• As #Scott_Warren retrial nears, judge orders lawyer for volunteer nurse in migrant harboring case

    As Scott Warren — a No More Deaths volunteer charged with two counts of human smuggling — again faces trial, the judge has assigned a lawyer for a volunteer nurse who works with the humanitarian group, in one of several rulings issued Monday morning.

    Warren, a 36-year-old geography professor, faced trial in May on three felony charges, including one count of criminal conspiracy to transport and harbor illegal aliens, and two counts of harboring, stemming from his January 2018 arrest by U.S. Border Patrol agents in Ajo, Ariz.

    In early June, after days of deliberation, a jury refused to convict Warren, but did not find him not guilty. The judge declared a mistrial because of the hung jury.

    Undaunted by the jury’s non-decision, federal prosecutors announced in July that they would seek a new trial, but dropped the conspiracy charge against Warren. They also announced a possible plea deal for Warren, which he did not accept by the prosecution’s deadline.

    As the case has moved toward a second trial, federal prosecutors and Warren’s defense team have issued a flurry of motions and counter-motions that will set the stage for the new court proceeding, slated to begin November 12.

    Among these motions was a request that Susannah Brown, a nurse who regularly provides medical aid to migrants crossing the desert, be assigned a lawyer. Federal prosecutors Nathaniel Walters and Anna Wright argued that Brown should retain a lawyer because “as the government argued in closing” her testimony “demonstrated that she conspired with the defendant to harbor” two men at a ramshackle building used as a staging area for humanitarian organizations, called “the Barn” in Ajo.

    Along with Warren, BP agents arrested Kristian Perez-Villanueva, a 23-year-old man from El Salvador, and Jose Arnaldo Sacaria-Goday, a 21-year-old man from Honduras. The men arrived together and stayed for four days and three nights at the Barn after crossing the desert days earlier, ending up at a gas station in Why, Ariz., in the desert west of Tucson.

    During the trial, Brown became a surprising target for federal prosecutors who tried to show that Warren was involved in a “plan,” along Brown, and an organizer of shelters in Mexico — Irineo Mujica — to smuggle the two men into the United States.

    While Brown sat in the courtroom looking shocked, federal prosecutors essentially accused her of a felony, and showed as part of their evidence video from Perez-Villanueva’s phone. In the video, Brown briefly spoke with the Salvadorian during a Christmas Day celebration at the shelter in Sonoyta, Sonora. In the video, Perez-Villanueva asks Brown her name, and she responds with the same question.

    As Perez-Villanueva turns his camera, Mujica comes into view and tells the man to put the phone down. Mujica and Warren had repeatedly emailed about the shelter and its needs, according to documents shown during the trial. This included a plan to arrange a Jan. 12 visit to the shelter, and that a group of No More Deaths volunteers went to Mexico to bring water and operate a temporary medical clinic. The next day, Perez-Villanueva and Sacaria-Goday began their journey by climbing over the fence that separates the U.S. and Mexico.

    In motions, Warren’s lawyers told the court that Brown could invoke her 5th Amendment rights during a retrial “given the accusations” made against her.

    Collins also considered a motion filed by Greg Kuykendall and Amy Knight, who argued that they should be able to submit evidence that shows Border Patrol agents may “hold biases or prejudices against No More Deaths in general and Dr. Warren in particular.”

    In their motion, Kuykendall and Knight, argued that the jury should be shown evidence that the two agents who arrested Warren—Border Patrol agents Brendan Burns and John Marquez—might have had reasons to “perceive Dr. Warren in a negative light and/or shade their testimony against him.”

    During the trial, the two Border Patrol agents said they set up an observation post about 200-300 yards from the Barn, just across from a rural road on a patch of federally owned land.

    As part of an anti-smuggling unit called the “disrupt unit,” the agents said they worked to break up smuggling organizations, but on Jan. 17—the same day that No More Deaths published a report that was highly critical of the agency, including videos of Border Patrol agents destroying water drops that immediately went viral—the two plain-clothes agents parked themselves near the Barn, and using a spotting scope, zeroed in on Warren “gesturing” to the mountains with two men they believed to be illegally in the U.S.

    Kuykendall and Knight argued that “the government depended heavily on these agents’ subjective impressions and intentions.”

    “This case was essentially a credibility contest—the agents’ interpretation set against the NMD volunteers’ explanations for their actions. The government argued that everything the defense had described was a cover-up engineered to avoid criminal liability,” Warren’s attorneys wrote. “In this context, it is crucial for jurors to understand the various possible reasons the agents may portrayed Dr. Warren as they did.”

    They also argued that Warren’s arrest was part of campaign of selective enforcement carried out by Border Patrol because the agents were upset that NMD had “that very morning, released a humiliating report and accompanying video footage exposing the Border Patrol’s gleeful destruction of humanitarian aid supplies, giving them a specific reason to resent NMD and the people associated with it.”

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    More by Paul Ingram

    Posted Oct 21, 2019, 1:59 pm

    Paul Ingram TucsonSentinel.com

    As Scott Warren — a No More Deaths volunteer charged with two counts of human smuggling — again faces trial, the judge has assigned a lawyer for a volunteer nurse who works with the humanitarian group, in one of several rulings issued Monday morning.

    Warren, a 36-year-old geography professor, faced trial in May on three felony charges, including one count of criminal conspiracy to transport and harbor illegal aliens, and two counts of harboring, stemming from his January 2018 arrest by U.S. Border Patrol agents in Ajo, Ariz.

    In early June, after days of deliberation, a jury refused to convict Warren, but did not find him not guilty. The judge declared a mistrial because of the hung jury.

    Undaunted by the jury’s non-decision, federal prosecutors announced in July that they would seek a new trial, but dropped the conspiracy charge against Warren. They also announced a possible plea deal for Warren, which he did not accept by the prosecution’s deadline.

    As the case has moved toward a second trial, federal prosecutors and Warren’s defense team have issued a flurry of motions and counter-motions that will set the stage for the new court proceeding, slated to begin November 12.

    Among these motions was a request that Susannah Brown, a nurse who regularly provides medical aid to migrants crossing the desert, be assigned a lawyer. Federal prosecutors Nathaniel Walters and Anna Wright argued that Brown should retain a lawyer because “as the government argued in closing” her testimony “demonstrated that she conspired with the defendant to harbor” two men at a ramshackle building used as a staging area for humanitarian organizations, called “the Barn” in Ajo.

    Along with Warren, BP agents arrested Kristian Perez-Villanueva, a 23-year-old man from El Salvador, and Jose Arnaldo Sacaria-Goday, a 21-year-old man from Honduras. The men arrived together and stayed for four days and three nights at the Barn after crossing the desert days earlier, ending up at a gas station in Why, Ariz., in the desert west of Tucson.

    During the trial, Brown became a surprising target for federal prosecutors who tried to show that Warren was involved in a “plan,” along Brown, and an organizer of shelters in Mexico — Irineo Mujica — to smuggle the two men into the United States.

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    While Brown sat in the courtroom looking shocked, federal prosecutors essentially accused her of a felony, and showed as part of their evidence video from Perez-Villanueva’s phone. In the video, Brown briefly spoke with the Salvadorian during a Christmas Day celebration at the shelter in Sonoyta, Sonora. In the video, Perez-Villanueva asks Brown her name, and she responds with the same question.

    As Perez-Villanueva turns his camera, Mujica comes into view and tells the man to put the phone down. Mujica and Warren had repeatedly emailed about the shelter and its needs, according to documents shown during the trial. This included a plan to arrange a Jan. 12 visit to the shelter, and that a group of No More Deaths volunteers went to Mexico to bring water and operate a temporary medical clinic. The next day, Perez-Villanueva and Sacaria-Goday began their journey by climbing over the fence that separates the U.S. and Mexico.

    In motions, Warren’s lawyers told the court that Brown could invoke her 5th Amendment rights during a retrial “given the accusations” made against her.

    Collins also considered a motion filed by Greg Kuykendall and Amy Knight, who argued that they should be able to submit evidence that shows Border Patrol agents may “hold biases or prejudices against No More Deaths in general and Dr. Warren in particular.”

    In their motion, Kuykendall and Knight, argued that the jury should be shown evidence that the two agents who arrested Warren—Border Patrol agents Brendan Burns and John Marquez—might have had reasons to “perceive Dr. Warren in a negative light and/or shade their testimony against him.”

    During the trial, the two Border Patrol agents said they set up an observation post about 200-300 yards from the Barn, just across from a rural road on a patch of federally owned land.

    As part of an anti-smuggling unit called the “disrupt unit,” the agents said they worked to break up smuggling organizations, but on Jan. 17—the same day that No More Deaths published a report that was highly critical of the agency, including videos of Border Patrol agents destroying water drops that immediately went viral—the two plain-clothes agents parked themselves near the Barn, and using a spotting scope, zeroed in on Warren “gesturing” to the mountains with two men they believed to be illegally in the U.S.

    Kuykendall and Knight argued that “the government depended heavily on these agents’ subjective impressions and intentions.”

    “This case was essentially a credibility contest—the agents’ interpretation set against the NMD volunteers’ explanations for their actions. The government argued that everything the defense had described was a cover-up engineered to avoid criminal liability,” Warren’s attorneys wrote. “In this context, it is crucial for jurors to understand the various possible reasons the agents may portrayed Dr. Warren as they did.”

    They also argued that Warren’s arrest was part of campaign of selective enforcement carried out by Border Patrol because the agents were upset that NMD had “that very morning, released a humiliating report and accompanying video footage exposing the Border Patrol’s gleeful destruction of humanitarian aid supplies, giving them a specific reason to resent NMD and the people associated with it.”

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    Collins accepted their argument in part, ruling that “the defense will be able to inquire as to the possible bias or prejudice of the government witnesses.” However, Collins ruled that a document released by No More Deaths itself “will not come into evidence and will not go to the jury.”

    Collins also denied and granted in part a motion filed by Warren’s lawyers to withhold the description of Perez-Villanueva and Sacaria-Goday’s journey in the United States. “The telling of the journey from Mexico to the United States is no longer relevant,” Collins wrote. However, what the two men said to Warren “is relevant and that can come in.”

    Collins also ruled that video from the Why-Not gas station could be played because the video shows the men moving around, buying sports drinks and food before they later received a ride to Ajo.

