https://www.hrw.org

  • China Holds Uighurs in Secret Camps: Daily Brief

    The regime in China is responsible for a long list of awful abuses against minorities in the country, according to a new United Nations human rights report. More than one million Uighurs are estimated to be detained in camps. On Monday, China responded with denials and lies during a meeting of the UN Committee on Racial Discrimination in Geneva.

    https://www.hrw.org/the-day-in-human-rights/2018/08/13
    #camps #répression #Ouïghour #Chine #détention #minorités

    v. aussi:
    https://twitter.com/StephNebehay/status/1028641284234379270

  • China: Crackdown on Tibetan Social Groups. New Regulations Ban Social Action Under Guise of Fighting ‘Organized Crime’

    Chinese authorities are using an ostensible anti-mafia campaign to target suspected political dissidents and suppress civil society initiatives in Tibetan areas, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today. The authorities are now treating even traditional forms of social action, including local mediation of community or family disputes by lamas or other traditional authority figures, as illegal.

    The 101-page report, “‘Illegal Organizations’: China’s Crackdown on Tibetan Social Groups,” details efforts by the Chinese Communist Party at the local level to eliminate the remaining influence of lamas and traditional leaders within Tibetan communities. The report features rare in-depth interviews, state media cartoons depicting the new restrictions, and cases of Tibetans arbitrarily detained for their involvement in community activities.


    https://www.hrw.org/news/2018/07/29/china-crackdown-tibetan-social-groups
    #Chine #Tibet #rapport #répression

  • 08/07: 19 travellers at Turkish-Greek landborder, pushed-back to Turkey

    Watch The Med Alarm Phone Investigations – 8th of July 2018

    Case name: 2018_07_08-AEG406
    Situation: 19 travellers at Turkish-Greek landborder, pushed-back to Turkey
    Status of WTM Investigation: Concluded

    Place of Incident: Aegean Sea

    Summary of the Case:

    On Sunday, 8th of July, at 11:14pm CEST, we were alerted to a group of travellers stuck near #Tichero, Greece, close to the Turkish landborder. The group consisted of 19 people, among them a 1-year-old child, a pregnant lady and a man that had a broken leg. At 12:11pm we managed to establish contact to the travellers. They were afraid of being pushed-back to Turkey by the police and asked for medical aid and the possibility to seek asylum in Greece. We asked them for a list of their names and birth dates in order to alert UNHCR. At 1:02am we received the list. We couldn’t get back in contact until 1:47am. The group decided not to move further and to wait until the morning for the UNHCR office to open so they could call there.
    At 8:30am we called UNHCR and asked for assistance. At 8:45am we also called the local police station but the operator refused to speak to us in English. We told the group to call 112 themselves for assistance. Until 9:30am we couldn’t reach any local police station. At 9:50am we sent an email to the local authorities and UNHCR to inform them about the people. Afterwards we continuously tried again to get in touch with the authorities and the group, but couldn’t establish a connection any more. At 2pm we reached the police in Alexandropolis. They informed us that they were searching since one hour but hadn’t found the travellers. During the afternoon, we couldn’t get any news and didn’t reach the travellers anymore. At 6:53pm the police informed us that they had not found the group yet. The next day at 11:02am we were informed by a contact person that the group had been found and that they had been allegedly violently pushed-back to Turkey. At 12:45am we managed to reach the group itself. They told us that the police had found them at 5:00pm the day before and put them in „a prison“. At 10:00pm the police had told the group that they were being moved to a camp to apply for international protection. However, the police instead brought them back to the river and handed them to officers discribed as „military“, who forced them onto a boat and across Evros border river back to Turkey. The police officers before had confiscated personal belongings of the refugees, including mobile phones, money, passports and the food for the baby.

    http://watchthemed.net/reports/view/943

    #Evros #Grèce #frontières #Turquie #push-back #refoulement #asile #migrations #réfugiés

    • WSJ: Turks fleeing Erdogan fuel new influx of refugees to Greece

      Thousands of Turks flee Turkey due to a massive witch-hunt launched by the Justice and Development Party (AK Party) government against the Kurds and the Gülen Group in the wake of a failed coup attempt on July 15, 2016.
      Around 14,000 people crossed the Evros frontier from January through September of this year, more than double the number for the whole of last year, according to the Greek police. Around half of them were Turkish citizens, according to estimates from Frontex, the European Union’s border agency. Many are judges, military personnel, civil servants or business people who have fallen under Turkish authorities’ suspicion, had their passports canceled and chosen an illegal route out.
      Nearly 4,000 Turks have applied for asylum in Greece so far this year. But most Turkish arrivals don’t register their presence in Greece, planning instead to head deeper into Europe and further from Turkey.

      About 30 Turks have been arriving on a daily basis since the failed coup, according to Kathimerini, there were zero arrivals from Turkey in 2015. However, thousands of Turkish citizens have started claiming asylum in Greece since “Erdogan stepped up his crackdown against his opponents since the failed coup attempt.”

      The Wall Street Journal interviewed some of the purge-victim families in Greece:

      “In the dead of night, Yunuz Cagar and his wife Cansu gave their baby some herbal tea to help her sleep, donned backpacks and followed smugglers on a muddy path along the Evros river, evading fences and border guards until they reached Greece.

      Mr. Cagar, a 29-year-old court clerk, was living a quiet life with his family in a provincial town near Istanbul until Turkey’s crackdown after a failed military coup in 2016 turned their world upside down. Judges, colleagues and friends were arrested. He lost his job and had to move the family into his parents’ attic. Mr. Cagar was arrested and spent four months in prison. His crime, he says, was downloading a messaging app, an act he says the state treated as evidence of supporting terrorism.
      The flow of asylum seekers crossing the Greek-Turkish border along the Evros river is rising for the first time since the peak of Europe’s migration crisis in 2015. This time, though, the increase is mainly due to Turks fleeing President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his dragnet against real or imagined followers of the U.S.-based cleric Fethullah Gulen. Turkey accuses Mr. Gulen, an ex-ally turned enemy of Mr. Erdogan, of orchestrating the coup attempt.

      “We didn’t say goodbye to anyone before leaving,” said Mr. Cagar, who is now in Athens trying to find some way to get to Germany. His wife and child already made it there with the help of smugglers who have demanded a hefty price. “We began our journey with €13,000 ($14,700) and I have €1,500 left,” he said.

      Ahmed, a 30-year-old former F-16 pilot in the Turkish air force, spends his days talking to smugglers and trying to find a way out. “My dream is Canada, but the reality is Omonoia,” he said, referring to the gritty square in downtown Athens where migrants and smugglers mingle.

      A few months after the coup attempt, Ahmed said, he was dismissed, accused of Gulenist links, arrested and beaten, after another officer denounced him. He said he has no connections with Mr. Gulen’s network. He was released pending trial, but decided to flee when a prison term appeared unavoidable.

      Yilmaz Bilir, his wife Ozlem and their four children were on vacation when the coup attempt happened. Mr. Bilir, who worked at the information-technology department of Turkey’s foreign ministry, found out months later that he was suspected of Gulenist links, which he denies. The family went into hiding, staying with relatives and friends. Mr. Bilir was arrested when he briefly visited his own home and neighbors called the police. When he was released pending trial, the family decided to leave Turkey.

      Mr. Bilir made it to Germany using a forged passport and has applied for asylum there. His wife and children have applied to join him.

      Mrs. Bilir, stuck for now in Athens, remembers how happy the family was when they crossed the river Evros one summer night. “It was an endless walk, but we were happy, because we were away together,” she said. “I was so stressed in Turkey that I couldn’t sleep well for months, but that first night in detention in Greece, I finally slept.”

      After the coup, Meral Budak was suspended from her job as a teacher. Her husband was a journalist at Zaman, a major Turkish newspaper linked to Mr. Gulen’s movement. He had a valid U.S. visa and was able to travel to Canada, where he now works as an Uber driver. His 18-year-old son joined him a few months later.

      Mrs. Budak and the couple’s 15-year-old son Ali remained in Turkey and soon had their passports revoked. They went into hiding for a year. “The most traumatic memory was when I burned hundreds of books,” she said. “Even my children’s school books could be considered evidence, since the publishing companies were funded by Gulen.”
      On Jan. 1 of this year, Mrs. Budak and Ali undertook the long walk across the Evros and into Greece, where they now wait to join the rest of the family in Canada.

      “When I was walking through Greek villages, I realized my life was never going to be the same,” Mrs. Budak said. “I was walking into the unknown.”
      Read the full report on: https://www.wsj.com/articles/turks-fleeing-erdogan-fuel-new-influx-of-refugees-to-greece-1543672801

      https://turkeypurge.com/wsj-turks-fleeing-erdogan-fuel-new-influx-of-refugees-to-greece
      #réfugiés_turcs

    • Fourth migrant found dead near border, Greek ’pushback’ suspected

      Bodies of migrants keep piling up on Turkey’s border with Greece, while Greece denies it is involved in illegal “pushback” practices. Villagers in Adasarhanlı, where the body of another migrant was found earlier this week, alerted authorities after they discovered a body in a rice field, a short distance from the Turkish-Greek border, late Wednesday. The man is believed to be an illegal migrant forced to walk back to Turkey in freezing temperatures by Greek police as part of their controversial pushback practice.

      An initial investigation shows the man froze to death three days ago, and there were lesions on his body stemming from prolonged exposure to water.

      İbrahim Dalkıran, the leader of the village, said they have seen a large number of migrants recently in the area, and many took shelter, in wet clothes or half naked, in Adasarhanlı. “This is a humanitarian situation. Greece sends back migrants almost every three or four days. Some arrive injured, and we call a doctor. It is sad to see them in such a state,” Dalkıran told reporters.

      Olga Gerovasili, Greece’s minister for citizen protection whose ministry oversees border security, has denied previous allegations of pushback and told Anadolu Agency (AA) that Greece is not involved in such incidents. Yet, figures provided to AA by Turkish security sources show many illegal migrants were forced to go back to Turkey by Greek officials, with some 2,490 migrants being pushed back in November alone. The agency reports that some 300 of them were subjected to mistreatment by Greek security forces, ranging from beatings to being forced to go back half naked to the Turkish side of the border.

      Three bodies, believed to be Afghan or Pakistani migrants, were found in three villages in Edirne, the Turkish province that borders Greece. More than 70,000 illegal migrants were intercepted in Edirne between January and November, a high number compared to the 47,731 stopped last year as they tried to cross into Greece despite an increase in pushback reports.

      Under international laws and conventions, Greece is obliged to register any illegal migrants entering its territory; yet, this is not the case for some migrants. Security sources say that accounts of migrants interviewed by Turkish migration authority staff and social workers show that they are forced to return to Turkey, where they arrived from their homelands with the hope of reaching Europe.

      Pırıl Erçoban, a coordinator for the Association for Solidarity with Refugees (Mülteci-Der), says pushback constitutes a serious crime. She said it was “sad and unacceptable” that three migrants died, the number of deaths illustrates a serious problem. “It sheds light on the fact that pushback is being applied. It is still a crime to send those people back, even if they can make it back to Turkey alive,” Erçoban told AA. She says pushback was also taking place on migrant sea journeys, but has stopped, although the practice has continued on land. “Both Greece and Bulgaria are involved in this practice. Our figures show some 11,000 [illegal migrants] entered Turkey from Greece and Bulgaria, though not all of them were forced; we believe a substantial portion of returns are the result of pushback,” she said, adding returns were mostly via Greece. Erçoban said taking legal action to help migrants forced to return was difficult, as they could not reach the victims. “There should be administrative and criminal sanctions, and the culprits should be found. Turkey should take steps against pushback if [Greece] adopted it as a state policy. We hear that they are being beaten with iron bars and sent back without their clothes. This is a crime,” she added.

      Every year, hundreds of thousands of migrants flee civil conflict or economic hardship in their home countries in hope of reaching Europe. Edirne is a primary migration route. Turkish Directorate General of Migration Management data reveals that most of the migrants come from Pakistan, Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan. The numbers increase in late summer and autumn before dropping in the winter months.

      Temperatures hover near minus zero degrees Celsius in Edirne and other provinces at the border, which also saw heavy rainfall last week. Migrants usually take boats on the Meriç River, while some try to swim across to the other side. Early yesterday, police stopped 17 Pakistani migrants who were walking on train tracks near the border.

      https://www.dailysabah.com/investigations/2018/12/07/fourth-migrant-found-dead-near-border-greek-pushback-suspected/amp?__twitter_impression=true
      #mourir_aux_frontières #décès #morts

    • Greece accused of migrant ’pushbacks’ at Turkey border

      Hundreds of migrants including children and families have been illegally returned from Greece to Turkey despite Greek authorities being repeatedly warned about the practice, three non-governmental organizations said Wednesday.

      Migrants being forced back over the border, in violation of international law, has become the “new normality” at the border crossing with Turkey in Greece’s northeast Evros region, the three Greek organizations said.

      The testimonies of 39 people who attempted to cross the border to Europe, collected in detention centers near the border since the spring, were published in a report by the Greek Council for Refugees, ARSIS and HumanRights360.

      In their testimonies, the migrants describe being intercepted and detained by people wearing police or military uniforms, sometimes with a hood covering their face, who then forced them onto a boat to cross the Evros River back to Turkey.

      Some migrants described being physically abused or robbed by the individuals, who mostly spoke Greek.

      The report “constitutes evidence of the practice of pushbacks being used extensively and not decreasing, regardless of the silence and denial by the responsible public bodies and authorities,” the NGOs said.

      The “particularly wide-spread practice” leaves the “state exposed and posing a threat for the rule of law in the country,” they added.

      The Greek office of the U.N. refugee agency also said it had recorded a “significant number of testimonies on informal forced returns” through the Evros border.

      “On many occasions, we have addressed those concerns to the Greek authorities requesting the investigation of incidents,” the UNHCR office said.

      “The state’s response so far to these practices has not produced the results required for an effective access to asylum.”

      Greek authorities have denied involvement in the migrant returns and have announced investigations into potential militia action, without result so far.

      The flow of migrants across the Greek-Turkish land border has almost tripled this year, according to Greece’s migration ministry, with 14,000 people intercepted so far compared to 5,400 in 2017.


      http://www.dailystar.com.lb/News/Middle-East/2018/Dec-12/471620-greece-accused-of-migrant-pushbacks-at-turkey-border.ashx

    • Greece: Violent Pushbacks at Turkey Border

      Greek law enforcement officers at the land border with Turkey in the northeastern Evros region routinely summarily return asylum seekers and migrants, Human Rights Watch said today. The officers in some cases use violence and often confiscate and destroy the migrants’ belongings.

      “People who have not committed a crime are detained, beaten, and thrown out of Greece without any consideration for their rights or safety,” said Todor Gardos, Europe researcher at Human Rights Watch. “The Greek authorities should immediately investigate the repeated allegations of illegal pushbacks.”

      Human Rights Watch interviewed 26 asylum seekers and other migrants in Greece in May, and in October and November in Turkey. They are from Afghanistan, Iraq, Morocco, Pakistan, Syria, Tunisia, and Yemen, and include families traveling with children. They described 24 incidents of pushbacks across the Evros River from Greece to Turkey.

      Most incidents took place between April and November. All of those interviewed reported hostile or violent behavior by Greek police and unidentified forces wearing uniforms and masks without recognizable insignia. Twelve said police or these unidentified forces accompanying the police stripped them of their possessions, including their money and personal identification, which were often destroyed. Seven said police or unidentified forces took their clothes or shoes and forced them back to Turkey in their underwear, sometimes at night in freezing temperatures.

      Abuse included beatings with hands and batons, kicking, and, in one case, the use of what appeared to be a stun gun. In another case, a Moroccan man said a masked man dragged him by his hair, forced him to kneel on the ground, held a knife to his throat, and subjected him to a mock execution. Others pushed back include a pregnant 19-year-old woman from Afrin, Syria, and a woman from Afghanistan who said Greek authorities took away her two young children’s shoes.

      Increasing numbers of migrants, including asylum seekers, have attempted to cross the Evros River, which forms a natural border between Greece and Turkey, since April. By the end of September, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) had registered 13,784 arrivals by land, a nearly fourfold increase over the same period last year.

      In early June, Turkey unilaterally suspended all returns under a bilateral readmission agreement, stopping coordinated returns over the land border. In a July letter to Human Rights Watch, Hellenic Police Director Georgios Kossioris acknowledged an “acute problem” related to new arrivals and migrants arrested in the region, causing the overcrowding in some facilities, and inhumane conditions in police stations and registration and identification centers Human Rights Watch had documented.

      Accounts gathered by Human Rights Watch are consistent with the findings of other nongovernmental groups, intergovernmental agencies, and media reports. UNHCR, the United Nations Refugee Agency, has raised similar concerns. In a June report, the Council of Europe’s (CoE) Committee for the Prevention of Torture said it has received “several consistent and credible allegations of pushbacks by boat from Greece to Turkey at the Evros River border by masked Greek police and border guards or (para-)military commandos.” In November, the CoE human rights commissioner called on Greece to investigate allegations, in light of information pointing to “an established practice.”

      Human Rights Watch wrote to the head of border protection of the Hellenic Police on December 6, 2018, informing them of its findings. In his reply, Police Director Kossioris categorically denied that Hellenic Police carry out forced summary returns. He said all procedures for the detention and identification of migrants entering Greece were carried out in line with relevant legislation, and that they “thoroughly investigate” any incidents of misconduct or violation of migrants’ and asylum seekers’ rights. Greek authorities have consistently denied pushback practices, including a high-ranking Greek police official in a June meeting with Human Rights Watch. For a decade, Human Rights Watch has documented systematic pushbacks by Greek law enforcement officials at its land border with Turkey.

      Greek authorities should promptly investigate in a transparent, thorough, and impartial manner repeated allegations that Greek police and border guards are involved in collective and extrajudicial expulsions at the Evros region. Authorities should investigate allegations of violence and excessive use of force. Any officer engaged in such illegal acts, as well as their commanding officers, should be subject to disciplinary sanction and, as appropriate, criminal prosecution. Anyone seeking international protection should have the opportunity to apply for asylum, and returns should follow a procedure that provides access to effective remedies and safeguards against refoulement – return to a country where they are likely to face persecution, and ill-treatment.

      The European Commission, which provides financial support to the Greek government for migration control, including in the Evros region, should urge Greece to end all summary returns of asylum seekers to Turkey, press the authorities to investigate allegations of violence, and open legal proceedings against Greece for violating European Union laws.

      “Despite government denials, it appears that Greece is intentionally, and with complete impunity, closing the door on many people who seek to reach the European Union through the Evros border,” Gardos said. “Greece should cease forced summary returns immediately and treat everyone with dignity and respect for their basic rights.”

      For detailed accounts from asylum seekers and migrants, please see below. Please note that all names have been changed.

      Human Rights Watch interviewed 26 people from Afghanistan, Iraq, Morocco, Pakistan, Syria, Tunisia, and Yemen, including seven women, two of whom were pregnant at the time they were summarily returned to Turkey across the Evros River. In seven cases, families were pushed back, including children.

      In Greece, Human Rights Watch interviewed people who managed to re-enter Greek territory following a pushback, in the Fylakio pre-removal detention center and in the Fylakio reception and identification center, as well as in the Diavata camp for asylum seekers in Thessaloniki. In Turkey, those interviewed were in the Edirne removal center and in urban locations in Istanbul.

      All names of interviewees have been changed to protect their privacy and security. Interviews were carried out privately and confidentially, in the interviewees’ first language, or a language they spoke fluently, through interpreters. Interviewees shared their accounts voluntarily, and without remuneration, and have consented to Human Rights Watch collecting and publishing their accounts.

      Pushbacks in Evros

      The 24 incidents described demonstrate a pattern that points to an established and well-coordinated practice of pushbacks. Most of the incidents share three key features: initial capture by local police patrols, detention in police stations or informal locations close to the border with Turkey, and handover from identifiable law enforcement bodies to unidentifiable paramilitaries who would carry out the pushback to Turkey across the Evros River, at times violently. In nine cases, migrants said uniformed police physically mistreated them before or during the pushback.

      The accounts suggest close and consistent coordination between police with unidentified, often masked, men who may or may not be law enforcement officers. In a May interview with Human Rights Watch, Second Lieutenant Sofia Lazopoulou at the border police station of Neo Cheimonio said that police officers wearing dark blue uniforms were in charge of services at the police station and that those who wear military camouflage uniforms were patrolling officers, in charge of prevention and deterrence of irregular migrants crossing into Greece.

      Interviewees said that people who looked like police officers or soldiers, as well as some of the unidentified masked men, carried equipment such as handguns, handcuffs, radios, spray cans, and batons, while others carried tactical gear such as armored gloves, binoculars, and knives and military grade weapons, such as rifles.

      The repeated nature of the pushbacks and the fact that those officers who conduct them were clearly on official duty, indicates that commanding officers knew, or ought to have known, what was happening.

      Ferhat G., a Syrian Kurdish man in his forties, said two police officers detained him, his wife, and three children, ages 12, 15, and 19, at an abandoned train station on September 19. They were held in a large caged area in the backyard of a police station with dozens of other people for five hours. Ferhat could not say where the train station or police station were:

      We were all put in a van, 60 to 70 people. Commandos all in black, wearing face masks, drove us back to the river. We were very afraid… I saw other people there, mainly youths with just shorts, no other clothes. Our blood froze out of fear. When they opened the van, we started going out. “Stand in one line, one-by-one,” they said and hit someone. Ten by 10, they put us in a small boat, driven by a Greek soldier. I cried because of the humiliation.

      The modus operandi was largely replicated, with some variations, in the other cases Human Rights Watch documented.

      Capture

      Twenty-one of those interviewed said local police patrols detained them in towns and villages near the border or in open farmland. Two said that the police took them off a bus or a train shortly after its departure. Three said they could not identify the men who detained them and took them directly back to the border. People said they were then transported in police cars, pick-up trucks, white vans without windows or signs, or larger trucks painted in green or camouflage that appeared to be military trucks.

      Karim L., 25, from Morocco, said that police officers removed him from a train to Alexandropouli on November 8. Shortly after its scheduled departure from Orestiada, at 12:37 p.m., police officers began asking passengers who looked foreign to show their passports and took Karim and five or six others off the train. The police took him to a nearby police station and kept him there for two nights. Then four men wearing police uniforms and black masks took him to the border in a van. He said they subjected him to physical violence and a mock execution, then pushed him back to Turkey. He was not photographed, fingerprinted, or given any paper to read or sign, or otherwise informed of the reasons for his arrest. He said that other people, including families with children, were also detained in the station’s three cells.

      Mahsa N., an Afghan woman, said uniformed police officers removed her, her husband, their three children, ages 5, 9, and 11, and two unrelated Afghan men from a bus 15 minutes after it left Alexandropouli in mid-September, during their third attempt to enter Greece. They were pushed back to Turkey the same day, with the police who had detained them taking them all the way to the Evros River, where others were already being held so they could be returned on a boat.

      Dila E., a 25-year-old Syrian woman, described her experience shortly after crossing the Evros River in late April. She said she was with seven other people, including four children, when masked men she could not identify pushed them back to Turkey as they were walking in a small town near the border:

      They came with a car and took us. They put us in a white van. You couldn’t see anything from the inside. They took us directly to the river and made us cross the river with a rubber boat. They took everyone’s mobile phones, set of clothes, and even the money from some.

      Malik N., a 26-year-old Moroccan man, said uniformed police stopped him along with three other men on November 13 near a gas station in Didymoteicho, a town two kilometers from the border. He said that one of the policemen made a phone call, and a white van arrived 15 minutes later. Two men he could not identify took him and two of his group to a location that he described as barracks: “They put us in the car, which was very well made, dark inside, and without seats. There were no signs on it. … There was a terrible smell [in the barracks], and officials had their masks on… There were 30 people there.”

      Masked men took him to the border the next evening:

      After the masked people came, they started to shout at us, and hit us one by one with batons at the door. There were around eight people outside the barracks, each with a thick plastic baton. They would hit you as you walked to the car. They would shout “Fuck Islam.” They put 30 of us in the van. [There were] no chairs. I felt like I was suffocating, there was no air. When we arrived at the river, they ordered people to strip to shorts only. They took my phones, my money, €1,500, and my glasses, and broke them.

      Sardar T., 18, from Afghanistan, said that uniformed police caught him and the group of people he was traveling with at the Didymoteicho bus station on April 23. He said the police came with a white van but later brought a big car, similar to a military truck with green camouflage. Human Rights Watch researchers saw a vehicle matching Sardar’s description parked in the yard of the border police station of Neo Cheimonio, as well as numerous white vans, without police signs. Sardar said that the officers who pushed them back to Turkey were wearing police uniforms and that masks concealed their faces except for their eyes.

      Detention

      Thirteen of those interviewed reported that they were detained in formal and informal locations close to the border, for periods ranging from a few hours to five days. Five said they were taken to a police station, while eight described buildings on the outskirts of nearby villages and towns, or on farmland that they said were used as drop-off points for detained migrants. None of the interviewees, even those held at police stations, were duly identified and registered, and their detention appears to have been arbitrary and incommunicado.

      A few dozen to one hundred people were detained at a time, without food, water, and sanitation, and then taken to the Evros River and returned to Turkey. Interviewees described the rooms in the unidentified buildings as “prison-like” and “like a storage room,” with a few mattresses and a single, filthy toilet. They said women and families with children were either held together with unrelated men, or sometimes in adjacent rooms.

      Mahsa, the Afghan woman who was summarily returned to Turkey three times, said she and her family were kept for five days, along with unrelated men who were also detained, in a dark room with no beds or heat before the second pushback, in late August. They were not given any food. Their belongings, including winter coats for her young children, and a cherished backpack and doll, were never returned. Up to 10 guards, wearing belts with what appeared to be handguns, batons, and pepper spray, would check on people and lock the door but not provide any information. She saw guards beating men staying in the same room: “They had a blue uniform with writing on it in Greek on the back, with big letters. They called us dirt.”

      Azadeh B., a 22-year-old Afghan woman traveling with her husband and two children, ages 2 and 4, said they were pushed back twice from Greece – and had spent five days in detention before being returned the second time, in early October. She said they were taken to a room in a structure located in the middle of farmland:

      We could not see or hear anything. We were not asked to sign anything or told anything. The guards closed the door and locked it. When families asked for water, they filled dirty bottles and threw them inside the room through the door. They took everything from us, even the Quran. We asked them to give back our kids’ shoes, but they didn’t. They do this because they don’t want us to come back. If it’s something of value, they keep it, something they don’t like, they put it in the bin.

      She said only the children were given some biscuits while detained in a room that was about 40 square meters and shared by about 80 people whom she believed were also all migrants.

      Hassan I., a Tunisian man in his thirties, said that before being violently pushed back along with four friends in early August, they spent a day in detention. He said the location resembled a military base because they saw military vehicles, including trucks and tanks, parked near the room in which they were held. It was a 15-minute drive from the town of Orestiada, where they had been stopped and picked up in the morning by two police officers in blue uniforms in a civilian car.

      The policemen drove them to the location, where guards violently pushed them against a wall, searched them, and hit them. “First, they asked for phones, then for money,” Hassan said. They were shouting ‘malaka’ [a Greek insult meaning ‘asshole’]. I was shocked. I felt humiliated. When we tried to ask for anything, like our sim cards, memory cards, they hit us immediately.” Hassan and his friends were put in a room that looked like a storage room. In an adjacent room, they could hear the voices of families with children. Hassan estimated that by 9 p.m., when they were taken to the border in trucks, about 80 men were in his room of about 24 square meters, in which there were only a few chairs, a toilet, and a water tap.

      Zara Z., 19 and four-months pregnant, from Afrin, Syria, said that in mid-May, men wearing camouflage uniforms stopped her and her husband and detained them overnight in a room without bedding or furniture, together with other migrant families, and without any food or water. The next day they were transferred in a van to the Evros River, put on a boat, and pushed back to Turkey.

      Pushbacks across the Evros River

      All those interviewed said they were transported to the border with Turkey in groups of 60 to 80, in military trucks or unmarked vans. In all but three cases, the agents wore face masks, black pants, or camouflage, making it impossible to recognize or identify them. In the three other cases, interviewees said police in regular blue and camouflage uniforms transported them to the river. Ten out of 26 interviewees said they were physically abused or witnessed others being ill-treated during the pushback operation.

      Karim, a 25-year-old Moroccan man, said Greek police handed him over to masked men wearing police uniforms after they caught him in Greece on November 10 and that he was violently pushed back to Turkey. After ordering him to take off his clothes and shoes, two of the masked officers kicked him to the ground and hit him with a baton, then one of them subjected him to a mock execution. They dragged him by his hair and forced him to kneel on the ground, while the masked officer held a knife to his throat and said in broken English, “Whoever returns to Greece, they will die.” Karim said he could not sleep at night and was experiencing recurrent nightmares.

      Hassan, the Tunisian who was pushed back with his four friends on August 10 or 11, said that masked men wearing black clothes ill-treated them after taking them to the border in a truck. One of the men used a stun gun on Hassan’s lower back, causing burns that were still visible over two months later. He provided video footage of the group’s injuries, which he said was recorded the day after the incident and was first posted on social media on August 12, showing several bruises he said resulted from blows to their upper and lower backs and limbs. “Next time I will see you,” one of the masked men told him in English, “I will kill you.” At the time of the interview, Hassan had been sleeping in parks in Istanbul, after all his belongings were confiscated in Greece.

      Amir B., a Tunisian man in his twenties, was pushed back to Turkey at the end of September after entering Greece and hiding for six days. He said he was returned from near Alexandropouli to the border in one of two military trucks, which together took around 80 people to the border, including about 30 women and a few children. Amir said masked men pushed people around as they got off the trucks, and then pushed them toward the river, ordering them to remain silent. The agents then split the group into smaller groups of 10 and ordered them to take off their shoes. Women had to give up their coats, while some men had to strip to underwear. Amir’s jeans, where he also kept his money, were set on fire. When a black pick-up truck arrived with a small boat, the guards checked the other side of the river with binoculars, and then used the small boat to take the groups of 10 in turn across the water.

      https://www.hrw.org/news/2018/12/18/greece-violent-pushbacks-turkey-border

      #vidéo:
      Greek Authorities Beat, Push Back Migrants into Turkey
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2olpuc_tqA

    • El oscuro secreto de la frontera oriental de Europa

      Grecia deporta ilegalmente a los refugiados que llegan a su territorio, en algunos casos incluso secuestrándolos lejos de la frontera, según denuncian ONG y Acnur.

      Firas debería estar en Grecia. Es más, oficialmente, según los registros del Gobierno heleno y del Alto Comisionado de Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados (ACNUR), reside en Grecia. Pero no. Este sirio, de 17 años, malvive amedrentado, sin dinero y sin papeles en un pequeño apartamento de Estambul que comparte con otros refugiados, después de haber sido deportado ilegalmente por la policía griega a Turquía en tres ocasiones. Una práctica prohibida por las leyes internacionales, pero que, según las organizaciones de derechos humanos, se está convirtiendo en “sistemática” a medida que la ruta migratoria de entrada a la Unión Europea se desvía hacia la frontera del río Evros. Acnur ha recabado unos 300 casos de devoluciones en caliente de personas que intentan llegar a la UE desde Turquía solo en 2018.

      “En los últimos años hemos recabado un número significante de casos de pushback [término en inglés para referirse a esta práctica ilegal]”, explica Margaritis Petritzikis, representante de Acnur en el campo de detención de Fylakio, en Grecia, junto al Evros. “Los testimonios describen a quienes practican las detenciones vistiendo uniformes de diferentes colores, muchas veces sin distintivos, y con la cara cubierta, por lo que no sabemos a qué cuerpo pertenecen. La jurisdicción del control fronterizo es de la policía griega, pero el área que rodea el río es zona militarizada”, añade Petritzikis.

      Los detenidos aseguran que, una vez detenidos y antes de ser devueltos en barcas al otro lado de la frontera, son llevados a almacenes, instalaciones militares o comisarías de policía, transportados con furgonetas sin identificar, supuestamente de las fuerzas de seguridad, según los testimonios recogidos en informes de diversas ONG, entre ellas Human Rights Watch y el Greek Council for Refugees (GCR).

      El Evros, también llamado Maritsa, hace de barrera natural a lo largo de 194 de los 206 kilómetros de frontera terrestre entre Turquía y Grecia; el resto lo cubre una valla levantada en 2012. Para aquellos migrantes y refugiados que, desde suelo turco, sueñan con alcanzar territorio europeo, son apenas 100 o 200 metros que cubrir en un bote hinchable, un trayecto mucho más corto que el que separa la costa turca de las islas griegas del mar Egeo. Además, aquí no está vigente el acuerdo firmado entre la UE y Turquía en 2016, que permite la devolución de aquellos migrantes llegados de manera irregular por vía marítima. En la zona del Evros regía otro acuerdo bilateral de devolución firmado entre Turquía y Grecia, aunque Ankara lo canceló el pasado año. Por ello, en los últimos años, se ha incrementado el número de llegadas a través de esta ruta (en 2018 fueron 18.014, un 35% del total de refugiados y migrantes que arribaron a Grecia, según los datos de Acnur). La mayor parte de los que llegan son sirios, afganos y turcos.

      Sus aguas aparentemente tranquilas son un espejismo engañoso. Es un río caudaloso, de habituales inundaciones y fuertes corrientes: durante el pasado año, medio centenar de personas murieron en esta ruta, la mayoría ahogadas o por hipotermia. “El río es pequeño, pero peligroso. Sobre todo porque los botes son para cinco personas y cruzamos 30 a la vez”, explica un joven bangladesí detenido en el campo de Fylakio.

      Un residente de Edirne, en la orilla turca del río, explica que las tarifas que exigen los traficantes por pasar al otro lado van de 1.000 a 5.000 euros. Aquellos que pagan más “reciben un servicio vip”, y en la orilla griega les esperan otros traficantes que los llevan en coche hasta Salónica o Atenas: “A estos no los suele detener nunca la policía”. A los que no disponen de ese dinero, después de superar el peligro de las aguas les aguarda una nueva barrera.
      Práctica ilegal

      Dos y media de la madrugada. Se escuchan pasos entre la maleza, en la zona boscosa que rodea el Evros. Hay cuchicheos. Los pasos se detienen al escuchar el vehículo en el que viaja este periodista. Poco después, se alejan.

