• #David_Graeber pushed us to imagine greater human possibilities | Protest | The Guardian

    http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/sep/08/david-graeber-pushed-us-to-imagine-greater-human-possibilities

    De notre amie #Rebecca_Solnit.

    his week has mingled, for me, the sadness of losing David Graeber the person, and the joy of immersing myself in David Graeber the writer, by diving into his many electrifyingly original essays and books, though their brilliance makes the loss all the sadder. The anthropologist and activist died in Venice on 2 September, suddenly and unexpectedly, and waves of grief, remembrance and gratitude streamed in from around the globe.

    He was a remarkable person, both a distinguished scholar and a committed direct-action organiser. The latter ranged from the global justice movement of the late 1990s to Occupy Wall Street in 2011, up to his support in recent years of the beautifully anarchic autonomous Rojava region in northeast Syria.

    • “We Are the 99%”: Occupy Wall Street Activist & Author David Graeber, Dead at 59, in His Own Words | Democracy Now!

      https://www.democracynow.org/2020/9/4/rip_david_graeber

      Upon the death of acclaimed anthropologist and anarchist David Graeber, we feature his 2011 interview on Democracy Now!, two days after the Occupy encampment began. Graeber helped organize the initial Occupy Wall Street protest and was credited with helping to develop the slogan, “We are the 99%.” “The idea is the system is not going to save us; we’re going to have to save ourselves,” says Graeber. “So, we’re going to try to get as many people as possible to camp in some public place and start rebuilding society as we’d like to see it.” He also discusses how his influential book “Debt: The First 5,000 Years” makes the case for sweeping debt cancellation.

  • Journalist Rami Khouri: Beirut Explosion Follows Years of Lebanese Gov’t Incompetence & Corruption
    August 05, 2020 | Democracy Now!
    https://www.democracynow.org/2020/8/5/rami_khouri_lebanon_beirut_explosion

    (...) RAMI KHOURI: Well, the information that has come out from the people who investigated it so far is that the storage shed was also storing some fireworks and other materials nearby, and it was those materials that caught fire or ignited or something happened because of the heat and humidity, and created a little fire. The fire department was there to put it out, and then that fire ignited the ammonium nitrate.

    But the real story is not just the 3.5 magnitude Richter scale measurement. It’s the 9.0 magnitude political scale measurement that this is going to unleash. Because looking backwards and looking forwards, this explosion is a consequence of the cumulative incompetence, corruption, lassitude, amateurism and uncaring attitude by successive Lebanese governments, going back ten, 15 years that has brought the Lebanese people to a point of pauperization and desperation. They don’t have enough water. They don’t have electricity. They don’t have jobs. They don’t have reasonably priced food. Education is declining. Every dimension of life in Lebanon has declined, steadily, uninterruptedly, for the last 15 or 20 years.

    It is the ruling political elite that is responsible for this, and looking back and looking forward, because this amount of ammonium nitrate was allowed to be stored there, when people knew about it. Other governments knew about it and did nothing about it. And people were talking to judges to pass a ruling to get the stuff out of there, because it was dangerous. And nobody did anything. So therefore the political shocks, the aftershocks are really going to be, I think, the significant dimension of this, beyond the humanitarian suffering that we are now seeing dealt with. (...)

    That’s the real aftermath of this explosion. And you see it in people saying, for instance, Lebanese saying, “Don’t give aid money to the government. They will steal it. They have stolen everything else. They’re going to steal the aid money. Give aid money to the Lebanese Red Cross, to NGOs, to hospitals. But don’t give it to the Lebanese government.”

    This is an important point because the ability of the Lebanese government, like all the Arab governments in the last 20 years or so, to continue a policy of autocratic authoritarian militarized policymaking that has led to the pauperization of a majority of Arabs. Around 70% of Arabs are poor or vulnerable now. And that is quickly increasing with COVID-19 and other things like this bombing.

    The ability of Arab governments to maintain these cruel policies is very much linked to the support they get from international parties including the Americans, the French, the British, the Russians. Everybody. There’s nobody that comes out of this modern legacy of Arab state failures—nobody comes out looking good. The French president is supposed to go to Lebanon today. People are very much anxious to hear what he says. And if he just comes and meets with the Lebanese government and makes happy statements about “we will always support you,” people are going to jeer at him and tell him to go home. (...)

    #Beyrouth

  • From Missouri to Detroit, The Squad emerges victorious from Tuesday’s Democratic primaries
    Amir Tibon - 5 août 2020 - Haaretz.com
    https://www.haaretz.com/us-news/.premium-from-missouri-to-detroit-the-squad-emerges-victorious-from-democra

    Rashida Tlaib wins almost two thirds of the votes in the Democratic primary in Michigan, as Black Lives Matters activist labeled ‘Heartland’s AOC’ wins primary contest in Missouri

    Rep. Rashida Tlaib secured another term in Congress on Tuesday after winning the Democratic primary in her Michigan district, one of the most Democratic leaning in America.

    In addition, the group of left-wing female lawmakers known as “The Squad,” which Tlaib is a member of, will likely grow from four to five lawmakers in the next Congress, following the upset victory of a Black Lives Matters activist in a primary contest in Missouri.

    Tlaib easily won her primary in Michigan’s 13th district, where she was challenged by Brenda Jones, president of the Detroit city council. Jones briefly represented the 13th district in Congress in 2018, after she won a special election to replace Congressman John Conyers, who resigned from office. Jones then competed in the 2018 primary and lost to Tlaib by a margin of less than 1,000 votes.

    On Tuesday, the gap between Tlaib and Jones was much more decisive, with Tlaib winning almost two thirds of the vote. Tlaib had a strong cash advantage over Jones, and also won the endorsements of key labor unions in the Detroit area, as well as of Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi.

    The district is one of the most Democratic-leaning districts in America, meaning that after winning the primary, Tlaib has de facto won another term in Congress.

    Members of “The Squad" who were first elected to Congress in the 2018 midterm elections, also includes Rep. Ilhan Omar from Minnesota, who will have her own primary challenge next week in Minnesota; and New York’s Rep. Alexandria Occasio-Cortez and Ayana Pressley from Massachusetts.

    The group could add a fifth member to its ranks after the November election, following the upset victory on Tuesday of Cori Bush, a Black Lives Matters activist, in the Democratic primary in Missouri’s 1st Congressional district.

    Bush, who was a nurse and a pastor before entering politics, defeated Rep. William Lacy Clay Jr., who has been in Congress for almost two decades, and whose father, William Lacy Clay Sr., represented the district for 32 years before him.

    Bush ended the 50-year long Clay “dynasty” in the district thanks to endorsements from Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont and from Justice Democrats, a left-wing group that also supported Occasio-Cortez in her primary challenge to veteran lawmaker Joe Crowley in New York in 2018.

    Bush ran on a progressive platform which included criminal justice reform, a $15 minimum wage and cancelling student debt.

    Similar to Tlaib’s district, Missouri’s 1st District is considered heavily tilted toward the Democratic Party, and so Bush will almost be certainly elected to Congress. Political analysts are already comparing her victory over Lacy Clay to Ocasio Cortez’s victory in 2018 and describing her as “the Heartland’s AOC.”

    Also on Tuesday, the Republican Party in Kansas improved its chances to hold on to a critical Senate seat by choosing Rep. Roger Marshall to be the party’s nominee in this year’s Senate election, instead of far-right activist Kris Kobach, whom Democrats were hoping to run against in November. Kobach was the Republican nominee for governor in 2018, and was defeated in one of the most Republican states in the country by Democrat Laura Kelly.