    “The Court will also allow the playing of the video at the gas station since the extent of the migrants’ injury is still an issue in the case,” Collins wrote.

    Along with this, Collins also will allow testimony that Warren made during a separate trial for misdemeanor charges that he was hit with for entering the Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge and leaving food and water.

    Collins did accept a motion to allow the defense to submit testimony made during the first trial by Ed McCullough, who showed maps describing where people have died attempting to cross the desert, but was unavailable to testify a second time.

    He also rejected a motion filed by prosecutors that would have kept Warren’s defense team from arguing that NMD had legal “protocols” that were established through consultation with Professor Andrew Silverman and that Warren was acting under the advice of counsel when he brought the two men into the Barn and gave them food, water, and medical care.

    During the first trial, Silverman told the jury that Warren was working under legal protocols that he had helped write, however, federal prosecutors had asked Collins to preclude the defense from “introducing evidence in support of an advice of counsel defense, including evidence pertaining to No More Deaths’ protocols and volunteer training.”

    “Such testimony is irrelevant, improper, and likely to confuse the jury about a material issue in this case,” they argued. Warren and his lawyers had “failed to establish any of the elements of an advice of counsel defense,” because they “did not offer any evidence that [Warren] consulted directly with any attorney and, in fact, objected to disclosing this information to the government.”

    “The defendant’s alleged compliance with the No More Deaths’ protocols also cannot satisfy the elements of the advice of counsel defense,” they wrote.
    First trial ended in jury deadlock

    Warren’s first felony trial began on May 29, and after a seven-day trial, jurors deliberated for about 11 hours over two days before they told the court they were struggling to reach a decision. Collins told the jurors to continue their deliberations, and issued an “Allen charge” instructing jurors to try to reach an unanimous verdict. Among the instructions read by Collins in court, jurors were told to "reexamine their own views, but not to change “an honest belief” because of the opinions of fellow jurors or “for the mere purpose of returning a verdict.”

    But,the next day, the third of deliberations, it became clear that the jury could not reach an unanimous verdict, and Collins declared a hung jury. Following the announcement, Collins set a new hearing for July 2, giving prosecutors time to consider whether they would pursue a retrial.

    During the trial, prosecutors argued that Warren “harbored and shielded from detection” two men in the country illegally at the Barn, and that he was at “hub” of a plan to transport and protect the two men after they illegally crossed the border by climbing over the border fence somewhere near Sonoyta, a Mexican border town.

    Warren, along with two men in the country without authorization, was arrested during at raid by several Border Patrol agents at “the Barn,” a ramshackle building on the town’s outskirts regularly used as a staging point for volunteers who have been working to stem an increasing number of deaths in the remote wildlife refuges west of the unincorporated town.

    As the trial loomed, Warren’s prosecution took on national and international importance, and humanitarian volunteers lead by No More Deaths collected more than 120,000 signatures and submitted them to the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Tucson just days before the trial began, asking for them to drop the charges.

    Warren’s prosecution also came to the attention of human rights experts from the United Nations, who wrote that “providing humanitarian aid is not a crime. We urge the U.S. authorities to immediately drop all charges against Scott Warren.”

    In a letter written by Michael Forst, a special rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders, the UN body said that Warren’’s work is “vital and legitimate,” and said that No More Deaths" upholds the right to life and prevents the deaths of migrants and asylum seekers at the US-Mexican border."

    “The prosecution of Scott Warren represents an unacceptable escalation of existing patterns criminalising migrant rights defenders along the migrant caravan routes,” they said.

    Forst also noted that Warren’s arrest came “hours after the release of a report” by No More Deaths which linked Border Patrol agents to the “systematic destruction of humanitarian supplies, including water stores, and denounced a pattern of harassment, intimidation and surveillance against humanitarian aid workers.”

    The decision to retry Warren will be the first high-profile test for U.S. Attorney Michael Bailey, who was nominated by President Trump in February and just confirmed by the Senate on May 23. Bailey replaced Elizabeth Strange, who served as the acting U.S. attorney for more than two years after John S. Leonardo stepped down from the position in January 2017.

    Warren’s case is one of three high-profile prosecutions launched against No More Deaths volunteers, including two misdemeanor trials — one also involving Warren — for the group’s efforts to leave food, water, medicine, and other aid in the Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge.

    Warren’s trial in the misdemeanor charges concluded in May, but Collins has not rendered a verdict in the bench trial, leaving Warren’s fate in those charges also up in the air.

    After the announcement, Warren thanked supporters supporters and castigated the government for bringing charges against him.

    “In the time since I was arrested in January 2018, no fewer than 88 bodies were recovered from the Arizona desert,” Warren said. “The government’s plan in the midst of this humanitarian crisis? Policies to target undocumented people, refugees, and their families. Prosecutions to criminalize humanitarian aid, kindness, and solidarity. And now, the revelation that they will build an enormous and expensive wall across a vast stretch of southwestern Arizona’s unbroken Sonoran Desert.”
    Re-trial would be complete re-do of case

    With the jury deadlocked and the proceedings declared a mistrial, Collins scheduled a hearing for July 2 to review the felony case. Prosecutors may attempt to re-try Warren on the charges, as the jury did not render a verdict. If they do so, the second trial would be a complete re-do, including the selection of a new jury.

    During final arguments, prosecutors argued that Warren “harbored and shielded from detection” two men in the country illegally at “the Barn,” a ramshackle house used as a staging point for aid organizations trying to stem what volunteers like Warren have called a “humanitarian crisis” in the deserts west and south of Ajo, an unincorporated town about 110 miles west of Tucson. Prosecutors said he was at “hub” of a plan to transport and protect the two men after they illegally crossed the border by climbing over the border fence somewhere near Sonoyta, a Mexican border town.

    Warren testified in his own defense telling jurors that his spiritual values compel him to help those who “stumble” out of the desert into the neighborhoods of Ajo, Ariz., and that doing so is “good and right, especially in a place that feels like a low-intensity conflict.”

    No More Deaths has maintained that the arrests of Warren and others were retribution for the release that same day of a report by the humanitarian aid group, documenting claims that Border Patrol agents vandalized water caches placed for migrants crossing the desert.

    After the trial closed, Warren noted that “the other men arrested with me that day Jose Sacaria-Goday and Kristian Perez-Villanueva, have not received the attention and outpouring of support that I have. I do not know how they are doing now, but I do hope they are safe.”

    Warren and other volunteers testified that the men needed medical care, as they were suffering from blisters on their feet, a minor cold, and injuries from being in the desert. However, prosecutors said that this was a “smokescreen,” and repeatedly referred to selfie photos captured from Perez-Villanueva’s cellphone and surveillance video from the Why-Not gas station in Why, Arizona to show that the men were not injured or sick.

    Evidence of a humanitarian crisis, and the loss of lives in the desert didn’t matter , because border crossers haven’t died in Ajo. “That’s not this case, that’s a smokescreen and a distraction for this case,” assistant U.S. Attorney Anna Wright said during her closing arguments.

    As the case went to the jury, the Border Patrol said that it recovered the body of a Guatemalan woman who died trying to cross the Barry M. Goldwater bombing range, which sits just to the north of Ajo and straddles Highway 85.

    Wright said that after Perez-Villanueva and Sacaria-Goday arrived at the barn, Warren called Brown, a registered nurse who volunteers for No More Deaths, not in an effort to get the men medical attention, but rather because she was involved in the “plan” to smuggle the men.

    Brown sat in the courtroom and appeared shocked when she heard the federal prosecutor implicate her in a felony.

    Perez-Villanueva’s phone remained a linchpin to the prosecutor’s case, and Wright highlighted as much saying that while other people who testified might have a bias, the photos and video were evidence that “doesn’t lie.”

    As the trial began, assistant U.S. Attorney Nathaniel Walters told the jury that federal authorities are not targeting humanitarian aid along the border with Mexico.

    “No More Deaths is not on trial,” Walters told the jury. “Scott Warren is.”

    But during the trial, prosecutors argued that these calls and the visit was part of a plan to illegally aid migrants, and noted later that night, Perez-Villanueva and Sacaria-Goday decided to cross the border.

    This brief interaction was enough to show a nexus of relationships between Warren, Mujica, Perez-Villanueva and Brown that could not be a coincidence, Wright argued.

    While Warren testified Wednesday, Mujica was arrested in Sonoyta by Mexican authorities.

    Mujica was later released, and the case against Mujica later collapsed, although there are signs that Mexican officials could once agains launch a case against the organizer, even as he now moves freely from Sonora to areas where there are large numbers of African and Cuban migrants seeking asylum in Tapachula.

    Questions about the timing of Mujica’s arrest and the Mexican government’s case remain.

    During the trial, a Border Patrol agent testified that he reviewed 14,000 pages of data from Warren’s phone, and from those thousands of pages the agent produced a one-page report. “They were not interested in innocence,” Kuykendall said.

    Defense attorney Greg Kuykendall said during his closing argument that it was “frankly terrifying, just terrifying” that his client was charged with a “total lack of evidence.”

    “It’s just supposition,” he said.

    In his opening statement two weeks ago, Kuykendall said Warren did not intend to break the law when he came across two undocumented immigrants early last year.

    “Scott intended to perform basic human kindness,” he told jurors, and was acting in accordance with his Christian faith.

    After the jury said it was deadlocked, Kuykendall was asked if “humanitarian aid being targeted by the federal government?,” Kuykendall responded, “you should ask the federal government. And use your own common sense.”

    Kuykendall also told the court last week that emails between Mujica and Warren, along with others showed that Warren was working on search and rescue and recovery efforts, and that when volunteers went to help the “Hope Shelter” there, they should contact Mujica.

    The U.S. government, he said, had all the power and resources to direct the agent to investigate and present all the evidence to the jury, he said. He also argued that the government failed to interview Mujica, noting that as one of the agents, Burns, who arrested Warren testified, he was called to a checkpoint after Mujica was held in a secondary inspection area, and yet he did not “interrogate” the man who might be at the center of the conspiracy.

    Photos from Perez-Villanueva’s phone shows the two men inside a van, after apparently leaving a gas station in Ajo. In the warrant for Warren’s phone, another agent noted that in Mujica’s vehicle Burns found black water bottles, a notebook containing a “detailed account” of travel through Mexico, and identity cards of men who were later apprehended by Border Patrol. However, Mujica wasn’t arrested by Burns, and weeks later, a passenger in his van was apprehended for being in the country illegally, leaving questions about Mujica’s role in Warren’s case.