      Anteriormente, en cuanto veían a cualquier persona en la orilla griega, los refugiados se identificaban como tales y pedían que se avisase a la policía. Sabían que habían llegado a territorio seguro. Ya no. Entre los refugiados es sabido que, si son apresados en esta zona, corren el riesgo de ser devueltos al otro lado. Las devoluciones en caliente están prohibidas por la ley: la normativa exige que sean primero identificados y, si es el caso, se les permita presentar una petición de asilo. Firas (que no es su nombre real) cuenta que pasó por ello dos veces durante el año pasado. En la primera ocasión, durante el verano, explica que fue detenido nada más cruzar el río, llevado a una comisaría y devuelto a Turquía al cabo de unas seis horas. “En la comisaría nos pegaron a todos los hombres, nos quitaron nuestras pertenencias y destrozaron los móviles”, asegura.

      La segunda fue aún peor: una vez capturados, Firas explica que los agentes de policía llamaron a otros agentes con uniforme militar y la cara cubierta y les propinaron una paliza. Esta vez les quitaron hasta la ropa y los devolvieron a Turquía en calzoncillos. Su historia es similar a las decenas de testimonios recabados por diferentes ONG, que consideran que puede haber un patrón de actuación de las fuerzas de seguridad helenas.

      En algunos casos no se trata ni siquiera de devoluciones «en caliente», es decir, al ser detenidos en el borde mismo de la frontera, sino desde bastante más adentro en el territorio griego y pasado bastante tiempo desde que los refugiados entraron al país. A. A., un sirio que residía en Alemania de manera legal, llegó en agosto de 2017 a la ciudad griega de Alejandrópolis para encontrarse con su mujer, que había cruzado recientemente la frontera. Pero, según manifestó al GCR, fue detenido por agentes de la policía que, haciendo caso omiso a sus documentos, lo encapucharon y lo enviaron a Turquía en un bote junto a otros refugiados.

      Similar es el caso de Firas. La tercera vez que intentó cruzar a Grecia, a mediados de noviembre, explica que lo logró. Y fue enviado al centro de detención de Fylakio. A inicios de enero, salió de él con los documentos que lo acreditaban como solicitante de asilo. Tomó un autobús hacia Salónica, pero cuenta que, cuando llevaba 15 minutos de viaje, la policía le ordenó bajar junto a otros cinco sirios. “Tenía los papeles de la policía griega y de Acnur, pero los destrozaron delante de mí”, relata. “Nos llevaron a un calabozo y agentes con pasamontañas nos desnudaron y nos pegaron. No nos dieron agua ni comida. El segundo día, vinieron otros agentes y nos pegaron con tubos de cañería. Luego nos llevaron al río junto a varias familias con niños y nos devolvieron a Turquía”.

      La respuesta del Gobierno griego es siempre la misma: “No existen estas prácticas”. Así lo han dicho públicamente los ministerios de Orden Público y Migraciones ante las quejas formales de ACNUR y el Consejo de Europa. La comandancia regional en Tracia de la policía griega, preguntada por la situación, redirigió a este periodista al comisario de Orestíada, Pascalis Siritudis, quien respondió al teléfono —un día después de haberse negado a recibirlo— con gran enfado: "La policía griega respeta siempre la ley y las normas internacionales. No olvide que esta es la frontera de la Unión Europea, no solo de Grecia”. Desde el Ministerio de Orden Público, la contestación fue similar: «La policía griega cumple con los derechos humanos».

      Hay varias investigaciones en marcha. Una, sobre la devolución de varios turcos en mayo de 2017, ha alcanzado el Tribunal Supremo de Grecia. También el Defensor del Pueblo y la Fiscalía de Orestíada han iniciado un proceso judicial tras la denuncia de un ciudadano sudanés deportado ilegalmente a Turquía. Pero, hasta ahora, nadie ha sido condenado. Dimitris Koros, abogado del GCR, admite que es difícil armar estos casos: “La mayoría de los refugiados devueltos no tienen tiempo ni medios para iniciar un proceso judicial y, además, es casi imposible identificar a quienes participan en las devoluciones ya que van con la cara cubierta y sin identificaciones, y se suelen producir de noche”.

      Entretanto Firas continúa en Estambul, temeroso de que un día lo detengan las autoridades turcas y lo deporten a la misma Siria de la que escapó huyendo de la guerra. Y se sigue preguntando por qué lo echaron de Grecia si tenía derecho a quedarse. “Me sorprendió mucho el nivel de brutalidad que emplearon conmigo. Siempre habíamos escuchado que la Unión Europea era un lugar donde no había violencia y se respetaban los derechos humanos”, se queja.

      https://elpais.com/internacional/2019/03/03/actualidad/1551607634_105978.html

    • Turkish computer science student missing in Evros following failed attempt to escape to Greece

      21-year-old university student #Mahir_Mete_Kul has been missing since the boat he used to cross Evros river between Greece and Turkey capsized on March 24.

      A computer science student at Istanbul’s Beykent University, Kul spent 10 months in prison on charges of membership to the leftist group, Liseli Dev-Genc, and was released 5 months ago with judicial control, media reported. As the court in charge put an overseas travel ban on his passport, Kul embarked on the risky journey to escape Turkey the same way thousands of others have tried over the past two years: crossing the Evros river along Turkey-Greece border in a bid to seek asylum abroad.

      “My son was a pretty young university student. They sent him up to prison. Following his release, they prevented him from going back to the school. As he had a travel ban on his passport, he chose this way [to escape],” Mahir’s mother Araz Kul spoke to Gazete Karinca. Five months ago, the mother left Turkey to Greece due to political reasons too, media said.

      Thousands of people have fled Turkey due to a massive witch-hunt launched by the Justice and Development Party (AK Party) government against all kinds of opposition.

      More than 510,000 people have been detained and some 100,000 including academics, judges, doctors, teachers, lawyers, students, policemen and many from different backgrounds have been put in pre-trial detention since last summer.

      Many tried to escape Turkey via illegal ways as the government cancelled their passports like thousands of others.


      https://turkeypurge.com/turkish-computer-science-student-missing-in-evros-following-failed-atte
      #mourir_aux_frontières #morts #décès #mourir_dans_l'Evros

      L’appel de la mère :
      https://twitter.com/TurkeyPurge/status/1110989355445678080
      https://twitter.com/TurkeyPurge/status/1110990512381530113

      #réfugiés_turcs

    • À la frontière gréco-turque. Empêcher les migrants d’entrer en Europe, sauver ceux qui y parviennent

      Je copie-colle ici la partie dédiée à la région de l’Evros :

      L’Evros, région délaissée par les garde-frontières

      La gare de Marasia semble aussi abandonnée que le village éponyme. Derrière un panneau jaune et rouge signalant le passage de trains à vapeurs, un cours d’eau ruisselle dans le calme. L’Evros, large d’une dizaine de mètres à peine à cet endroit, est la plus longue rivière des Balkans, prenant sa source en Bulgarie pour se jeter dans la mer Égée, près d’Alexandroupoli. Depuis l’accord entre l’Union européenne et la Turquie et la fermeture de la route des Balkans, la pression migratoire sur la Grèce, qui se concentrait ces dernières années sur les îles en mer Égée, se déporte vers l’Evros, frontière naturelle entre la Grèce et la Turquie. “Aujourd’hui, le problème n’est plus à la barrière mais dans la rivière”, atteste Paschalis Siritoudis, le directeur de la police du département d’Orestiada.

      Un effet de vases communicants

      Cette affluence ne l’inquiète pas plus que ça. “De plus en plus de migrants arrivent ces dernières années mais c’est un vieux problème auquel la région est confrontée depuis une vingtaine d’années. Avant la construction de la barrière avec la Turquie (celle-ci longe la frontière sur 12 kilomètres dans une zone militarisée, NdlR), 30 000 migrants passaient chaque année. En 2012, nous avons lancé une opération de surveillance à la frontière, du personnel a été recruté. Les années suivantes, ce nombre est tombé entre 1 000 et 3 000 personnes. En 2018, environ 7 000 ont franchi la frontière. Ces chiffres, même s’ils sont moindres, montrent qu’il y a toujours un problème migratoire ici. Mais le flux est sous contrôle, il n’y a aucune comparaison possible avec la situation avant 2012”, martèle le colonel, d’une voix tonitruante.

      Les chiffres du Haut-Commissariat des Nations unies (UNHCR) vont bien au-delà de ceux du directorat de police : en 2018, 18 014 personnes sont entrées en Grèce via l’Evros. Presque trois fois plus de personnes (dont une majorité de ressortissants turcs) que l’année précédente.

      Dès qu’une porte se ferme dans la région d’Evros, une fenêtre s’ouvre ailleurs. Et vice-versa. Quand, en juillet 2012, l’opération Aspida (“bouclier” en grec) est lancée, le nombre d’entrées à la frontière gréco-turque chute de manière vertigineuse. La première semaine du mois d’août, 2 000 migrants y sont appréhendés. Quelques mois plus tard, en octobre, moins de 10 personnes sont arrêtées par semaine.

      Les autorités compétentes et Frontex se félicitent du succès de cette opération. Les réjouissances sont cependant de courte durée : face au renforcement des contrôles à la frontière terrestre, les départs en mer se multiplient. “Immédiatement après le déploiement de l’opération Aspida, le nombre de détections de traversées illégales a augmenté, à la fois à la frontière maritime entre la Grèce et la Turquie et à la frontière terrestre avec la Bulgarie”, reconnaît Frontex dans son rapport annuel 2012, d’où sont issus les chiffres précités.

      Sur les 206 km de frontière fluviale entre la Grèce et la Turquie, seuls 12,5 kms sont terrestres et forment ce qu’on appelle le triangle de Karaağaç. C’est sur ce territoire qu’est érigée la barrière. (en rouge sur la carte)

      “Les barrières et les murs sont des solutions court-termistes à des mesures qui ne règlent pas le problème. L’Union européenne ne finane et ne financera pas cette barrière. Ça ne sert à rien.”
      Cecilia Malmström, ex-Commissaire européenne aux Affaires intérieures, février 2011.

      “Le problème n’est plus à la barrière mais dans la rivière” Paschalis Siritoudis, directeur de la police du département d’Orestiada

      Sept ans plus tard, l’opération Aspida est toujours en cours et semble faire la fierté de Paschalis Siritoudis. “Elle est connue dans toute la Grèce, dans toute l’Europe même ! Elle est effectuée avec le support de Frontex”, se félicite-t-il.

      Les officiers de Frontex déployés près d’Orestiada en 2010 (surtout pour identifier les migrants) pour prêter main forte aux Grecs sont partis. Aujourd’hui, l’agence européenne n’est que peu impliquée dans la région : quelques agents travaillent aux check-points et patrouillent avec des policiers et des militaires le long de la barrière de barbelés. “Nous avons parlé avec les autorités grecques pour augmenter notre présence mais la décision leur revient. Nous sommes prêts à intervenir s’ils en ressentent le besoin”, explique Eva Moncure, porte-parole de l’agence.

      À entendre Paschalis Siritoudis, ce n’est pas le cas. “Les officiers grecs qui effectuent l’enregistrement des migrants irréguliers, prennent leurs empreintes digitales et font le débriefing sont plus expérimentés que quiconque en Europe. Ils ont eu affaire à des dizaines de milliers de migrants et leur expertise est reconnue par tous”, s’exclame-t-il, assis derrière son bureau dans le commissariat d’Orestiada.

      De son côté, Frontex fait grand cas de ses compétences. “L’agence mutualise les ressources et fait appel aux États membres pour lui fournir du personnel. Il y a donc un turn-over important dans toutes les missions. Au fil des ans, nous avons toutefois développé une expertise, notamment au niveau de l’examen des documents. Avec quel genre de papiers voyagent les migrants ? Sont-ils faux ? Sont-ils vrais ? Où ont-ils été fabriqués ?”, explique Eva Moncure.

      Soumise à la bonne volonté des États membres, Frontex insiste pour pouvoir déployer ses guest officers. Ne serait-ce que pour partager les informations recueillies aux frontières avec une floppée d’institutions. Du point de vue de l’agence, plus celles-ci circulent, mieux les frontières sont protégées. Ainsi, depuis 2016, date du dernier élargissement du mandat de l’agence, Frontex est habilitée à mener des interviews sur le trafic d’êtres humains et à partager les informations récoltées avec Europol. “Nous n’enquêtons pas. Nous ne faisons que récolter des informations et les transmettons à qui de droit. Comme nous sommes en première ligne, nous pouvons obtenir ces informations plus aisément”, indique Eva Moncure. “Quand on parle de Frontex, tout le monde parle toujours des migrants mais personne ne parle des trafiquants d’êtres humains. Pour résumer, notre boulot est de surveiller les frontières, de venir en aide aux migrants s’ils sont en danger et de les renvoyer dans leur pays s’ils n’ont pas le droit d’asile en Europe. Un autre volet important, c’est de recueillir des informations sur les passeurs, les routes qu’ils utilisent, les connexions qu’ils ont, etc. Il ne faut pas oublier que les personnes qui font monter les migrants dans des bateaux ou qui leur font traverser une rivière ne sont pas des enfants de chœur. Le trafic d’êtres humains rapporte énormément d’argent, bien plus que le trafic de drogues. Le problème, c’est que pour l’instant, la justice arrête les petites mains pendant que les chefs des réseaux se la coulent douce à Dubaï en comptant leurs billets”, poursuit-elle.

      Pour rappel, les officiers ont un pouvoir exécutif lorsqu’ils sont impliqués dans l’enregistrement des migrants : prise d’empreintes digitales, screening (pour établir nationalité des migrants) et vérification des documents d’identité. En outre, ils ne peuvent délivrer de décisions relatives à l’asile puisqu’il s’agit d’un pouvoir régalien.

      Renvoyés en Turquie sur des bateaux

      Dans la région d’Evros, contrairement aux îles grecques, les agents de Frontex ne sont pas en contact avec les migrants et donc pas habilités à collecter des informations sur le trafic d’êtres humains. Laissé entre les mains des autorités grecques, l’enregistrement (et partant, le screening et l’interview) des migrants qui parviennent à entrer dans l’espace Schengen n’y semble pas garanti.

      À ce sujet, deux rapports, publiés en décembre 2018 - l’un par Humans Rights Watch et l’autre par le Greek Council for Refugees (GCR), Human Rights 360 et l’Association for the Social Support of Youth - sont glaçants. Confiscation de biens (“ils jettent nos téléphones dans la rivière”, “ils ont confisqué le lait artificiel pour notre bébé”, “il a déchiré mon certificat de naissance devant moi”) et de vêtements, privation de nourriture et parfois d’eau, fouilles corporelles, violences physiques et verbales… Comble du comble : les migrants seraient reconduits de l’autre côté de la rivière Evros dans des embarcations pneumatiques.

      Ces documents font état d’une pratique courante près de la rivière : le push-back, c’est-à-dire le refoulement des personnes qui franchissent la frontière. Ces expulsions collectives (et illégales) obéissent à un modus operandi bien rôdé, à lire les nombreux témoignages récoltés par ces ONG. “La plupart des incidents partagent trois caractéristiques principales : arrestation par une patrouille de police locale, détention dans des commissariats ou des emplacements informels (entrepôts, gares abandonnées, etc.) proches de la frontière avec la Turquie et remise des migrants par les forces de l’ordre à du personnel non-identifié (dont le visage serait le plus souvent caché par une cagoule, NdlR) qui procède au push-back via la rivière Evros, parfois de manière violente”, décrit Human Rights Watch. Certaines personnes interrogées ont subi plusieurs push-backs avant d’être finalement enregistrées selon la procédure légale.

      Les migrants ne sont pas photographiés, leurs empreintes digitales ne sont pas prises et les raisons de leur arrestation ne leur sont pas expliquées. Sans enregistrement, leur présence dans l’espace Schengen n’est pas attestée et il est donc impossible d’introduire une demande d’asile. Il est en revanche possible d’assurer qu’ils n’ont jamais un pied sur le sol européen.

      Ces allégations sont remontées jusqu’au Commissaire aux droits de l’homme du Conseil de l’Europe et au Comité européen pour la prévention de la torture qui les ont jugées crédibles. Après une visite en Grèce en avril 2018, le Commissaire a par ailleurs souligné l’absence d’enquêtes sur ce genre de pratiques de la part des autorités grecques.

      Des bateaux et des chaussures d’enfants

      À Marasia, derrière le panneau jaune et rouge signalant le passage de trains à vapeur, un chemin de terre longe une forêt, qui borde l’Evros. Avec l’arrivée du printemps, des fleurs jaunes tapissent ses berges.

      Il ne faut pas marcher bien loin pour découvrir les traces d’un spectacle qui suscite malaise et interrogations. À cent mètres de la gare, une paire de rames a été abandonnée.

      Un peu plus loin, au bord de l’eau, un bateau gris et bleu est recouvert de feuilles mortes. L’inscription “Excursion 5” est écrite dessus en lettres capitales. Cinquante mètres après, un autre bateau jaune et vert se confond avec la couleur des fleurs.

      De retour sur le chemin de terre, des taches de couleur attirent le regard. Ce sont des chaussures. En daim, celles d’un adulte, à côté d’un soutien-gorge et d’un jeans délavé. À côté, deux paires de basket appartiennent à des enfants. Les plus petites, bleues, sont une pointure 26. Leur ancien propriétaire doit avoir entre trois et cinq ans. Que lui est-il arrivé ? A-t-il été reconduit en Turquie ? Ses compagnons de route ont-ils été interrogés sur le trafic d’êtres humains dont ils ont été victimes ?

      Confronté aux accusations de push-backs menés dans la région, le chef de la police élude d’abord la question et jure que les migrants interceptés sont pris en charge. Avant de finir par admettre que “nous avons reçu des informations sur les push-backs de la part des ONG”.

      Pas suffisamment pour enquêter, comme recommandé par le Commissaire européen aux droits de l’homme et le Comité européen pour la prévention de la torture.

      https://dossiers.lalibre.be/greco-turque/login.php

    • Οργανωμένο σχέδιο ανομίας στον Έβρο καταγγέλλει η « Καμπάνια για το Άσυλο »

      Την κατεπείγουσα διερεύνηση των συνεχιζόμενων καταγγελιών για τις άτυπες επιχειρήσεις επαναπροώθησης προσφύγων στον Έβρο και τον έλεγχο των εμπλεκομένων ζητούν από τους υπουργούς Προστασίας του Πολίτη, Όλγα Γεροβασίλη, Μεταναστευτικής Πολιτικής, Δημήτρη Βίτσα, και Δικαιοσύνης, Μιχάλη Καλογήρου, δέκα οργανώσεις που συμμετέχουν στην « Καμπάνια για το Άσυλο ».

      Σημειώνουν ότι οι υπουργοί είναι υπόλογοι για κάθε καθυστέρηση, η οποία εντείνει την πεποίθηση ότι τα σύνορα στον Έβρο αποτελούν ένα πεδίο εκτός δικαίου και εκτός νόμου και έναν τόπο μαρτυρίου για τους πρόσφυγες.

      Υπογραμμίζουν ότι ο συστηματικός τρόπος και οι ομοιότητες της κακομεταχείρισης παραπέμπουν σε οργανωμένο σχέδιο αποτροπής, στο πλαίσιο του οποίου αναπτύσσονται γενικευμένες πρακτικές, οι οποίες έγιναν πιο εκτεταμένες, συστηματικές και σκληρές μετά την υπογραφή της ευρωτουρκικής συμφωνίας το Μάρτιο του 2016. Και αναφέρουν ότι οι πρακτικές αυτές εμπίπτουν στην αρμοδιότητα της ποινικής δικαιοσύνης και στοιχειοθετούν κατά περίπτωση κακουργήματα (βασανισμός, ληστεία, έκθεση ζωής σε κίνδυνο...).

      Οι οργανώσεις (ΑΡΣΙΣ, Δίκτυο Κοινωνικής Υποστήριξης Προσφύγων και Μεταναστών, ΕΠΣΕ, Ελληνικό Φόρουμ Προσφύγων, Κίνηση για τα Ανθρώπινα Δικαιώματα – Αλληλεγγύη στους Πρόσφυγες Σάμος, Κόσμος χωρίς Πολέμους και Βία, ΛΑΘΡΑ, PRAKSIS, Πρωτοβουλία για τα Δικαιώματα των Κρατουμένων, Υποστήριξη Προσφύγων στο Αιγαίο) κάνουν λόγο για επιδεικτική βαρβαρότητα ένστολων ή μη στην περιοχή και παράνομες ενέργειες οι οποίες αποτελούν αντικείμενο συγκεκριμένων οδηγιών και εντολών. Σημειώνουν ότι το οργανωμένο σχέδιο περιλαμβάνει επίσης τη συγκάλυψη και νομιμοποίηση των εγκληματικών μεθόδων που χρησιμοποιούνται.

      Ολόκληρη η ανακοίνωση της « Καμπάνιας για το Άσυλο » έχει ως εξής :

      Απαξίωση της ανθρώπινης ζωής και της νομιμότητας οι επαναπροωθήσεις στον Έβρο

      Αθήνα, 2 Μαΐου 2019

      Τα σύνορα της χώρας στον Έβρο τείνουν να καταστούν ένας εκτός δικαίου και εκτός νόμου τόπος μαρτυρίου για τους πρόσφυγες που επιχειρούν απελπισμένα να περάσουν στο ευρωπαϊκό έδαφος, στιγματίζοντας τη χώρα μας και τους υπευθύνους για τη διαχείρισή τους.

      Ενώ παρακολουθούμε τους αυξανόμενους πνιγμούς στα σύνορα, οι καταγγελίες προσφύγων για βάρβαρες πρακτικές επαναπροώθησης συνεχίζονται. Εκτός από τον αποτροπιασμό που προκαλούν, δείχνουν επίσης ότι η άσκηση βίας και οι συστηματικές παραβιάσεις δεν αποτελούν μεμονωμένες ατομικές επιλογές, αλλά γενικευμένες πρακτικές που αναπτύσσονται στα πλαίσια ενός σχεδίου αποτροπής και προσπάθειας ενίσχυσης του « μηνύματος » αποθάρρυνσης, που « πρέπει να σταλεί » για την ανάσχεση των προσφυγικών ρευμάτων.

      Όσα εκτενώς καταγράφονται στην κοινή έκθεση του Ελληνικού Συμβούλιου για τους Πρόσφυγες, της ΑΡΣΙΣ και της HumanRights360, που δημοσιεύτηκε πρόσφατα (1), δεν αφήνουν αμφιβολία για την αλήθεια των καταγγελλόμενων. Ο συστηματικός τρόπος και οι ομοιότητες της κακομεταχείρισης παραπέμπουν σε ένα οργανωμένο σχέδιο, η εφαρμογή του οποίου επιτρέπει -αν δεν προτρέπει- παράνομες συμπεριφορές. Οι περίπολοι ενόπλων με ή χωρίς αστυνομικές και στρατιωτικές στολές, μάσκες ή κουκούλες, που μιλούν εκτός από τα ελληνικά και άλλη ευρωπαϊκή γλώσσα (συχνά αναφερόμενη η γερμανική), που δρουν με επιδεικτική βαρβαρότητα ακόμα και μπροστά σε μικρά παιδιά και οικογένειες, βία και κακοποιήσεις, αφαίρεση προσωπικών ειδών και χρημάτων, ρούχων κατά περίπτωση και συχνά υποδημάτων, αφαίρεση ή καταστροφή κινητών τηλεφώνων (για να μην καταγράφεται η παράνομη δράση), μεταφορά σε εγκαταλειμμένες αποθήκες που χρησιμεύουν ως άτυπα κρατητήρια χωρίς τροφή και νερό και χρήση φουσκωτών για την επαναπροώθηση στην Τουρκία, παραπέμπουν σε εκτέλεση συγκεκριμένων οδηγιών και εντολών, που εφαρμόζονται επιλεκτικά σε εφαρμογή προαποφασισμένου σχεδίου, που περιλαμβάνει και τη συγκάλυψη -και κατά συνέπεια νομιμοποίηση- των εγκληματικών μεθόδων που χρησιμοποιούνται κατ’ αυτές.

      Η Καμπάνια για την Πρόσβαση στο Άσυλο καταγγέλλει για ακόμα μια φορά την εφαρμογή των πρακτικών άτυπης επαναπροώθησης που έχουν επεκταθεί και καταστεί σκληρότερες και συστηματικότερες μετά την Κοινή Δήλωση αρχηγών κρατών και κυβερνήσεων ΕΕ-Τουρκίας της 18ης Μαρτίου 2016 και επισημαίνει ότι δεν αποτελούν μόνο σοβαρή παραβίαση των διεθνών υποχρεώσεων της χώρας, αλλά εμπίπτουν στην αρμοδιότητα της ποινικής δικαιοσύνης και στοιχειοθετούν κατά περίπτωση κακουργήματα (βασανισμοί, ληστείες, έκθεση σε κίνδυνο ζωής κ.ά.)

      Ζητάμε να δοθούν απαντήσεις από τις αρχές :

      Ποια σώματα ενεργούν στα σύνορα για την αποτροπή παράτυπων εισόδων.
      Υπάρχει πλαίσιο συγκεκριμένων εντολών για την περίπτωση εντοπισμού, σύλληψης και μεταχείρισης των παράτυπα εισερχόμενων και έλεγχος για τον τρόπο εφαρμογής του από τις περιπόλους ;
      Υπάρχει υποχρέωση καταγραφής των περιπόλων που ενεργούν κατά μήκος του Έβρου και υποχρεωτική αναφορά σχετικά με την πορεία που ακολουθούν καθώς και τις ενέργειες τους ;
      Ελέγχεται από την εκάστοτε προϊσταμένη αρχή η νομιμότητα των ενεργειών αυτών των περιπόλων και η τήρηση των υποχρεώσεων που επιβάλει το διεθνές δίκαιο για την προστασία των προσφύγων ;

      Η Καμπάνια για την Πρόσβαση στο Άσυλο επισημαίνει ότι τα αρμόδια και εμπλεκόμενα Υπουργεία (Προστασίας του Πολίτη, Άμυνας και Μεταναστευτικής Πολιτικής) αλλά και ο Υπουργός Δικαιοσύνης οφείλουν να προβούν με διαδικασίες κατεπείγοντος στη διερεύνηση των καταγγελιών και τον έλεγχο των εμπλεκόμενων σε επιχειρήσεις αποτροπής και είναι υπόλογοι για κάθε καθυστέρηση, καθώς οι συνεχιζόμενες παραβιάσεις, όσο εκφεύγουν από κάθε μορφής έλεγχο, λογοδοσία και τιμωρία, επιβεβαιώνουν την πεποίθηση ότι ο Έβρος είναι ένα εκτεταμένο πεδίο εκτός δικαίου και εκτός νόμου όπου οι πρόσφυγες είτε σπρώχνονται στο θάνατο είτε στα χέρια εγκληματικών οργανώσεων, όπου μπορεί να αναπτύσσεται ανεμπόδιστα το οργανωμένο έγκλημα και όπου η ανθρώπινη ζωή είναι εξαιρετικά φτηνή ακόμη και γι’ αυτούς που είναι υπεύθυνοι να την προστατεύουν.

      https://www.efsyn.gr/node/193572

      Reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop avec ce commentaire :

      10 ONG et associations solidaires somment les Ministres de l’ordre public, de la Politique Migratoire et de la Justice d’ouvrir en toute urgence une enquête concernant les dénonciations répétées d’opérations illégales de refoulement de réfugiés à Evros (frontière fluviale gréco-turque au Nord de la Grèce) ; elles réclament aussi que tous les agents de l’état impliqués dans des telles actions fassent l’objet d’un contrôle.

      Les dix ONG qui font partie de celles ayant lancé la Campagne pour l’accès à l’asile (http://asylum-campaign.blogspot.com) font remarquer que les ministres seront tenus pour responsable de tout empêchement ou retard dans l’enquête, qui renforcerait la conviction que la frontière d’Evros est une zone de non-droit et un haut-lieu de torture pour les réfugiés (tortures, mauvais traitements, vols avec violence, mise en danger de la vie d’autrui).

      Elles soulignent que le mode opératoire quasi-identique de plusieurs opérations de refoulement et les ressemblances dans les mauvais traitements subis par les réfugiés renvoient à un plan organisé et concerté de dissuasion, dans le cadre duquel se déploient de pratiques généralisées qui sont devenus plus fréquentes, plus systématiques et encore plus dures après l’accord UE-Turquie en mars 2016.

      Les organisations Arsis , Réseau de soutien social de réfugiés et de migrants (Diktyo) Observatoire grec pour les accords d’Helsinki (Greek Helsinki Monitor ), Forum grec des réfugiés (Greek Forum of Refugees), Mouvement pour les Droits de l’Homme-Solidarité avec les Réfugiés Samos, Monde sans guerres et violence , « LATHRA » -Comité de Solidarité avec les Réfugiés de Chios, PRAKSIS , Initiative pour les droits de détenus ,

      Soutien aux Réfugiés en Egée (Refugees Support Aegean) parlent de brutalité ostentatoire de la part des policiers et de groupes paramilitaires et d’actions illégales qui ne pourraient être que le fruit de consignes précises et d’ ordres venant d’en haut. Pour les ONG, le recouvrement et la légalisation implicite de méthodes criminelles employées est partie intégrante du plan organisé de push-back.

    • “We were beaten and pushed back by masked men at Turkish-Greek border” – Turkish journalist and asylum seeker

      A group of Turkish political asylum seekers claims that, following their attempt to cross the Turkish border via Evros River in the northeast of Greece on Friday evening, they were pushed back after being beaten by masked men with batons.

      Tugba Ozkan, a journalist in the group, told IPA News on the phone that the group of 15 people fleeing persecution in Turkey crossed the Turkish-Greek border on Friday at 9 pm near Soufli, a town at Evros Regional Unit.

      When they stepped on Greek soil, however, she said a group of masked men beat them and pushed them back across the river to Turkish land, where a post-coup crackdown has persecuted tens of thousands of Turkish nationals since the abortive coup in 2016.

      A family of four from the group, including two children, disappeared after the alleged push-back. Turkish soldiers reportedly arrested the four Turkish nationals, Alpay Akinci (42), Meral Akinci (40), Okan Selim Akinci (11), and Ayse Hilal Akinci (8).

      Trying to hide from Turkish security officers, 11 people, including Ozkan, were attempting to cross the border for the second time.

      “Masked men beat us with batons. We are in a very dire situation. We are afraid to be pushed back again. We need help,” a desperate Ozkan said in dismay.

      The group of asylum seekers managed to cross the Evros safely in their second attempt, she said, and the group was attempting to hide when two Greek police cars found them.

      Greek Police detained the group at around 2 pm on Saturday near the border and took them into custody, according to the Greek Council for Refugees (GCR), a non-governmental organization defending human rights and fighting against illegal push-backs in the region.

      The group applied for asylum in Greece and are expected to be released in a few days after the official registration is done, according to GCR lawyers.
      Push-back: Infamous buzzword of immigration debate glossary

      The practice that notoriously became known as “push-back,” can be defined as ‘the use of force to stop asylum seekers at borders and to return them to the country from which they came.’

      According to official numbers of the United Nations, thousands of asylum seekers and refugees from various nations cross the Turkish-Greek border illegally every year in an attempt to reach Europe to take refuge.

      Many reported push-back incidents have occurred in recent years, but no accurate figures have been revealed yet.

      One of those incidents was the case of Murat Capan, a Turkish journalist who worked for the critical Nokta magazine. According to the narrative of Hellenic League for Human Rights, Capan and a Turkish family with three children crossed the Evros river in May 2017, escaping persecution.

      The Greek police took them into custody where they asked to apply for asylum. Subsequently, they were taken to a UN facility in a van.

      According to the information put forth by Hellenic League, the van met with a car along the road and five masked men dressed in camouflage bound the hands of the Turkish nationals. Two of the masked men then escorted them back to the Turkish side of the border where they were handed over to Turkish soldiers.

      Turkish authorities had already sentenced Capan in absentia to twenty-two and a half years in prison. Following the push-back incident, the security forces sent Capan to prison to serve his term.

      Another incident included 6 Turkish asylum seekers and took place in September 2018. Two Turkish families entered Greece via Evros and as reported by a Turkish journalist in exile, Cevheri Guven, their presence in Greece can be backed by solid evidence.

      One family had their two kids with them and took their photo on a roadside cafe in Alexandroupolis.

      Guven shares the location and picture of the coffee where the photo above had been taken to display that the families were indeed in Greece.

      The families were escorted back to Turkey after appealing for asylum by the Greek police and thrown into the water by the Turkish side, according to Guven. Turkish gendarmerie caught them after hours of walking along the road and 3 adults out of 4 in the group faced arrest.

      The cases of Capan and the Yildiz family crystalize the consequences of the push-back practice, which is a widespread method apparently enforced by Greek security forces working alongside Greece’s border with Turkey, according to the work of several NGOs.

      Greek NGOs, including GCR, HumanRights360, and ARSIS, released a report on the push-back practice in December 2018.

      The report, dubbed “The new normality: Continuous push-backs of third-country nationals on the Evros river,” includes testimonies of 39 people who tried to cross the Evros river to enter Greece, but who were pushed back to Turkey, often violently.

      The report of the NGOs concludes that “the practice of push-backs constitutes a particularly wide-spread practice, often employing violence in the process.”

      GCR, HumanRights360, and ARSIS have urged authorities to take action against the practice, which they label as “a threat to the rule of law” in Greece.