    Kobcah, who holds extreme anti-immigrant and anti-voting rights positions, has enjoyed the support of President Donald Trump, who campaigned for him in 2018 ahead of the gubernatorial election. But his loss to Kelly in 2018 convinced enough Republican voters in the state that placing him as the nominee for the Senate seat this year was too much of a risk.

    Marshall will now face off against State Senator Barbara Bollier, the Democratic nominee, in November. Bollier used to be a Republican but left the party in 2018 because of Trump, explaining that “Morally, the party is not going where my compass resides. I’m looking forward to being in a party that represents the ideals that I do, including Medicaid expansion and funding our schools."

    #SquadUSA #Rashida_Tlaib #Cori_Bush

  • » Hours Before His Sister’s Wedding, Israeli Soldiers Kill A Young Palestinian Man Near Bethlehem
    June 23, 2020 9:32 PM – IMEMC News
    https://imemc.org/article/hours-before-his-sisters-wedding-israeli-soldiers-kill-a-young-palestinian-ma

    Israeli soldiers shot and killed, Tuesday, a young Palestinian man near the “Container” military roadblock, northeast of Bethlehem, east of occupied Jerusalem in the West Bank.

    The head of Abu Dis Town Council, Ahmad Abu Hilal, said the soldiers shot the young man, identified as Ahmad Mustafa Erekat , 27, from Abu Dis, and left him to bleed to death, before taking his corpse away. Erekat suffered several gunshot wounds.

    Abu Hilal added that Ahmad was driving to Bethlehem city to fetch his sisters, and his mother, from a hairdressing shop in Bethlehem, as the family was preparing for the wedding of one of his sisters, which was supposed to take place on the same day, Tuesday, June 23 2019.

    Eyewitnesses said the soldiers at the permanent military roadblock closed the area, and prevented Red Crescent medics from approaching the young man, in addition to firing many gas bombs at Palestinian cars and residents to force them away.

    The Israeli army alleged that the young man “accelerated towards the roadblock, and attempted to ram a female soldier with his car,” and added that the soldier reportedly suffered mild wounds before she was moved to a hospital in Jerusalem.

    The spokesperson of the Israel police, Micky Rosenfeld, claimed that “after trying to ram the soldiers, the young man got out of his vehicle, and approached them before who shot him.”

    The family denied the military allegations and said the soldiers rushed to deliver the fatal shots without proper justification and added that they believe their slain son must have lost control over his car.

    “As we have seen in previous similar incidents, the soldiers were quick to open deadly fire,”, his family said, “Our son would never have tried to deliberately ram soldiers, or anybody else, especially on the eve of his sister’s wedding!”

    They added that they intend to hire a lawyer to demand Israel to release his corpse for burial.

    #Palestine_assassinée

    ““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““
    Said Shoaib
    @saidshouib
    https://twitter.com/saidshouib/status/1275477565797543940

    Israeli soldiers shot Palestinian young man and left him leading to death at a checkpoint to the east of of Jerusalem.
    #PalestinianLivesMatter

    • Erekat: “Netanyahu Is Responsible For Ahmad Erekat’s Execution”
      June 24, 2020 2:53 AM | IMEMC News
      https://imemc.org/article/erekat-netanyahu-is-responsible-for-ahmad-erekats-execution

      The Secretary-General of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) and the head of its Negotiations Affairs Department, Dr. Saeb Erekat, strongly denounced the Israel army’s killing of his relative Ahmad Erekat, and held Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu responsible for the crime.

      Erekat stated that Netanyahu’s policies against the Palestinian civilians are what encourages Israeli soldiers to continue to commit these crimes.

      He added that the Israeli occupation did not only execute Ahmad Erekat in a cold-blooded crime but also tried to coverup by fabricating the truth and coming up with lies and justifications for this crime by claiming the young man “attempted to ram the soldiers with his car.”

      His statements came from the mourning home of the slain young man, who was supposed to get married within a few days.

      “We, just like any Palestinian family, suffer from this racist occupation, Ahmad was killed in a cold-blooded crime! He was my cousin, and we were supposed to celebrate his wedding withing a few days,” Erekat added, “We were also supposed to be celebrating his sister’s wedding today, but the soldiers killed him and tried to justify their crime.”

      On his official Twitter account, Dr. Erekat said the army has many cameras at the roadblock, yet failed to release the video and show what really happened.

      “This is the invitation of Eman’s wedding , Ahmed’s sister 23rd of June 2020 from 7-10 pm. Ahmed Erakat (26) was murdered in cold blood at the wadi al-Nar (The Container) roadblock, by Israeli occupying . They continue their lies and claim he tried to run over the soldiers. Netanyahu is responsible. (...) ”

      https://twitter.com/ErakatSaeb/status/1275508368627679233

    • Israeli war criminals shot my cousin, then let him bleed to death
      Dalal Iriqat- 24.06.2020 - Haaretz.com
      https://www.haaretz.com/middle-east-news/.premium-israeli-war-criminals-shot-my-cousin-then-let-him-bleed-to-death-1
      https://images.haarets.co.il/image/fetch/x_48,y_0,w_416,h_242,c_crop/q_auto,h_698,w_1200,c_fill,f_auto/fl_lossy.any_format.preserve_transparency.progressive:none/https://www.haaretz.co.il/polopoly_fs/1.8944979!/image/687336996.png

      “O mother of the martyr, I wish it was my mother in your place!”

      That was the song of the young people processing through the streets of Abu Dis until they reached the house of the martyr. My little cousin, the handsome 26 year-old, the fiancé, the brother and son, Ahmed Mustafa Erekat.

      He was executed by the Israelis after he lost control of his car and crashed into a checkpoint. They left him bleeding for more than an hour. The occupation army prevented an ambulance from getting to him, it prevented civilians from approaching to comfort him, it prevented witnesses who could record the details of the crime.

      When my uncle arrived at the checkpoint barrier, he could see his son Ahmed writhing on the ground. He called out to the soldiers, he begged them, he cried out to them for help, but they offered no mercy. They stood by as Ahmed’s lifeblood left him.

      And killing him wasn’t enough: Israel’s criminal authorities weren’t satisfied, so they detained Ahmed’s dead body.

      We as Palestinians are used to Israel’s attempts to blame the victim, to swing the blame for each field execution back on us. In Ahmed’s case, we saw the same inhuman injustice, the same effort to humiliate us, with the invention of a narrative to implicate Ahmed, to make him responsible for his own murder.

      Ahmed was a regular guy. He enjoyed keeping fit. He had his own business printing graphic designs on T shirts.

      And he was a young man in love. He was due to get married at the end of May, but the wedding was delayed because of the coronavirus pandemic. His fiancée has spoken about the new house they were getting ready, and the wedding preparations, the dress, the festive jewellery, the furniture that they’d purchased.

      Ahmed didn’t attack anyone. This is the true story of his life. Don’t let the occupation rewrite his story.

      Today, the day after, was the wedding day of Iman, Ahmed’s little sister. Every scene is imprinted in my mind, all the pain.

      I stood there next to his traumatized sisters. My eyes scanned the details of the house, decorated with such expectations, joy and care: from the lace adorning the banisters, the chairs that filled the house in preparation for the guests, the beautifully laid out chocolate, wedding favors and coffee: everything was ready for Iman’s pre-wedding reception.

      Ahmed is not the first member that the Erekat family has lost to Israel’s occupation, and I fear he won’t be the last martyr from among the Palestinian people.

