοντας το κόστος δανεισμού σε ιστορικά χαμηλά επίπεδα για περιπτώσεις όπως η Ελλάδα.

      Ως έκτακτα μέτρα για την στήριξη της τοπικής αγοράς στην Περιφέρεια έχουν ήδη επιλεγεί 10000 επιχειρήσεις με συνολικό στόχο τις 25000 και στις οποίες επενδύουμε 65 εκατομμύρια από τους διαθέσιμους πόρους του Ευρωπαϊκού Ταμείου Περιφερειακής Ανάπτυξης. Για την αντιμετώπιση των κοινωνικοοικονομικών συνεπειών της κρίσης από την πανδημία και για την παροχή στήριξης στις πληγείσες μικρομεσαίες επιχειρήσεις. Επίσης, ενισχύουμε 41 επενδυτικά Project καινοτομίας, με σχεδόν 58 εκατομμύρια για δράσεις κοινωνικής ενσωμάτωσης και περίπου 6 εκατομμύρια για την στήριξη της απασχόλησης.

      Και πάνω απ’ όλα, δημιουργήσαμε το εμβληματικό και χωρίς προηγούμενο Σχέδιο Ανάκαμψης με τα 750 δισ. ευρώ του κοινού δανεισμού, που μαζί με το πολυετές δημοσιονομικό πλαίσιο για την περίοδο 2021-2027, δημιουργεί ένα υπερόπλο σχεδόν 2 τρισ. ευρώ για την οικονομική ανάκαμψη, πολλαπλάσιο του Πακέτου Μάρσαλ σε πραγματικούς όρους.

      Αναλογικά με το μέγεθος της οικονομίας της, η Ελλάδα θα είναι η 4η πιο ευνοημένη χώρα, λαμβάνοντας πάνω από 60 δισ. ευρώ σε επιδοτήσεις, ποσό που αντιστοιχεί στο ένα τρίτο του προ-κρίσης εθνικού προϊόντος μας.

      Εδώ και πάλι η Ελλάδα βγήκε μπροστά με παρρησία, καταθέτοντας δεύτερη σε όλη την Ευρώπη το Εθνικό της Σχέδιο Ανάκαμψης και Ανθεκτικότητας « Ελλάδα 2.0 » για την αξιοποίηση αυτών των κονδυλιών.

      Όπως προδίδει η ονομασία του, το Σχέδιο αποτελεί μια ιστορική ευκαιρία για την δημιουργία μίας νέας Ελλάδας : σύγχρονης, εξωστρεφούς, και έτοιμης να ανταποκριθεί όχι μόνο στις τρέχουσες επιπτώσεις της πανδημίας αλλά και στις παγκόσμιες επαναστάσεις που είναι ήδη εδώ όπως η Πράσινη Συμφωνία και η Ψηφιακή Μετάβαση που προανέφερα, που πλέον και ο πιο δύσπιστος καταλαβαίνει ότι η Ελλάδα έχει κάνει άλματα.

      Με λίγα λόγια, ένα σχέδιο Ελληνικό, Made in EU Greece, που γράψαμε εμείς, όχι άλλοι για μας και που αφορά κάθε Ελληνίδα και Έλληνα. Να είστε σίγουροι ότι προβάλλει μια Ελληνική, με περισσότερη Ευρώπη, δεκαετία. Το ελληνικό σχέδιο θα είναι από τα πρώτα που θα εγκριθούν τις επόμενες ημέρες με έναν ιδιαίτερο πολιτικό ευρωπαϊκό συμβολισμό.

      Σύμβολο της “ευρωπαϊκής ασπίδας” ο Εβρος
      Στη Μετανάστευση. “Εδώ επιτρέψτε μου έναν ιδιαίτερο προσωπικό τόνο, μιας και λίγες μέρες πριν μπει ο κορονοϊός στη ζωή μας, η Ελλάδα υπερασπιζόταν τα ευρωπαϊκά σύνορα με την ιστορική, εμβληματική παρουσία της ευρωπαϊκής ηγεσίας στο πλευρό του πρωθυπουργού στον Έβρο. Που σήμερα, Ευρωπαίοι συνοριοφύλακες και ακτοφύλακες δεν προστατεύουν μόνο τα κοινά μας σύνορα αλλά και γίνονται ανάχωμα στην εργαλειοποίηση κάθε είδους σκοπιμότητας εκμετάλλευση αθώων συνανθρώπων μας. Ποτέ ξανά φίλες και φίλοι, δεν έχει συστρατευτεί σύσσωμη η ευρωπαϊκή ηγεσία στον ίδιο τόπο, στο μέτωπο της κρίσης.

      Ο Έβρος, η Θράκη αποτελεί πλέον το σύμβολο της « ευρωπαϊκής ασπίδας », την καρδιά της ευρωπαϊκής άμυνας απέναντι σε κάθε επίδοξο και αστάθμητο παράγοντα. Στην περιοχή του Έβρου, η Frontex συνεργάζεται με τα τοπικά κέντρα συντονισμού της Ελληνικής Αστυνομίας στην Ορεστιάδα και την Αλεξανδρούπολη, όπου πραγματοποιείται η καθημερινή διοίκηση και ο έλεγχος των επιχειρησιακών δραστηριοτήτων. Η περιοχή φιλοξενεί σήμερα τη μεγαλύτερη εγκατάσταση προστασίας χερσαίων συνόρων στην Ευρώπη και περιλαμβάνει και τις τρεις κύριες κατηγορίες προσωπικού του Frontex, δηλαδή : Με αξιωματικούς του μόνιμου σώματος του Frontex, παρουσία δυνάμεων από άλλα κράτη μέλη με μακροπρόθεσμο σχεδιασμό αλλά και ορισμένου βραχυπρόθεσμου χρονικού πλαισίου ανάπτυξης. Οπως είπε, ξεκίνησε την περιοδεία του στη Θράκη από τα σύνορα στον Εβρο, όπου η Frontex αναπτύσσει δυνάμεις με οχήματα, φορτηγά με θερμικές κάμερες, σκοπούς με συνοδεία σκύλων και ειδικούς σε θέματα επιχειρησιακά.
      “Η πρόταση μας για ένα νέο « Σύμφωνο Αλληλεγγύης » για την μετανάστευση και το άσυλο που βρίσκεται ήδη στη διαπραγμάτευση ανάμεσα στα κράτη μέλη στο Συμβούλιο Υπουργών, προτείνει δίκαιο καταμερισμό των βαρών και των ευθυνών, αναβαθμίζει την Ευρώπη ως έναν προορισμό ασύλου αλλά μόνο για αυτούς που αποδεδειγμένα έχουν ανάγκη”, σημείωσε και πρόσθεσε : “Με το Σύμφωνο, στόχος μας είναι να δημιουργήσουμε μια εντελώς νέα αρχιτεκτονική, βασισμένη στη συνολική προσέγγιση του μεταναστευτικού. Επαναλαμβάνω : η αλληλεγγύη και ο επιμερισμός των βαρών θα γίνει ο κανόνας. Μέσα από ένα κυκλικό σύστημα όπου τα επιμέρους στοιχεία του Συμφώνου συνδέονται λειτουργικά : διαδικασίες διαλογής, συνόρων, ασύλου, επιστροφών, αλληλεγγύης – όλα μαζί, αδιάρρηκτα.

      Γυρνάμε σελίδα σε ένα σύστημα που δεν δούλεψε, που δεν περιποιεί τιμή στην Ευρώπη. Αλλάζουμε το υπόδειγμα, διασφαλίζοντας ότι οι προκλήσεις της μετανάστευσης αντιμετωπίζονται συνολικά και διεξοδικά – εντός και εκτός της Ένωσης. Σήμερα, έχουμε για πρώτη φορά μετά από χρόνια την ευκαιρία μίας ανθεκτικής, ενιαίας, συνεκτικής μεταναστευτικής πολιτικής. Μια ευκαιρία που δεν πρέπει να χαθεί”.

      Στη γεωπολιτική της Ευρώπης. “Ας ξεκινήσουμε με μια απλή παραδοχή : παρ’ όλες τις ατέλειες, τις ελλείψεις, τα όποια λάθη μας, αυτός ο σύγχρονος κόσμος πάει καλύτερα χάρις και στην Ευρώπη”, είπε και συνέχισε : “Να παραδεχτούμε υπερήφανα ότι μας αναγνωρίζει ο υπόλοιπος κόσμος, ότι η Ευρώπη είναι πάντα συνεπής στην υπεράσπιση ενός πολυμερούς, βασισμένου σε κανόνες δικαίου κόσμου. Είμαστε οι μεγαλύτεροι δωρητές αναπτυξιακής βοήθειας στον αναπτυσσόμενο κόσμο οι μεγαλύτεροι εξαγωγείς και χορηγοί εμβολίων, πρωταγωνιστές στη μάχη κατά της κλιματικής αλλαγής, πρότυπο δημοκρατικών και κοινωνικών δικαιωμάτων, υπερασπιστές της ειρήνης και δημοκρατίας παντού στον κόσμο. Η Ευρώπη έχει πολλά ατού για να μείνει αμέτοχη. Την μεγαλύτερη εσωτερική αγορά και το δεύτερο νόμισμα στον κόσμο, το μοντέλο της οικονομίας της αγοράς με ανοικτές αγορές αλλά και συστήματα υγείας και πρόνοιας για όλους, την προστασία των προσωπικών δεδομένων και των ανθρώπινων δικαιωμάτων”.
      Από την “ευρωπαϊκή αθωότητα” στην “ευρωπαϊκή ωριμότητα”
      Ο κ. Σχοινάς επισήμανε ότι η κρίση του COVID επιτάχυνε την πολιτική μετάβαση μας από την περίοδο “ευρωπαϊκής αθωότητας » σε εκείνη της « ευρωπαϊκής ωριμότητας », ίσως το τέλος μιας εποχής όπου η Ευρωπαϊκή Ένωση εθεωρείτο παίκτης αποκλειστικά « ήπιας δύναμης » στην γεωστρατηγική σκακιέρα.

      “Η Ελλάδα και σε αυτό το σημείο έχει αποδείξει ότι μπορεί να διαδραματίσει ρόλο πρωταγωνιστικό. Οι σθεναρές ελληνικές τοποθετήσεις στα ζητήματα που αφορούν την Ανατολική Μεσόγειο, η εποικοδομητική στάση στα Βαλκάνια, ο άξονας Φιλίας στον Κόλπο και το εύρος των δεσμών της στον Εύξεινο Πόντο και τον Καύκασο. Η επιμονή της στο κράτος δικαίου και το διεθνές κεκτημένο και η ενεργή ανάμειξη της χώρας στα στρατηγικής σημασίας ερωτήματα στα οποία καλείται να δώσει απάντηση η Ευρώπη, την καθιστούν σημαντική φωνή το επόμενο διάστημα. Αυτή η 70χρονη πορεία μας θυμίζει και κάτι άλλο : οι ευρωπαϊκές επιτυχίες έρχονται μόνο όταν τολμάμε, σπάνια όταν συμβιβαζόμαστε. Η τόλμη πάντα τέμνει τις εξελίξεις, οι συμβιβασμοί στον χαμηλότερο κοινό παρονομαστή συνήθως μετακυλούν τα προβλήματα. Η ενιαία εσωτερική αγορά, η γέννηση της ΟΝΕ και του ευρώ, το Σένγκεν και η Frontex, η δημιουργία του ESM, τα εμβόλια και το Ταμείο Ανάπτυξης, η Ευρωπαϊκή Πολιτική Προστασία και η κλιματικά ουδέτερη και ψηφιακά ώριμη Ευρώπη μας δείχνουν τον αυτονόητο δρόμο”, τόνισε.

      Στην αρχή της ομιλίας του ο αντιπρόεδρος της Κομισιόν μίλησε για τη Θράκη στη διαδρομή των αιώνων. Η Θράκη ήταν αδελφή της Ευρώπης κατά την ελληνική μυθολογία, έδωσε το όνομα της στη περιοχή που φιλοξένησε τον προστάτη των Θρακών, ‘Αρη, και μοιράζεται πολλούς κοινούς ηγεμόνες με τις γειτονικές περιοχές της Μακεδονίας, είπε. Η ευρύτερη περιοχή από τον Στρυμόνα στον Νέστο και από το Παγγαίο στην οροσειρά της Ροδόπης ως την Δαδιά και τον Έβρο, την χερσαία είσοδο της Ενωμένης Ευρώπης αναβλύζουν το σπουδαίο πέρασμα από την αρχαία Ελλάδα στην Ρωμαϊκή εποχή του πολυμήχανου Σπάρτακου και μετέπειτα στο Βυζάντιο με τις πολλές δυναστείες που είχαν την καταγωγή τους από τον τόπο αυτό.

      Εποχές που γέννησαν τις αρχές και τις αξίες της ίδιας της Ευρώπης και του σύγχρονου δυτικού πολιτισμού. Στις περιοχές αυτές που ενέπνευσαν τις αναζητήσεις του Λευκίππου, του Δημόκριτου που μίλησε για τους διαφορετικούς κόσμους στο σύμπαν και τον Πρωταγόρα, όλοι τους παιδιά των Αβδήρων. Την Ρωμαϊκή Εγνατία, τις τραγωδίες που αντήχησαν στα αρχαία θέατρα των Φιλίππων και της Μαρώνειας. Τον Απόστολο Παύλο που δίδαξε στις περιοχές αυτές, την Αγία Λυδία που βαφτίστηκε ως η πρώτη χριστιανή στην Ευρώπη, αλλά και την οθωμανική περίοδο που συνέθεσε στο αρχιτεκτονικό και μνημειακό τοπίο της περιοχής όπως το περιγράφει στις αναφορές του ο σπουδαίος χρονικογράφος Εβλιγιά Τσελεμπί, το εμβληματικό τέμενος του Διδυμοτείχου για παράδειγμα και αλλά πολλά στην περιοχή.

      Ανθρωποι των επιστημών και του πνεύματος όπως ο Καραθεοδωρής, ο Βιζυηνός ή ευεργέτες όπως ο Μαρασλής και ο Ευγενίδης που συνέβαλαν τα μέγιστα στην Ελλάδα, την Οθωμανική Αυτοκρατορία αλλά και την δύση και την ευρύτερη περιοχή της Μεσογείου συμβάλλοντας στην εξέλιξη και άλλων λαών ή περιοχών.

      Πριν την ομιλία ο κ. Σχοινάς συναντήθηκε με τον Περιφερειάρχη Ανατολικής Μακεδονίας και Θράκης Χρήστο Μέτιο, ο οποίος τον συνοδεύει σε όλη την διήμερη περιοδεία του στην Θράκη.

      https://www.evros-news.gr/2021/06/05/%cf%83%cf%87%ce%bf%ce%b9%ce%bd%ce%ac%cf%82-%cf%83%cf%8d%ce%bc%ce%b2%ce%bf

    • EU: Frontex splashes out: millions of euros for new technology and equipment (19.06.2020)

      The approval of the new #Frontex_Regulation in November 2019 implied an increase of competences, budget and capabilities for the EU’s border agency, which is now equipping itself with increased means to monitor events and developments at the borders and beyond, as well as renewing its IT systems to improve the management of the reams of data to which it will have access.

      In 2020 Frontex’s #budget grew to €420.6 million, an increase of over 34% compared to 2019. The European Commission has proposed that in the next EU budget (formally known as the Multiannual Financial Framework or MFF, covering 2021-27) €11 billion will be made available to the agency, although legal negotiations are ongoing and have hit significant stumbling blocks due to Brexit, the COVID-19 pandemic and political disagreements.

      Nevertheless, the increase for this year has clearly provided a number of opportunities for Frontex. For instance, it has already agreed contracts worth €28 million for the acquisition of dozens of vehicles equipped with thermal and day cameras, surveillance radar and sensors.

      According to the contract for the provision of Mobile Surveillance Systems, these new tools will be used “for detection, identification and recognising of objects of interest e.g. human beings and/or groups of people, vehicles moving across the border (land and sea), as well as vessels sailing within the coastal areas, and other objects identified as objects of interest”. [1]

      Frontex has also published a call for tenders for Maritime Analysis Tools, worth a total of up to €2.6 million. With this, Frontex seeks to improve access to “big data” for maritime analysis. [2] The objective of deploying these tools is to enhance Frontex’s operational support to EU border, coast guard and law enforcement authorities in “suppressing and preventing, among others, illegal migration and cross-border crime in the maritime domain”.

      Moreover, the system should be capable of delivering analysis and identification of high-risk threats following the collection and storage of “big data”. It is not clear how much human input and monitoring there will be of the identification of risks. The call for tenders says the winning bidder should have been announced in May, but there is no public information on the chosen company so far.

      As part of a 12-month pilot project to examine how maritime analysis tools could “support multipurpose operational response,” Frontex previously engaged the services of the Tel Aviv-based company Windward Ltd, which claims to fuse “maritime data and artificial intelligence… to provide the right insights, with the right context, at the right time.” [3] Windward, whose current chairman is John Browne, the former CEO of the multinational oil company BP, received €783,000 for its work. [4]

      As the agency’s gathering and processing of data increases, it also aims to improve and develop its own internal IT systems, through a two-year project worth €34 million. This will establish a set of “framework contracts”. Through these, each time the agency seeks a new IT service or system, companies selected to participate in the framework contracts will submit bids for the work. [5]

      The agency is also seeking a ’Software Solution for EBCG [European Border and Coast Guard] Team Members to Access to Schengen Information System’, through a contract worth up to €5 million. [6] The Schengen Information System (SIS) is the EU’s largest database, enabling cooperation between authorities working in the fields of police, border control and customs of all the Schengen states (26 EU member states plus Iceland, Norway, Liechtenstein and Switzerland) and its legal bases were recently reformed to include new types of alert and categories of data. [7]

      This software will give Frontex officials direct access to certain data within the SIS. Currently, they have to request access via national border guards in the country in which they are operating. This would give complete autonomy to Frontex officials to consult the SIS whilst undertaking operations, shortening the length of the procedure. [8]

      With the legal basis for increasing Frontex’s powers in place, the process to build up its personnel, material and surveillance capacities continues, with significant financial implications.

      https://www.statewatch.org/news/2020/june/eu-frontex-splashes-out-millions-of-euros-for-new-technology-and-equipme

      #technologie #équipement #Multiannual_Financial_Framework #MFF #surveillance #Mobile_Surveillance_Systems #Maritime_Analysis_Tools #données #big_data #mer #Windward_Ltd #Israël #John_Browne #BP #complexe_militaro-industriel #Software_Solution_for_EBCG_Team_Members_to_Access_to_Schengen_Information_System #SIS #Schengen_Information_System

    • EU : Guns, guards and guidelines : reinforcement of Frontex runs into problems (26.05.2020)

      An internal report circulated by Frontex to EU government delegations highlights a series of issues in implementing the agency’s new legislation. Despite the Covid-19 pandemic, the agency is urging swift action to implement the mandate and is pressing ahead with the recruitment of its new ‘standing corps’. However, there are legal problems with the acquisition, registration, storage and transport of weapons. The agency is also calling for derogations from EU rules on staff disciplinary measures in relation to the use of force; and wants an extended set of privileges and immunities. Furthermore, it is assisting with “voluntary return” despite this activity appearing to fall outside of its legal mandate.

      State-of-play report

      At the end of April 2020, Frontex circulated a report to EU government delegations in the Council outlining the state of play of the implementation of its new Regulation (“EBCG 2.0 Regulation”, in the agency and Commission’s words), especially relating to “current challenges”.[1] Presumably, this refers to the outbreak of a pandemic, though the report also acknowledges challenges created by the legal ambiguities contained in the Regulation itself, in particular with regard to the acquisition of weapons, supervisory and disciplinary mechanisms, legal privileges and immunities and involvement in “voluntary return” operations.

      The path set out in the report is that the “operational autonomy of the agency will gradually increase towards 2027” until it is a “fully-fledged and reliable partner” to EU and Schengen states. It acknowledges the impacts of unforeseen world events on the EU’s forthcoming budget (Multi-annual Financial Framework, MFF) for 2021-27, and hints at the impact this will have on Frontex’s own budget and objectives. Nevertheless, the agency is still determined to “continue increasing the capabilities” of the agency, including its acquisition of new equipment and employment of new staff for its standing corps.

      The main issues covered by the report are: Frontex’s new standing corps of staff, executive powers and the use of force, fundamental rights and data protection, and the integration into Frontex of EUROSUR, the European Border Surveillance System.

      The new standing corps

      Recruitment

      A new standing corps of 10,000 Frontex staff by 2024 is to be, in the words of the agency, its “biggest game changer”.[2] The report notes that the establishment of the standing corps has been heavily affected by the outbreak of Covid-19. According to the report, 7,238 individuals had applied to join the standing corps before the outbreak of the pandemic. 5,482 of these – over 75% – were assessed by the agency as eligible, with a final 304 passing the entire selection process to be on the “reserve lists”.[3]

      Despite interruptions to the recruitment procedure following worldwide lockdown measures, interviews for Category 1 staff – permanent Frontex staff members to be deployed on operations – were resumed via video by the end of April. 80 candidates were shortlisted for the first week, and Frontex aims to interview 1,000 people in total. Despite this adaptation, successful candidates will have to wait for Frontex’s contractor to re-open in order to carry out medical tests, an obligatory requirement for the standing corps.[4]

      In 2020, Frontex joined the European Defence Agency’s Satellite Communications (SatCom) and Communications and Information System (CIS) services in order to ensure ICT support for the standing corps in operation as of 2021.[5] The EDA describes SatCom and CIS as “fundamental for Communication, Command and Control in military operations… [enabling] EU Commanders to connect forces in remote areas with HQs and capitals and to manage the forces missions and tasks”.[6]

      Training

      The basic training programme, endorsed by the management board in October 2019, is designed for Category 1 staff. It includes specific training in interoperability and “harmonisation with member states”. The actual syllabus, content and materials for this basic training were developed by March 2020; Statewatch has made a request for access to these documents, which is currently pending with the Frontex Transparency Office. This process has also been affected by the novel coronavirus, though the report insists that “no delay is foreseen in the availability of the specialised profile related training of the standing corps”.

      Use of force

      The state-of-play-report acknowledges a number of legal ambiguities surrounding some of the more controversial powers outlined in Frontex’s 2019 Regulation, highlighting perhaps that political ambition, rather than serious consideration and assessment, propelled the legislation, overtaking adequate procedure and oversight. The incentive to enact the legislation within a short timeframe is cited as a reason that no impact assessment was carried out on the proposed recast to the agency’s mandate. This draft was rushed through negotiations and approved in an unprecedented six-month period, and the details lost in its wake are now coming to light.

      Article 82 of the 2019 Regulation refers to the use of force and carriage of weapons by Frontex staff, while a supervisory mechanism for the use of force by statutory staff is established by Article 55. This says:

      “On the basis of a proposal from the executive director, the management board shall: (a) establish an appropriate supervisory mechanism to monitor the application of the provisions on use of force by statutory staff, including rules on reporting and specific measures, such as those of a disciplinary nature, with regard to the use of force during deployments”[7]

      The agency’s management board is expected to make a decision about this supervisory mechanism, including specific measures and reporting, by the end of June 2020.

      The state-of-play report posits that the legal terms of Article 55 are inconsistent with the standard rules on administrative enquiries and disciplinary measures concerning EU staff.[8] These outline, inter alia, that a dedicated disciplinary board will be established in each institution including at least one member from outside the institution, that this board must be independent and its proceedings secret. Frontex insists that its staff will be a special case as the “first uniformed service of the EU”, and will therefore require “special arrangements or derogations to the Staff Regulations” to comply with the “totally different nature of tasks and risks associated with their deployments”.[9]

      What is particularly astounding about Frontex demanding special treatment for oversight, particularly on use of force and weapons is that, as the report acknowledges, the agency cannot yet legally store or transport any weapons it acquires.

      Regarding service weapons and “non-lethal equipment”,[10] legal analysis by “external experts and a regulatory law firm” concluded that the 2019 Regulation does not provide a legal basis for acquiring, registering, storing or transporting weapons in Poland, where the agency’s headquarters is located. Frontex has applied to the Commission for clarity on how to proceed, says the report. Frontex declined to comment on the status of this consultation and any indications of the next steps the agency will take. A Commission spokesperson stated only that it had recently received the agency’s enquiry and “is analysing the request and the applicable legal framework in the view of replying to the EBCGA”, without expanding further.

      Until Frontex has the legal basis to do so, it cannot launch a tender for firearms and “non-lethal equipment” (which includes batons, pepper spray and handcuffs). However, the report implies the agency is ready to do so as soon as it receives the green light. Technical specifications are currently being finalised for “non-lethal equipment” and Frontex still plans to complete acquisition by the end of the year.

      Privileges and immunities

      The agency is also seeking special treatment with regard to the legal privileges and immunities it and its officials enjoy. Article 96 of the 2019 Regulation outlines the privileges and immunities of Frontex officers, stating:

      “Protocol No 7 on the Privileges and Immunities of the European Union annexed to the Treaty on European Union (TEU) and to the TFEU shall apply to the Agency and its statutory staff.” [11]

      However, Frontex notes that the Protocol does not apply to non-EU states, nor does it “offer a full protection, or take into account a need for the inviolability of assets owned by Frontex (service vehicles, vessels, aircraft)”.[12] Frontex is increasingly involved in operations taking place on non-EU territory. For instance, the Council of the EU has signed or initialled a number of Status Agreements with non-EU states, primarily in the Western Balkans, concerning Frontex activities in those countries. To launch operations under these agreements, Frontex will (or, in the case of Albania, already has) agree on operational plans with each state, under which Frontex staff can use executive powers.[13] The agency therefore seeks an “EU-level status of forces agreement… to account for the partial absence of rules”.

      Law enforcement

      To implement its enhanced functions regarding cross-border crime, Frontex will continue to participate in Europol’s four-year policy cycle addressing “serious international and organised crime”.[14] The agency is also developing a pilot project, “Investigation Support Activities- Cross Border Crime” (ISA-CBC), addressing drug trafficking and terrorism.

      Fundamental rights and data protection

      The ‘EBCG 2.0 Regulation’ requires several changes to fundamental rights measures by the agency, which, aside from some vague “legal analyses” seem to be undergoing development with only internal oversight.

      Firstly, to facilitate adequate independence of the Fundamental Rights Officer (FRO), special rules have to be established. The FRO was introduced under Frontex’s 2016 Regulation, but has since then been understaffed and underfunded by the agency.[15] The 2019 Regulation obliges the agency to ensure “sufficient and adequate human and financial resources” for the office, as well as 40 fundamental rights monitors.[16] These standing corps staff members will be responsible for monitoring compliance with fundamental rights standards, providing advice and assistance on the agency’s plans and activities, and will visit and evaluate operations, including acting as forced return monitors.[17]

      During negotiations over the proposed Regulation 2.0, MEPs introduced extended powers for the Fundamental Rights Officer themselves. The FRO was previously responsible for contributing to Frontex’s fundamental rights strategy and monitoring its compliance with and promotion of fundamental rights. Now, they will be able to monitor compliance by conducting investigations; offering advice where deemed necessary or upon request of the agency; providing opinions on operational plans, pilot projects and technical assistance; and carrying out on-the-spot visits. The executive director is now obliged to respond “as to how concerns regarding possible violations of fundamental rights… have been addressed,” and the management board “shall ensure that action is taken with regard to recommendations of the fundamental rights officer.” [18] The investigatory powers of the FRO are not, however, set out in the Regulation.

      The state-of-play report says that “legal analyses and exchanges” are ongoing, and will inform an eventual management board decision, but no timeline for this is offered. [19] The agency will also need to adapt its much criticised individual complaints mechanism to fit the requirements of the 2019 Regulation; executive director Fabrice Leggeri’s first-draft decision on this process is currently undergoing internal consultations. Even the explicit requirement set out in the 2019 Regulation for an “independent and effective” complaints mechanism,[20] does not meet minimum standards to qualify as an effective remedy, which include institutional independence, accessibility in practice, and capacity to carry out thorough and prompt investigations.[21]

      Frontex has entered into a service level agreement (SLA) with the EU’s Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA) for support in establishing and training the team of fundamental rights monitors introduced by the 2019 Regulation. These monitors are to be statutory staff of the agency and will assess fundamental rights compliance of operational activities, advising, assisting and contributing to “the promotion of fundamental rights”.[22] The scope and objectives for this team were finalised at the end of March this year, and the agency will establish the team by the end of the year. Statewatch has requested clarification as to what is to be included in the team’s scope and objectives, pending with the Frontex Transparency Office.

      Regarding data protection, the agency plans a package of implementing rules (covering issues ranging from the position of data protection officer to the restriction of rights for returnees and restrictions under administrative data processing) to be implemented throughout 2020.[23] The management board will review a first draft of the implementing rules on the data protection officer in the second quarter of 2020.

      Returns

      The European Return and Reintegration Network (ERRIN) – a network of 15 European states and the Commission facilitating cooperation over return operations “as part of the EU efforts to manage migration” – is to be handed over to Frontex. [24] A handover plan is currently under the final stage of review; it reportedly outlines the scoping of activities and details of “which groups of returnees will be eligible for Frontex assistance in the future”.[25] A request from Statewatch to Frontex for comment on what assistance will be provided by the agency to such returnees was unanswered at the time of publication.

      Since the entry into force of its new mandate, Frontex has also been providing technical assistance for so-called voluntary returns, with the first two such operations carried out on scheduled flights (as opposed to charter flights) in February 2020. A total of 28 people were returned by mid-April, despite the fact that there is no legal clarity over what the definition “voluntary return” actually refers to, as the state-of-play report also explains:

      “The terminology of voluntary return was introduced in the Regulation without providing any definition thereof. This terminology (voluntary departure vs voluntary return) is moreover not in line with the terminology used in the Return Directive (EBCG 2.0 refers to the definition of returns provided for in the Return Directive. The Return Directive, however, does not cover voluntary returns; a voluntary return is not a return within the meaning of the Return Directive). Further elaboration is needed.”[26]

      On top of requiring “further clarification”, if Frontex is assisting with “voluntary returns” that are not governed by the Returns Directive, it is acting outside of its legal mandate. Statewatch has launched an investigation into the agency’s activities relating to voluntary returns, to outline the number of such operations to date, their country of return and country of destination.

      Frontex is currently developing a module dedicated to voluntary returns by charter flight for its FAR (Frontex Application for Returns) platform (part of its return case management system). On top of the technical support delivered by the agency, Frontex also foresees the provision of on-the-ground support from Frontex representatives or a “return counsellor”, who will form part of the dedicated return teams planned for the standing corps from 2021.[27]

      Frontex has updated its return case management system (RECAMAS), an online platform for member state authorities and Frontex to communicate and plan return operations, to manage an increased scope. The state-of-play report implies that this includes detail on post-return activities in a new “post-return module”, indicating that Frontex is acting on commitments to expand its activity in this area. According to the agency’s roadmap on implementing the 2019 Regulation, an action plan on how the agency will provide post-return support to people (Article 48(1), 2019 Regulation) will be written by the third quarter of 2020.[28]

      In its closing paragraph, related to the budgetary impact of COVID-19 regarding return operations, the agency notes that although activities will resume once aerial transportation restrictions are eased, “the agency will not be able to provide what has been initially intended, undermining the concept of the EBCG as a whole”.[29]

      EUROSUR

      The Commission is leading progress on adopting the implementing act for the integration of EUROSUR into Frontex, which will define the implementation of new aerial surveillance,[30] expected by the end of the year.[31] Frontex is discussing new working arrangements with the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the European Organisation for the Safety of Air Navigation (EUROCONTROL). The development by Frontex of the surveillance project’s communications network will require significant budgetary investment, as the agency plans to maintain the current system ahead of its planned replacement in 2025.[32] This investment is projected despite the agency’s recognition of the economic impact of Covid-19 on member states, and the consequent adjustments to the MFF 2021-27.

      Summary

      Drafted and published as the world responds to an unprecedented pandemic, the “current challenges” referred to in the report appear, on first read, to refer to the budgetary and staffing implications of global shut down. However, the report maintains throughout that the agency’s determination to expand, in terms of powers as well as staffing, will not be stalled despite delays and budgeting adjustments. Indeed, it is implied more than once that the “current challenges” necessitate more than ever that these powers be assumed. The true challenges, from the agency’s point of view, stem from the fact that its current mandate was rushed through negotiations in six months, leading to legal ambiguities that leave it unable to acquire or transport weapons and in a tricky relationship with the EU protocol on privileges and immunities when operating in third countries. Given the violence that so frequently accompanies border control operations in the EU, it will come as a relief to many that Frontex is having difficulties acquiring its own weaponry. However, it is far from reassuring that the introduction of new measures on fundamental rights and accountability are being carried out internally and remain unavailable for public scrutiny.

      Jane Kilpatrick

      Note: this article was updated on 26 May 2020 to include the European Commission’s response to Statewatch’s enquiries.