      According to a 2012 ruling of the European Court of Human Rights, push-back policy breaches international law, including the Geneva Convention and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

      International laws are clear on peoples’ rights to seek protection from persecution in other countries, and the latter is obliged to process these requests in order to avoid the risk of endangering people who have a legitimate claim to protection.

      https://ipa.news/2019/04/28/we-were-beaten-and-pushed-back-by-masked-men-at-turkish-greek-border-turkish-j

    • Three Kurdish children drown as more refugees try to make their way into Greece

      THREE KURDISH have perished while trying to cross from Turkey into Greece when the boat they were in capsized.

      The children were from the Iraqi Kurdistan capital of Erbil and drowned in Maritsa River.

      “In the early hours of today, around 3 am, a boat carrying thirteen immigrants who wanted to cross from Turkey to Greece through the Evros River overturned and two children drowned. One child died due to the cold weather,” said Ari Jalal, a representative of Federation of Iraqi Refugees in Kurdistan, in an interview with Kurdish Rudaw.

      Jalal further said the body of one child is yet to be found. “The search continues. We are in contact with the consulates of Iraq, Turkey and Greece after the tragic boat incident. The other immigrants were rescued by Greek police,” Jalal said.

      Turkey is used as a key and main route by thousands of refugees who want to cross into Europe through Greece, especially since 2011, when the Syrian civil war began.

      According to Greece police, the number of migrants registered and arrested after crossing the border was 3,543 by last October, an 82% increase over the same month in the preceding year.


      https://ipa.news/2019/02/04/three-kurdish-children-drown-as-more-refugees-try-to-make-their-way-into-greec
      #décès #morts

    • The new normality: Continuous push-backs of third country nationals on the Evros river

      The Greek Council for Refugees, ARSIS-Association for the Social Support of Youth and HumanRights360 publish this report containing 39 testimonies of people who attempted to enter Greece from the Evros border with Turkey, in order to draw the attention of the responsible authorities and public bodies to the frequent practice of push-backs that take place in violation of national, EU law and international law.

      The frequency and repeated nature of the testimonies that come to our attention by people in detention centres, under protective custody, and in reception and identification centres, constitutes evidence of the practice of pushbacks being used extensively and not decreasing, regardless of the silence and denial by the responsible public bodies and authorities, and despite reports and complaints denouncements that have come to light in the recent past.
      The testimonies that follow substantiate a continuous and uninterrupted use of the illegal practice of push-backs. They also reveal an even more alarming array of practices and patterns calling for further investigation; it is particularly alarming that the persons involved in implementing the practice of push-backs speak Greek, as well as other languages, while reportedly wearing either police or military clothing. In short, we observe that the practice of push-backs constitutes a particularly wide-spread practice, often employing violence in the process, leaving the State exposed and posing a threat for the rule of law in the country.
      Τhe organizations signing this report urge the competent authorities to investigate the incidents described, and to refrain from engaging in any similar action that violates Greek, EU law, and International law.

      https://www.gcr.gr/en/news/press-releases-announcements/item/1028-the-new-normality-continuous-push-backs-of-third-country-nationals-on-the-e

      Pour télécharger le #rapport:


      https://www.gcr.gr/en/news/press-releases-announcements/item/download/492_22e904e22458d13aa76e3dce82d4dd23

    • Απάντηση Γεροβασίλη για τις επαναπροωθήσεις

      Επιστολή στον επικεφαλής της Υπατης Αρμοστείας στην Ελλάδα, Φιλίπ Λεκλέρκ, έστειλε η Όλγα Γεροβασίλη απαντώντας στη δική του στην όποια, όπως αναφέρει υπουργός Προστασίας του Πολίτη, « παρατίθενται περιγραφές και μαρτυρίες μεταναστών για περιστατικά και πρακτικές προσώπων, που φέρονται να ανήκουν σε Σώματα Ασφαλείας, στην περιοχή του Έβρου.

       »Συγκεκριμένα, οι αναφορές αφορούν σε άτυπες αναγκαστικές επιστροφές στην Τουρκία, χωρίς την τήρηση των νόμιμων διαδικασιών, σε περιστατικά βίας και σοβαρών παραβιάσεων των ανθρωπίνων δικαιωμάτων, καθώς και σε περιστατικά σύμφωνα με τα οποία δεν επετράπη η πρόσβαση προσφύγων και μεταναστών στο μηχανισμό του ασύλου.

      Η κ. Γεροβασίλη υποστηρίζει πως « οι καταγγελλόμενες συμπεριφορές και πρακτικές ουδόλως υφίστανται ως επιχειρησιακή δραστηριότητα και πρακτική του προσωπικού των Υπηρεσιών Συνοριακής Φύλαξης, το οποίο κυρίως εμπλέκεται σε δράσεις για την αντιμετώπιση του φαινομένου της παράνομης μετανάστευσης στα ελληνοτουρκικά σύνορα. Από την διερεύνηση των μέχρι σήμερα καταγγελλομένων περιστατικών και από τις εσωτερικές έρευνες που έχουν πραγματοποιηθεί από τις αρμόδιες Υπηρεσίες, προκύπτει το συμπέρασμα ότι αυτά δεν δύνανται να επιβεβαιωθούν ».

      Ισχυρίζεται δε ότι « η εμπειρία, ο επαγγελματισμός και το ήθος του αστυνομικού προσωπικού των Υπηρεσιών Συνοριακής Φύλαξης, δεν αφήνουν ουδεμία αμφιβολία ότι το έργο της διαχείρισης συνόρων επιτελείται με υψηλό αίσθημα ευθύνης και ανθρωπισμού. Προς επίρρωση αυτού, σημειώνεται ότι, στον ποταμό Έβρο έχουν λάβει χώρα, πολλές φορές υπό άκρως αντίξοες συνθήκες, επιχειρήσεις διάσωσης μεταναστών που κινδύνευαν από πνιγμό, από το αστυνομικό προσωπικό, το οποίο και με κίνδυνο της ζωής του επιδιώκει την προστασία της ζωής των μεταναστών όταν εγκλωβίζονται σε επικίνδυνα σημεία του ποταμού Έβρου, αποσπώντας θετικά σχόλια από την κοινή γνώμη.

      Επίσης, η υπουργός σημειώνει πως « οι Έλληνες αστυνομικοί που πραγματοποιούν εθνικές επιχειρησιακές δράσεις επιτήρησης συνόρων στην περιοχή του Έβρου, τα τελευταία έτη, υποστηρίζονται από Φιλοξενούμενους Αξιωματούχους διαφόρων ειδικοτήτων, στο πλαίσιο Κοινών Επιχειρήσεων του Frontex που υλοποιούνται στην περιοχή. Ο εν λόγω Ευρωπαϊκός Οργανισμός ενισχύει την επίγνωση της κατάστασης και την επιχειρησιακή ανταπόκριση στα ελληνοτουρκικά χερσαία σύνορα. Σε αυτό το πλαίσιο, ουδέποτε έγινε αναφορά από ξένους Φιλοξενούμενους Αξιωματούχους του Frontex, περιστατικού παράτυπης επαναπροώθησης ή παραβίασης δικαιώματος μεταναστών, με εμπλοκή ελλήνων αστυνομικών ».

      Στην επιστολή επισημαίνεται πως « τόσο σε κεντρικό όσο και σε περιφερειακό επίπεδο, το αστυνομικό προσωπικό λαμβάνει ειδικότερες οδηγίες και διαταγές, ενώ παρακολουθεί και εκπαιδευτικά προγράμματα, σχετικά με την προστασία των θεμελιωδών δικαιωμάτων των μεταναστών, με ιδιαίτερη έμφαση στις ευάλωτες ομάδες. Οι οδηγίες εστιάζουν στην προστασία της ανθρώπινης ζωής και αξιοπρέπειας, την αποφυγή των διακρίσεων, την νόμιμη χρήση βίας και την αρχή της μη-επαναπροώθησης. Σε αυτό το πλαίσιο, το αστυνομικό προσωπικό εποπτεύεται και αξιολογείται σε μόνιμη βάση, από την ιεραρχία του σώματος.

      Τέλος, η κ. Γεροβασίλη υπενθυμίζει ότι « η Ελλάδα έχει διαχειρισθεί αποτελεσματικά, από το 2015 μέχρι και σήμερα, περισσότερους από 1.350.000 πρόσφυγες/μετανάστες, έχοντας ως γνώμονα την προστασία της ανθρώπινης ζωής και αξιοπρέπειας. Ειδικότερα, επισημαίνεται πώς, κατά το πρώτο 4μηνο του 2019 στην περιοχή δικαιοδοσίας των Δ.Α. Ορεστιάδας και Αλεξανδρούπολης έχουν πραγματοποιηθεί 3.130 συλλήψεις υπηκόων τρίτων χωρών, γεγονός που έρχεται σε αντίθεση με τις καταγγελίες περί επαναπροωθήσεων. Επιπλέον και κατά το συγκεκριμένο χρονικό διάστημα που αναφέρεται στις καταγγελίες (25-29.04.2019), πραγματοποιήθηκαν στην συγκεκριμένη περιοχή 101 συλλήψεις υπηκόων τρίτων χωρών ».

      https://www.efsyn.gr/node/193868

      Traduction de Vicky Skoumbi via la mailing-list Migreurop :

      La ministre grecque de Protection du Citoyen (euphémisme pour l’Ordre Public) Olga Gerovassili a démenti les accusations de refoulements illégaux à Evros –frontière nord-est de la Grèce avec la Turquie. En réponse à la lettre que lui avait adressée Philippe Leclerc, représentant de l’UNHCR en Grèce, où celui-ci évoque des témoignages des migrants concernant des mauvais traitements et des refoulements effectués par des forces de sécurité de la région d’Evros, la ministre a tout nié en bloc.

      Philippe Leclerc faisait état des témoignages qui dénoncent d’une part des renvois forcés vers la Turquie, sans que les procédures légales soient respectées, et d’autre part des violences et des violations graves des droits humains, ainsi que des cas où on a interdit aux réfugiés et aux migrants l’accès au mécanisme de l’asile.

      Mme Gerovassili soutient que « les comportements et les pratiques dénoncées ne font nullement partie des modes opératoires et des pratiques du personnel de la Garde-Frontière, qui est surtout impliqué à des actions de contrôle du phénomène d’immigration illégale aux frontières gréco-turques. L’investigation des incidents dénoncés jusqu’à aujourd’hui et les enquêtes internes réalisées par les services compétents ont conduit à la conclusion que ces incidents ne peuvent pas être confirmés ».

      La ministre prétend que « l’expérience, le professionnalisme et l’éthos du personnel policier de la Garde-Frontière, ne laissent aucun doute sur le fait qu’ils opèrent avec un très haut sens de responsabilité et d’humanisme. Pour corroborer ce fait, elle souligne le fait qu’à Evros des opérations de sauvetage ont eu lieu plusieurs fois sous de conditions extrêmement dangereuses : les policiers opèrent au péril de leur propre vie pour la protection de la vie des migrants, lorsque ceux-ci sont bloqués à des endroits dangereux du fleuve Evros.

      La ministre ajoute que les officiers de Frontex qui sont impliqués dans des opérations conjointes avec les policiers grecs n’ont jamais dénoncé des cas de refoulement illégal ou de violation de droit de migrants de la part des agents grecs.

      Dans la lettre que la ministre a adressée à Philippe Leclerc, il est dit que le personnel policier agit sous des consignes et ordres spécifiques, tandis qu’il est souvent amené à suivre des programmes de formation spécifiques à la protection des droits fondamentaux de migrants. D’après la ministre, les consignes données mettent en avant la nécessité de protéger la vie et la dignité humaine, d’éviter toute discrimination, de s’en tenir à l’usage légal de la violence et au principe du non-refoulement. « Dans ce cadre, les agents de police sont contrôlés et évalués en continu, par leurs supérieurs hiérarchiques », dit la ministre.

      Enfin Mme Gerovassili met en avant le fait que 3.130 arrestations de ressortissants de pays tiers ont été effectuées pendant les quatre premiers mois de 2019 dans les régions d’Orestiada et d’Alexandroupolis- proches d’Evros- ce qui, d’après la ministre, contredit les accusations de refoulements illégaux. « Qui plus est, pendant la période précise où les faits dénoncés auraient pu avoir lieu (25-29.04.2019), 101 arrestations de ressortissants de pays tiers ont eu lieu dans cette région ».

      Avec ce commentaire :

      N’en déplaise à la ministre, les faits sont têtus et aucun démenti ne saurait entamer la crédibilité de rapports des ONG et des témoignages comme ceux par ex. rapportés par le Conseil Grec pour les Réfugiés

      https://www.gcr.gr/en/news/press-releases-announcements/item/1067-gcr-and-cear-publish-a-joint-video-documenting-the-harsh-reality-of-pushbac

    • Εvros Pushbacks

      The Greek Council for Refugees and CEAR (C​omisión Española de Ayuda al Refugiado), with the support of the Municipality of Madrid, publish together a video on pushbacks in Evros, today, March 20, three years since the implementation of the EU-Turkey Joint Statement, of which the consequences are obvious in Greece’s northern border, as well as on the Eastern Aegean islands. The shattering testimonies of people who attempted to enter Greece from the Turkish border and were violently pushed back to Turkey, without ever being given the opportunity to apply for asylum, reveal the systematic nature of the pushbacks practice, in direct violation of Greek, EU and international law.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LAyuOlohOss


      #routes_migratoires #accord_UE-Turquie #parcours_migratoires #Pavlos_Pavlidis #identification #corps

      Le #cimetière :


      ... qui ne semble plus être le même que celui qu’on avait visité en 2012 :

    • Ces migrants mystérieusement refoulés de Grèce en Turquie

      C’est un sujet qui, régulièrement, vient mettre en porte-à-faux les autorités grecques : l’accueil des migrants qui traversent le fleuve Evros. Frontière entre la Turquie et la Grèce, ce fleuve sert de point d’entrée en Europe pour les migrants venus d’Asie, d’Afrique ou tout simplement de Turquie.

      Et si la traversée du fleuve n’est pas insurmontable, en revanche, les conditions d’accueil sont sujettes à critique par les ONG et même par les migrants.

      L’équipe d’euronews à Athènes en a rencontrés. Ils racontent comment les policiers grecs ont pour habitude de les refouler, sans ménagement.

      Mikail est turc, demandeur d’asile en Grèce. Il explique qu’il a traversé le fleuve avec un groupe de 11 personnes. Lorsqu’ils sont arrivés sur le sol grec, des policiers les ont arrêtés. « Les types portaient des tenues militaires, raconte-t-il. Et ils avaient des matraques. On aurait dit qu’ils partaient en guerre. Nous, on a essayé de comprendre pourquoi ils se comportaient ainsi. Ils nous ont simplement dit : "On va vous renvoyer chez vous". »

      « Mes enfants étaient à côté de moi, ajoute Gulay, réfugiée turque_. Ils m’ont dit : "Maman, y vont nous tuer ?" Je leur ai dit : "Non, ils ne vont pas nous tuer. Ils veulent juste nous renvoyer en Turquie"._ »

      Le groupe de ces 11 migrants parviendra malgré tout à rester en Grèce. D’autres n’ont pas eu cette chance.

      Le 4 mai, trois personnes, deux hommes et une jeune femme, ont traversé le fleuve. Craignant d’être refoulés, ils ont prévenu un proche vivant déjà en Grèce ainsi qu’un avocat. Ils ont envoyé une photo prise dans la ville de #Nea_Vyssa.


      https://twitter.com/zubeyirkoculu/status/1124764045024821249?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed&ref_url=https

      Ils ont ensuite été emmenés dans un commissariat de police à Neo Xeimonio. Et là, on a perdu leur trace. On a appris plus tard qu’ils avaient été renvoyés en Turquie, et qu’ils étaient désormais emprisonnés dans la ville turque d’Edirne.

      Ishan, le frère de la jeune femme raconte qu’il est allé au commissariat de police pour savoir ce qui était advenue de sa sœur. « Je leur ai dit : "je sais que ma sœur a été arrêtée et qu’elle était ici". Ils m’ont juste dit : "On n’est au courant de rien". »

      « Nous avons sollicité les autorités grecques pour en savoir davantage sur cette affaire, ajoute Michalis Arampatzoglou, journaliste d’euronews . Le ministère de la Protection civile a dit n’avoir aucune information sur cet incident. Pour autant, des cas comme celui-là, il y en a de plus en plus. Les avocats des victimes comptent engager des poursuites judiciaires, pour que enquêtes soient menées et que la lumière soit faite. »

      https://fr.euronews.com/2019/05/16/ces-migrants-mysterieusement-refoules-de-grece-en-turquie


    • https://twitter.com/zubeyirkoculu/status/1124764045024821249?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed&ref_url=https

      Je copie-colle ici le thread twitter:

      Breaking: 3 Turkish nationals, Kamil Y, Ayse E, Talip N, have crossed the Turkish-Greek border through Evros on May 4 at 5 am, they were taken into custody at #Xeimonio police station. A family member and a lawyer in the region, however, were told by the Police they are absent.
      Ms. Ayse E. sent her location at Xeimonio before they were detained, she also shared a video urging Greek authorities to stop any possible push-back.
      We are Turkish political asylum seekers. We fled persecution back in Turkey and crossed Evros on May 4 at 5 am. We are hiding near Nea Vyssa in fear of push-back. We urge the United Nations and Greek authorities to protect us from being pushed back."

      The latest live location Ms. Ayse shared with me was from #Xeimonia Police station which proves 3 Turkish asylum seekers taken into custody. The Greek police currently inform their lawyer that there are no such persons in the custody which might mean another push-back on the way.

    • ’Masked men beat us with batons’: Greece accused of violent asylum seeker pushbacks

      Scores of Turkish asylum seekers have been pushed back — sometimes violently — from Greece in the last three weeks, lawyers and family members told Euronews.

      Witnesses claim various groups of masked men in military uniform, as well as those in plain clothes collaborating with the police, used physical force against those who resisted.

      There have been 82 people from Turkey, including children, that have sought political asylum in neighbouring Greece and been sent back since April 23.

      Around half have been detained or arrested by Turkish authorities upon their return to their home country on terrorism charges.

      They have been linked to the Gulen Movement, which Ankara blames for the failed 2016 coup, or the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK), who have been involved in an armed struggle with the Turkish state over independence.

      The European Commission has urged Greece to follow up on the allegations that Euronews has detailed in this article.

      ’Violently pushed back’

      “We are Turkish political asylum seekers,” began Ayse Erdogan in a video she sent to a family member.

      “We fled persecution in Turkey and crossed [at] Evros on May 4, at 5 am. We are hiding near Nea Vyssa [on the Greek-Turkey land border] in fear of a push back. We urge the United Nations and Greek authorities to protect us from being pushed back.”

      Ayse, who had crossed the border with friends Kamil and Talip, was picked up by Greek police and taken into custody at a police station in the village of Nea Cheimonio. Hours later, Ayse would be part of a group of migrants that were allegedly violently pushed back to Turkey by Greek police.

      Nea Cheimonio was the last place that Ayse’s family was able to pick up a location signal from her phone.

      The same day, accompanied by a lawyer, Ayse’s twin brother, Ihsan Erdogan, who is a registered asylum seeker in Greece, went to the police station in Nea Cheimonio, based on her last location information. He was told his sister and her friends had never been held there.

      On May 5, Ihsan received a phone call from a family member saying his sister had been imprisoned by a court in the northwestern province of Edirne, over the border in Turkey.

      The relative had spoken to Ayse, who said her Turkish group, along with a number of Syrians, had been handed over to a group of masked men soon after they left the police station in Nea Cheimonio. Greek police, she claimed, seized their belongings including her phone.

      Ihsan rues that his sister was seemingly sent back just before he arrived in Nea Cheimonio. “I urge Greek authorities not to send others like my sister back to prison,” he told Euronews.
      ’Masked men beat us with batons’

      Freshly-graduated as a mathematics teacher, Ayse had spent 28 months in prison over alleged affiliation with the Gulen Movement, an organisation Turkish authorities have outlawed.

      Hundreds of people were arrested in the aftermath of the failed putsch in 2016 and accused of links to US-based Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen.

      Ayse was not the only political asylum seeker allegedly sent back to Turkey in what appears to be a violation of international asylum law.

      On April 26 this year, at Soufli, a border town near Evros River, a group of 11 people — including three children, a pregnant woman and another one that was disabled — was sent back by masked men after being beaten violently, according to a journalist in the group.

      “Masked men beat us with batons,” said Tugba Ozkan, who is 28 and pregnant. "We are in a very dire situation. We are afraid to be pushed back again. We need help.

      “I had forgotten about my pregnancy,” she added. “I tried to stop Greek police by moving ahead but they pushed me, too. It was unbelievable and unforgettable to see my husband beaten in front of my eyes.”
      No acknowledgement from Athens

      According to the account of the group, the police cooperated with a group of masked men who forced them to return to Turkey. The group managed to cross the border again the next day, only to be detained officially and come face-to-face with a police officer who had pushed them back at Soufli. They were released under the protection of a UNHCR officer on April 30.

      Greek NGOs published reports last year with testimonies from people from various nationalities who were allegedly sent back to Turkey via Evros after being beaten by masked men.

      The UN’s refugee agency (UNHCR) and the Commissioner for Human Rights of the Council of Europe urged Greek authorities to investigate those reports.

      The claims of violent push back operations at Evros river, however, have never ended. None have been officially acknowledged by Athens.

      Greece police declined to comment after requests by Euronews regarding the latest push back allegations.

      A European Commission spokesman, speaking to Euronews, said that they were aware of the recent push back claims.

      “The Commission expects that the Greek authorities will follow up on the specific allegations and will continue to closely monitor the situation,” he said.

      https://www.euronews.com/2019/05/11/masked-men-beat-us-with-batons-greece-accused-of-violent-asylum-seeker-pus

    • Migrants tortured by Greek police, illegally pushed back to Turkey

      Three migrants allegedly tortured by Greek security forces and illegally pushed back to neighboring Turkey were found by Turkish border units and are being provided medical treatment in northwestern Edirne province.

      Iraqi national Ibrahim Khidir (35) and Egyptian nationals Hassan Mahmoud (18) and Ahmed Samir (26) were found in a rural area, half-naked and exhausted with deep marks from plastic bullets and battering on their bodies. They were taken under protection by soldiers, who gave first aid to the migrants before handing them over to the provincial migration management directorate.

      The migrants told reporters that they crossed into Greece with a group of seven other illegal migrants after making arrangements with human smugglers in Istanbul’s Esenyurt district. They were held by the Greek police at the coach station in the border district of Didymoteicho while trying to travel to Thessaloniki. They were then taken to a local police station, where they spent two days along with 35 other illegal migrants and were denied any food.

      The migrants said they were divided into groups of 10 and boarded boats with two Greek police officers accompanying each and six officers watching guard. They were pushed back to Turkey through the Maritsa River (Meriç in Turkish, or Evros in Greek) forming the border with Greece.

      The violence that began at the police station, which included battering with truncheons, shooting with plastic bullets and electroshocks, continued at the riverside and on the boats.

      Khidir told reporters that Greek security forces captured him in Didymoteicho and tortured him with electroshocks, rear-handcuffing and plastic bullets fired at his body. His clothes and money were taken when he was detained.

      Turkish soldiers treated them very well and took care that they received treatment, according Khidir.

      Mahmoud and Samir also said that they were pushed back to Turkey after being stripped of their clothes and beaten up.

      Under international laws and conventions, Greece is obliged to register any illegal migrants entering its territory; yet, this is not the case for thousands of migrants were forcibly returned to Turkey especially since the beginning of refugee influx into Europe in 2015. Security sources say that accounts of migrants interviewed by Turkish migration authority staff and social workers show that they were subjected to torture, theft and other human rights abuses. Several migrants were also found frozen to death after being left in desolate areas.

      Similar incidents have also taken place on the Aegean, in which migrants and Turkish locals accused the Greek coast guard of deflating their boats or re-routing them back to Turkish territorial waters.

      Turkey and the European Union signed a deal in 2016 to curb illegal immigration through the dangerous Aegean Sea route from Turkey to Greece. Under the deal, Greece sends back migrants held in the Aegean islands they crossed to from nearby Turkish shores and in return, EU countries receive a number of Syrian migrants legally. The deal, reinforced with an escalated crackdown on human smugglers and more patrols in the Aegean, significantly decreased the number of illegal crossings.

      Bulgarian border authorities were also accused of abuses targeting migrants and pushing them back to Turkey in several incidents.

      However, some desperate migrants still take the route across the better-policed land border between Turkey, Greece and Bulgaria, especially in winter months when a safe journey through the Aegean is nearly impossible aboard dinghies.

      https://www.dailysabah.com/turkey/2019/05/30/migrants-tortured-by-greek-police-illegally-pushed-back-to-turkey/amp
      #torture

    • Greece continues to push asylum seekers back to Turkey

      Greek border forces along the Evros River pushed 59 migrants back into Turkey on Friday morning, signaling the continuation of a policy that started before the arrival of the new government.

      The pushback was reported by Zübeyir Koçulu, an Athens-based Turkish journalist who tweeted, “It seems nothing has changed on the Evros regarding pushbacks following a recent government change in Greece.”

      A total of 59 asylum seekers, nine of them Turkish and the remainder Afghans, Syrians and Somalis, were illegally sent back to Turkey, according to Koçulu.

      “The Greek police collected the group soon after their arrival and held them in custody at the Tychero police station for four hours,” he said. “After seizing their phones, security officers pushed the 59 people through the river near Soufli by force, perpetrating violence, according to witnesses.”

      He further claimed that Turkish political asylum seekers in the group were detained by Turkish security forces soon after the pushback. Three children in the group were delivered to their relatives.

      The Evros River, which forms most of the land border between the two countries, was one of the main routes used by Turkish asylum seekers fleeing government persecution as well as migrants of other nationalities until a series of violent pushback operations a few months ago stopped the flow.

      “Ironically, Kyriakos Mitsotakis, the new PM of Greece, fled with his parents into exile in Turkey when he was a year old in 1968 during the Greek junta,” Koçulu said. “He knows what it is to be a migrant from his own experience.”

      https://www.turkishminute.com/2019/07/21/greece-continues-to-push-asylum-seekers-back-to-turkey

    • What is happening on the Greece-Turkey border?

      While migrant camps on the Aegean islands have reached breaking point, and with Turkey threatening to ’open the gates’, migrants continue to arrive in Greece in the hundreds every week. Most come by sea, but in recent months, growing numbers have crossed via the land route across the Evros River. Many claim they are subjected to violent and illegal treatment by authorities at the border.
      Since the deaths of 39 Vietnamese migrants smuggled by lorry into the UK, there have been many more reports of migrants stowing away in trucks and vans. The latest group of 41 people hiding in a truck crossing from Turkey into northern Greece were reportedly mostly Afghan men between the ages of 20 and 30. Some reports said they were in danger of suffocation when they were discovered.

      On the Greek-Turkish border, smugglers are regularly caught transporting migrants in minibuses or trucks. There are mixed reports about how many people cross via this border. According to the UN migration agency, IOM, the number has risen steadily in recent months – from 255 arrivals in May to 1,233 in September.

      While the focus remains on the overcrowded migrant camps on the Aegean islands, which have seen a much bigger surge in arrivals during the same period, there has been less attention given to what is happening on the land border.

      ’Brutal treatment’

      There have been reports of violence and illegal activities by some Greek authorities against migrants crossing the Evros river since as early as mid-2017. These have included claims that migrants have been arrested, beaten up, robbed, detained, and forcibly returned or “pushed back” into Turkey.

      Dorothee Vakalis from Naomi, a refugee aid organization in Thessaloniki, says migrants continue to be subjected to “brutal treatment” by authorities at the border. “Everything gets taken away from them, phones, money, sometimes clothing as well. They are sent back to the other side practically naked,” she said on German radio on Tuesday. “We hear from relatives about families with small children, pregnant women being pushed back,” Vakalis said.

      Beaten by masked men

      According to an account of a case in April reported in Euronews, men wearing masks beat several migrants with batons before sending them back. In the group was a 28-year-old pregnant woman, Tugba Ozkan. “I had forgotten about my pregnancy,” Ozkan told Euronews. “I tried to stop Greek police by moving ahead but they pushed me, too. It was unbelievable and unforgettable to see my husband beaten in front of my eyes.”

      InfoMigrants was also in contact last year with a Kurdish couple who said they were locked in a small dark room with many others before being taken by masked commandos back across the border into Turkey.

      It is not clear who is carrying out the push backs, because they often wear masks and cannot be easily identified. The Hellenic League for Human Rights (HLHR) and Human Rights Watch describe them as paramilitaries. Eyewitnesses interviewed by Human Rights Watch said people who “looked like police officers or soldiers, as well as some unidentified masked men, carried handguns, handcuffs, radios, spray cans, and batons,” and others carried gear such as “armored gloves, binoculars and knives and military-grade weapons such as rifles.”

      The HLHR has suggested that the Greek police are either unaware of the existence of these paramilitaries or they turn a blind eye to them. According to Human Rights Watch, accounts suggest "close and consistent coordination “between police and unidentified men.” ..."Commanding officers knew, or ought to have known, what was happening," HRW’s report claims.

      Calls for investigation

      The Greek Refugee Council and other NGOs published a report in 2018 containing testimonies from people who said they had been beaten, sometimes by masked men, and sent back to Turkey. The UNHCR and the European Human Rights Commissioner have called on Greece to investigate the claims. Late last year another report by Human Rights Watch also based on testimonies of migrants, said that violent push backs were continuing.

      Turkey has also urged Greece to stop the practice of push backs. The Turkish foreign ministry recently claimed that a total of 25,404 irregular migrants were pushed back to Turkey in the first month of this year, according to the IPA news service. Turkey says it has evidence that the push backs are occurring and has invited the Greek government to “work on correcting the policy.” Greece has not acknowledged that violent push backs are occurring.

      According to some of the testimonies in the report by the Greek Refugee Council, Turkey is also responsible for carrying out push backs of Syrian and Iraqi single men.

      I believe these illegal push backs are not even known about or discussed in Europe or in Germany.
      _ Dorothee Vakalis, humanitarian worker with ’Naomi’ in Thessaloniki

      The European Commission spokesperson Natasha Bertaud has confirmed that the Commission contacted Greek authorities about reports of alleged push backs earlier this year. “The Commission expects that Greek authorities will follow up on the specific allegations and will continue to monitor the situation closely,” Bertaud said.

      Legal returns and illegal push backs

      The Evros River runs along 194 km of the 206 km of land border between the EU and Turkey. This border is not covered by the so-called EU-Turkey Statement, the agreement signed between Turkey and Europe in 2016 which allows the return to Turkey of Syrian migrants who arrive irregularly in Greece by sea.

      The land border was covered by a separate bilateral migrant readmission deal between Turkey and Greece. Turkey canceled that agreement last June because Greece refused to hand over several Turkish officers who escaped to Greece after Turkey‘s failed military coup in 2016.

      Push backs are prohibited by Greek and EU law, as well as international treaties and agreements, including the Geneva Convention on Refugees, which guarantees the right to seek protection. They go against the principle of non-refoulement, which means the forcible return of a person to a country where they are liable to be subject to persecution.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/20626/what-is-happening-on-the-greece-turkey-border
      #statistiques #chiffres

    • Griechenland soll 60.000 Migranten illegal abgeschoben haben

      Menschenrechtler und die Türkei beschuldigen Griechenland, Migranten und Flüchtlinge illegal abzuschieben. Türkische Dokumente, die dem SPIEGEL vorliegen, sollen die Anschuldigungen belegen.

      Am 3. November 2019 greift die die türkische Polizei 252 Migranten in der Nähe des Grenzübergangs Kapikule auf. Danach wird sie einen brisanten Aktenvermerk anfertigen: Die Migranten hätten es über die Grenze nach Griechenland geschafft, schreiben die türkischen Beamten später in ihrem Bericht. Aber dann seien sie gegen ihren Willen zurückgebracht worden, ohne Chance auf einen Asylantrag.

      „Push-Backs“ nennen sich diese illegalen Rückführungen von Migranten und Flüchtlingen. Sie sind nach europäischem und internationalem Recht verboten. Dieses schreibt den Staaten vor, potenziellen Asylbewerbern den Zugang zu einem effektiven Asylverfahren zu gewähren.

      Seit Jahren beschuldigen Menschenrechtsorganisationen und Anwälte griechische Behörden, Migranten am Grenzfluss Evros illegal in die Türkei abzuschieben. Der SPIEGEL hat nun türkische Dokumente erhalten, darunter auch die Aufzeichnungen der Polizisten über den Vorfall am 3. November. Diese legen nahe, dass Griechenland im großen Stil illegale Push-Backs an der Grenze zur Türkei durchführt.

      Harte Anschuldigungen gegen Griechenland

      In der Migrationspolitik liegen die Türkei und Griechenland schon lange im Clinch, Anfang November erreichte der Konflikt zwischen den Erzrivalen einen neuen Höhepunkt: Das türkische Außenministerium beschuldigte die griechischen Behörden, Flüchtlinge verhaftet, sie geschlagen, ihre Kleider geraubt, Habseligkeiten beschlagnahmt und sie dann in die Türkei zurückgeschickt zu haben. „Wir haben Fotos und Dokumente“, fügte das Ministerium hinzu.

      Der griechische Premierminister Kyriakos Mitsotakis reagierte knapp. „Diejenigen, die die Flüchtlingskrise ausgenutzt haben, indem sie die Verfolgten als Spielball für ihre eigenen geopolitischen Ziele benutzt haben, sollten vorsichtiger sein, wenn sie sich auf Griechenland beziehen.“

      Mehr als 58.000 Push-Backs in einem Jahr

      Das türkische Material umfasst Fallberichte und Interviewprotokolle. Zudem Fotos, die angeblich Migranten zeigen sollen, die von griechischen Behörden misshandelt wurden. Dazu enthält es bisher unveröffentlichte Daten, die vom türkischen Innenministerium zusammengestellt wurden.

      Diesen Daten zufolge hat Griechenland in den zwölf Monaten vor dem 1. November 2019 insgesamt 58.283 Migranten zurückgeschafft. Die meisten registrierten Fälle betrafen pakistanische Staatsangehörige (16.435), gefolgt von Afghanen, Somaliern, Bangladeschern und Algeriern. Dazu kommen mehr als 4.500 Syrer.