    During opening arguments, assistant U.S. Attorney Nathaniel Walters tried to downplay the case’s consequences for humanitarian aid in the borderlands. While Warren is a “high-ranking member” of No More Deaths, the group was not on trial, rather Warren is “on trial,” Walters said.

    “This case is not about humanitarian aid or anyone in medical distress,” Walters said. “But, rather, this is about an attempt to shield two illegal aliens for several days,” from law enforcement, he said.

    However, during her closing arguments, Wright focused on the idea that Warren was a “high-ranking member” of No More Deaths, and she admitted that Warren did not receive a financial benefit, but said that instead, Warren “gets to further the goals of the organization” and “thwart the Border Patrol at every turn.”

    During the trial, the two Border Patrol agents— Burns and John Marquez —said they set up an observation post about 200-300 yards from the Barn, just across from a rural road on a patch of federally owned land.

    As part of an anti-smuggling unit called the “disrupt unit,” the agents said they worked to break up smuggling organizations, but on Jan. 17—the same day that No More Deaths published a report that was highly critical of the agency, including videos of Border Patrol agents destroying water drops that immediately went viral—the two plain-clothes agents parked themselves near the Barn, and using a spotting scope, zeroed in on Warren “gesturing” to the mountains with two men they believed to be illegally in the U.S.

    Warren said during the trial that he was trying to “orient” the men, who were preparing to head north, and that he was telling them to stay inside a valley between Child’s Mountain and Hat Peak, where they “if they got in trouble” they could head to Highway 85 and seek help. Prosecutors said that Warren was telling the men how to bypass a Border Patrol checkpoint on the highway and that Warren was giving them a pathway to follow from Ajo toward Interstate 8.

    Warren said that he stayed outside and was working on building a fire in preparation for students from a high-school in Flagstaff to come the Barn, when he saw a “convoy” of vehicles heading his way. Once agents came up to the barn, Warren said during testimony that he was handcuffed within two minutes, but that he offered to walk into the Barn with the agents.

    Burns and Marquez arrived moments later, and went around to the back where Perez-Villanueva was sitting on the threshold in the bathroom door. Inside, Sacaria-Goday was hiding behind the shower curtain.

    Wright attacked Warren’s credibility, saying that by seeking “context” he was actually trying to “distract” from the central issue and that Warren use of the word “orientation” was just a “fancy word for giving people directions.” When he was outside and spotted by Border Patrol agents, he was giving the men information so they could go “from point A, Ajo, to point B, Interstate 8.” These directions gave the men a “path” to follow away from the Border Patrol checkpoint allowing them to “further their journey,” she said.
    Warren: ’Haunting crisis’

    During his testimony, Warren said that he went to Ajo in order to work on his dissertation as a doctoral candidate at Arizona State University. He became increasingly interested in issues in Ajo and met with members of the Ajo Samaritans after he attended one of the Border Patrol’s citizen academies, a six-week course designed to inform the public about the agency’s mission.

    He said that as he stayed in Ajo, his eyes were “really opened” to the humanitarian crisis in the desert surrounding the small desert town, and that he became heavily involved in the community, becoming an elected member of the West Pima County Community Council. “It’s an elected position, but everyone runs unopposed,” Warren quipped.

    As he lived in Ajo, it became clear that everyday migrants “are stumbling” out of the wilderness aching for food, water and shelter, and that helping them is a “ubiquitous experience,” for residents in the town. After months in Ajo, Warren found himself part of an effort to recover the remains of a migrant who had perished in the nearby Barry M. Goldwater Bombing Range, and the experience of finding human bones in the desert, “felt like a big transition for me,” Warren testified.

    “This crisis became real to me, in a haunting kind of way,” Warren said. He was used to finding animal bones in the desert, but the bones from a human being who had died “not long before,” stuck with him, he said.

    After finding the bones, he found that when he saw someone come out of the desert, he again saw the decaying bones at the “same time, almost like a split-screen,” and that he was struck by the “disturbing reality of how people who are living can be disappeared and lost to the desert,” he said.

    Warren testified that he has helped find and recover 18 sets of human remains in the desert around Ajo, and that the work is a “deeply profound effort.”

    During the hearing, Warren’s lawyer Kuykendall asked him, “what are you doing, spending your whole life helping strangers?”

    “It feels choice-less,” Warren said. “How could you not do that when there are people dying around you?” he asked. “How could you not respond?”

    “Everyone who enters that desert will suffer,” he said. Migrants attempt to cross the desert will have to walk a “long, long way” to cross the desert, and they’ll witness death, either of other migrants or their companions, along the way.

    “It’s an epic undertaking, you have to put everything you’ve got on the line in order to make it,” Warren said, telling the jury that migrants often have already faced danger and deprivation in Mexico before they even attempt “the hardest thing they’ve ever done in their lives.”

    Nonetheless, Warren testified that he felt it was important to follow the law, in part to protect the students and volunteers who came to the Barn.

    “Why would you want to understand the legal limits,” asked Kuykendall.

    “I want to work within the border of the law, and not be doing something illegal and put students in a situation where they’re doing something illegal,” Warren said.
    Payback?

    On the day Warren was arrested, NMD released a report that said that from 2012 to 2015, 415 caches of water left for crossers in the 800-square-mile corridor near Arivaca were vandalized, spilling nearly 3,600 gallons of water into the desert.

    During this same time period, the bodies of 1,026 people were found in the Sonoran Desert, according to records from the Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner.

    Using statistical analysis, including land-use patterns, as well as video from trail cameras, and personal experiences to support their claims, the group said that U.S. Border Patrol agents “are responsible for the widespread interference with essential humanitarian efforts.”

    As part of the report’s release, NMD also published videos of Border Patrol agents intentionally destroying water bottles, including a video in which a female Border Patrol agent systematically kicks a half-dozen water bottles, spilling their contents, and a 2017 video in which an agent punctures a water bottle with a knife.

    This report embarrassed and infuriated agents, prompting one to say that NMD had “gone too far” and “messed with the wrong guy,” according to a motion filed by Warren’s defense lawyers in March.

    Previous prosecutions
    Federal officials have attempted to prosecute humanitarian volunteers before, though after two high-profile cases in 2005 and 2008, the government avoided formal prosecutions until 2017, when nine No More Deaths volunteers–including Warren—were charged with entering a wildlife refuge without a permit and leaving food, water, and other supplies on the Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge, a 800,000-acre wilderness, west of Ajo.

    In 2005, agents arrested Shanti A. Sellz and Daniel M. Strauss after they stopped the two volunteers, and found three people in the country without authorization in their car. However, that indictment was tossed by U.S. District Judge Raner Collins—the same judge who is overseeing Warren’s case.

    In 2008, U.S. Fish and Wildlife officers cited volunteer Dan Millis for littering on the Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refugee after he left water jugs there, however, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals overturned his conviction.

    But, after eight years, a detente between the group and Border Patrol began to collapse, beginning with surveillance of the group’s camp on private land south of Arivaca in 2016, and followed by a June 2017 incident when, with a warrant in hand, Border Patrol agents raided the camp and arrested four men, all migrants suspected of being in the country illegally.

    That raid followed an announcement by then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions who told reporters during a press conference in Nogales on April 11, 2017 that federal prosecutors “are now required to consider for prosecution” the “transportation or harboring of aliens.”

    Sessions announcement was part of the Trump administrations “zero tolerance” policies as part of a hard-nosed crackdown on border and immigrant communities, and just nine months later, prosecutors in Tucson sought an indictment against Warren.

    Kuykendall also questioned the credibility of the agents, noting their use in messages in a group chat of the word “tonc.”

    The term “tonc” or “tonk” is widely used by agents to refer to border-crossers, but the term’s origin is unclear. Some have argued that the term refers to the sound of a metal flashlight hitting a skull, while others have said that it stands for “temporarily outside naturalized country,” or “true origin not known.”

    And, Kuykendall said that Burns did not know that the Barn remained unlocked and unsecured. After Warren’s arrest on Jan. 17, 2018, Border Patrol agents waited until Jan. 22 to execute a warrant and search the property. Burns appeared to not know that detail until he was told so by Kuykendall in court.

    “What kind of investigation is this, that leaves the building unsecured for 120 hours?,” the attorney rhetorically asked the jury.

    Kuykendall also argued that the two men who also arrested with Warren were given immunity from immigration charges so they would testify in a video deposition shown to the jury on Monday.

    “They are the government’s own witnesses” and yet they disputed some of Wright’s arguments. “This is the best the government can come up with?” he asked.

    Kuykendall said that government’s lack of evidence, “if it weren’t so scary, it would be laughable.”

    No More Deaths vows to continue aiding migrants
    “A hung jury means the government could not prove its case,” Warren defense attorney Amy Knight said. “Scott remains innocent and admirable.”

    Chris Fleischman, a volunteer with No More Deaths, said the organization plans to continue its humanitarian aid work following the announcement.

    “It’s still good to know that the Trump administration’s attempt to criminalize humanitarian aid has failed,” he said. “But we will still be working to end death and suffering in the borderlands.”

    It wasn’t immediately clear after the trial whether the government will seek a new case against Warren.

    “I would think that they wouldn’t waste their effort to do that,” Fleischman said, adding, “We’re concerned for his freedom. That he could be prosecuted for doing what we all had thought is legal anyway.”

    http://www.tucsonsentinel.com/local/report/102119_warren_trial/as-scott-warren-retrial-nears-judge-orders-lawyer-volunteer-nurse-mi

    #procès #justice #asile #migrations #réfugiés #délit_de_solidarité #solidarité #frontières #USA #Etats-Unis #USA

    Plus sur Scott Warren ici:
    https://seenthis.net/messages/784076

    ping @isskein

  • « ILS NOUS ONT TANT VOLÉ QU’ILS NOUS ONT MÊME DÉROBÉ NOTRE PEUR » : INSURRECTION POPULAIRE AU CHILI 21 octobre 2019

    Le #Chili vit depuis quelques jours un soulèvement insurrectionnel d’une ampleur inédite. Partie de l’augmentation des prix du ticket de métro, la #révolte s’est rapidement généralisée, prenant pour cible le système dans son ensemble – dans un pays qui, depuis le coup d’État mené par Pinochet en 1973, est un laboratoire du #néo-libéralisme le plus féroce et où les inégalités sont parmi les plus fortes au monde. Alors que le gouvernement de droite à décrété l’#État_d’_urgence et instauré un #couvre-feu, alors que les militaires patrouillent dans les rues pour la première fois depuis la fin de la #dictature en 1990, nous avons mené un entretien avec l’un de nos correspondants au Chili pour faire le point sur la situation. Il nous explique les enjeux de l’explosion sociale en cours, sa composition, ses méthodes de lutte et sa résonance avec les soulèvements parallèles en #Amérique_du_Sud.

