• Israel escalates surveillance of Palestinians with facial recognition program in West Bank
    By Elizabeth Dwoskin - 8 novembre 2021 - The Washington Post
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/middle_east/israel-palestinians-surveillance-facial-recognition/2021/11/05/3787bf42-26b2-11ec-8739-5cb6aba30a30_story.html

    HEBRON, West Bank — The Israeli military has been conducting a broad surveillance effort in the occupied West Bank to monitor Palestinians by integrating facial recognition with a growing network of cameras and smartphones, according to descriptions of the program by recent Israeli soldiers.

    The surveillance initiative, rolled out over the past two years, involves in part a smartphone technology called Blue Wolf that captures photos of Palestinians’ faces and matches them to a database of images so extensive that one former soldier described it as the army’s secret “Facebook for Palestinians.” The phone app flashes in different colors to alert soldiers if a person is to be detained, arrested or left alone.

    To build the database used by Blue Wolf, soldiers competed last year in photographing Palestinians, including children and the elderly, with prizes for the most pictures collected by each unit. The total number of people photographed is unclear but, at a minimum, ran well into the thousands.

    The surveillance program was described in interviews conducted by The Post with two former Israeli soldiers and in separate accounts that they and four other recently discharged soldiers gave to the Israeli advocacy group Breaking the Silence and were later shared with The Post. Much of the program has not been previously reported. While the Israeli military has acknowledged the existence of the initiative in an online brochure, the interviews with former soldiers offer the first public description of the program’s scope and operations.

    In addition to Blue Wolf, the Israeli military has installed face-scanning cameras in the divided city of Hebron to help soldiers at checkpoints identify Palestinians even before they present their I.D. cards. A wider network of closed-circuit television cameras, dubbed “Hebron Smart City,” provides real-time monitoring of the city’s population and, one former soldier said, can sometimes see into private homes.

    The former soldiers who were interviewed for this article and who spoke with Breaking the Silence, an advocacy group composed of Israeli army veterans that opposes the occupation, discussed the surveillance program on the condition of anonymity for fear of social and professional repercussions. The group says it plans to publish its research.

    They said they were told by the military that the efforts were a powerful augmentation of its capabilities to defend Israel against terrorists. But the program also demonstrates how surveillance technologies that are hotly debated in Western democracies are already being used behind the scenes in places where people have fewer freedoms.

    “I wouldn’t feel comfortable if they used it in the mall in [my hometown], let’s put it that way,” said a recently discharged Israeli soldier who served in an intelligence unit. “People worry about fingerprinting, but this is that several times over.” She told The Post that she was motivated to speak out because the surveillance system in Hebron was a “total violation of privacy of an entire people.”

    Israel’s use of surveillance and facial-recognition appear to be among the most elaborate deployments of such technology by a country seeking to control a subject population, according to experts with the digital civil rights organization AccessNow.

    In response to questions about the surveillance program, the Israel Defense Forces, or IDF, said that “routine security operations” were “part of the fight against terrorism and the efforts to improve the quality of life for the Palestinian population in Judea and Samaria.” (Judea and Samaria is the official Israeli name for the West Bank.)

    “Naturally, we cannot comment on the IDF’s operational capabilities in this context,” the statement added.

    Official use of facial recognition technology has been banned by at least a dozen U.S. cities, including Boston and San Francisco, according to the advocacy group the Surveillance Technology Oversight Project. And this month the European Parliament called for a ban on police use of facial recognition in public places.

    But a study this summer by the U.S. Government Accountability Office found that 20 federal agencies said they use facial recognition systems, with six law enforcement agencies reporting that the technology helped identify people suspected of law-breaking during civil unrest. And the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, a trade group that represents technology companies, took issue with the proposed European ban, saying it would undermine efforts by law enforcement to “effectively respond to crime and terrorism.”

    Inside Israel, a proposal by law enforcement officials to introduce facial recognition cameras in public spaces has drawn substantial opposition, and the government agency in charge of protecting privacy has come out against the proposal. But Israel applies different standards in the occupied territories.

    “While developed countries around the world impose restrictions on photography, facial recognition and surveillance, the situation described [in Hebron] constitutes a severe violation of basic rights, such as the right to privacy, as soldiers are incentivized to collect as many photos of Palestinian men, women, and children as possible in a sort of competition,” said Roni Pelli, a lawyer with the Association for Civil Rights in Israel, after being told about the surveillance effort. She said the “military must immediately desist.”

    Amro, seen in Hebron on Oct. 13, says Israel has ulterior motives for its surveillance of Palestinians. “They want to make our lives so hard so that we will just leave on our own, so more settlers can move in,” he said. (Kobi Wolf/for The Washington Post)_

    Last vestiges of privacy

    Yaser Abu Markhyah, a 49-year-old Palestinian father of four, said his family has lived in Hebron for five generations and has learned to cope with checkpoints, restrictions on movement and frequent questioning by soldiers after Israel captured the city during the Six-Day War in 1967. But, more recently, he said, surveillance has been stripping people of the last vestiges of their privacy.

    “We no longer feel comfortable socializing because cameras are always filming us,” said Abu Markhyah. He said he no longer lets his children play outside in front of the house, and relatives who live in less-monitored neighborhoods avoid visiting him.