      Dem Dokument nach lag die Zahl der gemeldeten Push-Backs allein im Oktober bei mehr als 6.500. Ein endgültiger Beweis sind die Dokumente nicht, die Anschuldigungen der Migranten lassen sich nicht unabhängig verifizieren. Und Griechenland bestreitet die Vorwürfe. Allerdings stimmen sie mit ähnlichen Berichten von Menschenrechtsorganisationen überein. Die Menge der Zeugenaussagen verschärft die Zweifel an den griechischen Unschuldsbeteuerungen.

      Die am 3. November festgenommenen Asylbewerber wurden nach türkischen Angaben später von der türkischen Polizei befragt und in ein Abschiebezentrum in Edirne gebracht, die Stadt liegt etwa 10 Kilometer von der Grenze entfernt. Alle bis auf die Syrer würden in ihre Herkunftsländer zurückgeschickt, erklärte ein türkischer Beamter. Die Syrer würden an den türkischen Ort zurückgebracht, an dem sie sich zuerst registriert hätten.

      Beraubt, eingesperrt, zurückgebracht: Die Geschichte eines Syrers

      Einer der acht Syrer, die am 3. November von der türkischen Polizei verhaftet worden sind, gibt an, mit seiner Frau vier Jahre zuvor aus Aleppo geflohen zu sein. So geht es aus der Abschrift des Interviews hervor. Zunächst habe der studierte Jurist demnach als Kassierer in Istanbul gearbeitet. Dann habe er „aus wirtschaftlichen Gründen“ beschlossen, nach Griechenland zu gehen.

      Mit einem Schmuggler überquerte der Syrer die Grenze, in der griechischen Stadt Alexandroupolis schließlich stellten er und seine Frau sich der Polizei, um Asyl zu beantragen. Stattdessen seien allerdings ihre Besitztümer beschlagnahmt, sie selbst in eine Zelle gesteckt worden. Laut Interviewabschrift wurden die beiden Syrer zwei Tage später von der griechischen Polizei zusammen mit anderen Migranten zurückgebracht.

      14 Polizisten sollen die Gruppe zum Fluss Evros begleitet haben, auf 150 Kilometern markiert er die natürliche Grenze zwischen den beiden Ländern. Anschließend hätten zwei Polizisten das Paar in einem Boot zurück auf die türkische Seite befördert.

      Griechisch-türkisches Grenzgebiet

      In letzter Zeit würden vermehrt Migranten zurückgebracht, nachdem sie mit Booten den Evros überquert hätten, heißt es in dem Bericht der türkischen Behörden. So gibt der Gouverneur von Edirne in einem Schreiben vom 29. Oktober an das türkische Innenministerium an, dass zwischen Anfang Januar und Ende September insgesamt 91.681 illegale Migranten in seiner Provinz aufgegriffen worden seien.

      Dies sei ein dramatischer Anstieg im Vergleich zu den knapp 30.000 Festgenommenen im Jahr 2016. Laut türkischen Behörden gaben mehr als 55 Prozent der festgenommenen Migranten an, es nach Griechenland geschafft zu haben, aber trotzdem zurückgebracht worden zu sein.

      Die Zahl spiegelt den erhöhten Druck an den Außengrenzen Europas wider. Seit dem Frühsommer steigt die Zahl der Migranten, die auf den griechischen Inseln in der Ägäis ankommen. In den vergangenen Monaten versuchen auch wieder deutlich mehr Migranten, den Evros auf illegalem Weg zu überqueren. Nach den Daten des UNHCR kamen 2018 über den Evros mehr als 18.000 Migranten in die EU - ein Anstieg von 173 Prozent gegenüber 2017.

      Die Überquerung des reißenden Grenzflusses ist gefährlich, immer wieder endet sie tödlich. Die Route hat aber auch Vorteile: Wer es unerkannt über den Fluss schafft, wird nicht wie auf den griechischen Ägäis-Inseln unter unmenschlichen Bedingungen in ein Lager gepfercht. Zudem liegt die Region viel näher an der Balkan-Route, die von Nordgriechenland nach Mittel- und Nordeuropa führt und wieder verstärkt genutzt wird.

      Die griechischen Behörden weisen die türkischen Vorwürfe zurück. Es gebe keine Push-Backs, teilte ein Sprecher des griechischen Ministeriums für Bürgerschutz auf Anfrage mit. Bisher haben griechische Behörden nur wenige der Beschwerden überprüft - und fanden demnach keine Beweise für Fehlverhalten.

      Nicht nur türkische Behörden sprechen allerdings von systematischen illegalen Abschiebungen: Menschenrechtler werfen Griechenland und anderen europäischen Staaten an der Außengrenze schon seit Jahren Push-Backs vor und dokumentieren diese. Auch in der griechischen und internationalen Presse wird immer wieder über einzelne Vorfälle berichtet (lesen Sie hier einen SPIEGEL-Bericht). Der Europarat spricht von „glaubwürdigen Anschuldigungen“, und auch das Flüchtlingshilfswerk der Uno zeigte sich bereits besorgt.

      Die Menschenrechtskommissarin des Europarates, Dunja Mijatovic, erklärte auf SPIEGEL-Anfrage, dass in den letzten Jahren sowohl in der Türkei als auch in Griechenland illegale Abschiebungen dokumentiert worden seien - und mahnte eine menschlichere Migrationspolitik an.

      https://www.spiegel.de/politik/ausland/griechenland-soll-zehntausende-migranten-illegal-in-die-tuerkei-abgeschoben-

      #renvois #expulsions #réfugiés #asile #migrations #Turquie #Grèce #push-back #refoulement #refoulements

    • Greece illegally deported 60,000 migrants to Turkey: report

      Greece illegally deported 60,000 migrants to Turkey, documents released by Turkey reportedly show. The process involves returning asylum seekers without assessing their status.

      Greece illegally deported about 60,000 migrants to Turkey between 2017 and 2018, according to a report on the online news portal of weekly German magazine Spiegel, published on Wednesday evening.

      Turkey is accusing Greece of not properly dealing with the asylum status of migrants. Instead, Turkish Interior Ministry files claim that Greece illegally transported 58,283 people to Turkey in the 12 month period leading up to November 1, 2018.

      Greece is disputing the accusations, with Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsokasis saying Ankara was playing games: “Those people who have used the refugee crisis to their own ends should be more careful when dealing with Greece.”

      A Greek Foreign Ministry spokesman told German news agency dpa that Athens had denied similar accusations “many times” already.

      This so-called “push back” of asylum seekers is illegal under European and international law. The state is obliged to assess the asylum status of new migrants rather than sending them to another country.

      Where were the migrants from?

      According to the Turkish documents, the largest proportion of migrants sent away from Greece were Pakistani, with large numbers from Somalia, Algeria and Bangladesh. 4,500 were Syrians.

      Turkish officials said they sent back most of the people back to their countries of origin except for the Syrians, who were sent back to the Turkish town where they originally registered as refugees.

      The governor of the Turkish-Greek border region of Edirne reported that over 90,000 migrants were arrested between January and September 2019, a big increase from the 30,000 arrested in the same region in 2016.

      https://www.dw.com/en/greece-illegally-deported-60000-migrants-to-turkey-report/a-51234698?maca=en-Twitter-sharing

    • Thousands of ’illegal’ Syrians and other migrants ejected from Istanbul

      Turkey says it has expelled nearly 50,000 migrants from Istanbul, including more than 6,000 Syrians. The government says the migrants were in the city illegally and will be made to leave Turkey.
      The Istanbul governor’s office said on Friday that 42,888 “illegal” migrants had been arrested and sent to repatriation centers, to be removed later from Turkey. It said 6,416 Syrians had been placed in “temporary refugee centers.”

      A campaign from July through to the end of October was aimed at reducing the number of unregistered refugees in Turkey’s biggest city. The country hosts about 3.6 million Syrians — more than any other country.

      Syrians who are registered in Turkey are given “temporary protection”, as the Turkish government does not offer them formal refugee status. Under the system, the Syrians have to stay in the province to which they were initially assigned, and can only visit other cities with short-term passes.

      In July, officials said that 547,000 Syrians were officially registered in Istanbul, and that no new registrations were being accepted. Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu said at the time that the aim was to expel 80,000 undocumented migrants by the end of the year.

      •••• ➤ Watch: Syrian refugees not ready to go home

      Public sentiment in Turkey towards Syrian refugees has worsened in recent years. The Turkish government wants to settle some of them in an area it now controls in northeast Syria, after it launched an offensive last month against the Kurdish YPG militia.

      Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch last month published reports saying Turkey was forcibly sending Syrian refugees to northern Syria. Turkey’s foreign ministry called the claims in the reports “false and imaginary.”

      https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/20903/thousands-of-illegal-syrians-and-other-migrants-ejected-from-istanbul

    • Refugees ‘tortured and beaten by Greek soldiers’ before being sent back to Turkey

      Bruised and bandaged, a group of refugees show off the injuries they claim were caused by Greek soldiers. One says he was blindfolded and burnt with a cigarette while another said his foot ended up broken in several places. A third migrant claims the authorities confiscated his money and clothes while others say they have been hit over the head with sticks. Their allegations form part of a growing number of complaints made against Greek soldiers at the border with Turkey. In the past year, hundreds of people claim to have been tortured and abused before being physically pushed back over the border.

      Under international law, Greece is obliged to register any illegal immigrant that enters its territory. But Turkey claims they forcibly reject them and this year alone they allege Greece returned some 25,404 undocumented migrants. That figure has not been independently verified but there are allegations of severe abuse, which includes withholding food and water. Musaddiq Javed from Pakistan was one of 30 men who entered Greece last week on foot. He said the group were arrested as they walked towards #Xanthi but the police handed them over to Greek soldiers who allegedly ripped the Turkish liras they found on them. He recalled: ‘The soldiers brought me in a room and blindfolded me. They then burned my hand with a cigarette and kicked my feet.’

      Muhammad Nainiya from Morocco added: ‘They brought us near a river and put us on a boat and hit our heads with sticks.’ He said they were made to walk back into Turkey and eventually reached a village where local residents gave them clothes. Muhammed added: ‘The doctor told me that I had three broken bones on my foot and that it would need surgery. I had the surgery and stayed in the hospital for a week.’ The men are now staying at a refugee centre in Turkey after receiving medical treatment while the Greek authorities have yet to comment on the claims.

      Greece is struggling with the number of refugees on both the mainland and the islands. It has camps on five Aegean islands (Lesbos, Chios, Samos, Kos and Leros) with an official capacity of 6,178 people. Two days ago it was holding 35,590 men, women and children in unsanitary and dangerous conditions. The Greek government has pledged a crackdown and plans to convert the refugee camps into detention centres. Human rights groups say it would make it easier for Greece to detain asylum seekers for longer and scrap protections for already vulnerable people. Turkey and the EU signed a refugee deal in March 2016 which aimed to discourage irregular migration through the Aegean Sea. People arriving by boat to the Greek islands were to be returned to Turkey in exchange for EU nations to take Syrian refugees from Turkey.

      https://metro.co.uk/2019/11/26/refugees-tortured-beaten-greek-soldiers-sent-back-turkey-11223565/?ito=article.desktop.share.top.twitter

    • Illegal push-backs in Evros. Evidence of human rights abuses at the Greece/Turkey border


      https://static1.squarespace.com/static/597473fe9de4bb2cc35c376a/t/5dcd1da2fefabc596320f228/1573723568483/Illegal+Evros+pushbacks+Report_Mobile+Info+Team_final.pdf
      #Mobile_Info_Team

      Résumé ici:

      Mobile Info Team have published a new report on pushbacks from Greece to Turkey in the Evros region. They have been gathering data since August 2018 and have brought together 27 testimonies from people who have experienced this illegal practice.

      The procedure is similar in all cases. Firstly, arrest and capture by Greek police inside Greek territory, then detention and confiscation of personal property, followed by coordinated handoffs/transfers to authorities and finally, collective expulsion across the Evros River in small boats.

      The violent practices of Greek police are of critical concern. Established legal procedures stipulate that Greek police would meet asylum seekers on Greek land, escort them to police stations, take their personal data and register their requests for asylum. Their reported actions however ranged from complicit handovers to unidentified ‘commando’ groups, to perpetrating acts of violence and theft themselves.

      Many of the testimonies are deeply disturbing, although all pushbacks are illegal regardless of whether an individual or group is subjected to violence. Often people reported the deprivation of food and water, theft of property, detention in dirty and cramped spaces, unprovoked violent beatings and even electric shocks.

      https://medium.com/are-you-syrious/ays-daily-digest-27-11-19-evros-pushbacks-report-human-rights-abuses-at-gree

    • Έξι Μετανάστες Πέθαναν Από το Κρύο στον Έβρο

      Μια νέα θανάσιμη διαδρομή ανησυχεί τις Αρχές, ενώ οι ροές στον Έβρο αυξάνονται.

      Έξι μετανάστες βρέθηκαν νεκροί από το κρύο στον Έβρο, σε διάστημα 48 ωρών. Είναι η πρώτη φορά που καταγράφεται αντίστοιχος αριθμός θανάτων από υποθερμία, σε τόσο μικρό διάστημα. Επιπλέον, τα σημεία όπου εντοπίστηκαν τα τέσσερα από τα έξι θύματα, μαρτυρά ότι οι άνθρωποι που περνούν τον Έβρο και κατευθύνονται προς την ενδοχώρα επιλέγουν μια νέα διαδρομή, που ακολουθεί παράλληλα τα ελληνο-βουλγαρικά σύνορα και αποδεικνύεται θανάσιμη λόγω του άγριου εδάφους και των εξαιρετικά χαμηλών θερμοκρασιών.

      Το VICE πληροφορείται ότι οι έξι νεκροί μετανάστες βρέθηκαν στη διάρκεια του Σαββατοκύριακου, σε διαφορετικά σημεία. Πρόκειται για τέσσερις άντρες και δύο γυναίκες. Δεν υπάρχει κανένα στοιχείο για την ταυτότητά τους, καθώς δεν είχαν έγγραφα. Οι δύο γυναίκες είναι αφρικανικής καταγωγής, ενώ η ηλικία των θυμάτων εκτιμάται μεταξύ 18 και 30 ετών.

      Τα δύο πρώτα θύματα βρέθηκαν κοντά στο ποτάμι, σε χωράφι έξω από το χωριό Γεμιστή. Οι υπόλοιποι τέσσερις άνθρωποι, όμως, εντοπίστηκαν πολύ μακριά από τον Έβρο. Πιο ειδικά, δύο στο 17ο χιλιόμετρο της επαρχιακής οδού Μεγάλου Δέρειου-Σαπών και δύο έξω από το χωριό Κόρυμβος. Οι Αρχές προσπαθούν να διαπιστώσουν αν οι τέσσερις νεκροί στον ορεινό όγκο ήταν στην ίδια ομάδα που είχε περάσει τον Έβρο.

      Οι τελευταίοι θάνατοι, αλλά και μαρτυρίες ανθρώπων που κατάφεραν να φθάσουν στη Θεσσαλονίκη, αποκαλύπτουν ότι υπάρχει μια νέα διαδρομή μεταναστών. Προσπαθώντας να αποφύγουν την Εγνατία Οδό και τους ελέγχους της Αστυνομίας, οι μετανάστες περνούν το ποτάμι και κατευθύνονται στον ορεινό όγκο πίσω από το Σουφλί. Έπειτα, περπατούν κατά μήκος των ελληνο-βουλγαρικών συνόρων, ακολουθώντας χωμάτινους δρόμους και τις οδηγίες διακινητών που λαμβάνουν μέσω στιγμάτων στο GPS. Εκτός από τις οδηγίες, δεν έχει διαπιστωθεί φυσική παρουσία διακινητών κατά μήκος της διαδρομής, αναφέρουν πηγές.

      Οι μετανάστες θέλουν να φθάσουν στην Κομοτηνή και από εκεί να πάρουν το λεωφορείο για τη Θεσσαλονίκη. Το ταξίδι με τα πόδια από τον Έβρο ως την Κομοτηνή, μπορεί να διαρκέσει ως και επτά μέρες, ανάλογα με τις καιρικές συνθήκες. Η απότομη αλλαγή του καιρού και η σφοδρή κακοκαιρία που έπληξε την περιοχή, φαίνεται ότι ευθύνονται για τους μαζικούς θανάτους των τελευταίων ημερών, σε συνδυασμό με το γεγονός ότι στο βουνό δεν υπάρχουν σημάδια για να ακολουθήσουν.

      Όσοι μετανάστες επιλέγουν την παραπάνω διαδρομή, επιθυμούν να συνεχίσουν βόρεια προς την Ευρώπη, χωρίς να καταγραφούν στην Ελλάδα. Υπάρχει κάτι ακόμη. Άνθρωποι που περπάτησαν κατά μήκος των ελληνο-βουλγαρικών συνόρων ανέφεραν ότι έπεσαν θύματα ληστείας από αγνώστους, που φορούσαν ρούχα παραλλαγής, όπως περιέγραψαν. Σε μια περίπτωση, τους άρπαξαν χρήματα και κινητά. Σε μια δεύτερη, γυναίκα από το Ιράν ανέφερε ότι τους άφησαν να συνεχίσουν, επειδή εκείνη τους μίλησε στα τούρκικα, στοιχείο που δείχνει πιθανή εμπλοκή ατόμων από τα μειονοτικά χωριά.

      Όλα αυτά συμβαίνουν, ενώ οι ροές στον Έβρο αυξάνονται και η κυβέρνηση σχεδιάζει να λάβει επιπλέον μέτρα για την ανάσχεσή τους, μεταξύ αυτών την επέκταση του φράχτη που υπάρχει από το 2012 στο μοναδικό χερσαίο τμήμα των συνόρων. Ο φράχτης έχει μήκος 12 χιλιόμετρα και εκ του αποτελέσματος απλώς μετάφερε τα περάσματα προς τα νότια, σε άλλα σημεία του ποταμού. Στον σχεδιασμό της κυβέρνησης περιλαμβάνεται επίσης η δημιουργία μιας δεύτερης ζώνης ελέγχου στην Εγνατία Οδό, καθώς και η ανάπτυξη των ηλεκτρονικών μέσων με τα οποία ελέγχονται τα περάσματα στον Έβρο.

      https://www.vice.com/gr/article/a355mk/e3i-metanastes-pagwsan-kai-pe8anan-apo-to-krio-ston-ebro

      –----------

      Source : un tweet de Bruno Tersago :

      Bodies of 6 #refugees/#migrants found near #Evros river (border #Greece/#Turkey). Aged between 18 and 30. Apparently frozen to death.

      https://twitter.com/BrunoTersago/status/1204405077936627717

      #décès #morts #mourir_de_froid

    • Six migrants retrouvés morts de froid à la frontière gréco-turque

      Six migrants ont été retrouvés morts de froid ces derniers jours dans la région de l’Evros, à la frontière entre la Grèce et la Turquie, a annoncé mardi Pavlos Pavlidis, le médecin légiste de l’hôpital d’Alexandroupoli en charge des autopsies.

      Les six migrants, deux femmes africaines et quatre hommes dont les âges étaient évalués de 18 à 30 ans, sont morts d’hypothermie entre jeudi et dimanche derniers, a précisé à la presse le médecin légiste. Aucun document d’identité n’a été retrouvé sur ces migrants, rendant le processus d’identification complexe. La région frontalière de l’Evros séparant la Grèce de la Turquie est un lieu de passage privilégié par les passeurs depuis la signature de l’accord UE-Turquie en 2016 et le renforcement des patrouilles navales en mer Égée.

      Malgré un mur de 12 km de long à la frontière gréco-turque, les trafiquants ont trouvé des points de passage pour les migrants, situés au sud des barbelés. Le gouvernement grec a annoncé en novembre l’embauche de 400 gardes-frontières dans la région de l’Evros et le renforcement de la surveillance à la frontière avec des radars infrarouges. La traversée de la rivière est particulièrement dangereuse. De nombreux migrants ont été retrouvés noyés ces dernières années. Des réseaux de passeurs entassent également souvent des dizaines de migrants dans des voitures, conduites à grande vitesse pour échapper aux contrôles policiers, entraînant des accidents fréquents.

      Début novembre, quarante-et-un migrants ont été découverts vivants, cachés dans un camion frigorifique intercepté sur une autoroute du nord de la Grèce. Pour la première fois depuis 2016, la Grèce est redevenue cette année la principale porte d’entrée des demandeurs d’asile en Europe. Le flux migratoire via les îles de la mer Egée face à la Turquie reste le plus important avec plus de 55000 arrivées en 2019 selon le HCR, l’Agence des Nations unies pour les réfugiés. Mais les arrivées via la frontière terrestre avec la Turquie sont en augmentation depuis 2018. En 2019, plus de 14000 personnes ont emprunté ce chemin périlleux selon le HCR.

      https://www.lefigaro.fr/flash-actu/six-migrants-retrouves-morts-de-froid-a-la-frontiere-greco-turque-20191210

    • Statement: Four Push-Back Operations at the Greek-Turkish Land Border Witnessed by the Alarm Phone

      The Alarm Phone witnessed four illegal push-back operations at the Greek-Turkish land border over the course of ten days.

      CASE 1: The first case occurred on Saturday the 30th of June 2018. In the early morning, we had been informed about a group of people along the Turkish-Greek land border that was in need of support. Five of them were from Syria, five from Sierra Leone, six men, two women, and two children. We contacted the travellers, received their GPS position, and notified the police to their whereabouts, as the travellers had asked us to do. The police confirmed to us that they would search for them. Hours later, in the early afternoon, one of the members of the group told us that she was on her way back to Istanbul. She informed us about what had happened to them: At around 9am local time, they had been found by Greek officers in blue & black uniforms. Their belongings was taken away, and at least 5 of them were forced back to Turkey. They had not taken any pictures as their phones had been taken away. Our contact person had been able to hide her phone. They were kept in confinement for about one hour and treated badly, “like dogs” she said, before being forced onto a boat that returned them illegally to Turkey.

      CASE 2: On Thursday the 5th of July, the second push-back operation was observed by the Alarm Phone. We had received a distress call from a group of Syrian, Iraqi, Yemeni and Sudanese migrants who had crossed into Greece seeking international protection. The group was found by the Greek police. The police handed the group to Greek officers who did not hesitate to use violence and intimidation. They were beaten, robbed, and forced onto a boat that returned them to Turkish territory.

      CASE 3: In the night of 5th-6th of July 2018, a group of 12 people from Syria and Iraq, including two women, one of whom was elderly, two children (six and eleven years old), and eight men, was reportedly apprehended on Greek soil near Mikrochori in Evros region and pushed back to Turkey. It remains unclear what happened to them upon return to Turkey.

      CASE 4: In the night of 9th-10th of July 2018, 19 people from Syria and Iraq, including a one-year-old child, a pregnant woman and a man with a broken leg, were reportedly pushed-back from Greece to Turkey at the land border in Evros. They arrived on 9th July and had sent a SOS-call to the Alarm Phone. The first GPS coordinates received showed their position near Filakto. The group said they had sick kids with them and they were very hungry. A second set of GPS coordinates sent showed them at a position near Provatonas. Communications with the group broke down in the afternoon and only in the late morning of the next day, the group answered again – now from Turkey. They reported that ‘the police’ had found them around 5pm on the 9th of July. They brought them to a place the migrants described as ‘a prison’. At 10pm, the officers allegedly wearing blue trousers and camouflage sweaters, told the group that they would be moved to a camp so that they could apply for international protection. However, instead, they brought them back to the river. There, according to one testimony, the men of the group were beaten. Their belongings such as phones, money, passports and the food for the infant were taken away. They were then put onto a boat at the river and were threatened not to come back to Greece again.

      Reacting to our questions concerning cases 3 and 4, the Greek police stated that they had not found anyone at the positions we had provided them with.

      The Alarm Phone, when receiving distress calls from groups in the Evros border region who report to have persons among them with special needs, such as pregnant women, people with disabilities, toddlers and infants, elderly or sick, informs the respective authorities (Greek and /or Turkish) upon request of the people in need. In these four cases, GPS positions shared with us showed clearly locations on Greek soil. Despite this fact and despite many requests for assistance made toward the responsible authorities, the people ended up back in Turkey. Instead of getting access to protection in Greece as requested in their calls for help and their claims to asylum, they were returned to a place where they stated they would be in danger.

      The Alarm Phone is very concerned about repeated testimonies of illegal push-backs at the Greek-Turkish land border. We demand respect for the people’s human rights and dignity, as well as for the international law, which is clearly beached in such push-back operations.

      https://alarmphone.org/en/2018/07/06/four-push-back-operations-at-the-greek-turkish-land-border-witnessed-by-

    • The Turkish Woman Who Fled Her Country only To Get Sent Back

      #Ayşe_Erdoğan was persecuted in Turkey as an alleged follower of the Gülen movement. The young teacher fled to Greece to seek refuge. This is how she wound up back in a Turkish prison.

      As Ayşe Erdoğan reached for her mobile phone to film herself, she was already aware of the risk she was facing. She had managed to cross over into Greece from Turkey, meaning she had made it to Europe. But she still wasn’t home free.

      On the morning of May 4, 2019, Erdoğan, a 28-year-old math teacher from Turkey, hid near the Greek village of Nea Vyssa. Accompanied by two Turkish traveling companions, she had succeeded in crossing the Evros, a wild river that forms a natural border between the two countries but whose current is so strong that it often sweeps migrants away to their deaths.

      Erdoğan, who bears no relation to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, had been sentenced to more than six years in prison in Turkey. Authorities there had accused her of belonging to the sect of the Islamist cleric Fethullah Gülen, which Ankara considers a terrorist organization. Erdoğan was allowed to leave prison until the start of her appeal, but only under the condition that she remain in Turkey.

      Shortly after her release, she fled. She traveled to the north to reach Europe, just as thousands of other Turks who are persecuted as Gülen supporters have done.

      Erdoğan wanted to file an application for political asylum. The Turkish national wanted to exercise the right the European Union grants to every individual who reaches European soil — at least in theory.

      “We are Turkish political asylum-seekers,” Erdoğan said in one video she recorded on her phone. “We fled persecution back in Turkey. We are hiding near Nea Vyssa in fear of pushback.” She sent the videos to her brother Ihsan, who was already in Athens. A journalist later posted the video on Twitter, and the Greek daily Kathimerini also reported on her case.

      Using WhatsApp, Erdoğan sent her location to her brother. She also sent emails to Greek human rights lawyers and the head of the UNHCR, the UN refugee agency. “If we push back to Turkey, our life will be in danger,” she wrote.

      That same day, Erdoğan was taken back across the Evros. Turkish border officials apprehended her and the two Turkish nationals traveling with her the next morning at 8:10 a.m. and put them in jail. A court convicted Erdoğan the next day for violating the terms of her parole by leaving the country.

      For the first time, Forensic Architecture, a research agency based at Goldsmiths College at the University of London, has reconstructed the precise events in the hours leading up to Erdoğan’s capture. DER SPIEGEL also interviewed the brother and Ayşe Erdoğan’s lawyers in addition to reviewing Turkish court documents.

      The data and documents lead to just one conclusion: Ayşe Erdoğan had made it to Greece and was in the hands of Greek authorities before she was returned to Turkey. These were presumably Greek border guards or police. Erdoğan herself claims to have been picked up at a Greek police station by masked men.

      Responding to a request for comment from DER SPIEGEL, the Greek police stated that they "always comply with Greek and European law in the performance of their duties.” Officials would not comment on the specific case in question. Back in December, DER SPIEGEL and Forensic Architecture analyzed videos showing how the illegal pushbacks along the Evros apparently take place: Masked men speaking with Greek accents are seen taking people who have fled to Greece across to the Turkish side of the Evros in motorized dinghies. Refugees who claim they were pushed back also say they were abused and that their mobile phones were rendered unusable.

      All available evidence suggests that the Greek authorities are carrying out systematic pushbacks. DER SPIEGEL has previously reported on Turkish documents which suggest that Greece is illegally deporting tens of thousands of migrants and refugees. Following the revelations, the European Commission demanded an investigation into the accusations, though this has yet to happen.

      The only person who has followed up on the pushback allegations is the Greek ombudsman, the agency responsible for independently monitoring the country’s authorities. The agency opened a general investigation into the issue in June 2017. It is now investigating more than half a dozen cases, including the videos published by DER SPIEGEL.

      However, the Greek authorities have expressed little interest in the videos. A police spokesman told DER SPIEGEL in January: “There won’t be any investigation because there are no pushbacks on the Evros.”

      But Ayşe Erdoğan’s case suggests it is very likely that this statement isn’t true. It underscores suspicions that Greek border officials are deporting even Turkish asylum-seekers without granting them any asylum procedures, even though these people are the subject of political persecution in their home country.

      The pushbacks violate international law, European Union law as well as Greek law, since every refugee has the right to fair asylum proceedings. Moreover, those who apply for asylum cannot be sent back to countries where they could be in danger or threatened with persecution. That, however, appears to be exactly what happened to Erdoğan.

      The fact that Erdoğan repeatedly shared her location with her brother on WhatsApp and took a selfie together with the two people accompanying her in the village center of Nea Vyssa has been helpful in the effort to reconstruct events. A government building can be seen in the photo, including its logo. Another lawyer, Nikolaos Ouzounidis, met with the group in Nea Vyssa and also took a photo of them.

      In collaboration with the Greek NGO HumanRights360, Forensic Architecture analyzed the photos, videos, WhatsApp messages, emails, court files and police reports. Among other steps, the agency compared the photos to images from Google Earth. This made it possible to verify that Erdoğan had, in fact, entered Greece before her arrest.

      There is no doubt that Ayşe and the two accompanying her had been in Nea Vyssa that day. “I saw them with my own eyes,” said Ouzounidis.

      Erdoğan contacted the police station in Nea Vyssa, near the Turkish border, to apply for asylum. But Greek police brought them to a police station in Neo Cheimonio, a town 18 kilometers (11 miles) south of Nea Vyssa. This is evidenced in Erdoğan’s WhatsApp locations and her testimony in court, which has been obtained by DER SPIEGEL.

      Ouzounidis tried to speak to Erdoğan at the police station twice — first on his own and later with her brother, Ihsan, who had come from Athens. Both times, police informed the lawyer that no one with that name was being held at the station. Officially, at least, there was never any arrest or charges filed.

      At 6:53 p.m., Erdoğan once again shared her location with her brother on WhatsApp, with the pin pointing to the police station. It would be the last message that Ayşe Erdoğan would send from Greece.

      “I thought Ayşe was safe,” said Ihsan Erdoğan. “But they just brushed us off at the police station.” Ihsan found out the next day from his parents that his sister had been deported to Turkey and arrested there.

      The Turkish court documents provide details about how Erdoğan experienced her pushback. They describe how masked men put them in a car and took them back to the Evros River. "They put us in a car, took us to Meriç river (Eds. note: as the Evros is known in Turkey) again, put us in an inflatable boat, and took us back to the Turkish banks. Thus, we weren’t able to apply for asylum.”

      Turkish police officers apprehended Erdoğan the next morning. A court in the province of Edirne convicted her the following morning on charges of illegally fleeing the country. The court transcript states that, “The accused violated the rules of her parole and left the country via illegal routes but was deported and returned to Turkey.”

      As part of her defense, Erdoğan claimed that she had felt isolated after her release from prison, that she was no longer able to find work and that even her friends weren’t speaking to her anymore. She told the court that she regretted having fled. “I am the victim,” Erdoğan said, according to the court transcript.

      Her brother Ihsan also denied to DER SPIEGEL that he or Ayşe were members of the Gülen sect.

      Turkish President Erdoğan has blamed the Gülen movement for the attempted coup in July 2016. In response, the Turkish state ordered the arrest of tens of thousands of Gülen supporters.

      Gülen, who has lived in exile in the United States since the 1990s, has denied the accusations. In public, he presents himself as a modern reformer of moderate Islam. His followers run schools, universities, media organizations, hospitals and foundations in more than 100 countries.

      But people who have left the community have described it as a secret society. “Infiltrating state agencies, maximizing political influence and gaining control of the state is seen as the goal by all those who have been interviewed,” reads one document from Germany’s Foreign Ministry.

      Tens of thousands of the Islamist movement’s followers have found refuge in European countries in recent years. More than 10,000 Turks have applied for asylum in Greece alone since 2016.

      But it’s not clear how many of those applications have been approved. The Greek authorities don’t want to publish that kind of information out of fear of provoking Turkish President Erdoğan, with whom the Greek government already has a tense relationship.

      However, Greek bureaucratic sources say that most of the Turkish refugees who apply for it are granted asylum in Greece. That had also been Ayşe Erdoğan’s hope. Instead, she now finds herself locked up by the Turkish government in a prison in the Gebze province near Istanbul.

      Greece has already thrown out a lawsuit submitted by her lawyers. Erdoğan’s attorney, Maria Papamina of the Greek Council for Refugees, says that all the prosecutor did was obtain assurances from the Greek police that Ayşe Erdoğan had never been registered there.

      She claims that evidence of the pushback wasn’t even taken into consideration. Papamina says she wants to appeal the case and take it right up to Greece’s highest court if she has to — and even further up to the European Court of Human Rights, if need be.