    L’élément déclencheur du soulèvement, c’est la lutte contre l’augmentation du prix du métro à Santiago. Un journaliste de l’Agence France Presse, toujours aussi fin limier, vient de découvrir que le métro de Santiago du Chili était le plus étendu de toute l’Amérique latine, et que la capitale était surpolluée par les embouteillages. Il serait plus judicieux de dire que ce mouvement, initié par des étudiants, des précaires et des lycéens, est typique de la situation analysée par l’#opéraïsme italien à travers le concept d’#ouvrier_social. Dans une époque où c’est la ville entière qui est devenue une #usine, et donc où c’est l’ensemble de l’espace social urbain qui participe à la production de valeur, il est tout à fait logique que le prix du métro devienne un enjeu radical des luttes. Si l’on pense aux mouvements de ces derniers années en Amérique du Sud, on peut faire la comparaison avec les luttes de 2013 à São Paulo, revendiquant la gratuité du bus dans cette ville. Un peu comme au Brésil, le mouvement a commencé avec un groupe militant indépendant des partis et syndicats ouvriers, et s’est répandu de la capitale aux autres grandes villes de tout le pays. Le plus surprenant, c’est la rapidité de l’extension du mouvement dans le cas chilien. Vendredi, il a pris Santiago. Samedi, il s’est déployé dans toutes les grandes villes du pays, du Nord jusqu’au Sud. (...) Ces formes de luttes contemporaines, où c’est la métropole elle-même qui devient un enjeu politique, sont de plus en plus présentes au Chili depuis ces dernières années. Ce n’est certes pas la première tentative de politisation du « #droit_à_la_ville » qui se passe au Chili, que ce soit à Santiago ou ailleurs. D’autres luttes antérieures ont déjà eu lieu, avec des résultats relatifs. De même, les pratiques émeutières ne sont pas nouvelles ici. Et il faut rappeler le courage des militantes féministes face à la répression policière, que ce soit lors du mouvement féministe de 2018, ou même lors de la marche du 8 Mars de cette année. S’il y a une explosion sociale d’une telle ampleur cette fois-ci, je crois que l’une des raisons se trouve dans les nouvelles formes de luttes, beaucoup plus offensives, qui ont été développées dès le premier jour à #Santiago.

    https://acta.zone/ils-nous-ont-tant-vole-quils-nous-ont-meme-derobe-notre-peur-insurrection-pop

  • Illich et la guerre contre la subsistance,
    hier et aujourd’hui

    Jean Robert

    https://lavoiedujaguar.net/Illich-et-la-guerre-contre-la-subsistance-hier-et-aujourd-hui

    Durant l’automne de 2013, l’essayiste public que je prétends être a dû faire face à deux tâches hétérogènes entre lesquelles j’ai eu l’intuition de convergences à explorer, mais aussi la certitude immédiate d’incompatibilités. Ce furent, d’une part, la rédaction d’un essai et la traduction française de textes d’un collègue mexicain sur la « petite école » zapatiste qui eut lieu en août, et, d’autre part l’élaboration de l’article que le lecteur a sous les yeux.

    La première de ces tâches consistait à mettre au net, d’abord en espagnol et puis en français, les souvenirs des jours passés au Chiapas à étudier, sous la conduite de paysans et paysannes indigènes, l’expérience zapatiste, depuis 2003, de construction d’un monde de liberté et de justice concrètes, c’est-à-dire proportionnées aux communautés qui les pratiquent. La seconde : la rédaction du présent article sur un homme — un penseur, un historien, un philosophe et un théologien qui se défendait de l’être — qui m’honora de son amitié du début des années 1970 à sa mort, en 2002 : Ivan Illich. Quel rapport y a-t-il entre ce qui en 2002 était encore un mouvement insurgé indigène et ce penseur « radical au vrai sens du mot » ? (...)

    #Ivan_Illich #zapatistes #EZLN #Mexique #Guillermo_Bonfil #Ernst_Bloch #État-nation #Marché #subsistance #guerre #travail #autonomie #modernité #développement #aliénation #Karl_Polanyi #Marx #transports #villes #conquête #invasion #faim #misère #Bentham #Mumford

  • Le #tabac à sucer pourra clamer être moins nocif que la cigarette aux #Etats-Unis - FRANCE 24
    https://www.france24.com/fr/20191022-le-tabac-%C3%A0-sucer-pourra-clamer-%C3%AAtre-moins-nocif-que-la-

    « Bien que nous autorisions ces produits spécifiques au tabac pour des risques modifiés, il est important que le grand public comprenne que tous les produits au tabac, y compris ceux-ci, présentent des risques. Quiconque n’utilise pas actuellement de produit au tabac, surtout les jeunes, doivent continuer à les éviter », a déclaré le directeur par intérim de la FDA, Ned Sharpless.

  • How #Coca-Cola Undermines Plastic Recycling Efforts
    https://theintercept.com/2019/10/18/coca-cola-recycling-plastics-pollution

    ... bottle bills [...] put some of the responsibility — and cost — of recycling back on the companies that produce the waste, which may be why Coke and other soda companies have long fought against them.

    [...]

    Coca-Cola now makes 117 billion plastic bottles a year, according to its own estimates, untold billions of which end up being burned or dumped in landfills and nature. Coke was responsible for more waste than any other company in a 2018 global plastic cleanup conducted by the advocacy group Break Free From Plastic, with Coke-branded plastic found along the coasts and in the parks and streets of 40 out of 42 participating countries.

    On the political front, its advocacy against bottle bills has largely succeeded. Only 10 states now have bottle bills on the books, most of which passed in the 1970s and ’80s.

    #plastique #lobbying #politique #corruption #etats-unis

  • La police mexicaine, attaquée à l’arme lourde, obligée de relâcher le fils de Joaquin « El Chapo » Guzman
    https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2019/10/18/mexique-violents-affrontements-et-arrestation-possible-d-un-des-fils-d-el-ch

    Un homme, présenté comme étant Ovidio Guzman Lopez, a d’abord été interpellé par une patrouille d’une trentaine de policiers après une attaque contre une patrouille de la garde nationale dans la ville de Culiacan, dans l’Etat du Sinaloa. Mais après à peine quelques heures, les autorités l’ont relâché pour, selon le secrétaire d’Etat à la sécurité et la protection des citoyens, Alfonso Durazo, « protéger » la population de Culiacan :

    « La décision a été prise de quitter les lieux sans Guzman, pour éviter plus de violence dans la zone et s’assurer que le calme revienne dans la ville. »

    L’autre raison qui a poussé les policiers à relâcher le suspect est le fait qu’ils ont rapidement été encerclés par des dizaines d’hommes masqués et munis d’armes lourdes.

    #Mexique #narcos #El_Chapo #état_failli #corruption

  • The US military is trying to read minds

    A new #DARPA research program is developing brain-computer interfaces that could control “swarms of drones, operating at the speed of thought”. What if it succeeds?


    https://www.technologyreview.com/s/614495/us-military-super-soldiers-control-drones-brain-computer-interface
    #armée #USA #Etats-Unis #drones #cerveau

    #paywall

  • WSJ, NYT Celebrate ‘Shale Revolution’ for Investor Class, Despite Its Leading to Our Doom | FAIR
    https://fair.org/home/wsj-nyt-celebrate-shale-revolution-for-investor-class-despite-its-leading-to-o

    The Times’ report (6/17/14) on “the shale revolution going global,” as “the world’s largest energy companies are on the hunt for new sources of what they call unconventional oil and natural gas,” described how these “multi-billion dollar investments” could “change the face of global energy markets.” The Times’ Mark Scott emphasized the size and profitability of the potential shale energy resources—rather than the dangers in extracting them:

    #etats-unis #liberal #climat #business

  • Corporate America’s Second War With the Rule of Law | WIRED
    https://www.wired.com/story/corporate-americas-second-war-with-the-rule-of-law

    The third-richest man in the country, Andrew Mellon, wasn’t just a baron of industry, he also served as secretary of the Treasury from 1921 to 1932, under Warren Harding, Calvin Coolidge, and Herbert Hoover. (Citizens joked that three presidents served under him.)

    #états-unis
    #corruption

  • Les ventes de #Huawei progressent, malgré les sanctions américaines...
    http://www.boursier.com/actualites/economie/les-ventes-de-huawei-progressent-malgre-les-sanctions-americaines-42425.ht

    Du côté de la #5G, le ciel semble également s’éclaircir, malgré les efforts américains pour bloquer Huawei dans cette nouvelle technologie. Mercredi, il a signé plus de 60 contrats commerciaux 5G pour dans le monde entier... L’#Inde a dit ne « rien avoir contre Huawei » et en #Allemagne, l’un des plus grands marchés européens, l’administration Merkel a déclaré que le matériel de Huawei ne serait pas exclus lors de futurs achats 5G. Le plus gros pari de Huawei reste cependant en #Chine, où les opérateurs publics sont prêts à construire leurs propres réseaux 5G.

    #etats-unis

  • « Les Kurdes nous ont dit "sortez, courez !" » : le témoignage de djihadistes françaises

    Prises sous le feu de l’armée turque, les forces kurdes ouvrent les portes des camps de #prisonniers #djihadistes. Témoignages recueillis par deux journalistes qui les avaient suivies dans le cadre d’un livre.

    Dix Françaises, membres de l’organisation Etat islamique (EI), sont libres en Syrie, après avoir pu sortir du camp d’Aïn Issa, à 50 km au nord de Raqqa. Selon nos informations, les forces kurdes, qui les détenaient, ne pouvaient plus les garder.