    Hebron has long been a flashpoint for violence, with an enclave of hardline, heavily protected Israeli settlers near the Old City surrounded by hundreds of thousands of Palestinians and security divided between the Israeli military and the Palestinian administration.

    In his quarter of Hebron, close to the Cave of the Patriarchs, a site that is sacred to Muslims and Jews alike, surveillance cameras have been mounted about every 300 feet, including on the roofs of homes. And he said the real-time monitoring appears to be increasing. A few months ago, he said, his 6-year-old daughter dropped a teaspoon from the family’s roof deck, and although the street seemed empty, soldiers came to his home soon after and said he was going to be cited for throwing stones.

    Issa Amro, a neighbor and activist who runs the group Friends of Hebron, pointed to several empty houses on his block. He said Palestinian families had moved out because of restrictions and surveillance.

    “They want to make our lives so hard so that we will just leave on our own, so more settlers can move in,” Amro said.

    “The cameras,” he said, “only have one eye — to see Palestinians. From the moment you leave your house to the moment you get home, you are on camera.”

    Incentives for photos

    The Blue Wolf initiative combines a smartphone app with a database of personal information accessible via mobile devices, according to six former soldiers who were interviewed by The Post and Breaking the Silence.

    One of them told The Post that this database is a pared-down version of another, vast database, called Wolf Pack, which contains profiles of virtually every Palestinian in the West Bank, including photographs of the individuals, their family histories, education and a security rating for each person. This recent soldier was personally familiar with Wolf Pack, which is accessible only on desktop computers in more secure environments. (While this former soldier described the data base as “Facebook for Palestinians,” it is not connected to Facebook.)

    Another former soldier told The Post that his unit, which patrolled the streets of Hebron in 2020, was tasked with collecting as many photographs of Palestinians as possible in a given week using an old army-issued smartphone, taking the pictures during daily missions that often lasted eight hours. The soldiers uploaded the photos via the Blue Wolf app installed on the phones.

    This former soldier said Palestinian children tended to pose for the photographs, while elderly people — and particularly older women — often would resist. He described the experience of forcing people to be photographed against their will as traumatic for him.

    The photos taken by each unit would number in the hundreds each week, with one former soldier saying the unit was expected to take at least 1,500. Army units across the West Bank would compete for prizes, such as a night off, given to those who took the most photographs, former soldiers said.

    Often, when a soldier takes someone’s photograph, the app registers a match for an existing profile in the Blue Wolf system. The app then flashes yellow, red or green to indicate whether the person should be detained, arrested immediately or allowed to pass, according to five soldiers and a screenshot of the system obtained by The Post.

    The big push to build out the Blue Wolf database with images has slowed in recent months, but troops continue to use Blue Wolf to identify Palestinians, one former soldier said.

    A separate smartphone app, called White Wolf, has been developed for use by Jewish settlers in the West Bank, a former soldier told Breaking the Silence. Although settlers are not allowed detain people, security volunteers can use White Wolf to scan a Palestinian’s identification card before that person enters a settlement, for example, to work in construction. The military in 2019 acknowledged existence of White Wolf in a right-wing Israeli publication.

    ’Rights are simply irrelevant’

    The Israeli military, in the only known instance, referred to the Blue Wolf technology in June in an online brochure inviting soldiers to be part of “a new platoon” that “will turn you into a Blue Wolf.” The brochure said that the “advanced technology” featured “smart cameras with sophisticated analytics” and “censors that can detect and alert suspicious activity in real-time and the movement of wanted people.”

    The military also has mentioned “Hebron Smart City” in a 2020 article on the army’s website. The article, which showed a group of female soldiers called “scouts” in front of computer monitors and wearing virtual-reality goggles, described the initiative as a “major milestone” and a “breakthrough” technology for security in the West Bank. The article said “a new system of cameras and radars had been installed throughout the city” that can document “everything that happens around it” and “recognize any movement or unfamiliar noise.”

    In 2019, Microsoft invested in an Israeli facial recognition start-up called AnyVision, which NBC and the Israeli business publication the Marker reported was working with the army to build a network of smart security cameras using face-scanning technology throughout the West Bank. (Microsoft said it pulled out of its investment in AnyVision during fighting in May between Israel and the Hamas militant group in Gaza.)

    Also in 2019, the Israeli military announced the introduction of a public facial-recognition program, powered by AnyVision, at major checkpoints where Palestinians cross into Israel from the West Bank. The program uses kiosks to scan IDs and faces, similar to airport kiosks used at airports to screen travelers entering the United States. The Israeli system is used to check whether a Palestinian has a permit to enter Israel, for example to work or to visit relatives, and to keep track of who is entering the country, according to news reports. This check is obligatory for Palestinians, as is the check at American airports for foreigners.

    Unlike the border checks, the monitoring in Hebron is happening in a Palestinian city without notification to the local populace, according to one former soldier who was involved in the program and four Palestinian residents. These checkpoint cameras also can recognize vehicles, even without registering license plates, and match them with their owners, the former soldier told The Post.