      I hope those who genuinely want to console the family will help share the truth, and expose the occupation. Raise your voices to call for Israel to release the full footage from the ten security cameras that recorded Ahmed’s last hour on earth.

      In Occupied Palestine, there is no right to life, no right to joy, no right even to say farewell. Young Palestinian men are just numbers, not individuals, and Ahmed’s body has now joined that cold audit.

      Our fight is to stop the killing of our people. When we cry for help, will anyone listen? Do Palestinian lives really matter?

      Dalal Iriqat, PhD is the vice president for International Relations at the Arab American University in Palestine and a weekly columnist at the Al Quds newspaper. Twitter: @Dalaliriqat

      ““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““
      Palestinian Scholar Noura Erakat: Israeli Forces Killed My Cousin on His Sister’s Wedding Day
      24 juin 2020
      https://www.democracynow.org/2020/6/24/noura_erakat

      Israeli soldiers on Tuesday killed 27-year-old Ahmed Erekat at a checkpoint in the occupied West Bank as he was on his way to pick up his sister, who was set to be married that night. Ahmed Erekat is the nephew of senior Palestinian official Saeb Erekat, secretary general of the Palestine Liberation Organization, and cousin of Palestinian American legal scholar Noura Erakat, who says Israeli claims that Ahmed was attempting a car-ramming attack on soldiers are completely unfounded. “What we understand is that Ahmed lost control of his car or was confused while he was in his car. That was all it took to have a knee-jerk reaction … and immediately to cause the soldiers to open fire on him multiple times,” she says.

    • De la famille Erakat le 27 juin 2020
      https://www.facebook.com/santrisi/posts/2628004383966293

      La famille Erakat vous remercie pour les condoléances, l’intérêt et le suivi de l’assassinat d’Ahmad Erakat, et souhaite soulever quelques points importants pour les médias et le partage des nouvelles :
      Le martyr Ahmed Erakat n’est pas le premier martyr palestinien à être victime des crimes d’exécution israélienne. Onze martyrs ont précédé Ahmad rien que cette année. Israël continue d’ignorer le droit à la vie des palestiniens.
      Israël applique une politique générale d’exécution extrajudiciaire du peuple palestinien, citant des raisons de sécurité, et le martyr, Iyad Al-Hallaq, un jeune homme autiste tué il y a quelques semaines, est le meilleur exemple de cette politique systématique.
      Dans de nombreux cas, Israël tente de fabriquer l’histoire de ce qui s’est réellement passé et fait tourner la vérité pour porter plainte contre les victimes palestiniennes.
      Se poser des questions sur les détails minuscules de la fusillade sur comment et pourquoi ne devrait pas être au centre de l’attention. Les questions devraient être : pourquoi y a-t-il des barrières entre les villes palestiniennes qui sont militarisées par Israël ? Pourquoi les victimes sont-elles tirées à bout portant et refusées de soins médicaux ?
      Nous demandons à tout le monde d’examiner ce meurtre de manière objective et de ne pas adapter le récit israélien fabriqué qui est devenu un record répété pour Israël afin de lui permettre l’impunité des crimes répétés. (...)

  • “Movements Work”: As Activists Occupy Seattle’s Capitol Hill, City Bans Tear Gas, Expels Police Union | Democracy Now!
    https://www.democracynow.org/2020/6/18/seattle_police

    In Seattle, the fight to demilitarize and defund the police continues as the King County Labor Council voted to expel the Seattle police union Wednesday, following weeks of protest. Seattle police sparked outrage for responding to massive protests against police brutality by using pepper spray, tear gas and flashbangs on demonstrators and reporters. Activists then formed an autonomous zone in response to the police department’s abandonment of a precinct building. On Wednesday, President Trump threatened to send troops into Seattle to dismantle the community-run Capitol Hill Occupied Protest, which extends over several city blocks. Seattle socialist Councilmember Kshama Sawant calls the threat of military intervention “absolutely horrific” and says it “shows that Donald Trump is a coward and movements work.”

    #zone_libérée #zone_autonome #syndicats_policiers #police #USA #Seattle

  • What a World Without Cops Would Look Like – Mother Jones
    https://www.motherjones.com/crime-justice/2020/06/police-abolition-george-floyd

    Efforts to cut off funding for police have already taken root in Minneapolis, where the police department’s budget currently totals $193 million. (In 2017, the department received 36 percent of the city’s general fund expenditures.) Two days after Floyd’s killing, the president of the University of Minnesota declared that that the campus would no longer contract with the police department to provide security for large gatherings like football games. On Friday, a member of the Minneapolis Board of Education announced a resolution to end the school district’s contract to station 14 cops in its schools. And community groups such as the Black Visions Collective and Reclaim the Block are petitioning the city council to cut the police department’s budget by $45 million and reinvest the money in health and (non-police) safety programs.

    With other campaigns to cut police budgets underway in cities like Los Angeles and New York and calls to defund the police gathering steam on social media, I spoke with Brooklyn College sociology professor Alex Vitale, the coordinator of the Policing & Social Justice Project and author of The End of Policing, to talk about the sweeping vision of police abolition and what it means in practice.

    #abolir_la_police #police #justice #justice_réparative #USA

    • Minneapolis council member: Conversations underway to disband police
      https://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/america-in-crisis/minneapolis-council-member-conversations-underway-to-disband-polic

      "The department is ungovernable,” Fletcher said. “Chief (Medaria) Arradondo is a leader that we’ve all had very high hopes in and that I imagined could play a role in envisioning the next version of public safety. But he has clearly not been able to make the culture change happen that we were hoping for and investing in.”

      What it would take to disband the department is unclear. But what is clear is that the department is already seeing a reduced role in the protection of the city.

      On Wednesday, the Minneapolis Park Board voted to terminate its relationship with the department, and the Minneapolis Police will no longer be involved in guarding events on park property.

      Fletcher said in a Twitter post that it’s time to “declare policing as we know it a thing of the past.”

      Minneapolis City Council members look to disband the police department as schools and other city agencies cut ties with police
      https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/world/minneapolis-city-council-members-look-to-disband-the-police-department-as-schools-and-other-city-agencies-cut-ties-with-police/ar-BB152szZ
      https://img-s-msn-com.akamaized.net/tenant/amp/entityid/BB152eBW.img?h=630&w=1200&m=6&q=60&o=t&l=f&f=jpg

      Several members of the Minneapolis City Council are exploring ways to permanently disband the Minneapolis Police Department.
      Over the past week, several other city agencies have severed their ties to the department.
      “We can send a city response that makes situations better. We can resolve confusion over a $US20 grocery transaction without drawing a weapon, or pulling out handcuffs,” Councilmember Steve Fletcher said.

      Mais pas de grosse presse sur ça...

    • Six Ideas for a Cop-Free World - Rolling Stone
      https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/politics-news/police-brutality-cop-free-world-protest-199465

      Editor’s note: This story was originally published on December 16th, 2014, following the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner, black men who were killed by police. In recent days, in the wake of nationwide protests demanding justice for George Floyd, we are sharing some of our previous coverage about how to end systematic racism in America.

      After months of escalating protests and grassroots organizing in response to the police killings of Michael Brown and Eric Garner, police reformers have issued many demands. The moderates in this debate typically qualify their rhetoric with “We all know we need police, but…” It’s a familiar refrain to those of us who’ve spent years in the streets and the barrios organizing around police violence, only to be confronted by officers who snarl, “But who’ll help you if you get robbed?” We can put a man on the moon, but we’re still lacking creativity down here on Earth.