    Ces dix Françaises et leurs 25 enfants ont été sortis du camp, dimanche 13 octobre au matin, alors que l’armée turque prenait pour cible Aïn Issa, ville sous contrôle kurde dans le nord de la #Syrie. Dans l’incapacité de gérer ces centaines de femmes djihadistes étrangères retenues dans cette prison, les gardes kurdes ont quitté les lieux, les laissant libres.

    Comme les autres, les dix Françaises sont donc sorties dans la précipitation avec leurs enfants. Toutes sont connues des services de renseignement et sont sous le coup d’un mandat international pour avoir rejoint #Daech.

    http://www.leparisien.fr/international/en-syrie-les-kurdes-laissent-s-echapper-des-djihadistes-francaises-14-10-
    #femmes #camps #Kurdistan #EI #ISIS #Etat_islamique #prison #Aïn_Issa #France #françaises #fuite

  • Pour Julian Assange Monika Karbowska - Librairie-tropiques.over-blog.com - 14 Octobre 2019 La situation de Julian Assange, à la date du 10 octobre 2019
    http://www.librairie-tropiques.fr/2019/10/assange.html

    Pour Julian Assange et tous ceux qui osent affronter la "Bête".
    Depuis qu’il s’est avisé de révéler à la "communauté internationale" les turpitudes de toutes les classes dirigeantes qui la composent, et singulièrement ses prétendus "démocrates" donneurs de leçons, du genre de ceux qui ont dévasté le monde ces dernières années ( voir : "la stratégie du chaos" ), et non plus seulement les croquemitaines qui leurs servent commodément d’exutoire, Julian Assange n’est plus (du tout) en odeur de sainteté parmi les médias "de référence" et l’appareil idéologique qu’ils servent, de FOX News à France Television, en passant Le Monde, le New-York Times, Libération, CNN, Mediapart et le Figaro.
    
Désormais, les "lanceurs d’alerte" sont vivement incités à remiser leurs sifflets, sauf si c’est pour siffler la mi-temps et protéger l’appareil d’État en alimentant l’enfumage généralisé qui le pérennise (voir dernièrement à ce propos : Eleanor Goldfield ou le reportage de Vincent Lenormant sur les "démocrates radicaux" qui ont maintenant la faveur de cet appareil idéologique).

    Aujourd’hui au déni de justice, au droit bafoué, risque fort de s’ajouter un crime d’État, qui ne semble pourtant guère émouvoir notre (go)gauche morale et ses "intellectuels d’influence", et pas davantage les donneurs de leçon, ordinairement si prompts à farouchement dénoncer les atteintes aux droits de l’homme (et du citoyen)...

    En pratique...

    La situation de Julian Assange, à la date du 10 octobre 2019
    
Julian Assange n’est pas en bonne santé, son moral n’est pas bon.

    Il est détenu à Belmarsh dans une cellule individuelle dans l’unité médicale dont il ne sort qu’une heure ou deux par jour.

    Il peut recevoir des visites :
- il rencontre ses avocats plusieurs fois par semaine et a accès régulièrement à eux.
- il peut également recevoir des visites de ses proches trois fois par semaine.

    Les visites de ses avocats comme celles de ses proches sont en "principe" privées.

    Il peut recevoir du courrier et en reçoit beaucoup, mais tout est lu dans les 2 sens.
On peut lui écrire et il peut correspondre si on lui envoie une enveloppe timbrée
avec adresse du destinataire.

    Pour lui rendre visite :
    Julian doit d’abord en faire la demande
et inscrire le nom sur une liste de "visiteurs
Ensuite, il faut en faire la demande à la prison ;
cela peut prendre deux semaines pour obtenir l’autorisation de la prison.
La demande doit mentionner le nom du visiteur, sa date de naissance,
son numéro de téléphone, son adresse, deux preuves de résidence.
Et montrer sa carte d’identité ou son passeport le jour de la visite.
Donc :
1) lui écrire pour lui proposer de lui rendre visite
2) attendre sa réponse
3) celle-ci reçue, faire une demande de visite à la prison.

    Julian a accès depuis peu à un ordinateur fourni par la prison, mais pas à internet.
Julian a toujours son passeport australien et n’est donc pas apatride.

    Historique des faits.
    Julian Assange était détenu depuis le 11 avril (date de son arrestation) pour avoir violé les termes de sa mise en liberté sous caution lorsqu’il est allé se réfugier à l’Ambassade de l’Equateur en 2012. 

    Pour cette violation mineure il a avait été condamné à 50 semaines de réclusion, ce qui était pratiquement la peine maximale (1 an).
Ses avocats avaient fait appel contre cette condamnation, mais comme le tribunal a traîné pour nommer un juge pour entendre l’appel et que ce dernier étai hostile à Julian, ses avocats ont retiré leur appel.

    D’autant que, passé la moitié de cette peine, il devait être libéré pour bon comportement.

    Le 22 septembre dernier, le tribunal en a jugé autrement...

    Alors qu’il aurait du être libéré sous caution en attendant le déroulement de la procédure judiciaire relative à sa demande d’extradition, le juge a décidé de le maintenir en détention provisoire,
rejetant préemptivement la mise en liberté sous caution - avant même que Julian n’en ait fait la demande.

    Le juge a argué du fait que vu que Julian Assange avait violé les conditions de sa liberté sous caution en 2012 en se réfugiant à l’Ambassade d’Equateur, sa parole n’avait pas de valeur car s’il était libéré, il risquerait probablement de s’enfuir de nouveau.

    Le juge n’a envisagé aucune mesure alternative permettant à Julian Assange de recouvrer au moins une semi-liberté, confirmant le parti pris évident de la justice britannique dans son cas.

    Tous les documents personnels de Julian Assange, ont été saisis à l’ambassade par le gouvernement de l’équateur puis remis avec le département américain de la justice.
L’avocat de Julian Assange en Équateur a reçu fin septembre une notification officielle de la justice équatorienne l’informant que le gouvernement équatorien remettrait le contenu des ordinateurs de Julian
(saisis arbitrairement par l’Ambassade équatorienne lors de son arrestation) au ministère de la Justice des États-Unis le 2 octobre 2019.

    Ce fait est confirmé de source officielle équatorienne.
C’est une nouvelle violation flagrante de son droit à la vie privée
Articles

    12 de la Déclaration universelle ;
    17 de la Convention internationale sur les droits civils et politiques ;
    11 de la Convention interaméricaine sur les droits de l’homme,auxquelles est tenu l’Equateur, mais le gouvernement actuel, dans la main des Etats-Unis,n’en a cure.
    Les documents saisis contiennent tout ce dont disposait Julian Assange à l’Ambassade depuis 2012 (ordinateurs, disques durs, carnets de notes, manuscrits, y compris ses notes d’entretien avec ses avocats quant à la préparation de sa défense).

    Remettre ces documents au gouvernement qui le persécute et cherche à le juger revient à mettre Julian Assange à la merci de ses futurs juges.

    Au vu de la saisie des documents personnels de Julian Assange et leur mise
à la disposition de la justice américaine, sans aucune procédure pour ce faire,
le Rapporteur spécial sur la vie privée Joseph Cannataci est intervenu
plusieurs fois auprès des Equatoriens, en privé et publiquement,
pour leur demander de remettre ces documents à ses ayants droits.
Sans succès.

    Du côté des Nations Unies, les 4 rapporteurs spéciaux (experts indépendants) qui se sont prononcés sur le cas de Julian Assange poursuivent leurs efforts, dans le cadre limité qui est le leur :

    le Groupe de travail sur la détention arbitraire,qui continue de demander sa libération ;

    Le rapporteur spécial sur la torture (Nils Melzer)

    Le rapporteur spécial sur le droit à la vie privée (Joseph Cannataci)

    Le rapporteur spécial sur les défenseurs des droits de l’homme (Michel Forst)

    Leur action se poursuit sur trois niveaux :
    – niveau diplomatique : le Rapporteur Spécial sur la torture a écrit
aux gouvernements suédois, britannique, US et équatorien,
arguant du fait que leur action conjuguée,
publique et juridique constitue une forme de torture psychologique incompatible
avec leurs engagements internationaux en vertu des conventions ratifiées
(Convention sur les droits civils et politiques et convention contre la torture).

    La Suède, les Etats-Unis et l’Equateur ont répondu par écrit.
Le Royaume Uni vient finalement de répondre à l’intervention (la semaine dernière)
du Rapporteur Spécial sur la torture ;

    Les lettres du Rapporteur Spécial et les réponses des 3 gouvernements sont
publiques (elles deviennent publiques automatiquement après 60 jours).
Donc à ce jour les 4 gouvernements ont répondu et les lettres de Nils Melzer
et leurs réponses sont publiques.
    – niveau juridique à travers la défense organisée par Gareth Peirce.

    Toujours au niveau juridique, une injonction du droit international des droits de l’homme et du droit européen des droits de l’homme lors de la défense de Julian Assange est indispensable.
La question est comment y procéder de la manière la plus efficace.
    – au niveau public : le Rapporteur Spécial sur la torture continue de s’exprimer publiquement comme en témoignent ses interviews aux différents médias afin de maintenir une mobilisation publique.

    La première audience d’extradition serait prévue en février 2020.


    Quand le sort d’un homme se joue aux dés 
Julian Assange jugé le 11 octobre 2019
    WikiJustice Julian Assange - Vendredi 11 octobre 2019
    Monika Karbowska

    Comme le 20 septembre 2019 son nom figurait en premier des jugés pour être extradés, mais c’est parce qu’il commence à la lettre A et que la liste des 21 hommes, majoritairement Polonais et Roumains et d’une femme azerbaidjanaise, est alphabétique. A la Westminster Magistrate Court, ce 11 octobre 2019, le greffier et le secrétaire du greffe préparait la séance dans la petite salle numéro 3 alors que le public a vite rempli les dix chaises réservées derrière la vitre. Julian Assange figurait donc à la séance du jour parmi les migrants d’Europe de l’Est vivant en Grande Bretagne et réclamés par la justice de leur pays à grand renfort de Mandats d’Arrêt Européens. Comme sur la liste du 20 septembre, certains des prolétaires accusés de vols, escroqueries ou autre bagarres et délit de pauvres étaient aussi menacés d’être livrés aux USA. Et Julian Assange est sur la même liste. Etrange sensation de le savoir en compagnie du prolétariat européen le plus vulnérable, le moins conscient de ses droits, le moins politisé. Mais ce jour-là, après toutes les avanies de cette justice expéditive ou l’on juge les hommes en leur absence, les militants de l’Association Wikijustice, ne s’attendaient même pas à le voir comparaitre.