    In addition to privacy concerns, one of the main reasons that facial recognition surveillance has been restricted in some other countries is that many of these systems have exhibited widely varying accuracy, with individuals being put in jeopardy by being misidentified.

    The Israeli military did not comment on concerns raised about the use of facial-recognition technology.

    The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation has said that studies showing that the technology is inaccurate have been overblown. In objecting to the proposed European ban, the group said time would be better spent developing safeguards for the appropriate use of the technology by law enforcement and performance standards for facial recognition systems used by the government.

    In the West Bank, however, this technology is merely “another instrument of oppression and subjugation of the Palestinian people,” said Avner Gvaryahu, executive director of Breaking the Silence. “Whilst surveillance and privacy are at the forefront of the global public discourse, we see here another disgraceful assumption by the Israeli government and military that when it comes to Palestinians, basic human rights are simply irrelevant.”

    By Elizabeth Dwoskin
    Lizza joined The Washington Post as Silicon Valley correspondent in 2016, becoming the paper’s eyes and ears in the region. She focuses on social media and the power of the tech industry in a democratic society. Before that, she was the Wall Street Journal’s first full-time beat reporter covering AI and the impact of algorithms on people’s lives.

    #Bigbrother

  • Les États-Unis mettent hors service une société israélienne de logiciels d’espionnage Moon of Alabama
    https://www.moonofalabama.org/2021/07/us-takes-down-israeli-spy-software-company.html#more
    https://lesakerfrancophone.fr/les-etats-unis-mettent-hors-service-une-societe-israelienne-de-lo

    Un certain nombre de journaux, dans le monde entier, parlent aujourd’hui https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jul/18/revealed-leak-uncovers-global-abuse-of-cyber-surveillance-weapon-nso-gr de la société de piratage israélienne NSO qui vend des logiciels d’espionnage [nommés Pegasus, NdT] à divers régimes. Ce logiciel est ensuite utilisé pour espionner les téléphones des ennemis du régime, des adversaires politiques ou des journalistes qui déplaisent. Tout cela était déjà bien connu, mais l’histoire a pris un nouvel essor puisque plusieurs centaines de personnes qui sont espionnées peuvent maintenant être nommées.

    La façon dont cela s’est produit est intéressante https://www.washingtonpost.com/gdpr-consent/?next_url=https%3a%2f%2fwww.washingtonpost.com%2finvestigations%2fin :

    Les téléphones sont apparus sur une liste de plus de 50 000 numéros concentrés dans des pays connus pour surveiller leurs citoyens et également connus pour avoir été clients de la société israélienne NSO Group, un leader mondial dans le secteur, en pleine expansion et largement non réglementé, des logiciels d’espionnage privés, selon l’enquête.

    La liste ne permet pas de savoir qui y a inscrit les numéros, ni pourquoi, et on ignore combien de téléphones ont été ciblés ou surveillés. Mais l’analyse technique de 37 smartphones montre que beaucoup d’entre eux présentent une corrélation étroite entre les horodatages associés à un numéro de la liste et le déclenchement de la surveillance, dans certains cas aussi brève que quelques secondes.

    Forbidden Stories, une organisation de journalisme à but non lucratif basée à Paris, et Amnesty International, une organisation de défense des droits de l’homme, ont eu accès à cette liste et l’ont partagée avec certains journaux, qui ont effectué des recherches et des analyses supplémentaires. Le Security Lab d’Amnesty International a effectué les analyses techniques des smartphones.

    Les chiffres figurant sur la liste ne sont pas attribués, mais les journalistes ont pu identifier plus de 1 000 personnes dans plus de 50 pays grâce à des recherches et des entretiens sur quatre continents.

    Qui aurait pu dresser une telle liste pour la donner à Amnesty et à Forbidden Stories ?

    NSO est l’une des sociétés israéliennes utilisées pour mettre sur le marché le travail de l’unité de renseignement militaire israélienne, 8200. Les « anciens » membres de 8200 sont employés par NSO pour produire des outils d’espionnage qui sont ensuite vendus à des gouvernements étrangers. Le prix de la licence est de 7 à 8 millions de dollars pour 50 téléphones à espionner. C’est une affaire louche mais lucrative pour cette société et pour l’État d’Israël.

    NSO nie les allégations selon lesquelles son logiciel est utilisé pour des objectifs malsains en racontant beaucoup de conneries https://www.nsogroup.com/Newses/following-the-publication-of-the-recent-article-by-forbidden-stories-we-wa :

    Le rapport de Forbidden Stories est rempli d’hypothèses erronées et de théories non corroborées qui soulèvent de sérieux doutes sur la fiabilité et les intérêts de leurs sources. Il semble que ces "sources non identifiées" aient fourni des informations qui n’ont aucune base factuelle et sont loin de la réalité.

    Après avoir vérifié leurs affirmations, nous démentons fermement les fausses allégations faites dans leur rapport. Leurs sources leur ont fourni des informations qui n’ont aucune base factuelle, comme le montre l’absence de documentation à l’appui de nombre de leurs affirmations. En fait, ces allégations sont tellement scandaleuses et éloignées de la réalité que NSO envisage de porter plainte pour diffamation.