      It was updated on 1 July with some minor corrections:

      “the Council of the EU has signed or initialled a number of Status Agreements with non-EU states... under which” replaces “the agency has entered into working agreements with Balkan states, under which”
      “The investigatory powers of the FRO are not, however, set out in any detail in the Regulation beyond monitoring the agency’s ’compliance with fundamental rights, including by conducting investigations’” replaces “The investigatory powers of the FRO are not, however, set out in the Regulation”
      “if Frontex is assisting with “voluntary returns” that are not governed by the Returns Directive, it further exposes the haste with which legislation written to deny entry into the EU and facilitate expulsions was drafted” replaces “if Frontex is assisting with “voluntary returns” that are not governed by the Returns Directive, it is acting outside of its legal mandate”

      Endnotes

      [1] Frontex, ‘State of play of the implementation of the EBCG 2.0 Regulation in view of current challenges’, 27 April 2020, contained in Council document 7607/20, LIMITE, 20 April 2020, http://statewatch.org/news/2020/may/eu-council-frontex-ECBG-state-of-play-7607-20.pdf

      [2] Frontex, ‘Programming Document 2018-20’, 10 December 2017, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/feb/frontex-programming-document-2018-20.pdf

      [3] Section 1.1, state of play report

      [4] Jane Kilpatrick, ‘Frontex launches “game-changing” recruitment drive for standing corps of border guards’, Statewatch Analysis, March 2020, http://www.statewatch.org/analyses/no-355-frontex-recruitment-standing-corps.pdf

      [5] Section 7.1, state of play report

      [6] EDA, ‘EU SatCom Market’, https://www.eda.europa.eu/what-we-do/activities/activities-search/eu-satcom-market

      [7] Article 55(5)(a), Regulation (EU) 2019/1896 of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European Border and Coast Guard (Frontex 2019 Regulation), https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/en/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32019R1896

      [8] Pursuant to Annex IX of the EU Staff Regulations, https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:01962R0031-20140501

      [9] Chapter III, state of play report

      [10] Section 2.5, state of play report

      [11] Protocol (No 7), https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=uriserv:OJ.C_.2016.202.01.0001.01.ENG#d1e3363-201-1

      [12] Chapter III, state of play report

      [13] ‘Border externalisation: Agreements on Frontex operations in Serbia and Montenegro heading for parliamentary approval’, Statewatch News, 11 March 2020, http://statewatch.org/news/2020/mar/frontex-status-agreements.htm

      [14] Europol, ‘EU policy cycle – EMPACT’, https://www.europol.europa.eu/empact

      [15] ‘NGOs, EU and international agencies sound the alarm over Frontex’s respect for fundamental rights’, Statewatch News, 5 March 2019, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/mar/fx-consultative-forum-rep.htm; ‘Frontex condemned by its own fundamental rights body for failing to live up to obligations’, Statewatch News, 21 May 2018, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2018/may/eu-frontex-fr-rep.htm

      [16] Article 110(6), Article 109, 2019 Regulation

      [17] Article 110, 2019 Regulation

      [18] Article 109, 2019 Regulation

      [19] Section 8, state of play report

      [20] Article 111(1), 2019 Regulation

      [21] Sergio Carrera and Marco Stefan, ‘Complaint Mechanisms in Border Management and Expulsion Operations in Europe: Effective Remedies for Victims of Human Rights Violations?’, CEPS, 2018, https://www.ceps.eu/system/files/Complaint%20Mechanisms_A4.pdf

      [22] Article 110(1), 2019 Regulation

      [23] Section 9, state of play report

      [24] ERRIN, https://returnnetwork.eu

      [25] Section 3.2, state of play report

      [26] Chapter III, state of play report

      [27] Section 3.2, state of play report

      [28] ‘’Roadmap’ for implementing new Frontex Regulation: full steam ahead’, Statewatch News, 25 November 2019, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/nov/eu-frontex-roadmap.htm

      [29] State of play report, p. 19

      [30] Matthias Monroy, ‘Drones for Frontex: unmanned migration control at Europe’s borders’, Statewatch Analysis, February 2020, http://www.statewatch.org/analyses/no-354-frontex-drones.pdf

      [31] Section 4, state of play report

      [32] Section 7.2, state of play report
      Next article >

      Mediterranean: As the fiction of a Libyan search and rescue zone begins to crumble, EU states use the coronavirus pandemic to declare themselves unsafe

      https://www.statewatch.org/analyses/2020/eu-guns-guards-and-guidelines-reinforcement-of-frontex-runs-into-problem

      #EBCG_2.0_Regulation #European_Defence_Agency’s_Satellite_Communications (#SatCom) #Communications_and_Information_System (#CIS) #immunité #droits_fondamentaux #droits_humains #Fundamental_Rights_Officer (#FRO) #European_Return_and_Reintegration_Network (#ERRIN) #renvois #expulsions #réintégration #Directive_Retour #FAR (#Frontex_Application_for_Returns) #RECAMAS #EUROSUR #European_Aviation_Safety_Agency (#EASA) #European_Organisation_for_the_Safety_of_Air_Navigation (#EUROCONTROL)

    • Frontex launches “game-changing” recruitment drive for standing corps of border guards

      On 4 January 2020 the Management Board of the European Border and Coast Guard Agency (Frontex) adopted a decision on the profiles of the staff required for the new “standing corps”, which is ultimately supposed to be staffed by 10,000 officials. [1] The decision ushers in a new wave of recruitment for the agency. Applicants will be put through six months of training before deployment, after rigorous medical testing.

      What is the standing corps?

      The European Border and Coast Guard standing corps is the new, and according to Frontex, first ever, EU uniformed service, available “at any time…to support Member States facing challenges at their external borders”.[2] Frontex’s Programming Document for the 2018-2020 period describes the standing corps as the agency’s “biggest game changer”, requiring “an unprecedented scale of staff recruitment”.[3]

      The standing corps will be made up of four categories of Frontex operational staff:

      Frontex statutory staff deployed in operational areas and staff responsible for the functioning of the European Travel Information and Authorisation System (ETIAS) Central Unit[4];
      Long-term staff seconded from member states;
      Staff from member states who can be immediately deployed on short-term secondment to Frontex; and

      A reserve of staff from member states for rapid border interventions.

      These border guards will be “trained by the best and equipped with the latest technology has to offer”.[5] As well as wearing EU uniforms, they will be authorised to carry weapons and will have executive powers: they will be able to verify individuals’ identity and nationality and permit or refuse entry into the EU.

      The decision made this January is limited to the definition of profiles and requirements for the operational staff that are to be recruited. The Management Board (MB) will have to adopt a new decision by March this year to set out the numbers of staff needed per profile, the requirements for individuals holding those positions, and the number of staff needed for the following year based on expected operational needs. This process will be repeated annually.[6] The MB can then further specify how many staff each member state should contribute to these profiles, and establish multi-annual plans for member state contributions and recruitment for Frontex statutory staff. Projections for these contributions are made in Annexes II – IV of the 2019 Regulation, though a September Mission Statement by new European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen urges the recruitment of 10,000 border guards by 2024, indicating that member states might be meeting their contribution commitments much sooner than 2027.[7]

      The standing corps of Frontex staff will have an array of executive powers and responsibilities. As well as being able to verify identity and nationality and refuse or permit entry into the EU, they will be able to consult various EU databases to fulfil operational aims, and may also be authorised by host states to consult national databases. According to the MB Decision, “all members of the Standing Corps are to be able to identify persons in need of international protection and persons in a vulnerable situation, including unaccompanied minors, and refer them to the competent authorities”. Training on international and EU law on fundamental rights and international protection, as well as guidelines on the identification and referral of persons in need of international protection, will be mandatory for all standing corps staff members.

      The size of the standing corps

      The following table, taken from the 2019 Regulation, outlines the ambitions for growth of Frontex’s standing corps. However, as noted, the political ambition is to reach the 10,000 total by 2024.

      –-> voir le tableau sur le site de statewatch!

      Category 2 staff – those on long term secondment from member states – will join Frontex from 2021, according to the 2019 Regulation.[8] It is foreseen that Germany will contribute the most staff, with 61 expected in 2021, increasing year-by-year to 225 by 2027. Other high contributors are France and Italy (170 and 125 by 2027, respectively).

      The lowest contributors will be Iceland (expected to contribute between one and two people a year from 2021 to 2027), Malta, Cyprus and Luxembourg. Liechtenstein is not contributing personnel but will contribute “through proportional financial support”.

      For short-term secondments from member states, projections follow a very similar pattern. Germany will contribute 540 staff in 2021, increasing to 827 in 2027; Italy’s contribution will increase from 300 in 2021 to 458 in 2027; and France’s from 408 in 2021 to 624 in 2027. Most states will be making less than 100 staff available for short-term secondment in 2021.

      What are the profiles?

      The MB Decision outlines 12 profiles to be made available to Frontex, ranging from Border Guard Officer and Crew Member, to Cross Border Crime Detection Officer and Return Specialist. A full list is contained in the Decision.[9] All profiles will be fulfilled by an official of the competent authority of a member state (MS) or Schengen Associated Country (SAC), or by a member of Frontex’s own statutory staff.

      Tasks to be carried out by these officials include:

      border checks and surveillance;
      interviewing, debriefing* and screening arrivals and registering fingerprints;
      supporting the collection, assessment, analysis and distribution of information with EU member and non-member states;
      verifying travel documents;
      escorting individuals being deported on Frontex return operations;
      operating data systems and platforms; and
      offering cultural mediation

      *Debriefing consists of informal interviews with migrants to collect information for risk analyses on irregular migration and other cross-border crime and the profiling of irregular migrants to identify “modus operandi and migration trends used by irregular migrants and facilitators/criminal networks”. Guidelines written by Frontex in 2012 instructed border guards to target vulnerable individuals for “debriefing”, not in order to streamline safeguarding or protection measures, but for intelligence-gathering - “such people are often more willing to talk about their experiences,” said an internal document.[10] It is unknown whether those instructions are still in place.

      Recruitment for the profiles

      Certain profiles are expected to “apply self-safety and security practice”, and to have “the capacity to work under pressure and face emotional events with composure”. Relevant profiles (e.g. crew member) are required to be able to perform search and rescue activities in distress situations at sea borders.

      Frontex published a call for tender on 27 December for the provision of medical services for pre-recruitment examinations, in line with the plan to start recruiting operational staff in early 2020. The documents accompanying the tender reveal additional criteria for officials that will be granted executive powers (Frontex category “A2”) compared to those staff stationed primarily at the agency’s Warsaw headquarters (“A1”). Those criteria come in the form of more stringent medical testing.

      The differences in medical screening for category A1 and A2 staff lie primarily in additional toxicology screening and psychiatric and psychological consultations. [11] The additional psychiatric attention allotted for operational staff “is performed to check the predisposition for people to work in arduous, hazardous conditions, exposed to stress, conflict situations, changing rapidly environment, coping with people being in dramatic, injure or death exposed situations”.[12]

      Both A1 and A2 category provisional recruits will be asked to disclose if they have ever suffered from a sexually transmitted disease or “genital organ disease”, as well as depression, nervous or mental disorders, among a long list of other ailments. As well as disclosing any medication they take, recruits must also state if they are taking oral contraceptives (though there is no question about hormonal contraceptives that are not taken orally). Women are also asked to give the date of their last period on the pre-appointment questionnaire.

      “Never touch yourself with gloves”

      Frontex training materials on forced return operations obtained by Statewatch in 2019 acknowledge the likelihood of psychological stress among staff, among other health risks. (One recommendation contained in the documents is to “never touch yourself with gloves”). Citing “dissonance within the team, long hours with no rest, group dynamic, improvisation and different languages” among factors behind psychological stress, the training materials on medical precautionary measures for deportation escort officers also refer to post-traumatic stress disorder, the lack of an area to retreat to and body clock disruption as exacerbating risks. The document suggests a high likelihood that Frontex return escorts will witness poverty, “agony”, “chaos”, violence, boredom, and will have to deal with vulnerable persons.[13]

      For fundamental rights monitors (officials deployed to monitor fundamental rights compliance during deportations, who can be either Frontex staff or national officials), the training materials obtained by Statewatch focus on the self-control of emotions, rather than emotional care. Strategies recommended include talking to somebody, seeking professional help, and “informing yourself of any other option offered”. The documents suggest that it is an individual’s responsibility to prevent emotional responses to stressful situations having an impact on operations, and to organise their own supervision and professional help. There is no obvious focus on how traumatic responses of Frontex staff could affect those coming into contact with them at an external border or during a deportation. [14]

      The materials obtained by Statewatch also give some indication of the fundamental rights training imparted to those acting as deportation ‘escorts’ and fundamental rights monitors. The intended outcomes for a training session in Athens that took place in March 2019 included “adapt FR [fundamental rights] in a readmission operation (explain it with examples)” and “should be able to describe Non Refoulement principle” (in the document, ‘Session Fundamental rights’ is followed by ‘Session Velcro handcuffs’).[15] The content of the fundamental rights training that will be offered to Frontex’s new recruits is currently unknown.

      Fit for service?

      The agency anticipates that most staff will be recruited from March to June 2020, involving the medical examination of up to 700 applicants in this period. According to Frontex’s website, the agency has already received over 7,000 applications for the 700 new European Border Guard Officer positions.[16] Successful candidates will undergo six months of training before deployment in 2021. Apparently then, the posts are a popular career option, despite the seemingly invasive medical tests (especially for sexually active women). Why, for instance, is it important to Frontex to know about oral hormonal contraception, or about sexually transmitted infections?

      When asked by Statewatch if Frontex provides in-house psychological and emotional support, an agency press officer stated: “When it comes to psychological and emotional support, Frontex is increasing awareness and personal resilience of the officers taking part in our operations through education and training activities.” A ‘Frontex Mental Health Strategy’ from 2018 proposed the establishment of “a network of experts-psychologists” to act as an advisory body, as well as creating “online self-care tools”, a “psychological hot-line”, and a space for peer support with participation of psychologists (according to risk assessment) during operations.[17]

      One year later, Frontex, EASO and Europol jointly produced a brochure for staff deployed on operations, entitled ‘Occupational Health and Safety – Deployment Information’, which offers a series of recommendations to staff, placing the responsibility to “come to the deployment in good mental shape” and “learn how to manage stress and how to deal with anger” more firmly on the individual than the agency.[18] According to this document, officers who need additional support must disclose this by requesting it from their supervisor, while “a helpline or psychologist on-site may be available, depending on location”.

      Frontex anticipates this recruitment drive to be “game changing”. Indeed, the Commission is relying upon it to reach its ambitions for the agency’s independence and efficiency. The inclusion of mandatory training in fundamental rights in the six-month introductory education is obviously a welcome step. Whether lessons learned in a classroom will be the first thing that comes to the minds of officials deployed on border control or deportation operations remains to be seen.

      Unmanaged responses to emotional stress can include burnout, compassion-fatigue and indirect trauma, which can in turn decrease a person’s ability to cope with adverse circumstance, and increase the risk of violence.[19] Therefore, aside from the agency’s responsibility as an employer to safeguard the health of its staff, its approach to internal psychological care will affect not only the border guards themselves, but the people that they routinely come into contact with at borders and during return operations, many of whom themselves will have experienced trauma.

      Jane Kilpatrick

      Endnotes

      [1] Management Board Decision 1/2020 of 4 January 2020 on adopting the profiles to be made available to the European Border and Coast Guard Standing Corps, https://frontex.europa.eu/assets/Key_Documents/MB_Decision/2020/MB_Decision_1_2020_adopting_the_profiles_to_be_made_available_to_the_

      [2] Frontex, ‘Careers’, https://frontex.europa.eu/about-frontex/careers/frontex-border-guard-recruitment

      [3] Frontex, ‘Programming Document 2018-20’, 10 December 2017, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/feb/frontex-programming-document-2018-20.pdf

      [4] The ETIAS Central Unit will be responsible for processing the majority of applications for ‘travel authorisations’ received when the European Travel Information and Authorisation System comes into use, in theory in late 2022. Citizens who do not require a visa to travel to the Schengen area will have to apply for authorisation to travel to the Schengen area.

      [5] Frontex, ‘Careers’, https://frontex.europa.eu/about-frontex/careers/frontex-border-guard-recruitment

      [6] Article 54(4), Regulation (EU) 2019/1896 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 November 2019 on the European Border and Coast Guard and repealing Regulations (EU) No 1052/2013 and (EU) 2016/1624, https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/en/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32019R1896

      [7] ‘European Commission 2020 Work Programme: An ambitious roadmap for a Union that strives for more’, 29 January 2020, https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/IP_20_124; “Mission letter” from Ursula von der Leyen to Ylva Johnsson, 10 September 2019, https://ec.europa.eu/commission/sites/beta-political/files/mission-letter-ylva-johansson_en.pdf

      [8] Annex II, 2019 Regulation

      [9] Management Board Decision 1/2020 of 4 January 2020 on adopting the profiles to be made available to the European Border and Coast Guard Standing Corps, https://frontex.europa.eu/assets/Key_Documents/MB_Decision/2020/MB_Decision_1_2020_adopting_the_profiles_to_be_made_available_to_the_

      [10] ‘Press release: EU border agency targeted “isolated or mistreated” individuals for questioning’, Statewatch News, 16 February 2017, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2017/feb/eu-frontex-op-hera-debriefing-pr.htm

      [11] ‘Provision of Medical Services – Pre-Recruitment Examination’, https://etendering.ted.europa.eu/cft/cft-documents.html?cftId=5841

      [12] ‘Provision of medical services – pre-recruitment examination, Terms of Reference - Annex II to invitation to tender no Frontex/OP/1491/2019/KM’, https://etendering.ted.europa.eu/cft/cft-document.html?docId=65398

      [13] Frontex training presentation, ‘Medical precautionary measures for escort officers’, undated, http://statewatch.org/news/2020/mar/eu-frontex-presentation-medical-precautionary-measures-deportation-escor

      [14] Ibid.

      [15] Frontex, document listing course learning outcomes from deportation escorts’ training, http://statewatch.org/news/2020/mar/eu-frontex-deportation-escorts-training-course-learning-outcomes.pdf

      [16] Frontex, ‘Careers’, https://frontex.europa.eu/about-frontex/careers/frontex-border-guard-recruitment

      [17] Frontex, ‘Frontex mental health strategy’, 20 February 2018, https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/89c168fe-e14b-11e7-9749-01aa75ed71a1/language-en

      [18] EASO, Europol and Frontex, ‘Occupational health and safety’, 12 August 2019, https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/17cc07e0-bd88-11e9-9d01-01aa75ed71a1/language-en/format-PDF/source-103142015

      [19] Trauma Treatment International, ‘A different approach for victims of trauma’, https://www.tt-intl.org/#our-work-section

      https://www.statewatch.org/analyses/2020/frontex-launches-game-changing-recruitment-drive-for-standing-corps-of-b
      #gardes_frontières #staff #corps_des_gardes-frontières

    • Drones for Frontex: unmanned migration control at Europe’s borders (27.02.2020)

      Instead of providing sea rescue capabilities in the Mediterranean, the EU is expanding air surveillance. Refugees are observed with drones developed for the military. In addition to numerous EU states, countries such as Libya could also use the information obtained.

      It is not easy to obtain majorities for legislation in the European Union in the area of migration - unless it is a matter of upgrading the EU’s external borders. While the reform of a common EU asylum system has been on hold for years, the European Commission, Parliament and Council agreed to reshape the border agency Frontex with unusual haste shortly before last year’s parliamentary elections. A new Regulation has been in force since December 2019,[1] under which Frontex intends to build up a “standing corps” of 10,000 uniformed officials by 2027. They can be deployed not just at the EU’s external borders, but in ‘third countries’ as well.

      In this way, Frontex will become a “European border police force” with powers that were previously reserved for the member states alone. The core of the new Regulation includes the procurement of the agency’s own equipment. The Multiannual Financial Framework, in which the EU determines the distribution of its financial resources from 2021 until 2027, has not yet been decided. According to current plans, however, at least €6 billion are reserved for Frontex in the seven-year budget. The intention is for Frontex to spend a large part of the money, over €2 billion, on aircraft, ships and vehicles.[2]

      Frontex seeks company for drone flights

      The upgrade plans include the stationing of large drones in the central and eastern Mediterranean. For this purpose, Frontex is looking for a private partner to operate flights off Malta, Italy or Greece. A corresponding tender ended in December[3] and the selection process is currently underway. The unmanned missions could then begin already in spring. Frontex estimates the total cost of these missions at €50 million. The contract has a term of two years and can be extended twice for one year at a time.

      Frontex wants drones of the so-called MALE (Medium Altitude Long Endurance) class. Their flight duration should be at least 20 hours. The requirements include the ability to fly in all weather conditions and at day and night. It is also planned to operate in airspace where civil aircraft are in service. For surveillance missions, the drones should carry electro-optical cameras, thermal imaging cameras and so-called “daylight spotter” systems that independently detect moving targets and keep them in focus. Other equipment includes systems for locating mobile and satellite telephones. The drones will also be able to receive signals from emergency call transmitters sewn into modern life jackets.

      However, the Frontex drones will not be used primarily for sea rescue operations, but to improve capacities against unwanted migration. This assumption is also confirmed by the German non-governmental organisation Sea-Watch, which has been providing assistance in the central Mediterranean with various ships since 2015. “Frontex is not concerned with saving lives,” says Ruben Neugebauer of Sea-Watch. “While air surveillance is being expanded with aircraft and drones, ships urgently needed for rescue operations have been withdrawn”. Sea-Watch demands that situation pictures of EU drones are also made available to private organisations for sea rescue.

      Aircraft from arms companies

      Frontex has very specific ideas for its own drones, which is why there are only a few suppliers worldwide that can be called into question. The Israel Aerospace Industries Heron 1, which Frontex tested for several months on the Greek island of Crete[4] and which is also flown by the German Bundeswehr, is one of them. As set out by Frontex in its invitation to tender, the Heron 1, with a payload of around 250 kilograms, can carry all the surveillance equipment that the agency intends to deploy over the Mediterranean. Also amongst those likely to be interested in the Frontex contract is the US company General Atomics, which has been building drones of the Predator series for 20 years. Recently, it presented a new Predator model in Greece under the name SeaGuardian, for maritime observation.[5] It is equipped with a maritime surveillance radar and a system for receiving position data from larger ships, thus fulfilling one of Frontex’s essential requirements.

      General Atomics may have a competitive advantage, as its Predator drones have several years’ operational experience in the Mediterranean. In addition to Frontex, the European Union has been active in the central Mediterranean with EUNAVFOR MED Operation Sophia. In March 2019, Italy’s then-interior minister Matteo Salvini pushed through the decision to operate the EU mission from the air alone. Since then, two unarmed Predator drones operated by the Italian military have been flying for EUNAVFOR MED for 60 hours per month. Officially, the drones are to observe from the air whether the training of the Libyan coast guard has been successful and whether these navy personnel use their knowledge accordingly. Presumably, however, the Predators are primarily pursuing the mission’s goal to “combat human smuggling” by spying on the Libyan coast. It is likely that the new Operation EU Active Surveillance, which will use military assets from EU member states to try to enforce the UN arms embargo placed on Libya,[6] will continue to patrol with Italian drones off the coast in North Africa.

      Three EU maritime surveillance agencies

      In addition to Frontex, the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) and the European Fisheries Control Agency (EFCA) are also investing in maritime surveillance using drones. Together, the three agencies coordinate some 300 civil and military authorities in EU member states.[7] Their tasks include border, fisheries and customs control, law enforcement and environmental protection.

      In 2017, Frontex and EMSA signed an agreement to benefit from joint reconnaissance capabilities, with EFCA also involved.[8] At the time, EMSA conducted tests with drones of various sizes, but now the drones’ flights are part of its regular services. The offer is not only open to EU Member States, as Iceland was the first to take advantage of it. Since summer 2019, a long-range Hermes 900 drone built by the Israeli company Elbit Systems has been flying from Iceland’s Egilsstaðir airport. The flights are intended to cover more than half of the island state’s exclusive economic zone and to detect “suspicious activities and potential hazards”.[9]

      The Hermes 900 was also developed for the military; the Israeli army first deployed it in the Gaza Strip in 2014. The Times of Israel puts the cost of the operating contract with EMSA at €59 million,[10] with a term of two years, which can be extended for another two years. The agency did not conclude the contract directly with the Israeli arms company, but through the Portuguese firm CeiiA. The contract covers the stationing, control and mission control of the drones.

      New interested parties for drone flights

      At the request of the German MEP Özlem Demirel (from the party Die Linke), the European Commission has published a list of countries that also want to use EMSA drones.[11] According to this list, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Portugal and also Greece have requested unmanned flights for pollution monitoring this year, while Bulgaria and Spain want to use them for general maritime surveillance. Until Frontex has its own drones, EMSA is flying its drones for the border agency on Crete. As in Iceland, this is the long-range drone Hermes 900, but according to Greek media reports it crashed on 8 January during take-off.[12] Possible causes are a malfunction of the propulsion system or human error. The aircraft is said to have been considerably damaged.

      Authorities from France and Great Britain have also ordered unmanned maritime surveillance from EMSA. Nothing is yet known about the exact intended location, but it is presumably the English Channel. There, the British coast guard is already observing border traffic with larger drones built by the Tekever arms company from Portugal.[13] The government in London wants to prevent migrants from crossing the Channel. The drones take off from the airport in the small town of Lydd and monitor the approximately 50-kilometre-long and 30-kilometre-wide Strait of Dover. Great Britain has also delivered several quadcopters to France to try to detect potential migrants in French territorial waters. According to the prefecture of Pas-de-Calais, eight gendarmes have been trained to control the small drones[14].

      Information to non-EU countries

      The images taken by EMSA drones are evaluated by the competent national coastguards. A livestream also sends them to Frontex headquarters in Warsaw.[15] There they are fed into the EUROSUR border surveillance system. This is operated by Frontex and networks the surveillance installations of all EU member states that have an external border. The data from EUROSUR and the national border control centres form the ‘Common Pre-frontier Intelligence Picture’,[16] referring to the area of interest of Frontex, which extends far into the African continent. Surveillance data is used to detect and prevent migration movements at an early stage.

      Once the providing company has been selected, the new Frontex drones are also to fly for EUROSUR. According to the invitation to tender, they are to operate in the eastern and central Mediterranean within a radius of up to 250 nautical miles (463 kilometres). This would enable them to carry out reconnaissance in the “pre-frontier” area off Tunisia, Libya and Egypt. Within the framework of EUROSUR, Frontex shares the recorded data with other European users via a ‘Remote Information Portal’, as the call for tender explains. The border agency has long been able to cooperate with third countries and the information collected can therefore also be made available to authorities in North Africa. However, in order to share general information on surveillance of the Mediterranean Sea with a non-EU state, Frontex must first conclude a working agreement with the corresponding government.[17]

      It is already possible, however, to provide countries such as Libya with the coordinates of refugee boats. For example, the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea stipulates that the nearest Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre (MRCC) must be informed of actual or suspected emergencies. With EU funding, Italy has been building such a centre in Tripoli for the last two years.[18] It is operated by the military coast guard, but so far has no significant equipment of its own.

      The EU military mission “EUNAVFOR MED” was cooperating more extensively with the Libyan coast guard. For communication with European naval authorities, Libya is the first third country to be connected to European surveillance systems via the “Seahorse Mediterranean” network[19]. Information handed over to the Libyan authorities might also include information that was collected with the Italian military ‘Predator’ drones.

      Reconnaissance generated with unmanned aerial surveillance is also given to the MRCC in Turkey. This was seen in a pilot project last summer, when the border agency tested an unmanned aerostat with the Greek coast guard off the island of Samos.[20] Attached to a 1,000 metre-long cable, the airship was used in the Frontex operation ‘Poseidon’ in the eastern Mediterranean. The 35-meter-long zeppelin comes from the French manufacturer A-NSE.[21] The company specializes in civil and military aerial observation. According to the Greek Marine Ministry, the equipment included a radar, a thermal imaging camera and an Automatic Identification System (AIS) for the tracking of larger ships. The recorded videos were received and evaluated by a situation centre supplied by the Portuguese National Guard. If a detected refugee boat was still in Turkish territorial waters, the Greek coast guard informed the Turkish authorities. This pilot project in the Aegean Sea was the first use of an airship by Frontex. The participants deployed comparatively large numbers of personnel for the short mission. Pictures taken by the Greek coastguard show more than 40 people.

      Drones enable ‘pull-backs’

      Human rights organisations accuse EUNAVFOR MED and Frontex of passing on information to neighbouring countries leading to rejections (so-called ‘push-backs’) in violation of international law. People must not be returned to states where they are at risk of torture or other serious human rights violations. Frontex does not itself return refugees in distress who were discovered at sea via aerial surveillance, but leaves the task to the Libyan or Turkish authorities. Regarding Libya, the Agency since 2017 provided notice of at least 42 vessels in distress to Libyan authorities.[22]

      Private rescue organisations therefore speak of so-called ‘pull-backs’, but these are also prohibited, as the Israeli human rights lawyer Omer Shatz argues: “Communicating the location of civilians fleeing war to a consortium of militias and instructing them to intercept and forcibly transfer them back to the place they fled from, trigger both state responsibility of all EU members and individual criminal liability of hundreds involved.” Together with his colleague Juan Branco, Shatz is suing those responsible for the European Union and its agencies before the International Criminal Court in The Hague. Soon they intend to publish individual cases and the names of the people accused.

      Matthias Monroy

      An earlier version of this article first appeared in the German edition of Le Monde Diplomatique: ‘Drohnen für Frontex Statt sich auf die Rettung von Bootsflüchtlingen im Mittelmeer zu konzentrieren, baut die EU die Luftüberwachung’.

      Note: this article was corrected on 6 March to clarify a point regarding cooperation between Frontex and non-EU states.

      Endnotes

      [1] Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European Border and Coast Guard, https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/PE-33-2019-INIT/en/pdf

      [2] European Commission, ‘A strengthened and fully equipped European Border and Coast Guard’, 12 September 2018, https://ec.europa.eu/commission/sites/beta-political/files/soteu2018-factsheet-coast-guard_en.pdf

      [3] ‘Poland-Warsaw: Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) for Medium Altitude Long Endurance Maritime Aerial Surveillance’, https://ted.europa.eu/udl?uri=TED:NOTICE:490010-2019:TEXT:EN:HTML&tabId=1

      [4] IAI, ‘IAI AND AIRBUS MARITIME HERON UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEM (UAS) SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED 200 FLIGHT HOURS IN CIVILIAN EUROPEAN AIRSPACE FOR FRONTEX’, 24 October 2018, https://www.iai.co.il/iai-and-airbus-maritime-heron-unmanned-aerial-system-uas-successfully-complet

      [5] ‘ European Maritime Flight Demonstrations’, General Atomics, http://www.ga-asi.com/european-maritime-demo

      [6] ‘EU agrees to deploy warships to enforce Libya arms embargo’, The Guardian, 17 February 2020, https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/feb/17/eu-agrees-deploy-warships-enforce-libya-arms-embargo

      [7] EMSA, ‘Heads of EMSA and Frontex meet to discuss cooperation on European coast guard functions’, 3 April 2019, http://www.emsa.europa.eu/news-a-press-centre/external-news/item/3499-heads-of-emsa-and-frontex-meet-to-discuss-cooperation-on-european-c

      [8] Frontex, ‘Frontex, EMSA and EFCA strengthen cooperation on coast guard functions’, 23 March 2017, https://frontex.europa.eu/media-centre/news-release/frontex-emsa-and-efca-strengthen-cooperation-on-coast-guard-functions

      [9] Elbit Systems, ‘Elbit Systems Commenced the Operation of the Maritime UAS Patrol Service to European Union Countries’, 18 June 2019, https://elbitsystems.com/pr-new/elbit-systems-commenced-the-operation-of-the-maritime-uas-patrol-servi

      [10] ‘Elbit wins drone contract for up to $68m to help monitor Europe coast’, The Times of Israel, 1 November 2018, https://www.timesofisrael.com/elbit-wins-drone-contract-for-up-to-68m-to-help-monitor-europe-coast

      [11] ‘Answer given by Ms Bulc on behalf of the European Commission’, https://netzpolitik.org/wp-upload/2019/12/E-2946_191_Finalised_reply_Annex1_EN_V1.pdf

      [12] ‘Το drone της FRONTEX έπεσε, οι μετανάστες έρχονται’, Proto Thema, 27 January 2020, https://www.protothema.gr/greece/article/968869/to-drone-tis-frontex-epese-oi-metanastes-erhodai

      [13] Morgan Meaker, ‘Here’s proof the UK is using drones to patrol the English Channel’, Wired, 10 January 2020, https://www.wired.co.uk/article/uk-drones-migrants-english-channel

      [14] ‘Littoral: Les drones pour lutter contre les traversées de migrants sont opérationnels’, La Voix du Nord, 26 March 2019, https://www.lavoixdunord.fr/557951/article/2019-03-26/les-drones-pour-lutter-contre-les-traversees-de-migrants-sont-operation

      [15] ‘Frontex report on the functioning of Eurosur – Part I’, Council document 6215/18, 15 February 2018, http://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-6215-2018-INIT/en/pdf

      [16] European Commission, ‘Eurosur’, https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/what-we-do/policies/borders-and-visas/border-crossing/eurosur_en

      [17] Legal reforms have also given Frontex the power to operate on the territory of non-EU states, subject to the conclusion of a status agreement between the EU and the country in question. The 2016 Frontex Regulation allowed such cooperation with states that share a border with the EU; the 2019 Frontex Regulation extends this to any non-EU state.

      [18] ‘Helping the Libyan Coast Guard to establish a Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre’, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/E-8-2018-000547_EN.html

      [19] Matthias Monroy, ‘EU funds the sacking of rescue ships in the Mediterranean’, 7 July 2018, https://digit.site36.net/2018/07/03/eu-funds-the-sacking-of-rescue-ships-in-the-mediterranean

      [20] Frontex, ‘Frontex begins testing use of aerostat for border surveillance’, 31 July 2019, https://frontex.europa.eu/media-centre/news-release/frontex-begins-testing-use-of-aerostat-for-border-surveillance-ur33N8

      [21] ‘Answer given by Ms Johansson on behalf of the European Commission’, 7 January 2020, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/E-9-2019-002529-ASW_EN.html

      [22] ‘Answer given by Vice-President Borrell on behalf of the European Commission’, 8 January 2020, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/E-9-2019-002654-ASW_EN.html

      https://www.statewatch.org/analyses/2020/drones-for-frontex-unmanned-migration-control-at-europe-s-borders

      #drones

    • Monitoring “secondary movements” and “hotspots”: Frontex is now an internal surveillance agency (16.12.2019)

      The EU’s border agency, Frontex, now has powers to gather data on “secondary movements” and the “hotspots” within the EU. The intention is to ensure “situational awareness” and produce risk analyses on the migratory situation within the EU, in order to inform possible operational action by national authorities. This brings with it increased risks for the fundamental rights of both non-EU nationals and ethnic minority EU citizens.

      The establishment of a new ’standing corps’ of 10,000 border guards to be commanded by EU border agency Frontex has generated significant public and press attention in recent months. However, the new rules governing Frontex[1] include a number of other significant developments - including a mandate for the surveillance of migratory movements and migration “hotspots” within the EU.

      Previously, the agency’s surveillance role has been restricted to the external borders and the “pre-frontier area” – for example, the high seas or “selected third-country ports.”[2] New legal provisions mean it will now be able to gather data on the movement of people within the EU. While this is only supposed to deal with “trends, volumes and routes,” rather than personal data, it is intended to inform operational activity within the EU.

      This may mean an increase in operations against ‘unauthorised’ migrants, bringing with it risks for fundamental rights such as the possibility of racial profiling, detention, violence and the denial of access to asylum procedures. At the same time, in a context where internal borders have been reintroduced by numerous Schengen states over the last five years due to increased migration, it may be that he agency’s new role contributes to a further prolongation of internal border controls.

      From external to internal surveillance

      Frontex was initially established with the primary goals of assisting in the surveillance and control of the external borders of the EU. Over the years it has obtained increasing powers to conduct surveillance of those borders in order to identify potential ’threats’.

      The European Border Surveillance System (EUROSUR) has a key role in this task, taking data from a variety of sources, including satellites, sensors, drones, ships, vehicles and other means operated both by national authorities and the agency itself. EUROSUR was formally established by legislation approved in 2013, although the system was developed and in use long before it was subject to a legal framework.[3]

      The new Frontex Regulation incorporates and updates the provisions of the 2013 EUROSUR Regulation. It maintains existing requirements for the agency to establish a “situational picture” of the EU’s external borders and the “pre-frontier area” – for example, the high seas or the ports of non-EU states – which is then distributed to the EU’s member states in order to inform operational activities.[4]

      The new rules also provide a mandate for reporting on “unauthorised secondary movements” and goings-on in the “hotspots”. The Commission’s proposal for the new Frontex Regulation was not accompanied by an impact assessment, which would have set out the reasoning and justifications for these new powers. The proposal merely pointed out that the new rules would “evolve” the scope of EUROSUR, to make it possible to “prevent secondary movements”.[5] As the European Data Protection Supervisor remarked, the lack of an impact assessment made it impossible: “to fully assess and verify its attended benefits and impact, notably on fundamental rights and freedoms, including the right to privacy and to the protection of personal data.”[6]

      The term “secondary movements” is not defined in the Regulation, but is generally used to refer to journeys between EU member states undertaken without permission, in particular by undocumented migrants and applicants for internal protection. Regarding the “hotspots” – established and operated by EU and national authorities in Italy and Greece – the Regulation provides a definition,[7] but little clarity on precisely what information will be gathered.