      But the only likely real chance Ayşe Erdoğan would have of getting released from prison would be through her appeal to Turkey’s highest court, but her chances are slim. There’s much to suggest that Ayşe Erdoğan will spend years in a Turkish prison.

      https://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/the-turkish-woman-who-fled-her-country-only-to-get-sent-back-a-fd2989c7-0439

  • #Grèce : Des enfants demandeurs d’asile privés d’école

    À cause de sa politique migratoire appuyée par l’Union européenne qui bloque des milliers d’enfants demandeurs d’asile dans les îles de la mer Égée, la Grèce prive ces enfants de leur droit à l’éducation, a déclaré Human Rights Watch aujourd’hui.
    Le rapport de 51 pages, intitulé « ‘Without Education They Lose Their Future’ : Denial of Education to Child Asylum Seekers on the Greek Islands » (« ‘Déscolarisés, c’est leur avenir qui leur échappe’ : Les enfants demandeurs d’asile privés d’éducation sur les îles grecques », résumé et recommandations disponibles en français), a constaté que moins de 15 % des enfants en âge d’être scolarisés vivant dans les îles, soit plus de 3 000, étaient inscrits dans des établissements publics à la fin de l’année scolaire 2017-2018, et que dans les camps que gère l’État dans les îles, seuls une centaine, tous des élèves de maternelle, avaient accès à l’enseignement officiel. Les enfants demandeurs d’asile vivant dans les îles grecques sont exclus des opportunités d’instruction qu’ils auraient dans la partie continentale du pays. La plupart de ceux qui ont pu aller en classe l’ont fait parce qu’ils ont pu quitter les camps gérés par l’État grâce à l’aide des autorités locales ou de volontaires.

    « La Grèce devrait abandonner sa politique consistant à confiner aux îles les enfants demandeurs d’asile et leurs familles, puisque depuis deux ans, l’État s’est avéré incapable d’y scolariser les enfants », a déclaré Bill Van Esveld, chercheur senior de la division Droits des enfants à Human Rights Watch. « Abandonner ces enfants sur des îles où ils ne peuvent pas aller en classe leur fait du tort et viole les propres lois de la Grèce. »

    Human Rights Watch s’est entretenue avec 107 enfants demandeurs d’asile et migrants en âge d’être scolarisés vivant dans les îles, ainsi qu’avec des responsables du ministère de l’Éducation, de l’ONU et de groupes humanitaires locaux. Elle a également examiné la législation en vigueur.

    L’État grec applique une politique appuyée par l’UE qui consiste à maintenir dans les îles les demandeurs d’asile qui arrivent de Turquie par la mer jusqu’à ce que leurs dossiers de demande d’asile soient traités. Le gouvernement soutient que ceci est nécessaire au regard de l’accord migratoire que l’EU et la Turquie ont signé en mars 2016. Le processus de traitement est censé être rapide et les personnes appartenant aux groupes vulnérables sont censées en être exemptées. Mais Human Rights Watch a parlé à des familles qui avaient été bloquées jusqu’à 11 mois dans les camps, souvent à cause des longs délais d’attente pour être convoqué aux entretiens relatifs à leur demande d’asile, ou parce qu’elles ont fait appel du rejet de leur demande.

    Même si l’État grec a transféré plus de 10 000 demandeurs d’asile vers la Grèce continentale depuis novembre, il refuse de mettre fin à sa politique de confinement. En avril 2018, la Cour suprême grecque a invalidé cette politique pour les nouveaux arrivants. Au lieu d’appliquer ce jugement, le gouvernement a émis une décision administrative et promulgué une loi afin de rétablir la politique.

    D’après la loi grecque, la scolarité est gratuite et obligatoire pour tous les enfants de 5 à 15 ans, y compris ceux qui demandent l’asile. Le droit international garantit à tous les enfants le même droit de recevoir un enseignement primaire et secondaire, sans discrimination. Les enfants vivant en Grèce continentale, non soumis à la politique de confinement, ont pu s’inscrire dans l’enseignement officiel.

    Selon l’office humanitaire de la Commission européenne, ECHO, « l’éducation est cruciale » pour les filles et garçons touchés par des crises. Cette institution ajoute que l’éducation permet aux enfants de « retrouver un certain sens de normalité et de sécurité », d’acquérir des compétences importantes pour leur vie, et que c’est « un des meilleurs outils pour investir dans leur avenir, ainsi que dans la paix, la stabilité et la croissance économique de leur pays ».

    Une fille afghane de 12 ans, qui avait séjourné pendant six mois dans un camp géré par l’État grec dans les îles, a déclaré qu’avant de fuir la guerre, elle était allée à l’école pendant sept ans, et qu’elle voulait y retourner. « Si nous n’étudions pas, nous n’aurons pas d’avenir et nous ne pourrons pas réussir, puisque nous [ne serons pas] instruits, nous ne saurons parler aucune langue étrangère », a-t-elle déclaré.

    Plusieurs groupes non gouvernementaux prodiguent un enseignement informel aux enfants demandeurs d’asile dans les îles, mais d’après les personnes qui y travaillent, rien ne peut remplacer l’enseignement officiel. Par exemple il existe une école de ce type dans le camp de Moria géré par l’État sur l’île de Lesbos, mais elle ne dispose qu’à temps partiel d’une salle dans un préfabriqué, ce qui signifie que les enfants ne peuvent recevoir qu’une heure et demie d’enseignement par jour. « Ils font de leur mieux et nous leur en sommes reconnaissants, mais ce n’est pas une véritable école », a fait remarquer un père.

    D’autres assurent le transport vers des écoles situées à l’extérieur des camps, mais ne peuvent pas emmener les enfants qui sont trop jeunes pour s’y rendre tout seuls. Certains élèves vivant à l’extérieur des camps de l’État suivent un enseignement informel et ont également reçu l’aide de volontaires ou de groupes non gouvernementaux afin de s’inscrire dans l’enseignement public. Ainsi des volontaires ont aidé un garçon kurde de 13 ans vivant à Pipka, un site situé à l’extérieur des camps de l’île de Lesbos, désormais menacé de fermeture, à s’inscrire dans un établissement public, où il est déjà capable de suivre la classe en grec

    Des parents et des enseignants estimaient que la routine scolaire pourrait aider les enfants demandeurs d’asile à se remettre des expériences traumatisantes qu’ils ont vécues dans leurs pays d’origine et lors de leur fuite. À l’inverse, le manque d’accès à l’enseignement, combiné aux insuffisances du soutien psychologique, exacerbe le stress et l’anxiété qui découlent du fait d’être coincé pendant des mois dans des camps peu sûrs et surpeuplés. Évoquant les conditions du camp de Samos, une fille de 17 ans qui a été violée au Maroc a déclaré : « [ça] me rappelle ce que j’ai traversé. Moi, j’espérais être en sécurité. »

    Le ministère grec de la Politique d’immigration, qui est responsable de la politique de confinement et des camps des îles, n’a pas répondu aux questions que Human Rights Watch lui avait adressées au sujet de la scolarisation des enfants demandeurs d’asile et migrants vivant dans ces îles. Plusieurs professionnels de l’éducation ont déclaré qu’il existait un manque de transparence autour de l’autorité que le ministère de l’Immigration exerçait sur l’enseignement dans les îles. Une commission du ministère de l’Éducation sur la scolarisation des réfugiés a rapporté en 2017 que le ministère de l’Immigration avait fait obstacle à certains projets visant à améliorer l’enseignement dans les îles.

    Le ministère de l’Éducation a mis en place deux programmes clés pour aider les enfants demandeurs d’asile de toute la Grèce qui ne parlent pas grec et ont souvent été déscolarisés pendant des années, à intégrer l’enseignement public et à y réussir, mais l’un comme l’autre excluaient la plupart des enfants vivant dans les camps des îles gérés par l’État.

    En 2018, le ministère a ouvert des écoles maternelles dans certains camps des îles, et en mai, environ 32 enfants d’un camp géré par une municipalité de Lesbos ont pu s’inscrire dans des écoles primaires – même si l’année scolaire se terminait en juin. Le ministère a déclaré que plus de 1 100 enfants demandeurs d’asile avaient fréquenté des écoles des îles à un moment ou un autre de l’année scolaire 2017-2018, mais apparemment ils étaient nombreux à avoir quitté les îles avant la fin de l’année.

    Une loi adoptée en juin a permis de clarifier le droit à l’éducation des demandeurs d’asile et, le 9 juillet, le ministère de l’Éducation a déclaré qu’il prévoyait d’ouvrir 15 classes supplémentaires destinées aux enfants demandeurs d’asile des îles pour l’année scolaire 2018-2019. Ce serait une mesure très positive, à condition qu’elle soit appliquée à temps, contrairement aux programmes annoncés les années précédentes. Même dans ce cas, elle laisserait sur le carreau la majorité des enfants demandeurs d’asile et migrants en âge d’être scolarisés, à moins que le nombre d’enfants vivant dans les îles ne diminue.

    « La Grèce a moins de deux mois devant elle pour veiller à ce que les enfants qui ont risqué leur vie pour atteindre ses rivages puissent aller en classe lorsque l’année scolaire débutera, une échéance qu’elle n’a jamais réussi à respecter auparavant », a conclu Bill Van Esveld. « L’Union européenne devrait encourager le pays à respecter le droit de ces enfants à l’éducation en renonçant à sa politique de confinement et en autorisant les enfants demandeurs d’asile et leurs familles à quitter les îles pour qu’ils puissent accéder à l’enseignement et aux services dont ils ont besoin. »

    https://www.hrw.org/fr/news/2018/07/18/grece-des-enfants-demandeurs-dasile-prives-decole
    #enfance #enfants #éducation #îles #mer_Egée #asile #migrations #réfugiés #école #éducation #rapport #Lesbos #Samos #Chios

    Lien vers le rapport :
    https://www.hrw.org/report/2018/07/18/without-education-they-lose-their-future/denial-education-child-asylum-seekers

  • J’essaie de compiler ici des liens et documents sur les processus d’ #externalisation des #frontières en #Libye, notamment des accords avec l’#UE #EU.

    Les documents sur ce fil n’ont pas un ordre chronologique très précis... (ça sera un boulot à faire ultérieurement... sic)

    Les négociations avec l’#Italie sont notamment sur ce fil :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/600874
    #asile #migrations #réfugiés

    Peut-être qu’Isabelle, @isskein, pourra faire ce travail de mise en ordre chronologique quand elle rentrera de vacances ??

    • Ici, un des derniers articles en date... par la suite de ce fil des articles plus anciens...

      Le supplice sans fin des migrants en Libye

      Ils sont arrivés en fin d’après-midi, blessés, épuisés, à bout. Ce 23 mai, près de 117 Soudanais, Ethiopiens et Erythréens se sont présentés devant la mosquée de Beni Oualid, une localité située à 120 km au sud-ouest de Misrata, la métropole portuaire de la Tripolitaine (Libye occidentale). Ils y passeront la nuit, protégés par des clercs religieux et des résidents. Ces nouveaux venus sont en fait des fugitifs. Ils se sont échappés d’une « prison sauvage », l’un de ces centres carcéraux illégaux qui ont proliféré autour de Beni Oualid depuis que s’est intensifié, ces dernières années, le flux de migrants et de réfugiés débarquant du Sahara vers le littoral libyen dans l’espoir de traverser la Méditerranée.

      Ces migrants d’Afrique subsaharienne – mineurs pour beaucoup – portent dans leur chair les traces de violences extrêmes subies aux mains de leurs geôliers : corps blessés par balles, brûlés ou lacérés de coups. Selon leurs témoignages, quinze de leurs camarades d’évasion ont péri durant leur fuite.

      Cris de douleur
      A Beni Oualid, un refuge héberge nombre de ces migrants en détresse. Des blocs de ciment nu cernés d’une terre ocre : l’abri, géré par une ONG locale – Assalam – avec l’assistance médicale de Médecins sans frontières (MSF), est un havre rustique mais dont la réputation grandit. Des migrants y échouent régulièrement dans un piètre état. « Beaucoup souffrent de fractures aux membres inférieurs, de fractures ouvertes infectées, de coups sur le dos laissant la chair à vif, d’électrocution sur les parties génitales », rapporte Christophe Biteau, le chef de la mission MSF pour la -Libye, rencontré à Tunis.

      Leurs tortionnaires les ont kidnappés sur les routes migratoires. Les migrants et réfugiés seront détenus et suppliciés aussi longtemps qu’ils n’auront pas payé une rançon, à travers les familles restées au pays ou des amis ayant déjà atteint Tripoli. Technique usuelle pour forcer les résistances, les détenus torturés sont sommés d’appeler leurs familles afin que celles-ci puissent entendre en « direct » les cris de douleur au téléphone.

      Les Erythréens, Somaliens et Soudanais sont particulièrement exposés à ce racket violent car, liés à une diaspora importante en Europe, ils sont censés être plus aisément solvables que les autres. Dans la région de Beni Oualid, toute cette violence subie, ajoutée à une errance dans des zones désertiques, emporte bien des vies. D’août 2017 à mars 2018, 732 migrants ont trouvé la mort autour de Beni Oualid, selon Assalam.

      En Libye, ces prisons « sauvages » qui parsèment les routes migratoires vers le littoral, illustration de l’osmose croissante entre réseaux historiques de passeurs et gangs criminels, cohabitent avec un système de détention « officiel ». Les deux systèmes peuvent parfois se croiser, en raison de l’omnipotence des milices sur le terrain, mais ils sont en général distincts. Affiliés à une administration – le département de lutte contre la migration illégale (DCIM, selon l’acronyme anglais) –, les centres de détention « officiels » sont au nombre d’une vingtaine en Tripolitaine, d’où embarque l’essentiel des migrants vers l’Italie. Si bien des abus s’exercent dans ces structures du DCIM, dénoncés par les organisations des droits de l’homme, il semble que la violence la plus systématique et la plus extrême soit surtout le fait des « prisons sauvages » tenues par des organisations criminelles.

      Depuis que la polémique s’est envenimée en 2017 sur les conditions de détention des migrants, notamment avec le reportage de CNN sur les « marchés aux esclaves », le gouvernement de Tripoli a apparemment cherché à rationaliser ses dispositifs carcéraux. « Les directions des centres font des efforts, admet Christophe Biteau, de MSF-Libye. Le dialogue entre elles et nous s’est amélioré. Nous avons désormais un meilleur accès aux cellules. Mais le problème est que ces structures sont au départ inadaptées. Il s’agit le plus souvent de simples hangars ou de bâtiments vétustes sans isolation. »

      Les responsables de ces centres se plaignent rituellement du manque de moyens qui, selon eux, explique la précarité des conditions de vie des détenus, notamment sanitaires. En privé, certains fustigent la corruption des administrations centrales de Tripoli, qui perçoivent l’argent des Européens sans le redistribuer réellement aux structures de terrain.

      Cruel paradoxe
      En l’absence d’une refonte radicale de ces circuits de financement, la relative amélioration des conditions de détention observée récemment par des ONG comme MSF pourrait être menacée. « Le principal risque, c’est la congestion qui résulte de la plus grande efficacité des gardes-côtes libyens », met en garde M. Biteau. En effet, les unités de la marine libyenne, de plus en plus aidées et équipées par Bruxelles ou Rome, ont multiplié les interceptions de bateaux de migrants au large du littoral de la Tripolitaine.

      Du 1er janvier au 20 juin, elles avaient ainsi reconduit sur la terre ferme près de 9 100 migrants. Du coup, les centres de détention se remplissent à nouveau. Le nombre de prisonniers dans ces centres officiels – rattachés au DCIM – a grimpé en quelques semaines de 5 000 à 7 000, voire à 8 000. Et cela a un impact sanitaire. « Le retour de ces migrants arrêtés en mer se traduit par un regain des affections cutanées en prison », souligne Christophe Biteau.

      Simultanément, l’Organisation mondiale des migrations (OIM) intensifie son programme dit de « retours volontaires » dans leurs pays d’origine pour la catégorie des migrants économiques, qu’ils soient détenus ou non. Du 1er janvier au 20 juin, 8 571 d’entre eux – surtout des Nigérians, Maliens, Gambiens et Guinéens – sont ainsi rentrés chez eux. L’objectif que s’est fixé l’OIM est le chiffre de 30 000 sur l’ensemble de 2018. Résultat : les personnes éligibles au statut de réfugié et ne souhaitant donc pas rentrer dans leurs pays d’origine – beaucoup sont des ressortissants de la Corne de l’Afrique – se trouvent piégées en Libye avec le verrouillage croissant de la frontière maritime.

      Le Haut-Commissariat pour les réfugiés (HCR) des Nations unies en a bien envoyé certains au Niger – autour de 900 – pour que leur demande d’asile en Europe y soit traitée. Cette voie de sortie demeure toutefois limitée, car les pays européens tardent à les accepter. « Les réfugiés de la Corne de l’Afrique sont ceux dont la durée de détention en Libye s’allonge », pointe M. Biteau. Cruel paradoxe pour une catégorie dont la demande d’asile est en général fondée. Une absence d’amélioration significative de leurs conditions de détention représenterait pour eux une sorte de double peine.

      http://lirelactu.fr/source/le-monde/28fdd3e6-f6b2-4567-96cb-94cac16d078a
      #UE #EU

    • Remarks by High Representative/Vice-President Federica Mogherini at the joint press conference with Sven Mikser, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Estonia
      Mogherini:

      if you are asking me about the waves of migrants who are coming to Europe which means through Libya to Italy in this moment, I can tell you that the way in which we are handling this, thanks also to a very good work we have done with the Foreign Ministers of the all 28 Member States, is through a presence at sea – the European Union has a military mission at sea in the Mediterranean, at the same time dismantling the traffickers networks, having arrested more than 100 smugglers, seizing the boats that are used, saving lives – tens of thousands of people were saved but also training the Libyan coasts guards so that they can take care of the dismantling of the smuggling networks in the Libyan territorial waters.

      And we are doing two other things to prevent the losses of lives but also the flourishing of the trafficking of people: inside Libya, we are financing the presence of the International Organisation for Migration and the UNHCR so that they can have access to the detention centres where people are living in awful conditions, save these people, protect these people but also organising voluntary returns to the countries of origin; and we are also working with the countries of origin and transit, in particular Niger, where more than 80% of the flows transit. I can tell you one number that will strike you probably - in the last 9 months through our action with Niger, we moved from 76 000 migrants passing through Niger into Libya to 6 000.

      https://eeas.europa.eu/headquarters/headquarters-homepage/26042/remarks-high-representativevice-president-federica-mogherini-joint-press
      #Libye #Niger #HCR #IOM #OIM #EU #UE #Mogherini #passeurs #smugglers

    • Il risultato degli accordi anti-migranti: aumentati i prezzi dei viaggi della speranza

      L’accordo tra Europa e Italia da una parte e Niger dall’altra per bloccare il flusso dei migranti verso la Libia e quindi verso le nostre coste ha ottenuto risultati miseri. O meglio un paio di risultati li ha avuti: aumentare il prezzo dei trasporti – e quindi i guadagni dei trafficanti di uomini – e aumentare a dismisura i disagi e i rischi dei disperati che cercano in tutti i modi di attraversare il Mediterraneo. Insomma le misure adottate non scoraggiano chi vuole partire. molti di loro muoiono ma non muore la loro speranza di una vita migliore.

      http://www.africa-express.info/2017/02/03/il-risultato-dellaccordo-con-il-niger-sui-migranti-aumentati-prezzi

    • C’était 2016... et OpenMigration publiait cet article:
      Il processo di esternalizzazione delle frontiere europee: tappe e conseguenze di un processo pericoloso

      L’esternalizzazione delle politiche europee e italiane sulle migrazioni: Sara Prestianni ci spiega le tappe fondamentali del processo, e le sue conseguenze più gravi in termini di violazioni dei diritti fondamentali.

      http://openmigration.org/analisi/il-processo-di-esternalizzazione-delle-frontiere-europee-tappe-e-conseguenze-di-un-processo-pericoloso/?platform=hootsuite

    • Per bloccare i migranti 610 milioni di euro dall’Europa e 50 dall’Italia

      Con la Libia ancora fortemente compromessa, la sfida per la gestione dei flussi di migranti dall’Africa sub-sahariana si è di fatto spostata più a Sud, lungo i confini settentrionali del Niger. Uno dei Paesi più poveri al mondo, ma che in virtù della sua stabilità - ha mantenuto pace e democrazia in un’area lacerata dai conflitti - è oggi il principale alleato delle potenze europee nella regione. Gli accordi prevedono che il Niger in cambio di 610 milioni d’ euro dall’Unione Europea, oltre a 50 promessi dall’Italia, sigilli le proprie frontiere settentrionali e imponga un giro di vite ai traffici illegali. È dal Niger infatti che transita gran parte dei migranti sub-sahariani: 450.000, nel 2016, hanno attraversato il deserto fino alle coste libiche, e in misura inferiore quelle algerine. In Italia, attraverso questa rotta, ne sono arrivati 180.000 l’anno scorso e oltre 40.000 nei primi quattro mesi del 2017.


      http://www.lastampa.it/2017/05/31/esteri/per-bloccare-i-migranti-milioni-di-euro-dalleuropa-e-dallitalia-4nPsLCnUURhOkXQl14sp7L/pagina.html

    • The Human Rights Risks of External Migration Policies

      This briefing paper sets out the main human rights risks linked to external migration policies, which are a broad spectrum of actions implemented outside of the territory of the state that people are trying to enter, usually through enhanced cooperation with other countries. From the perspective of international law, external migration policies are not necessarily unlawful. However, Amnesty International considers that several types of external migration policies, and particularly the externalization of border control and asylum-processing, pose significant human rights risks. This document is intended as a guide for activists and policy-makers working on the issue, and includes some examples drawn from Amnesty International’s research in different countries.

      https://www.amnesty.org/en/documents/pol30/6200/2017/en

    • Libya’s coast guard abuses migrants despite E.U. funding and training

      The European Union has poured tens of millions of dollars into supporting Libya’s coast guard in search-and-rescue operations off the coast. But the violent tactics of some units and allegations of human trafficking have generated concerns about the alliance.

      https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/middle_east/libyas-coast-guard-abuses-desperate-migrants-despite-eu-funding-and-training/2017/07/10/f9bfe952-7362-4e57-8b42-40ae5ede1e26_story.html?tid=ss_tw

    • How Libya’s #Fezzan Became Europe’s New Border

      The principal gateway into Europe for refugees and migrants runs through the power vacuum in southern Libya’s Fezzan region. Any effort by European policymakers to stabilise Fezzan must be part of a national-level strategy aimed at developing Libya’s licit economy and reaching political normalisation.

      https://www.crisisgroup.org/middle-east-north-africa/north-africa/libya/179-how-libyas-fezzan-became-europes-new-border
      cc @i_s_

      v. aussi ma tentative cartographique :


      https://seenthis.net/messages/604039

    • Avramopoulos says Sophia could be deployed in Libya

      (ANSAmed) - BRUSSELS, AUGUST 3 - European Commissioner Dimitris Avramopoulos told ANSA in an interview Thursday that it is possible that the #Operation_Sophia could be deployed in Libyan waters in the future. “At the moment, priority should be given to what can be done under the current mandate of Operation Sophia which was just renewed with added tasks,” he said. “But the possibility of the Operation moving to a third stage working in Libyan waters was foreseen from the beginning. If the Libyan authorities ask for this, we should be ready to act”. (ANSAmed).

      http://www.ansamed.info/ansamed/en/news/sections/politics/2017/08/03/avramopoulos-says-sophia-could-be-deployed-in-libya_602d3d0e-f817-42b0-ac3

    • Les ambivalences de Tripoli face à la traite migratoire. Les trafiquants ont réussi à pénétrer des pans entiers des institutions officielles

      Par Frédéric Bobin (Zaouïa, Libye, envoyé spécial)

      LE MONDE Le 25.08.2017 à 06h39 • Mis à jour le 25.08.2017 à 10h54

      Les petits trous dessinent comme des auréoles sur le ciment fauve. Le haut mur hérissé de fils de fer barbelés a été grêlé d’impacts de balles de kalachnikov à deux reprises, la plus récente en juin. « Ils sont bien mieux armés que nous », soupire Khaled Al-Toumi, le directeur du centre de détention de Zaouïa, une municipalité située à une cinquantaine de kilomètres à l’ouest de Tripoli. Ici, au cœur de cette bande côtière de la Libye où se concentre l’essentiel des départs de migrants vers l’Italie, une trentaine d’Africains subsahariens sont détenus – un chiffre plutôt faible au regard des centres surpeuplés ailleurs dans le pays.

      C’est que, depuis les assauts de l’établissement par des hommes armés, Khaled Al-Toumi, préfère transférer à Tripoli le maximum de prisonniers. « Nous ne sommes pas en mesure de les protéger », dit-il. Avec ses huit gardes modestement équipés, il avoue son impuissance face aux gangs de trafiquants qui n’hésitent pas à venir récupérer par la force des migrants, dont l’arrestation par les autorités perturbe leurs juteuses affaires. En 2014, ils avaient repris environ 80 Erythréens. Plus récemment, sept Pakistanais. « On reçoit en permanence des menaces, ils disent qu’ils vont enlever nos enfants », ajoute le directeur.

      Le danger est quotidien. Le 18 juillet, veille de la rencontre avec Khaled Al-Toumi, soixante-dix femmes migrantes ont été enlevées à quelques kilomètres de là alors qu’elles étaient transférées à bord d’un bus du centre de détention de Gharian à celui de Sorman, des localités voisines de Zaouïa.

      On compte en Libye une trentaine de centres de ce type, placés sous la tutelle de la Direction de combat contre la migration illégale (DCMI) rattachée au ministère de l’intérieur. A ces prisons « officielles » s’ajoutent des structures officieuses, administrées ouvertement par des milices. L’ensemble de ce réseau carcéral détient entre 4 000 et 7 000 détenus, selon les Nations unies (ONU).

      « Corruption galopante »

      A l’heure où l’Union européenne (UE) nourrit le projet de sous-traiter à la Libye la gestion du flux migratoire le long de la « route de la Méditerranée centrale », le débat sur les conditions de détention en vigueur dans ces centres a gagné en acuité.

      Une partie de la somme de 90 millions d’euros que l’UE s’est engagée à allouer au gouvernement dit d’« union nationale » de Tripoli sur la question migratoire, en sus des 200 millions d’euros annoncés par l’Italie, vise précisément à l’amélioration de l’environnement de ces centres.

      Si des « hot spots » voient le jour en Libye, idée que caressent certains dirigeants européens – dont le président français Emmanuel Macron – pour externaliser sur le continent africain l’examen des demandes d’asile, ils seront abrités dans de tels établissements à la réputation sulfureuse.

      La situation y est à l’évidence critique. Le centre de Zaouïa ne souffre certes pas de surpopulation. Mais l’état des locaux est piteux, avec ses matelas légers jetés au sol et l’alimentation d’une préoccupante indigence, limitée à un seul plat de macaronis. Aucune infirmerie ne dispense de soins.

      « Je ne touche pas un seul dinar de Tripoli ! », se plaint le directeur, Khaled Al-Toumi. Dans son entourage, on dénonce vertement la « corruption galopante de l’état-major de la DCMI à Tripoli qui vole l’argent ». Quand on lui parle de financement européen, Khaled Al-Toumi affirme ne pas en avoir vu la couleur.

      La complainte est encore plus grinçante au centre de détention pour femmes de Sorman, à une quinzaine de kilomètres à l’ouest : un gros bloc de ciment d’un étage posé sur le sable et piqué de pins en bord de plage. Dans la courette intérieure, des enfants jouent près d’une balançoire.

      Là, la densité humaine est beaucoup plus élevée. La scène est un brin irréelle : dans la pièce centrale, environ quatre-vingts femmes sont entassées, fichu sur la tête, regard levé vers un poste de télévision rivé au mur délavé. D’autres se serrent dans les pièces adjacentes. Certaines ont un bébé sur les jambes, telle Christiane, une Nigériane à tresses assise sur son matelas. « Ici, il n’y a rien, déplore-t-elle. Nous n’avons ni couches ni lait pour les bébés. L’eau de la nappe phréatique est salée. Et le médecin ne vient pas souvent : une fois par semaine, souvent une fois toutes les deux semaines. »

      « Battu avec des tuyaux métalliques »

      Non loin d’elle, Viviane, jeune fille élancée de 20 ans, Nigériane elle aussi, se plaint particulièrement de la nourriture, la fameuse assiette de macaronis de rigueur dans tous les centres de détention.

      Viviane est arrivée en Libye en 2015. Elle a bien tenté d’embarquer à bord d’un Zodiac à partir de Sabratha, la fameuse plate-forme de départs à l’ouest de Sorman, mais une tempête a fait échouer l’opération. Les passagers ont été récupérés par les garde-côtes qui les ont répartis dans les différentes prisons de la Tripolitaine. « Je n’ai pas pu joindre ma famille au téléphone, dit Viviane dans un souffle. Elle me croit morte. »

      Si la visite des centres de détention de Zaouïa ou de Sorman permet de prendre la mesure de l’extrême précarité des conditions de vie, admise sans fard par les officiels des établissements eux-mêmes, la question des violences dans ces lieux coupés du monde est plus délicate.

      Les migrants sont embarrassés de l’évoquer en présence des gardes. Mais mises bout à bout, les confidences qu’ils consentent plus aisément sur leur expérience dans d’autres centres permettent de suggérer un contexte d’une grande brutalité. Celle-ci se déploie sans doute le plus sauvagement dans les prisons privées, officieuses, où le racket des migrants est systématique.

      Et les centres officiellement rattachés à la DCMI n’en sont pas pour autant épargnés. Ainsi Al Hassan Dialo, un Guinéen rencontré à Zaouïa, raconte qu’il était « battu avec des tuyaux métalliques » dans le centre de Gharian, où il avait été précédemment détenu.

      « Extorsion, travail forcé »

      On touche là à l’ambiguïté foncière de ce système de détention, formellement rattaché à l’Etat mais de facto placé sous l’influence des milices contrôlant le terrain. Le fait que des réseaux de trafiquants, liés à ces milices, peuvent impunément enlever des détenus au cœur même des centres, comme ce fut le cas à Zaouïa, donne la mesure de leur capacité de nuisance.

      « Le système est pourri de l’intérieur », se désole un humanitaire. « Des fonctionnaires de l’Etat et des officiels locaux participent au processus de contrebande et de trafic d’êtres humains », abonde un rapport de la Mission d’appui de l’ONU en Libye publié en décembre 2016.

      Dans ces conditions, les migrants font l’objet « d’extorsion, de travail forcé, de mauvais traitements et de tortures », dénonce le rapport. Les femmes, elles, sont victimes de violences sexuelles à grande échelle. Le plus inquiétant est qu’avec l’argent européen promis les centres de détention sous tutelle de la DCMI tendent à se multiplier. Trois nouveaux établissements ont fait ainsi leur apparition ces derniers mois dans le Grand Tripoli.

      La duplicité de l’appareil d’Etat, ou de ce qui en tient lieu, est aussi illustrée par l’attitude des gardes-côtes, autres récipiendaires des financements européens et même de stages de formation. Officiellement, ils affirment lutter contre les réseaux de passeurs au maximum de leurs capacités tout en déplorant l’insuffisance de leurs moyens.

      « Nous ne sommes pas équipés pour faire face aux trafiquants », regrette à Tripoli Ayoub Kassim, le porte-parole de la marine libyenne. Au détour d’un plaidoyer pro domo, le hiérarque militaire glisse que le problème de la gestion des flux migratoires se pose moins sur le littoral qu’au niveau de la frontière méridionale de la Libye. « La seule solution, c’est de maîtriser les migrations au sud, explique-t-il. Malheureusement, les migrants arrivent par le Niger sous les yeux de l’armée française » basée à Madama…

      Opérations de patrouille musclées

      Les vieilles habitudes perdurent. Avant 2011, sous Kadhafi, ces flux migratoires – verrouillés ou tolérés selon l’intérêt diplomatique du moment – étaient instrumentalisés pour exercer une pression sur les Européens.

      Une telle politique semble moins systématique, fragmentation de l’Etat oblige, mais elle continue d’inspirer le comportement de bien des acteurs libyens usant habilement de la carte migratoire pour réclamer des soutiens financiers.

      La déficience des équipements des gardes-côtes ne fait guère de doute. Avec son patrouilleur de 14 mètres de Zaouïa et ses quatre autres bâtiments de 26,4 mètres de Tripoli – souffrant de défaillances techniques bien qu’ayant été réparés en Italie –, l’arsenal en Tripolitaine est de fait limité. Par ailleurs, l’embargo sur les ventes d’armes vers la Libye, toujours en vigueur, en bride le potentiel militaire.

      Pourtant, la hiérarchie des gardes-côtes serait plus convaincante si elle était en mesure d’exercer un contrôle effectif sur ses branches locales. Or, à l’évidence, une sérieuse difficulté se pose à Zaouïa. Le chef local de gardes-côtes, Abdelrahman Milad, plus connu sous le pseudonyme d’Al-Bija, joue un jeu trouble. Selon le rapport du panel des experts sur la Libye de l’ONU, publié en juin, Al-Bija doit son poste à Mohamed Koshlaf, le chef de la principale milice de Zaouïa, qui trempe dans le trafic de migrants.

      Le patrouilleur d’Al-Bija est connu pour ses opérations musclées. Le 21 octobre 2016, il s’est opposé en mer à un sauvetage conduit par l’ONG Sea Watch, provoquant la noyade de vingt-cinq migrants. Le 23 mai 2017, le même patrouilleur intervient dans la zone dite « contiguë » – où la Libye est juridiquement en droit d’agir – pour perturber un autre sauvetage mené par le navire Aquarius, affrété conjointement par Médecins sans frontières et SOS Méditerranée, et le Juvena, affrété par l’ONG allemande Jugend Rettet.

      Duplicité des acteurs libyens

      Les gardes-côtes sont montés à bord d’un Zodiac de migrants, subtilisant téléphones portables et argent des occupants. Ils ont également tiré des coups de feu en l’air, et même dans l’eau où avaient sauté des migrants, ne blessant heureusement personne.

      « Il est difficile de comprendre la logique de ce type de comportement, commente un humanitaire. Peut-être le message envoyé aux migrants est-il : “La prochaine fois, passez par nous.” » Ce « passez par nous » peut signifier, selon de bons observateurs de la scène libyenne, « passez par le réseau de Mohamed Koshlaf », le milicien que l’ONU met en cause dans le trafic de migrants.