    Les rapports affirment, par exemple, que le gouvernement indien du Premier ministre Narendra Modi a utilisé le logiciel de NSO pour espionner https://thewire.in/government/rahul-gandhi-pegasus-spyware-target-2019-polls le chef du parti d’opposition, Rahul Gandhi.

    Comment NSO pourrait-elle nier cette allégation ? Elle ne le peut pas.

    Plus loin dans la déclaration de NSO, la société se contredit https://www.nsogroup.com/Newses/following-the-publication-of-the-recent-article-by-forbidden-stories-we-wa sur ces questions :

    Comme NSO l’a déclaré précédemment, notre technologie n’a été associée en aucune façon au meurtre odieux de Jamal Khashoggi. Nous pouvons confirmer que notre technologie n’a pas été utilisée pour écouter, surveiller, suivre ou collecter des informations le concernant ou concernant les membres de sa famille mentionnés dans l’enquête. Nous avons déjà enquêté sur cette allégation, qui, une fois encore, est faite sans validation.

    Nous tenons à souligner que NSO vend ses technologies uniquement aux services de police et aux agences de renseignement de gouvernements contrôlés dans le seul but de sauver des vies en prévenant la criminalité et les actes terroristes. NSO n’exploite pas le système et n’a aucune visibilité sur les données.

    Comment NSO peut-elle nier que le gouvernement saoudien, l’un de ses clients reconnus, a utilisé son logiciel pour espionner Jamal Khashoggi, puis l’assassiner, en disant qu’il « n’exploite pas le système » et « n’a aucune visibilité sur les données » ?

    Vous ne pouvez pas prétendre à la fois a. recueillir des informations et b. n’avoir aucun moyen de les recueillir.

    Mais revenons à la vraie question :
    • Qui a la capacité de dresser une liste de 50 000 numéros de téléphone dont au moins 1 000 ont été espionnés avec le logiciel de NSO ?
    • Qui peut faire « fuiter » une telle liste à ONG et s’assurer que de nombreux médias « occidentaux » s’en emparent ?
    • Qui a intérêt à faire fermer NSO ou du moins à rendre ses activités plus difficiles ?

    La concurrence, je dirais. Et le seul véritable concurrent dans ce domaine est l’Agence nationale de sécurité [la NSA, NdT] étatsunienne.

    Les États-Unis utilisent souvent le « renseignement » comme une sorte de monnaie diplomatique pour maintenir les autres pays dans une situation de dépendance. Si les Saoudiens sont obligés de demander aux États-Unis d’espionner quelqu’un, il est beaucoup plus facile d’avoir de l’influence sur eux. Le NSO gêne cette activité. Il y a aussi le problème que ce logiciel d’espionnage de première classe que NSO vend à des clients un peu louches pourrait bien tomber entre les mains d’un adversaire des États-Unis.

    La « fuite » à Amnesty et Forbidden Stories est donc un moyen de conserver un certain contrôle monopolistique sur les régimes clients et sur les technologies d’espionnage. (Les Panama Papers étaient un type similaire de « fuite » parrainée par les États-Unis, mais dans le domaine financier).

    Edward Snowden, qui était autrefois un partisan convaincu de la NSA mais qui en a divulgué des documents parce qu’il voulait qu’elle respecte la loi, soutient cette campagne :

    Edward Snowden @Snowden - 16:28 UTC - 18 juil. 2021 https://twitter.com/Snowden/status/1416797153524174854

    Arrêtez ce que vous êtes en train de faire et lisez ceci. Cette fuite va être l’histoire de l’année : https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jul/18/revealed-leak-uncovers-global-abuse-of-cyber-surveillance-weapon-nso-gr

    Edward Snowden @Snowden - 15:23 UTC - 19 juil. 2021 https://twitter.com/Snowden/status/1417143168752095239

    Il y a certaines industries, certains secteurs, contre lesquels il n’y a aucune protection. Nous n’autorisons pas un marché commercial pour les armes nucléaires. Si vous voulez vous protéger, vous devez changer la donne, et la façon dont nous le faisons est de mettre fin à ce commerce.
    Guardian : Edward Snowden demande l’interdiction du commerce de logiciels espions dans le cadre des révélations sur Pegasus https://www.theguardian.com/news/2021/jul/19/edward-snowden-calls-spyware-trade-ban-pegasus-revelations

    Edward Snowden semble vouloir dire https://www.theguardian.com/news/2021/jul/19/edward-snowden-calls-spyware-trade-ban-pegasus-revelations que NSO, qui ne vend ses logiciels qu’aux gouvernements, devrait cesser de le faire mais que la NSA devrait continuer à utiliser cet instrument d’espionnage :

    Dans une interview accordée au Guardian, M. Snowden a déclaré que les conclusions du consortium illustraient la manière dont les logiciels malveillants commerciaux avaient permis aux régimes répressifs de placer beaucoup plus de personnes sous une surveillance invasive.

    L’opinion de Snowden à ce sujet est plutôt étrange :
    chinahand @chinahand - 17:28 UTC - 19 juil. 2021 https://twitter.com/chinahand/status/1417174487678656527

    Fascinant de voir comment M."La surveillance étatique américaine est la plus grande menace pour l’humanité" s’énerve sur le fait qu’un peu de surveillance étatique est apparemment externalisée à un entrepreneur privé par des acteurs étatiques de niveau moyen et bas.