      But police are not a permanent fixture in society. While law enforcers have existed in one form or another for centuries, the modern police have their roots in the relatively recent rise of modern property relations 200 years ago, and the “disorderly conduct” of the urban poor. Like every structure we’ve known all our lives, it seems that the policing paradigm is inescapable and everlasting, and the only thing keeping us from the precipice of a dystopic Wild West scenario. It’s not.

    • I’m a Minneapolis City Council Member. We Must Disband the Police—Here’s What Could Come Next | Time
      https://time.com/5848705/disband-and-replace-minneapolis-police

      I have been surprised, then, by how difficult and controversial it has been to pass the relatively small budget changes that we have made, which have not even cut their budget but merely redirected some proposed increases to fund a new Office of Violence Prevention. Other programmatic proposals to change the way we police have been met with stiff institutional resistance.

      Minneapolis Police had an opportunity to distance themselves from Derek Chauvin, to express sympathy, to be a calming presence. Instead, they deployed tear gas and rubber bullets, effectively escalating the situation from protest to pitched conflict. By the next day, it was clear that people on Lake Street were rallying for much more than the prosecution of four officers. They were demonstrating their anger at decades of harassment and racialized violence and calling for it to end.

      We have a talented, thoughtful police chief who has attempted some important steps. He has fired officers for significant abuses only to have his decisions overturned and those officers reinstated by arbitrators. Mayor Frey has met fierce resistance from the Federation to implement even minor policy changes.

      After viewing George Floyd’s murder, watching police not only fail to apologize, but escalate the situation with aggressive tactics, and finally watching the department abandon neighborhood businesses to exclusively defend their precinct building, most of my constituents have had enough.

      Every member of the Minneapolis City Council has now expressed the need for dramatic structural change. I am one of many on the Council, including the Council President and the Chair of Public Safety, who are publicly supporting the call to disband our police department and start fresh with a community-oriented, non-violent public safety and outreach capacity. What I hear from most of my constituents is that they want to make sure we provide for public safety, and they have learned their whole lives to equate “safety” with “police,” but are now concluding that need not be the case.

      We had already pushed for pilot programs to dispatch county mental health professionals to mental health calls, and fire department EMTs to opioid overdose calls, without police officers. We have similarly experimented with unarmed, community-oriented street teams on weekend nights downtown to focus on de-escalation. We could similarly turn traffic enforcement over to cameras and, potentially, our parking enforcement staff, rather than our police department.

      By Steve Fletcher
      June 5, 2020 9:57 AM EDT
      Fletcher is a City Council Member for Ward 3 in Minneapolis, Minn.

      We can invest in cultural competency and mental health training, de-escalation and conflict resolution. We can send a city response that that is appropriate to each situation and makes it better. We can resolve confusion over a $20 grocery transaction without drawing a weapon or pulling out handcuffs.

      Mostly—and this might be the hardest part to envision and make real—we need to be more deeply engaged with each other. We need to build the relationship networks, skills, and capacity in our communities to support each other in resolving conflicts and keeping each other safe before things escalate dangerously. Our isolation from each other has required us to outsource the management of social interactions. We have to get relational.

    • Opinion | The Police Killed George Floyd. Redirect Their Funding Elsewhere. - The New York Times
      https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/30/opinion/george-floyd-police-funding.html

      The only way we’re going to stop these endless cycles of police violence is by creating alternatives to policing. Because even in a pandemic where black people have been disproportionately killed by the coronavirus, the police are still murdering us.

      On Monday, a worker at a store in Minneapolis called 911, claiming that George Floyd had used counterfeit money. The incident ended with a police officer suffocating Mr. Floyd to death, despite his and bystanders’ pleas for mercy. Protests have since erupted across the country while the police respond with military-style violence.

      As the case of George Floyd makes clear, calling 911 for even the slightest thing can be a death sentence for black people. For many marginalized communities, 911 is not a viable option because the police often make crises worse.

      More training or diversity among police officers won’t end police brutality, nor will firing and charging individual officers. Look at the Minneapolis Police Department, which is held up as a model of progressive police reform. The department offers procedural justice as well as trainings for implicit bias, mindfulness and de-escalation. It embraces community policing and officer diversity, bans “warrior style” policing, uses body cameras, implemented an early intervention system to identify problematic officers, receives training around mental health crisis intervention, and practices “reconciliation” efforts in communities of color.

      George Floyd was still murdered. The focus on training, diversity and technology like body cameras shifts focus away from the root cause of police violence and instead gives the police more power and resources. The problem is that the entire criminal justice system gives police officers the power and opportunity to systematically harass and kill with impunity.

      The solution to ending police violence and cultivating a safer country lies in reducing the power of the police and their contact with the public.

      Municipalities can begin by changing policies or statutes so police officers never respond to certain kinds of emergencies, including ones that involve substance abuse, domestic violence, homelessness or mental health. Instead, health care workers or emergency response teams would handle these incidents.

      Ideally, people would have the option to call a different number — say 727 — to access various trained response teams.

      The good news is, this is already happening. Violence interruption programs exist throughout the country and they’re often led by people from the community who have experience navigating tricky situations. Some programs, like one in Washington, D.C., do not work with the police; its staff members rely instead on personal outreach and social connections for information about violence that they work to mediate and diffuse. We should invest in these programs, which operate on shoestring budgets, so they have their own dedicated dispatch centers outside of 911.

      Dallas is pioneering a new approach where social workers are being dispatched to some 911 calls that involve mental health emergencies. The program has shown success, and many of the people receive care that they would never have gotten in jails or overcrowded hospitals.

      In California, the Bay Area Transformative Justice Collective deals with child sexual abuse without the police. The collective develops pods — groups of people including survivors, bystanders or people who have harmed in the past — that each pod-member feels they can turn to for support when needed.

      Here’s another idea: Imagine if the money used to pay the salaries of police officers who endlessly patrol public housing buildings and harass residents can be used to fund plans that residents design to keep themselves safe. The money could also pay the salaries of maintenance and custodial workers; fund community programs, employment and a universal basic income; or pay for upgrades to elevators and apartment units so residents are not stuck without gas during a pandemic, as some people in Brooklyn were.

      https://batjc.wordpress.com

      By Philip V. McHarris and Thenjiwe McHarris

      Mr. McHarris is a doctoral candidate focusing on race, housing and policing. Ms. McHarris is a strategist with the Movement for Black Lives.

    • Black Lives Matter Has Been Doing The Work To ’Defund The Police’ For Years
      https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/black-lives-matter-has-been-doing-the-work-to-defund-the-police-for-years/ar-BB156D9S
      https://img-s-msn-com.akamaized.net/tenant/amp/entityid/BB156BjH.img?h=630&w=1200&m=6&q=60&o=t&l=f&f=jpg&x=3157&y=7

      Los Angeles’ BLM chapter and its partners proposed an alternative “People’s Budget,” which showed how redirecting money allocated for LAPD could pay for desperately needed housing assistance, rent suspension, mental health services and support for public schools. The activists succeeded in embarrassing City Council members into delaying a vote on the budget and ultimately allowing a June 1 deadline to pass without revising the budget.

      Despite its progressive reputation, Los Angeles has lagged behind the rest of the state in criminal justice reform. L.A. County jails incarcerate more people than any other jail system in the country.Black Lives Matter activists have been at the forefront of efforts to change that.