      Legal provisions

      A quick glance at Section 3 of the new Regulation, dealing with EUROSUR, gives little indication that the system will now be used for internal surveillance. The formal scope of EUROSUR is concerned with the external borders and border crossing points:

      “EUROSUR shall be used for border checks at authorised border crossing points and for external land, sea and air border surveillance, including the monitoring, detection, identification, tracking, prevention and interception of unauthorised border crossings for the purpose of detecting, preventing and combating illegal immigration and cross-border crime and contributing to ensuring the protection and saving the lives of migrants.”

      However, the subsequent section of the Regulation (on ‘situational awareness’) makes clear the agency’s new internal role. Article 24 sets out the components of the “situational pictures” that will be visible in EUROSUR. There are three types – national situational pictures, the European situational picture and specific situational pictures. All of these should consist of an events layer, an operational layer and an analysis layer. The first of these layers should contain (emphasis added in all quotes):

      “…events and incidents related to unauthorised border crossings and cross-border crime and, where available, information on unauthorised secondary movements, for the purpose of understanding migratory trends, volume and routes.”

      Article 26, dealing with the European situational picture, states:

      “The Agency shall establish and maintain a European situational picture in order to provide the national coordination centres and the Commission with effective, accurate and timely information and analysis, covering the external borders, the pre-frontier area and unauthorised secondary movements.”

      The events layer of that picture should include “information relating to… incidents in the operational area of a joint operation or rapid intervention coordinated by the Agency, or in a hotspot.”[8] In a similar vein:

      “The operational layer of the European situational picture shall contain information on the joint operations and rapid interventions coordinated by the Agency and on hotspots, and shall include the mission statements, locations, status, duration, information on the Member States and other actors involved, daily and weekly situational reports, statistical data and information packages for the media.”[9]

      Article 28, dealing with ‘EUROSUR Fusion Services’, says that Frontex will provide national authorities with information on the external borders and pre-frontier area that may be derived from, amongst other things, the monitoring of “migratory flows towards and within the Union in terms of trends, volume and routes.”

      Sources of data

      The “situational pictures” compiled by Frontex and distributed via EUROSUR are made up of data gathered from a host of different sources. For the national situational picture, these are:

      national border surveillance systems;
      stationary and mobile sensors operated by national border agencies;
      border surveillance patrols and “other monitoring missions”;
      local, regional and other coordination centres;
      other national authorities and systems, such as immigration liaison officers, operational centres and contact points;
      border checks;
      Frontex;
      other member states’ national coordination centres;
      third countries’ authorities;
      ship reporting systems;
      other relevant European and international organisations; and
      other sources.[10]

      For the European situational picture, the sources of data are:

      national coordination centres;
      national situational pictures;
      immigration liaison officers;
      Frontex, including reports form its liaison officers;
      Union delegations and EU Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) missions;
      other relevant Union bodies, offices and agencies and international organisations; and
      third countries’ authorities.[11]

      The EUROSUR handbook – which will presumably be redrafted to take into account the new legislation – provides more detail about what each of these categories may include.[12]

      Exactly how this melange of different data will be used to report on secondary movements is currently unknown. However, in accordance with Article 24 of the new Regulation:

      “The Commission shall adopt an implementing act laying down the details of the information layers of the situational pictures and the rules for the establishment of specific situational pictures. The implementing act shall specify the type of information to be provided, the entities responsible for collecting, processing, archiving and transmitting specific information, the maximum time limits for reporting, the data security and data protection rules and related quality control mechanisms.” [13]

      This implementing act will specify precisely how EUROSUR will report on “secondary movements”.[14] According to a ‘roadmap’ setting out plans for the implementation of the new Regulation, this implementing act should have been drawn up in the last quarter of 2020 by a newly-established European Border and Coast Guard Committee sitting within the Commission. However, that Committee does not yet appear to have held any meetings.[15]

      Operational activities at the internal borders

      Boosting Frontex’s operational role is one of the major purposes of the new Regulation, although it makes clear that the internal surveillance role “should not lead to operational activities of the Agency at the internal borders of the Member States.” Rather, internal surveillance should “contribute to the monitoring by the Agency of migratory flows towards and within the Union for the purpose of risk analysis and situational awareness.” The purpose is to inform operational activity by national authorities.

      In recent years Schengen member states have reintroduced border controls for significant periods in the name of ensuring internal security and combating irregular migration. An article in Deutsche Welle recently highlighted:

      “When increasing numbers of refugees started arriving in the European Union in 2015, Austria, Germany, Slovenia and Hungary quickly reintroduced controls, citing a “continuous big influx of persons seeking international protection.” This was the first time that migration had been mentioned as a reason for reintroducing border controls.

      Soon after, six Schengen members reintroduced controls for extended periods. Austria, Germany, Denmark, Sweden and Norway cited migration as a reason. France, as the sixth country, first introduced border checks after the November 2015 attacks in Paris, citing terrorist threats. Now, four years later, all six countries still have controls in place. On November 12, they are scheduled to extend them for another six months.”[16]

      These long-term extensions of internal border controls are illegal (the upper limit is supposed to be two years; discussions on changes to the rules governing the reintroduction of internal border controls in the Schengen area are ongoing).[17] A European Parliament resolution from May 2018 stated that “many of the prolongations are not in line with the existing rules as to their extensions, necessity or proportionality and are therefore unlawful.”[18] Yves Pascou, a researcher for the European Policy Centre, told Deutsche Welle that: “"We are in an entirely political situation now, not a legal one, and not one grounded in facts.”

      A European Parliament study published in 2016 highlighted that:

      “there has been a noticeable lack of detail and evidence given by the concerned EU Member States [those which reintroduced internal border controls]. For example, there have been no statistics on the numbers of people crossing borders and seeking asylum, or assessment of the extent to which reintroducing border checks complies with the principles of proportionality and necessity.”[19]

      One purpose of Frontex’s new internal surveillance powers is to provide such evidence (albeit in the ideologically-skewed form of ‘risk analysis’) on the situation within the EU. Whether the information provided will be of interest to national authorities is another question. Nevertheless, it would be a significant irony if the provision of that information were to contribute to the further maintenance of internal borders in the Schengen area.

      At the same time, there is a more pressing concern related to these new powers. Many discussions on the reintroduction of internal borders revolve around the fact that it is contrary to the idea, spirit (and in these cases, the law) of the Schengen area. What appears to have been totally overlooked is the effect the reintroduction of internal borders may have on non-EU nationals or ethnic minority citizens of the EU. One does not have to cross an internal Schengen frontier too many times to notice patterns in the appearance of the people who are hauled off trains and buses by border guards, but personal anecdotes are not the same thing as empirical investigation. If Frontex’s new powers are intended to inform operational activity by the member states at the internal borders of the EU, then the potential effects on fundamental rights must be taken into consideration and should be the subject of investigation by journalists, officials, politicians and researchers.

      Chris Jones

      Endnotes

      [1] The new Regulation was published in the Official Journal of the EU in mid-November: Regulation (EU) 2019/1896 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 November 2019 on the European Border and Coast Guard and repealing Regulations (EU) No 1052/2013 and (EU) 2016/1624, https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/en/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32019R1896

      [2] Article 12, ‘Common application of surveillance tools’, Regulation (EU) No 1052/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 October 2013 establishing the European Border Surveillance System (Eurosur), https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32013R1052

      [3] According to Frontex, the Eurosur Network first came into use in December 2011 and in March 2012 was first used to “exchange operational information”. The Regulation governing the system came into force in October 2013 (see footnote 2). See: Charles Heller and Chris Jones, ‘Eurosur: saving lives or reinforcing deadly borders?’, Statewatch Journal, vol. 23 no. 3/4, February 2014, http://database.statewatch.org/article.asp?aid=33156

      [4] Recital 34, 2019 Regulation: “EUROSUR should provide an exhaustive situational picture not only at the external borders but also within the Schengen area and in the pre-frontier area. It should cover land, sea and air border surveillance and border checks.”

      [5] European Commission, ‘Proposal for a Regulation on the European Border and Coast Guard and repealing Council Joint Action no 98/700/JHA, Regulation (EU) no 1052/2013 and Regulation (EU) no 2016/1624’, COM(2018) 631 final, 12 September 2018, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2018/sep/eu-com-frontex-proposal-regulation-com-18-631.pdf

      [6] EDPS, ‘Formal comments on the Proposal for a Regulation on the European Border and Coast Guard’, 30 November 2018, p. p.2, https://edps.europa.eu/sites/edp/files/publication/18-11-30_comments_proposal_regulation_european_border_coast_guard_en.pdf

      [7] Article 2(23): “‘hotspot area’ means an area created at the request of the host Member State in which the host Member State, the Commission, relevant Union agencies and participating Member States cooperate, with the aim of managing an existing or potential disproportionate migratory challenge characterised by a significant increase in the number of migrants arriving at the external borders”

      [8] Article 26(3)(c), 2019 Regulation

      [9] Article 26(4), 2019 Regulation

      [10] Article 25, 2019 Regulation

      [11] Article 26, 2019 Regulation

      [12] European Commission, ‘Commission Recommendation adopting the Practical Handbook for implementing and managing the European Border Surveillance System (EUROSUR)’, C(2015) 9206 final, 15 December 2015, https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/sites/homeaffairs/files/what-we-do/policies/securing-eu-borders/legal-documents/docs/eurosur_handbook_annex_en.pdf

      [13] Article 24(3), 2019 Regulation

      [14] ‘’Roadmap’ for implementing new Frontex Regulation: full steam ahead’, Statewatch News, 25 November 2019, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/nov/eu-frontex-roadmap.htm

      [15] Documents related to meetings of committees operating under the auspices of the European Commission can be found in the Comitology Register: https://ec.europa.eu/transparency/regcomitology/index.cfm?do=Search.Search&NewSearch=1

      [16] Kira Schacht, ‘Border checks in EU countries challenge Schengen Agreement’, DW, 12 November 2019, https://www.dw.com/en/border-checks-in-eu-countries-challenge-schengen-agreement/a-51033603

      [17] European Parliament, ‘Temporary reintroduction of border control at internal borders’, https://oeil.secure.europarl.europa.eu/oeil/popups/ficheprocedure.do?reference=2017/0245(COD)&l=en

      [18] ‘Report on the annual report on the functioning of the Schengen area’, 3 May 2018, para.9, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/A-8-2018-0160_EN.html

      [19] Elpseth Guild et al, ‘Internal border controls in the Schengen area: is Schengen crisis-proof?’, European Parliament, June 2016, p.9, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2016/571356/IPOL_STU(2016)571356_EN.pdf

      https://www.statewatch.org/analyses/2019/monitoring-secondary-movements-and-hotspots-frontex-is-now-an-internal-s

      #mouvements_secondaires #hotspot #hotspots

  • Victoire d’Apple qui ne doit pas rembourser 13 milliards d’avantages fiscaux à l’Irlande
    _ Apple n’a finalement dû payer que 1% d’impôts irlandais sur ses bénéfices européens en 2003. Et en 2014, ce taux a encore diminué jusqu’à 0,005%
    https://www.rtbf.be/info/economie/detail_ue-contre-apple-la-justice-se-prononce-sur-les-13-milliards-d-avantages-

    C’est une victoire importante pour le géant du numérique Apple et pour le gouvernement irlandais. La justice européenne a annulé la décision de la Commission exigeant le remboursement à l’Irlande de 13 milliards d’euros d’avantages fiscaux.

    Selon le Tribunal de la Cour de justice de l’Union européenne, la Commission n’est pas parvenue à démontrer « l’existence d’un avantage économique sélectif » _ accordé par l’Etat irlandais à Apple. Cette décision constitue un cuisant revers pour la Commission européenne et sa vice-présidente Margrethe Vestager dans sa volonté de combattre la concurrence fiscale entre Etats qui profite aux multinationales. La Commission peut encore introduire un appel.

    L’Irlande et Apple se réjouissent
    Le gouvernement irlandais et Apple se sont immédiatement félicités de la décision des juges de Luxembourg. « Nous saluons le jugement de la Cour européenne » , a souligné le ministère irlandais des Finances dans un communiqué. Il répète qu’il « n’y a jamais eu de traitement spécial » pour Apple, taxé selon les règles en vigueur dans le pays.
    Selon Apple, « cette affaire ne portait pas sur le montant des impôts que nous payons, mais sur l’endroit où nous devons les payer. Nous sommes fiers d’être le plus grand contribuable au monde, car nous connaissons le rôle important que joue le versement d’impôts dans la société » , a déclaré le groupe à la pomme.

    Un taux de 0,005% sur les bénéfices
    L’affaire remonte au 30 août 2016 : alors Commissaire européenne à la Concurrence, Margrethe Vestager décide de frapper un grand coup. Selon l’enquête de la Commission, Apple a rapatrié en Irlande entre 2003 et 2014 l’ensemble des revenus engrangés en Europe (ainsi qu’en Afrique, au Moyen-Orient et en Inde) car l’entreprise y bénéficiait d’un traitement fiscal favorable, grâce à un accord passé avec les autorités de Dublin. Le groupe a ainsi échappé à la quasi-totalité des impôts dont il aurait dû s’acquitter sur cette période, soit environ 13 milliards d’euros, selon les calculs de la Commission.

    Margrethe Vestager dénonçait alors sans ménagement https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/fr/ip_16_2923 ces arrangements douteux entre le gouvernement irlandais et le géant technologique : « L’enquête de la Commission a conclu que l’Irlande avait accordé des avantages fiscaux illégaux à Apple, ce qui a permis à cette dernière de payer nettement moins d’impôts que les autres sociétés pendant de nombreuses années.  » La Commission a établi qu’Apple n’a finalement dû payer que 1% d’impôts irlandais sur ses bénéfices européens en 2003. Et en 2014, ce taux a encore diminué jusqu’à 0,005%, autrement dit, Apple ne paie pratiquement plus d’impôts sur ses bénéfices en Europe.

    Pour arriver à ce résultat, l’Irlande a détourné la possibilité de conclure des rulings, des arrangements fiscaux avec une société. La Commission relevait que " pratiquement tous les bénéfices de vente enregistrés par les deux sociétés étaient affectés en interne à un « siège ». L’appréciation de la Commission a montré que ces « sièges » n’existaient que sur le papier et n’auraient pas pu générer de tels bénéfices.  " Ce traitement fiscal préférentiel créé un avantage accordé à Apple envers ses concurrents. Cet avantage constitue une « aide d’Etat » illégale, puisqu’elle se fait aux dépens d’autres entreprises soumises à des conditions moins favorables.

    L’Irlande : eldorado des multinationales
    Pour Dublin néanmoins, il n’y avait rien d’illégal. Connue pour ses positions « pro-business », l’Irlande a attiré sur l’île de nombreuses multinationales, pourvoyeuses d’emplois, grâce à une fiscalité avantageuse. C’est d’ailleurs pour cette raison que l’Irlande, comme Apple, a fait appel de la décision. « La Commission a outrepassé ses pouvoirs et violé la souveraineté » irlandaise concernant l’impôt sur les sociétés, avait affirmé Dublin. Quant au patron d’Apple, Tim Cook, il avait qualifié l’affaire de « foutaise politique ».

    L’arrêt pris aujourd’hui est susceptible d’appel. La vice-présidente de la Commission a déclaré qu’elle allait « étudier avec attention le jugement et réfléchir aux prochaines étapes » , sans toutefois dire si la Commission allait faire appel de cet arrêt. Généralement, lorsque les affaires font l’objet d’un pourvoi devant la Cour, la décision définitive intervient environ 16 mois après. Donc dans le cas d’Apple, au cours de l’année 2021. « La Commission européenne maintient son objectif de voir toutes les entreprises payer leur juste part d’impôts » , a ajouté Mme Vestager.

    Pour la Danoise Margrethe Vestager, bête noire des Gafa et surnommée la « tax lady » par le président américain Donald Trump, précisément à cause du cas d’Apple, cette décision vient cependant affaiblir sa politique menée contre une série de multinationales ayant bénéficié d’un traitement fiscal jugé trop favorable.

    La taxe sur le numérique toujours en suspend
    Dans deux affaires similaires, les juges européens avaient tranché dans des sens différents. Ils avaient déjà réfuté les arguments de la Commission européenne concernant la chaîne américaine de cafés Starbucks, sommée de rembourser jusqu’à 30 millions d’euros d’arriérés d’impôts aux Pays-Bas. En revanche, dans le cas de Fiat, ils avaient donné raison à Bruxelles, qui exigeait du groupe italien le versement au Luxembourg d’une somme identique pour avantages fiscaux indus.

    #apple en #Irlande , #paradis_fiscal légal vis à vis de l’#UE #union_européenne Margrethe_Vestager #impôts #fraude_fiscal #multinationnales #gafa

    • Coronavirus : l’inquiétude monte chez les fabricants asiatiques de produits de mode
      https://fr.fashionnetwork.com/news/Coronavirus-l-inquietude-monte-chez-les-fabricants-asiatiques-de-

      Les moyens de subsistance de millions de travailleurs asiatiques de l’habillement sont actuellement menacés par les annulations de commandes des grandes marques de mode , ce qui inquiète à la fois les syndicats, les chercheurs et les militants locaux, qui craignent que la pandémie n’ait des effets délétères sur ce secteur régulièrement pointé du doigt pour ses violations du droit du travail.

      Magasins fermés, chute des ventes : de nombreuses enseignes occidentales annulent leurs commandes ou demandent des remises à leurs fournisseurs asiatiques, notamment au Cambodge ou au Bangladesh. Résultat, de nombreux employés du secteur ont été licenciés, ou ont dû accepter de travailler sans salaire. 

      Selon plusieurs observateurs de l’industrie de la mode, 60 millions de travailleurs pourraient avoir du mal à surmonter la crise, à moins que davantage de marques ne prennent leurs responsabilités. Des poids lourds comme Adidas, H&M et le propriétaire de Zara, Inditex ont promis de payer intégralement toutes leurs commandes, qu’elles soient livrées ou encore en production, selon le Consortium pour les droits des travailleurs (WRC), qui a mené une étude sur 27 des plus importants détaillants de mode mondiaux.

Toutefois, le groupe de surveillance américain a constaté qu’environ la moitié d’entre eux n’avaient pris aucun engagement de ce type pour honorer leurs contrats. Plusieurs détaillants, dont Asos, C&A, Edinburgh Woollen Mill, Gap et Primark, ont déclaré à la Thomson Reuters Foundation qu’ils avaient été contraints de suspendre ou d’annuler certaines commandes, tout en assurant maintenir le contact avec leurs fournisseurs afin d’atténuer l’impact économique de ces annulations.

      Côté fabricants, autre son de cloche. À les entendre, ceux-ci ne font pas le poids face à leurs interlocuteurs occidentaux, ce qui pourrait entraîner des pertes d’emplois. « On n’a jamais pu vraiment négocier avec les acheteurs », indique ainsi un important fournisseur de vêtements du sud de l’Inde, qui préfère garder l’anonymat pour protéger son entreprise.


      Face au tollé général provoqué par ces annulations, plusieurs marques ont accepté de rétablir certaines commandes — pas toutes —, tandis que d’autres ont exigé des remises, des délais de paiement ou se sont contentées de laisser leurs fournisseurs dans l’incertitude, rapporte Penelope Kyritsis, directrice adjointe au WRC. « Ne pas s’engager à honorer l’intégralité de ses commandes, c’est adopter une conduite irresponsable envers ses fournisseurs », tranche-t-elle.



      Il y a quelque temps, le WRC estimait que les annulations de commandes représentaient un manque à gagner de plus de 24 milliards de dollars (près de 22 milliards d’euros) pour les fournisseurs ; ce chiffre est probablement redescendu après les revirements de certaines marques. Mais selon la Fédération internationale de l’industrie textile, les commandes ont baissé de près d’un tiers dans le secteur de l’habillement. « La pandémie de Covid-19, à l’instar de la catastrophe du Rana Plaza, révèle comment les chaînes d’approvisionnement profitent aux entreprises au détriment des fournisseurs et, par conséquent, des travailleurs », conclut Penelope Kyritsis.

La catastrophe du Rana Plaza, du nom de cet immeuble au Bangladesh dont l’effondrement avait tué 1135 travailleurs de l’habillement en 2013, avait déclenché plusieurs initiatives pour améliorer les conditions et les droits du travail à l’échelle mondiale — les experts sont cependant divisés sur le rythme et la portée de ces réformes. Certains observateurs de l’industrie estiment que l’attention suscitée par la crise sanitaire pourrait donner un nouveau souffle à la mobilisation, quand d’autres craignent que la pandémie n’érode les avancées récentes sur le terrain.

      Des réputations en danger
      Les revenus du secteur de l’habillement, qui s’élèvent à 2500 milliards de dollars, pourraient chuter de 30 % en 2020, selon un récent rapport du cabinet de conseil en gestion McKinsey, qui prévient que les entreprises de mode pourraient être les plus touchées par la crise qui s’annonce.

Les marques de vêtements, les syndicats et les organisations patronales ont annoncé la semaine dernière la création d’un groupe de travail, convoqué par les Nations Unies, afin d’aider les fabricants à payer leurs salariés et à survivre à la crise, tout en garantissant l’accès des travailleurs aux soins de santé et à la protection sociale. Toutefois, selon le WRC, certains des détaillants qui soutiennent l’initiative n’ont pas atteint son objectif — garantir que toutes les commandes, livrées ou en cours de production, soient payées dans les temps.

"Visiblement, certaines marques préfèrent soigner leur image publique plutôt que d’honorer leurs contrats", ironise Fiona Gooch, conseillère politique principale au sein du groupe de défense Traidcraft Exchange. « Les détaillants se servent du Covid-19 pour mettre en danger leurs fournisseurs et exiger des remises... certains se comportent comme des voyous », tranche-t-elle, à quelques jours de la Fête du Travail. « Ces mauvais comportements pourraient nuire à leur réputation, après la crise ».

En revanche, les entreprises qui font preuve d’équité et de transparence sur les droits des travailleurs pendant cette période troublée pourraient attirer de nouveaux investisseurs, prédisent plusieurs experts en placement de fonds. Ce mois-ci, un groupe de 286 investisseurs pesant plus de 8200 milliards de dollars d’actifs a exhorté les entreprises à protéger autant que possible leurs relations avec leurs fournisseurs, et à garantir les droits des travailleurs dans leurs chaînes d’approvisionnement.


      Des remises et des annulations 
Selon deux fournisseurs bangladais, qui s’expriment sous couvert d’anonymat, certains détaillants — notamment la société britannique Edinburgh Woollen Mill (EWM) — ont exigé des rabais allant jusqu’à 70 %, un chiffre qui ferait perdre de l’argent aux fabricants sur ces commandes.

Selon un propriétaire d’usine indien, EWM aurait exigé une remise de 50 %, en précisant que le paiement restant ne serait versé qu’après la vente de 70 % des marchandises en question. « EWM adopte un comportement opportuniste, abusif et contraire à l’éthique », déplore-t-il, ajoutant que la plupart de ses autres acheteurs occidentaux ont « agi raisonnablement » dans le cadre des négociations engagées autour de leurs commandes.

Un porte-parole du groupe EWM — qui contrôle également des marques comme Jane Norman et Peacocks — assure que des négociations sont en cours avec ses fournisseurs pour trouver une solution « qui leur convienne ». « Ce n’est pas ce que nous souhaiterions faire en temps normal, mais les circonstances actuelles sont telles que cela devient nécessaire », plaide-t-il.

De nombreuses marques ont fait valoir des clauses de force majeure dans leurs contrats, invoquant des circonstances extraordinaires et imprévues pour annuler leurs commandes. Mais selon plusieurs experts juridiques, il faut encore déterminer si la pandémie peut justifier le recours à cette clause, déclenchée habituellement par les guerres ou les catastrophes naturelles.

Pour l’Organisation internationale des employeurs (OIE), le plus grand réseau de défense du secteur privé au monde, de manière générale, les marques ont agi de manière responsable dans le cadre des négociations avec leurs fournisseurs. « Toutes les marques et tous les acheteurs sont sous pression... des arrangements flexibles ont été mis en place et fonctionnent déjà, dans une certaine mesure au moins », assure le secrétaire général de l’OIE, Roberto Suárez Santos. « La situation est difficile pour tout le monde ».


      Vers un recul des droits des travailleurs ?
      Selon un rapport publié cette semaine par le cabinet de conseil en gestion des risques Verisk Maplecroft, les travailleurs du secteur de l’habillement récemment licenciés pourraient se tourner vers des emplois précaires, où ils risqueraient d’être victimes de travail forcé, voire d’imposer le même traitement à leurs enfants pour remédier à la perte de leurs revenus.

Dans des pays comme la Birmanie, certaines usines ont licencié des ouvriers syndiqués en invoquant une baisse des commandes, tout en conservant des employés non syndiqués, selon des militants qui craignent que la pandémie ne provoque également une érosion des droits, qui pourrait passer inaperçue dans la tourmente actuelle. « Nous devons veiller à ce que les droits et les conditions de travail des ouvriers ne soient pas remis en cause par la crise », martèle Aruna Kashyap, avocate principale de la division consacrée aux droits des femmes de Human Rights Watch, qui exige également que la santé des travailleurs soit prise en compte.

Alors que la plupart des usines fonctionnent toujours au Cambodge et que des centaines d’entre elles ont rouvert au Bangladesh cette semaine, plusieurs défenseurs des droits des travailleurs se disent inquiets face à la faible application des mesures de distanciation physique et d’hygiène. Au Cambodge, par exemple, des petites mains s’inquiètent pour leur santé au travail, mais rappellent qu’elles ont des familles à nourrir. Au Bangladesh, une source du ministère du Travail reconnaît que les quelque 500 usines qui ont repris leurs activités ne sont pas en mesure de faire respecter les mesures de distanciation physique par leurs salariés.

Garantir la sécurité des employés sur leur lieu de travail, c’est justement l’un des objectifs du groupe de travail soutenu par l’ONU, qui exhorte par ailleurs les donateurs, les institutions financières et les gouvernements à accélérer l’accès au crédit, aux allocations de chômage et aux compléments de revenus. Pour ces militants, il est nécessaire que les régimes d’aide et de sécurité sociale des pays producteurs de vêtements soient en partie financés par les marques elles-mêmes, et que la réglementation des pays occidentaux contraigne les entreprises à éradiquer les pratiques commerciales déloyales, l’exploitation et l’esclavage moderne.

Mais pour Jenny Holdcroft, du syndicat IndustriALL qui regroupe 50 millions de membres dans le monde entier, la lumière jetée sur les difficultés des travailleurs du secteur et la réaction inégale des marques face à la crise pourrait s’avérer insuffisante pour transformer en profondeur les chaînes d’approvisionnement. « Si l’on examine toute l’histoire de l’industrie de l’habillement, il est peu probable qu’un véritable changement arrive suite à la crise », prophétise ainsi la secrétaire générale adjointe de l’organisation.

"Les dynamiques et les rapports de pouvoir à l’oeuvre dans le secteur permettent aux marques de s’en tirer malgré leurs comportements autocentrés. Il faut que nous placions la barre plus haut pour l’ensemble de l’industrie de l’habillement... tout en empêchant les entreprises les moins éthiques de continuer leurs activités".



      La Thomson Reuters Foundation entretient un partenariat avec la Laudes Foundation, elle-même affiliée à l’enseigne C&A.

      #mode #esclavage #travail #économie #Inde #Birmanie #Cambodge #Banglades

    • La richissime famille Benetton cède les autoroutes italiennes
      https://fr.businessam.be/la-richissime-famille-benetton-cede-les-autoroutes-italiennes

      Le groupe Atlantia, contrôlé par la dynastie commerciale Benetton, transfère la gestion des autoroutes italiennes à l’État. Cet accord fait suite à la tragédie de l’effondrement du pont Morandi, à Gênes, il y a deux ans.
      La société d’autoroutes Aspi (Autostrade per l’Italia) est transférée à un véhicule d’investissement du gouvernement italien, la Cassa Depositi e Prestiti (CDP).
      Aspi exploitait jusqu’ici plus de 3.000 kilomètres d’autoroutes en tant que société de péage. Elle était également le gestionnaire du pont de Gênes, qui s’est effondré en août 2018. Une catastrophe qui a coûté la vie à 43 personnes. Les Benetton ont pointé du doigt à de multiples reprises. Les enquêtes préliminaires ont en effet révélé de graves lacunes en matière de maintenance. Des critiques envers sa famille qui n’ont pas été au goût du patriarche, Luciano Benetton.
      . . . . . . .
      #Benetton #Italie #pont_morandi #gênes #ponte_morandi #catastrophe d’une #privatisation #pont #infrastructures #effondrement #autostrade #autoroutes #benetton

  • Commission recommends gradual lifting of travel restrictions
    https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/ip_20_1035

    Aujourd’hui, la Commission a recommandé aux États membres de l’espace Schengen et aux pays associés à l’espace Schengen de lever au plus tard le 15 juin 2020 les contrôles aux frontières intérieures et de prolonger jusqu’au 30 juin 2020 la restriction temporaire des déplacements non essentiels vers l’Union ; elle a, en outre, proposé une approche pour la levée progressive de cette restriction ultérieurement.
    La situation sanitaire de certains pays tiers demeurant critique, la Commission ne propose pas à ce stade une levée généralisée des restrictions aux déplacements. Les restrictions devraient être levées pour des pays sélectionnés d’un commun accord par les États membres, sur la base d’un ensemble de principes et de critères objectifs, comme la situation sanitaire, la capacité de faire appliquer des mesures de confinement pendant les déplacements ainsi que des considérations de réciprocité, en tenant compte des données provenant de sources pertinentes telles que l’ECDC et l’OMS.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#europe#frontiere

  • Greece to extend border fence over migration surge

    Greece will extend its fence on the border with Turkey, a government source said Sunday (8 March), amid continuing efforts by migrants to break through in a surge enabled by Ankara.

    “We have decided to immediately extend the fence in three different areas,” the government source told AFP, adding that the new sections, to the south of the area now under pressure, would cover around 36 kilometres (22 miles).

    The current stretch of fence will also be upgraded, the official added.

    Tens of thousands of asylum-seekers have been trying to break through the land border from Turkey for a week after Ankara announced it would no longer prevent people from trying to cross into the European Union.

    A police source Sunday told AFP that riot police reinforcements from around the country had been sent to the border in recent days, in addition to drones and police dogs.

    There have been numerous exchanges of tear gas and stones between Greek riot police and migrants.

    Turkey has also bombarded Greek forces with tear gas at regular intervals, and Athens has accused Turkish police of handing out wire cutters to migrants to help them break through the border fence.

    The Greek government over the weekend also released footage which it said showed a Turkish armoured vehicle assisting efforts to bring down the fence.

    “Parts of the fence have been removed, both by the (Turkish) vehicle and with wire cutters, but they are constantly being repaired,” local police unionist Elias Akidis told Skai TV.

    Turkey has accused Greek border guards of using undue force against the migrants, injuring many and killing at least five.

    The government in Athens has consistently dismissed the claim as lies.

    https://www.euractiv.com/section/justice-home-affairs/news/greece-to-extend-border-fence-over-migration-surge
    #murs #Evros #barrières_frontalières #Grèce #Turquie #frontières #extension
    ping @fil @reka @albertocampiphoto

    • je suis tombé sur une vidéo YT d’un compte néo-nazi montrant une attaque du mur de l’Evros par des migrants. L’attaque y est présentée comme soutenue par la police turque, ce qui est vraiment beaucoup solliciter les images… les migrants sont noyés sous les lacrymos.

    • Evros: Greece to extend the fence on the borders with Turkey to 40km

      Greece will extend the fence to its Evros borders with Turkey to 40 km, government spokesman Stelios Petsas said on Friday morning. The additional fence will be installed in “sensitive” areas preferred for illegal entries by migrants and refugees.

      The fence currently covers 12.5 km.

      Speaking to ANT1 TV, Petsas noted that at the moment the most vulnerable border point is in the south.

      The current 12.5 km fence of land access points is installed north and south of Kastanies customs office, where thousands of migrants and refugees have amassed.

      According to the daily Kathimerini, the 40 kilometers new fence is planned to be partially installed either in areas where the Evros waters are low or in areas where the landscape favors illegla paasage.

      Sections such as Ormenio, Gardens, Feres, Tychero, Soufli, Dikaia, Dilofo, Marassia, Nea Vyssa and elsewhere have been designated as the areas where the new fence will installed by the Greek Army and support by the police.

      According to a report by daily Elftheros Typos, Greece’s Plan B aside from the fence extension is the presence of about 4,000 police officers and soldiers in parallel patrols, helicopters, unmanned aircraft, message broadcasting, cameras for audio-video.

      A Greek Army – Greek Police “joint operations center” is to be established in Nea Vryssa.

      According to the daily more than 1,000 soldiers, two commandos squads, 1,500 police and national guards are currently operating in the Evros area.

      Petsas underlined that the Greek government has changed its policy because there is a national security issue at the moment.

      He reiterated the new policy saying that “no one will cross the border.”

      https://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2020/03/06/evros-greece-fence-borders-turkey-extension

    • Video 2 - Violences contre les exilé·es à la frontière gréco-turque

      Depuis le début du mois de mars 2020, des milliers d’exilé·es, incité·es voire poussé·es par les autorités turques, se sont précipité·es aux frontières terrestres et maritimes entre la Turquie et la Grèce. Ils et elles se sont heurté·es à la violence de la police et de l’armée grecque, ainsi que de groupe fascistes, mobilisés pour leur en interdire le franchissement, la suite : www.gisti.org/spip.php ?article6368

      https://indymotion.fr/videos/watch/e8938a1c-5456-46e8-a0cb-be0806c96051?start=1s

    • Greece shields Evros border with blades wire, 400 new border guards

      Greece is strengthening ifs defense and is preparing for a possible new wave of migrants at its Evros border. A fence of sharp blades wire (concertina wire) and 400 additional border guards are to shield the country for the case Turkey will open its borders again so that migrants can cross into Europe.

      According to daily ethnos (https://www.ethnos.gr/ellada/105936_ohyronetai-o-ebros-frahtis-me-lepidoforo-syrmatoplegma-kai-400-neoi-sy), Ankara has already been holding groups of migrants in warehouses near the border, while the Greek side is methodically being prepared for the possibility of a new attempt for waves of migrants to try to cross again the border.

      “At the bridgeheads of Peplos and Fera, at the land borders after the riverbed is aligned, and in other vulnerable areas along the border, kilometer-long of metal fence with sharp blades wire are being installed, the soil is being cleaned from wild vegetation and clearing of marsh lands.

      The fence in the northern part is being strengthened and expanded, and 11 additional border pylons, each one 50 meters high, will be installed along the river in the near future. Each pylon will be equipped with cameras and modern day and night surveillance systems, with a range of several kilometers and multiple telecommunications capabilities, the daily notes.

      Within the next few months, 400 newly recruited border guards will be on duty and will almost double the deterrent force and enhance the joint patrols of the Army and Police, ethnos adds.

      Big armored military vehicles destined for Libya and confiscated five years ago south of Crete have been made available to the Army in the area, the daily notes.

      One and a half month after the end of the “war without arms” at the Evros border from end of February till the end of March, sporadic movement on the Turkish side of the border has been observed.

      At least four shooting incidents have been reported in the past two weeks, with Turkish jandarmerie to have fired at Greek border guards and members of the Frontex.

      Greece’s security forces are on high alert.

      Just a few days ago, Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu reiterated that Ankara’s policy of “open borders” will continue for anyone wishing to cross into Europe.

      Speaking to nationalist Akit TV on Wednesday, Cavusoglu claimed that Greece used “inhumane” behavior towards the migrants who want to cross into the country.