      Al-Bija pratiquerait ainsi le deux poids-deux mesures, intraitable ou compréhensif selon que les migrants relèvent de réseaux rivaux ou amis, illustration typique de la duplicité des acteurs libyens. « Al-Bija sait qu’il a commis des erreurs, il cherche maintenant à restaurer son image », dit un résident de Zaouïa. Seule l’expérience le prouvera. En attendant, les Européens doivent coopérer avec lui pour fermer la route de la Méditerranée.

      http://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2017/08/16/en-libye-nous-ne-sommes-que-des-esclaves_5172760_3212.html

    • A PATTI CON LA LIBIA

      La Libia è il principale punto di partenza di barconi carichi di migranti diretti in Europa. Con la Libia l’Europa deve trattare per trovare una soluzione. La Libia però è anche un paese allo sbando, diviso. C’è il governo di Tripoli retto da Fayez al-Sarraj. Poi c’è il generale Haftar che controlla i due terzi del territorio del paese. Senza contare gruppi, milizie, clan tribali. Il compito insomma è complicato. Ma qualcosa, forse, si sta muovendo.

      Dopo decine di vertici inutili, migliaia di morti nel Mediterraneo, promesse non mantenute si torna a parlare con una certa insistenza della necessità di stabilizzare la Libia e aiutare il paese che si affaccia sul Mediterraneo. Particolarmente attiva in questa fase la Francia di Macron, oltre naturalmente all’Italia.

      Tra i punti in discussione c’è il coinvolgimento di altri paesi africani di transito come Niger e Ciad che potrebbero fungere da filtro. Oltre naturalmente ad aiuti diretti alla Libia. Assegni milionari destinati a una migliore gestione delle frontiere ad esempio.

      Ma è davvero così semplice? E come la mettiamo con le violenze e le torture subite dai migranti nei centri di detenzione? Perché proprio ora l’Europa sembra svegliarsi? Cosa si cela dietro questa competizione soprattutto tra Roma e Parigi nel trovare intese con Tripoli?

      http://www.rsi.ch/rete-uno/programmi/informazione/modem/A-PATTI-CON-LA-LIBIA-9426001.html

    • Le fonds fiduciaire de l’UE pour l’Afrique adopte un programme de soutien à la gestion intégrée des migrations et des frontières en Libye d’un montant de 46 millions d’euros

      À la suite du plan d’action de la Commission pour soutenir l’Italie, présenté le 4 juillet, le fonds fiduciaire de l’UE pour l’Afrique a adopté ce jour un programme doté d’une enveloppe de 46 millions d’euros pour renforcer les capacités des autorités libyennes en matière de gestion intégrée des migrations et des frontières.

      http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-17-2187_fr.htm

    • L’Europe va verser 200 millions d’euros à la Libye pour stopper les migrants

      Les dirigeants européens se retrouvent ce vendredi à Malte pour convaincre la Libye de freiner les traversées de migrants en Méditerranée. Ils devraient proposer d’équiper et former ses gardes-côtes. Le projet d’ouvrir des camps en Afrique refait surface.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/020217/leurope-va-verser-200-millions-deuros-la-libye-pour-stopper-les-migrants

      –-> pour archivage...

    • Persécutés en Libye : l’Europe est complice

      L’Union européenne dans son ensemble, et l’Italie en particulier, sont complices des violations des droits humains commises contre les réfugiés et les migrants en Libye. Enquête.

      https://www.amnesty.fr/refugies-et-migrants/actualites/refugies-et-migrants-persecutes-en-libye-leurope-est-complice

      #complicité

      Et l’utilisation du mot « persécutés » n’est évidemment pas été choisi au hasard...
      –-> ça renvoie à la polémique de qui est #réfugié... et du fait que l’UE essaie de dire que les migrants en Libye sont des #migrants_économiques et non pas des réfugiés (comme ceux qui sont en Turquie et/ou en Grèce, qui sont des syriens, donc des réfugiés)...
      Du coup, utiliser le concept de #persécution signifie faire une lien direct avec la Convention sur les réfugiés et admettre que les migrants en Libye sont potentiellement des réfugiés...

      La position de l’UE :

      #Mogherini was questioned about the EU’s strategy of outsourcing the migration crisis to foreign countries such as Libya and Turkey, which received billions to prevent Syrian refugees from crossing to Greece.

      She said the situation was different on two counts: first, the migrants stranded in Libya were not legitimate asylum seekers like those fleeing the war in Syria. And second, different international bodies were in charge.

      “When it comes to Turkey, it is mainly refugees from Syria; when it comes to Libya, it is mainly migrants from Sub-Saharan Africa and the relevant international laws apply in different manners and the relevant UN agencies are different – the UNHC

      https://www.euractiv.com/section/development-policy/news/libya-human-bondage-risks-overshadowing-africa-eu-summit
      voir ici : http://seen.li/dqtt

      Du coup, @sinehebdo, « #persécutés » serait aussi un mot à ajouter à ta longue liste...

    • v. aussi:
      Libya: Libya’s dark web of collusion: Abuses against Europe-bound refugees and migrants

      In recent years, hundreds of thousands of refugees and migrants have braved the journey across Africa to Libya and often on to Europe. In response, the Libyan authorities have used mass indefinite detention as their primary migration management tool. Regrettably, the European Union and Italy in particular, have decided to reinforce the capacity of Libyan authorities to intercept refugees and migrants at sea and transfer them to detention centres. It is essential that the aims and nature of this co-operation be rethought; that the focus shift from preventing arrivals in Europe to protecting the rights of refugees and migrants.

      https://www.amnesty.org/fr/documents/document/?indexNumber=mde19%2f7561%2f2017&language=en
      #rapport

    • Amnesty France : « L’Union Européenne est complice des violations de droits de l’homme en Libye »

      Jean-François Dubost est responsable du Programme Protection des Populations (réfugiés, civils dans les conflits, discriminations) chez Amnesty France. L’ONG publie un rapport sur la responsabilité des gouvernements européens dans les violations des droits humains des réfugiés et des migrants en Libye.

      https://www.franceinter.fr/emissions/l-invite-de-6h20/l-invite-de-6h20-12-decembre-2017
      #responsabilité

    • Accordi e crimini contro l’umanità in un rapporto di Amnesty International

      La Rotta del Mediterraneo centrale, dal Corno d’Africa, dall’Africa subsahariana, al Niger al Ciad ed alla Libia costituisce ormai l’unica via di fuga da paesi in guerra o precipitati in crisi economiche che mettono a repentaglio la vita dei loro abitanti, senza alcuna possibile distinzione tra migranti economici e richiedenti asilo. Anche perché in Africa, ed in Libia in particolare, la possibilità concreta di chiedere asilo ed ottenere un permesso di soggiorno o un visto, oltre al riconoscimento dello status di rifugiato da parte dell’UNHCR, è praticamente nulla. Le poche persone trasferite in altri paesi europei dai campi libici (resettlement), come i rimpatri volontari ampiamente pubblicizzati, sono soltanto l’ennesima foglia di fico che si sta utilizzando per nascondere le condizioni disumane in cui centinaia di migliaia di persone vengono trattenute sotto sequestro nei centri di detenzione libici , ufficiali o informali. In tutti gravissime violazioni dei diritti umani, anche subito dopo la visita dei rappresentanti dell’UNHCR e dell’OIM, come dichiarano alcuni testimoni.

      https://www.a-dif.org/2017/12/12/accordi-e-crimini-contro-lumanita-in-un-rapporto-di-amnesty-international

    • Bundestag study: Cooperation with Libyan coastguard infringes international conventions

      “Libya is unable to nominate a Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre (MRCC), and so rescue missions outside its territorial waters are coordinated by the Italian MRCC in Rome. More and more often the Libyan coastguard is being tasked to lead these missions as on-scene-commander. Since refugees are subsequently brought to Libya, the MRCC in Rome may be infringing the prohibition of refoulement contained in the Geneva Convention relating to the Status of Refugees. This, indeed, was also the conclusion reached in a study produced by the Bundestag Research Service. The European Union and its member states must therefore press for an immediate end to this cooperation with the Libyan coastguard”, says Andrej Hunko, European policy spokesman for the Left Party.

      The Italian Navy is intercepting refugees in the Mediterranean and arranging for them to be picked up by Libyan coastguard vessels. The Bundestag study therefore suspects an infringement of the European Human Rights Convention of the Council of Europe. The rights enshrined in the Convention also apply on the high seas.

      Andrej Hunko goes on to say, “For two years the Libyan coastguard has regularly been using force against sea rescuers, and many refugees have drowned during these power games. As part of the EUNAVFOR MED military mission, the Bundeswehr has also been cooperating with the Libyan coastguard and allegedly trained them in sea rescue. I regard that as a pretext to arm Libya for the prevention of migration. This cooperation must be the subject of proceedings before the European Court of Human Rights, because the people who are being forcibly returned with the assistance of the EU are being inhumanely treated, tortured or killed.

      The study also emphasises that the acts of aggression against private rescue ships violate the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. Nothing in that Convention prescribes that sea rescues must be undertaken by a single vessel. On the contrary, masters of other ships even have a duty to render assistance if they cannot be sure that all of the persons in distress will be quickly rescued. This is undoubtedly the case with the brutal operations of the Libyan coastguard.

      The Libyan Navy might soon have its own MRCC, which would then be attached to the EU surveillance system. The European Commission examined this option in a feasibility study, and Italy is now establishing a coordination centre for this purpose in Tripoli. A Libyan MRCC would encourage the Libyan coastguard to throw its weight about even more. The result would be further violations of international conventions and even more deaths.”

      https://andrej-hunko.de/presse/3946-bundestag-study-cooperation-with-libyan-coastguard-infringes-inter

      v. aussi l’étude:
      https://andrej-hunko.de/start/download/dokumente/1109-bundestag-research-services-maritime-rescue-in-the-mediterranean/file

    • Migrants : « La nasse libyenne a été en partie tissée par la France et l’Union européenne »

      Dans une tribune publiée dans « Le Monde », Thierry Allafort-Duverger, le directeur général de Médecins Sans Frontières, juge hypocrite la posture de la France, qui favorise l’interception de migrants par les garde-côtes libyens et dénonce leurs conditions de détention sur place.

      https://www.msf.fr/actualite/articles/migrants-nasse-libyenne-ete-en-partie-tissee-france-et-union-europeenne
      #hypocrisie

    • Libye : derrière l’arbre de « l’esclavage »
      Par Ali Bensaâd, Professeur à l’Institut français de géopolitique, Paris-VIII — 30 novembre 2017 à 17:56

      L’émotion suscitée par les crimes abjectes révélés par CNN ne doit pas occulter un phénomène bien plus vaste et ancien : celui de centaines de milliers de migrants africains qui vivent et travaillent depuis des décennies, en Libye et au Maghreb, dans des conditions extrêmes d’exploitation et d’atteinte à leur dignité.

      L’onde de choc créée par la diffusion de la vidéo de CNN sur la « vente » de migrants en Libye, ne doit pas se perdre en indignations. Et il ne faut pas que les crimes révélés occultent un malheur encore plus vaste, celui de centaines de milliers de migrants africains qui vivent et travaillent depuis des décennies, en Libye et au Maghreb, dans des conditions extrêmes d’exploitation et d’atteinte à leur dignité. Par ailleurs, ces véritables crimes contre l’humanité ne sont, hélas, pas spécifiques de la Libye. A titre d’exemple, les bédouins égyptiens ou israéliens - supplétifs sécuritaires de leurs armées - ont précédé les milices libyennes dans ces pratiques qu’ils poursuivent toujours et qui ont été largement documentées.

      Ces crimes contre l’humanité, en raison de leur caractère particulièrement abject, méritent d’être justement qualifiés. Il faut s’interroger si le qualificatif « esclavage », au-delà du juste opprobre dont il faut entourer ces pratiques, est le plus scientifiquement approprié pour comprendre et combattre ces pratiques d’autant que l’esclavage a été une réalité qui a structuré pendant un millénaire le rapport entre le Maghreb et l’Afrique subsaharienne. Il demeure le non-dit des inconscients culturels des sociétés de part et d’autre du Sahara, une sorte de « bombe à retardement ». « Mal nommer un objet, c’est ajouter au malheur de ce monde » (1) disait Camus. Et la Libye est un condensé des malheurs du monde des migrations. Il faut donc les saisir par-delà le raccourci de l’émotion.

      D’abord, ils ne sont nullement le produit du contexte actuel de chaos du pays, même si celui-ci les aggrave. Depuis des décennies, chercheurs et journalistes ont documenté la difficile condition des migrants en Libye qui, depuis les années 60, font tourner pour l’essentiel l’économie de ce pays rentier. Leur nombre a pu atteindre certaines années jusqu’à un million pour une population qui pouvait alors compter à peine cinq millions d’habitants. C’est dire leur importance dans le paysage économique et social de ce pays. Mais loin de favoriser leur intégration, l’importance de leur nombre a été conjurée par une précarisation systématique et violente comme l’illustrent les expulsions massives et violentes de migrants qui ont jalonné l’histoire du pays notamment en 1979, 1981, 1985, 1995, 2000 et 2007. Expulsions qui servaient tout à la fois à installer cette immigration dans une réversibilité mais aussi à pénaliser ou gratifier les pays dont ils sont originaires pour les vassaliser. Peut-être contraints, les dirigeants africains alors restaient sourds aux interpellations de leurs migrants pour ne pas contrarier la générosité du « guide » dont ils étaient les fidèles clients. Ils se tairont également quand, en 2000, Moussa Koussa, l’ancien responsable des services libyens, aujourd’hui luxueusement réfugié à Londres, a organisé un véritable pogrom où périrent 500 migrants africains assassinés dans des « émeutes populaires » instrumentalisées. Leur but était cyniquement de faire avaliser, par ricochet, la nouvelle orientation du régime favorable à la normalisation et l’ouverture à l’Europe et cela en attisant un sentiment anti-africain pour déstabiliser la partie de la vieille garde qui y était rétive. Cette normalisation, faite en partie sur le cadavre de migrants africains, se soldera par l’intronisation de Kadhafi comme gardien des frontières européennes. Les migrants interceptés et ceux que l’Italie refoule, en violation des lois européennes, sont emprisonnés, parfois dans les mêmes lieux aujourd’hui, et soumis aux mêmes traitements dégradants.

      En 2006, ce n’était pas 260 migrants marocains qui croupissaient comme aujourd’hui dans les prisons libyennes, ceux dont la vidéo a ému l’opinion, mais 3 000 et dans des conditions tout aussi inhumaines. Kadhafi a signé toutes les conventions que les Européens ont voulues, sachant qu’il n’allait pas les appliquer. Mais lorsque le HCR a essayé de prendre langue avec le pouvoir libyen au sujet de la convention de Genève sur les réfugiés, Kadhafi ferma les bureaux du HCR et expulsa, en les humiliant, ses dirigeants le 9 juin 2010. Le même jour, débutait un nouveau round de négociations en vue d’un accord de partenariat entre la Libye et l’Union européenne et le lendemain, 10 juin, Kadhafi était accueilli en Italie. Une année plus tard, alors même que le CNT n’avait pas encore établi son autorité sur le pays et que Kadhafi et ses troupes continuaient à résister, le CNT a été contraint de signer avec l’Italie un accord sur les migrations dont un volet sur la réadmission des migrants transitant par son territoire. Hier, comme aujourd’hui, c’est à la demande expresse et explicite de l’UE que les autorités libyennes mènent une politique de répression et de rétention de migrants. Et peut-on ignorer qu’aujourd’hui traiter avec les pouvoirs libyens, notamment sur les questions sécuritaires, c’est traiter de fait avec des milices dont dépendent ces pouvoirs eux-mêmes pour leur propre sécurité ? Faut-il s’étonner après cela de voir des milices gérer des centres de rétention demandés par l’UE ?

      Alors que peine à émerger une autorité centrale en Libye, les pays occidentaux n’ont pas cessé de multiplier les exigences à l’égard des fragiles centres d’un pouvoir balbutiant pour leur faire prendre en charge leur protection contre les migrations et le terrorisme au risque de les fragiliser comme l’a montré l’exemple des milices de Misrata. Acteur important de la réconciliation et de la lutte contre les extrémistes, elles ont été poussées, à Syrte, à combattre Daech quasiment seules. Elles en sont sorties exsangues, rongées par le doute et fragilisées face à leurs propres extrémistes. Les rackets, les kidnappings et le travail forcé pour ceux qui ne peuvent pas payer, sont aussi le lot des Libyens, notamment ceux appartenant au camp des vaincus, détenus dans ce que les Libyens nomment « prisons clandestines ». Libyens, mais plus souvent migrants qui ne peuvent payer, sont mis au travail forcé pour les propres besoins des miliciens en étant « loués » ponctuellement le temps d’une captivité qui dure de quelques semaines à quelques mois pour des sommes dérisoires.

      Dans la vidéo de CNN, les sommes évoquées, autour de 400 dinars libyens, sont faussement traduites par les journalistes, selon le taux officiel fictif, en 400 dollars. En réalité, sur le marché réel, la valeur est dix fois inférieure, un dollar valant dix dinars libyens et un euro, douze. Faire transiter un homme, même sur la seule portion saharienne du territoire, rapporte 15 fois plus (500 euros) aux trafiquants et miliciens. C’est par défaut que les milices se rabattent sur l’exploitation, un temps, de migrants désargentés mais par ailleurs encombrants.

      La scène filmée par CNN est abjecte et relève du crime contre l’humanité. Mais il s’agit de transactions sur du travail forcé et de corvées. Il ne s’agit pas de vente d’hommes. Ce n’est pas relativiser ou diminuer ce qui est un véritable crime contre l’humanité, mais il faut justement qualifier les objets. Il s’agit de pratiques criminelles de guerre et de banditisme qui exploitent les failles de politiques migratoires globales. On n’assiste pas à une résurgence de l’esclavage. Il ne faut pas démonétiser l’indignation et la vigilance en recourant rapidement aux catégories historiques qui mobilisent l’émotion. Celle-ci retombe toujours. Et pendant que le débat s’enflamme sur « l’esclavage », la même semaine, des centaines d’hommes « libres » sont morts, noyés en Méditerranée, s’ajoutant à des dizaines de milliers qui les avaient précédés.

      (1) C’est la véritable expression utilisée par Camus dans un essai de 1944, paru dans Poésie 44, (Sur une philosophie de l’expression), substantiellement très différente, en termes philosophiques, de ce qui sera reporté par la suite : « Mal nommer les choses, c’est ajouter aux malheurs du monde. »

      http://www.liberation.fr/debats/2017/11/30/libye-derriere-l-arbre-de-l-esclavage_1613662

    • Quand l’Union européenne veut bloquer les exilé-e-s en Libye

      L’Union européenne renforce les capacités des garde-côtes Libyens pour qu’ils interceptent les bateaux d’exilé-e-s dans les eaux territoriales et les ramènent en Libye. Des navires de l’#OTAN patrouillent au large prétendument pour s’attaquer aux « bateaux de passeurs », ce qui veut dire que des moyens militaires sont mobilisés pour empêcher les exilé-e-s d’atteindre les côtes européennes. L’idée a été émise de faire le tri, entre les personnes qui relèveraient de l’asile et celles qui seraient des « migrants économiques » ayant « vocation » à être renvoyés, sur des bateaux ua large de la Libye plutôt que sur le sol italien, créant ainsi des « #hotspots_flottants« .

      https://lampedusauneile.wordpress.com/2016/07/15/quand-lunion-europeenne-veut-bloquer-les-exile-e-s-en-lib

    • Le milizie libiche catturano in mare centinaia di migranti in fuga verso l’Europa. E li richiudono in prigione. Intanto l’Unione Europea si prepara ad inviare istruttori per rafforzare le capacità di arresto da parte della polizia libica. Ma in Libia ci sono tante «guardie costiere» ed ognuna risponde ad un governo diverso.

      Sembra di ritornare al 2010, quando dopo i respingimenti collettivi in Libia eseguiti direttamente da mezzi della Guardia di finanza italiana a partire dal 7 maggio 2009, in base agli accordi tra Berlusconi e Gheddafi, si inviarono in Libia agenti della Guardia di finanza per istruire la Guardia Costiera libica nelle operazioni di blocco dei migranti che erano riusciti a fuggire imbarcandosi su mezzi sempre più fatiscenti.

      http://dirittiefrontiere.blogspot.ch/2016/05/le-milizie-libiche-catturano-in-mare.html?m=1

    • Merkel, Hollande Warn Libya May Be Next Big Migrant Staging Area

      The European Union may need an agreement with Libya to restrict refugee flows similar to one with Turkey as the North African country threatens to become the next gateway for migrants to Europe, the leaders of Germany and France said.

      http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-04-07/merkel-hollande-warn-libya-may-be-next-big-migrant-staging-area
      #accord #Libye #migrations #réfugiés #asile #politique_migratoire #externalisation #UE #Europe

    • Le fonds fiduciaire de l’UE pour l’Afrique adopte un programme de 90 millions € pour la protection des migrants et l’amélioration de la gestion des migrations en Libye

      Dans le prolongement de la communication conjointe sur la route de la Méditerranée centrale et de la déclaration de Malte, le fonds fiduciaire de l’UE pour l’Afrique a adopté ce jour, sur proposition de la Commission européenne, un programme de 90 millions € visant à renforcer la protection des migrants et à améliorer la gestion des migrations en Libye.

      http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-17-951_fr.htm

    • L’Europa non può affidare alla Libia le vite dei migranti

      “Il rischio è che Italia ed Europa si rendano complici delle violazioni dei diritti umani commesse in Libia”, dice il direttore generale di Medici senza frontiere (Msf) Arjan Hehenkamp. Mentre le organizzazioni non governative che salvano i migranti nel Mediterraneo centrale sono al centro di un processo di criminalizzazione, l’Italia e l’Europa stanno cercando di delegare alle autorità libiche la soluzione del problema degli sbarchi.

      http://www.internazionale.it/video/2017/05/04/ong-libia-migranti

    • MSF accuses Libyan coastguard of endangering people’s lives during Mediterranean rescue

      During a rescue in the Mediterranean Sea on 23 May, the Libyan coastguard approached boats in distress, intimidated the passengers and then fired gunshots into the air, threatening people’s lives and creating mayhem, according to aid organisations Médecins Sans Frontières and SOS Méditerranée, whose teams witnessed the violent incident.

      http://www.msf.org/en/article/msf-accuses-libyan-coastguard-endangering-people%E2%80%99s-lives-during-mediter

    • Enquête. Le chaos libyen est en train de déborder en Méditerranée

      Pour qu’ils bloquent les flux migratoires, l’Italie, appuyée par l’UE, a scellé un accord avec les gardes-côtes libyens. Mais ils ne sont que l’une des très nombreuses forces en présence dans cet État en lambeaux. Désormais la Méditerranée devient dangereuse pour la marine italienne, les migrants, et les pêcheurs.


      http://www.courrierinternational.com/article/enquete-le-chaos-libyen-est-en-train-de-deborder-en-mediterra

    • Architect of EU-Turkey refugee pact pushes for West Africa deal

      “Every migrant from West Africa who survives the dangerous journey from Libya to Italy remains in Europe for years afterwards — regardless of the outcome of his or her asylum application,” Knaus said in an interview.

      To accelerate the deportations of rejected asylum seekers to West African countries that are considered safe, the EU needs to forge agreements with their governments, he said.

      http://www.politico.eu/article/migration-italy-libya-architect-of-eu-turkey-refugee-pact-pushes-for-west-a
      cc @i_s_

      Avec ce commentaire de Francesca Spinelli :

    • Pour 20 milliards, la Libye pourrait bloquer les migrants à sa frontière sud

      L’homme fort de l’Est libyen, Khalifa Haftar, estime à « 20 milliards de dollars sur 20 ou 25 ans » l’effort européen nécessaire pour aider à bloquer les flux de migrants à la frontière sud du pays.

      https://www.rts.ch/info/monde/8837947-pour-20-milliards-la-libye-pourrait-bloquer-les-migrants-a-sa-frontiere-

    • Bruxelles offre 200 millions d’euros à la Libye pour freiner l’immigration

      La Commission européenne a mis sur la table de nouvelles mesures pour freiner l’arrivée de migrants via la mer méditerranée, dont 200 millions d’euros pour la Libye. Un article de notre partenaire Euroefe.

      http://www.euractiv.fr/section/l-europe-dans-le-monde/news/bruxelles-offre-200-millions-deuros-a-la-libye-pour-freiner-limmigration/?nl_ref=29858390

      #Libye #asile #migrations #accord #deal #réfugiés #externalisation
      cc @reka

    • Stuck in Libya. Migrants and (Our) Political Responsibilities

      Fighting at Tripoli’s international airport was still under way when, in July 2014, the diplomatic missions of European countries, the United States and Canada were shut down. At that time Italy decided to maintain a pied-à-terre in place in order to preserve the precarious balance of its assets in the two-headed country, strengthening security at its local headquarters on Tripoli’s seafront. On the one hand there was no forsaking the Mellitah Oil & Gas compound, controlled by Eni and based west of Tripoli. On the other, the Libyan coast also had to be protected to assist the Italian forces deployed in Libyan waters and engaged in the Mare Nostrum operation to dismantle the human smuggling network between Libya and Italy, as per the official mandate. But the escalation of the civil war and the consequent deterioration of security conditions led Rome to leave as well, in February 2015.

      http://www.ispionline.it/it/pubblicazione/stuck-libya-migrants-and-our-political-responsibilities-16294

    • Libia: diritto d’asilo cercasi, smarrito fra Bruxelles e Tripoli (passando per Roma)

      La recente Comunicazione congiunta della Commissione e dell’Alto rappresentante per la politica estera dell’UE, il Memorandum Italia-Libia firmato il 2 febbraio e la Dichiarazione uscita dal Consiglio europeo di venerdì 3 alla Valletta hanno delineato un progetto di chiusura della “rotta” del Mediterraneo centrale che rischia di seppellire, di fatto, il diritto d’asilo nel Paese e ai suoi confini.

      http://viedifuga.org/libia-diritto-d-asilo-cercasi-smarrito-fra-bruxelles-e-tripoli

    • Immigration : l’Union européenne veut aider la Libye

      L’Union européenne veut mettre fin à ces traversées entre la Libye et l’Italie. Leur plan passe par une aide financière aux autorités libyennes.

      http://www.rts.ch/play/tv/19h30/video/immigration-lunion-europeenne-veut-aider-la-libye?id=8360849

      Dans ce bref reportage, la RTS demande l’opinion d’Etienne Piguet (prof en géographie des migrations à l’Université de Neuchâtel) :
      « L’Union européenne veut absolument limiter les arrivées, mais en même temps on ne peut pas simplement refouler les gens. C’est pas acceptable du point de vue des droits humains. Donc l’UE essaie de mettre en place un système qui tient les gens à distance tout en leur offrant des conditions acceptables d’accueil » (en Libye, entend-il)
      Je m’abstiens de tout commentaire.

    • New EU Partnerships in North Africa: Potential to Backfire?

      As European leaders meet in Malta to receive a progress report on the EU flagship migration partnership framework, the European Union finds itself in much the same position as two years earlier, with hundreds of desperate individuals cramming into flimsy boats and setting off each week from the Libyan coast in hope of finding swift rescue and passage in Europe. Options to reduce flows unilaterally are limited. Barred by EU law from “pushing back” vessels encountered in the Mediterranean, the European Union is faced with no alternative but to rescue and transfer passengers to European territory, where the full framework of European asylum law applies. Member States are thus looking more closely at the role transit countries along the North African coastline might play in managing these flows across the Central Mediterranean. Specifically, they are examining the possibility of reallocating responsibility for search and rescue to Southern partners, thereby decoupling the rescue missions from territorial access to international protection in Europe.

      http://www.migrationpolicy.org/news/new-eu-partnerships-north-africa-potential-backfire

    • Migration: MSF warns EU about inhumane approach to migration management

      As European Union (EU) leaders meet in Malta today to discuss migration, with a view to “close down the route from Libya to Italy” by stepping up cooperation with the Libyan authorities, we want to raise grave concerns about the fate of people trapped in Libya or returned to the country. Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been providing medical care to migrants, refugees and asylum seekers detained in Tripoli and the surrounding area since July 2016 and people are detained arbitrarily in inhumane and unsanitary conditions, often without enough food and clean water and with a lack of access to medical care.

      http://www.msf.org/en/article/migration-msf-warns-eu-about-inhumane-approach-migration-management

    • EU and Italy migration deal with Libya draws sharp criticism from Libyan NGOs

      Twelve Libyan non-governmental organisations (NGOs) have issued a joint statement criticising the EU’s latest migrant policy as set out at the Malta summit a week ago as well as the Italy-Libya deal signed earlier which agreed that migrants should be sent back to Libya and repartiated voluntarily from there. Both represented a fundamental “immoral and inhumane attitude” towards migrants, they said. International human rights and calls had to be respected.

      https://www.libyaherald.com/2017/02/10/eu-and-italy-migration-deal-with-libya-draws-sharp-criticism-from-libya

    • Libya is not Turkey: why the EU plan to stop Mediterranean migration is a human rights concern

      EU leaders have agreed to a plan that will provide Libya’s UN-backed government €200 million for dealing with migration. This includes an increase in funding for the Libyan coastguard, with an overall aim to stop migrant boats crossing the Mediterranean to Italy.

      https://theconversation.com/libya-is-not-turkey-why-the-eu-plan-to-stop-mediterranean-migration

    • EU aims to step up help to Libya coastguards on migrant patrols

      TUNIS (Reuters) - The European Union wants to rapidly expand training of Libyan coastguards to stem migrant flows to Italy and reduce deaths at sea, an EU naval mission said on Thursday, signaling a renewed push to support a force struggling to patrol its own coasts.

      https://www.reuters.com/article/us-europe-migrants-libya/eu-aims-to-step-up-help-to-libya-coastguards-on-migrant-patrols-idUSKCN1GR3

      #UE #EU

    • Why Cooperating With Libya on Migration Could Damage the EU’s Standing

      Italy and the Netherlands began training Libyan coast guard and navy officers on Italian and Dutch navy ships in the Mediterranean earlier in October. The training is part of the European Union’s anti-smuggling operation in the central Mediterranean with the goal of enhancing Libya’s “capability to disrupt smuggling and trafficking… and to perform search-and-rescue activities.”

      http://europe.newsweek.com/why-cooperating-libya-migration-could-damage-eus-standing-516099?rm
      #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Europe #UE #EU #Libye #coopération #externalisation #Méditerranée #Italie #Pays-Bas #gardes-côtes

    • Les migrants paient le prix fort de la coopération entre l’UE et les garde-côtes libyens

      Nombre de dirigeants européens appellent à une « coopération » renforcée avec les garde-côtes libyens. Mais une fois interceptés en mer, ces migrants sont renvoyés dans des centres de détention indignes et risquent de retomber aux mains de trafiquants.

      C’est un peu la bouée de sauvetage des dirigeants européens. La « coopération » avec la Libye et ses légions de garde-côtes reste l’une des dernières politiques à faire consensus dans les capitales de l’UE, s’agissant des migrants. Initiée en 2016 pour favoriser l’interception d’embarcations avant leur entrée dans les eaux à responsabilité italienne ou maltaise, elle a fait chuter le nombre d’arrivées en Europe.

      Emmanuel Macron en particulier s’en est félicité, mardi 26 juin, depuis le Vatican : « La capacité à fermer cette route [entre la Libye et l’Italie, ndlr] est la réponse la plus efficace » au défi migratoire. Selon lui, ce serait même « la plus humaine ». Alors qu’un Conseil européen crucial s’ouvre ce jeudi 28 juin, le président français appelle donc à « renforcer » cette coopération avec Tripoli.

      Convaincu qu’il faut laisser les Libyens travailler, il s’en est même pris, mardi, aux bateaux humanitaires et en particulier au Lifeline, le navire affrété par une ONG allemande qui a débarqué 233 migrants mercredi soir à Malte (après une semaine d’attente en mer et un blocus de l’Italie), l’accusant d’être « intervenu en contravention de toutes les règles et des garde-côtes libyens ». Lancé, Emmanuel Macron est allé jusqu’à reprocher aux bateaux des ONG de faire « le jeu des passeurs ».

      Inédite dans sa bouche (mais entendue mille fois dans les diatribes de l’extrême droite transalpine), cette sentence fait depuis bondir les organisations humanitaires les unes après les autres, au point que Médecins sans frontières (qui affrète l’Aquarius avec SOS Méditerranée), Amnesty International France, La Cimade et Médecins du monde réclament désormais un rendez-vous à l’Élysée, se disant « consternées ».

      Ravi, lui, le ministre de l’intérieur italien et leader d’extrême droite, Matteo Salvini, en a profité pour annoncer mercredi un don exceptionnel en faveur des garde-côtes de Tripoli, auxquels il avait rendu visite l’avant-veille : 12 navires de patrouille, une véritable petite flotte.

      En deux ans, la coopération avec ce pays de furie qu’est la Libye post-Kadhafi semble ainsi devenue la solution miracle, « la plus humaine » même, que l’UE ait dénichée face au défi migratoire en Méditerranée centrale. Comment en est-on arrivé là ? Jusqu’où va cette « coopération » qualifiée de « complicité » par certaines ONG ? Quels sont ses résultats ?

      • Déjà 8 100 interceptions en mer
      À ce jour, en 2018, environ 16 000 migrants ont réussi à traverser jusqu’en Italie, soit une baisse de 77 % par rapport à l’an dernier. Sur ce point, Emmanuel Macron a raison : « Nous avons réduit les flux. » Les raisons, en réalité, sont diverses. Mais de fait, plus de 8 100 personnes parties de Libye ont déjà été rattrapées par les garde-côtes du pays cette année et ramenées à terre, d’après le Haut Commissariat aux réfugiés (le HCR). Contre 800 en 2015.

      Dans les écrits de cette agence de l’ONU, ces migrants sont dits « sauvés/interceptés », sans qu’il soit tranché entre ces deux termes, ces deux réalités. À lui seul, ce « / » révèle toute l’ambiguïté des politiques de coopération de l’UE : si Bruxelles aime penser que ces vies sont sauvées, les ONG soulignent qu’elles sont surtout ramenées en enfer. Certains, d’ailleurs, préfèrent sauter de leur bateau pneumatique en pleine mer plutôt que retourner en arrière.