      Although Black Lives Matter does not endorse candidates, it has led the effort to oust Lacey, who has opposed almost every criminal justice reform measure that has come up during her eight years in office. Lacey, the county’s first Black district attorney, ran for reelection in 2016 unopposed but is facing a progressive challenger in November after failing to secure more than 50% of the vote in the primary.

      Thanks to BLM organizing, L.A. residents will also have the chance to vote on Measure R, a civilian-driven ballot initiative that aims to reduce the county’s jail population by getting prisoners with mental health conditions out of jail and into treatment. Organizers collected 250,000 signatures to get Measure R on the ballot.

    • What does ’defund the police’ mean? The rallying cry sweeping the US – explained | US news | The Guardian
      https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/jun/05/defunding-the-police-us-what-does-it-mean?ref=hvper.com
      https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/8fd0ed9636b86ed15b807511f42695dda676873d/0_135_3219_1931/master/3219.jpg?width=1200&height=630&quality=85&auto=format&fit=crop&overlay-ali

      For years, community groups have advocated for defunding law enforcement – taking money away from police and prisons – and reinvesting those funds in services. The basic principle is that government budgets and “public safety” spending should prioritize housing, employment, community health, education and other vital programs, instead of police officers. Advocates argue that defunding is the best way forward since attempts to reform police practices over the last five years have failed, as evidenced by the brutal killing of George Floyd. Groups have a range of demands, with some seeking modest reductions and others viewing full defunding as a step toward abolishing contemporary police services.
      How much does America currently spend on police?

      In the past four decades, the cost of policing in the US has tripled and is now $115bn, according to a recent analysis. That steady increase comes as crime has been consistently declining. In most cities, spending on police is significantly greater than spending on services and other departments ($1.8bn on police in Los Angeles, for example, which is more than half the city’s general fund). The Covid-19 economic crisis has led cities and states to make drastic budget cuts to education, youth programs, arts and culture, parks, libraries, housing services and more. But police budgets have grown or gone largely untouched – until pressure from protests this week.

    • Abolishing Prisons Is within Our Grasp | Bitch Media
      https://www.bitchmedia.org/article/prison-abolition-should-be-the-american-dream

      The United States incarcerates more people than any other country, with 2.2 million adults in prisons or jails at the end of 2016. Nearly 60,000 children under the age of 18 are also incarcerated in juvenile jails or prisons, and about 10,000 more children are held in adult jails or prisons. Citizens pay the high price for this system because our tax dollars are funneled into policing and incarcerating the people in these systems—predominantly Black and Brown people. This is by design. Slavery legally ended in 1865 with the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, but the language of this amendment still allowed slavery as punishment for a crime. The carceral system revived slave labor, allowing the United States to continue disenfranchising and enslaving incarcerated Black people. Now almost every aspect of Black and Brown people’s lives is affected by the carceral state—from extra surveillance and imprisonment to disenfranchisement upon release. The entire system is built to maintain white supremacy, which remains the status quo in the United States.

      “It might be challenging to envision a world without policing or imprisonment because we’re constantly being told that these systems are natural [they’re not] and have always existed [they haven’t],” says Mohamed Shehk, the national media and communications director of Critical Resistance. Though some Americans have difficulties imagining a world without police or prisons, communities who don’t rely on the PIC do exist. Shehk says the Palestinian village where his mother grew up doesn’t have a police force. Problems there are resolved by “bringing in the elders of the community to come up with a resolution.” In 2011, the indigenous Purépecha town of Cherán banned political parties, gangs, and police. Since then, they boast the lowest murder rate in the entire Michoacán region, which is historically one of the most violent regions in Mexico. What’s more, since Cherán abolished the corrupt police force, they haven’t had a single kidnapping.

      “Policing exists to manage the consequences of inequality in ways that benefit those people who are creating the inequality,” says Alex S. Vitale, a sociology professor at Brooklyn College and author of the 2017 book The End of Policing. “The decision to use police to manage the problems of the poor is inherently unjust in most circumstances and actually racist because this burden so falls most heavily on communities of color.” Many wealthy white communities have already abolished police forces because they don’t want the criminal justice system solving their intercommunal problems. Why is this option not available to all of us?

      Abolitionists are often asked to explain what will happen to people who commit murder or rape if police and prisons are abolished. Shehk responds with a similar question: “What are we doing now with people who commit those harms?” Some of the high-profile assault stories that surfaced during the #MeToo movement, including Chanel Miller’s rape at the hands of Brock Turner and Dr. Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony of her assault by Brett Kavanaugh, revealed that survivors of sexual harassment and assault aren’t being protected by this system. Instead, the criminal justice system protects and maintains agents of the patriarchy, including students like Turner, police officers, lawyers, Supreme Court justices, and presidents.

      Since the United States locks people up at a higher rate than any other country, you’d assume this “would be the safest place, virtually free of harm or violence,” Shehk says, but that’s obviously not the case. The president of the United States and two Supreme Court justices have been accused of sexual harassment or sexual assault on multiple occasions. Less than 1 percent of rapes result in the incarceration of the perpetrator, while at least 89 percent of survivors face emotional and physical consequences. Often the rapes reported to police aren’t even investigated, considering the 200,000 rape kits the federal government estimates are sitting—submitted, yet unopened—in police storage. That’s not justice.

      ActivismMagazinePoliticsprisonThe Fantasy Issue
      Beyond BarsPrison Abolition Should Be the American Dream
      by Reina Sultan |

      artwork by Matice Moore and Dawud Lee
      Published on June 4, 2020

      I do not have all the answers, left. I try to have conversations about every subject we must deal with in our communities, center. Someone you love needs your support, but you cannot be there, no matter how much they need you, right. (Artwork by Matice Moore and Dawud Lee for the LifeLines Project)
      This article was published in Fantasy Issue #87 | Summer 2020 Subscribe »

      In her 2003 book, Are Prisons Obsolete?, scholar and activist Angela Y. Davis wrote, “Prison abolitionists are dismissed as utopians and idealists whose ideas are at best unrealistic and impracticable, and, at worst, mystifying and foolish.” Those who oppose prison-industrial complex (PIC) abolition partially see it as a fantasy that can’t be realized. “This is a measure of how difficult it is to envision a social order that does not rely on the threat of sequestering people in dreadful places designed to separate them from their communities and families. The prison is considered so ‘natural’ that it is extremely hard to imagine life without it,” Davis writes.

      But activists and organizations have been imagining life without prisons for decades. The Prison Research/Education/Action Project’s 1976 pamphlet “Instead of Prisons: A Handbook for Abolitionists” laid out the pillars of abolition: “moratorium,” “decarceration,” and “excarceration.” “Moratorium” calls for an end to the building of prisons, jails, and detention centers; “decarceration” works to have nonviolent offenders released from prison; and “excarceration” involves diverting people away from interacting with law enforcement through decriminalization. In 1997, Davis and City University of New York professor Ruth Wilson Gilmore cofounded Critical Resistance, an international organization that aims to dismantle the pic by using these three pillars. A year later, 3,500 people convened for a three-day Critical Resistance conference to discuss the limitations of the PIC in the United States.