      Also Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu had threatened that the migrants will be allowed to leave Turkey again once the pandemic was over.

      PS It could be a very hot summer, should Turkey attempt to send migrants to Europe by land through Evros and by sea with boats to the Aegean islands and at the same time, deploys a drilling ship off Crete in July, as it claimed a few days ago.

      https://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2020/05/17/greece-shields-evros-border-blades-wire-400-border-guards

      #militarisation_des_frontières

    • Pour la bagatelle de 63 millions d’euro...

      Greece to extend fence on land border with Turkey to deter migrants

      Greece will proceed with plans to extend a cement and barbed-wire fence that it set up in 2012 along its northern border with Turkey to prevent migrants from entering the country, the government said on Monday.

      The conservative government made the decision this year, spokesman Stelios Petsas said, after tens of thousands of asylum seekers tried to enter EU member Greece in late February when Ankara said it would no longer prevent them from doing so.

      Greece, which is at odds with neighbouring Turkey over a range of issues, has been a gateway to Europe for people fleeing conflicts and poverty in the Middle East and beyond, with more than a million passing through the country in 2015-2016.

      The project led by four Greek construction companies will be completed within eight months at an estimated cost of 63 million euros, Petsas told a news briefing.

      The 12.5-kilometre fence was built eight years ago to stop migrants from crossing into Greece. It will be extended in areas indicated by Greek police and the army, Petsas said without elaborating. In March, he said it would be extended to 40 kilometres.

      Tensions between NATO allies Greece and Turkey, who disagree over where their continental shelves begin and end, have recently escalated further over hydrocarbon resources in the eastern Mediterranean region.

      https://kdal610.com/2020/08/24/greece-to-extend-fence-on-land-border-with-turkey-to-deter-migrants

    • Greece to extend fence on land border with Turkey to deter migrants

      Greece will proceed with plans to extend a cement and barbed-wire fence that it set up in 2012 along its northern border with Turkey to prevent migrants from entering the country, the government said on Monday.

      The conservative government made the decision this year, spokesman Stelios Petsas said, after tens of thousands of asylum seekers tried to enter EU member Greece in late February when Ankara said it would no longer prevent them from doing so.

      Greece, which is at odds with neighbouring Turkey over a range of issues, has been a gateway to Europe for people fleeing conflicts and poverty in the Middle East and beyond, with more than a million passing through the country in 2015-2016.

      The project led by four Greek construction companies will be completed within eight months at an estimated cost of 63 million euros, Petsas told a news briefing.

      The 12.5-kilometre fence was built eight years ago to stop migrants from crossing into Greece. It will be extended in areas indicated by Greek police and the army, Petsas said without elaborating. In March, he said it would be extended to 40 kilometres.

      Tensions between NATO allies Greece and Turkey, who disagree over where their continental shelves begin and end, have recently escalated further over hydrocarbon resources in the eastern Mediterranean region.

      https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-greece-turkey-fence/greece-to-extend-fence-on-land-border-with-turkey-to-deter-migrants-idUK

    • Evros land border fence to be ready in eight months

      The construction of a new fence on northeastern Greece’s Evros land border with Turkey will be completed in eight months, according to Citizens’ Protection Minister Michalis Chrysochoidis, speaking in Parliament on Monday.

      The border fence project has a total budget of 62.9 million euros and has been undertaken by a consortium put together by four construction companies.

      It will have a total length of 27 kilometers and eight elevated observatories will be constructed to be used by the Hellenic Army.

      Moreover, the existing fence will be reinforced with a steel railing measuring 4.3 meters in height, instead of the current 3.5 meters.

      Damage to the existing fence during attempts by thousands of migrants to cross into Greece territory from Turkey, as well as bad weather, will be repaired – including a 400-meter stretch that collapsed as a result of flooding.

      https://www.ekathimerini.com/256184/article/ekathimerini/news/evros-land-border-fence-to-be-ready-in-eight-months

    • New Evros fence to be completed by April next year, PM says during on-site inspection

      Construction of a new fence designed to stop undocumented migrants from slipping into Greece along its northeastern border with Turkey, demarcated by the Evros River, is expected to be completed by April next year, Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis said during a visit at the area of Ferres on Saturday.

      “Building the Evros fence was the least we could do to secure the border and make the people of Evros feel more safe,” Mitsotakis said.

      The 62.9-million-euro steel fence with barbed wire will be five meters high and have a total length of 27 kilometers. Eight elevated observatories will be constructed to be used by the Hellenic Army. The project, which is designed to also serve as anti-flood protection, has been undertaken by a consortium put together by four construction companies.

      During a meeting with local officials, Mitsotakis also confirmed the hiring of 400 guards to patrol the border.

      https://www.ekathimerini.com/258187/article/ekathimerini/news/new-evros-fence-to-be-completed-by-april-next-year-pm-says-during-on-s

    • To Vima: Evros wall will be ready in April, the Min. of Public
      Order said that ’labourers worked in the snow to finish the fence’.
      It also claims drones fly daily over the border - can anyone confirm? Only found older news saying they were to be deployed.

      https://twitter.com/lk2015r/status/1363625427307278340

      –—

      Εβρος : Ο φράκτης, τα drones και ο χιονιάς

      O καινούργιος φράκτης στα σύνορα με μήκος 27 χιλιόμετρα και με 13 χιλιόμετρα ο παλαιός, θα είναι απόλυτα έτοιμος τον Απρίλιο.

      Ούτε το χιόνι, ούτε οι λευκές νύχτες του Φεβρουαρίου, ούτε οι θερμοκρασίες κάτω από το μηδέν εμπόδισαν τα συνεργεία στις εργασίες τους για την κατασκευή του φράκτη στον Έβρο. Όπως μου είπε ο Μιχάλης Χρυσοχοΐδης « μηχανήματα και εργάτες δούλεψαν μέσα στα χιόνια για να ολοκληρώσουν τον φράκτη ». Μου αποκάλυψε μάλιστα ότι ο καινούργιος φράκτης στα σύνορα με μήκος 27 χιλιόμετρα και με 13 χιλιόμετρα ο παλαιός, θα είναι απόλυτα έτοιμος τον Απρίλιο. Και τούτο παρά το γεγονός ότι αυτές τις ημέρες το μόνον που δυσκολεύει τις εργασίες είναι τα πολλά νερά του ποταμού ο οποίος έχει υπερχειλίσει. Ωστόσο τα drones πετούν καθημερινά και συλλέγουν πληροφορίες, οι περιπολίες είναι συνεχείς και τα ηχοβολιστικά μηχανήματα έτοιμα, εάν χρειαστεί να δράσουν.

      https://www.tovima.gr/2021/02/19/opinions/evros-o-fraktis-ta-drones-kai-o-xionias

    • In post-pandemic Europe, migrants will face digital fortress

      As the world begins to travel again, Europe is sending migrants a loud message: Stay away!

      Greek border police are firing bursts of deafening noise from an armored truck over the frontier into Turkey. Mounted on the vehicle, the long-range acoustic device, or “sound cannon,” is the size of a small TV set but can match the volume of a jet engine.

      It’s part of a vast array of physical and experimental new digital barriers being installed and tested during the quiet months of the coronavirus pandemic at the 200-kilometer (125-mile) Greek border with Turkey to stop people entering the European Union illegally.

      A new steel wall, similar to recent construction on the US-Mexico border, blocks commonly-used crossing points along the Evros River that separates the two countries.

      Nearby observation towers are being fitted with long-range cameras, night vision, and multiple sensors. The data will be sent to control centers to flag suspicious movement using artificial intelligence analysis.

      “We will have a clear ‘pre-border’ picture of what’s happening,” Police Maj. Dimonsthenis Kamargios, head of the region’s border guard authority, told the Associated Press.

      The EU has poured 3 billion euros ($3.7 billion) into security tech research following the refugee crisis in 2015-16, when more than 1 million people – many escaping wars in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan – fled to Greece and on to other EU countries.

      The automated surveillance network being built on the Greek-Turkish border is aimed at detecting migrants early and deterring them from crossing, with river and land patrols using searchlights and long-range acoustic devices.

      Key elements of the network will be launched by the end of the year, Kamargios said. “Our task is to prevent migrants from entering the country illegally. We need modern equipment and tools to do that.”

      Researchers at universities around Europe, working with private firms, have developed futuristic surveillance and verification technology, and tested more than a dozen projects at Greek borders.

      AI-powered lie detectors and virtual border-guard interview bots have been piloted, as well as efforts to integrate satellite data with footage from drones on land, air, sea and underwater. Palm scanners record the unique vein pattern in a person’s hand to use as a biometric identifier, and the makers of live camera reconstruction technology promise to erase foliage virtually, exposing people hiding near border areas.

      Testing has also been conducted in Hungary, Latvia and elsewhere along the eastern EU perimeter.

      The more aggressive migration strategy has been advanced by European policymakers over the past five years, funding deals with Mediterranean countries outside the bloc to hold migrants back and transforming the EU border protection agency, Frontex, from a coordination mechanism to a full-fledged multinational security force.

      But regional migration deals have left the EU exposed to political pressure from neighbors.

      Earlier this month, several thousand migrants crossed from Morocco into the Spanish enclave of Ceuta in a single day, prompting Spain to deploy the army. A similar crisis unfolded on the Greek-Turkish border and lasted three weeks last year.

      Greece is pressing the EU to let Frontex patrol outside its territorial waters to stop migrants reaching Lesbos and other Greek islands, the most common route in Europe for illegal crossing in recent years.

      Armed with new tech tools, European law enforcement authorities are leaning further outside borders.

      Not all the surveillance programs being tested will be included in the new detection system, but human rights groups say the emerging technology will make it even harder for refugees fleeing wars and extreme hardship to find safety.

      Patrick Breyer, a European lawmaker from Germany, has taken an EU research authority to court, demanding that details of the AI-powered lie detection program be made public.

      “What we are seeing at the borders, and in treating foreign nationals generally, is that it’s often a testing field for technologies that are later used on Europeans as well. And that’s why everybody should care, in their own self-interest,” Breyer of the German Pirates Party told the AP.

      He urged authorities to allow broad oversight of border surveillance methods to review ethical concerns and prevent the sale of the technology through private partners to authoritarian regimes outside the EU.

      Ella Jakubowska, of the digital rights group EDRi, argued that EU officials were adopting “techno-solutionism” to sideline moral considerations in dealing with the complex issue of migration.

      “It is deeply troubling that, time and again, EU funds are poured into expensive technologies which are used in ways that criminalize, experiment with and dehumanize people on the move,” she said.

      Migration flows have slowed in many parts of Europe during the pandemic, interrupting an increase recorded over years. In Greece, for example, the number of arrivals dropped from nearly 75,000 in 2019 to 15,700 in 2020, a 78% decrease.

      But the pressure is sure to return. Between 2000 and 2020, the world’s migrant population rose by more than 80% to reach 272 million, according to United Nations data, fast outpacing international population growth.

      At the Greek border village of Poros, the breakfast discussion at a cafe was about the recent crisis on the Spanish-Moroccan border.

      Many of the houses in the area are abandoned and in a gradual state of collapse, and life is adjusting to that reality.

      Cows use the steel wall as a barrier for the wind and rest nearby.

      Panagiotis Kyrgiannis, a Poros resident, says the wall and other preventive measures have brought migrant crossings to a dead stop.

      “We are used to seeing them cross over and come through the village in groups of 80 or a 100,” he said. “We were not afraid. … They don’t want to settle here. All of this that’s happening around us is not about us.”

      https://www.ekathimerini.com/news/1162084/in-post-pandemic-europe-migrants-will-face-digital-fortress

      #pandémie #covid-19 #coronavirus #barrière_digitale #mur_digital #pré-mur #technologie #complexe_militaro-industriel #AI #IA #intelligence_artificielle #détecteurs_de_mensonge #satellite #biométrie #Hongrie #Lettonie #Frontex #surveillance #privatisation #techno-solutionism #déshumanisation

    • Greece: EU Commission upgrades border surveillance – and criticises it at the same time

      The Greek border police are using a sound cannon and drones on a new border fence, and the EU Commission expresses its „concern“ about this. However, it is itself funding several similar research projects, including a semi-autonomous drone with stealth features for „effective surveillance of borders and migration flows“

      On Monday, the Associated Press (AP) news agency had reported (https://apnews.com/article/middle-east-europe-migration-technology-health-c23251bec65ba45205a0851fab07e) that police in Greece plan to deploy a long-range sound cannon at the external border with Turkey in the future. The device, mounted on a police tank, makes a deafening noise with the volume of a jet engine. It is part of a system of steel walls that is being installed and tested along with drones on the 200-kilometre border with Turkey for migration defence. The vehicle, made by the Canadian manufacturer #Streit, comes from a series of seized „#Typhoons“ (https://defencereview.gr/mrap-vehicles-hellenic-police) that were to be illegally exported to Libya via Dubai (https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/streit-libya-un-1.3711776).

      After the AP report about the sound cannons went viral, Commission spokesman Adalbert Jahnz had clarified that it was not an EU project (https://twitter.com/Ad4EU/status/1400010786064437248).

      Yesterday, AP reported again on this (https://apnews.com/article/middle-east-europe-migration-government-and-politics-2cec83ae0d8544a719a885a). According to Jahnz, the Commission has „noted with concern“ the installation of the technology and is requesting information on its use. Methods used in EU member states would have to comply with European fundamental rights, including the „right to dignity“. The right to asylum and the principle of non-refoulement in states where refugees face persecution must also be respected.

      The Commission’s outrage is anything but credible. After Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan used refugees to storm the Turkish-Greek border in March 2020, Commission President Ursula von der Leyen travelled to the border river Evros before the start of a Frontex mission and declared her solidarity there. Literally, the former German Defence Minister said (https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/statement_20_380): „I thank Greece for being our European shield“.

      Commission funds research on border surveillance

      Also yesterday, the Commission-funded #ROBORDER project (https://cordis.europa.eu/project/id/740593/de) said in a statement (https://roborder.eu/2021/06/03/new-collaboration-with-borderuas-project) that it is now cooperating with the #BorderUAS project (https://cordis.europa.eu/project/id/883272/de). Both are about the use of drones. The police in Greece are involved and the applications are to be tested there.

      The acronym ROBORDER stands for „#Autonomous_Swarm_of_Heterogeneous_Robots_for_Border_Surveillance“. It works with drones on water, on land and in the air. In Greece, for example, a drone is to be used to detect „unauthorised sea border crossing“ (https://roborder.eu/the-project/demonstrators), as well as an aircraft from the #Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft with a surveillance test platform, #radar systems and thermal imaging cameras.

      All drones in ROBORDER are supposed to be able to operate in swarms. They are controlled via a mobile control centre from the German company #Elettronica. This „#Multipurpose_Mission_Support_Vehicle“ (#MUROS) is used to collect all recorded data (https://www.elettronica.de/de/produkte/oeffentliche-sicherheit-integration). The project, which will soon come to an end, will cost around nine million euros, of which the EU Commission will pay the largest share.

      High-resolution cameras on lighter-than-air drones

      The acronym BorderUAS means „#Semi-Autonomous_Border_Surveillance_Platform_with_a_High-Resolution_Multi-Sensor_Surveillance_Payload“. Border authorities, police forces as well as companies and institutes mainly from Eastern Europe and Greece want to use it to investigate so-called lighter-than-air drones.

      These can be small zeppelins or balloons that are propelled by alternative propulsion systems and have a multitude of sensors and cameras. The participating company #HiperSfera (https://hipersfera.hr) from Croatia markets such systems for border surveillance, for example.

      The project aims to prevent migration on the so-called Eastern Mediterranean route, the Western Balkan route and across the EU’s eastern external land border. According to the project description, these account for 58 percent of all detected irregular border crossings. BorderUAS ends in 2023, and the technology will be tested by police forces in Greece, Ukraine and Belarus until then. The Commission is funding the entire budget with around seven million euros.

      Civilian and military drone research

      For border surveillance, the EU Defence Agency and the Commission are funding numerous civilian and military drone projects in Greece. These include the €35 million #OCEAN2020 project (https://ocean2020.eu), which conducts research on the integration of drones and unmanned submarines into fleet formations. #ARESIBO, which costs around seven million euros (https://cordis.europa.eu/project/id/833805/de) and on which the Greek, Portuguese and Romanian Ministries of Defence and the #NATO Research Centre are working on drone technology, will end in 2022. With another five million euros, the Commission is supporting an „#Information_Exchange_for_Command_Control_and_Coordination_Systems_at_the_Borders“ (#ANDROMEDA) (https://cordis.europa.eu/project/id/833881/de). This also involves drones used by navies, coast guards and the police forces of the member states.

      In #CAMELOT (https://cordis.europa.eu/project/id/740736/de) are flying various drones from Israel and Portugal, and as in ROBORDER, a single ground station is to be used for this purpose. A scenario „illegal activity, illegal immigration persons“ is being tested with various surveillance equipment at the Evros river. The Commission is contributing eight million euros of the total sum. This year, results from #FOLDOUT (https://cordis.europa.eu/project/rcn/214861/factsheet/de) will also be tried out on the Greek-Turkish border river Evros, involving satellites, high-flying platforms and drones with technology for „through-foliage detection“ (https://foldout.eu/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Flyer_v1_Foldout_EN_v2_Print.pdf) in the „outermost regions of the EU„. The Commission is allocating eight million euros for this as well.

      Also with EU funding, predominantly Greek partners, including drone manufacturers #ALTUS and #Intracom_Defense, as well as the Air Force, are developing a drone under the acronym LOTUS with „autonomy functions“ and stealth features for surveillance. The project manager promotes the system as suitable for „effective surveillance of borders and migration flows“ (https://www.intracomdefense.com/ide-leader-in-european-defense-programs).

      https://digit.site36.net/2021/06/04/greece-eu-commission-upgrades-border-surveillance-and-criticises-it-at

      #drones #Canada #complexe_militaro-industriel

    • La Grèce construit un mur sur sa frontière avec la Turquie

      22 août - 13h : La Grèce a annoncé vendredi avoir achevé une clôture de 40 km à sa frontière avec la Turquie et mis en place un nouveau système de #surveillance pour empêcher d’éventuels demandeurs d’asile d’essayer d’atteindre l’Europe après la prise de contrôle de l’Afghanistan par les talibans.

      La crise afghane a créé « des possibilités de flux de migrants », a déclaré le ministre de la Protection des citoyens Michalis Chrysochoidis après s’être rendu vendredi dans la région d’Evros avec le ministre de la Défense et le chef des forces armées. « Nous ne pouvons pas attendre passivement l’impact possible », a-t-il affirmé. « Nos frontières resteront sûres et inviolables. »

      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/refugies-balkans-les-dernieres-infos

  • #Frontex wants to disembark refugees in Senegal

    #Hera“ is the only Frontex maritime mission on the territory of a third country. A new agreement might extend this joint border #surveillance.

    The EU border agency Frontex wants to bring back refugees picked up in the Atlantic Ocean to Senegal. The EU Commission should therefore negotiate a so-called #Status_Agreement with the government in Dakar. The proposal can be found in the annual report (https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-6294-2020-INIT/en/pdf) on the implementation of the Regulation for the surveillance of external sea borders (https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32014R0656). It regulates the maritime „operational cooperation“ of Frontex with third countries.

    It would be the first agreement of this kind with an African government. So far, Frontex has only concluded Status Agreements with a number of Western Balkan countries for the joint surveillance of land borders. The only operation to date in a third country (https://digit.site36.net/2019/11/25/frontex-expands-operations-in-eu-neighbouring-countries) was launched by the Border Agency in Albania a year ago.

    Frontex has been coordinating the joint operation „Hera“ in the Atlantic since 2006 (https://frontex.europa.eu/media-centre/news-release/longest-frontex-coordinated-operation-hera-the-canary-islands-WpQlsc). The reason for the first and thus oldest EU border surveillance mission (http://www.statewatch.org/analyses/no-307-frontex-operation-hera.pdf) was the arrival of many thousands of refugees in boats on the Canary Islands via Morocco, Mauritania, Cape Verde and Senegal. For a short period of time, the German Federal Police had also participated in „Hera“ (http://dipbt.bundestag.de/doc/btd/16/098/1609888.pdf), in addition to Portugal, France, Italy, Finland and Luxembourg. Already in 2007 the arrivals decreased drastically. For the past year, Frontex’s „Migratory Map“ (https://frontex.europa.eu/along-eu-borders/migratory-map) records only 711 irregular arrivals (by December) on Gran Canaria, Tenerife and the other Spanish islands. According to media reports (https://www.laprovincia.es/canarias/2020/03/03/canarias-supera-1200-personas-llegadas/1260792.html), this number has been nearly doubled in the first two months of 2020 alone.

    „Hera“ is the only maritime mission in which Frontex coordinates an operation which, with Senegal, also takes place in the 12-mile zone, the exclusive economic zone and the airspace of a third country. In „Themis“, „Indalo“ and „Poseidon“, the operational plan only covers waters under the jurisdiction and monitoring of EU Member States.

    Currently, „Hera“ is operated by Spain as the „host state“ with support from Portugal. The two countries patrol with frigates and smaller ships and carry out aerial surveillance with a helicopter. They first transmit their information to a control centre in Las Palmas, to which Morocco, Mauritania and Senegal have sent liaison officers. Processed intelligence is then forwarded to the International Coordination Centre (ICC) in Madrid, which manages all operations of the Spanish border authorities and is also responsible for cooperation with Frontex.

    If suspicious boats are detected in the area of operations in „Hera“, a report is made to the competent Maritime Rescue Operations Centre (MRCC). All those picked up in the Spanish Search and Rescue zone have been able to disembark in the Canary Islands in recent years.

    If the refugees are still in the Senegalese #SAR zone, the national coast guard brings them back to the West African country. With a Status Agreement, Frontex assets could do the same. According to SAR Info, a Canadian information platform, the Senegalese national #MRCC (https://sarcontacts.info/countries/senegal) is also responsible for the rescue coordination off the coast of Gambia, Guinea-Bissau and Mauritania.

    Before each operation, Frontex is required to assess the possible disembarkation of intercepted refugees in the third countries concerned. In the report for 2018, Leggeri writes that his agency, with the „host states“ of the missions „Themis“ (Italy) and „Indalo“ (Spain), considered such disembarkations to Libya and Tunisia as well as to Morocco to be incompatible with regulations to which Frontex is bound.

    From Frontex’s point of view, however, disembarkations would be possible for Turkey and Senegal, as the governments there do not violate basic fundamental and human rights and also adhere to the principle of non-refoulement, according to which refugees may not be returned to countries from which they have fled. So far, says Leggeri, Frontex and the EU Member States involved in „Poseidon“ and „Hera“ have not forced any persons to Turkey or Senegal.

    The report signed by Frontex director Fabrice Leggeri is as usual one year late, the paper published last week refers to 2018. That was the same year in which the European Union once again wanted to set up „regional disembarkation centres“ in North Africa (https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/IP_18_4629). There, asylum applications of persons seeking protection would be examined even before they reach Europe. All the governments in question rejected the proposal, and the African Union also opposed it a year ago. Led by Egypt, the 55 member states criticise the planned EU facilities as „de facto detention centres“ (https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/feb/24/african-union-seeks-to-kill-eu-plan-to-process-migrants-in-africa).

    In the report, Leggeri complains that Frontex has too little competence in its four maritime missions. Bilateral agreements, such as those Italy has concluded with Libya (https://www.hrw.org/news/2020/02/12/italy-halt-abusive-migration-cooperation-libya) or Spain with Morocco (https://english.elpais.com/elpais/2019/02/21/inenglish/1550736538_089908.html), allow for much closer cooperation with North African coastguards.

    https://digit.site36.net/2020/03/01/frontex-wants-to-disembark-refugees-in-senegal
    #Sénégal #asile #migrations #réfugiés #externalisation #désembarquement #surveillance_frontalière #accord #accords #frontières

    Et pas mal de matériel sur seenthis autour de...
    #plateformes_de_désembarquement #disembarkation_paltforms #plateformes_de_débarquement #regional_disembarkation_platforms #Albanie #Océane_atlantique #Atlantique #Allemagne

    –-> voir notamment ici, dans la métaliste sur l’externalisation des contrôles frontaliers :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765334

    ping @karine4 @isskein @_kg_

  • L’UE veut multiplier les « #partenariats » avec les pays africains

    L’UE cherche à placer une série de « partenariats » de diverses thématiques politiques au cœur de sa #stratégie_UE-Afrique, qui sera officiellement lancée début mars, selon un document confidentiel.

    22 commissaires européens sur 27 doivent se retrouver jeudi à Addis Abeba en Ethiopie, pour le sommet de l’Union africaine. Le continent, dont la présidente de la commission a fait une priorité, doit faire l’objet d’une stratégie ad hoc. Dans une première version qu’Euractiv a pu consulter, la Commission assure qu’il faut « changer de discours et regarder l’Afrique sous l’angle de son devenir : la terre de la plus jeune population mondiale, la plus grande région commerciale depuis la création de l’OMC, un appétit pour l’intégration régionale, l’autonomisation des femmes, et tout ça créant d’immenses #opportunités_économiques. »

    L’ébauche de stratégie énonce aussi les domaines que l’UE couvrirait. Elle souhaite ainsi créer des partenariats pour la #croissance_durable et l’#emploi, pour une #transition_écologique, pour une #transformation_numérique, pour la #paix, la #sécurité, la #gouvernance et la #résilience, mais aussi pour la #migration et la #mobilité et enfin, le #multilatéralisme.

    L’accent mis sur les « partenariats » plutôt que sur le « #développement » y est clair. Il avait aussi marqué les premiers mois de la Commission #Von_der_Leyen.

    Le document de la Commission contient peu de substance sur les politiques mais montre la direction de la politique EU-Afrique dans l’un des documents clés donnant les orientations de la Commission « géopolitique » d’#Ursula_von_der_Leyen. Il devrait être dévoilé par l’exécutif le 4 mars sous la forme d’une communication, mais il est peu probable qu’il devienne une politique officielle avant le sommet UE/Union africaine en octobre à Bruxelles.

    Le processus d’ébauche de la #stratégie a débuté avec une réunion des ministres européens du Développement le 13 février dernier. Ces derniers doivent maintenant adopter des conclusions lors d’un Conseil Affaires étrangères en avril ou mai, puis lors du sommet européen des 18 et 19 juin.

    La #politique_africaine est aussi portée par le gouvernement finlandais, qui détient la présidence tournante de l’UE jusqu’en juillet.

    « La #Finlande prépare aussi sa propre stratégie pour l’Afrique. Les deux stratégies visent à renforcer un #partenariat_stratégique entre égaux entre l’UE et l’Afrique, et à stimuler leurs relations commerciales et politiques », commente la ministre finlandaise du Développement, Ville Skinnari.

    La stratégie se concentrera probablement sur les manières d’accroître les #opportunités_commerciales et l’#investissement entre les deux continents. Elle promet aussi davantage de soutien de l’UE pour l’accord établissant la #zone_de_libre-échange continentale africaine, qui entrera en vigueur plus tard dans l’année.

    Il risque néanmoins d’être éclipsé par les lentes tractations autour du successeur de l’#accord_de_Cotonou, qui couvre les relations politiques et commerciales entre l’UE et l’Afrique, les Caraïbes et le Pacifique. L’accord de Cotonou expire en mars et pour l’instant pas l’ombre d’un nouvel accord à l’horizon.

    L’exécutif européen assure qu’il est sur la bonne voie pour verser les 44 milliards d’euros d’investissements dans le #secteur_privé promis dans le cadre du #Plan_extérieur_d’investissement lancé par la Commission Juncker. Reste à savoir si la nouvelle « stratégie » comprendra de nouveaux investissements ou outils d’investissement.

    La note confidentielle souligne seulement que la Commission se concentrera sur « la mobilisation de tous les moyens : l’#engagement_politique, l’#aide_publique_au_développement, la #sécurité, la mobilisation des #ressources_domestiques, le secteur privé, etc. »

    L’UE est loin d’être le seul acteur international en lice pour développer davantage de relations économiques et politiques avec l’Afrique. Le #Royaume-Uni, l’#Inde, la #Turquie, la #Russie et la #France ont organisé ou organisent des conférences sur l’investissement axées sur l’Afrique en 2020.

    L’administration américaine de Donald Trump a également commencé à étoffer sa nouvelle offre de #commerce et d’investissement aux dirigeants africains.

    Le secrétaire d’État américain, Mike Pompeo, s’est rendu au Sénégal, en Éthiopie et en Angola pour une tournée express du continent la semaine dernière. Il s’agissait de son premier voyage en Afrique subsaharienne depuis sa prise de fonction il y a deux ans.

    L’administration Trump a entamé des pourparlers sur un accord de libre-échange avec le #Kenya ce mois-ci. Selon elle, c’est le premier d’une série d’#accords_commerciaux_bilatéraux avec les nations africaines dans le cadre de sa nouvelle stratégie commerciale « #Prosper_Africa ».

    Dans le même temps, Washington veut que sa nouvelle #Société_internationale_financière_pour_le_développement rivalise avec les investissements chinois sur le continent africain.

    https://www.euractiv.fr/section/l-europe-dans-le-monde/news/partnerships-to-be-at-heart-of-eu-africa-strategy-leaked-paper-reveals
    #Afrique #accords #UE #EU #libre_échange #USA #Etats-Unis

    • A record number of College members travel to Addis Ababa for the 10th European Union-African Union Commission-to-Commission meeting

      The President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, travels tomorrow to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, for the 10th Commission-to-Commission meeting between the European Union and the African Union, accompanied by 20 Commissioners and the EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy. Discussions will focus on key issues such as growth, jobs, green transition, digital, peace, security and governance, and mobility and migration.

      Before departing Brussels, President von der Leyen, said: “Europe and Africa are natural partners. We have a historic bond and we share many of today’s challenges. One of our main objectives is to turn the green and digital transformation of our economies into opportunities for our youth.”

      This 10th Commission-to-Commission meeting marks a record participation on the EU side, a testament of the priority relations which Africa represents for the new European Commission and its aspiration to take them to a new level.

      Besides High Representative/Vice-President of the Commission Josep Borrell, Vice-Presidents for the European Green Deal, Frans Timmermans, for a Europe fit for the Digital Age, Margrethe Vestager, for an Economy that works for people, Valdis Dombrovskis, for Inter-institutional Relations and Foresight, Maroš Šefčovič, for Values and Transparency, Věra Jourová, for Democracy and Demography, Dubravka Šuica, as well as Vice-President for Promoting our European way of life, Margaritis Schinas, will accompany the President.

      Commissioners for International Partnerships, Jutta Urpilainen, for Trade, Phil Hogan, for Innovation and Youth, Mariya Gabriel, for Jobs and Social Rights, Nicolas Schmit, for Economy, Paolo Gentiloni, for Agriculture, Janusz Wojciechowski, for Cohesion and Reforms, Elisa Ferreira, for Justice, Didier Reynders, for Equality, Helena Dalli, for Home Affairs, Ylva Johansson, for Crisis Management, Janez Lenarčič, as well as Commissioners for Transport, Adina Ioana Vălean, for Energy, Kadri Simson and for Environment, Oceans and Fisheries, Virginijus Sinkevičius, will also travel to Addis Ababa.

      The EU and the African Union (AU) will discuss how to take foward their cooperation to address key challenges both Europe and Africa are facing such as the need to promote sustainable growth and jobs, green transition, digital transformation, peace, security and good governance, mobility and migration.

      The meeting will also be an opportunity for the EU side to consult its African partners on the upcoming comprehensive Africa Strategy which President von der Leyen promised to deliver in her first 100 days in office and is due to be presented in early March.

      The presentation of this important document will kick-start a wider consultation process that will lead up to the EU-AU Ministerial meeting in May 2020 in Kigali, Rwanda, and the upcoming EU-AU Summit in October in Brussels, where both sides will agree a joint approach on shared priorities.

      Background

      The EU and the AU have progressively built a solid strategic and political partnership that is anchored on reciprocal commitments. This partnership is based on shared values and interests, enshrined in the Joint Africa-EU Strategy adopted in 2007 in the Summit in Lisbon.

      Political dialogue between the EU and the AU takes place regularly at different levels. Commission-to-Commission and ministerial meetings take place every year, whilst EU-AU Summits at Heads of State level are held every three years. At the 5th AU-EU Summit in 2017, African and European leaders identified economic opportunities for the youth, peace and security, mobility and migration and cooperation on governance as the strategic priorities for 2018-2020 and committed to tackle them jointly.

      The EU also presented in the Summit in 2017 in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, its new External Investment Plan with the objective to create 10 million new jobs by 2023, in particular for women and young people. The Plan hopes to trigger €47 billion in public and private investments.

      In the last Commission-to-Commission meeting in May 2018 in Brussels, the EU and the AU signed a Memorandum of Understanding to reinforce their cooperation in the area of peace and security.

      The two Commissions are committed to being active players and driving forces to implement the EU-AU Partnership, which is today more relevant than ever in a fast evolving global environment.

      https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/IP_20_317

    • Questions et réponses : vers une #stratégie_globale_avec_l'Afrique

      1. Pourquoi l’UE a-t-elle besoin d’une nouvelle #stratégie ?

      L’Afrique est le voisin le plus proche de l’Europe. En raison de l’histoire, de la proximité et des intérêts partagés, les liens qui unissent l’Afrique à l’Union européenne (UE) sont vastes et profonds. Il est temps de faire passer cette relation à un niveau supérieur.

      Pour les relations entre l’Afrique et l’UE, 2020 sera une année charnière pour concrétiser l’ambition de développer un #partenariat encore plus solide.

      Le nouvel #accord de partenariat entre l’UE et le groupe des États d’Afrique, des Caraïbes et du Pacifique devrait être conclu et le prochain sommet UE-Union africaine aura lieu à Bruxelles en octobre 2020 en vue de définir un #programme_commun_de_partenariat.

      L’Afrique comme l’Europe sont confrontées à un nombre croissant de défis communs, notamment les effets du changement climatique et la transformation numérique.

      L’Europe doit donc coopérer avec l’Afrique pour relever avec elle les défis communs du 21e siècle. C’est la raison pour laquelle cette communication propose de nouvelles voies de coopération entre les deux continents qui visent à renforcer l’alliance stratégique de l’UE avec l’Afrique.

      2. Qu’y a-t-il de nouveau dans cette proposition de nouvelle stratégie ?

      La communication conjointe de la Commission et du haut représentant est une contribution à une nouvelle stratégie avec l’Afrique. Elle expose des idées pour intensifier la coopération dans tous les aspects du partenariat UE-Afrique. Elle propose un cadre global pour le futur partenariat afin de permettre aux deux parties d’atteindre leurs objectifs communs et de relever les défis mondiaux.

      En réponse aux nouvelles réalités changeantes, la proposition de stratégie met l’accent sur la #transition_écologique et la #transformation_numérique, qui constituent les principaux domaines cibles de la #coopération future.

      Surtout, l’UE insiste tout au long de la communication conjointe sur la nécessité de prendre pleinement en considération les #jeunes et les #femmes ainsi que leur potentiel en tant que vecteurs de changement. En répondant à leurs aspirations, nous déterminerons l’avenir du continent.

      La proposition de nouvelle stratégie constitue un point de départ pour faire passer le partenariat à un niveau supérieur fondé sur une compréhension claire de nos intérêts et responsabilités mutuels et respectifs. Elle vise à rendre compte de l’exhaustivité et de la maturité de notre relation, dans laquelle les intérêts et les valeurs des deux parties sont rassemblés pour promouvoir une coopération commune dans des domaines d’intérêt commun.