      • En Libye, l’« abominable » sort des migrants (source officielle)
      Pour comprendre les critiques des ONG, il faut rappeler les conditions inhumaines dans lesquelles les exilés survivent dans cet « État tampon », aujourd’hui dirigé par un gouvernement d’union nationale ultra contesté (basé à Tripoli), sans contrôle sur des parts entières du territoire. « Ce que nous entendons dépasse l’entendement, rapporte l’un des infirmiers de l’Aquarius, qui fut du voyage jusqu’à Valence. Les migrants subsahariens sont affamés, assoiffés, torturés. » Parmi les 630 passagers débarqués en Espagne, l’une de ses collègues raconte avoir identifié de nombreux « survivants de violences sexuelles », « des femmes et des hommes à la fois, qui ont vécu le viol et la torture sexuelle comme méthodes d’extorsion de fonds », les familles étant souvent soumises au chantage par téléphone. Un diagnostic dicté par l’émotion ? Des exagérations de rescapés ?

      Le même constat a été officiellement dressé, dès janvier 2017, par le Haut-Commissariat aux droits de l’homme de l’ONU. « Les migrants se trouvant sur le sol libyen sont victimes de détention arbitraire dans des conditions inhumaines, d’actes de torture, notamment de violence sexuelle, d’enlèvements visant à obtenir une rançon, de racket, de travail forcé et de meurtre », peut-on lire dans son rapport, où l’on distingue les centres de détention officiels dirigés par le Service de lutte contre la migration illégale (relevant du ministère de l’intérieur) et les prisons clandestines tenues par des milices armées.

      Même dans les centres gouvernementaux, les exilés « sont détenus arbitrairement sans la moindre procédure judiciaire, en violation du droit libyen et des normes internationales des droits de l’homme. (…) Ils sont souvent placés dans des entrepôts dont les conditions sont abominables (…). Des surveillants refusent aux migrants l’accès aux toilettes, les obligeant à uriner et à déféquer [là où ils sont]. Dans certains cas, les migrants souffrent de malnutrition grave [environ un tiers de la ration calorique quotidienne minimale]. Des sources nombreuses et concordantes [évoquent] la commission d’actes de torture, notamment des passages à tabac, des violences sexuelles et du travail forcé ».

      Sachant qu’il y a pire à côté : « Des groupes armés et des trafiquants détiennent d’autres migrants dans des lieux non officiels. » Certaines de ces milices, d’ailleurs, « opèrent pour le compte de l’État » ou pour « des agents de l’État », pointe le rapport. Le marché du kidnapping, de la vente et de la revente, est florissant. C’est l’enfer sans même Lucifer pour l’administrer.

      En mai dernier, par exemple, une centaine de migrants a réussi à s’évader d’une prison clandestine de la région de Bani Walid, où MSF gère une clinique de jour. « Parmi les survivants que nous avons soignés, des jeunes de 16 à 18 ans en majorité, certains souffrent de blessures par balles, de fractures multiples, de brûlures, témoigne Christophe Biteau, chef de mission de l’ONG en Libye. Certains nous racontent avoir été baladés, détenus, revendus, etc., pendant trois ans. » Parfois, MSF recueille aussi des migrants relâchés « spontanément » par leurs trafiquants : « Un mec qui commence à tousser par exemple, ils n’en veulent plus à cause des craintes de tuberculose. Pareil en cas d’infections graves. Il y a comme ça des migrants, sur lesquels ils avaient investi, qu’ils passent par “pertes et profits”, si j’ose dire. »

      Depuis 2017, et surtout les images d’un marché aux esclaves diffusées sur CNN, les pressions de l’ONU comme de l’UE se sont toutefois multipliées sur le gouvernement de Tripoli, afin qu’il s’efforce de vider les centres officiels les plus honteux – 18 ont été fermés, d’après un bilan de mars dernier. Mais dans un rapport récent, daté de mai 2018, le secrétaire général de l’ONU persiste : « Les migrants continuent d’être sujets (…) à la torture, à du rançonnement, à du travail forcé et à des meurtres », dans des « centres officiels et non officiels ». Les auteurs ? « Des agents de l’État, des groupes armés, des trafiquants, des gangs criminels », encore et encore.

      Au 21 juin, plus de 5 800 personnes étaient toujours détenues dans les centres officiels. « Nous en avons répertorié 33, dont 4 où nous avons des difficultés d’accès », précise l’envoyé spécial du HCR pour la situation en Méditerranée centrale, Vincent Cochetel, qui glisse au passage : « Il est arrivé que des gens disparaissent après nous avoir parlé. » Surtout, ces derniers jours, avec la fin du ramadan et les encouragements des dirigeants européens adressés aux garde-côtes libyens, ces centres de détention se remplissent à nouveau.

      • Un retour automatique en détention
      Car c’est bien là, dans ces bâtiments gérés par le ministère de l’intérieur, que sont théoriquement renvoyés les migrants « sauvés/interceptés » en mer. Déjà difficile, cette réalité en cache toutefois une autre. « Les embarcations des migrants décollent en général de Libye en pleine nuit, raconte Christophe Biteau, de MSF. Donc les interceptions par les garde-côtes se font vers 2 h ou 3 h du matin et les débarquements vers 6 h. Là, avant l’arrivée des services du ministère de l’intérieur libyen et du HCR (dont la présence est autorisée sur la douzaine de plateformes de débarquement utilisées), il y a un laps de temps critique. » Où tout peut arriver.

      L’arrivée à Malte, mercredi 27 juin 2018, des migrants sauvés par le navire humanitaire « Lifeline » © Reuters
      Certains migrants de la Corne de l’Afrique (Érythrée, Somalie, etc.), réputés plus « solvables » que d’autres parce qu’ils auraient des proches en Europe jouissant déjà du statut de réfugiés, racontent avoir été rachetés à des garde-côtes par des trafiquants. Ces derniers répercuteraient ensuite le prix d’achat de leur « marchandise » sur le tarif de la traversée, plus chère à la seconde tentative… Si Christophe Biteau ne peut témoigner directement d’une telle corruption de garde-côtes, il déclare sans hésiter : « Une personne ramenée en Libye peut très bien se retrouver à nouveau dans les mains de trafiquants. »

      Au début du mois de juin, le Conseil de sécurité de l’ONU (rien de moins) a voté des sanctions à l’égard de six trafiquants de migrants (gel de comptes bancaires, interdiction de voyager, etc.), dont le chef d’une unité de… garde-côtes. D’autres de ses collègues ont été suspectés par les ONG de laisser passer les embarcations siglées par tel ou tel trafiquant, contre rémunération.

      En tout cas, parmi les migrants interceptés et ramenés à terre, « il y a des gens qui disparaissent dans les transferts vers les centres de détention », confirme Vincent Cochetel, l’envoyé spécial du HCR. « Sur les plateformes de débarquement, on aimerait donc mettre en place un système d’enregistrement biométrique, pour essayer de retrouver ensuite les migrants dans les centres, pour protéger les gens. Pour l’instant, on n’a réussi à convaincre personne. » Les « kits médicaux » distribués sur place, financés par l’UE, certes utiles, ne sont pas à la hauteur de l’enjeu.

      • Des entraînements financés par l’UE
      Dans le cadre de l’opération Sophia (théoriquement destinée à lutter contre les passeurs et trafiquants dans les eaux internationales de la Méditerranée), Bruxelles a surtout décidé, en juin 2016, d’initier un programme de formation des garde-côtes libyens, qui a démarré l’an dernier et déjà bénéficié à 213 personnes. C’est que, souligne-t-on à Bruxelles, les marines européennes ne sauraient intervenir elles-mêmes dans les eaux libyennes.

      Il s’agit à la fois d’entraînements pratiques et opérationnels (l’abordage de canots, par exemple) visant à réduire les risques de pertes humaines durant les interventions, et d’un enseignement juridique (droit maritimes, droits humains, etc.), notamment à destination de la hiérarchie. D’après la commission européenne, tous les garde-côtes bénéficiaires subissent un « check de sécurité » avec vérifications auprès d’Interpol et Europol, voire des services de renseignement des États membres, pour écarter les individus les plus douteux.

      Il faut dire que les besoins de « formation » sont – pour le moins – criants. À plusieurs reprises, des navires humanitaires ont été témoins d’interceptions violentes, sinon criminelles. Sur une vidéo filmée depuis le Sea Watch (ONG allemande) en novembre dernier, on a vu des garde-côtes frapper certains des migrants repêchés, puis redémarrer alors qu’un homme restait suspendu à l’échelle de bâbord, sans qu’aucun Zodiac de secours ne soit jamais mis à l’eau. « Ils étaient cassés », ont répondu les Libyens.

      Un « sauvetage » effectué en novembre 2017 par des garde-côtes Libyens © Extrait d’une vidéo publiée par l’ONG allemande Sea Watch
      Interrogée sur le coût global de ces formations, la commission indique qu’il est impossible à chiffrer, Frontex (l’agence de garde-côtes européenne) pouvant participer aux sessions, tel État membre fournir un bateau, tel autre un avion pour trimballer les garde-côtes, etc.

      • La fourniture d’équipements en direct
      En décembre, un autre programme a démarré, plus touffu, financé cette fois via le « Fonds fiduciaire de l’UE pour l’Afrique » (le fonds d’urgence européen mis en place en 2015 censément pour prévenir les causes profondes des migrations irrégulières et prendre le problème à la racine). Cette fois, il s’agit non plus seulement de « formation », mais de « renforcement des capacités opérationnelles » des garde-côtes libyens, avec des aides directes à l’équipement de bateaux (gilets, canots pneumatiques, appareils de communication, etc.), à l’entretien des navires, mais aussi à l’équipement des salles de contrôle à terre, avec un objectif clair en ligne de mire : aider la Libye à créer un « centre de coordination de sauvetage maritime » en bonne et due forme, pour mieux proclamer une « zone de recherche et sauvetage » officielle, au-delà de ses seules eaux territoriales actuelles. La priorité, selon la commission à Bruxelles, reste de « sauver des vies ».

      Budget annoncé : 46 millions d’euros avec un co-financement de l’Italie, chargée de la mise en œuvre. À la marge, les garde-côtes libyens peuvent d’ailleurs profiter d’autres programmes européens, tel « Seahorse », pour de l’entraînement à l’utilisation de radars.

      L’Italie, elle, va encore plus loin. D’abord, elle fournit des bateaux aux garde-côtes. Surtout, en 2017, le ministre de l’intérieur transalpin a rencontré les maires d’une dizaine de villes libyennes en leur faisant miroiter l’accès au Fonds fiduciaire pour l’Afrique de l’UE, en contrepartie d’un coup de main contre le trafic de migrants. Et selon diverses enquêtes (notamment des agences de presse Reuters et AP), un deal financier secret aurait été conclu à l’été 2017 entre l’Italie et des représentants de milices, à l’époque maîtresses des départs d’embarcations dans la région de Sabratha. Rome a toujours démenti, mais les appareillages dans ce coin ont brutalement cessé pour redémarrer un peu plus loin. Au bénéfice d’autres milices.

      • L’aide à l’exfiltration de migrants
      En même temps, comme personne ne conteste plus l’enfer des conditions de détention et que tout le monde s’efforce officiellement de vider les centres du régime en urgence, l’UE travaille aussi à la « réinstallation » en Europe des exilés accessibles au statut de réfugié, ainsi qu’au rapatriement dans leur pays d’origine des migrants dits « économiques » (sur la base du volontariat en théorie). Dans le premier cas, l’UE vient en soutien du HCR ; dans le second cas, en renfort de l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM).

      L’objectif affiché est limpide : épargner des prises de risque en mer inutiles aux réfugiés putatifs (Érythréens, Somaliens, etc.), comme à ceux dont la demande à toutes les chances d’être déboutée une fois parvenus en Europe, comme les Ivoiriens par exemple. Derrière les éléments de langage, que disent les chiffres ?

      Selon le HCR, seuls 1 730 réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile prioritaires ont pu être évacués depuis novembre 2017, quelques-uns directement de la Libye vers l’Italie (312) et la Roumanie (10), mais l’essentiel vers le Niger voisin, où les autorités ont accepté d’accueillir une plateforme d’évacuations de 1 500 places en échange de promesses de « réinstallations » rapides derrière, dans certains pays de l’UE.

      Et c’est là que le bât blesse. Paris, par exemple, s’est engagé à faire venir 3 000 réfugiés de Niamey (Niger), mais n’a pas tenu un vingtième de sa promesse. L’Allemagne ? Zéro.

      « On a l’impression qu’une fois qu’on a évacué de Libye, la notion d’urgence se perd », regrette Vincent Cochetel, du HCR. Une centaine de migrants, surtout des femmes et des enfants, ont encore été sortis de Libye le 19 juin par avion. « Mais on va arrêter puisqu’on n’a plus de places [à Niamey], pointe le représentant du HCR. L’heure de vérité approche. On ne peut pas demander au Niger de jouer ce rôle si on n’est pas sérieux derrière, en termes de réinstallations. Je rappelle que le Niger a plus de réfugiés sur son territoire que la France par exemple, qui fait quand même des efforts, c’est vrai. Mais on aimerait que ça aille beaucoup plus vite. » Le HCR discute d’ailleurs avec d’autres États africains pour créer une seconde « plateforme d’évacuation » de Libye, mais l’exemple du Niger, embourbé, ne fait pas envie.

      Quant aux rapatriements vers les pays d’origine des migrants dits « économiques », mis en œuvre avec l’OIM (autre agence onusienne), les chiffres atteignaient 8 546 à la mi-juin. « On peut questionner le caractère volontaire de certains de ces rapatriements, complète Christophe Biteau, de MSF. Parce que vu les conditions de détention en Libye, quand on te dit : “Tu veux que je te sorte de là et que je te ramène chez toi ?”… Ce n’est pas vraiment un choix. » D’ailleurs, d’après l’OIM, les rapatriés de Libye sont d’abord Nigérians, puis Soudanais, alors même que les ressortissants du Soudan accèdent à une protection de la France dans 75 % des cas lorsqu’ils ont l’opportunité de voir leur demande d’asile examinée.
      En résumé, sur le terrain, la priorité des États de l’UE va clairement au renforcement du mur de la Méditerranée et de ses Cerbère, tandis que l’extraction de réfugiés, elle, reste cosmétique. Pour Amnesty International, cette attitude de l’Union, et de l’Italie au premier chef, serait scandaleuse : « Dans la mesure où ils ont joué un rôle dans l’interception des réfugiés et des migrants, et dans la politique visant à les contenir en Libye, ils partagent avec celle-ci la responsabilité des détentions arbitraires, de la torture et autres mauvais traitements infligés », tance un rapport de l’association publié en décembre dernier.

      Pour le réseau Migreurop (regroupant chercheurs et associations spécialisés), « confier le contrôle des frontières maritimes de l’Europe à un État non signataire de la Convention de Genève [sur les droits des réfugiés, ndlr] s’apparente à une politique délibérée de contournement des textes internationaux et à une sous-traitance des pires violences à l’encontre des personnes exerçant leur droit à émigrer ». Pas sûr que les conclusions du conseil européen de jeudi et vendredi donnent, à ces organisations, la moindre satisfaction.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/280618/les-migrants-paient-le-prix-fort-de-la-cooperation-entre-lue-et-les-garde-

    • Au Niger, l’Europe finance plusieurs projets pour réduire le flux de migrants

      L’Union européenne a invité des entreprises du vieux continent au Niger afin qu’elles investissent pour améliorer les conditions de vie des habitants. Objectif : réduire le nombre de candidats au départ vers l’Europe.

      Le Niger est un pays stratégique pour les Européens. C’est par là que transitent la plupart des migrants qui veulent rejoindre l’Europe. Pour réduire le flux, l’Union européenne finance depuis 2015 plusieurs projets et veut désormais créer un tissu économique au Niger pour dissuader les candidats au départ. Le président du Parlement européen, Antonio Tajani, était, la semaine dernière dans la capitale nigérienne à Niamey, accompagné d’une trentaine de chefs d’entreprise européens à la recherche d’opportunités d’investissements.
      Baisse du nombre de départ de 90% en deux ans

      Le nombre de migrants qui a quitté le Niger pour rejoindre la Libye avant de tenter la traversée vers l’Europe a été réduit de plus de 90% ces deux dernières années. Notamment grâce aux efforts menés par le gouvernement nigérien avec le soutien de l’Europe pour mieux contrôler la frontière entre le Niger et la Libye. Mais cela ne suffit pas selon le président du Parlement européen, Antonio Tajani. « En 2050, nous aurons deux milliards cinq cents millions d’Africains, nous ne pourrons pas bloquer avec la police et l’armée l’immigration, donc voilà pourquoi il faut intervenir tout de suite ». Selon le président du Parlement européen, il faut donc améliorer les conditions de vie des Nigériens pour les dissuader de venir en Europe.
      Des entreprises françaises vont investir au Niger

      La société française #Sunna_Design, travaille dans le secteur de l’éclairage public solaire et souhaite s’implanter au Niger. Pourtant les difficultés sont nombreuses, notamment la concurrence chinoise, l’insécurité, ou encore la mauvaise gouvernance. Stéphane Redon, le responsable export de l’entreprise, y voit pourtant un bon moyen d’améliorer la vie des habitants. « D’abord la sécurité qui permet à des gens de pouvoir penser à avoir une vie sociale, nocturne, et une activité économique. Et avec ces nouvelles technologies, on aspire à ce que ces projets créent du travail localement, au niveau des installations, de la maintenance, et de la fabrication. »
      Le Niger salue l’initiative

      Pour Mahamadou Issoufou, le président du Niger, l’implantation d’entreprises européennes sur le territoire nigérien est indispensable pour faire face au défi de son pays notamment démographique. Le Niger est le pays avec le taux de natalité le plus élevé au monde, avec huit enfants par femme. « Nous avons tous décidé de nous attaquer aux causes profondes de la migration clandestine, et l’une des causes profondes, c’est la #pauvreté. Il est donc important qu’une lutte énergique soit menée. Certes, il y a les ressources publiques nationales, il y a l’#aide_publique_au_développement, mais tout cela n’est pas suffisant. il faut nécessairement un investissement massif du secteur privé », explique Mahamadou Issoufou. Cette initiative doit être élargie à l’ensemble des pays du Sahel, selon les autorités nigériennes et européennes.

      https://mobile.francetvinfo.fr/replay-radio/en-direct-du-monde/en-direct-du-monde-au-niger-l-europe-finance-plusieurs-projets-p
      #investissements #développement #APD

    • In die Rebellion getrieben

      Die Flüchtlingsabwehr der EU führt zu neuen Spannungen in Niger und droht womöglich gar eine Rebellion im Norden des Landes auszulösen. Wie Berichte aus der Region bestätigen, hat die von Brüssel erzwungene Illegalisierung des traditionellen Migrationsgeschäfts besonders in der Stadt Agadez, dem Tor zur nigrischen Sahara, Zehntausenden die Lebensgrundlage genommen. Großspurig angekündigte Ersatzprogramme der EU haben lediglich einem kleinen Teil der Betroffenen wieder zu einem Job verholfen. Lokale Beobachter warnen, die Bereitschaft zum Aufstand sowie zum Anschluss an Jihadisten nehme zu. Niger ist ohnehin Schauplatz wachsenden jihadistischen Terrors wie auch gesteigerter westlicher „Anti-Terror“-Operationen: Während Berlin und die EU vor allem eine neue Eingreiftruppe der Staatengruppe „G5 Sahel“ fördern - deutsche Soldaten dürfen dabei auch im Niger eingesetzt werden -, haben die Vereinigten Staaten ihre Präsenz in dem Land ausgebaut. Die US-Streitkräfte errichten zur Zeit eine Drohnenbasis in Agadez, die neue Spannungen auslöst.
      Das Ende der Reisefreiheit

      Niger ist für Menschen, die sich aus den Staaten Afrikas südlich der Sahara auf den Weg zum Mittelmeer und weiter nach Europa machen, stets das wohl wichtigste Transitland gewesen. Nach dem Zerfall Libyens im Anschluss an den Krieg des Westens zum Sturz von Muammar al Gaddafi hatten zeitweise drei Viertel aller Flüchtlinge, die von Libyens Küste mit Ziel Italien in See stachen, zuvor das Land durchquert. Als kaum zu vermeidendes Nadelöhr zwischen den dichter besiedelten Gebieten Nigers und der Wüste fungiert die 120.000-Einwohner-Stadt Agadez, von deren Familien bis 2015 rund die Hälfte ihr Einkommen aus der traditionell legalen Migration zog: Niger gehört dem westafrikanischen Staatenbund ECOWAS an, in dem volle Reisefreiheit gilt. Im Jahr 2015 ist die Reisefreiheit in Niger allerdings durch ein Gesetz eingeschränkt worden, das, wie der Innenminister des Landes bestätigt, nachdrücklich von der EU gefordert worden war.[1] Mit seinem Inkrafttreten ist das Migrationsgeschäft in Agadez illegalisiert worden; das hatte zur Folge, dass zahlreiche Einwohner der Stadt ihren Erwerb verloren. Die EU hat zwar Hilfe zugesagt, doch ihre Maßnahmen sind allenfalls ein Tropfen auf den heißen Stein: Von den 7.000 Menschen, die offiziell ihre Arbeit in der nun verbotenen Transitreisebranche aufgaben, hat Brüssel mit einem großspurig aufgelegten, acht Millionen Euro umfassenden Programm weniger als 400 in Lohn und Brot gebracht.
      Ohne Lebensgrundlage

      Entsprechend hat sich die Stimmung in Agadez in den vergangenen zwei Jahren systematisch verschlechtert, heißt es in einem aktuellen Bericht über die derzeitige Lage in der Stadt, den das Nachrichtenportal IRIN Ende Juni publiziert hat.[2] Rangiert Niger auf dem Human Development Index der Vereinten Nationen ohnehin auf Platz 187 von 188, so haben die Verdienstmöglichkeiten in Agadez mit dem Ende des legalen Reisegeschäfts nicht nur stark abgenommen; selbst wer mit Hilfe der EU einen neuen Job gefunden hat, verdient meist erheblich weniger als zuvor. Zwar werden weiterhin Flüchtlinge durch die Wüste in Richtung Norden transportiert - jetzt eben illegal -, doch wachsen die Spannungen, und sie drohen bei jeder neuen EU-Maßnahme zur Abriegelung der nigrisch-libyschen Grenze weiter zu steigen. Das Verbot des Migrationsgeschäfts werde auf lange Sicht „die Leute in die Rebellion treiben“, warnt gegenüber IRIN ein Bewohner von Agadez stellvertretend für eine wachsende Zahl weiterer Bürger der Stadt. Als Reiseunternehmer für Flüchtlinge haben vor allem Tuareg gearbeitet, die bereits von 1990 bis 1995, dann erneut im Jahr 2007 einen bewaffneten Aufstand gegen die Regierung in Niamey unternommen hatten. Hinzu kommt laut einem örtlichen Würdenträger, dass die Umtriebe von Jihadisten im Sahel zunehmend als Widerstand begriffen und für jüngere, in wachsendem Maße aufstandsbereite Bewohner der Region Agadez immer häufiger zum Vorbild würden.
      Anti-Terror-Krieg im Sahel

      Jihadisten haben ihre Aktivitäten in Niger in den vergangenen Jahren bereits intensiviert, nicht nur im Südosten des Landes an der Grenze zu Nigeria, wo die nigrischen Streitkräfte im Krieg gegen Boko Haram stehen, sondern inzwischen auch an der Grenze zu Mali, von wo der dort seit 2012 schwelende Krieg immer mehr übergreift. Internationale Medien berichteten erstmals in größerem Umfang darüber, als am 4. Oktober 2017 eine US-Einheit, darunter Angehörige der Spezialtruppe Green Berets, nahe der nigrischen Ortschaft Tongo Tongo unweit der Grenze zu Mali in einen Hinterhalt gerieten und vier von ihnen von Jihadisten, die dem IS-Anführer Abu Bakr al Baghdadi die Treue geschworen hatten, getötet wurden.[3] In der Tat hat die Beobachtung, dass Jihadisten in Niger neuen Zulauf erhalten, die Vereinigten Staaten veranlasst, 800 Militärs in dem Land zu stationieren, die offiziell nigrische Soldaten trainieren, mutmaßlich aber auch Kommandoaktionen durchführen. Darüber hinaus beteiligt sich Niger auf Druck der EU an der Eingreiftruppe der „G5 Sahel“ [4], die im gesamten Sahel - auch in Niger - am Krieg gegen Jihadisten teilnimmt und auf lange Sicht nach Möglichkeit die französischen Kampftruppen der Opération Barkhane ersetzen soll. Um die „G5 Sahel“-Eingreiftruppe jederzeit und überall unterstützen zu können, hat der Bundestag im Frühjahr das Mandat für die deutschen Soldaten, die in die UN-Truppe MINUSMA entsandt werden, auf alle Sahelstaaten ausgedehnt - darunter auch Niger. Deutsche Soldaten sind darüber hinaus bereits am Flughafen der Hauptstadt Niamey stationiert. Der sogenannte Anti-Terror-Krieg des Westens, der in anderen Ländern wegen seiner Brutalität den Jihadisten oft mehr Kämpfer zugeführt als genommen hat, weitet sich zunehmend auf nigrisches Territorium aus.
      Zunehmend gewaltbereit

      Zusätzliche Folgen haben könnte dabei die Tatsache, dass die Vereinigten Staaten gegenwärtig für den Anti-Terror-Krieg eine 110 Millionen US-Dollar teure Drohnenbasis errichten - am Flughafen Agadez. Niger scheint sich damit dauerhaft zum zweitwichtigsten afrikanischen Standort von US-Truppen nach Djibouti mit seinem strategisch bedeutenden Hafen zu entwickeln. Washington errichtet die Drohnenbasis, obwohl eine vorab durchgeführte Umfrage des U.S. Africa Command und des State Department ergeben hat, dass die Bevölkerung die US-Militäraktivitäten im Land zunehmend kritisch sieht und eine starke Minderheit Gewalt gegen Personen oder Organisationen aus Europa und Nordamerika für legitim hält.[5] Mittlerweile dürfen sich, wie berichtet wird, US-Botschaftsangehörige außerhalb der Hauptstadt Niamey nur noch in Konvois in Begleitung von nigrischem Sicherheitspersonal bewegen. Die Drohnenbasis, die ohne die von der nigrischen Verfassung vorgesehene Zustimmung des Parlaments errichtet wird und daher mutmaßlich illegal ist, droht den Unmut noch weiter zu verschärfen. Beobachter halten es für nicht unwahrscheinlich, dass sie Angriffe auf sich zieht - und damit Niger noch weiter destabilisiert.[6]
      Flüchtlingslager

      Hinzu kommt, dass die EU Niger in zunehmendem Maß als Plattform nutzt, um Flüchtlinge, die in libyschen Lagern interniert waren, unterzubringen, bevor sie entweder in die EU geflogen oder in ihre Herkunftsländer abgeschoben werden. Allein von Ende November bis Mitte Mai sind 1.152 Flüchtlinge aus Libyen nach Niger gebracht worden; dazu wurden 17 „Transitzentren“ in Niamey, sechs in Agadez eingerichtet. Niger gilt inzwischen außerdem als möglicher Standort für die EU-"Ausschiffungsplattformen" [7] - Lager, in die Flüchtlinge verlegt werden sollen, die auf dem Mittelmeer beim Versuch, nach Europa zu reisen, aufgegriffen wurden. Damit erhielte Niger einen weiteren potenziellen Destabilisierungsfaktor - im Auftrag und unter dem Druck der EU. Ob und, wenn ja, wie das Land die durch all dies drohenden Erschütterungen überstehen wird, das ist völlig ungewiss.

      [1], [2] Eric Reidy: Destination Europe: Frustration. irinnews.org 28.06.2018.

      [3] Eric Schmitt: 3 Special Forces Troops Killed and 2 Are Wounded in an Ambush in Niger. nytimes.com 04.10.2017.[4] S. dazu Die Militarisierung des Sahel (IV).

      [5] Nick Turse: U.S. Military Surveys Found Local Distrust in Niger. Then the Air Force Built a $100 Million Drone Base. theintercept.com 03.07.2018.

      [6] Joe Penney: A Massive U.S. Drone Base Could Destabilize Niger - And May Even Be Illegal Under its Constitution. theintercept.com 18.02.2018.

      [7] S. dazu Libysche Lager.

      https://www.german-foreign-policy.com/news/detail/7673

      –-> Commentaire reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop :

      La politique d’externalisation de l’UE crée de nouvelles tensions au Niger et risque de déclencher une rebellion dans le nord du pays. Plusieurs rapports de la région confirment que le fait que Bruxelle ait rendu illégal la migration traditionnelle et de fait détruit l’économie qui tournait autour, particulièrement dans la ville d’Agadez, porte d’entrée du Sahara nigérien, a privé de revenus des dizaines de milliers de personnes. Les programmes de développement annoncés par l’UE n’ont pu aider qu’une infime partie de ceux qui ont été affectés par la mesure. Les observateurs locaux constatent que une augmentation des volontés à se rebeller et/ou à rejoindre les djihadistes. Le Niger est déja la scène d’attaques terroristes djihadistes ainsi que d’opérations occidentales « anti-terreur » : alors que Berlin et l’UE soutiennent une intervention des forces du G5 Sahel - les soldats allemands pourraient être déployés au Niger - les Etats Unis ont étendu leur présence sur le territoire. Les forces US sont en train de construire une base de #drones à Agadez, ce qui a déclenché de nouvelles tensions.

      #déstabilisation

    • Libya: EU’s patchwork policy has failed to protect the human rights of refugees and migrants

      A year after the emergence of shocking footage of migrants apparently being sold as merchandise in Libya prompted frantic deliberations over the EU’s migration policy, a series of quick fixes and promises has not improved the situation for refugees and migrants, Amnesty International said today. In fact, conditions for refugees and migrants have largely deteriorated over the past year and armed clashes in Tripoli that took place between August and September this year have only exacerbated the situation further.

      https://www.amnesty.org/en/documents/mde19/9391/2018/en
      #droits_humains

      Pour télécharger le rapport:
      https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/MDE1993912018ENGLISH.pdf

    • New #LNCG Training module in Croatia

      A new training module in favour of Libyan Coastguard and Navy started in Split (Croatia) on November the 12.
      Last Monday, November the 12th, a new training module managed by operation Sophia and focused on “Ship’s Divers Basic Course” was launched in the Croatian Navy Training Centre in Split (Croatia).

      The trainees had been selected by the competent Libyan authorities and underwent a thorough vetting process carried out in different phases by EUNAVFOR Med, security agencies of EU Member States participating in the Operation and international organizations.

      After the accurate vetting process, including all the necessary medical checks for this specific activity, 5 Libyan military personnel were admitted to start the course.

      The course, hosted by the Croatian Navy, will last 5 weeks, and it will provide knowledge and training in diving procedures, specifically related techniques and lessons focused on Human Rights, Basic First Aid and Gender Policy.

      The end of the course is scheduled for the 14 of December 2018.

      Additionally, with the positive conclusion of this course, the threshold of more than 300 Libyan Coastguard and Navy personnel trained by #EUNAVFOR_Med will be reached.

      EUNAVFOR MED Operation Sophia continues at sea its operation focused on disrupting the business model of migrant smugglers and human traffickers, contributing to EU efforts for the return of stability and security in Libya and the training and capacity building of the Libyan Navy and Coastguard.


      https://www.operationsophia.eu/new-lncg-training-module-in-croatia

    • EU Council adopts decision expanding EUBAM Libya’s mandate to include actively supporting Libyan authorities in disrupting networks involved in smuggling migrants, human trafficking and terrorism

      The Council adopted a decision mandating the #EU_integrated_border_management_assistance_mission in Libya (#EUBAM_Libya) to actively support the Libyan authorities in contributing to efforts to disrupt organised criminal networks involved in smuggling migrants, human trafficking and terrorism. The mission was previously mandated to plan for a future EU civilian mission while engaging with the Libyan authorities.

      The mission’s revised mandate will run until 30 June 2020. The Council also allocated a budget of € 61.6 million for the period from 1 January 2019 to 30 June 2020.

      In order to achieve its objectives EUBAM Libya provides capacity-building in the areas of border management, law enforcement and criminal justice. The mission advises the Libyan authorities on the development of a national integrated border management strategy and supports capacity building, strategic planning and coordination among relevant Libyan authorities. The mission will also manage as well as coordinate projects related to its mandate.

      EUBAM Libya responds to a request by the Libyan authorities and is part of the EU’s comprehensive approach to support the transition to a democratic, stable and prosperous Libya. The civilian mission co-operates closely with, and contributes to, the efforts of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya.

      The mission’s headquarters are located in Tripoli and the Head of Mission is Vincenzo Tagliaferri (from Italy). EUBAM Libya.

      https://migrantsatsea.org/2018/12/18/eu-council-adopts-decision-expanding-eubam-libyas-mandate-to-include-

      EUBAM Libya :
      Mission de l’UE d’assistance aux frontières (EUBAM) en Libye


      https://eeas.europa.eu/csdp-missions-operations/eubam-libya_fr

    • Comment l’UE a fermé la route migratoire entre la Libye et l’Italie

      Les Européens coopèrent avec un Etat failli, malgré les mises en garde sur le sort des migrants dans le pays

      L’une des principales voies d’entrée en Europe s’est tarie. Un peu plus de 1 100 personnes migrantes sont arrivées en Italie et à Malte par la mer Méditerranée sur les cinq premiers mois de l’année. Un chiffre en fort recul, comparé aux 650 000 migrants qui ont emprunté cette voie maritime ces cinq dernières années. Le résultat, notamment, d’une coopération intense entre l’Union européenne, ses Etats membres et la Libye.

      En 2014, alors que le pays est plongé dans une guerre civile depuis la chute du régime de Kadhafi, plus de 140 000 migrants quittent ses côtes en direction de l’Italie, contre quelque 42 000 l’année précédente pour toute la rive sud de la Méditerranée centrale. Cette dernière devient, deux ans plus tard, la principale porte d’entrée sur le continent européen.