    Notre soucis était de savoir si un minimum de défense serai présent pour lui, contrairement au 20 septembre dernier. Les dix places du public ont été vite remplies par Wikijustice et par les membres du comité de soutien britannique. Andrej Hunko, député de die Linke, était également présent dans le public, lui le combattant de longue date pour la justice en Europe, notamment pour une enquête internationale indépendante sur l’assassinat de 100 personnes brulées vives dans la Maison des Syndicat à Odessa le 2 mai 2014 au cours du Maidan ukrainien. Les familles des autres prévenus ont du hélas se contenter de places debout. Malheureusement, pour leurs hommes comme pour Julian Assange, la justice britannique fut rapide, sèche et dénuée de la moindre analyse.

    Madame Emma Arbuthnot, juge et présidente du tribunal a pris place à l’estrade et nous nous sommes tous levés. Le greffier lui a présenté le plan de travail. Julian Assange figurait sur la liste comme le numéro 11, mais finalement c’est dans un ordre tout à fait différent que les « cas », les hommes, ont été présentés à la juge. Le secrétaire du greffe commença par le cas numéro 16, et après avoir dit son nom à haute voix, appela le prévenu polonais de la prison de Belmarsh après avoir actionné la vidéo. Sur l’écran apparait alors un gardien qui affirme que M. K. est trop malade pour comparaitre ce jour-là. Et c’est tout. Terrible justice dématérialisée ou l’étrange comparution en vidéo déporte le tribunal ipso facto en prison et nous ramène vers une forme d’ancien régime, tellement le détenu est devenu immatériel, caché, inaccessible.
    . . . . . . . . . . .
    Madame la juge se lève alors et nous nous levons car elle sort de la salle. Nous croyons à une pause et nous apprêtons à discuter de ce que nous avons vu. Mais le greffier annonce que le cas de Julian Assange est discuté. Nous nous levons car un autre juge, un homme de 45 ans, arrive. Et la sinistre farce politique peut commencer. La vidéo s’anime et Julian Assange apparait devant nos yeux. Il s’assied sur une chaise dans un espèce de box ou un petit local avec des cadres derrière lui comme des miroirs sans teints. Il parait amaigri, en s’asseyant il se crispe nerveusement sur la chaise, une jambe posée sur l’autre, les bras croisés, les mains cachées, repliées. Il porte une longue barbe et des cheveux longs gris et blancs, le même sweat-shirt bleu délavé et ce même pantalon gris que sur la vidéo de Wandsworth d’avril et fuitée en mai. J’ai l’impression qu’il a froid et il fait froid en cette matinée humide d’automne à Londres.

    Je ne peux m’empêcher de me demander si quelqu’un lui a quand même fourni des vêtements ou de l’argent pour en acheter à l’intérieur de la prison, des produits de première nécessité auxquels tout être humain a droit, même enfermé. Je me remémore mon voyage d’hier à la prison de Belmarsh ou les gardiens du « visitor center » ont refusé de certifier s’il avait bien reçu nos colis avec les chaussettes chaudes. C’est bouleversant de le voir ainsi et je pense alors que nos chaussettes envoyées ne sont pas superflues.

    Julian Assange dit juste une phrase, « Paul Julian Assange » et sa date de naissance. Puis il garde jusqu’au bout un air absent. Il est légèrement penché en avant, le regard fixant le sol, comme s’il refusait de participer à cette mascarade. Nous ne savons pas exactement ce qu’il peut voir de la salle, probablement uniquement son avocate, l’accusation au premier rang, le greffier et le juge. Nous ne le voyons pas en entier, la caméra le coupant à la taille. Justement son avocate, Gareth Peirce est là, arrivée à 10h mais absente de la salle pendant la présentation des autres cas. Elle dialogue avec le juge, cela dure quelques minutes. Il me frappe qu’elle ne regarde pas Julian Assange. Elle ne se tourne pas une seule fois vers la vidéo et il n’y a entre eux aucun regard ni signe de connivence. On a l’impression d’assister à une pièce de théâtre dont tous les acteurs connaissent le jeu, les ficelles du jeu et naturellement le dénouement de l’intrigue. Normal, ils se connaissent tous car ils jouent dans la même troupe du système judiciaire alors que nous assistons à la comédie humaine en spectateurs impuissants. Mais il s’agit d’un homme dont le sort se joue à pile ou à face… Nous comprenons que Gareth Peirce demande la comparution physique de Julian Assange au tribunal la semaine prochaine, le 21 octobre. Ce n’est pas une mauvaise idée, mais je pensais, suite à nos consultations juridiques avec les avocats spécialisés dans l’extradition, qu’à cette audience du 11 octobre seraient présentés les arguments de la défense et que le « management hearing » de la semaine suivante sert à lister les arguments des deux parties, défense et accusation. Puis le juge a 3 semaines pour trancher. Justement l’accusation est bien présente à l’audience en la personne d’une femme élégante qui parle en dernier, assise juste à côté de Gareth Peirce. Après l’audience elle m’explique qu’elle est la « request barrister », l’avocate de la « partie adverse », c’est-à-dire, me dit-elle, qu’elle défend les intérêts américains. Obligeamment elle me donne son nom,Clair Dobbin. Son CV fourni apparait immédiatement sur internet, et je remarque que ses bureaux d’avocat sont situés dans le même bâtiment que ceux de Matrix Chambers, le cabinet de barristers 1 dont l’un, Mark Summers, avait lu la fameuse lettre d’excuses de Julian Assange lors de l’audience du 2 mai.

    Le juge finit en demandant d’une voix forte à Gareth Peirce : pas « d’application » aujourd’hui ? Pas de requête, de demande de libération sous caution ? Non. Gareth Peirce, l’avocate de Julian Assange ne demande rien. Elle veut que tout se joue le 21 octobre. Son client fixe le sol de la prison et on ne sait s’il entend et comprend, ni s’il est d’accord. C’est fini. Le juge sort, nous nous levons et nous sortons dans le couloir ou se joue le reste de la comédie humaine et politique.

    Le 21 octobre ou le 18 octobre sont évoqués à l’audience. Nous savons maintenant qu’il faut nous précipiter au secrétariat du tribunal pour demander la confirmation des dates. Revenez demain, nous ne les avons pas encore dans l’ordinateur. Gareth Peirce reste un moment seule dans le couloir, à l’écart des Anglais des comités de soutien et des journalistes. Je me présente et je lui demande si je peux lui demander des explications. Elle commence à me parler, mais déjà le secrétaire du greffe la sollicite. Elle me propose de parler avec son assistante et le suit.

    Le 21 octobre une partie, ou tous les dés seront jetés.

    Que faire pour renforcer la défense de Julian Assange avant qu’il ne soit trop tard ?
    1- Dans le système anglais il existe une hiérarchie entre les avocats – les sollicitors sont les avocats en contact avec le clients qui peuvent plaider devant les tribunaux de première instance, les Magistrate Court. Mais pour aller à la Crown Court, tribunal de seconde instance il doivent louer les services d’avocats plus spécialisés, les barrister. Jennifer Robinson et Mark Summers ont été les barristers de Julian Assange alors que Gareth Peirce est son sollicitor.
    Monika Kabrowska

    Pour celles et ceux qui veulent écrire à la cour. Voici l’adresse, ainsi que le numéro de dossier de Julian Assange

    N°dossier European Arrest Warrant
AM 131226-10 :
N°dossier RCJ CO/1925/2011

    Mr/Mrs Président Magistrate of Westminster Court
181 Marylebone Road
London
    ECRIVEZ A JULIAN ASSANGE. WRITE TO JULIAN ASSANGE

    Julian Assange, éditeur de wikileaks. Participez à notre campagne de lettres de masse. Inondons la prison de Belmarsh de messages de soutien !

    Si vous pouvez joindre une photo d’actions ou le descriptif d’une action, ce n’est que mieux (une lettre envoyée à un parlementaire ou un ministre par exemple)
    Mr. Julian Assange (A 93 79 AY)
HMP Belmarsh
Western Way
London SE28 0EB
UK

    Il faut préciser son nom et son adresse complète au dos de l’enveloppe sinon le courrier n’est pas distribué.
Joindre enveloppes, papiers et timbres pour la réponse.

    Si le numéro d’écrou n’est pas mentionné, le courrier n’est pas distribué.
Pour ceux qui veulent s’inscrire pour téléphoner ou envoyer un mail, il faut s’inscrire sur ce site.
Le numéro d’écrou doit être mentionné sans espace : A9379AY
www.emailaprisoner.com

    Association WIKIJUSTICE JULIAN ASSANGE
    2 rue Frédéric Scheider, 75018 Paris
    Présidente Véronique Pidancet Barrière
    wikijusticejulianassange@gmail.com

     #assange #julian_assange #angleterre #prison #tribunal #justice #surveillance #nsa #etats-unis #en_vedette #activisme #usa #pouvoirs #politique #equateur #actualités_internationales #wikileaks #lanceurs_d'alerte #lanceur_d'alerte #répression #prison #prisons

  • #Los_Angeles Intersection Named After Black #LGBT Icon

    An intersection in Los Angeles’ Jefferson Park neighborhood now bears the name of revered LGBT activist #Carl_Bean.

    On Sunday, Los Angeles City Council President Herb Wesson appointed the intersection of Jefferson Boulevard and Sycamore Avenue as Archbishop Carl Bean Square.

    “Through his activism Carl Bean pioneered how we treat, educate and advocate for one of the most significant health crises of our time and he did it with a focus and passion for saving Black lives,” said Wesson in a statement obtained by EBONY.

    https://www.ebony.com/news/los-angeles-intersection-named-after-black-lgbt-icon
    #toponymie #noms_de_rue #USA #Etats-Unis #Noirs

  • British orphans found trapped in Syria IS camp

    The war in Syria has been reignited on new fronts by Turkey’s incursion into the north east of the country.

    In camps across the regions are thousands of terrified children whose parents supported the Islamic State group, but most of their countries don’t want them home.