      Il s’agit notamment de développer un modèle de #croissance_verte, d’améliorer l’environnement des entreprises et le climat d’#investissement, d’encourager l’#éducation, la #recherche, l’#innovation et la création d’#emplois_décents grâce à des investissements durables, de maximiser les bienfaits de l’#intégration_économique_régionale et des #échanges_commerciaux, de lutter contre le #changement_climatique, de garantir l’accès à l’#énergie_durable, de protéger la #biodiversité et les #ressources_naturelles, ainsi que de promouvoir la #paix et la #sécurité, de garantir la bonne gestion de la #migration et de la #mobilité et d’œuvrer ensemble au renforcement d’un ordre multilatéral fondé sur des règles qui promeut les valeurs universelles, les #droits_de_l'homme, la #démocratie et l’égalité entre les hommes et les femmes. Une coopération renforcée sur les questions mondiales et multilatérales doit être au cœur de notre action commune.

      L’UE et ses États membres doivent adapter leur dialogue avec l’Afrique en veillant à ce que leur positionnement soit conforme à nos intérêts mutuels et accorder plus d’importance aux valeurs, aux principes clés et aux bonnes pratiques réglementaires, compte tenu de l’intérêt accru affiché par de nombreux acteurs pour le potentiel de l’Afrique.

      3. Quels sont les principaux défis et domaines de coopération à venir ?

      La stratégie recense cinq domaines clés de la future coopération approfondie entre l’Europe et l’Afrique.

      Il s’agit des domaines suivants : (1) transition écologique et accès à l’énergie, (2) transformation numérique, (3) croissance et emplois durables, (4) paix et #gouvernance, (5) migration et mobilité.

      Dans chacun de ces domaines, la proposition de nouvelle stratégie définit des moyens de réaliser des objectifs communs.

      En outre, le développement d’une coopération politique renforcée sur les questions mondiales et multilatérales sera au cœur de notre action commune.

      4. L’UE a-t-elle noué des contacts avec les parties prenantes pour élaborer cette stratégie ?

      La Commission et le haut représentant ont présenté aujourd’hui les premiers éléments de la stratégie. Des contacts préliminaires avaient eu lieu auparavant. Outre un dialogue interne avec les États membres de l’UE et les députés du Parlement européen ainsi que la société civile au niveau formel et informel, l’UE a noué des contacts avec des partenaires africains, notamment lors de la 10e rencontre de « Commission à Commission », qui s’est tenue le 27 février 2020 à Addis-Abeba.

      Les propositions s’inscrivent également dans le prolongement du programme arrêté d’un commun accord lors du sommet Union africaine-UE de 2017 à Abidjan et des récents échanges qui ont eu lieu au niveau politique.

      La communication conjointe de ce jour présente des propositions destinées à alimenter le dialogue en cours avec les États membres de l’UE, les partenaires africains, ainsi que le secteur privé, la société civile et les groupes de réflexion, et il sera donné suite à ces propositions dans la perspective du prochain sommet UE-Union africaine qui se tiendra à Bruxelles en octobre 2020.

      La réunion ministérielle Union africaine-UE qui se tiendra les 4 et 5 mai à Kigali sera une autre occasion de débattre en profondeur de la communication à un niveau plus formel avec la partie africaine.

      Le sommet UE-Union africaine d’octobre 2020 devrait être le point culminant au cours duquel nous espérons nous accorder sur une approche commune avec nos partenaires africains pour s’attaquer aux priorités communes, ce qui est notre objectif.

      5. La nouvelle stratégie va-t-elle remplacer la stratégie commune Afrique-UE définie en 2007 ?

      La stratégie commune Afrique-UE de 2007 a marqué une étape importante dans la relation entre l’UE et l’Afrique. Toutefois, à cette période, le monde était différent et la réalité de notre partenariat avec l’Afrique s’inscrivait dans un autre contexte mondial. En 2020, soit 13 ans plus tard, de nouvelles opportunités et de nouveaux défis se présentent, tels le changement climatique, la transformation numérique, les inégalités, les pressions démographiques et la gouvernance mondiale. L’Afrique est un continent en plein essor, qui a vu ces dernières années certains de ses pays afficher les taux de croissances les plus rapides au niveau mondial, et elle attire l’attention de plusieurs autres acteurs. Nous vivons dans un environnement mondial concurrentiel dans lequel les biens publics mondiaux sont menacés. Nous devons nous adapter à ces nouvelles réalités et renouveler notre partenariat avec l’Afrique.

      Aujourd’hui, l’UE propose les priorités envisageables pour ce nouveau partenariat. L’UE continuera de dialoguer avec les partenaires africains en vue de définir avec eux nos priorités stratégiques communes pour les années à venir.

      6. En quoi cette stratégie est-elle compatible avec les objectifs plus larges de la Commission européenne, tels que le pacte vert pour l’Europe et la priorité accordée au numérique ?

      La Commission européenne entend conduire la transition vers une planète saine et un nouveau monde numérique. Le dialogue de l’UE avec l’Afrique prend en compte ces ambitions dans ces deux domaines.

      Pour atteindre les objectifs de développement durable, l’UE et l’Afrique doivent choisir un avenir à faible intensité de carbone, efficace dans l’utilisation des ressources et résilient face au changement climatique, conformément à l’accord de Paris.

      La Commission européenne est déterminée à faire de l’Europe le premier continent neutre sur le plan climatique au monde ; dans le cadre de son action extérieure, elle propose de coopérer avec l’Afrique afin de maximiser les bienfaits de la transition écologique et de réduire autant que possible les menaces pesant sur l’environnement. Cela englobera chaque aspect de l’économie circulaire et de chaînes de valeur et de systèmes alimentaires durables, à travers la promotion des énergies renouvelables, la réduction des émissions, la protection de la biodiversité et des écosystèmes et une progression vers des modèles d’urbanisation verts et durables.

      Les pays africains sont particulièrement vulnérables face au changement climatique, car celui-ci risque de compromettre les progrès en cours en matière de développement durable.

      De même, la Commission européenne s’est engagée à créer une Europe adaptée à l’ère numérique ; dans le cadre de son action extérieure, elle propose de coopérer avec l’Afrique afin de promouvoir et de valoriser la transformation numérique en Afrique et de garantir l’accès à des services numériques sûrs et abordables.

      Selon les estimations, une augmentation de 10 % de la couverture numérique pourrait augmenter le PIB de l’Afrique de plus de 1 %. Avec les investissements, les infrastructures et le cadre réglementaire appropriés, le passage au numérique a le pouvoir de transformer les économies et les sociétés en Afrique. En outre, l’interdépendance des deux continents sous-tend que le dialogue de l’UE avec l’Afrique est dicté tant par ses valeurs que par ses intérêts.

      7. Quels liens économiques existent entre l’Europe et l’Afrique ?

      L’UE est le principal partenaire de l’Afrique en matière d’échanges et d’investissements, et le principal soutien de la zone de libre-échange continentale africaine (ZLECA), avec la mobilisation prévue de 72,5 millions d’euros d’ici la fin de 2020.

      En 2018, le total des échanges de biens entre les 27 États membres de l’UE et l’Afrique s’élevait à 235 milliards d’euros, soit 32 % des échanges totaux de l’Afrique. À titre de comparaison, ce total s’élève à 125 milliards d’euros pour la Chine (17 %) et à 46 milliards d’euros pour les États-Unis (6 %).

      En 2017, le stock d’investissements directs étrangers des 27 États membres de l’UE en Afrique s’élevait à 222 milliards d’euros, soit plus de cinq fois les stocks des États-Unis (42 milliards d’euros) ou de la Chine (38 milliards d’euros).

      8. Quelle est l’ampleur de l’aide humanitaire et de l’aide au développement fournies par l’UE en Afrique ?

      L’UE et ses États membres sont le principal fournisseur d’aide publique au développement (APD) en faveur de l’Afrique. En 2018, l’UE et ses 27 États membres ont octroyé 19,6 milliards d’euros, soit 46 % du total reçu par l’Afrique.

      En outre, l’UE, conjointement avec ses États membres, est le principal donateur d’aide humanitaire en Afrique. Depuis 2014, la Commission européenne a elle-même alloué plus de 3,5 milliards d’euros à l’aide humanitaire déployée en Afrique.

      L’UE négocie actuellement son futur budget à long terme. Selon les propositions de la Commission européenne, le nouvel instrument de financement extérieur de l’UE pour la période 2021-2027 aura une portée mondiale, mais plus de 60 % des fonds disponibles profiteront à l’Afrique.

      9. Que fait l’UE pour stimuler les investissements et la création d’emplois en Afrique ?

      L’Afrique est un continent où les possibilités de croissance sont de plus en plus nombreuses, avec une main-d’œuvre jeune et innovante et des niveaux de croissance économique élevés. L’UE est le plus grand partenaire commercial et d’investissement de l’Afrique.

      Nous entendons coopérer avec l’Afrique afin de :

      – stimuler les échanges commerciaux et les investissements durables en Afrique ;

      – promouvoir des réformes qui améliorent l’environnement des entreprises et le climat d’investissement ;

      – améliorer l’accès à une éducation de qualité, aux compétences, à la recherche, à l’innovation, à la santé et aux droits sociaux ;

      – favoriser l’intégration économique régionale et continentale.

      Il est possible d’y parvenir en s’appuyant sur les travaux menés dans le cadre de l’Alliance Afrique-Europe pour un investissement et des emplois durables, lancée en 2018 dans le but de créer 10 millions d’emplois en cinq ans, de stimuler l’investissement et de promouvoir le développement durable. Avec le plan d’investissement extérieur de l’UE, qui est un élément clé de l’Alliance, l’UE a déjà alloué 4,6 milliards d’euros de fonds pour des financements mixtes et des garanties depuis 2018. Ces fonds devraient permettre de mobiliser 47 milliards d’euros d’investissements publics et privés. En outre, depuis 2018, l’UE a également fourni près de 1,4 milliard d’euros à l’Afrique pour qu’elle renforce l’environnement des entreprises et le climat d’investissement.

      L’UE propose de faire de l’Alliance un pilier central des relations économiques entre les deux continents.

      10. L’UE accordera-t-elle la priorité aux échanges commerciaux, aux investissements et à la croissance économique aux dépens des droits de l’homme ? Comment la stratégie va-t-elle promouvoir le respect des droits de l’homme ?

      Le respect des droits de l’homme demeure au cœur de la coopération au développement de l’UE et occupe donc une place fondamentale dans la proposition de nouvelle stratégie.

      Le respect des droits de l’homme universels - politiques, civils, économiques, sociaux ou culturels - restera une caractéristique essentielle de notre partenariat.

      Dans le cadre du partenariat pour la paix et la gouvernance, l’UE s’emploiera à unir ses forces à celles des partenaires africains afin de promouvoir le plein respect des droits de l’homme, en agissant à tous les niveaux. Par exemple, l’UE continuera de soutenir les défenseurs des droits de l’homme et les initiatives visant à renforcer les organisations de la société civile. Une approche plus stratégique et structurée des dialogues politiques sur les droits de l’homme menés avec les pays africains sera également adoptée, en complémentarité avec les consultations régulières avec les organisations régionales africaines et le dialogue bien établi sur les droits de l’homme entre l’UE et l’UA.

      Le développement, c’est-à-dire la croissance économique, ne peut être durable que s’il repose sur les fondements du respect des droits de l’homme.

      11. Que fait l’UE pour promouvoir la paix et la stabilité en Afrique ?

      La paix et la sécurité ne sont pas seulement un besoin fondamental pour tous, elles constituent également une condition préalable au développement économique et social.

      La paix, la sécurité, la bonne gouvernance et la prospérité économique en Afrique sont également essentielles pour la propre sécurité et prospérité de l’UE.

      L’UE est déjà active dans ce domaine en Afrique. Elle fournit actuellement des conseils et des formations à plus de 30 000 membres des personnels militaires, policiers et judiciaires africains dans le cadre de 10 missions relevant de la politique de sécurité et de défense commune. En outre, l’UE a fourni 3,5 milliards d’euros par l’intermédiaire de la facilité de soutien à la paix pour l’Afrique depuis sa création en 2004, dont 2,4 milliards d’euros depuis 2014, afin de contribuer aux opérations militaires et de paix menées par l’Union africaine.

      Par ailleurs, plus d’un million de personnes en Afrique subsaharienne ont bénéficié depuis 2014 de programmes soutenus par l’UE en faveur de la consolidation de la paix après un conflit et de la prévention des conflits.

      Dans le cadre des propositions formulées dans la stratégie, l’UE adaptera et approfondira son soutien aux efforts de paix africains au moyen d’une coopération plus structurée et stratégique, en mettant particulièrement l’accent sur les régions connaissant les tensions et les vulnérabilités les plus fortes. L’UE propose de soutenir les capacités africaines en matière de défense et de sécurité, notamment au moyen de la facilité européenne pour la paix et de ses missions de la PSDC, et de se concentrer sur une approche intégrée des conflits et des crises, en agissant à tous les stades du cycle des conflits. Cela suppose de déployer des efforts de prévention, de résolution et de stabilisation au moyen d’actions bien ciblées sur le plan humanitaire, du développement, de la paix et de la sécurité.

      La résilience devrait en particulier être au cœur des efforts consentis par l’Afrique et l’UE pour faire face aux conflits et fragilités qui perdurent, sachant que la résilience, la paix, la sécurité et la gouvernance sont étroitement liées. L’UE propose, dans la stratégie, de soutenir les efforts déployés par nos partenaires africains pour s’attaquer à l’ensemble des défis et accroître leur résilience globale.

      12. Comment l’UE coopérera-t-elle avec l’Afrique en matière de migration et de mobilité ?

      L’évolution démographique, l’aspiration à bénéficier d’opportunités économiques, les conflits et crises actuels et l’impact du changement climatique auront pour conséquence que les niveaux de migration et de déplacement forcé continueront d’engendrer des défis et des opportunités aussi bien pour l’Europe que pour l’Afrique.

      La migration restera l’une des priorités de notre partenariat. Une migration et une mobilité bien maîtrisées peuvent avoir un effet positif sur les pays d’origine, de transit et de destination et profiter aux sociétés de nos deux continents.

      Depuis 2015, les pays de l’UE et les pays africains ont mis en place, dans le cadre du dialogue et de la coopération relevant des processus de La Valette, de Rabat et de Khartoum, une approche commune de la gestion des aspects extérieurs de la migration et de la mobilité, qui a démontré qu’ensemble nous pouvons sauver et protéger des vies, venir en aide aux personnes dans le besoin et démanteler le terrible modèle économique des passeurs et des trafiquants.

      L’UE coopérera avec l’Afrique sur une approche équilibrée, cohérente et globale de la migration et de la mobilité, guidée par les principes de solidarité, de partenariat et de responsabilité partagée et fondée sur le respect des droits de l’homme et du droit international. Tant les possibilités de migration légale que l’amélioration de la coopération en matière de retour et de réadmission feront l’objet des discussions sur l’approche à suivre.

      L’UE promeut le dialogue entre les continents sur la mobilité et la migration et continuera à renforcer la coopération trilatérale entre l’Union africaine, les Nations unies et l’UE.

      13. Comment les négociations avec les pays d’Afrique, des Caraïbes et du Pacifique seront-elles prises en compte ?

      L’UE et le groupe des États d’Afrique, des Caraïbes et du Pacifique (ACP) devraient conclure un nouvel accord de partenariat pour remplacer l’accord de Cotonou, qui expirera à la fin de 2020. Le futur accord ACP-UE englobe un accord de base commun, ainsi que trois partenariats spécifiques adaptés à chaque région, dont un pour les relations de l’UE avec les pays d’Afrique subsaharienne qui sont parties au groupe des États ACP. Cela permettra de créer un nouveau cadre juridique pour les relations entre l’UE et les pays ACP.

      L’UE a également conclu des accords d’association distincts avec quatre pays d’Afrique du Nord.

      Les relations globales entre l’UE et l’UA sont définies par les sommets conjoints, qui ont lieu tous les trois ans, et par les réunions ministérielles régulières, qui donnent une direction politique à la relation entre les deux continents.

      https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/fr/QANDA_20_375

  • Visa Facilitation and Readmission : the European Union and Belarus sign agreements

    Today, the European Union and Belarus signed a visa facilitation agreement and a readmission agreement. The agreements represent an important step in EU-Belarus relations and pave the way for improved mobility of citizens, contributing to closer links between the EU and its Eastern Partnership neighbours. At today’s signing ceremony, Commissioner for Home Affairs, Ylva Johansson, together with Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Interior of Croatia as Council Presidency, Davor Božinović, signed for the EU, while Belarus was represented by the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Vladimir Makei.

    Commissioner Johansson said: "These agreements between the European Union and Belarus are a significant step forward in our cooperation. They will improve the mobility of our citizens in a well-managed and secure environment and help build closer links between the European Union and Belarus. From the European side, we will now move ahead rapidly with ratification procedures, so citizens can feel the benefits as soon as possible.”

    The visa facilitation agreement will make it easier for Belarusian citizens to acquire short-term visas to come to the European Union. Once the visa facilitation agreement enters into force, the visa fee will be reduced to €35. In addition, the service fee will be limited and the deadline for consulates to take a decision on a visa application will be shortened. Several categories of travellers, including journalists, students and members of official delegations, will be able to receive multiple-entry visas with increasingly longer validity, while having to submit less supporting documents to prove their purpose of travel. Belarus has unilaterally introduced measures to facilitate short-term visa-free travel for EU citizens arriving in Minsk.

    The main objective of the EU-Belarus readmission agreement is to establish, on the basis of reciprocity, procedures for the safe and orderly return of persons who reside irregularly in the EU or Belarus, in full respect of their rights under international law.

    Next steps

    Following today’s signature, the agreements will be submitted to the European Parliament for consent. The Council will then be able to formally conclude the ratification of both agreements. A ratification procedure is also required on the Belarusian side, through approval from Belarus National Assembly. The agreements could enter into force in June 2020 (on the first day of the second month following conclusion). Both agreements will enter into force on the same day.

    Background

    Negotiation of the EU-Belarus Visa Facilitation Agreement formally started in 2014. In February 2015, the Council amended its negotiating directives by including the possibility to negotiate a reciprocal visa waiver for the holders of diplomatic passports. At the sixth round of talks held on 26 March 2019, the parties reached final agreement on both texts, which were initialled on 17 June 2019.

    Over the past years, there has been progress in EU-Belarus relations. Belarus has been participating actively in the multilateral formats of the Eastern Partnership. The EU-Belarus Coordination Group meets twice a year to steer cooperation and oversee further development of relations. The bilateral relationship will be strengthened through the EU-Belarus Partnership Priorities, which are currently being negotiated. This will set the strategic framework for cooperation in the coming years. Tangible steps taken by Belarus to respect universal freedoms, the rule of law and human rights will remain fundamental for shaping EU’s policy towards Belarus.

    Since 2006, the EU has concluded visa facilitation agreements with Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cape Verde, North Macedonia, Georgia, Moldova, Montenegro, Serbia, Russia and Ukraine.

    Formal readmission agreements or practical arrangements on return and readmission are in place with 24 countries.

    https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/ip_20_6
    #visa #accord_de_réadmission #UE #EU #Biélorussie #Union_européenne #renvois #expulsions

  • Aides d’État : la Commission autorise des régimes d’aide au transport maritime à Chypre, au Danemark,
    https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/fr/IP_19_6780

    La Commission européenne a autorisé, en vertu des règles de l’UE en matière d’aides d’État, cinq régimes d’aide destinés à soutenir le transport maritime à Chypre, au Danemark, en Estonie, en Pologne et en Suède. Ces régimes encouragent l’immatriculation des navires en Europe et contribuent à la compétitivité du secteur à l’échelle mondiale sans fausser indûment la concurrence.

    La Commission a adopté cinq décisions distinctes, concernant
    • l’introduction d’un régime de taxation au tonnage et de soutien des gens de mer en Estonie,
    • la prolongation d’un régime de taxation au tonnage et de soutien des gens de mer à Chypre,
    • l’introduction d’un nouveau régime de soutien des gens de mer en Pologne,
    • la prolongation et l’extension d’un régime de soutien des gens de mer au Danemark et
    • la prolongation d’un régime de soutien des gens de mer en Suède.

    La Commission a apprécié les cinq régimes sur la base des règles de l’UE en matière d’aides d’État, en particulier des orientations sur les aides d’État au transport maritime, et a établi que tous les régimes étaient conformes à son interprétation desdites orientations.

    En ce qui concerne les régimes de taxation au tonnage estonien et chypriote, la Commission a constaté qu’ils respectent les règles et que la taxation au tonnage est limitée aux activités et navires éligibles. En outre, pour ce qui est de la taxation des dividendes versés aux actionnaires, la Commission a constaté que les deux régimes en question garantissent que les actionnaires des compagnies maritimes sont traités à l’égal des actionnaires dans n’importe quel autre secteur.

    Pour ce qui est des régimes de soutien des gens de mer estonien, chypriote, polonais, danois et suédois, la Commission a constaté que les cinq États membres sont tous convenus d’appliquer leur régime respectif à tous les navires battant pavillon d’un État membre de l’UE ou de l’EEE.

    La Commission a conclu que ces régimes étaient conformes aux règles de l’UE en matière d’aides d’État, car ils contribueront à la compétitivité du secteur du transport maritime de l’UE et encourageront l’immatriculation des navires en Europe tout en préservant les normes sociales, environnementales et de sécurité strictes de l’Europe et en garantissant des conditions de concurrence équitables.

    Contexte
    Afin d’éviter le risque de transfert de pavillon et de délocalisation de compagnies maritimes vers des pays à faible fiscalité n’appartenant pas à l’UE, les orientations sur les aides d’État au transport maritime adoptées par la Commission en 2004 autorisent les États membres à prendre des mesures pour rendre l’environnement fiscal plus favorable aux compagnies maritimes. Seules les compagnies exerçant des activités dans le domaine du transport maritime (défini comme le transport de voyageurs et de marchandises par mer) peuvent bénéficier de mesures sur le fondement des orientations concernant les aides au transport maritime.

    La mesure de ce type la plus connue est la taxation au tonnage, qui permet aux compagnies maritimes d’opter pour une imposition sur la base d’un bénéfice notionnel ou du tonnage qu’elles exploitent, en lieu et place du régime normal d’imposition des sociétés. Ce type de taxation peut réduire le niveau global des impôts payés et rendre ces derniers plus prévisibles pour les entreprises. Dans le cadre des régimes en faveur des gens de mer, les coûts salariaux (c’est-à-dire l’impôt sur le revenu et les cotisations de sécurité sociale) peuvent être réduits ou supprimés pour les marins employés à bord de navires battant pavillon d’un État membre de l’UE ou de l’Espace économique européen (EEE).

    Lorsqu’elle applique ces orientations, la Commission veille résolument à la cohérence et à l’égalité de traitement des compagnies maritimes dans toute l’UE, tout en s’assurant que les régimes avantageux de taxation au tonnage et de soutien des gens de mer ne contreviennent pas aux règles du marché intérieur. La Commission veille en particulier à ce que le traitement fiscal favorable accordé aux compagnies maritimes n’ait pas de répercussions dans d’autres secteurs non liés au transport maritime, à ce qu’aucune discrimination ne soit opérée à l’égard des registres d’autres États membres de l’UE et de l’EEE, et à ce qu’aucune aide n’excède le plafond fixé dans ses orientations sur les aides au transport maritime.

    Les versions non confidentielles de ces décisions seront publiées sous les numéros SA.51809 (Chypre), SA.52069 (Danemark), SA.53469 (Estonie), SA.46380 (Pologne) et SA.46740 (Suède) dans le registre des aides d’État figurant sur le site web de la Commission consacré à la concurrence, dès que tous les problèmes de confidentialité auront été résolus. Le bulletin d’information électronique « State Aid Weekly e-News » donne la liste des dernières décisions relatives aux aides d’État publiées au Journal officiel de l’UE et sur l’internet.

    #seafarer_scheme
    #tonnage_tax

  • Bosnian police block 100 migrants from reaching Croatia

    Bosnian border police on Monday stopped about 100 migrants from reaching the border with European Union member Croatia amid a rise in the influx of people heading through the Balkans toward Western Europe.

    Police blocked the migrants near the Maljevac border crossing in northwestern Bosnia, which was briefly closed down. The group has moved toward Croatia from the nearby town of #Velika_Kladusa, where hundreds have been staying in makeshift camps while looking for ways to move on.

    Migrants have recently turned to Bosnia in order to avoid more heavily guarded routes through the Balkans. Authorities in the war-ravaged country have struggled with the influx of thousands of people from the Mideast, Africa and Asia.

    Peter Van der Auweraert, from the International Organization for Migration, tweeted the attempted group crossing on Monday was a “very worrying development that risks” creating a backlash.

    Van der Auweraert told The Associated Press that the migrant influx has already put pressure on Bosnia and any incidents could further strain the situation, making Bosnians view migrants as “troublemakers” rather than people in need of help, he said.

    Migrants arrive in Bosnia from Serbia or Montenegro after traveling from Greece to Albania, Bulgaria or Macedonia.

    Also Monday, a migrant was stabbed in a fight with another migrant in an asylum center in southern Bosnia, police said.

    The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies said Monday that more than 5,600 migrants have reached Bosnia and Herzegovina so far this year, compared with only 754 in all of 2017.

    Hundreds of thousands of people passed through the Balkans toward Europe at the peak of the mass migration in 2015. The flow eased for a while but has recently picked up a bit with the new route through Bosnia.

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/article213373449.html
    #Bosnie #fermeture_des_frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Croatie #frontières #route_des_Balkans #Bosnie-Herzégovine

    • Migrants en Croatie : « on ne nous avait encore jamais tiré dessus »

      Le 30 mai, la police croate ouvrait le feu sur une camionnette qui venait de forcer un barrage près de la frontière avec la Bosnie-Herzégovine. À l’intérieur, 29 migrants. Bilan : deux enfants et sept adultes blessés. Reportage sur le lieu du drame, nouvelle étape de la route de l’exil, où des réfugiés désœuvrés errent dans des villages désertés par l’exode.

      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Migrants-en-Croatie-nulle-part-ailleurs-on-ne-nous-avait-tire-des
      #police #violences_policières

    • Refugees stranded in Bosnia allege Croatian police brutality

      Croatian officers accused of physical and verbal abuse, along with harassment including theft, but deny all allegations.

      Brutally beaten, mobile phones destroyed, strip-searched and money stolen.

      These are some of the experiences refugees and migrants stranded in western Bosnia report as they describe encounters with Croatian police.

      The abuse, they say, takes place during attempts to pass through Croatia, an EU member, with most headed for Germany.

      Bosnia has emerged as a new route to Western Europe, since the EU tightened its borders. This year, more than 13,000 refugees and migrants have so far arrived in the country, compared with only 755 in 2017.

      In Velika Kladusa, Bosnia’s most western town beside the Croatian border, hundreds have been living in makeshift tents on a field next to a dog kennel for the past four months.

      When night falls, “the game” begins, a term used by refugees and migrants for the challenging journey to the EU through Croatia and Slovenia that involves treks through forests and crossing rivers.

      However, many are caught in Slovenia or Croatia and are forced to return to Bosnia by Croatian police, who heavily patrol its EU borders.

      Then, they have to start the mission all over again.

      Some told Al Jazeera that they have attempted to cross as many as 20 times.

      The use of violence is clearly not acceptable. It is possible to control borders in a strict matter without violence.

      Peter Van der Auweraert, Western Balkans coordinator for the International Organization for Migration

      All 17 refugees and migrants interviewed by Al Jazeera said that they have been beaten by Croatian police - some with police batons, others punched or kicked.

      According to their testimonies, Croatian police have stolen valuables and money, cut passports, and destroyed mobile phones, hindering their communication and navigation towards the EU.

      “Why are they treating us like this?” many asked as they narrated their ordeals.

      “They have no mercy,” said 26-year-old Mohammad from Raqqa, Syria, who said he was beaten all over his body with batons on the two occasions he crossed into the EU. Police also took his money and phone, he said.

      “They treat babies and women the same. An officer pressed his boot against a woman’s head [as she was lying on the ground],” Mohammad said. “Dogs are treated better than us … why are they beating us like this? We don’t want to stay in Croatia; we want to go to Europe.”

      Mohammad Abdullah, a 22-year-old Algerian, told Al Jazeera that officers laughed at a group of migrants as they took turns beating them.

      "One of them would tell the other, ’You don’t know how to hit’ and would switch his place and continue beating us. Then, another officer would say, ’No, you don’t know how to hit’ and would take his place.

      “While [one of them] was beating me, he kissed me and started laughing. They would keep taking turns beating us like this, laughing,” Abdullah said.

      Croatia’s Interior Ministry told Al Jazeera that it “strongly dismisses” allegations of police brutality.

      In an emailed statement, it said those attempting to cross borders know they are acting outside of the law, and claimed that “no complaint so far has proved to be founded.”

      At a meeting in late August with Croatian Prime Minister Andrej Plenkovic, German Chancellor Angela Merkel praised Croatia for its control over its borders.

      “You are doing a great job on the borders, and I wish to commend you for that,” Merkel said.

      But according to a new report, the UNHCR received information about 1,500 refugees being denied access to asylum procedures, including over 100 children. More than 700 people reported violence and theft by Croatian police.

      Al Jazeera was unable to independently verify all of the claims against police, because many of the refugees and migrants said their phones - which held evidence - were confiscated or smashed. However, the 17 people interviewed separately reported similar patterns of abuse.

      Shams and Hassan, parents of three, have been trying to reach Germany to apply for asylum, but Croatian authorities have turned them back seven times over the past few months.

      Four years ago, they left their home in Deir Az Zor, Syria, after it was bombed.

      Shams, who worked as a lawyer in Syria, said Croatian policemen strip-searched her and her 13-year-old daughter Rahma on one occasion after they were arrested.

      The male officers handled the women’s bodies, while repeating: “Where’s the money?”

      They pulled off Shams’ headscarf, threw it on the ground and forced her to undress, and took Rahma into a separate room.

      “My daughter was very afraid,” Shams said. "They told her to take off all her clothes. She was shy, she told them, ’No.’

      "They beat her up and stripped her clothes by force, even her underwear.

      “She kept telling them ’No! No! There isn’t [any money]!’ She was embarrassed and was asking them to close the window and door so no one would see her. [The officer] then started yelling at her and pulled at her hair. They beat her up.”

      Rahma screamed for her mother but Shams said she couldn’t do anything.

      “They took 1,500 euros ($1,745) from me and they took my husband’s golden ring. They also broke five of our mobiles and took all the SIM cards … They detained us for two days in prison and didn’t give us any food in the beginning,” Shams said, adding they cut her Syrian passport into pieces.

      “They put my husband in solitary confinement. I didn’t see him for two days; I didn’t know where he was.”

      A senior policeman told Shams that she and her children could apply for asylum, but Hassan would have to return to Bosnia.

      When she refused, she said the police drove the family for three hours to a forest at night and told them to walk back to Bosnia.

      They did not have a torch or mobile phone.

      She said they walked through the forest for two days until they reached a small town in western Bosnia.

      “No nation has the right to treat people this way,” Shams said.

      In another instance, they said they were arrested in a forest with a group of refugees and migrants. All 15 of them were forced into a van for two hours, where it was difficult to breathe.

      “It was closed like a box, but [the officer] refused to turn on the air conditioning so we could breathe. My younger son Mohammad - he’s eight years old - he has asthma and allergies, he was suffocating. When we knocked on the window to ask if he could turn on the air conditioning, [the officer] beat my husband with the baton,” Shams said.

      No Name Kitchen, a volunteer organisation that provides assistance to refugees and migrants on the Balkan route, has been documenting serious injuries on Instagram.

      In one post, the group alleges that Croatian police twice crushed a refugee’s orthopaedic leg.

      Peter Van der Auweraert, the Western Balkans coordinator for the International Organization for Migration, says he has heard stories of police brutality, but called for an independent investigation to judge how alleged victims sustained injuries.

      “Given the fact that there are so many of these stories, I think it’s in everyone’s interest to have an independent inquiry to see what is going on, on the other side of the border,” Van der Auweraert said.

      “The use of violence is clearly not acceptable. It’s not acceptable under European human rights law, it’s not acceptable under international human rights law and it is to my mind also, not necessary. It is possible to control borders in a strict matter without violence.”

      Shams’ family journey from Syria was traumatic from the get-go, and they have spent and lost several thousand euros.

      While travelling in dinghies from Turkey to Greece, they saw dead bodies along the way.

      “We call upon Merkel to help us and open the borders for us. At least for those of us stuck at the borders,” she said. “Why is the EU paying Croatia to prevent our entry into the EU, yet once we reach Germany, after spending a fortune with lives lost on the way, we’ll be granted asylum?”

      “We have nothing,” said her husband Hassan. “Our houses have been destroyed. We didn’t have any problems until the war started. We had peace in our homes. Is there a single country that accepts refugees?”

      “There are countries but there’s no way to reach them,” Shams replied. “This is our misery.”


      https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/refugees-stranded-bosnia-report-campaign-police-brutality-180915100740024

    • Le Conseil de l’Europe somme la Croatie d’enquêter sur les violences policières

      Le Commissariat aux droits de l’Homme du Conseil de l’Europe a appelé la Croatie à ouvrir rapidement des enquêtes sur les allégations de violences policières et de vol à l’encontre de « demandeurs d’asile et autres migrants », ainsi que sur les cas d’expulsions collectives.

      Dans un courrier publié vendredi 5 octobre et adressé au Premier ministre croate Andrej Plenkovic, la commissaire aux droits de l’Homme du Conseil de l’Europe, Dunja Mijatovic, a déclaré être « préoccupée » par les informations « cohérentes et corroborées » fournies par plusieurs organisations attestant « d’un grand nombre d’expulsions collectives de la Croatie vers la Serbie et vers la Bosnie-Herzégovine de migrants en situation irrégulière, dont de potentiels demandeurs d’asile ».

      Elle s’inquiète particulièrement du « recours systématique à la violence des forces de l’ordre croates à l’encontre de ces personnes », y compris les « femmes enceintes et les enfants ». La responsable s’appuie sur les chiffres du Haut-Commissariat de l’ONU aux réfugiés (UNHCR), selon lesquels sur 2 500 migrants expulsés par la Croatie, 700 ont accusé la police de violences et de vols.

      « Consciente des défis auxquels la Croatie est confrontée dans le domaine des migrations », Dunja Mijatovic souligne cependant que les « efforts pour gérer les migrations » doivent respecter les principes du droit international. « Il s’agit notamment de l’interdiction absolue de la torture et des peines ou traitements inhumains prévue à l’article 3 de la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme et l’interdiction des expulsions collectives », qui s’appliquent « aux demandeurs d’asile comme aux migrants en situation irrégulière », écrit-elle.

      Une « violence systématique » selon les associations

      Pour la commissaire, Zagreb doit « entamer et mener rapidement à leur terme des enquêtes rapides, efficaces et indépendantes sur les cas connus d’expulsions collectives et sur les allégations de violence contre les migrants ». Elle somme également le gouvernement croate de « prendre toutes les mesures nécessaires pour mettre fin à ces pratiques et éviter qu’elles ne se reproduisent ».