    Edward Snowden @Snowden - 17:06 UTC - 19 juil. 2021 https://twitter.com/Snowden/status/1417168921472405504

    Lisez les articles sur les fonctionnaires de Biden, Trump et Obama qui ont accepté de l’argent du groupe NSO pour enterrer toute responsabilité, même après leur implication dans la mort et la détention de journalistes et de défenseurs des droits dans le monde entier !
    WaPo : Comment les assoiffés de pouvoir de Washington ont profité des ambitions de NSO en matière d’espionnage https://www.washingtonpost.com/gdpr-consent/?next_url=https%3a%2f%2fwww.washingtonpost.com%2ftechnology%2f2021%2

    Le tumulte créé dans les médias par les révélations concernant NSO a déjà eu l’effet escompté https://www.vice.com/en/article/xgx5bw/amazon-aws-shuts-down-nso-group-infrastructure :

    Amazon Web Services (AWS) a fermé l’infrastructure et les comptes liés au fournisseur israélien de logiciels de surveillance NSO Group, a déclaré Amazon dans un communiqué.

    Cette mesure intervient alors que des médias et des organisations militantes ont publié de nouvelles recherches sur les logiciels malveillants de NSO et les numéros de téléphone potentiellement sélectionnés pour être ciblés par les gouvernements clients de NSO.

    "Lorsque nous avons appris cette activité, nous avons agi rapidement pour fermer l’infrastructure et les comptes concernés", a déclaré, dans un courriel, un porte-parole d’AWS à Motherboard.
    Cela fait des années qu’AWS est au courant des activités de NSO. NSO a utilisé CloudFront, un réseau de diffusion de contenu appartenant à Amazon :

    L’infrastructure de CloudFront a été utilisée pour déployer les logiciels malveillants de NSO contre des cibles, notamment sur le téléphone d’un avocat français spécialisé dans les droits de l’homme, selon le rapport d’Amnesty. Le passage à CloudFront protège aussi quelque peu NSO contre des enquêteurs ou d’autres tiers qui tenteraient de découvrir l’infrastructure de l’entreprise.

    "L’utilisation de services en nuage protège NSO Group de certaines techniques de balayage d’Internet", ajoute le rapport d’Amnesty.

    Cette protection n’est plus valable. NSO aura bien du mal à remplacer un service aussi pratique.

    Israël s’en plaindra, mais il me semble que les États-Unis ont décidé de faire fermer NSO.

    Pour vous et moi, cela ne réduira que marginalement le risque d’être espionné.
    Moon of Alabama
    Traduit par Wayan, relu par Hervé, pour le Saker Francophone

    #nso #NSA #israel #Amnesty #police #agences_de_renseignement #Edward_Snowden #CloudFront #surveillance #pegasus #spyware #écoutes #smartphone #journalisme #hacking #sécuritaire #espionnage #géolocalisation #jamal_khashoggi #Forbidden_Stories #Amazon #Amazon_Web_Services #AWS
    #USA #CloudFront

    • La firme derrière Pegasus est liée au Luxembourg
      http://www.lessentiel.lu/fr/luxembourg/story/la-firme-derriere-pegasus-est-liee-au-luxembourg-15258218

      Jean Asselborn, ministre des Affaires étrangères, a confirmé l’existence au Luxembourg de deux bureaux de la firme israélienne NSO Group, qui a conçu le logiciel Pegasus, accusé d’avoir été utilisé par plusieurs États pour espionner les téléphones de journalistes et de dissidents.

      Selon le ministre, les bureaux luxembourgeois servent au back office, c’est-à-dire au contrôle des opérations financières de l’entreprise. Un communiqué de l’entreprise datant de 2019 précise que le siège social se trouve au Luxembourg. « NSO développe des technologies qui aident les services de renseignements et les agences étatiques à prévenir et enquêter sur le terrorisme et le crime », indique l’entreprise, dans sa présentation. Il serait même « un leader mondial » en la matière, générant « 250 millions de dollars de revenus en 2018 ». NSO affirme aussi s’être passé de clients à cause d’un non-respect des droits de l’homme.

      Un tour politique
      Mais la nature des activités au Grand-Duché reste floue. D’après Amnesty International, le logiciel Pegasus n’a pas été conçu au Grand-Duché. Aucune demande d’exportation de produit n’a d’ailleurs été formulée. « Je ne peux dire qu’une chose. S’il s’avère que le groupe NSO au Luxembourg a commis des violations des droits de l’homme, alors le Luxembourg doit réagir et réagira », a déclaré Asselborn. Ce dernier a envoyé une lettre aux dirigeants concernés pour rappeler les obligations en matière de droits de l’homme.