      Inquiète de cette recrudescence, l’Italie relance en mars 2016 ses relations bilatérales avec la Libye – interrompues depuis la chute de Kadhafi –, à peine le fragile gouvernement d’union nationale (GNA) de Faïez Sarraj installé à Tripoli sous l’égide de l’ONU. Emboîtant le pas à Rome, l’UE modifie le mandat de son opération militaire « Sophia ». Jusque-là cantonnée à la lutte contre le trafic de migrants en Méditerranée, celle-ci doit désormais accompagner le rétablissement et la montée en puissance des gardes-côtes libyens.

      Dans cette optique, dès juillet 2016, l’UE mandate les gardes-côtes italiens pour « assumer une responsabilité de premier plan » dans le projet de mise en place d’un centre de coordination de sauvetage maritime (MRCC) à Tripoli et d’une zone de sauvetage à responsabilité libyenne dans les eaux internationales. C’est une étape majeure dans le changement du paysage en Méditerranée centrale. Jusque-là, compte tenu de la défaillance de Tripoli, la coordination des sauvetages au large de la Libye était assumée par le MRCC de Rome. Les migrants secourus étaient donc ramenés sur la rive européenne de la Méditerranée. Si Tripoli prend la main sur ces opérations, alors ses gardes-côtes ramèneront les migrants en Libye, même ceux interceptés dans les eaux internationales. Une manière de « contourner l’interdiction en droit international de refouler un réfugié vers un pays où sa vie ou sa liberté sont menacées », résume Hassiba Hadj-Sahraoui, conseillère aux affaires humanitaires de Médecins sans frontières (MSF).

      Les premières formations de gardes-côtes débutent en octobre 2016, et les agences de l’ONU sont mises à contribution pour sensibiliser les personnels au respect des droits de l’homme. « C’est difficile d’en mesurer l’impact, mais nous pensons que notre présence limite les risques pour les réfugiés », estime Roberto Mignone, l’ancien représentant du Haut-Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés en Libye.

      Au sein de l’UE, tous les outils sont mobilisés. Même les équipes du Bureau européen d’appui à l’asile sont sollicitées. Un fonctionnaire européen se souvient du malaise en interne. « Le Conseil a fait pression pour nous faire participer, rapporte-t-il. On n’était clairement pas emballés. C’était nous compromettre un peu aussi dans ce qui ressemble à une relation de sous-traitance et à un blanc-seing donné à des pratiques problématiques. »
      Le travail des ONG entravé

      Le pays est alors dans une situation chaotique, et les migrants en particulier y encourent de graves violences telles que le travail forcé, l’exploitation sexuelle, le racket et la torture.

      Mais l’Europe poursuit son plan et continue de s’appuyer sur l’Italie. Le 2 février 2017, le gouvernement de gauche de Paolo Gentiloni (Parti démocrate) réactive un traité d’amitié de 2008 entre Rome et Tripoli, avec l’approbation du Conseil européen dès le lendemain. Des moyens du Fonds fiduciaire de l’UE pour l’Afrique sont fléchés vers les enjeux migratoires en Libye – 338 millions d’euros jusqu’à aujourd’hui –, bien que l’Union fasse état de « préoccupations sur une collusion possible entre les bénéficiaires de l’action et les activités de contrebande et de traite ».

      A cette époque, les Nations unies dénoncent l’implication des gardes-côtes de Zaouïa (à 50 km à l’ouest de Tripoli) dans le trafic de migrants. En mai 2017, Marco Minniti, ministre italien de l’intérieur (Parti démocrate), remet quatre bateaux patrouilleurs à la Libye. Trois mois plus tard, Tripoli déclare auprès de l’Organisation maritime internationale (OMI) qu’elle devient compétente pour coordonner les sauvetages jusqu’à 94 milles nautiques au large de ses côtes.

      Le travail des ONG, lui, est de plus en plus entravé par l’Italie, qui les accuse de collaborer avec les passeurs et leur impose un « code de conduite ». S’ensuivront des saisies de bateaux, des retraits de pavillon et autres procédures judiciaires. L’immense majorité d’entre elles vont jeter l’éponge.

      Un tournant s’opère en Méditerranée centrale. Les gardes-côtes libyens deviennent à l’automne 2017 les premiers acteurs du sauvetage dans la zone. Ils ramènent cette année-là 18 900 migrants sur leur rive, presque quarante fois plus qu’en 2015.

      Leur autonomie semble pourtant toute relative. C’est Rome qui transmet à Tripoli « la majorité des appels de détresse », note un rapport de l’ONU. C’est Rome encore qui dépose en décembre 2017, auprès de l’OMI, le projet de centre libyen de coordination des sauvetages maritimes financé par la Commission européenne. Un bilan d’étape interne à l’opération « Sophia », de mars 2018, décrit d’ailleurs l’impréparation de Tripoli à assumer seule ses nouvelles responsabilités. La salle d’opération depuis laquelle les sauvetages doivent être coordonnés se trouve dans « une situation infrastructurelle critique »liée à des défauts d’électricité, de connexion Internet, de téléphones et d’ordinateurs. Les personnels ne parlent pas anglais.

      Un sauvetage, le 6 novembre 2017, illustre le dangereux imbroglio que deviennent les opérations de secours. Ce jour-là, dans les eaux internationales, à 30 milles nautiques au nord de Tripoli, au moins 20 personnes seraient mortes. Une plainte a depuis été déposée contre l’Italie devant la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme. Des rescapés accusent Rome de s’être défaussé sur les gardes-côtes libyens.« Un appel de détresse avait été envoyé à tous les bateaux par le MRCC Rome, relate Violeta Moreno-Lax, juriste qui a participé au recours. L’ONG allemande Sea-Watch est arrivée sur place quelques minutes après les gardes-côtes libyens. C’est Rome qui a demandé aux Libyens d’intervenir et à Sea-Watch de rester éloignée. »

      Les gardes-côtes présents – certains formés par l’UE – n’ont alors ni gilets ni canot de sauvetage. Sur les vidéos de l’événement, on peut voir l’embarcation des migrants se coincer sous la coque de leur patrouilleur. Des gens tombent à l’eau et se noient. On entend aussi les Libyens menacer l’équipage du Sea-Watch de représailles, puis quitter les lieux en charriant dans l’eau un migrant accroché à une échelle.

      Tout en ayant connaissance de ce drame, et bien qu’elle reconnaisse un suivi très limité du travail des gardes-côtes en mer, la force navale « Sophia » se félicite, dans son bilan d’étape de mars 2018, du « modèle opérationnel durable » qu’elle finance.

      L’année 2018 confirme le succès de cette stratégie. Les arrivées en Italie ont chuté de 80 %, ce qui n’empêche pas le ministre de l’intérieur, Matteo Salvini (extrême droite), d’annoncer à l’été la fermeture de ses ports aux navires humanitaires.
      « Esclavage » et « torture »

      L’ONU rappelle régulièrement que la Libye ne doit pas être considérée comme un « port sûr » pour débarquer les migrants interceptés en mer. Les personnes en situation irrégulière y sont systématiquement placées en détention, dans des centres sous la responsabilité du gouvernement où de nombreux abus sont documentés, tels que des « exécutions extrajudiciaires, l’esclavage, les actes de torture, les viols, le trafic d’être humains et la sous-alimentation ».

      La dangerosité des traversées, elle, a explosé : le taux de mortalité sur la route de la Méditerranée centrale est passé de 2,6 % en 2017 à 13,8 % en 2019.

      https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2019/05/07/comment-l-ue-a-ferme-la-route-entre-la-libye-et-l-italie_5459242_3210.html

  • UK Should Reject Extraditing Julian #Assange to US | Human Rights Watch
    https://www.hrw.org/news/2018/06/19/uk-should-reject-extraditing-julian-assange-us

    While some admire and others despise Assange, no one should be prosecuted under the antiquated Espionage Act for publishing leaked government documents. That 1917 statute was designed to punish people who leaked secrets to a foreign government, not to the media, and allows no defense or mitigation of punishment on the basis that public interest served by some leaks may outweigh any harm to national security.

  • Bosnian police block 100 migrants from reaching Croatia

    Bosnian border police on Monday stopped about 100 migrants from reaching the border with European Union member Croatia amid a rise in the influx of people heading through the Balkans toward Western Europe.

    Police blocked the migrants near the Maljevac border crossing in northwestern Bosnia, which was briefly closed down. The group has moved toward Croatia from the nearby town of #Velika_Kladusa, where hundreds have been staying in makeshift camps while looking for ways to move on.

    Migrants have recently turned to Bosnia in order to avoid more heavily guarded routes through the Balkans. Authorities in the war-ravaged country have struggled with the influx of thousands of people from the Mideast, Africa and Asia.

    Peter Van der Auweraert, from the International Organization for Migration, tweeted the attempted group crossing on Monday was a “very worrying development that risks” creating a backlash.

    Van der Auweraert told The Associated Press that the migrant influx has already put pressure on Bosnia and any incidents could further strain the situation, making Bosnians view migrants as “troublemakers” rather than people in need of help, he said.

    Migrants arrive in Bosnia from Serbia or Montenegro after traveling from Greece to Albania, Bulgaria or Macedonia.

    Also Monday, a migrant was stabbed in a fight with another migrant in an asylum center in southern Bosnia, police said.

    The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies said Monday that more than 5,600 migrants have reached Bosnia and Herzegovina so far this year, compared with only 754 in all of 2017.

    Hundreds of thousands of people passed through the Balkans toward Europe at the peak of the mass migration in 2015. The flow eased for a while but has recently picked up a bit with the new route through Bosnia.

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/article213373449.html
    #Bosnie #fermeture_des_frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Croatie #frontières #route_des_Balkans #Bosnie-Herzégovine

    • Migrants en Croatie : « on ne nous avait encore jamais tiré dessus »

      Le 30 mai, la police croate ouvrait le feu sur une camionnette qui venait de forcer un barrage près de la frontière avec la Bosnie-Herzégovine. À l’intérieur, 29 migrants. Bilan : deux enfants et sept adultes blessés. Reportage sur le lieu du drame, nouvelle étape de la route de l’exil, où des réfugiés désœuvrés errent dans des villages désertés par l’exode.

      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Migrants-en-Croatie-nulle-part-ailleurs-on-ne-nous-avait-tire-des
      #police #violences_policières

    • Refugees stranded in Bosnia allege Croatian police brutality

      Croatian officers accused of physical and verbal abuse, along with harassment including theft, but deny all allegations.

      Brutally beaten, mobile phones destroyed, strip-searched and money stolen.

      These are some of the experiences refugees and migrants stranded in western Bosnia report as they describe encounters with Croatian police.

      The abuse, they say, takes place during attempts to pass through Croatia, an EU member, with most headed for Germany.

      Bosnia has emerged as a new route to Western Europe, since the EU tightened its borders. This year, more than 13,000 refugees and migrants have so far arrived in the country, compared with only 755 in 2017.

      In Velika Kladusa, Bosnia’s most western town beside the Croatian border, hundreds have been living in makeshift tents on a field next to a dog kennel for the past four months.

      When night falls, “the game” begins, a term used by refugees and migrants for the challenging journey to the EU through Croatia and Slovenia that involves treks through forests and crossing rivers.

      However, many are caught in Slovenia or Croatia and are forced to return to Bosnia by Croatian police, who heavily patrol its EU borders.

      Then, they have to start the mission all over again.

      Some told Al Jazeera that they have attempted to cross as many as 20 times.

      The use of violence is clearly not acceptable. It is possible to control borders in a strict matter without violence.

      Peter Van der Auweraert, Western Balkans coordinator for the International Organization for Migration

      All 17 refugees and migrants interviewed by Al Jazeera said that they have been beaten by Croatian police - some with police batons, others punched or kicked.

      According to their testimonies, Croatian police have stolen valuables and money, cut passports, and destroyed mobile phones, hindering their communication and navigation towards the EU.

      “Why are they treating us like this?” many asked as they narrated their ordeals.

      “They have no mercy,” said 26-year-old Mohammad from Raqqa, Syria, who said he was beaten all over his body with batons on the two occasions he crossed into the EU. Police also took his money and phone, he said.

      “They treat babies and women the same. An officer pressed his boot against a woman’s head [as she was lying on the ground],” Mohammad said. “Dogs are treated better than us … why are they beating us like this? We don’t want to stay in Croatia; we want to go to Europe.”

      Mohammad Abdullah, a 22-year-old Algerian, told Al Jazeera that officers laughed at a group of migrants as they took turns beating them.

      "One of them would tell the other, ’You don’t know how to hit’ and would switch his place and continue beating us. Then, another officer would say, ’No, you don’t know how to hit’ and would take his place.

      “While [one of them] was beating me, he kissed me and started laughing. They would keep taking turns beating us like this, laughing,” Abdullah said.

      Croatia’s Interior Ministry told Al Jazeera that it “strongly dismisses” allegations of police brutality.

      In an emailed statement, it said those attempting to cross borders know they are acting outside of the law, and claimed that “no complaint so far has proved to be founded.”

      At a meeting in late August with Croatian Prime Minister Andrej Plenkovic, German Chancellor Angela Merkel praised Croatia for its control over its borders.

      “You are doing a great job on the borders, and I wish to commend you for that,” Merkel said.

      But according to a new report, the UNHCR received information about 1,500 refugees being denied access to asylum procedures, including over 100 children. More than 700 people reported violence and theft by Croatian police.

      Al Jazeera was unable to independently verify all of the claims against police, because many of the refugees and migrants said their phones - which held evidence - were confiscated or smashed. However, the 17 people interviewed separately reported similar patterns of abuse.

      Shams and Hassan, parents of three, have been trying to reach Germany to apply for asylum, but Croatian authorities have turned them back seven times over the past few months.

      Four years ago, they left their home in Deir Az Zor, Syria, after it was bombed.

      Shams, who worked as a lawyer in Syria, said Croatian policemen strip-searched her and her 13-year-old daughter Rahma on one occasion after they were arrested.

      The male officers handled the women’s bodies, while repeating: “Where’s the money?”

      They pulled off Shams’ headscarf, threw it on the ground and forced her to undress, and took Rahma into a separate room.

      “My daughter was very afraid,” Shams said. "They told her to take off all her clothes. She was shy, she told them, ’No.’

      "They beat her up and stripped her clothes by force, even her underwear.

      “She kept telling them ’No! No! There isn’t [any money]!’ She was embarrassed and was asking them to close the window and door so no one would see her. [The officer] then started yelling at her and pulled at her hair. They beat her up.”

      Rahma screamed for her mother but Shams said she couldn’t do anything.

      “They took 1,500 euros ($1,745) from me and they took my husband’s golden ring. They also broke five of our mobiles and took all the SIM cards … They detained us for two days in prison and didn’t give us any food in the beginning,” Shams said, adding they cut her Syrian passport into pieces.

      “They put my husband in solitary confinement. I didn’t see him for two days; I didn’t know where he was.”

      A senior policeman told Shams that she and her children could apply for asylum, but Hassan would have to return to Bosnia.

      When she refused, she said the police drove the family for three hours to a forest at night and told them to walk back to Bosnia.

      They did not have a torch or mobile phone.

      She said they walked through the forest for two days until they reached a small town in western Bosnia.

      “No nation has the right to treat people this way,” Shams said.

      In another instance, they said they were arrested in a forest with a group of refugees and migrants. All 15 of them were forced into a van for two hours, where it was difficult to breathe.

      “It was closed like a box, but [the officer] refused to turn on the air conditioning so we could breathe. My younger son Mohammad - he’s eight years old - he has asthma and allergies, he was suffocating. When we knocked on the window to ask if he could turn on the air conditioning, [the officer] beat my husband with the baton,” Shams said.

      No Name Kitchen, a volunteer organisation that provides assistance to refugees and migrants on the Balkan route, has been documenting serious injuries on Instagram.

      In one post, the group alleges that Croatian police twice crushed a refugee’s orthopaedic leg.

      Peter Van der Auweraert, the Western Balkans coordinator for the International Organization for Migration, says he has heard stories of police brutality, but called for an independent investigation to judge how alleged victims sustained injuries.

      “Given the fact that there are so many of these stories, I think it’s in everyone’s interest to have an independent inquiry to see what is going on, on the other side of the border,” Van der Auweraert said.

      “The use of violence is clearly not acceptable. It’s not acceptable under European human rights law, it’s not acceptable under international human rights law and it is to my mind also, not necessary. It is possible to control borders in a strict matter without violence.”

      Shams’ family journey from Syria was traumatic from the get-go, and they have spent and lost several thousand euros.

      While travelling in dinghies from Turkey to Greece, they saw dead bodies along the way.

      “We call upon Merkel to help us and open the borders for us. At least for those of us stuck at the borders,” she said. “Why is the EU paying Croatia to prevent our entry into the EU, yet once we reach Germany, after spending a fortune with lives lost on the way, we’ll be granted asylum?”

      “We have nothing,” said her husband Hassan. “Our houses have been destroyed. We didn’t have any problems until the war started. We had peace in our homes. Is there a single country that accepts refugees?”

      “There are countries but there’s no way to reach them,” Shams replied. “This is our misery.”


      https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/refugees-stranded-bosnia-report-campaign-police-brutality-180915100740024

    • Le Conseil de l’Europe somme la Croatie d’enquêter sur les violences policières

      Le Commissariat aux droits de l’Homme du Conseil de l’Europe a appelé la Croatie à ouvrir rapidement des enquêtes sur les allégations de violences policières et de vol à l’encontre de « demandeurs d’asile et autres migrants », ainsi que sur les cas d’expulsions collectives.

      Dans un courrier publié vendredi 5 octobre et adressé au Premier ministre croate Andrej Plenkovic, la commissaire aux droits de l’Homme du Conseil de l’Europe, Dunja Mijatovic, a déclaré être « préoccupée » par les informations « cohérentes et corroborées » fournies par plusieurs organisations attestant « d’un grand nombre d’expulsions collectives de la Croatie vers la Serbie et vers la Bosnie-Herzégovine de migrants en situation irrégulière, dont de potentiels demandeurs d’asile ».

      Elle s’inquiète particulièrement du « recours systématique à la violence des forces de l’ordre croates à l’encontre de ces personnes », y compris les « femmes enceintes et les enfants ». La responsable s’appuie sur les chiffres du Haut-Commissariat de l’ONU aux réfugiés (UNHCR), selon lesquels sur 2 500 migrants expulsés par la Croatie, 700 ont accusé la police de violences et de vols.

      « Consciente des défis auxquels la Croatie est confrontée dans le domaine des migrations », Dunja Mijatovic souligne cependant que les « efforts pour gérer les migrations » doivent respecter les principes du droit international. « Il s’agit notamment de l’interdiction absolue de la torture et des peines ou traitements inhumains prévue à l’article 3 de la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme et l’interdiction des expulsions collectives », qui s’appliquent « aux demandeurs d’asile comme aux migrants en situation irrégulière », écrit-elle.

      Une « violence systématique » selon les associations

      Pour la commissaire, Zagreb doit « entamer et mener rapidement à leur terme des enquêtes rapides, efficaces et indépendantes sur les cas connus d’expulsions collectives et sur les allégations de violence contre les migrants ». Elle somme également le gouvernement croate de « prendre toutes les mesures nécessaires pour mettre fin à ces pratiques et éviter qu’elles ne se reproduisent ».

      « Aucun cas de mauvais de traitement policier à l’encontre de migrants (...) ni aucun vol n’ont été établis », s’est défendu le ministre croate de l’Intérieur Davor Bozinovic dans une lettre de réponse au Conseil de l’Europe.

      Pourtant, dans un rapport intitulé « Games of violence », l’organisation Médecins sans frontières MSF alertait déjà en octobre 2017 sur les violences perpétrées par les polices croates, hongroises et bulgares envers les enfants et les jeunes migrants.

      Sur sa page Facebook, l’association No Name Kitchen a également rappelé qu’elle documentait les cas de violences aux frontières croates depuis 2017 sur le site Border violence.
      En août dernier, cette association qui aide les réfugiés à Sid en Serbie et dans le nord-ouest de la Bosnie expliquait à InfoMigrants que la violence était « systématique » pour les migrants expulsés de Croatie. « Il y a un ou deux nouveaux cas chaque jour. Nous n’avons pas la capacité de tous les documenter », déclarait Marc Pratllus de No Name Kitchen.


      http://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/12518/le-conseil-de-l-europe-somme-la-croatie-d-enqueter-sur-les-violences-p

    • Bosnie-Herzégovine : des réfugiés tentent de passer en force en Croatie

      Alors que les températures ont brutalement chuté ces derniers jours, des réfugiés bloqués en Bosnie-Herzégovine ont tenté de franchir la frontière croate. Des rixes ont éclaté, des policiers croates ont été blessés, des réfugiés aussi.

      Environ 150 à 200 réfugiés ont essayé, mercredi après-midi, de traverser en force le pont reliant la Bosnie-Herzégovine au poste-frontière croate de Mlajevac. Des échauffourées ont éclaté entre la police et les réfugiés, parmi lesquels des femmes et des enfants. Au moins deux policiers croates ont été blessés par des jets de pierres, selon le ministère croate de l’Intérieur. Les réfugiés ont depuis organisé un sit-in devant la frontière, dont ils demandent l’ouverture.

      « Les réfugiés se sont déplacés jusqu’à la frontière croate où la police leur a refusé l’entrée, illégale et violente, sur le territoire », a rapporté le ministère croate de l’Intérieur. « Les réfugiés ont ensuite jeté des pierres sur les agents de la police croate, dont deux ont été légèrement blessé et ont demandé une aide médicale. »

      Après avoir passé la nuit près de la frontière de Velika Kalduša – Maljevac, les réfugiés s’attendaient à pouvoir entrer en Croatie depuis la Bosnie-Herzégovine et ont franchi un premier cordon de la police bosnienne aux frontières. « La police croate n’a pas réagi après que les réfugiés eurent passé le premier cordon de police en direction de la Croatie, car il y avait un second cordon de la police bosnienne », a déclaré la cheffe du département des relations publiques du ministère croate de l’Intérieur, Marina Mandić, soulignant que la police croate, en poste à la frontière, n’est intervenue à aucun moment et n’a donc pas pénétré sur le territoire de la Bosnie-Herzégovine, comme l’ont rapporté certains médias.

      Selon l’ONG No Name Kitchen, la police bosnienne aurait fait usage de gaz lacrymogènes. Au moins trois réfugiés ont été blessés et pris en charge par Médecins sans frontières.

      Mardi, plus de 400 réfugiés sont arrivés à proximité de la frontière où la police a déployé une bande jaune de protection pour les empêcher de passer en Croatie. Parmi les réfugiés qui dorment dehors ou dans des tentes improvisées, on compte beaucoup de femmes et d’enfants. Ils ont ramassé du bois et allumé des feux, alors que la température atteint à peine 10°C.

      Le commandant de la police du canton d’Una-Sana, en Bosnie-Herzégovine, Mujo Koričić, a confirmé mercredi que des mesures d’urgence étaient entrées en vigueur afin d’empêcher l’escalade de la crise migratoire dans la région, notamment l’afflux de nouveaux réfugiés.

      Mise à jour, jeudi 25 octobre, 17h – Environ 120 réfugiés stationnent toujours près du poste-frontière de Velika Kalduša–Maljevac après avoir passé une deuxième nuit sur place, dehors ou dans des tentes improvisées. La police aux frontières de Bosnie-Herzégovine assure que la situation est sous contrôle et pacifiée. La circulation est toujours suspendue. Des enfants portent des banderoles avec des inscriptions demandant l’ouverture de la frontière.

      En réaction, le secrétaire général aux Affaires étrangères de l’UE, l’autrichien Johannes Peterlik, a déclaré jeudi 25 octobre en conférence de presse : « Les migrations illégales ne sont pas la voie à suivre. Il y a des voies légales et cela doit être clair ».

      Le nombre de migrants dans le canton d’Una-Sana est actuellement estimé à 10500.


      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Bosnie-Herzegovine-des-refugies-tentent-un-passage-en-force-en-Cr
      #violence

      v. aussi :

      Sulla porta d’Europa. Scontri e feriti oggi alla frontiera fra Bosnia e Croazia. Dove un gruppo di 200 migranti ha cercato di passare il confine. Foto Reuters/Marko Djurica

      https://twitter.com/NiccoloZancan/status/1055070667710828545

    • Bleak Bosnian winter for migrants camped out on new route to Europe

      Shouting “Open borders!”, several dozen migrants and asylum seekers broke through a police cordon last week at the Maljevac border checkpoint in northwestern Bosnia and Herzegovina and tried to cross into Croatia.

      After being forced back by Croatian police with teargas, they set up camp just inside Bosnian territory. They are in the vanguard of a new wave of migrants determined to reach wealthier European countries, often Germany. Stalled, they have become a political football and face winter with little assistance and inadequate shelter.

      The old Balkan route shut down in 2016 as a raft of European countries closed their borders, with Hungary erecting a razor-wire fence. But a new route emerged this year through Bosnia (via Albania and Montenegro or via Macedonia and Serbia) and on to Croatia, a member of the EU. The flow of travellers has been fed by fresh streams of people from the Middle East and Central and South Asia entering Greece from Turkey, notably across the Evros River.

      By the end of September, more than 16,000 asylum seekers and migrants had entered Bosnia this year, compared to just 359 over the same period last year, according to official figures. The real number is probably far higher as more are smuggled in and uncounted. Over a third of this year’s official arrivals are Pakistani, followed by Iranians (16 percent), Syrians (14 percent), and Iraqis (nine percent).

      This spike is challenging Bosnia’s ability to provide food, shelter, and other aid – especially to the nearly 10,000 people that local institutions and aid organisations warn may be stranded at the Croatian border as winter begins. Two decades after the Balkan wars of the 1990s, the situation is also heightening tensions among the country’s Muslim, Serb, and Croat communities and its often fraught tripartite political leadership.

      How to respond to the unexpected number of migrants was a key issue in the presidential election earlier this month. Nationalist Bosnian Serb leader Milorad Dodik, who won the Serb seat in the presidency, charged that it was a conspiracy to boost the country’s Muslim population. The outgoing Croat member of the presidency, Dragan Čović, repeatedly called for Bosnia’s borders to be closed to stem the migrant flow.

      Maja Gasal Vrazalica, a left-wing member of parliament and a refugee herself during the Bosnian wars, accuses nationalist parties of “misusing the topic of refugees because they want to stoke up all this fear through our nation.”
      “I’m very scared”

      Most migrants and asylum seekers are concentrated around two northwestern towns, Bihać and nearby Velika Kladuša. Faris Šabić, youth president of the Bihać Red Cross, organises assistance for the some 4,000 migrants camped in Bihać and others who use the town as a way station.

      Since the spring and throughout the summer, as arrivals spiked, several local volunteers joined his staff to provide food, hygiene items, and first aid. But now, as winter draws in, they fear the scale of the crisis is becoming untenable.

      “I have to be honest, I’m very scared,” Šabić told IRIN, examining a notebook filled with the names of new arrivals. “Not only for migrants, I’m scared for my locals as well. We are a generous and welcoming people, but I fear that we will not be able to manage the emergency anymore.”

      The Bihać Red Cross, along with other aid organisations and human rights groups, is pushing the government to find long-term solutions. But with an economy still recovering from the legacy of the war and a youth unemployment rate of almost 55 percent, it has been hard-pressed to find answers.

      Hope that the end of the election season might improve the national debate around migration appears misguided. Around 1,000 Bihać locals staged protests for three consecutive days, from 20-22 October, demanding the relocation of migrants outside the town centre. On the Saturday, Bihać residents even travelled to the capital, Sarajevo, blocking the main street to protest the inaction of the central government.

      The local government of the border district where most migrants and asylum seekers wait, Una-Sana, complains of being abandoned by the central government in Sarajevo. “We do not have bad feelings towards migrants, but the situation is unmanageable,” the mayor of Bihać, Šuhret Fazlić, told IRIN.

      To begin with most residents openly welcomed the migrants, with volunteers providing food and medical help. But tensions have been growing, especially as dozens of the latest newcomers have started occupying the main public spaces in the town.

      “They turned our stadium into a toilet and occupied children’s playgrounds,” said Fazlić. “I would like to understand why they come here, but what is important at the moment is to understand where to host them in a dignified manner.”
      Beatings and abuse

      Those camped near the Croatian border have all entered Bosnia illegally. Each night, they wait to enter “The Game” – as they refer to attempts to cross the frontier and strike out into dense forests.

      Most are detained and pushed back into Bosnia by the Croatian police. Some reach Slovenia before being deported all the way back. Abuse is rife, according to NGOs and human rights groups. Those who have attempted to cross say Croatian police officers destroy their phones to prevent them from navigating the mountains, beat them with electric batons, unleash dogs, steal their money, and destroy their documents and personal belongings. Croatia’s interior ministry has strongly denied allegations of police brutality.

      No Name Kitchen, a group of activists that provides showers, soap, and hygiene products to migrants in Velika Kladuša, has been documenting cases of violence allegedly committed by the Croatian police. In August alone the organisation collected accounts from 254 deportees. Most claimed to have suffered physical violence. Of those cases, 43 were minors.

      Croatian media has reported cases of shootings, too. In late May, a smuggler’s van bringing migrants and asylum seekers from Bosnia was shot at and three people including a boy and a girl, both 12, were wounded.

      A report earlier this year from the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR, collated accounts from 2,500 refugees and migrants allegedly pushed back from Croatia to Serbia and Bosnia. In more than 1,500 cases – 100 of them relating to children – asylum procedures were denied, and over 700 people made allegations of violence or theft.
      Winter housing needed

      In Velika Kladuša, two kilometres from the Maljevac border checkpoint, around 1,000 people live in a makeshift tent camp that turns into a swamp every time it rains. Temperatures here will soon plummet below zero at night. Finding a new place for them "is a race against time and the key challenge,” said Stephanie Woldenberg, senior UNHCR protection officer.

      Already, life is difficult.

      “Nights here are unsustainable,” Emin, a young Afghan girl who tried twice to cross the border with her family and is among those camped in Velika Kladuša, told IRIN. “Dogs in the kennel are treated better than us.”

      Bosnian police reportedly announced last week that migrants are no longer allowed to travel to the northwest zone, and on 30 October said they had bussed dozens of migrants from the border camps to a new government-run facility near Velika Kladuša. Another facility has been set up near Sarajevo since the election. Together, they have doubled the number of beds available to migrants to 1,700, but it’s still nowhere near the capacity needed.

      The federal government has identified a defunct factory, Agrokomerc, once owned by the mayor of Velika Kladuša, Fikret Abdić, as a potential site to house more migrants. Abdić was convicted on charges of war crimes during the Balkan wars and sentenced to 20 years imprisonment. He became mayor in 2016, after his 2012 release. His local government is strongly opposed to the move and counters that the migrants and asylum seekers should be equally distributed throughout Bosnia.

      For now, around 800 people live inside a former student dormitory in Velika Kladuša that is falling apart due to damage sustained during the Bosnian wars. Holes in the floor and the absence of basic fixtures and of a proper heating system make it highly unsuitable to house migrants this winter. Clean water and bathing facilities are scarce, and the Red Cross has registered several cases of scabies, lice, and other skin and vector-borne diseases.

      Throughout the three-storey building, migrants and asylum seekers lie sprawled across the floor on mattresses, waiting their turn to charge their phones at one of the few electrical sockets. Many are young people from Lahore, Pakistan who sold their family’s homes and businesses to pay for this trip. On average they say they paid $10,000 to smugglers who promised to transport them to the EU. Several display bruises and abrasions, which they say were given to them by Croatian border patrol officers as they tried to enter Croatia.

      The bedding on one mattress is stained with blood. Witnesses told IRIN the person who sleeps there was stabbed by other migrants trying to steal his few belongings. “It happens frequently here,” one said.


      https://www.irinnews.org/news-feature/2018/10/31/bleak-bosnian-winter-migrants-camped-out-new-route-europe

    • ’They didn’t give a damn’: first footage of Croatian police ’brutality’

      Migrants who allegedly suffer savage beatings by state officials call it ‘the game’. But as shocking evidence suggests, attempting to cross the Bosnia-Croatia border is far from mere sport.

      As screams ring out through the cold night air, Sami, hidden behind bushes, begins to film what he can.

      “The Croatian police are torturing them. They are breaking people’s bones,’’ Sami whispers into his mobile phone, as the dull thumps of truncheons are heard.

      Then silence. Minutes go by before Hamdi, Mohammed and Abdoul emerge from the woods, faces bruised from the alleged beating, mouths and noses bloody, their ribs broken.

      Asylum seekers from Algeria, Syria and Pakistan, they had been captured by the Croatian police attempting to cross the Bosnia-Croatia border into the EU, and brutally beaten before being sent back.

      Sami, 17, from Kobane, gave the Guardian his footage, which appears to provide compelling evidence of the physical abuses, supposedly perpetrated by Croatian police, of which migrants in the Bosnian cities of Bihac and Velika Kladusa have been complaining.

      The EU border agency, Frontex, announced on Wednesday that this year is likely to produce the lowest number of unauthorised migrants arriving into Europe in five years.

      Frontex said that approximately 118,900 irregular border crossings were recorded in the first 10 months of 2018, roughly 31% lower than the same period in 2017.
      Advertisement

      Despite this steady decline in numbers, many states remain embroiled in political disputes that fuel anti-migrant sentiment across Europe.

      Frontex also noted that, while entries are declining, the number of people reaching Europe across the western Mediterranean, mostly through Spain from Morocco, continues to rise. Nearly 9,400 people crossed in October, more than double the number for the same month last year.

      But the brutality of what is happening on Europe’s borders is not documented. Every night, migrants try to cross into Croatia. And, according to dozens of accounts received by the Guardian and charities, many end up in the hands of police, who beat them back to Bosnia.

      No Name Kitchen (NNK), an organisation consisting of volunteers from several countries that distributes food to asylum seekers in Serbia, Bosnia and It