      « Aucun cas de mauvais de traitement policier à l’encontre de migrants (...) ni aucun vol n’ont été établis », s’est défendu le ministre croate de l’Intérieur Davor Bozinovic dans une lettre de réponse au Conseil de l’Europe.

      Pourtant, dans un rapport intitulé « Games of violence », l’organisation Médecins sans frontières MSF alertait déjà en octobre 2017 sur les violences perpétrées par les polices croates, hongroises et bulgares envers les enfants et les jeunes migrants.

      Sur sa page Facebook, l’association No Name Kitchen a également rappelé qu’elle documentait les cas de violences aux frontières croates depuis 2017 sur le site Border violence.
      En août dernier, cette association qui aide les réfugiés à Sid en Serbie et dans le nord-ouest de la Bosnie expliquait à InfoMigrants que la violence était « systématique » pour les migrants expulsés de Croatie. « Il y a un ou deux nouveaux cas chaque jour. Nous n’avons pas la capacité de tous les documenter », déclarait Marc Pratllus de No Name Kitchen.


      http://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/12518/le-conseil-de-l-europe-somme-la-croatie-d-enqueter-sur-les-violences-p

    • Bosnie-Herzégovine : des réfugiés tentent de passer en force en Croatie

      Alors que les températures ont brutalement chuté ces derniers jours, des réfugiés bloqués en Bosnie-Herzégovine ont tenté de franchir la frontière croate. Des rixes ont éclaté, des policiers croates ont été blessés, des réfugiés aussi.

      Environ 150 à 200 réfugiés ont essayé, mercredi après-midi, de traverser en force le pont reliant la Bosnie-Herzégovine au poste-frontière croate de Mlajevac. Des échauffourées ont éclaté entre la police et les réfugiés, parmi lesquels des femmes et des enfants. Au moins deux policiers croates ont été blessés par des jets de pierres, selon le ministère croate de l’Intérieur. Les réfugiés ont depuis organisé un sit-in devant la frontière, dont ils demandent l’ouverture.

      « Les réfugiés se sont déplacés jusqu’à la frontière croate où la police leur a refusé l’entrée, illégale et violente, sur le territoire », a rapporté le ministère croate de l’Intérieur. « Les réfugiés ont ensuite jeté des pierres sur les agents de la police croate, dont deux ont été légèrement blessé et ont demandé une aide médicale. »

      Après avoir passé la nuit près de la frontière de Velika Kalduša – Maljevac, les réfugiés s’attendaient à pouvoir entrer en Croatie depuis la Bosnie-Herzégovine et ont franchi un premier cordon de la police bosnienne aux frontières. « La police croate n’a pas réagi après que les réfugiés eurent passé le premier cordon de police en direction de la Croatie, car il y avait un second cordon de la police bosnienne », a déclaré la cheffe du département des relations publiques du ministère croate de l’Intérieur, Marina Mandić, soulignant que la police croate, en poste à la frontière, n’est intervenue à aucun moment et n’a donc pas pénétré sur le territoire de la Bosnie-Herzégovine, comme l’ont rapporté certains médias.

      Selon l’ONG No Name Kitchen, la police bosnienne aurait fait usage de gaz lacrymogènes. Au moins trois réfugiés ont été blessés et pris en charge par Médecins sans frontières.

      Mardi, plus de 400 réfugiés sont arrivés à proximité de la frontière où la police a déployé une bande jaune de protection pour les empêcher de passer en Croatie. Parmi les réfugiés qui dorment dehors ou dans des tentes improvisées, on compte beaucoup de femmes et d’enfants. Ils ont ramassé du bois et allumé des feux, alors que la température atteint à peine 10°C.

      Le commandant de la police du canton d’Una-Sana, en Bosnie-Herzégovine, Mujo Koričić, a confirmé mercredi que des mesures d’urgence étaient entrées en vigueur afin d’empêcher l’escalade de la crise migratoire dans la région, notamment l’afflux de nouveaux réfugiés.

      Mise à jour, jeudi 25 octobre, 17h – Environ 120 réfugiés stationnent toujours près du poste-frontière de Velika Kalduša–Maljevac après avoir passé une deuxième nuit sur place, dehors ou dans des tentes improvisées. La police aux frontières de Bosnie-Herzégovine assure que la situation est sous contrôle et pacifiée. La circulation est toujours suspendue. Des enfants portent des banderoles avec des inscriptions demandant l’ouverture de la frontière.

      En réaction, le secrétaire général aux Affaires étrangères de l’UE, l’autrichien Johannes Peterlik, a déclaré jeudi 25 octobre en conférence de presse : « Les migrations illégales ne sont pas la voie à suivre. Il y a des voies légales et cela doit être clair ».

      Le nombre de migrants dans le canton d’Una-Sana est actuellement estimé à 10500.


      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Bosnie-Herzegovine-des-refugies-tentent-un-passage-en-force-en-Cr
      #violence

      v. aussi :

      Sulla porta d’Europa. Scontri e feriti oggi alla frontiera fra Bosnia e Croazia. Dove un gruppo di 200 migranti ha cercato di passare il confine. Foto Reuters/Marko Djurica

      https://twitter.com/NiccoloZancan/status/1055070667710828545

    • Bleak Bosnian winter for migrants camped out on new route to Europe

      Shouting “Open borders!”, several dozen migrants and asylum seekers broke through a police cordon last week at the Maljevac border checkpoint in northwestern Bosnia and Herzegovina and tried to cross into Croatia.

      After being forced back by Croatian police with teargas, they set up camp just inside Bosnian territory. They are in the vanguard of a new wave of migrants determined to reach wealthier European countries, often Germany. Stalled, they have become a political football and face winter with little assistance and inadequate shelter.

      The old Balkan route shut down in 2016 as a raft of European countries closed their borders, with Hungary erecting a razor-wire fence. But a new route emerged this year through Bosnia (via Albania and Montenegro or via Macedonia and Serbia) and on to Croatia, a member of the EU. The flow of travellers has been fed by fresh streams of people from the Middle East and Central and South Asia entering Greece from Turkey, notably across the Evros River.

      By the end of September, more than 16,000 asylum seekers and migrants had entered Bosnia this year, compared to just 359 over the same period last year, according to official figures. The real number is probably far higher as more are smuggled in and uncounted. Over a third of this year’s official arrivals are Pakistani, followed by Iranians (16 percent), Syrians (14 percent), and Iraqis (nine percent).

      This spike is challenging Bosnia’s ability to provide food, shelter, and other aid – especially to the nearly 10,000 people that local institutions and aid organisations warn may be stranded at the Croatian border as winter begins. Two decades after the Balkan wars of the 1990s, the situation is also heightening tensions among the country’s Muslim, Serb, and Croat communities and its often fraught tripartite political leadership.

      How to respond to the unexpected number of migrants was a key issue in the presidential election earlier this month. Nationalist Bosnian Serb leader Milorad Dodik, who won the Serb seat in the presidency, charged that it was a conspiracy to boost the country’s Muslim population. The outgoing Croat member of the presidency, Dragan Čović, repeatedly called for Bosnia’s borders to be closed to stem the migrant flow.

      Maja Gasal Vrazalica, a left-wing member of parliament and a refugee herself during the Bosnian wars, accuses nationalist parties of “misusing the topic of refugees because they want to stoke up all this fear through our nation.”
      “I’m very scared”

      Most migrants and asylum seekers are concentrated around two northwestern towns, Bihać and nearby Velika Kladuša. Faris Šabić, youth president of the Bihać Red Cross, organises assistance for the some 4,000 migrants camped in Bihać and others who use the town as a way station.

      Since the spring and throughout the summer, as arrivals spiked, several local volunteers joined his staff to provide food, hygiene items, and first aid. But now, as winter draws in, they fear the scale of the crisis is becoming untenable.

      “I have to be honest, I’m very scared,” Šabić told IRIN, examining a notebook filled with the names of new arrivals. “Not only for migrants, I’m scared for my locals as well. We are a generous and welcoming people, but I fear that we will not be able to manage the emergency anymore.”

      The Bihać Red Cross, along with other aid organisations and human rights groups, is pushing the government to find long-term solutions. But with an economy still recovering from the legacy of the war and a youth unemployment rate of almost 55 percent, it has been hard-pressed to find answers.

      Hope that the end of the election season might improve the national debate around migration appears misguided. Around 1,000 Bihać locals staged protests for three consecutive days, from 20-22 October, demanding the relocation of migrants outside the town centre. On the Saturday, Bihać residents even travelled to the capital, Sarajevo, blocking the main street to protest the inaction of the central government.

      The local government of the border district where most migrants and asylum seekers wait, Una-Sana, complains of being abandoned by the central government in Sarajevo. “We do not have bad feelings towards migrants, but the situation is unmanageable,” the mayor of Bihać, Šuhret Fazlić, told IRIN.

      To begin with most residents openly welcomed the migrants, with volunteers providing food and medical help. But tensions have been growing, especially as dozens of the latest newcomers have started occupying the main public spaces in the town.

      “They turned our stadium into a toilet and occupied children’s playgrounds,” said Fazlić. “I would like to understand why they come here, but what is important at the moment is to understand where to host them in a dignified manner.”
      Beatings and abuse

      Those camped near the Croatian border have all entered Bosnia illegally. Each night, they wait to enter “The Game” – as they refer to attempts to cross the frontier and strike out into dense forests.

      Most are detained and pushed back into Bosnia by the Croatian police. Some reach Slovenia before being deported all the way back. Abuse is rife, according to NGOs and human rights groups. Those who have attempted to cross say Croatian police officers destroy their phones to prevent them from navigating the mountains, beat them with electric batons, unleash dogs, steal their money, and destroy their documents and personal belongings. Croatia’s interior ministry has strongly denied allegations of police brutality.

      No Name Kitchen, a group of activists that provides showers, soap, and hygiene products to migrants in Velika Kladuša, has been documenting cases of violence allegedly committed by the Croatian police. In August alone the organisation collected accounts from 254 deportees. Most claimed to have suffered physical violence. Of those cases, 43 were minors.

      Croatian media has reported cases of shootings, too. In late May, a smuggler’s van bringing migrants and asylum seekers from Bosnia was shot at and three people including a boy and a girl, both 12, were wounded.

      A report earlier this year from the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR, collated accounts from 2,500 refugees and migrants allegedly pushed back from Croatia to Serbia and Bosnia. In more than 1,500 cases – 100 of them relating to children – asylum procedures were denied, and over 700 people made allegations of violence or theft.
      Winter housing needed

      In Velika Kladuša, two kilometres from the Maljevac border checkpoint, around 1,000 people live in a makeshift tent camp that turns into a swamp every time it rains. Temperatures here will soon plummet below zero at night. Finding a new place for them "is a race against time and the key challenge,” said Stephanie Woldenberg, senior UNHCR protection officer.

      Already, life is difficult.

      “Nights here are unsustainable,” Emin, a young Afghan girl who tried twice to cross the border with her family and is among those camped in Velika Kladuša, told IRIN. “Dogs in the kennel are treated better than us.”

      Bosnian police reportedly announced last week that migrants are no longer allowed to travel to the northwest zone, and on 30 October said they had bussed dozens of migrants from the border camps to a new government-run facility near Velika Kladuša. Another facility has been set up near Sarajevo since the election. Together, they have doubled the number of beds available to migrants to 1,700, but it’s still nowhere near the capacity needed.

      The federal government has identified a defunct factory, Agrokomerc, once owned by the mayor of Velika Kladuša, Fikret Abdić, as a potential site to house more migrants. Abdić was convicted on charges of war crimes during the Balkan wars and sentenced to 20 years imprisonment. He became mayor in 2016, after his 2012 release. His local government is strongly opposed to the move and counters that the migrants and asylum seekers should be equally distributed throughout Bosnia.

      For now, around 800 people live inside a former student dormitory in Velika Kladuša that is falling apart due to damage sustained during the Bosnian wars. Holes in the floor and the absence of basic fixtures and of a proper heating system make it highly unsuitable to house migrants this winter. Clean water and bathing facilities are scarce, and the Red Cross has registered several cases of scabies, lice, and other skin and vector-borne diseases.

      Throughout the three-storey building, migrants and asylum seekers lie sprawled across the floor on mattresses, waiting their turn to charge their phones at one of the few electrical sockets. Many are young people from Lahore, Pakistan who sold their family’s homes and businesses to pay for this trip. On average they say they paid $10,000 to smugglers who promised to transport them to the EU. Several display bruises and abrasions, which they say were given to them by Croatian border patrol officers as they tried to enter Croatia.

      The bedding on one mattress is stained with blood. Witnesses told IRIN the person who sleeps there was stabbed by other migrants trying to steal his few belongings. “It happens frequently here,” one said.


      https://www.irinnews.org/news-feature/2018/10/31/bleak-bosnian-winter-migrants-camped-out-new-route-europe

    • ’They didn’t give a damn’: first footage of Croatian police ’brutality’

      Migrants who allegedly suffer savage beatings by state officials call it ‘the game’. But as shocking evidence suggests, attempting to cross the Bosnia-Croatia border is far from mere sport.

      As screams ring out through the cold night air, Sami, hidden behind bushes, begins to film what he can.

      “The Croatian police are torturing them. They are breaking people’s bones,’’ Sami whispers into his mobile phone, as the dull thumps of truncheons are heard.

      Then silence. Minutes go by before Hamdi, Mohammed and Abdoul emerge from the woods, faces bruised from the alleged beating, mouths and noses bloody, their ribs broken.

      Asylum seekers from Algeria, Syria and Pakistan, they had been captured by the Croatian police attempting to cross the Bosnia-Croatia border into the EU, and brutally beaten before being sent back.

      Sami, 17, from Kobane, gave the Guardian his footage, which appears to provide compelling evidence of the physical abuses, supposedly perpetrated by Croatian police, of which migrants in the Bosnian cities of Bihac and Velika Kladusa have been complaining.

      The EU border agency, Frontex, announced on Wednesday that this year is likely to produce the lowest number of unauthorised migrants arriving into Europe in five years.

      Frontex said that approximately 118,900 irregular border crossings were recorded in the first 10 months of 2018, roughly 31% lower than the same period in 2017.
      Advertisement

      Despite this steady decline in numbers, many states remain embroiled in political disputes that fuel anti-migrant sentiment across Europe.

      Frontex also noted that, while entries are declining, the number of people reaching Europe across the western Mediterranean, mostly through Spain from Morocco, continues to rise. Nearly 9,400 people crossed in October, more than double the number for the same month last year.

      But the brutality of what is happening on Europe’s borders is not documented. Every night, migrants try to cross into Croatia. And, according to dozens of accounts received by the Guardian and charities, many end up in the hands of police, who beat them back to Bosnia.

      No Name Kitchen (NNK), an organisation consisting of volunteers from several countries that distributes food to asylum seekers in Serbia, Bosnia and Italy, registers 50-100 people a week who have been pushed back by the Croatian authorities. Roughly 70% of them claim to have been beaten.

      “In the last months our team in Bosnia and Herzegovina has regularly treated patients – sometimes even women and small children – with wounds allegedly inflicted by state authorities when attempting to cross into Croatia and Slovenia, where, according to their testimonies, their claims for asylum and protection are regularly ignored,” says Julian Koeberer, humanitarian affairs officer in the northern Balkans for Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF).
      Advertisement

      Since the turn of the year, the Bosnian authorities have registered the entry of about 21,000 people, coming from Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran or Syria. Of these, an estimated 5,000 remain in the country.

      Of 50 people to whom the Guardian spoke, mostly from Pakistan, 35 said they had been attacked by Croatian police. The majority of them arrived in Bosnia through Turkey, hoping to reach Slovenia, a Schengen country, before heading to Italy, Austria or Germany.

      ‘‘The Iranian police broke all my teeth, the Croatian ones broke my nose and ribs,” says Milad, 29, an Iranian asylum seeker who since September has lived in Bihac. “Yet everyone talks about the violence in Iran and nobody talks about the violence perpetrated by a European country.”

      Adeel, 27, from Pakistan, claims he had his ankle broken with a truncheon. ‘‘Where are the human rights?” he asks.

      Anees, 43, also from Pakistan, says he begged the police not to beat him after he was stopped in the woods on the border with Velika Kladusa. ‘‘I have a heart disease, I told them to stop because they could have killed me,’’ explains Anees, whose medical conditions are detailed in a clinical file.

      On 9 June 2018, he had heart surgery at the Zdravstveni centre hospital in the Serbian city of Uzice. After the operation, he continued his journey. He struggles to breathe as he tells his story: ‘‘I told him I was sick, I showed them the clinical file. They did not give a damn. They started beating me and sent us back to Bosnia. But it does not matter. Tomorrow I will try the game again.’’

      That’s what migrants call it: ‘the game”. But there is nothing fun about it. They set off in groups: 70 or 80 people, or sometimes as few as five to 10. Police, armed with truncheons, pistols and night vision goggles, patrol Europe’s longest border between Bosnia and Croatia. According to accounts provided by more than 10 migrants, some officers wear paramilitary uniforms with a badge depicting a sword upraised by two lightning bolts. This is the badge of Croatian special police.

      “They stop us and, before beating us, they frisk us”, says Hamdi, 35, An Algerian language teacher. “If they find money, they steal it. If they find mobile phones, they destroy them to avoid being filmed or simply to stop us from contacting our friends. And then they beat us, four or five against one. They throw us to the ground, kick us, and beat us with their truncheons. Sometimes their dogs attack us. To them, we probably don’t seem much different from their dogs.”

      Hamdi is one of three men traveling with Sami. The screams in the video are his. His face is covered in blood when he reaches his friends. His nose is broken, his lips swollen.

      “After repeatedly being pushed back or forced to return to Bosnia on their own, asylum seekers find themselves in unsanitary, improvised settlements such as open fields and squats while formal government camps are full,” says Koeberer.

      “Those sites still offer alarmingly inadequate conditions due to only slow improvement in provision of winter shelter (food, hygiene, legal status and medical care), and these inhumane living conditions have severe impact on people’s physical and mental health. In winter, the lives of those who are forced to remain outside will seriously be at risk.’’

      At the camp in Velika Kladusa, where Hamdi lives, dozens of people sit in the mud and on piles of rubbish, awaiting the arrival of the doctors. On man has a cast on his arm and leg, the result, he says, of a police beating. Others show black eyes, bruises on their backs and legs, lumps and wounds on their heads, split lips, and scars on their legs.

      ‘‘There have been cases in which migrants claimed to have been stripped and forced to walk barefoot with temperatures below freezing,” said Stephane Moissaing, MSF’s head of mission in Serbia. “Cases where asylum seekers have told how police would beat children in front of their parents. From the information we have, up until now, it is a systematic and planned violence.”

      Karolina Augustova, an NKK volunteer, says violence has increased since October protests in which hundreds of asylum seekers marched from the north-western town of Velika Kladusa towards Croatia to object against pushbacks that violate the rights of people to seek asylum in Europe.

      The Bosnian police appear to be aware of the assaults. A Bosnian police agent guarding the camp in Velika Kladusa, who prefers to remain anonymous, points out a bruise on a boy’s leg. “You see this bruise?” he says. “It was the Croatian police. The Bosnian police know, but there is no clear and compelling evidence, just the accounts of the refugees and their wounds.”

      The majority of Bosnians live in peace with migrants and view them as refugees. The scars from the war that ravaged this area in the early 1990s are everywhere, in the abandoned homes riddled with machine gun fire and in the collective memory of Bosnians. People from Bihac and Velika Kladusa know what it means to flee from war. The minarets of the numerous mosques along the border are a reminder that Bosnia is the closest Muslim community in Europe.

      “I feel sorry for these people,’’ says the policeman on guard. ‘‘They remind me of the Bosnians when the war devastated our country.’’

      MSF, NNK and a number of other organisations have repeatedly reported and denounced violence perpetrated by the security forces in the Balkans, but Croatian police deny all the allegations.

      The Guardian has contacted the Croatian interior minister, the police and the Croatian government for comment, but has received no response.

      Abdul, 33, recently arrived in Velika Klaudusa after a journey that lasted over a year. He comes from Myanmar and has lost everything: his wife and children were killed, and he has no news of his father, mother and sisters. Abdul has heard about the violence and is worried. The migrants around him, with bandaged legs and noses and bleeding mouths, cause fear.

      “I lost everything, yes, it’s true,” he says. “But I have to get to Europe, one way or another. To make sense of what I lost. I owe it to my dead children. To my wife who was killed. To those who have not had the good fortune to have arrived here safe and sound.”

      https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2018/nov/14/didnt-give-a-damn-refugees-film-croatian-police-brutality-bosnia

    • A la frontière bosno-croate, des matraques pour les migrants

      Les policiers croates violentent les exilés bloqués entre les deux pays, nouveau point de passage de la route des Balkans. Mais dans la région, la #solidarité s’organise.

      L’intervention de la police bosnienne est fixée à 18 heures au poste frontière de Maljevac, entre la Bosnie-Herzégovine et la Croatie. Des dizaines de riverains s’y sont massées, ce jour-là, pour assister à cette opération qui va déloger les migrants qui campent depuis une semaine à 300 mètres de la douane. « Je n’ai rien contre les réfugiés, mais 200 personnes ne peuvent pas bloquer toute une ville », explique un Bosnien d’une cinquantaine d’années. Deux heures plus tard le passage est rouvert. Nous sommes à Velika Kladusa, dans le canton d’Una-Sana, dans le nord-ouest de la Bosnie, le long de la dernière déviation de la « route des Balkans ». Depuis le début de l’année, plus de 21 000 personnes (venant du Pakistan, d’Afghanistan ou encore d’Iran) ont choisi de traverser la Bosnie-Herzégovine dans l’espoir d’atteindre l’ouest de l’Europe. Et alors que 5 000 d’entre eux seraient toujours bloqués dans le pays, Sarajevo a enregistré ces dernières semaines une hausse des arrivées, avec environ 1 000 nouvelles entrées hebdomadaires.

      Sachets à emporter

      Dans ce petit bourg, la situation a dégénéré fin octobre lorsque des centaines de migrants ont tenté d’entrer de force en Croatie, avant d’être repoussés par les policiers. A la suite de ces heurts qui ont fait plusieurs blessés, Zagreb a décidé de suspendre pendant une semaine le transit à Maljevac : une très mauvaise nouvelle pour cette ville qui vit du commerce avec la Croatie et dont les habitants commencent à s’agacer d’une situation qui s’enlise. « La Croatie est à moins de 2 kilomètres dans cette direction », indique Asim Latic en pointant du doigt la plaine qui s’étend derrière les buissons. Avant d’ajouter : « Mais les réfugiés, eux, passent par les bois, et cela prend plusieurs jours de marche. » Ce restaurateur de Velika Kladusa, propriétaire de la pizzeria Teferic, fait partie des habitants qui se sont engagés dans l’aide aux migrants dès février, lorsque des dizaines, puis des centaines de personnes sont arrivées dans ce coin de la Bosnie.

      Pendant neuf mois, il a offert chaque jour 400 repas à autant d’exilés. Début novembre, après une chute des dons de la communauté locale, il a bien cru devoir mettre la clé sous la porte. « Les Bosniens ont aussi connu la guerre, mais ils sont fatigués », explique ce grand gaillard que les réfugiés appellent « papa ». De temps en temps, il leur prépare de la nourriture dans des sachets à emporter, « pour qu’ils survivent dans la forêt ». Le chemin des bois est emprunté par tous ceux qui ne peuvent pas se permettre les tarifs des passeurs : 2 000 euros ou plus pour aller en voiture à Trieste en Italie, 1 200 euros pour descendre à Split en Croatie. A pied, il faut marcher environ une semaine, assurent les migrants : 80 kilomètres en Croatie, puis, une fois entrés en Slovénie, on se dirige vers l’Italie ou l’Autriche. Mais c’est sans compter sur l’intervention de la police croate, véritable inconnue dans le game - nom donné ici aux tentatives de passage de la frontière.

      Non loin de la séparation bosno-croate, Aadi a décidé de planter sur sa tente le drapeau bleu et jaune de la Bosnie-Herzégovine. « Les Bosniens sont des gens accueillants. Ce sont les policiers croates qui nous posent problème », dit-il. « Les policiers m’ont violemment frappé avec une matraque. Les conditions hygiéniques de ce camp ont fait le reste », renchérit Gabdar, un jeune Irakien qui arbore une plaie infectée à la main droite, où du pus s’est formé sous les croûtes. Youssef, un Tunisien trentenaire, se plaint que la police croate n’a pas seulement détruit son smartphone, mais aussi la powerbank, cette batterie externe indispensable à ceux qui passent de longs mois sur les routes.

      Ecrans brisés

      « Police, problem » est un refrain mille fois entendu. Dès que l’on mentionne les forces de l’ordre croates, les migrants sortent leurs portables. La multitude d’écrans brisés et les connecteurs d’alimentation rendus inutilisables avec des tournevis sont la preuve - disent-ils - des abus des policiers. Une accusation difficile à prouver, mais qui a attiré l’attention du Conseil de l’Europe (CoE). Début octobre, la commissaire aux droits de l’homme Dunja Mijatovic a invité Zagreb à faire la lumière sur ces allégations.

      D’après le CoE et le Haut Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés, la Croatie aurait expulsé collectivement 2 500 migrants depuis le début de 2018, « parmi eux, 1 500 personnes ont affirmé n’avoir pas pu soumettre une demande d’asile, tandis que 700 disent avoir été victimes de violences ou de vols de la part des policiers croates ». Joint par mail, le ministère de l’Intérieur de Zagreb assure que la police agit « dans le respect de la loi et des traités internationaux » et que « les vérifications effectuées jusque-là n’ont prouvé aucun cas de violence ».

      Au centre de Bihac, à 60 kilomètres au sud de Velika Kladusa, Ali, un Pakistanais de 17 ans se jette dans l’eau glaciale de la rivière Una et entreprend de se savonner les cheveux. Sur les bancs du parc alentour, d’autres migrants tuent le temps, cigarette ou smartphone à la main. La scène est devenue courante dans cette ville de 60 000 habitants, et la situation qui s’éternise agace certains locaux. Plusieurs pétitions ont fait leur apparition et quelques manifestations ont rassemblé un millier de personnes à Bihac, demandant aux autorités de trouver une solution à la présence des migrants en centre-ville.

      « Je n’ai rien contre les réfugiés, mais ces gens ne viennent pas de pays en guerre, ce sont des migrants économiques », affirme Sej Ramic, conseiller municipal à Bihac et professeur d’art, modérateur du groupe Facebook « Stop invaziji migranata ! Udruženje gradjana Bihaća » (« Stop à l’invasion des migrants ! Collectif de citoyens de Bihac »). Un argumentaire devenu habituel au sein de l’Union européenne, mais qu’on avait moins l’habitude d’entendre en Bosnie, pays lui-même marqué par une forte émigration.

      Face à cette opposition grandissante, le gouvernement du canton a entrepris d’arrêter les bus et les trains en provenance de Sarajevo et de renvoyer vers la capitale tous les migrants qui en descendent. Et dans le centre-ville de Biha, les policiers renvoient les migrants qui traînent vers le Dacki Dom. Cet ancien dortoir étudiant abandonné, dont la carcasse de béton nu se dresse au milieu des bois, héberge environ 1 000 personnes dans des conditions très précaires. Des centaines d’autres sont logées dans les environs, dans une ancienne usine de réfrigérateurs et dans un hôtel fermé depuis de nombreuses années. D’autres campent ou squattent des maisons abandonnées des alentours. L’objectif de l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) est « d’atteindre, dans les prochains jours, une capacité d’hébergement de 5 000 personnes sur l’ensemble du territoire bosnien », indique Peter Van der Auweraert, coordinateur de l’OIM pour les Balkans occidentaux. Cependant, « si le flux actuel de 1 000 entrées par semaine devait continuer, nous serons bientôt dans une situation très compliquée », poursuit-il, et note qu’avec l’hiver qui arrive, « ce qui coince, c’est le timing ».

      L’UE a récemment débloqué 7,2 millions d’euros pour aider la Bosnie, l’un des pays les plus pauvres des Balkans, à gérer le flux migratoire. Alors qu’à Bihac les ouvriers s’affairent à sécuriser les bâtiments et que les ONG tentent de reloger les centaines de personnes toujours dans des tentes, Van der Auweraert souligne le manque de volonté politique des autorités locales. L’imbroglio institutionnel bosnien, hérité des accords de Dayton, complique davantage le processus décisionnel.

      Il est midi à Velika Kladusa, et la pizzeria Teferic est en pleine distribution. Des dizaines de migrants patientent pour s’asseoir devant une assiette de macaronis. Dans la cuisine, Halil et Refik - « c’est lui qui a arrêté le chauffeur de Mladic pendant la guerre », nous glisse Asim - s’affairent autour d’une énorme casserole. Deux jeunes Indiens et un Pakistanais de passage prêtent main forte à la petite équipe. Après neuf mois de travail bénévole dans la pizzeria, Asim est fatigué « physiquement et mentalement ». S’il a trouvé de l’aide auprès de l’association néerlandaise Lemon Foundation, l’avenir de leur activité reste fragile. Tout en contemplant le va-et-vient des migrants à l’extérieur, il secoue la tête : « Mais que vont faire ces gens ? »

      https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2018/11/20/a-la-frontiere-bosno-croate-des-matraques-pour-les-migrants_1693271

    • Croatia: Migrants Pushed Back to Bosnia and Herzegovina

      Croatian police are pushing migrants and asylum seekers back to Bosnia and Herzegovina, in some cases violently, and without giving them the possibility to seek asylum, Human Rights Watch said.

      Human Rights Watch interviewed 20 people, including 11 heads of families and 1 unaccompanied boy, who said that Croatian police deported them to Bosnia and Herzegovina without due process after detaining them deep inside Croatian territory. Sixteen, including women and children, said police beat them with batons, kicked and punched them, stole their money, and either stole or destroyed their mobile phones.

      “Croatia has an obligation to protect asylum seekers and migrants,” said Lydia Gall, Balkans and Eastern EU researcher at Human Rights Watch. “Instead, the Croatian police viciously beat asylum seekers and pushed them back over the border.”

      All 20 interviewees gave detailed accounts of being detained by people who either identified themselves as Croatian police or wore uniforms matching those worn by Croatian police. Seventeen gave consistent descriptions of the police vans used to transport them to the border. One mother and daughter were transported in what they described as a police car. Two people said that police had fired shots in the air, and five said that the police were wearing masks.

      These findings confirm mounting evidence of abuse at Croatia’s external borders, Human Rights Watch said. In December 2016, Human Rights Watch documented similar abuses by Croatian police at Croatia’s border with Serbia. The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) reported in August 2018 that it had received reports Croatia had summarily pushed back 2,500 migrants and asylum seekers to Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina since the beginning of the year, at times accompanied by violence and theft.

      In response to a call by the Council of Europe’s human rights commissioner to investigate the allegations, Prime Minister Andrej Plenkovic in September denied any wrongdoing and questioned the sources of the information. Police in Donji Lapac, on the border with Bosnia and Herzegovina, refused to provide Croatia’s ombudswoman, Lora Vidović, access to police records on treatment of migrants and told her that police are acting in accordance with the law.

      In a December 4 letter, Interior Minister Davor Bozinovic responded to a detailed description of the Human Rights Watch findings. He said that the evidence of summary returns and violence was insufficient to bring criminal prosecutions, that the allegations could not be confirmed, and that migrants accuse Croatian police in the hope that it will help them enter Croatia. He said that his ministry does not support any type of violence or intolerance by police officers.

      Croatia has a bilateral readmission agreement with Bosnia and Herzegovina that allows Croatia to return third-country nationals without legal permission to stay in the country. According to the Security Ministry of Bosnia and Herzegovina, under the agreement, between January and November 27, Croatia returned 493 people to Bosnia and Herzegovina, 265 of whom were Turkish nationals. None of the people Human Rights Watch interviewed underwent any formal return procedure before being forced back over the border.

      The summary return of asylum seekers without consideration of their protection needs is contrary to European Union asylum law, the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights, and the 1951 Refugee Convention.

      Croatian authorities should conduct thorough and transparent investigations of abuse implicating their officials and hold those responsible to account, Human Rights Watch said. They should ensure full cooperation with the Ombudswoman’s inquiry, as required by national law and best practice for independent human rights institutions. The European Commission should call on Croatia, an EU member state, to halt and investigate summary returns of asylum seekers to Bosnia and Herzegovina and allegations of violence against asylum seekers. The Commission should also open legal proceedings against Croatia for violating EU laws, Human Rights Watch said.

      As a result of the 2016 border closures on the Western Balkan route, thousands of asylum seekers were stranded, the majority in Serbia, and found new routes toward the EU. In 2018, migrant and asylum seeker arrivals increased in Bosnia and Herzegovina, from fewer than 1,000 in 2017 to approximately 22,400, according to the European Commission. The Commission estimates that 6,000 migrants and asylum seekers are currently in the country. Bosnia and Herzegovina has granted international protection to only 17 people since 2008. In 2017, 381 people applied for asylum there.

      Bosnia and Herzegovina has only one official reception center for asylum seekers near Sarajevo, with capacity to accommodate just 156 people. Asylum seekers and migrants in the border towns of Bihac and Velika Kladusa, where Human Rights Watch conducted the interviews, are housed in temporary facilities managed by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) – a dilapidated building, a refurbished warehouse, and former hotels – or they sleep outdoors. The IOM and UNHCR have been improving the facilities. The EU has allocated over €9 million to support humanitarian assistance for asylum seekers and migrants in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

      “Just because the EU is sending humanitarian aid to refugees in Bosnia and Herzegovina, that does not justify turning a blind eye to violence at the Croatian border,” Gall said. “Brussels should press Zagreb to comply with EU law, investigate alleged abuse, and provide fair and efficient access to asylum.”

      For detailed accounts by the people interviewed, please see below.

      Human Rights Watch interviewed 13 men, 6 women, and one 15-year-old unaccompanied boy. All interviewees’ names have been changed in order to protect their security and privacy. All interviews were conducted in English or with the aid of a Persian or Arabic speaking interpreter. Human Rights Watch informed interviewees of the purpose of the interview and its voluntary nature, and they verbally consented to be interviewed.

      Denied Access to Asylum Procedure, Summarily Returned

      All 20 people interviewed said that people who identified themselves as Croatian police or whom they described as police detained them well inside Croatian territory and subsequently returned them to Bosnia and Herzegovina without any consideration of asylum claims or human rights obstacles to their return.

      Nine said that police detained them and others and took them to a police station in Croatia. The others said that police officers took them directly to the border with Bosnia-Herzegovina and made them cross.

      Those taken to police stations said they were searched, photographed, and questioned about details such as their name, country of origin, age, and their route entering Croatia. They were not given copies of any forms. They said they were held there in rooms with limited or no seating for between 2 and 24 hours, then taken to the border. Three people said they asked for asylum at the police station but that the police ignored or laughed at them. Six others said they dared not speak because police officers told them to remain quiet.

      Faven F. and Kidane K., a married couple in their thirties from Eritrea, said they had been walking for seven days when they were detained on November 9, close to Rijeka, 200 kilometers from the border. They said that four men in green uniforms detained them in the forest and took them in a windowless white van without proper seats to a police station in Rijeka:

      They delivered us to new police. One was in plain clothes, the other one in dark blue uniform that said “Policija” on it…. At the station, they gave us a paper in English where we had to fill in name, surname, and place of birth…. A lady officer asked us questions about our trip, how we got there, who helped us. We told them that if Croatia can give us asylum, we would like to stay. The lady officer just laughed. They wrote our names on a white paper and some number and made us hold them for a mug shot. Then they kept us in the cell the whole night and didn’t give us food, but we could drink tap water in the bathroom.