      Le sujet n’a pas encore été évoqué en commission des Affaires étrangères à la Chambre, expliquent des députés concernés. L’affaire a cependant vite pris un tour politique, avec d’abord une question parlementaire urgente du parti Pirates, sommant le gouvernement d’indiquer si des journalistes, politiciens ou militants au Luxembourg sont concernés par le scandale d’espionnage et quels sont les liens entre NSO et le Grand-Duché. Le parti déi Lénk demande aux autorités de réagir, bien au-delà du « Pacte national entreprises et droits de l’homme », avec une « loi opposable et munie des moyens financiers et personnels permettant d’intervenir pour mettre fin au mépris envers les droits humains ».

    • Hilarants ces politiques et ces journalistes choqués par leur surveillance !

      On n’a pas arrêté, ces dernières années, d’étendre toujours plus la surveillance du citoyen, depuis l’extension des caméras de surveillance partout sur le territoire jusqu’à la reconnaissance faciale qui ne cesse de progresser, y compris en France, jamais en retard d’une idée pour nous pister, nous surveiller, nous fliquer.

      Une surveillance active, intrusive, poussée, de plus en plus vicelarde, de certaines cibles aisément identifiées par ceux qui sont pouvoir, pour le profit personnel des politiciens et de leurs amis.

      Pour elles et eux, les drones qui seront sans nul doute utilisés pour mieux canaliser les mouvements de foule, les manifestations, pas de problème.
      Pour elles et eux, la loi européenne « ePrivacy » qui instaure de manière dérogatoire une surveillance automatisée de masse des échanges numériques sur internet en Europe, pas de problème.
      Le smartphone obligatoire, pas de problème.

      Ne parlons pas des données sur nos enfants, envoyées directement chez microsoft, education nationale, santé . . .
      Ne parlons pas non plus de toutes les informations possibles et imaginables que les gafam nous volent, de façon de plus en plus vicieuse.

      Pegasus, ePrivacy, pass sanitaire, la société qui se dessine ces dernières semaines devient véritablement cauchemardesque.
      Bon, d’après Edward Snowden la NSA n’aimait pas la concurrence pour ce qui est de nous espionner, et Julian Assange est toujours en prison, en Angleterre, sans aucun motif.

      Pour le reste, l’essentiel, c’est de monter à dessein les habitants de ce pays les uns contre les autres, et c’est une réussite.

  • Derrière l’application de Google qui trouve votre sosie artistique, du digital labor (gratuit) pour entraîner son IA de reconnaissance faciale http://www.rtl.fr/actu/futur/l-application-de-google-qui-trouve-votre-sosie-artistique-souleve-des-inquietude
    http://media.rtl.fr/online/image/2018/0117/7791879937_l-application-google-arts-culture-est-en-tete-des-telechargemen

    (Le seul article un peu critique que j’ai trouvé provient donc de rtl.fr)

    La dernière version de l’application Google Arts & Culture est l’une des plus populaires du moment aux États-Unis. La raison ? L’ajout d’une fonctionnalité permettant aux utilisateurs de découvrir quel est leur sosie artistique. Intitulée "Is your portrait in a museum ?" ("Votre portrait se trouve-t-il dans un musée ?"), elle propose de comparer un selfie à des portraits célèbres réalisés par des peintres de renom.

    L’expérience repose sur la technologie de reconnaissance faciale Face Net. Développée par #Google, elle scanne la photo envoyée par l’utilisateur pour créer une empreinte numérique de son #visage et la comparer aux 70.000 œuvres de sa base de données. Une fois les correspondances trouvées, les résultats les plus pertinents sont affichés avec leur pourcentage de ressemblance.

    Cette fonction a largement emballé les internautes américains. Depuis sa mise à jour mi-décembre, #Google_Arts_&_Culture truste les premières places des applications les plus téléchargées aux États-Unis sur l’App Store d’Apple et le Play Store de Google. Disponible uniquement outre-Atlantique, elle fait l’objet d’une expérimentation par Google.

    (…) Devant la popularité de l’application, certaines voix se sont élevées aux États-Unis pour mettre en garde le public contre le véritable objectif poursuivi par Google. "Le stagiaire de Google qui a inventé cette application pour tromper les utilisateurs en les incitant à envoyer des images pour remplir sa base de données de reconnaissance faciale a certainement eu une promotion", a observé sur Twitter l’analyste politique, Yousef Munayyer. "Personne ne s’inquiète d’abandonner les données de son visage à Google ou vous estimez tous que c’est déjà le cas ?", s’est aussi émue l’actrice et activiste américaine, Alyssa Milano.

    Google propose régulièrement des outils ludiques et gratuits aux internautes pour faire la démonstration de ses progrès dans l’intelligence artificielle. Ces programmes permettent aussi à l’entreprise américaine de mettre ses réseaux de neurones artificiels à l’épreuve de neurones humains afin de les perfectionner à peu de frais. Les programmes Quick Draw ! et AutoDraw visaient notamment à améliorer la #reconnaissance_visuelle de ses algorithmes. La société utilise aussi la reconnaissance des caractères des #Captcha pour aider ses robots à déchiffrer les pages de livres mal conservés sur Google Book et les indexer par la suite à son moteur de recherche.