      Other organizations with similar goals have also been erected: Decrim NY wants to decriminalize sex work in New York City and in the state and decarcerate sex workers. The Black Youth Project 100 uses a Black, queer, and feminist lens to work toward the liberation of all Black people, including those who are currently incarcerated. No New Jails NYC calls for an end to the building and funding of new prisons and jails in New York City. All of these organizations are working toward a common goal: ending the pic.
      Justice Is Not Served

      The United States incarcerates more people than any other country, with 2.2 million adults in prisons or jails at the end of 2016. Nearly 60,000 children under the age of 18 are also incarcerated in juvenile jails or prisons, and about 10,000 more children are held in adult jails or prisons. Citizens pay the high price for this system because our tax dollars are funneled into policing and incarcerating the people in these systems—predominantly Black and Brown people. This is by design. Slavery legally ended in 1865 with the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, but the language of this amendment still allowed slavery as punishment for a crime. The carceral system revived slave labor, allowing the United States to continue disenfranchising and enslaving incarcerated Black people. Now almost every aspect of Black and Brown people’s lives is affected by the carceral state—from extra surveillance and imprisonment to disenfranchisement upon release. The entire system is built to maintain white supremacy, which remains the status quo in the United States.

      “It might be challenging to envision a world without policing or imprisonment because we’re constantly being told that these systems are natural [they’re not] and have always existed [they haven’t],” says Mohamed Shehk, the national media and communications director of Critical Resistance. Though some Americans have difficulties imagining a world without police or prisons, communities who don’t rely on the PIC do exist. Shehk says the Palestinian village where his mother grew up doesn’t have a police force. Problems there are resolved by “bringing in the elders of the community to come up with a resolution.” In 2011, the indigenous Purépecha town of Cherán banned political parties, gangs, and police. Since then, they boast the lowest murder rate in the entire Michoacán region, which is historically one of the most violent regions in Mexico. What’s more, since Cherán abolished the corrupt police force, they haven’t had a single kidnapping.
      Doctor Climax

      From Our Sponsors

      Some communities within the United States are also accustomed to policing themselves. Shehk says it’s “important to remember that many communities don’t call the cops because of rightful mistrust.” He also points out that “you can also visit Beverly Hills or the Golden Triangle or the other elite, wealthy, white neighborhoods of this country to see what a community without police or prisons looks like.” When a student at an elite private school in Orange County, California, is found with weed in their backpack, teachers don’t call the police—and there isn’t an active police presence within the school itself. Instead, teachers call the student’s parents, believing it’s an issue that can be solved within the family. Black and Brown students, on the other hand, are funneled from school into the criminal justice system in what is commonly known as the school-to-prison pipeline. These students are increasingly accused of crimes, suspended, or reported to the police compared to their white counterparts, which often creates a lasting connection with the carceral state.

      Reducing interaction with law enforcement would allow students the space to make mistakes and learn from them, and would encourage teachers to build better relationships with parents. It also moves resources away from metal detectors, surveillance equipment, and onsite police and toward quality educators, better school supplies, and extracurricular activities. “Policing exists to manage the consequences of inequality in ways that benefit those people who are creating the inequality,” says Alex S. Vitale, a sociology professor at Brooklyn College and author of the 2017 book The End of Policing. “The decision to use police to manage the problems of the poor is inherently unjust in most circumstances and actually racist because this burden so falls most heavily on communities of color.” Many wealthy white communities have already abolished police forces because they don’t want the criminal justice system solving their intercommunal problems. Why is this option not available to all of us?
      What Does Abolition Look Like?

      Abolitionists are often asked to explain what will happen to people who commit murder or rape if police and prisons are abolished. Shehk responds with a similar question: “What are we doing now with people who commit those harms?” Some of the high-profile assault stories that surfaced during the #MeToo movement, including Chanel Miller’s rape at the hands of Brock Turner and Dr. Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony of her assault by Brett Kavanaugh, revealed that survivors of sexual harassment and assault aren’t being protected by this system. Instead, the criminal justice system protects and maintains agents of the patriarchy, including students like Turner, police officers, lawyers, Supreme Court justices, and presidents.

      Since the United States locks people up at a higher rate than any other country, you’d assume this “would be the safest place, virtually free of harm or violence,” Shehk says, but that’s obviously not the case. The president of the United States and two Supreme Court justices have been accused of sexual harassment or sexual assault on multiple occasions. Less than 1 percent of rapes result in the incarceration of the perpetrator, while at least 89 percent of survivors face emotional and physical consequences. Often the rapes reported to police aren’t even investigated, considering the 200,000 rape kits the federal government estimates are sitting—submitted, yet unopened—in police storage. That’s not justice.

      Get Bitch Media’s top 9 reads of the week delivered to your inbox every Saturday morning! Sign up for the Weekly Reader:
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      Murder clearance rates aren’t much better, with police reportedly solving only about 60 percent of murders. When the victim is Black—as the majority of homicide victims are—the clearance rate declines to the lowest of any other racial group. In communities that are particularly disenfranchised, those rates can be in the single digits. These figures don’t instill much faith in law enforcement’s efficacy.

      As Vitale puts it, “serial killers don’t just fall out of the sky.” According to him, treating criminalization as the only option for deterrence is one of the reasons nothing is done to help children or teenagers who, despite the threat of prison, still exhibit violent tendencies. That violence might be prevented through robust social services, mental healthcare, and support systems. Shehk also lists “restorative and transformative justice practices, healing circles, or community accountability models” as examples of nonpunitive ways of addressing harm. “Rather than trying to cage away the problem, one key part of these models is an attempt to address the root cause of the harm and to change the conditions in which it occurred so that it doesn’t happen again,” he says. “Many of these are informed by Indigenous practices, and all of them seek to uplift the humanity of the parties involved.”

      Mass incarceration costs $182 billion a year, when considering policing, court costs, and the operating costs of prisons and jails—and it doesn’t even effectively deter crime, achieve justice for victims, or rehabilitate perpetrators. Rather than funneling money into the PIC, the United States could fund an education system that invests in mental-health services instead of policing and surveillance. We could use those billions of dollars to finance living accommodations for houseless people and provide them with mental healthcare and drug rehabilitation as needed. This money could be used to train crisis intervention teams or violence interrupters to deal with escalated situations.

      The possibilities are endless, if we allow ourselves to dream bigger than criminalization and bondage. “Being an abolitionist is the most realistic position because it is based in statistics and logic along with empathy and respect for human dignity,” says Agbebiyi. To Daoud, “over-policing creates a system of engineered conflict and perpetuates harm. As such, she—and others at BBO—believes that abolishing prisons must be coupled with radically caring for your community in many forms, including cop-watching and bystander intervention. The dream of abolition is being realized every day by people working for a more equitable world. “If you’re doing work to advocate for a living wage, that’s abolitionist work. If you’re doing work to advocate against environmental racism, that’s abolitionist work. If you’re working to make sure folks have access to affordable healthcare, that’s abolitionist work,” Agbebiyi says. Moving abolition from a fantasy to a reality is going to happen incrementally, but we can certainly make it happen. Vitale confirms this, saying, “Abolition is embedded in tons of movements all over the country and it’s happening right now.”

      by Reina Sultan
      #abolitionnisme_carcéral #prison

    • Majority of the Minneapolis City Council pledges to dismantle the Police Department.
      https://seenthis.net/messages/859237

      Nine members — a veto-proof majority — of the Minneapolis City Council pledged on Sunday to dismantle the city’s Police Department, promising to create a new system of public safety in a city where law enforcement has long been accused of racism.

      Saying that the city’s current policing system could not be reformed, the council members stood before hundreds of people gathered late in the day on a grassy hill, and signed a pledge to begin the process of taking apart the Police Department as it now exists.