    In one camp, the BBC has discovered three children, believed to be from London, whose parents joined IS five years ago, and were subsequently killed in the fighting.

    The children - Amira, Heba and Hamza - are stranded, in danger and they want to come home.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-middle-east-50030567/british-orphans-found-trapped-in-syria-is-camp
    #enfants #enfance #ISIS #EI #Etat_islamique #camps #orphelins #Syrie #conflit #guerre #combattants_étrangers

    • Gli svizzeri della Jihad

      Chi sono gli jihadisti elvetici, di che reti facevano parte e cosa li ha spinti a partire? Da Winterthur a Ginevra, dai palazzi popolari ai quartieri borghesi, siamo andati a cercare i giovani che si sono uniti all’ISIS.

      Sono svizzeri e sono partiti per fare la jihad. Molti di loro hanno combattuto per lo stato islamico, altri sono entrati in contatto con gli attentatori che hanno colpito l’Europa. Sono stati catturati in Siria e adesso si trovano nelle prigioni nel nord del paese.Con loro ci sono donne e bambini. Per ora nessun tribunale sta giudicando i loro crimini, tutti quanti sono in attesa che i rispettivi paesi d’origine decidano come procedere nei loro confronti. Uno stallo che sembra però sbloccarsi: secondo alcune indiscrezioni Berna starebbe considerando l’ipotesi di far rientrare le donne e i bambini.Una squadra di Falò è stata nei campi di prigionia che ospitano donne e bambini dell’ISIS; tendopoli al collasso in cui l’ideologia radicale sta risorgendo. Ma ci sono anche svizzeri che hanno fatto parte dello Stato Islamico e sono già rientrati in Svizzera.Chi sono questi jihadisti elvetici, di che reti facevano parte e cosa li ha spinti a partire? Da Winterthur a Ginevra, dai palazzi popolari ai quartieri borghesi, siamo andati a cercare i giovani che si sono uniti all’ISIS. Alcuni si dicono pentiti, altri sembrano aver mantenuto dei legami con gli ambienti radicalizzati. A che punto stanno i processi nei loro confronti? Chi si occupa di sorvegliare le loro attività? Quanto pericolosi li dobbiamo considerare?

      https://www.rsi.ch/play/tv/falo/video/gli-svizzeri-della-jihad----------?id=12256843
      #documentaire #film #suisse #femmes #al-Hol #camps_de_réfugiés #détention #prison

    • UK special forces may help British orphans escape Syria

      Home Office reverses stance and says it will consider repatriating children in camps.
      https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/d0a1d88ba6202391e12730afd5aac7dc8694af18/0_235_5616_3370/master/5616.jpg?width=620&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=204f73a9482a4debc42258

      Britain will consider repatriating orphans and unaccompanied children in north-east Syria if they are alerted to their presence by local military or aid agencies.

      Home Office officials said the UK would assist British orphans trapped in Syria after the Turkish invasion, reversing a previous policy that children had to be taken out of the country before they might get any help.

      Officials would not say exactly how children might be extracted from the country, implying that SAS or other special forces, still understood to be based in the region, could be involved in the repatriations.

      They said children thought to be British would be assessed on a case-by-case basis once removed from Syria and only orphans and unaccompanied children would be eligible to be brought back to the UK.

      The shift in policy comes after a BBC reporting team found three English-speaking orphans aged 10 or under in a Syria camp over the weekend. The children are believed to have been taken by their parents to live under Islamic State five years ago.

      The eldest, Amira, 10, told the film crew that their parents and other immediate adult family members were killed in an air assault on Baghouz, the last Isis stronghold, which fell in March, and she wanted to return to the UK.

      Save the Children, one of the few charities operating in north-east Syria, said the Home Office developments were a step in the right direction but more detail was required.

      “For this to translate into a real change of policy, we need to know that the government is working on how to bring all British children to the UK while we still can, not just those featured in the media,” the charity said.

      It is not clear how many British unaccompanied children remain in the crowded refugee camps in the Kurdish region of Syria. Some unofficial estimates put the figure at around 30.

      Any child born to a Briton – whether inside or outside the UK – is a British citizen. Before the Turkish invasion the government had said it was too risky to try to attempt any rescue children with a legitimate claim.

      When Shamima Begum was deprived of her UK citizenship in February, the British government said her infant son was still British. After the child died at a Syrian refugee camp at the age of three weeks, Jeremy Hunt, then foreign secretary, said it had been too dangerous for British officials to attempt to a rescue.

      Opposition MPs questioned whether the change in stance would lead to more orphaned children getting help. Stephen Gethins, the SNP’s foreign affairs spokesman, said: “We know the UK government’s record on resettling refugees and vulnerable people leaves a lot to be desired. Beyond the rhetoric there is very little substance from the UK government.”

      On Tuesday the foreign secretary, Dominic Raab, had hinted at a change of policy when, during an urgent debate on the Syrian crisis, he said: “We are looking at whether orphans and unaccompanied minors who bear UK nationality can be given safe passage to return to the UK.”

      Further details were spelled out on Wednesday by the Home Office, which has been leading on repatriations from Syria.

      The government does not want former Isis fighters and adult supporters to return to the UK, although around 450 are thought to have previously done so, and it is suggesting they could be put on trial in the region.

      https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/oct/16/uk-shifts-stance-on-helping-british-orphans-escape-syria?CMP=Share_iOSA
      #orphelins #rapatriement

  • The Trump administration is sucking up tens of millions of gallons of precious desert groundwater to build the #BorderWall.

    Even after our children tear down this absurd barrier, it could take the ancient aquifers at #Organ_Pipe generations to recover.

    https://twitter.com/LaikenJordahl/status/1182038921145831424
    #eau #murs #barrières_frontalières #USA #Etats-Unis #nappe_phréatique #désert #frontières

    ping @mobileborders

  • Syria-Turkey briefing: The fallout of an invasion for civilians

    Humanitarians are warning that a Turkish invasion in northeast Syria could force hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes, as confusion reigns over its possible timing, scope, and consequences.

    Panos Moumtzis, the UN’s regional humanitarian coordinator for Syria, told reporters in Geneva on Monday that any military operation must guard against causing further displacement. “We are hoping for the best but preparing for the worst,” he said, noting that an estimated 1.7 million people live in the country’s northeast.

    Some residents close to the Syria-Turkey border are already leaving, one aid worker familiar with the situation on the ground told The New Humanitarian. Most are staying with relatives in nearby villages for the time-being, said the aid worker, who asked to remain anonymous in order to continue their work.

    The number of people who have left their homes so far remains relatively small, the aid worker said, but added: “If there is an incursion, people will leave.”

    The International Rescue Committee said “a military offensive could immediately displace at least 300,000 people”, but analysts TNH spoke to cautioned that the actual number would depend on Turkey’s plans, which remain a major unknown.

    As the diplomatic and security communities struggle to get a handle on what’s next, the same goes for humanitarians in northeastern Syria – and the communities they are trying to serve.

    Here’s what we know, and what we don’t:
    What just happened?

    Late on Sunday night, the White House said that following a phone call with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, “Turkey will soon be moving forward with its long-planned operation into Northern Syria,” adding that US soldiers would not be part of the move, and “will no longer be in the immediate area”.

    The Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) – the Syrian-Kurdish-led militia that until now had been supported by the United States and played a major role in wresting territory back from the so-called Islamic State (IS) group in Syria – vowed to stand its ground in the northeast.

    An SDF spokesperson tweeted that the group “will not hesitate to turn any unprovoked attack by Turkey into an all-out war on the entire border to DEFEND ourselves and our people”.

    Leading Republicans in the US Congress criticised President Donald Trump’s decision, saying it represents an abandonment of Kurdish allies in Syria, and the Pentagon appeared both caught off-guard and opposed to a Turkish incursion.

    Since then, Trump has tweeted extensively on the subject, threatening to “totally destroy and obliterate the economy of Turkey” if the country does anything he considers to be “off limits”.

    On the ground, US troops have moved out of two key observation posts on the Turkey-Syria border, in relatively small numbers: estimates range from 50 to 150 of the total who would have been shifted, out of around 1,000 US soldiers in the country.
    What is Turkey doing?

    Erdogan has long had his sights on a “safe zone” inside Syria, which he has said could eventually become home to as many as three million Syrian refugees, currently in Turkey.

    Turkish Interior Minister Süleyman Soylu said in August that only 17 percent of Turkey’s estimated 3.6 million Syrian refugees come from the northeast of the country, which is administered by the SDF and its political wing.

    Turkish and US forces began joint patrols of a small stretch of the border early last month. While Turkey began calling the area a “safe zone”, the United States referred to it as a “security mechanism”. The terms of the deal were either never made public or not hammered out.

    In addition to any desire to resettle refugees, which might only be a secondary motive, Turkey wants control of northeast Syria to rein in the power of the SDF, which it considers to be a terrorist organisation.

    One of the SDF’s main constituent parts are People’s Defense Units – known by their Kurdish acronym YPG.

    The YPG are an offshoot of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK – a Turkey-based Kurdish separatist organisation that has conducted an insurgency against the Turkish government for decades, leading to a bloody crackdown.

    While rebels fight for the northwest, and Russian-backed Syrian government forces control most of the rest of Syria, the SDF currently rules over almost all of Hassakeh province, most of Raqqa and Deir Ezzor provinces, and a small part of Aleppo province.
    How many civilians are at risk?

    There has not been a census in Syria for years, and numbers shift quickly as people flee different pockets of conflict. This makes estimating the number of civilians in northeast Syria very difficult.

    The IRC said in its statement it is “deeply concerned about the lives and livelihoods of the two million civilians in northeast Syria”; Moumtzis mentioned 1.7 million people; and Save the Children said “there are 1.65 million people in need of humanitarian assistance in this area, including more than 650,000 displaced by war”.

    Of those who have had to leave their homes in Raqqa, Deir Ezzor, and Hassakeh, only 100,000 are living in camps, according to figures from the International Committee of the Red Cross. Others rent houses or apartments, and some live in unfinished buildings or tents.

    “While many commentators are rightly focusing on the security implications of this policy reversal, the humanitarian implications will be equally enormous,” said Jeremy Konyndyk, senior policy fellow at the Center for Global Development, and a former high-ranking Obama administration aid official.