      Yaran Y., a 19-year-old from Iraq, was carrying his 14-year old sister Dilva, who has a disability and uses a wheelchair, on his back when they were detained along with at least five others at night in the forest. Yaran Y. said he told officers he wanted asylum for his sister, but that the police just laughed. “They told us to go to Brazil and ask for asylum there,” Yaran Y. said.

      Ardashir A., a 33-year-old Iranian, was travelling with his wife and 7-year-old daughter in a group of 18 people, including 3 other children, the youngest of whom is under age 2. He said that Croatian police detained the group 12 kilometers inside Croatian territory on November 15 and took them to a police station:

      They [Croatian police] brought us to a room, like a prison. They took our bags and gave us only a few slices of bread. There were no chairs, we sat on the floor. Two people in civilian clothes came after a while, I don’t know if they were police, but they took a group picture of us and refused to let us go to the toilet. A 10-year-old child really needed to go but wasn’t allowed so he had to endure. After two hours they took us … to the border.

      Adal A., a 15-year-old boy from Afghanistan traveling on his own said that he was detained on November 15 near Zagreb and taken in a white windowless van to a police station:

      They searched us at the police station and took our phones, power banks, bags, and everything we had. They took three kinds of pictures: front, side, and back. We had to hold a paper with a number. I was asked questions about my name, where I am from, my age, and about the smuggler. I told them I’m 15. We then sat in a room for 24 hours and received no food but could get water from the tap in the toilet.

      Palmira P., a 45-year-old Iranian, said that a female police officer mistreated Palmira’s 11-year-old daughter during a body search in a police station courtyard on the outskirts of Rijeka in early November: “She pulled my daughter’s pants down in front of everyone. My daughter still has nightmares about this policewoman, screaming out in the middle of the night, ‘Don’t do it, don’t do it!’”

      Everyone interviewed said that Croatian police confiscated and never returned or destroyed their phones and destroyed power banks and phone chargers. Four people said that Croatian police forced them to unlock their phones before stealing them.

      Madhara M., a 32-year-old from Iran, said a police officer found a €500 bill in his pocket on November 15: “He looked at it, inspected it, and admired it and then demonstratively put it in his pocket in front of me.”

      Accounts of Violence and Abuse

      Seventeen people described agonizing journeys ranging from 15 minutes to five hours in windowless white police vans to the border. In two cases, people described the vans with a deep dark blue/black stripe running through the middle and a police light on top. A Human Rights Watch researcher saw a police van matching that description while driving through Croatia.

      Croatian roads close to the border with Bosnia and Herzegovina cross windy, mountainous terrain. People interviewed said they had experienced nausea, vomited, or felt extreme cold or heat in the van. A 23-year-old Syrian woman said she believed the difficult van ride and pushback caused her to miscarry her 7-week pregnancy. Amez A., a 28-year-old Iraqi, said police sprayed what he thought was teargas into the van before closing the back doors and driving off, making everyone in the car vomit and have difficulty breathing.

      Sixteen people, including women and children, said that they were slapped, pummelled with fists, beaten with police batons made of rubber or wood, or kicked by people they described as or who identified themselves as Croatian police during the pushbacks.

      In many cases, the violence was accompanied by abusive language in English. Human Rights Watch observed marks and bruises on nine people and viewed photographs of injuries on four more who said they were the result of beatings by Croatian police officers. Four people said that they required treatment at Bosnian hospitals.

      Adal A., the 15-year-old unaccompanied boy, described a particularly vicious beating on November 16:

      They wore dark blue uniforms with masks, and as I exited the van, both police hit me with their batons. I felt a blow to my neck and I fell forward and wanted to get up. At that point, I was on the Bosnian side of the border stones, where another six Croatian police officers stood waiting. They were all over me, beating me. I don’t know how they beat me, but it was hard and strong, and I tried to protect my face. I was so badly beaten on my back that I still can’t sleep on it properly because of the pain. When they saw that my nose was bleeding, and that my hand was injured and that I couldn’t walk, they stopped…. They yelled “Go!” and as I was trying to leave, they fired guns in the air.

      Human Rights Watch interviewed Adal A. four days after he said this had happened and observed marks and bruises on his legs and arms.

      Aftab A., 37, from Iran, said that police officers in dark blue uniforms beat him and his 12-year-old son in what he called the “Tunnel of Death:”

      They [police] make this tunnel [lined up on each side] and you have to pass. They took us out of the van one by one and they started beating me with batons from both sides. I was beaten on my arm, shoulder, and on my knee with batons. My son was beaten with batons on his back and on his head…We kept screaming ‘my son my son!’ or ‘my dad my dad!’ but they didn’t care. They kept beating at us until we crossed the border. Even my wife was struck across her back with a baton. The child was so scared and was crying for half an hour and then wouldn’t speak for a long time.

      Madhara M., 32, from Iran, was taken to the border on November 15 along with four others, including a married couple. He said that Croatian police beat him and then threw him into a ditch he said separates Croatia from Bosnia and Herzegovina:

      There were about eight police officers in front of the van. But there were more behind them making sure we can’t run away. The first punch broke my tooth… I fell, and the officer rolled me over, and punched me in the eye. It was so painful, I tried to escape by crawling, but the police struck me with the baton on my back. Suddenly, I received a second blow on the same eye. Then the police officers grabbed me and threw me into the ditch. All along, they were laughing and swearing in English, things like ‘I will fuck your mother.’

      Bahadur B. and Nabila N., both 32 and from Iran, are a married couple who were traveling with Madhara M. Nabila N., who was three-months’ pregnant at the time, described the violence at the border:

      They [Croatian police] were standing four on one side and four on the other side. We call it the ‘terror tunnel.’ They told us to get out. Bahadur tried to help me down from the van, as I was stiff from the ride. When he did, the police started beating him…I turned and screamed at them to stop beating my husband, but…. I stumbled on a bag in the darkness…When I got up, I was face-to-face with a police officer who was wearing a mask. I kept screaming, “Please don’t do it, we will leave” but he deliberately hit me hard with his baton across my hand. I kept screaming “baby, baby!” during the whole ordeal but they didn’t listen, they just laughed.

      Both Yaran Y., 19, and his sister Dilva, 14, who has a physical disability, said they required medical treatment after Croatian police used physical force during the pushback in early July. Yaran Y. said:

      I was carrying Dilva on my back the whole way while others pushed her wheelchair. Our family travelled with five other people. It was dark, when the police surprised us by firing shots in the air. They police wore dark or black color uniforms and there were six or seven of them. I asked one of the police officers for asylum but he harshly pushed me so I fell with my sister on my back. In the fall, my sister and I landed on a sharp wooden log which severely injured her foot and my hand.

      A Human Rights Watch researcher observed scars on Dilva’s foot and Yaran’s hand and saw pictures of the fresh injuries.

      Sirvan S., 38, from Iraq, said Croatian police in dark blue uniforms beat him and his youngest son, age 6, during a pushback on November 14: “My son and I were beaten with a rubber baton. I was beaten in the head and on my leg. My son was beaten with a baton on his leg and head as well as he was running from the police.” Sirvan’s wife, 16-year-old daughter, and 14-year-old son witnessed the violence.

      Gorkem G., 30, travelling with his 25-year-old pregnant wife, 5-year-old son, and 2-year-old daughter, said that Croatian police pushed his son, so he fell hard to the ground. “He only wanted to say “hi” to the police,” Gorkem G. said

      Family members described the anger, frustration, and trauma they experienced seeing the police officers beat their loved ones. A 10-year-old Yazidi boy from Iraq said, “I saw how police kicked my father in his back and how they beat him all over. It made me angry.” His father, Hussein H., said that police officers had dragged him out of the van at the border and kicked and punched him when he was on the ground.

      Fatima F., 34, a Syrian mother of six, travelled with her husband’s 16-year-old brother and three of her children, ages 2, 4, and 10. She said that three police officers in dark uniforms beat her husband’s brother in front of her and her children:

      They were merciless […] One officer was by the van, one in the middle of the line of people, and one close to the path [into Bosnia and Herzegovina]. They kept beating the others with batons, and kicking. They [the officers] saw me and the kids but they just kept beating the men despite the kids crying. They didn’t beat me or the children, but the children were very afraid when they saw the men being beaten. My oldest girl kept screaming when she saw my husband’s brother get beaten…[she] screams out in the middle of the night.

      In three cases, people said they were forced to cross ice-cold rivers or streams even though they were near a bridge.

      Thirty-year-old Abu Hassan A. from Iran, travelling in a group of seven other single men, said:

      They [police] were wearing masks. There was a bridge about 50-60 meters away. More than six police were guarding the bridge. It [the stream] was about 5-6 meters wide and waist high and muddy. They told us we have to cross. Then the police… beat me with batons and kicked me, and the first handed me over to the second police who did the same thing, and then handed me over to the third, who did the same thing. After that, I was close to the riverbank, where two other police were waiting. The first one beat me again with baton and pushed me toward the other. They beat me on the legs, hands, arms, shoulders. This is what they did to force us to go into the water and across. I could barely stand or walk for a week after.

      https://www.hrw.org/news/2018/12/11/croatia-migrants-pushed-back-bosnia-and-herzegovina

    • Why are police in Croatia attacking asylum seekers trapped in the Balkans?

      Hearing increasing reports of police brutality against refugees on the Croatia-Bosnia border, Human Rights Watch is demanding action from Zagreb and the EU Commission.

      In November, I spent four days talking to migrants, including asylum seekers, in dilapidated, freezing buildings in Bihac and Velika Kladusa in Bosnia Herzegovina, an area close to the Croatian border. I heard the same story over and over: Croatian police officers beat and robbed them before illegally forcing them over the border to Bosnia and Herzegovina.

      Unfortunately, in my work as the Eastern Europe and Balkans researcher at Human Rights Watch, these stories are not new to me. But what really struck me this time around was the sheer brutality and cruelty of the police assaults.

      “They are merciless,” 34-year-old Fatima*, from Syria, said of Croatian police officers. She and her three young children, the youngest only two years old, were forced to watch Croatian police officers beat her 16-year-old brother-in-law. “My 10-year-old daughter suffered psychologically since it happened, having nightmares,” Fatima said.

      Nabila*, an Iranian woman who was three months pregnant at the time, told me a police officer struck her on her hand with a baton though she told him and other officers repeatedly that she was pregnant.

      Sirvan*, from Iraq, said a Croatian police officer beat his six-year-old son with a baton on his leg and his head as he was trying to run away from the police beatings.

      Yaran*, also from Iraq, was carrying his 14-year-old sister, Dilva*, who has a physical disability and uses a wheelchair, when Croatian police officers manhandled them. “When they captured us, I immediately told them ‘asylum’ but one police officer just pushed me hard so I fell backwards with my sister on my back.” They both required medical treatment after they were forced back to Bosnia and Herzegovina.

      Croatia’s interior ministry has denied any wrongdoing but testimonies from migrants continue to emerge.

      Since March 2016, when the Western Balkan route was closed, many people have found themselves stuck in the Balkans. After fleeing countries such as Syria, Afghanistan, Iran, Eritrea, Pakistan and Bangladesh, people had travelled through Turkey to Greece or Bulgaria, and onwards to Macedonia and Serbia.

      There are now between 6,000 and 8,000 people trapped in Serbia and around 6,000 in Bosnia and Herzegovina, who want to move onwards to EU states and particularly to Western Europe.

      Many have tried to cross to Hungary and Croatia but are met with violence from border guards. Most of the people I talked to had been walking for days inside Croatia by the time police detained them.

      Some were taken to police stations, where they were denied food for up to 24 hours; others were taken directly to the border. They were transported in windowless locked vans on winding mountainous roads on trips of up to five hours. People kept sliding off the narrow benches, bumping into each other, and throwing up.

      At the border, a “Tunnel of Terror” – as some called it — greeted them. A gauntlet of police officers beat them, pushing each person to the next officer and then to the next, laughing and mocking them on the way.

      Tired and beaten, migrants and asylum seekers were then chased down a slippery slope or thrown into a ditch four to five meters deep that is the de facto border between Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina or made to wade across an ice-cold stream.

      Most of the 20 people I interviewed, including parents with their children, the girl with a disability, and pregnant women, said they were brutally forced across the border in the cold of dark winter nights.

      Every person I interviewed also said that Croatian police robbed them of their phones and money. They kept the good phones, forcing people to surrender their passcodes, and smashed the rest. Money, if found, was stolen too.

      All this is going on at the EU’s borders. With total impunity.

      And it has been going on for some time. I documented similar abuses on Croatia’s border with Serbia two years ago. The government rejected our allegations and the EU didn’t act. In two years, rather than improving, the situation has got worse.

      More recently, the Croatian government dismissed concerns raised by UN refugee agency UNHCR and the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights and told us they didn’t have enough evidence to bring prosecutions and that allegations can’t be confirmed.

      The EU provides funds for humanitarian assistance to migrants and asylum seekers in Bosnia and Herzegovina that, while helpful, cannot justify turning a blind eye to neighbouring member state, Croatia, blatantly breaking EU laws and ignoring violence committed against those same people.

      Croatian authorities need to take these allegations seriously. They need to immediately open an investigation into the summary returns and violence by Croatian police against migrants and asylum seekers. And they need to hold those responsible to account.

      It’s also well past time for EU institutions to break their silence and send a strong message to Zagreb that pushbacks and violence flies in the face of Croatia’s legal obligations. The EU should make failure by Zagreb to address this issue come at a serious cost.

      *Names have been changed to protect identities.

      https://lacuna.org.uk/migration/why-police-croatia-attacking-asylum-seekers-trapped-in-the-balkans

      #Velika_Kladusa

    • Croatia violating EU law by sending asylum seekers back to Bosnia

      Hidden cameras capture apparent expulsions by Croatian border police in forest.

      Croatian police are returning groups of asylum seekers across the EU’s external border with Bosnia, a video obtained by the Guardian suggests, in an apparent breach of EU law.

      Footage shared by the watchdog organisation Border Violence Monitoring (BVM) shows a number of alleged collective expulsions or “pushbacks” of migrants in a forest near Lohovo, in Bosnian territory.

      The videos, filmed on hidden cameras between 29 September and 10 October, capture 54 incidents of people being pushed back in groups from Croatia into Bosnia with 368 people in total returned, according to the footage.

      Bosnia-Herzegovina’s security minister, Dragan Mektić, told the news channel N1 the behaviour of the Croatian police was “a disgrace for an EU country”.

      Croatian police are returning groups of asylum seekers across the EU’s external border with Bosnia, a video obtained by the Guardian suggests, in an apparent breach of EU law.

      Footage shared by the watchdog organisation Border Violence Monitoring (BVM) shows a number of alleged collective expulsions or “pushbacks” of migrants in a forest near Lohovo, in Bosnian territory.

      The videos, filmed on hidden cameras between 29 September and 10 October, capture 54 incidents of people being pushed back in groups from Croatia into Bosnia with 368 people in total returned, according to the footage.

      Bosnia-Herzegovina’s security minister, Dragan Mektić, told the news channel N1 the behaviour of the Croatian police was “a disgrace for an EU country”.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CAmdAjzcrcA


      https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/dec/17/croatia-violating-eu-law-by-sending-back-asylum-seekers-to-bosnia?CMP=s

    • ‘Unverifiable information from unknown migrants’? – First footage of push-backs on the Croatian-Bosnian border

      By now our database contains more than 150 push-back reports from the Bosnian-Croatian border. In light of this figure it seems hard to deny this illegal practice of collective expulsions of people seeking protection, perpetrated by the Croatian police and often accompanied by violence. The people returning from the border with broken arms or legs, or showing bloodshot eyes and marks of beatings with batons on their backs, are no isolated cases. Their injuries and testimonies prove irrefutably institutionalised and systematically applied practices – even if the Croatian Minister of the Interior [1] continues to deny these accusations and instead prefers to accuse refugees of self-injury [2]. Meanwhile, various large international media have taken up the topic and report on developments at the Bosnian-Croatian border. The Guardian, for example, recently published a video showing a refugee bleeding from several wounds just after a pushback [3]. Yet, for some reason, up to now the available evidence has not been enough to hold the responsible persons and institutions accountable. New video material provided to BVM by an anonymous group should now close this gap in evidence.

      VIDEO MATERIAL PROVES ILLEGAL PUSH-BACKS FROM CROATIA

      On 20 November we received a letter containing extensive video footage from the Bosnian-Croatian border area. For security reasons, the informants themselves prefer to remain anonymous; yet for the extensiveness and level of detail of the material in concordance with other reports, we consider it authentic. The footage was filmed by hidden cameras in a forest near Lohovo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, (Coordinates 44.7316124, 15.9133454) between 29 September and 10 October 2018 and show 54 push-backs.

      At least 350 refugees, including small children, minors and women, can clearly be seen on the video recordings as victims of these pushbacks, which take place several times a day and at night. Should they occur just as frequently as during the filmed period, the number of push-backs at this border crossing alone exceeds 150 per month. For the first time, the material can unambiguously prove that the Croatian police systematically conducts collective expulsions on Bosnian territory.

      The group’s report accompanying the material reads:

      “These push-backs are not conducted at an official border checkpoint and without the presence of Bosnian officials and are therefore illegal. In addition, documentation by various NGOs suggests that asylum applications by refugees were previously disregarded.”

      These expulsions over the green border do not follow formal return procedures [4] and can thus not be justified with the 2007 readmission agreement between the EU and Bosnia. The only legal way to return people would be through the readmission process at the official border crossing after a readmission application has been made to the Bosnian authorities.

      PROOF OF MULTIPLE CRIMINAL OFFENCES

      In not complying with these procedures, the police officers involved violate international law, in particular the prohibition of collective expulsions laid down in Article 4 of the Fourth Additional Protocol to the European Convention on Human Rights [5] and Article 19 of the European Charter of Fundamental Rights [6]. Similarly, the right to asylum, as agreed in the Geneva Convention on Refugees [7] and Article 18 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights, is not granted.

      “According to first-hand accounts, the officials inflict violence during approximately one in five push-backs in Lohovo, which is considerably less than on other push-back locations on the Bosnian-Croatian border. Here as in other locations, mobile phones are almost always destroyed and returned in a yellow plastic bag.”

      In the videos themselves, the violence becomes apparent in the form of kicks and insults. Shots and screams that can be heard at close range indicate that the beatings and humilliations which are extensively documented by various NGOs [8], take place nearby.

      Interestingly enough, the group seems to be planning to release even more video material from the border:

      “We already have more recordings from other locations and will publish them as soon as we have collected enough material. Since push-backs at other locations often take place at night, we work here with thermal cameras and other special equipment.”

      With their work, the group aims to contribute to the end of push-backs and police violence in Croatia, they state:

      “We demand that the human rights violations at the Bosnian-Croatian border stop immediately. For this it is necessary that they are examined in an official investigation both internally, by the Croatian Minister of the Interior, and by the European Commission, which co-finances Croatian border security from the Internal Security Fund (ISF).”

      BVM supports these demands. Now more than ever, the evidence is calling for immediate investigations by the Croatian authorities as well as by the European Union of which Croatia is a member state and which co-funds Croatian border security. The European Commission should call on Croatia to stop and investigate collective expulsions of asylum seekers to Bosnia and Herzegovina as well as allegations of violence perpetrated by Croatian officers. The EU Commission should also open legal proceedings against Croatia for violating EU laws.

      We would like to make the material that was sent to us available to the general public, in order to make them visible as evidence of the everyday events at the borders of the European Union.

      The data package, including the report, an overview of the content of the material and all the videos, can be accessed or downloaded here:

      https://files.borderviolence.eu/index.php/s/EYZdTo0OeGXrCqW

      In case of queries we can establish encrypted communication with the anonymous group.


      https://www.borderviolence.eu/proof-of-push-backs

    • Human rights group files complaint against Croatian police

      A Croatian NGO working with migrants has filed a complaint against police who it claims used excessive force and violence against migrants, illegally pushing them back at the border with Bosnia.
      A human rights organization in Croatia on Wednesday filed a complaint against several Croatian police officers, whose identities are unknown. The organization claims that they are guilty of using excessive force, violence and other illegal behavior against migrants and refugees that were pushed back at the border with Bosnia.

      The complaint by the Center for Peace Studies (CMS), a Zagreb-based NGO, is based on footage published in recent days by Border Violence Monitoring (BVM), an international organization that collects evidence of abuse and illegal push-backs against migrants on the Balkan route.

      Video and witness statements

      BVM received the footage from an anonymous source in November. The organization said that it had verified that the videos were credible. They also argued that the footage was in line with hundreds of witness statements from migrants collected over the past year, according to which Croatian police systematically push back migrants towards Bosnia.

      The footage was reportedly filmed in September and allegedly shows a group of migrants lined up and Croatian police forcing them to return to Bosnia, without giving them the possibility to ask for asylum or international humanitarian protection. BVM said that this was against international law, because the incidents occurred in the so-called “green zone,” in the forest between the two countries, not at border crossings, and without the presence of Bosnian border guards.

      The footage also shows some incidents of Croatian police kicking, threatening and insulting migrants.

      Collective forced push-backs

      The Center for Peace Studies said that, for the first time, the footage offers undeniable proof corroborating the many complaints against Croatian police presented in recent months by international organizations including the Council of Europe, UNHCR, and Human Rights Watch. “The footage shows collective forced push-backs and the use of unjustified violence,” CMS said.

      The NGO has asked for an investigation by the judiciary as well as the resignation of the interior minister and some high-ranking members of Croatian police.

      Croatian Interior Minister Davor Bozinovic said that he had not seen any video in which Croatian police made use of violence and that there was no substantial evidence that showed illegal conduct by the police. Croatia has always rejected accusations that its police engage in illegal behavior against migrants.

      http://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/14039/human-rights-group-files-complaint-against-croatian-police

    • En Bosnie, des milliers de réfugiés sont bloqués dans la neige aux frontières de l’Union européenne

      La Bosnie-Herzégovine est devenue un cul-de-sac aux portes de l’Union européenne, où sont bloqués plusieurs milliers d’exilés. Malgré les violences de la police croate et une neige redoutable, ils cherchent à continuer leur route vers l’Ouest.

      Depuis l’été, les témoignages et les rapports des organisations internationales s’accumulent : la police croate maltraite systématiquement les migrants et les réfugiés, et procède à des rapatriements forcés extra-légaux en Bosnie-Herzégovine. Le 16 décembre, le réseau Border violence monitoring a ainsi publié d’accablantes vidéos montrant comment les forces de l’ordre regroupaient des réfugiés arrêtés alors qu’ils tentaient d’entrer en Croatie et les forçaient à reprendre la route de la Bosnie-Herzégovine.

      Ces vidéos, réalisées en caméra cachée, documentent 54 cas de refoulement, effectués entre le 29 septembre et le 10 octobre dans la forêt de Lehovo, dans les régions montagneuses et très peuplées de Krajina, qui marquent la frontière entre les deux pays. Sur les vidéos, on peut dénombrer au moins 350 réfugiés, dont des femmes et des enfants. « Pour la première fois, des documents prouvent que la police croate mène systématiquement des expulsions collectives sur le territoire bosnien, note Border Violence Monitoring. Ces refoulements ne sont pas menés à un poste-frontière et ont lieu sans présence de représentants légaux de la Bosnie-Herzégovine, ils sont donc contraires au droit international. »

      https://twitter.com/Border_Violence/status/1074178137217478656

      Deux jours plus tôt, Human Rights Watch publiait un rapport accablant sur les actes de violence et de torture commis par la police croate. Zagreb interdit bien souvent aux réfugiés de déposer une demande d’asile, contrevenant ainsi à ses obligations internationales. L’organisation internationale affirme avoir recueilli les témoignages de 20 personnes, dont 16 évoquaient des brutalités systématiques, voire de véritables actes de torture commis par les forces de l’ordre croates, ainsi que des vols d’argent et de téléphones portables.

      Le Commissaire des Nations unies pour les réfugiés confirmait de son côté en août 2018 avoir reçu des rapports qui soulignaient que la Croatie avait illégalement refoulé 2 500 migrants et demandeurs d’asile vers la Bosnie-Herzégovine et la Serbie depuis le début de l’année dernière. Ces accusations ont été réfutées par le premier ministre croate Andrej Plenković, dans une réponse à une interpellation du Conseil de l’Europe.

      Depuis plusieurs mois, les associations et les collectifs croates de soutien aux réfugiés font d’ailleurs l’objet d’un véritable harcèlement : attaques de leurs locaux ou de leurs véhicules par des « inconnus », poursuites judiciaires contre plusieurs militants. Ces collectifs viennent d’ailleurs de publier une « Lettre ouverte aux citoyens de l’Union européenne depuis la périphérie », soulignant que les politiques de fermeture des frontières pourraient faire basculer tous ces pays de la périphérie européenne – membres ou non de l’Union – dans des régimes de plus en plus autoritaires.

      Dragan Mektić, le ministre de la sécurité de Bosnie-Herzégovine, a pourtant confirmé à la télévision N1 la réalité de ces mauvais traitements. « Le comportement de la police croate est une honte pour un pays membre de l’Union européenne. Les policiers se font les complices des trafiquants, en poussant les migrants dans les mains des réseaux criminels », a-t-il expliqué. Depuis la fermeture de la « route des Balkans », au printemps 2016, et l’édification d’un mur de barbelés le long de la frontière hongroise, les candidats à l’exil empruntent de nouvelles routes depuis la Grèce, transitant par l’Albanie, le Monténégro et la Bosnie-Herzégovine, ou directement depuis la Serbie vers la Bosnie-Herzégovine, devenue une étape obligatoire sur la route vers l’Union européenne.

      La région de Bihać constitue effectivement un cul-de-sac. Selon les chiffres officiels, 18 628 réfugiés ont été enregistrés en Bosnie-Herzégovine en 2018. Au 18 décembre, 5 300 se trouvaient dans le pays, dont au moins 4 000 dans le canton de Bihać, les autres étant répartis dans des centres d’accueil à proximité de la capitale Sarajevo ou de la ville de Mostar. La majorité d’entre eux ne fait que transiter, alors que des températures polaires et de fortes neiges se sont abattues sur la Bosnie-Herzégovine depuis la fin du mois de décembre.

      À Velika Kladuša, une petite ville coincée à la frontière occidentale du pays, le camp de Trnovi a été évacué mi-décembre et tous ses habitants relogés dans l’ancienne usine Miral, aménagée en centre d’hébergement d’urgence par l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM). « Les conditions sont très précaires, mais au moins, il y a du chauffage », se réjouit Husein Kličić, président du Comité cantonal de la Croix-Rouge.

      Les entrées en Bosnie-Herzégovine se sont ralenties avec l’arrivée de l’hiver, 450 par semaine en novembre contre 1 200 un mois plus tôt, selon Peter Van der Auweraert, directeur de l’OIM dans le pays, mais les flux ne se sont pas taris : en ce début janvier, de nouveaux groupes arrivent tous les jours au Monténégro, explique Sabina Talovic, volontaire dans la ville de Pljevlja, proche des frontières de la Bosnie-Herzégovine. Ces flux devraient recommencer à enfler une fois le printemps revenu.

      L’urgence est désormais de passer l’hiver. Selon Damir Omerdić, ministre de l’éducation du canton d’Una-Sana, une trentaine d’enfants installés avec leurs familles dans l’ancien hôtel Sreda, dans la ville de Cazin, devraient même pouvoir intégrer l’école primaire d’un petit village voisin et des négociations sont en cours avec un autre établissement. « Ils passeront deux ou trois heures par jour à l’école. Notre but est de leur permettre de faire connaissance avec d’autres enfants », explique-t-il à Radio Slobodna Evropa.

      La police du canton d’Una-Sana a observé, courant décembre, plusieurs groupes de réfugiés en train de s’engager dans le massif de Plješevica, qui fait frontière avec la Croatie. Non seulement, des secteurs n’ont toujours pas été déminés depuis la fin de la guerre, mais seuls des montagnards expérimentés et bien équipés peuvent s’engager en plein hiver dans ces montagnes dont les sommets culminent à plus de 1 600 mètres. Les policiers bosniens n’ont aucun mandat pour stopper les réfugiés qui prennent cette route dangereuse – mais si jamais ils parviennent à franchir ces montagnes, on peut hélas gager que la police croate les arrêtera.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/130119/en-bosnie-des-milliers-de-refugies-sont-bloques-dans-la-neige-aux-frontier

    • Entre violences et désespoir, le quotidien des migrants oubliés en Bosnie-Herzégovine

      Ils sont plus de 3 500 dans les #camps surpeuplés à la frontière avec la Croatie, des centaines dans les squats insalubres à Sarajevo, et bien d’autres encore dans le reste du pays. Depuis plus d’un an, la Bosnie-Herzégovine subit afflux massif de migrants, auquel les autorités ont toutes les peines de faire face. Pour ces candidats à l’exil bloqués à la lisière de l’Union européenne, l’espoir de passer se fait de plus en plus ténu. « Entre violences et désespoir, le quotidien des migrants oubliés en Bosnie-Herzégovine », un Grand reportage de Jean-Arnault Dérens et Simon Rico.


      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/15228/entre-violences-et-desespoir-le-quotidien-des-migrants-oublies-en-bosn
      #campement

    • In Bosnia, a Migrant Way Station Is Becoming a Winter Prison

      For years, the country remained untouched by the global migrant crisis, but now, even in a place where many people were once refugees, tensions are on the rise.

      BIHAC, Bosnia and Herzegovina—Zohaib Ali, a 22-year-old student from Pakistan, has attempted to cross into the European Union through the mountainous border separating Bosnia and Herzegovina from Croatia 16 times. Many of the migrants he met during his repeated efforts have now made it to Italy or France. “I tried, and they tried. … [I had] bad luck,” he told Foreign Policy in December. But bad luck is not the only element to blame.

      Ali speculated that if he had come to Bosnia earlier in the spring of 2018, when the border with Croatia wasn’t so heavily guarded, he might have succeeded. Instead, he arrived in August, finding himself in one of the world’s most difficult migration bottlenecks.

      For years, the global migrant crisis was a remote concern for Bosnia. Migrants traveling along the Balkan corridor first arrived in Greece by sea from Turkey and then moved toward Macedonia and Serbia in order to enter Croatia and Hungary, both EU member states. As in 2015 and 2016, countries along the route have closed their borders, sending migrants fanning out across the Balkans.

      Now, migrants leaving Greece go through jagged mountains and dense woodland to reach Albania, then Montenegro, only to find themselves stuck in Bosnia. This small, ethnically divided country with a dearth of economic opportunities has found itself at the epicenter of the crisis, as more people make their way in and can no longer find a way out.

      Since January 2018, more than 23,000 migrants and asylum-seekers have arrived in Bosnia. The year before, there were fewer than 1,000.

      The shift has caught the country’s authorities flat-footed. Many international actors, including the Council of Europe’s commissioner for human rights, have expressed concerns over the slow and chaotic response to the needs of these new arrivals.

      Despite his determination to reach his brother in Germany or his sister in Canada, Ali has resolved to spend the winter in northwestern Bosnia before he attempts his next crossing in the spring. Maybe borders won’t be so heavily guarded and Croatian police so brutal, he speculates. He wasn’t beaten or attacked with dogs, as was the case for many less fortunate migrants, who have accused Croatian forces of systematic violence. But he was the victim of theft on multiple occasions. “They took my rucksack with belongings,” he recounted matter-of-factly.

      It’s an uncomfortable compromise. Ali’s efforts to find help to get out of Bosnia have been anything but fruitful. When a smuggler promised to get him a safe passage to Italy, Ali handed over 16,000 euros ($18,000), and in return, he received nothing.

      In Bosnia, he was told that he would need a visa. Then a smuggler took his passport and never gave it back, making his presence in Bihac—without documents or refugee status—completely illegal. “It’s not a problem,” Ali said. “There [are] too many migrants here. No one will notice.”

      Extreme temperatures are a factor, too. “The cold in the mountains is like ice going inside you, in your blood,” Ali said. In these conditions, around 4,000 others have made the same pragmatic decision—Bosnia will have to do, for now.

      For migrants and asylum-seekers stuck in Bosnia through the winter, options are limited. They’re allowed to stay in one of four refugee camps along the border with Croatia. The camps are temporary and were never intended for their current purpose.

      https://foreignpolicy.com/2019/02/20/in-bosnia-a-migrant-way-station-is-becoming-a-winter-prison-bihac-cro

    • Reçu via la mailing-list Inicijativa Dobrodosli, le 29.04.2019

      Since 18 July 2018, the border has been monitored by a Frontex airplane. Croatian border with Bosnia and Herzegovina is regularly patrolled by over 1,000 officers (out of a total of 6,500 border police officers) and there are additional 2,000 riot police officers deployed for border surveillance.

      #militarisation_des_frontières #Frontex #surveillance #surveillance_aérienne #police #Bosnie-Herzégovine #Croatie #frontières #surveillance_frontalière #contrôles_frontaliers

    • Kroatische Polizei bei illegaler Abschiebung gefilmt

      Kroatien schiebt Flüchtlinge an der grünen Grenze illegal nach Bosnien ab. Das verstösst gegen EU- und Völkerrecht.

      Ein verlassener Grenzabschnitt im Norden Bosniens Ende April. Aus dem Wald tauchen kroatische Uniformierte auf. Dahinter eine Gruppe von rund 30 Menschen mit Rucksäcken und Decken bepackt. Am Grenzstein zwischen Kroatien und Bosnien bleiben die Beamten stehen und schicken die Gruppe per Handbewegung nach Bosnien.

      Was aus der Ferne wie eine Grenzwanderung am Balkan aussieht, ist eine illegale Abschiebung von Flüchtlingen an der kroatischen EU-Aussengrenze. «Rundschau»-Reporter dokumentieren an zwei Tagen vier sogenannte Push-Backs. Die vier Aktionen betreffen rund 70 Menschen, hauptsächlich aus Pakistan, Algerien und Afghanistan.

      Knüppelhiebe und zerstörte Handys

      Die «Rundschau» konnte direkt nach den Push-Backs mit den betroffenen Migranten reden. Es ist das erste Mal, dass diese illegalen Ausschaffungen an der EU-Aussengrenze vollständig dokumentiert werden können.

      Die Betroffenen berichteten übereinstimmend, dass sie von der kroatischen Polizei ohne Verfahren an der grünen Grenze nach Bosnien zurückgeschafft worden seien. Bei den Push-Backs sei von kroatischen Beamten auch Gewalt angewendet worden.

      Ein junger Pakistani erzählt: «Sie haben uns im Wald aufgegriffen, alle in einen Van gesteckt und direkt zur Grenze gefahren. Die Fahrt dauerte etwa zwei Stunden. Dann haben sie unsere Handys zerstört und uns mit Knüppelhieben Richtung Bosnien geschickt».

      Das Geld, das einige dabeigehabt hätten, sei ihnen gestohlen worden. Diese und ähnliche Berichte über zum Teil brutales Vorgehen der kroatischen Grenzwächter dokumentieren NGO seit über einem Jahr.
      Asylanfragen ignoriert

      Eine afghanische Familie mit Kleinkindern berichtet, wie sie im Wald von kroatischen Polizisten gestoppt worden sei. «Sie richteten die Pistolen auf uns und sagten ‹Stopp›. Wir hatten grosse Angst und weinten», erzählt das älteste der Kinder. Als die Familie um Asyl gebeten habe, hätten die Beamten gelacht, man werde ihnen «bosnisches Asyl» geben – sie also nach Bosnien zurückschaffen.