    • Mpls. Council majority backs dismantling police department - StarTribune.com
      https://www.startribune.com/mpls-council-majority-backs-dismantling-police-department/571088302


      Alondra Cano was one of nine Minneapolis Council members who spoke out in support of advocacy group Black Visions, which is calling for the end of the Minneapolis Police Department.
      JERRY HOLT – STAR TRIBUNE

      In their boldest statement since George Floyd’s killing, nine Minneapolis City Council members told a crowd Sunday that they will “begin the process of ending the Minneapolis Police Department.

      We recognize that we don’t have all the answers about what a police-free future looks like, but our community does,” they said, reading off a prepared statement. “We’re committed to engaging with every willing community member in the City of Minneapolis over the next year to identify what safety looks like for you.

      Their words — delivered one day after Mayor Jacob Frey told a crowd of protesters he does not support the full abolishment of the MPD — set off what is likely to be a long, complicated debate about the future of the state’s largest police force.

      With the world watching, and the city’s leaders up for re-election next year, the stakes are particularly high. While Minneapolis has debated the issue in the past, Floyd’s death at the hands of Minneapolis police has added a sense of urgency, and the calls for police departments to be disbanded have echoed in other cities around the country.

      Council members have noted repeatedly since Floyd’s death that Minneapolis has the chance to redefine policing. On a sunny Sunday afternoon, nine of them walked onto a stage at Powderhorn Park to support members of advocacy group Black Visions, who were calling for the end of the MPD. On stage were Council President Lisa Bender, Vice President Andrea Jenkins and Council Members Alondra Cano, Phillippe Cunningham, Jeremiah Ellison, Steve Fletcher, Cam Gordon, Andrew Johnson and Jeremy Schroeder.

      Decades of police reform efforts have proved that the Minneapolis Police Department cannot be reformed and will never be accountable for its actions,” they said. “We are here today to begin the process of ending the Minneapolis Police Department and creating a new, transformative model for cultivating safety in Minneapolis.

      #démantèlement de la #police_municipale


      Gallery: A new sculpture was erected on Chicago Avenue S. just north of E. 38th Street, the site where George Floyd was was asphyxiated in Minneapolis police custody
      JEFF WHEELER – STAR TRIBUNE.


      Visitors to the intersection where George Floyd was killed in Minneapolis were continuously leaving fresh flowers on the names of other victims of police violence on Sunday, June 7.
      JEFF WHEELER – STAR TRIBUNE_

    • The End of Policing: Alex Vitale on How Cops & Their Unions Cover Up Inequality, Exploitation | Democracy Now!
      https://www.democracynow.org/2020/6/8/alex_vitale_end_of_policing#transcript

      Professor Alex Vitale argues the answer to police violence is not “reform.” It’s defunding. The author of “The End of Policing” says the movement to defund the police is part of “a long story about the use of police and prisons to manage problems of inequality and exploitation.” He asks, “Why are we using police to paper over problems of economic exploitation?” He also discusses the role of police unions. “They become, in many cities, the locus, the institutional hub, for a whole set of right-wing ’thin blue line’ politics that believe that policing is not only effective but it’s the most desirable way to solve our problems. And embedded in this is a deep racism that says that certain populations can only be managed through constant threats of coercion.”

    • Minneapolis City Council Vows to Dismantle Police Dept. After Mass Protests & Grassroots Organizing | Democracy Now!
      https://www.democracynow.org/2020/6/8/minneapolis_police_abolition#transcript

      The City Council of Minneapolis announced Saturday it would disband and abolish the police department responsible for the killing of African American man George Floyd, following nearly two weeks of mass protest and growing calls to defund the police.

      In a statement, nine of the city’s 12 councilmembers said, quote, “Decades of police reform efforts have proved that the Minneapolis Police Department cannot be reformed, and will never be accountable for its action. … We recognize that we don’t have all the answers about what a police-free future looks like, but our community does,” they said.

      The historic announcement comes after years of organizing on the ground by groups like Reclaim the Block, Black Visions Collective and MPD150.

  • “We Don’t Have the Capacity to Treat”: Palestinian-Canadian Doctor Says Israel Must Lift Gaza Siege
    April 24, 2020 | Democracy Now!
    https://www.democracynow.org/2020/4/24/tarek_loubani_palestinian_canadian_doctor_gaza

    As fears continue to grow about what a rampant outbreak of the coronavirus might do to the occupied Palestinian territory, already crippled by years of Israeli sanctions, we get an update from Dr. Tarek Loubani, Palestinian-Canadian doctor and emergency physician who volunteers in the Gaza Strip and returned from a trip there last month. “Testing is severely limited,” he says. “There have been fewer tests in Gaza so far throughout the entire pandemic than there were in South Korea yesterday.”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=34&v=L_R0VmCrvzs&feature=emb_logo


    #GAZA

  • Civil Liberties at Risk as Authorities Deploy Invasive Technologies to Contain Virus
    Democracy Now, le 3 avril 2020
    https://www.democracynow.org/2020/4/3/headlines/civil_liberties_at_risk_as_authorities_deploy_invasive_technologies_to

    In San Francisco, the founder and CEO of the videoconferencing company Zoom apologized Wednesday over software flaws that have allowed hackers to steal passwords, to join private calls and even to hijack Mac users’ webcams and microphones. Zoom has seen a sudden surge of nearly 200 million daily users working and studying remotely.

    In Tunisia, police are remotely operating robots — equipped with cameras, microphones and loudspeakers — to check residents’ IDs while enforcing a lockdown in the capital Tunis.

    Indonesian authorities are using drones to spray disinfectant in some residential neighborhoods, raising concerns over privacy and toxic chemicals.

    South Korea’s government has collected massive amounts of cellphone data to create a public map warning residents if they’ve come into contact with someone who has COVID-19.

    In Israel, the high-tech firm NSO Group is promoting software that would assign every person a 1-to-10 ranking of how likely they are to carry the virus. NSO Group previously developed spyware known as Pegasus, which allows hackers to turn on a cellphone’s camera and microphone and to trawl through personal data and messages. NSO Group is being sued by WhatsApp after the malware was discovered on the phones of human rights activists and journalists, including a Saudi dissident close to murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

    #coronavirus #fascistovirus #surveillance

    Voir compile des effets délétères indirects de la pandémie :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/832147

  • #Coronavirus_Capitalism” : Naomi Klein’s Case for Transformative Change Amid Coronavirus Pandemic

    Author, activist and journalist Naomi Klein says the coronavirus crisis, like earlier ones, could be a catalyst to shower aid on the wealthiest interests in society, including those most responsible for our current vulnerabilities, while offering next to nothing to most workers and small businesses. In 2007, Klein wrote “The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism.” Now she argues President Trump’s plan is a pandemic shock doctrine. In a new video for The Intercept, where she is a senior correspondent, Klein argues it’s vital for people to fight for the kind of transformative change that can not only curb the worst effects of the current crisis but also set society on a more just path.

    AMY GOODMAN: Today we spend much of the hour looking at the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic, what some are calling coronavirus capitalism. Soon we’ll be joined by Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz, whose new book is People, Power and Profits: Progressive Capitalism for an Age of Discontent. But first we begin with a new video by author and activist Naomi Klein, produced by The Intercept. In 2007, Klein wrote The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism. Now she argues Trump’s plan is a pandemic shock doctrine, but it’s not the only way forward. The video opens with this quote from economist Milton Friedman, who says, “Only a crisis — actual or perceived — produces real change. When that crisis occurs, the actions that are taken depend on the ideas that are lying around.”