    (…)

    Interrogé par plusieurs médias américains sur la portée réelle de son application « Arts & Culture », Google se veut rassurant. Selon la firme américaine, les photos téléchargées par les utilisateurs ne sont pas utilisées à d’autres fins et sont effacées une fois trouvées les correspondances avec des œuvres d’art. La dernière expérience du géant américain illustre à nouveau les craintes suscitées par les progrès rapides de l’#intelligence_artificielle et plus particulièrement de la #reconnaissance_faciale, dont les applications ont pris une place grandissante dans nos vies ces derniers mois.

    Apple a fait entrer cette technologie dans la vie de millions d’utilisateurs cet automne en intégrant le dispositif #Face_ID à l’iPhone X pour déverrouiller l’appareil d’un simple regard. Dans le sillage de la pomme, un grand nombre de constructeurs travaille à généraliser ce système sur des smartphones à moindre prix. Facebook a recours à la reconnaissance faciale depuis décembre pour traquer les usurpations d’identité sur sa plateforme. Google l’utilise déjà dans son service Photos, utilisé par 500 millions d’utilisateurs, capable depuis peu de reconnaître les animaux de compagnies.

    Les défenseurs des libertés craignent que la généralisation de la reconnaissance faciale dans des outils utilisés à si grande échelle ne glisse vers une utilisation plus large par les publicitaires ou les autorités. En Chine, cette technologie est déjà utilisée pour surveiller les citoyens dans les endroits publics. 170 millions de caméras de surveillance sont installées à travers le pays. Un nombre qui doit atteindre 400 millions à horizon 2020. La plupart sont dotées de programmes d’intelligence artificielle pour analyser les données en temps réel et inciter les individus à ne pas déroger à la norme édictée par le pouvoir.

    #digital_labor #IA

    Et puis cf. le thread d’@antoniocasilli sur son fil Twitter :

    Avez-vous déjà vu, partagé, commenté les « art selfies » de l’appli @googlearts ? Savez-vous qu’ils utilisent votre visage pour constituer un fichier biométrique ? J’en veux pour preuve qu’ils ne sont pas disponibles en Illinois—état où les lois sur la biométrie sont plus strictes.

    https://twitter.com/AntonioCasilli/status/953662993480474624

    • Version optimiste, ft. John Berger :

      In one way, the art selfie app might be seen as a fulfillment of Berger’s effort to demystify the art of the past. As an alternative to museums and other institutions that reinforce old hierarchies, Berger offered the pinboard hanging on the wall of an office or living room, where people stick images that appeal to them: paintings, postcards, newspaper clippings, and other visual detritus. “On each board all the images belong to the same language and all are more or less equal within it, because they have been chosen in a highly personal way to match and express the experience of the room’s inhabitant,” Berger writes. “Logically, these boards should replace museums.” (As the critic Ben Davis has noted, today’s equivalent of the pinboard collage might be Tumblr or Instagram.)

      Yet in Berger’s story this flattening represents the people prying away power from “a cultural hierarchy of relic specialists.” Google Arts & Culture is overseen by a new cadre of specialists: the programmers and technology executives responsible for the coded gaze. Today the Google Cultural Institute, which released the Arts & Culture app, boasts more than forty-five thousand art works scanned in partnership with over sixty museums. What does it mean that our cultural history, like everything else, is increasingly under the watchful eye of a giant corporation whose business model rests on data mining? One dystopian possibility offered by critics in the wake of the Google selfie app was that Google was using all of the millions of unflattering photos to train its algorithms. Google has denied this. But the training goes both ways. As Google scans and processes more of the world’s cultural artifacts, it will be easier than ever to find ourselves in history, so long as we offer ourselves up to the computer’s gaze.

      https://www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/the-google-arts-and-culture-app-and-the-rise-of-the-coded-gaze-doppelgang

      Version réaliste, par Evgeny Morozov :

      Google vient de lancer une plateforme d’IA destinée aux entreprises qui veulent mettre en œuvre une infrastructure d’apprentissage automatique (machine learning) de afin de construire leurs propres modèles (contre rétribution, bien entendu). Il sait pertinemment qu’il est toujours rentable de s’attirer la sympathie des utilisateurs, par exemple en leur donnant des outils d’IA pour trouver des œuvres d’art qui ressemblent à leur visage (1). Ces instruments gagnent ainsi en précision et peuvent ensuite être vendus aux entreprises. Mais pour combien de temps encore Google aura-t-il besoin de cobayes ?

      https://blog.mondediplo.net/2018-01-27-Mark-Zuckerberg-vous-veut-du-bien

  • Vault 7 : CIA Hacking Tools Revealed
    https://wikileaks.org/ciav7p1

    Today, Tuesday 7 March 2017, WikiLeaks begins its new series of leaks on the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. Code-named “Vault 7” by WikiLeaks, it is the largest ever publication of confidential documents on the agency.

    The first full part of the series, “Year Zero”, comprises 8,761 documents and files from an isolated, high-security network situated inside the CIA’s Center for Cyber Intelligence in Langley, Virgina. It follows an introductory disclosure last month of CIA targeting French political parties and candidates in the lead up to the 2012 presidential election.

    Recently, the CIA lost control of the majority of its hacking arsenal including malware, viruses, trojans, weaponized “zero day” exploits, malware remote control systems and associated documentation. This extraordinary collection, which amounts to more than several hundred million lines of code, gives its possessor the entire hacking capacity of the CIA. The archive appears to have been circulated among former U.S. government hackers and contractors in an unauthorized manner, one of whom has provided WikiLeaks with portions of the archive.