      Die «Rundschau» sprach mit mehr als hundert weiteren Migranten und Flüchtlingen. Alle erklärten, dass sie daran gehindert worden seien, in Kroatien Asyl zu beantragen.

      Kein Einzelfall in Europa

      Die «Rundschau» legte die Filmaufnahmen Migrationsexperten und Menschenrechtsorganisationen vor. Der deutsche Migrationsforscher Marcus Engler ist deutlich: «Es ist ein Verstoss gegen EU-Recht und Völkerrecht.» Kroatien sei kein Einzelfall. «Diese Praxis wird an der ganzen EU-Aussengrenze angewendet.»

      András Léderer vom Hungarian Helsinki Committee (HHC), spricht von schweren Menschenrechtsverletzungen. Bei einer möglichen Rückführung von Migranten brauche es immer ein offizielles Verfahren – auch wenn diese illegal über die grüne Grenze eingereist seien. Jeder Mensch muss einzeln angehört, sein Fall einzeln geprüft werden.

      Aber das Video zeige klar: Hier finde eine kollektive Ausschaffung statt, was immer illegal sei. «Man darf Menschen nicht mitten im Wald oder auf einem Feld aus dem Land werfen», so Léderer. Dass die Zurückweisungen an der grünen Grenze inoffiziell stattfänden, also nicht in Gegenwart der bosnischen Behörden, sei eine klare Verletzung des Grenzabkommens.

      https://www.srf.ch/news/international/ausschaffung-ueber-gruene-grenze-kroatische-polizei-bei-illegaler-abschiebung-ge
      #vidéo

      Commentaire sur la vidéo de Inicijativa Dobrodosli, reçu par email, le 22.05.2019 :

      This week, the Swiss media SRF released a report containing recordings of police conduct on the Croatian border with Bosnia and Herzegovina. The aforementioned report brings us new testimonies and evidence of illegal conduct of the Croatian police at the border with BH. Footage concretely demonstrate collective expulsion on the green border and a police van transporting people from the depths of the Croatian territory, which confirms that this is not a “discouragement”, and all without the presence of the Bosnian-Herzegovinian police that would be there in case of lawful readmission process. The testimonies reaffirm that this is a European problem, not just a Croatian one because refugees speak of chain pushbacks from Slovenia (https://push-forward.org/porocilo/report-illegal-practice-collective-expulsion-slovene-croatian-border) through Croatia to BH. Footage also brings shocking testimonies of children (https://www.srf.ch/play/tv/news-clip/video/kinder-erzaehlen-wie-sie-mit-waffengewalt-zurueckgedraengt-worden-sind?id=090062) describing police threats with weapons, as well as testimonies of denial of asylum seeking. The Ministry of Interior, as usual, rejects the responsibility without any counter-evidence or legally justified arguments. We wonder how many more violations of human rights should happen in order for the Croatian authorities to take responsibility and stop the illegal conduct.

    • Prvi intervju u kojem hrvatski policajac tvrdi: šefovi nam naređuju da ilegalno protjerujemo migrante

      Telegram ekskluzivno objavljuje priču Barbare Matejčić, nastalu nakon iscrpnih razgovora s pripadnikom MUP-a

      "Početkom 2017. vratio sam prvu grupu migranata. Naredbe sam dobivao od šefa smjene. Dakle, nazovem šefa, kažem da imamo grupu migranata. Često nam građani dojave kada vide migrante, a nekada bismo ih i sami našli na ulici. Šef smjene mi onda kaže da će me nazvati za 10 minuta. Nazove me na privatni mobitel na kojemu se ne snimaju razgovori, kaže da ih vozimo na granicu. Migranti kažu: ’Azil’, a mi: ’No azil’ i stavimo ih u maricu u kojoj isključimo vezu, koja inače stalno odašilje GPS signal, da se ne bi znalo gdje smo’, detaljno prepričava hrvatski policajac kojem, zbog zaštite, nećemo otkriti identitet

      “I ja i moje kolege policajci provodili smo nezakonita vraćanja migranta iz Zagreba na granicu Hrvatske s Bosnom i Hercegovinom i Srbijom. Doveli bismo ih pred zelenu granicu i rekli im da prijeđu nazad u Bosnu ili Srbiju. Nismo ih evidentirali. Takve smo naredbe dobivali od nadređenih u policijskoj postaji, nisu se policajci toga sami sjetili”, rekao nam je zagrebački policajac u razgovorima koje smo s njim vodili tijekom lipnja 2019. Time je potvrdio ono na što međunarodne i domaće organizacije poput Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, Are You Syrious i Centar za mirovne studije upozoravaju već duže od dvije i pol godine: hrvatska policija suprotno hrvatskim i međunarodnim zakonima sustavno i organizirano provodi grupna protjerivanja izbjeglica s teritorija Republike Hrvatske na teritorije Republike Srbije i Bosne i Hercegovine. Pri tome im ne dozvoljava da zatraže azil u Hrvatskoj.

      Unatoč stotinama svjedočanstava samih izbjeglica koje tvrde da ih je hrvatska policija nezakonito protjerala u Bosnu i Srbiju, anonimnoj pritužbi koju je od pripadnika granične policije nedavno primila pučka pravobraniteljica Lora Vidović, snimkama protjerivanja koje su prikupile nevladine organizacije i mediji, tvrdnjama stanovnika Bosne i Hercegovine koji su vidjeli hrvatsku policiju kako protjeruje izbjeglice, hrvatsko Ministarstvo unutarnjih poslova negira sve optužbe. Također, MUP tvrdi da se ne radi o protjerivanju, već o zakonitom odvraćanju na samoj granici. No ovo je prvi put da izvor iz policije osobno novinarki potvrđuje grupna protjerivanja tražitelja azila, i to iz Zagreba, daleko od hrvatske granice. Riječ je o policajcu s dugim stažem u zagrebačkoj policiji, kojem zbog zaštite ne otkrivamo identitet kao ni policijsku postaju kojoj pripada.

      ‘Šef me zove na privatni mobitel, jer se ne snima i kaže mi da ih vozimo’

      “Početkom 2017. vratio sam prvu grupu migranata. Naredbe sam dobivao od šefa smjene, jer o svemu što se dogodi na terenu moraš obavijestiti šefa smjene. Dakle, nazovem šefa smjene, kažem da imamo grupu migranata. Često nam građani dojave kada vide migrante, a nekada bismo ih i sami našli na ulici. Šef smjene mi onda kaže da će me nazvati za 10 minuta. Nazove me na privatni mobitel na kojemu se ne snimaju razgovori, kaže da ih vozimo na granicu. Migranti kažu: ‘Azil’, a mi: ‘No azil’ i stavimo ih u maricu u kojoj isključimo vezu, koja inače stalno odašilje GPS signal, da se ne bi znalo gdje smo.

      Napravimo im pretres, bez naloga naravno, da vidimo odakle su ušli u Hrvatsku, imaju li neki račun iz kafića, karticu za mobitel, ili nam oni sami kažu. Kada utvrdimo iz koje zemlje su došli, tamo ih vodimo. Na putu bi se pri svakom ulasku i izlasku iz područja policijske postaje trebalo prijaviti operativno-komunikacijskom centru. I putuje se s putnim nalogom na kojem sve piše, gdje ideš i zašto. Kod vraćanja migranata to se ništa nije radilo. Njih se vraćalo bez ikakve dokumentirane procedure. Kao da ih nikada nismo našli ni odveli do granice“, prepričava postupak nezakonitih vraćanja naš izvor.

      ‘Na internetu smo sami proučavali zakone i shvatili da to nije legalno’

      U početku nije znao da je takav postupak nezakonit. “Kada je krenuo onaj prvi val izbjeglica 2015., dolazili su organizirano i dobivali smo smjernice kako da postupamo. Kada su kasnije počeli ilegalni prelasci, nitko nam nije rekao koja je procedura. Tek kada smo ih trebali procesuirati, jer nismo sve automatski vraćali na granicu, onda smo na internetu proučavali zakone i gledali što treba raditi. Sami smo se educirali i tako smo shvatili da način na koji smo mi to obavljali nije po zakonu.”

      Takvim postupanjem, za koje naš izvor optužuje hrvatsku policiju, osim što se krši pravo izbjeglicama da zatraže međunarodnu zaštitu, krše se i propisi prema kojima se ne smiju provoditi grupna protjerivanja, već individualni povratci, i to u zakonom predviđenom postupku uz propisanu dokumentaciju te u dogovoru s policijom zemlje u koju ih se vraća. Redom, krši se UN-ova Konvencija o statusu izbjeglica, Europska konvencija o ljudskim pravima, Povelja EU o temeljnim pravima, direktive koje reguliraju sustav međunarodne zaštite i postupke povratka državljana trećih zemalja, Zakonik o schengenskim granicama, hrvatski Zakon o strancima i Zakon o međunarodnoj i privremenoj zaštiti.

      ‘Neki policajci su odbijali to raditi, njih su odmah kažnjavali’

      Naš izvor nije ni jednom obavijestio bosansku ili srpsku policiju, već bi odveo grupu na zelenu granicu i protjerao ih same preko. Također ne postoji nikakav pisani trag o takvom postupanju. Izvor, nadalje, tvrdi kako nisu vraćali sve migrante koje bi našli. “Ako bi u grupi bile žene i djeca, ili ako je puno građana prijavilo da je vidjelo migrante – jer ti pozivi ostaju zabilježeni – ili ako bi ih našli usred dana na cesti kada bi postojala mogućnost da netko fotografira policiju kako odvodi migrante i može kasnije pitati gdje su ti ljudi, onda se išlo po proceduri”, tvrdi. Odvelo bi ih se u policijsku postaju, pokrenulo postupak utvrđivanja identiteta, fotografiralo bi ih se, uzelo otiske prstiju i smjestilo u Porin (prihvatilište za azilante) gdje im se pruža utočište do odluke hoće li im se udovoljiti zahtjevu za azil ili ne.

      Također, izvor kaže da nije svaki šef smjene naređivao nezakonita vraćanja, kao što ni svi policajci nisu to htjeli raditi: “Bilo je policajaca koji su odbili takve naredbe pa su za kaznu završili na čuvanju objekata. Šest mjeseci čuvaš zgradu i dobiješ bitno manju plaću, ukupno oko 3500 do 4000 kuna. Nakon što bi im se to dogodilo, nitko više nije odbio vratiti migrante na granicu.

      Po pravilniku bismo morali odbiti naredbu ako je protuzakonita i obavijestiti o tome neposrednog nadređenog osobe koja je izdala protuzakonitu naredbu. Ali, nemaš se kome obratiti, jer su te naredbe dolazile od nadređenih kojima bi se ti, kao, trebao žaliti. Svi smo znali da su šefovi smjene naredbe dobivali od svojih nadređenih, to je javna tajna. Takva je hijerarhija MUP-a. Imaš načelnika postaje i trojicu pomoćnika načelnika, nije se ni jedan šef smjene sam toga sjetio”, priča.
      Isključivo usmene naredbe, nema pisanih tragova

      Sve naredbe su, kaže, bile usmene i naš izvor nije nikada vidio pisani trag o tome. Također, nikada nije dobio naredbu da primjenjuje silu ili da uništava imovinu izbjeglica, iako su zabilježena brojna svjedočanstva o nasilju policije nad izbjeglicama. “Svakakve priče su kolale o tome, ali osobno nisam ni dobio takvu naredbu ni vidio da je netko od policajaca tukao migrante ili im uništio mobitel.” On je obavio četiri vraćanja, odnosno tri jer je jedno bilo neuspješno – dva u Bosnu i Hercegovinu i jedno u Srbiju.

      Svaki put se radilo o grupama mlađih muškaraca. Jednom ih je bilo devetero otraga u marici, a dvaput četrnaestero. Po zakonu se u marici u stražnjem dijelu može voziti najviše šestero ljudi. Iako tri vraćanja ne zvuči kao da se radi o čestoj praksi, napominje da je to ono što ga je zapalo u njegovoj smjeni, a da treba uračunati sve policajce u svim zagrebačkim postajama te smjene kroz 365 dana u godini, čime bi se došlo do puno veće brojke nezakonitih vraćanja samo s područja Zagreba.
      Zašto je odlučio progovoriti, iako bi mogao završiti u zatvoru?

      Zna da bi, kada bi se saznalo o kome se radi, mogao završiti u istražnom zatvoru. Ovime što je radio počinio je kazneno djelo, a nadređeni u policiji bi, uvjeren je, tvrdili da nije bilo nikakve naredbe. Zbog čega je, usprkos tome, pristao istupiti u medije?

      “Ni jedan policajac nije se sam sjetio da tjera ljude preko granice. Gdje će policajcu iz Zagreba pasti na pamet da skupi u maricu migrante i vozi ih na granicu? Ali nitko od šefova neće preuzeti odgovornost ako se sazna za takvo ponašanje, nego će reći da je policajac to sam napravio. Nije, već mu je naredio šef smjene, pomoćnici načelnika, načelnik policijske postaje, načelnik uprave… Po tom lancu išla je naredba na niže, do policajaca. Ali, nitko to neće reći i nastradat će obični policajci koji su najmanje krivi”, objašnjava svoje motive.

      Pravobraniteljica: ‘Zaštita policajaca koji časno rade svoj posao’

      Komentar smo zatražili od pučke pravobraniteljice Lore Vidović: “Ovi navodi, na žalost, samo potvrđuju ono što mi govorimo i pišemo već godinama, a MUP demantira bez argumenata. Ponovno se nameće pitanje kako u ovakvim okolnostima utvrditi odgovornost onih koji takva postupanja naređuju i provode, između ostaloga i kako bi se zaštitili oni policijski službenici koji časno obavljaju svoj posao. Osim toga, jedan od ključnih argumenata koji MUP neprekidno ističe je i kako su policijski službenici educirani za postupanje s migrantima, a sada vidimo da to ipak nije tako”, kaže pravobraniteljica.

      Vidović napominje i da MUP njenom uredu protivno zakonu brani pristup podacima i informacijskom sustavu MUP-a dok se komunikacija s policijskim službenicima “svodi na kontrolirano i šablonizirano davanje podataka”. Amnesty International je u svom opsežnom izvještaju, objavljenom u ožujku 2019., također utvrdio da su sustavna grupna protjerivanja, ponekad popraćena nasiljem i zastrašivanjem, redovita na granici između Hrvatske i Bosne i Hercegovine.
      Nevladine procjene kažu da je 2018. bilo 10.000 protjerivanja iz RH

      Milena Zajović Milka iz nevladine organizacije Are You Syrious kaže da je prema njihovim procjenama u 2018. bilo čak 10.000 protjerivanja iz Hrvatske. “Nezakonite prakse hrvatske policije nadilaze svaku vjerodostojnu mogućnost poricanja. Razmjeri i dosljednost izvještaja, video snimaka i uznemirujućih svjedočenja ljudi koji su iskusili loše postupanje u rukama hrvatske policije, ukazuju na sustavnu i namjernu politiku hrvatskih vlasti, a ne na dobro organiziranu urotu izbjeglica i migranata kako bi dobili međunarodnu zaštitu, kao što hrvatsko Ministarstvo unutarnjih poslova često sugerira.

      Želeći zaštitom vanjske granice EU pokazati svoju spremnost za pridruživanje schengenskoj zoni 2020., Hrvatska je postala jedan od europskih marljivih čuvara vrata. U svom pristupu migracijama, hrvatske vlasti se opasno približavaju ponašanju mađarske vlade protiv koje je Europska komisija pokrenula postupak zbog povrede propisa EU-a”, komentirala nam je Jelena Sesar, autorica izvještaja Amnesty Internationala. Ona napominje da treba provesti neko vrijeme na bosanskoj strani granice kako bi se svjedočilo grupama ljudi protjeranih duboko s hrvatskog teritorija. To smo i napravili.
      Slovenska policija ih ne tuče, za našu kažu: ‘Croatian police very bad’

      U Velikoj Kladuši i Bihaću krajem lipnja 2019. čuli smo desetine podjednakih svjedočenja izbjeglica: prešli su hrvatsku granicu, policija ih je uhvatila, razbila im mobitele da ne mogu dokazati gdje su uhvaćeni, da ne mogu dokumentirati što su im policajci napravili, a i da im otežaju ponovni prelazak. Većinu ih je, tvrde, hrvatska policija i pretukla. Mnogi su nam pokazivali svježe ozljede, kao i zarasle ožiljke od, kako tvrde, hrvatske policije.

      Umar (18), Rizwan (18) i Ali (19) su iz Pakistana i više puta ih je u Bosnu, tvrde, vratila hrvatska policija. Pričaju kako su ih tukli palicom. Uzeli im novac. Papire koje su dobili u Bosni su im uništili. Stvari, uključujući vreću za spavanje, su im zapalili. Jednom su došli do Slovenije, ali ih je uhvatila slovenska policija i predala hrvatskoj policiji, koja ih je pak protjerala u Bosnu, kažu. Slovenska policija ih nije tukla. “Croatian police very bad”, ponavljaju, a Umar svaki put doda: “I’m sorry, madam”, jer sam iz Hrvatske pa da me ne uvrijedi njihovo loše mišljenje o hrvatskoj policiji.

      Gradonačelnik Bihaća koji je naletio na hrvatske policajce s migrantima

      Jelena Sesar potvrđuje da su dokumentirali brojne slučajeve prisilnog vraćanja iz Slovenije, pa čak i Italije u Bosnu i Hercegovinu: “Takva se vraćanja događaju na, čini se, dobro organiziran način i kroz učinkovitu suradnju talijanske, slovenske i hrvatske policije, iako se ne radi o sustavnoj praksi”. I gradonačelnik Bihaća Šuhret Fazlić nezadovoljan je postupanjem hrvatske policije. Razgovarali smo u blizini Bihaća gdje je tijekom lova u siječnju 2019., kaže, zatekao dvojicu naoružanih hrvatskih policajaca koji su doveli grupu od 30 do 40 migranata.

      “Bili su otprilike 500 metara od granice s Hrvatskom. Predstavio sam se tim policajcima i rekao im da su na bosanskom teritoriju i da je to što rade nezakonito. Policajac je slegnuo ramenima i rekao da su dobili takve naredbe. Znam i ime tog policajca, ali mu ne želim stvarati probleme”, kaže gradonačelnik. Hrvatski ministar unutarnjih poslova Davor Božinović nazvao je čak i te gradonačelnikove tvrdnje “insinuacijama” i “lažnim optužbama”.
      Europska unija Hrvatskoj cijelo vrijeme šalje različite signale

      Ministar Božinović očigledno se osjeća dovoljno jakim i sigurnim da može opovrgavati sve dokaze o nezakonitostima policije kojom zapovijeda. Znači li to da ima potporu u EU u obrani njezine vanjske granice bez obzira na primijenjena sredstva? “Tvrdnje o zloporabama hrvatske policije daleko se ozbiljnije shvaćaju izvan Hrvatske. Povjerenica Vijeća Europe za ljudska prava, posebni izaslanik Vijeća Europe za migracije, Europski parlament i Europska komisija zatražili su od hrvatskih vlasti da istraže te tvrdnje i ustrajali na tome da Hrvatska mora nadzirati svoje granice u punoj suglasnosti s europskim zakonima.

      Europska komisija je također zatražila od hrvatskih vlasti da ojačaju trenutačno prilično neučinkovit nadzorni mehanizam nad svojim praksama na granici, što bi uključivalo neovisni nadzor nevladinih organizacija. No, istina je da su dužnosnici EU Hrvatskoj slali različite signale. Istovremeno su kritizirali dokumentirane nezakonitosti policije i hvalili vlasti za zaštitu vanjskih granica EU.

      Također, Europska komisija je u proteklih nekoliko godina Hrvatskoj dodijelila više od 100 milijuna eura, od čega je značajan dio namijenjen nadzoru i upravljanju granicom, uključujući financiranje plaća policijskih službenika, unatoč vjerodostojnim dokazima represivnih mjera koje koriste iste te snage. Osiguravajući sredstva te propuštajući da se hrvatske vlasti javno i odlučno prozovu zbog postupanja prema izbjeglicama i migrantima, EU je de facto odobrila takvo ponašanje”, kaže Jelena Sesar. Tražili smo od MUP-a očitovanje o našim saznanjima, no nismo dobili odgovor.

      https://www.telegram.hr/price/prvi-intervju-u-kojem-hrvatski-policajac-tvrdi-sefovi-nam-nareduju-da-ilega

      –------------------

      Reçu via la newsletter Inicijativa Dobrodosli, le 29.07.2019, avec ce commentaire:

      The new testimony of the policeman within which he describes the practice of pushbacks confirms countless testimonies of refugees who claimed that pushbacks are implemented even from the depths of the territory of the Republic of Croatia. In this text, written by Barbara Matejčić, you can read about methods and internal procedures that the policeman describes, and given the fact that he is already the second policeman who spoke about illegal, inhuman and immoral procedures that they have been seeking to do. It will be interesting to see what will be the next step taken by Minister Božinović, the Ministry of Internal Affairs and the Government of the Republic of Croatia. Until the writing of this report, five days after the publication, we did not receive any response from the Ministry of Internal Affairs.

      Et en plus:

      You can read about anonymous testimonies and the work of the State Attorney of the Republic of Croatia and the Parliamentary Committee on Internal Affairs as well as other events that followed the theme of pushbacks and violence at the border in a new interview with the Croatian Ombudswoman, Lora Vidović (https://www.jutarnji.hr/vijesti/hrvatska/pucka-pravobraniteljica-u-velikom-intervjuu-za-jutarnji-stat-cu-iza-svakog-policajca-koji-odluci-progovoriti-o-nasilju-nad-migrantima/9157892). You can also take a look at the TV report on police violence and refugee testimonies at the SRF (https://www.srf.ch/news/international/migration-auf-der-balkanroute-asyl-tuersteher-fuer-die-schweiz).

      Minister Božinović in his reaction that came a week later after the anonymous complaint of the policeman got published failed to address the content of the complaint. Additionally, following concerns show that state institutions did not approach seriously to these problems and that are no sufficient efforts to stop these practices and properly sanction them: the information that the Parliamentary Committee on Internal Affairs and National Security revealed the details of the above mentioned anonymous complaint to the Ministry of Internal Affairs as well as the fact of the insufficient capacity of the State Attorney of the Republic of Croatia to conduct an investigation within the Ministry of Internal Affairs without using the capacities of MoI.

      This week we could read numerous comments about the latest statement of the President in which she tried to explain what she meant when she addressed pushbacks and her admitting that they are carried out at the border with Bosnia and Herzegovina. While trying to justify illegal pushbacks, the President, strengthened the narrative of refugees as threats and instructed journalists to work in official propaganda service. In connection to this, we are sharing comments of Ladislav Tomčić (www.novilist.hr/Komentari/Kolumne/Ladovina-Ladislava-Tomicica/LADISLAV-TOMICIC-Spomenar-Kolinde-Grabar-Kitarovic), Boris Pavelić (novilist.hr/Komentari/Kolumne/Pronadena-zemlja-Borisa-Pavelica/Kuscevic-Maric-Zalac-A-Bozinovic-Trebao-je-prvi-otici), Slavica Lukić (https://www.jutarnji.hr/komentari/opasne-poruke-predsjednice-grabar-kitarovic/9138125), and Gordan Duhaček (https://www.index.hr/vijesti/clanak/eu-koristi-hrvatsku-za-obavljanje-prljavog-posla-s-migrantima/2103291.aspx).

    • Asyl-Türsteher für die Schweiz

      Mit umstrittenen Methoden weist Kroatien Asylsuchende ab. Die Schweiz profitiert. Welche Verantwortung hat die Politik?

      Der junge Afghane taucht mit einer Gruppe anderer junger Männer aus dem Niemandsland zwischen Kroatien und Bosnien auf. Den Migranten war es gelungen, bei Velika Kladuša über die grüne Grenze in die EU zu kommen. Nach sechs Tagen Fussmarsch wurden sie kurz vor dem Übergang nach Slowenien entdeckt: «Männer mit Masken übers ganze Gesicht haben uns weggeschleppt. An der Grenze haben sie mich geschlagen.» Offenbar haben ihn kroatische Polizisten zusammen mit seinen Kollegen ohne Verfahren über die EU-Aussengrenze ausgeschafft. Nach internationalem Recht wäre dies ein illegaler «push back».
      Fragen an den Bundesrat

      Derweil sinken in der Schweiz die Asylzahlen. Der Bund prüft gar den Verzicht auf einzelne Asylzentren. Auch im Wahlherbst dürften die Themen Asyl und Migration kaum eine Rolle spielen. Die Türsteher an der EU-Aussengrenzen erledigen ihren Job effektiv – auch im Interessen der Schweiz. So stellt sich die Frage: Welche Verantwortung trägt die Schweizer Politik für den Umgang mit Migranten und Flüchtlingen vor den Toren der europäischen Wohlstandszone?

      SP-Nationalrätin Samira Marti hat Fragen: «Ich will vom Bundesrat wissen, ob Flüchtlinge in Kroatien Zugang zum Rechtssystem und zum Asylverfahren haben. Es handelt sich schliesslich nicht einfach um eine Staatsgrenze, sondern um eine europäische Aussengrenze.» Der Bundesrat wird die Interpellation voraussichtlich im Herbst beantworten. Bis dann hält sich die Verwaltung mit öffentlichen Auftritten zum Thema zurück.

      «Push backs» auf Befehl

      Trotzdem gibt es indirekt eine Antwort: In einem Brief an ein Basler Bürgerforum von Ende Juni 2019 hält die zuständige EJPD-Chefin Karin Keller-Sutter fest: «Die Schweiz setzt sich (…) mit Nachdruck dafür ein, dass ein effektiver Grenzschutz nicht zu Lasten der internationalen und europäischen Menschenrechtsnormen gehen darf.» Schengen-Kandidat Kroatien betone, dass er sich an die geltenden Normen und Gesetze halte.

      Unterdessen sind in Kroatien mögliche Beweise aufgetaucht, dass illegale «push backs» durchaus System haben könnten: Ein Mann, der angeblich für die Polizei arbeitet, schreibt an die Ombudsfrau für Menschenrechte, dass es klare Befehle gebe, «die Flüchtlinge gewaltsam nach Bosnien zurückzuschicken». Die kroatische Polizeigewerkschaft HSP bestreitet die Echtheit des Briefs. Ihr Präsident Dubravko Jagić sagt zu SRF: «Wie soll die Polizei das Gesetz umsetzen, wenn sie nicht selbst dem Gesetz folgt.»

      8500 Asylsuchende allein in Bosnien

      In den nächsten Tagen erscheint allerdings auf dem Newsportal Telegram eine Recherche der renommierten Journalistin Barbara Matejčić. Sie hat einen kroatischen Polizisten interviewt, der bestätigt, dass die illegalen «push backs» von Migranten über die Befehlskette befohlen werden: «Wir führten sie ins Grenzgebiet. Dort wurden sie angewiesen, nach Bosnien oder Serbien zurückzukehren. Ohne Registrierung oder Asylantrag. Dies waren die Befehle unserer Vorgesetzten.»

      Während in Kroatien der Widerstand gegen das Vorgehen der Polizei wächst, warten in Bosnien nach Schätzungen des UNHCR rund 8500 Asylsuchende darauf, ihr Glück in der europäischen Wohlstandszone zu suchen. Dazu gehört auch die Schweiz. Das Staatsekretariat für Migration (SEM) bemüht sich, die Not vor Ort zu lindern und ist dabei, zusammen mit einer lokalen Organisation die Trinkwasseraufbereitung sicherzustellen. Auch wenn die Schweiz offiziell ihr Handeln auf die EU abstimmt: Als unabhängiger Kleinstaat kann sie ihre Chance nutzen, selbständig zu agieren.

      https://www.srf.ch/news/international/migration-auf-der-balkanroute-asyl-tuersteher-fuer-die-schweiz

      L’adresse URL de la vidéo:
      https://www.srf.ch/play/tv/rundschau/video/pruegel-an-der-eu-grenze-wie-kroatien-migranten-abschiebt?id=972c5996-ec49-4079-

    • Reçu via la newsletter Inicijativa Dobrodosli, le 12.08.2019:

      The accusations against the Croatian police and their execution of violent pushbacks continue. The Mayor of Bihac reiterated that Croatian police conducts violent pushbacks and is illegally entering the territory of Bosnia and Herzegovina (https://m.vecernji.hr/vijesti/eurozastupnik-podupire-bih-sram-me-je-hrvatska-granicna-policija-se-ne-sm). The Greens - European Free Alliance MEP Eric Marquardt, condemned the execution of illegal pushbacks by Croatian police (https://m.vecernji.hr/vijesti/eurozastupnik-podupire-bih-sram-me-je-hrvatska-granicna-policija-se-ne-sm), saying that “the European Border Police act as a criminal gang robbing and beating people and illegally returning them to BiH from Croatia.” Another accusation (https://www.oslobodjenje.ba/vijesti/bih/potvrdeno-za-oslobodenje-povrijedeno-18-migranata-gpbih-ih-skupljala-uz in the series of testimonies arrived on Wednesday when Migrant Coordinator for the Municipality of Velika Kladuša Jasmin Čehić confirmed that a total of 18 injured refugees were brought to the Velika Kladuša Health Center. Border police found refugees beaten up at various locations along the border, and refugees later said in their statements that they had entered Croatian territory when they were intercepted by Croatian police, beaten up, the police seized their money, put them in a van and transferred to the territory of Bosnia and Herzegovina. In their statement (http://hr.n1info.com/Vijesti/a425120/MUP-kaze-da-nisu-tukli-migrante-samo-su-ih-odvratili-od-prelaska-granice.), the Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Republic of Croatia again rejected the conduct of violent pushbacks, stating that Croatian police intercepted the refugees as they crossed the border and that they were deterred from doing so without force. However, the content of a statement from the Interior Ministry was challenged by a local man from #Kladuša (http://hr.n1info.com/Vijesti/a425170/Mjestanin-Velike-Kladuse-kaze-da-je-vidio-2-kombija-iz-kojih-su-izasli-mi), who told reporters that he witnessed the arrival of two Croatian police vans and the expulsion of refugees into the territory of Bosnia and Herzegovina. It is beyond dispute that the Ministry of the Interior systematically ignores the numerous testimonies of refugees about violence at the borders. Numerous foreign media such as the Guardian (https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jul/16/croatian-police-use-violence-to-push-back-migrants-says-president and the BBC (https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-europe-49132735/beaten-and-robbed-how-croatia-is-policing-its-borders published the stories about illegal pushbacks. This week the German weekly magazine Der Spiegel (https://www.index.hr/vijesti/clanak/potresna-reportaza-iz-bih-hrvatski-policajci-su-se-smijali-dok-su-nas-tukli/2107078.aspx), published testimonies from refugees stating that Croatian police officers laughed while kicking them on the body and face, confiscating their cell phones and money and burning their personal belongings.

    • This week Croatia received from the European Commission the green light to enter the Schengen area (https://www.vecernji.hr/vijesti/europska-komisija-upravo-donijela-odluku-hrvatska-je-ispunila-uvjete-za-sch. The confirmation of the fulfillment of the requirements comes some months after the end of the European independent experts’ inspection who assessed that Croatia meets Schengen standards. Both the above-mentioned inspection and the Commission paid particular attention to the sphere of management and protection of the external borders, and especially to the control of the one with Bosnia and Herzegovina. The European Commission’s report states how Croatia needs to invest in the procurement of new technical equipment and training of special dogs that would support the border protection. The day after the European Commission’s positive decision, Dimitris Avramopoulos, the European Commissioner for Migration, Internal Affairs, and Citizenship, visited Zagreb and emphasized how “Croatia has to maintain a high level of control of its external borders and especially with Bosnia and Herzegovina” (https://www.slobodnaevropa.org/a/30232391.html.

      While EU officials, together with Croatian Government representatives, celebrate the European Commission’s approval for the admission to the Schengen area, civil society organisations at national and international level warn that Croatia cannot become a member of the Schengen area as long as it violates both human rights and the Schengen acquis (https://www.ecre.org/editorial-croatias-schengen-accession-reinforcing-legal-red-lines-not-borders). The European Council on Refugees and Exiles (ECRE) warned that the continuous practice of push-backs conducted by Croatian police officers at the border with Bosnia and Herzegovina represents a violation of Article 4 of the Schengen Borders Code. Welcome Initiative, together with the Border Violence Monitoring Network, the Centre for Peace Studies, Are you Syrious?, Rigardu, Mobile Info Team, Re:ports Sarajevo, the Asylum Protection Centre, and Refugee Aid Serbia, published a statement regarding the approval of the European Commission for Croatian entrance to the Schengen area. The statement highlights that “Croatia’s membership to the Schengen area should have been put on hold until the Government of the Croatian Republic does not stop the violent #push-backs” (https://www.cms.hr/hr/azil-i-integracijske-politike/hrvatska-ne-smije-uci-u-schengen-dok-krsi-ljudska-prava). In an interview for Faktograf (https://faktograf.hr/2019/10/23/zeleno-svjetlo-za-ulazak-hrvatske-u-schengen-ima-svoju-mracnu-stranu, the representative of the Centre for Peace Studies claimed that it is impossible that EU institutions do not know what is happening at the borders with Bosnia and Herzegovina, especially when not only many national and international organisations but also institutions such as the UN Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Migrants (https://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=25088&LangID=E) and the Commissioner of Human Rights of the Council of Europe (https://rm.coe.int/09000016808d7db3) warned about violent push-backs. Paradoxically, the European Commission confirms in its report that the violence against refugees at the borders is acknowledged, and at the same time, it makes certain decisions that tacitly support these practices. If the European Union really wanted to dissociate itself from the policies which rely on beating the people who are in a search of safety, then it would have already taken some steps to urge the Croatian Government to take the necessary measures and to prevent daily violence.

      Reçu via la newsletter Inicijativa Dobrodosli, le 29.10.2019.

      Mise en évidence de ce passage :

      The European Commission’s report states how Croatia needs to invest in the procurement of new technical equipment and training of special dogs that would support the border protection.

      –-> #chiens #militarisation_des_frontières #technologie #protection_des_frontières #frontières_extérieures #refoulements

      #Schengen #adhésion #espace_Schengen #violence

      –-------------

      voir aussi en français :

      Adhésion à Schengen : la Croatie en bonne voie pour intégrer l’espace Schengen

      La Commission rend compte aujourd’hui des progrès accomplis par la Croatie en vue de satisfaire aux conditions nécessaires pour intégrer l’espace Schengen. La Commission européenne considère que, sur la base des résultats du processus d’évaluation Schengen lancé en 2016, la Croatie a pris les mesures requises pour que les conditions nécessaires à l’application intégrale des règles et normes Schengen soient remplies. La Croatie devra continuer à mettre en œuvre toutes les actions en cours, notamment en ce qui concerne la gestion des frontières extérieures, pour faire en sorte que les conditions précitées continuent d’être remplies. La Commission confirme également que la Croatie continue de remplir les engagements liés aux règles Schengen qu’elle a pris dans le cadre des négociations d’adhésion.

      https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/fr/IP_19_6140