    NAOMI KLEIN: “Ideas that are lying around.” Friedman, one of history’s most extreme free market economists, was wrong about a whole lot, but he was right about that. In times of crisis, seemingly impossible ideas suddenly become possible. But whose ideas? Sensible, fair ones, designed to keep as many people as possible safe, secure and healthy? Or predatory ideas, designed to further enrich the already unimaginably wealthy while leaving the most vulnerable further exposed? The world economy is seizing up in the face of cascading shocks.

    TEDROS ADHANOM GHEBREYESUS: COVID-19 can be characterized as a pandemic.

    GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: In the wake of the coronavirus crisis, stocks have stopped trading on Wall Street after a 7% drop.

    KRISTINA PARTSINEVELOS: This is a historical day, the biggest drop we’ve seen since that crash in 1987.

    ELAINE QUIJANO: The drop was spurred by a growing oil price war as the market was already weakened by coronavirus fears.

    PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: Yeah, no, I don’t take responsibility at all.

    NAOMI KLEIN: In the midst of this widespread panic, corporate lobbyists of all stripes are of course dusting off all the ideas they had lying around. Trump is pushing a suspension of the payroll tax, which could bankrupt Social Security, providing the excuse to cut it or privatize it completely — an idea that has been lying around for very long time.

    PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH: A worker, at his or her option, ought to be allowed to put some of their own money in a — you know, in a private savings account.

    NAOMI KLEIN: Lying around on both sides of the aisle.

    SEN. JOE BIDEN: When I argued if we should freeze federal spending, I meant Social Security, as well. I meant Medicare and Medicaid.

    NAOMI KLEIN: And then, there are the ideas being floated to bail out some of the wealthiest and most polluting sectors in our economy.

    PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: We are working very closely with the cruise line industry, likewise with the airline industry. They’re two great industries, and we’ll be helping them through this patch.

    NAOMI KLEIN: Bailouts for fracking companies, not to mention cruise ships, airlines and hotels, handouts which Trump could benefit from personally. Which is a big problem because the virus isn’t the only crisis we face. There’s also climate disruption, and these industries that are getting rescued with our money are the ones driving it. Trump has also been meeting with the private health insurers.

    PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: We’re meeting with the top executives of the health insurance companies.

    NAOMI KLEIN: The very ones who have made sure that so many Americans can’t afford the care they need. And what are the chances they don’t have their hands out? It seems like the whole pandemic is getting outsourced.

    BRIAN CORNELL: Well, Mr. President, thank you for inviting us here today, along with our colleagues from Walmart and Walgreens and our partners at CVS. Normally you’d view us as competitors, but today we’re focused on a common competitor. And that’s defeating the spread of the coronavirus.

    NAOMI KLEIN: The Fed’s first move was to pump $1.5 trillion into the financial markets, with more undoubtedly on the way. But if you’re a worker, especially a gig worker, there’s a very good chance you’re out of luck. If you do need to see a doctor for care, there’s a good chance no one’s going to help you pay if you aren’t covered. And if you want to heed the public health warnings to stay home from work, there’s also a chance that you won’t get paid. Of course, you still need to pay your rent and all of your debts — medical, student, credit card, mortgage. The results are predictable. Too many sick people have no choice but to go to work, which means more people contracting and spreading the virus. And without comprehensive bailouts for workers, we can expect more bankruptcies and more homelessness down the road.

    Look, we know this script. In 2008, the last time we had a global financial meltdown, the same kinds of bad ideas for no-strings-attached corporate bailouts carried the day, and regular people around the world paid the price. And even that was entirely predictable. Thirteen years ago, I wrote a book called The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism, described a brutal and recurring tactic by right-wing governments. After a shocking event — a war, coup, terrorist attack, market crash or natural disaster — they exploit the public’s disorientation, suspend democracy, push through radical free market policies that enrich the 1% at the expense of the poor and middle class.

    But here is what my research has taught me. Shocks and crises don’t always go the shock doctrine path. In fact, it’s possible for crisis to catalyze a kind of evolutionary leap. Think of the 1930s, when the Great Depression led to the New Deal.

    PRESIDENT FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT: The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.

    NAOMI KLEIN: In the United States and elsewhere, governments began to weave a social safety net, so that the next time there was a crash, there would be programs like Social Security to catch people.

    PRESIDENT FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT: The right of every family to a decent home, the right to adequate medical care and the opportunity to achieve and enjoy good health.

    NAOMI KLEIN: Look, we know what Trump’s plan is: a pandemic shock doctrine, featuring all the most dangerous ideas lying around, from privatizing Social Security to locking down borders to caging even more migrants. Hell, he might even try canceling elections. But the end of this story hasn’t been written yet. It is an election year. And social movements and insurgent politicians are already mobilized. And like in the 1930s, we have a whole bunch of other ideas lying around.

    SEN. BERNIE SANDERS: Do we believe that everybody should be entitled, as a right, to healthcare?

    SANDERS SUPPORTERS: Yes!

    DOMINIQUE WALKER: We will not stop organizing and fighting until all unhoused folks who want shelter have shelter.

    REP. ILHAN OMAR: Canceling student debt.

    REP. RO KHANNA: It makes so much sense that if you’re sick, that you should not be penalized where you don’t have an income.

    NAOMI KLEIN: Many of these ideas were dismissed as too radical just a week ago. Now they’re starting to seem like the only reasonable path to get out of this crisis and prevent future ones.

    ELIZABETH COHEN: Now, here’s something that helps explain the difference between the testing situation in South Korea and the U.S. The South Korea, like European countries and Canada, has universal single-payer insurance. And that means that it’s easier to mobilize, and also people know what to do. There is pretty much one answer for how to get testing. The U.S. is a patchwork of countless different systems, and so you can’t say, “Here’s exactly the steps that every American should take in order to get tested.”

    NAOMI KLEIN: And with Washington suddenly in the giant stimulus business, this is precisely the time for the stimulus that many of us have been talking about for years.

    REP. ALEXANDRIA OCASIO-CORTEZ: Today is the day that we truly embark on a comprehensive agenda of economic, social and racial justice in the United States of America.

    NAOMI KLEIN: It’s called the Green New Deal. Instead of rescuing the dirty industries of the last century, we should be boosting the clean ones that will lead us into safety in the coming century. If there is one thing history teaches us, it’s that moments of shock are profoundly volatile. We either lose a whole lot of ground, get fleeced by elites and pay the price for decades, or we win progressive victories that seemed impossible just a few weeks earlier. This is no time to lose our nerve. The future will be determined by whoever is willing to fight harder for the ideas they have lying around.

    AMY GOODMAN: That’s author and activist Naomi Klein of The Intercept. The video ends with Milton Friedman’s quote: “Only a crisis — actual or perceived — produces real change. When that crisis occurs, the actions that are taken depend on ideas that are lying around. That, I believe, is our basic function: to develop alternatives to existing policies, to keep them alive and available until the politically impossible becomes politically inevitable.”

    This is Democracy Now!, democracynow.org, The War and Peace Report. When we come back, Nobel Prize-winning economist Joe Stiglitz. Stay with us.

    [break]

    AMY GOODMAN: That’s Spanish pianist Alberto Gestoso, performing the Titanic theme song, “My Heart Will Go On,” for his quarantined neighbors in Barcelona. He was on his balcony. Spain has had more than 3,400 cases of the coronavirus in the last 24 hours. Now at least 17,000 people are infected, and that’s only what is known without widespread testing.

    https://www.democracynow.org/2020/3/19/naomi_klein_coronavirus_capitalism
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