Explicit cookie consent | The Economist

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  • Daily chart: Revenge of the nerds | The Economist

    http://www.economist.com/blogs/graphicdetail/2015/03/daily-chart-2?fsrc=scn/tw/te/dc/revengeofthenerds

    THE economies of the rich world increasingly depend upon skilled workers, and college degrees are in high demand. In 1972 a university-educated man aged 25-34 could expect to earn 22% more than a peer without a degree, according to the Urban Institute, a think-tank. Today that premium has risen to 70%. But if university pays, its benefits are not spread evenly across all graduates. A new report from PayScale, a research firm, calculates the returns to higher education in American universities. Its authors compare the career earnings of college graduates with the present-day cost of a degree at their alma maters, after taking account of financial aid.

    • Les jeunes diplômés sont dans la mouïse ? Ouh la, ça va pas être bon pour l’immobilier !
      #prêt_étudiant #chômage_des_jeunes_diplômés #déqualification massive…
      (j’adore l’angle !)

      In the past, college was a ticket to a brighter future. Now, it’s a ticket to immense debt and an uncertain financial future for far too many students. Student loan debt in the U.S. has now topped $1 trillion. According to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, 44 percent of recent college graduates are underemployed — working in jobs that don’t require their degree — as of 2012.

      In a recent report to Congress, Fed Chairwoman Janet Yellen talked about the struggles of the Millennial generation saying “They’re certainly waiting longer to buy houses, to get married. They have a lot of student debt. They seem quite worried about housing as an investment. They’ve had a tough time in the job market.

      Those delays could have a serious impact on the U.S. economy as a whole and specifically the housing market. Derek Thompson of The Atlantic recently wrote “More years of school + more student debt + lower starting salaries + a nervous housing market + stricter rules for new home-buyers = no new home-buyers.