    “Year Zero” introduces the scope and direction of the CIA’s global covert hacking program, its malware arsenal and dozens of “zero day” weaponized exploits against a wide range of U.S. and European company products, include Apple’s iPhone, Google’s Android and Microsoft’s Windows and even Samsung TVs, which are turned into covert microphones.

    Since 2001 the CIA has gained political and budgetary preeminence over the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA). The CIA found itself building not just its now infamous drone fleet, but a very different type of covert, globe-spanning force — its own substantial fleet of hackers. The agency’s hacking division freed it from having to disclose its often controversial operations to the NSA (its primary bureaucratic rival) in order to draw on the NSA’s hacking capacities.

  • on the NSA Leak #Shadow_Brokers (tweets du 6/08/16)
    #Shadow_Brokers (tweets du 6/08/16)
    (via @baroug (merci !))

    Edward Snowden ( Snowden) | Twitter on the NSA Leak
    https://twitter.com/Snowden

    The hack of an NSA malware staging server is not unprecedented, but the publication of the take is. Here’s what you need to know: (1/x)

    1) NSA traces and targets malware C2 servers in a practice called Counter Computer Network Exploitation, or CCNE. So do our rivals.

    2) NSA is often lurking undetected for years on the C2 and ORBs (proxy hops) of state hackers. This is how we follow their operations.

    3) This is how we steal their rivals’ hacking tools and reverse-engineer them to create “fingerprints” to help us detect them in the future.

    4) Here’s where it gets interesting: the NSA is not made of magic. Our rivals do the same thing to us — and occasionally succeed.

    5) Knowing this, NSA’s hackers (TAO) are told not to leave their hack tools ("binaries") on the server after an op. But people get lazy.

    6) What’s new? NSA malware staging servers getting hacked by a rival is not new. A rival publicly demonstrating they have done so is.

    7) Why did they do it? No one knows, but I suspect this is more diplomacy than intelligence, related to the escalation around the DNC hack.

    8) Circumstantial evidence and conventional wisdom indicates Russian responsibility. Here’s why that is significant:

    9) This leak is likely a warning that someone can prove US responsibility for any attacks that originated from this malware server.

    10) That could have significant foreign policy consequences. Particularly if any of those operations targeted US allies.

    11) Particularly if any of those operations targeted elections.

    12) Accordingly, this may be an effort to influence the calculus of decision-makers wondering how sharply to respond to the DNC hacks.

    13) TL;DR: This leak looks like a somebody sending a message that an escalation in the attribution game could get messy fast.

    Bonus: When I came forward, NSA would have migrated offensive operations to new servers as a precaution - it’s cheap and easy. So? So...

  • #Edward_Snowden, un Genevois si discret

    Pour ce premier article de notre série d’été consacrée à Genève et ses liens avec le monde de l’espionnage, retour sur le cas d’un éphémère résident genevois pas tout-à-fait comme les autres, Edward Snowden. Sans refaire toute une chronologie du personnage et de ses faits d’armes plus qu’abondamment relayés par la presse du monde entier, l’objet de cet article est plutôt de se focaliser sur une période que l’ancien agent de la NSA invoquera lui-même comme charnière dans sa prise de décision et les choix qui l’ont amené à rendre publiques des informations classées secret-défense par le gouvernement des Etats-Unis. Chronique de deux années formatrices à Genève.

    https://www.gbnews.ch/edward-snowden
    #Genève #Snowden

  • According to US National Intelligence Director James Clapper, the Snowden revelations have accelerated the availability of commercial encryption by 7 years

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z9bcFXWInWE&t=247

    “as a result of the Snowden revelations, the onset of commercial encryption has been accelerated by about seven years”

    “the growing availability of apps that provide unbreakable encryption is obviously a challenge for us”

    The Intercept wrote about this, but I cannot say they are very neutral in their interpretation, because they speak of “complain” and “blame”, whereas when I listened to Clapper I did not have the impression he was really complaining about it being Snowden’s fault. He just stated facts, without a negative ring to it.

    https://theintercept.com/2016/04/25/spy-chief-complains-that-edward-snowden-sped-up-spread-of-encryption-b

    Anyway, Snowden seems happy about Clapper’s statement:

    https://twitter.com/Snowden/status/724629731686137856
    Of all the things I’ve been accused of, this is the one of which I am most proud

    #encryption
    #privacy

  • Edward #Snowden interview : ’Smartphones can be taken over’

    Mr Snowden also explained that the #SMS message sent by the agency to gain access to the phone would pass unnoticed by the handset’s owner.

    “It’s called an ’exploit’,” he said. “That’s a specially crafted message that’s texted to your number like any other text message but when it arrives at your phone it’s hidden from you. It doesn’t display. You paid for it [the phone] but whoever controls the software owns the phone.”

    #Smartphone users can do “very little” to stop security services getting “total control” over their devices, US whistleblower Edward Snowden has said.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-34444233

    https://twitter.com/Snowden/status/651399283976073217

    #surveillance