    “All across Northern Syria, hundreds of thousands of displaced and conflict-affected people who survived the horrors of the… [IS] era will now face the risk of new violence between Turkish and SDF forces.”
    Who will be first in the firing line?

    It’s unlikely all of northeast Syria would be impacted by a Turkish invasion right away, given that so far the United States has only moved its troops away from two border posts, at Tel Abyad (Kurdish name: Gire Spi), and roughly 100 kilometres to the east, at Ras al-Ayn (Kurdish name: Serê Kaniyê).

    Depending on how far into Syria one is counting, aid workers estimate there are between 52,000 to 68,000 people in this 100-kilometre strip, including the towns of Tel Abyad and Ras al-Ayn themselves. The aid worker in northeast Syria told TNH that if there is an offensive, these people are more likely, at least initially, to stay with family or friends in nearby villages than to end up in camps.

    The aid worker added that while humanitarian operations from more than 70 NGOs are ongoing across the northeast, including in places like Tel Abyad, some locals are avoiding the town itself and, in general, people are “extremely worried”.
    What will happen to al-Hol camp?

    The fate of the rest of northeast Syria’s population may also be at risk.

    Trump tweeted on Monday that the Kurds “must, with Europe and others, watch over the captured ISIS fighters and families”.

    The SDF currently administers al-Hol, a tense camp of more than 68,000 people – mostly women and children – deep in Hassakeh province, where the World Health Organisation recently said people are living “in harsh and deplorable conditions, with limited access to quality basic services, sub-optimal environment and concerns of insecurity.”

    Many of the residents of al-Hol stayed with IS through its last days in Syria, and the camp holds both these supporters and people who fled the group earlier on.

    Last week, Médecins Sans Frontières said security forces shot at women protesting in a part of the camp known as “the annex”, which holds around 10,000 who are not Syrian or Iraqi.

    The SDF also holds more than 10,000 IS detainees in other prisons, and the possible release of these people – plus those at al-Hol – may become a useful bargaining chip for the Kurdish-led group.

    On Monday, an SDF commander said guarding the prisoners had become a “second priority” in the wake of a possible Turkish offensive.

    “All their families are located in the border area,” General Mazloum Kobani Abdi told NBC News of the SDF fighters who had been guarding the prisoners. “So they are forced to defend their families.”

    https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/news/2019/10/08/syria-turkey-briefing-fallout-invasion-civilians
    #Syrie #Turquie #guerre #conflit #civiles #invasion #al-Hol #Kurdistan #Kurdes #camps #camps_de_réfugiés
    ping @isskein

    • Il faut stopper Erdogan

      Les Kurdes de Syrie ont commencé à payer le prix de la trahison de l’Occident. Une pluie de bombes s’est abattue mercredi après-midi sur les villes frontière, précédant de peu une offensive terrestre de l’armée turque et de ses alliés islamistes de Syrie. Le macabre décompte des victimes peut débuter. On imagine l’effroi qui a saisi les habitants du #Rojava déjà durement éprouvés par plusieurs années de guerre contre les djihadistes.

      Le tweet dominical de Donald Trump avait annoncé la trahison ultime des Etats-Unis. Mais l’offensive turque répond à une logique plus profonde. A force de voir l’Union européenne lui manger dans la main, à force de jouer sans trop de heurts la balance géopolitique entre Moscou et Washington au gré de l’opportunisme des deux grandes puissances, Recep Tayyip Erdogan a des raisons de se sentir intouchable. Lorsqu’en 2015 et 2016, il faisait massacrer sa propre population dans les villes kurdes de Cizre, Nusaybin, Silopi ou Sur, le silence était de plomb.

      L’offensive débutée hier, le sultan l’annonce de longue date, sans provoquer de réaction ferme des Européens. La girouette Trump a bon dos : en matière d’allégeance à Ankara, les Européens sont autrement plus constants.

      Il faudra pourtant stopper Erdogan. Laisser le #Kurdistan_syrien tomber aux mains des milices islamistes et de l’armée turque reviendrait à cautionner un crime impardonnable. A abandonner des centaines de milliers de civils, dont de très nombreux réfugiés, et des milliers de combattants de la liberté à leurs bourreaux. Ce serait également la certitude d’une guerre de longue durée entre la Turquie et sa propre minorité kurde, environ un cinquième de sa population.

      Plusieurs pays européens ont réclamé une réunion du Conseil de sécurité de l’ONU. Le signe d’un sursaut ? L’espoir d’un cessez-le-feu rapide ? Ou des jérémiades d’arrière-garde, qui cesseront dès que la Turquie aura atteint ses objectifs ?

      Comme souvent, la superpuissance étasunienne détient les cartes maîtresses. Et Donald Trump n’en est pas à son premier virage intempestif. S’il a donné son feu vert à Erdogan, le républicain se retrouve coincé entre les interventionnistes et les isolationnistes de son propre parti. Hier, le premier camp s’indignait bruyamment. Exerçant une pression redoutable pour un président déjà affaibli par le dossier ukrainien.

      Il faudra qu’elle pèse aussi sur les dirigeants européens. La solidarité avec le Rojava doit devenir une priorité du mouvement social et des consciences.

      https://lecourrier.ch/2019/10/09/il-faut-stopper-erdogan

    • #Al-Hol detainees attack guards and start fires as Turkish assault begins

      Camp holding thousands of Islamic State suspects thrown into ’chaos’, says Kurdish official

      The Turkish assault on northeast Syria has prompted Islamic State group-affiliated women and youth in al-Hol’s camp to attack guards and start fires, a Kurdish official told Middle East Eye.

      Kurdish-held northeastern Syria has been on high alert since the United States announced on Sunday it would leave the area in anticipation of a Turkish offensive.

      Over the three days since the US announcement, chaos has broken out in the teeming al-Hol camp, Mahmoud Kro, an official that oversees internment camps in the Kurdish-run autonomous area, told MEE.

      Some 60,000 people suspected of being affiliated or linked to the Islamic State (IS) group, the majority women and children, are being held in the camp.

      “There are attacks on guards and camp management, in addition to burning tents and preparing explosive devices,” Kro told MEE from Qamishli.

      The status of al-Hol’s detainees has been a major concern since Turkey began making more threats to invade northeast Syria this year.

      In the phone call between Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Donald Trump on Sunday that precipitated the United States’ pullout, the US president pressed his Turkish counterpart on the fate of foreign IS suspects in Kurdish custody, MEE revealed.
      ‘Targeting our existence as Kurds’

      Turkey launched its assault on northeastern Syria on Wednesday alongside its Syrian rebel allies, aiming, it says, to push the Kurdish YPG militia at least 32km from the border.

      Ankara views the YPG as an extension of the outlawed PKK militant group.

      However, the YPG is a leading component of the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) militia, which has been Washington’s principal partner on the ground in the fight against IS.

      SDF fighters guard al-Hol, but Kro said the Turkish attack would draw them away to join the battle.

      “Any war in the region will force the present forces guarding the camp to go defend the border,” he said. “This will increase the chance of chaos in the camp.”

      Kro said that the administration in al-Hol has not made any preparations for a war with Turkey because the SDF’s priority is protecting northeast Syria and Kurds.

      “In terms of preparations, our first priority is protecting our region and existence,” he said. “The Turks are targeting our existence as Kurds to the first degree.”

      Some officials from the Syrian Democratic Council (SDC), the political wing of the SDF, agree with Kro’s assessment that the detainees in al-Hol could get out.

      “If fighting breaks out between the SDF and Turkey, security at prisons will relax and prisoners could escape,” Bassam Ishak, the co-chair of the SDC in the US, told MEE ahead of the offensive.

      Meanwhile, SDC spokesman Amjad Osman said, as other Syrian Kurdish officials have, that a Turkish attack on northeast Syria would negatively affect the continuing war on IS in the country.

      “We are committed to fighting terrorism,” he told MEE. “But now our priority is to, first of all, confront the Turkish threats. And this will have a negative effect on our battle against Daesh,” using the Arabic acronym for IS.

      However, Turkey has bristled at the suggestion that the camps and fight against IS will be endangered by Ankara’s offensive.

      “This blackmail reveals the true face of the YPG and demonstrates how it has no intent of fighting against IS,” a Turkish official told MEE.

      Some residents of northeast Syria are already starting to flee. Many fear yet another war in the country that is still dealing with the conflict between government and rebel forces, and lingering IS attacks.

      Osman stopped short of saying the SDF would pack up and leave al-Hol. However, it will be hard for the group to keep holding the Syrian, Iraqi and international detainees during such a war, he said.

      “We are trying as much as possible to continue protecting the camps,” Osman said. “But any attempt to drag us into a military battle with Turkey will have a dangerous impact.”

      https://www.middleeasteye.net/news/al-hol-detainees-attack-guards-and-start-fires-turkish-assault-begins
      #ISIS #Etat_islamique #EI

  • #Californie : courant coupé pour 800.000 clients face au risque d’incendie
    https://information.tv5monde.com/info/californie-courant-coupe-pour-800000-clients-face-au-risque-d-

    Un fournisseur d’électricité américain, jugé responsable de l’incendie le plus meurtrier de Californie l’an dernier, a annoncé mercredi qu’il allait couper préventivement l’électricité à 800.000 clients autour de San Francisco pour limiter les risques de feu.

    #récidiviste #etats-unis

  • Eisenhower called it the ‘military-industrial complex.’ It’s vastly bigger now. - The Washington Post
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2019/06/26/eisenhower-called-it-military-industrial-complex-its-vastly-bigger-n

    We used to call the nexus of private interests and national defense the “military-industrial complex.” But that Cold War term no longer fits. “Industrial” does not capture the breadth of the activities involved. And “military” fails to describe the range of government policies and interests implicated. Over the past two decades we’ve seen transformations that include new government reliance on private security firms, revolutions in digital technology, a post-9/11 surge in the number of veterans, and the creation of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). What we have now could be called a “National Security Corporate Complex.”

    Here are four things you need to know about this transformation.

    #complexe_militaro_industriel
    #etats-unis

  • Manif monstre pour le #climat : des #intérêts trop divergents nuisent à la #lutte
    https://theconversation.com/manif-monstre-pour-le-climat-des-interets-trop-divergents-nuisent-a

    Le seul clivage partisan qui existe sépare les climato-sceptiques et les autres, renvoyant les « autres » à une masse indistincte sur le plan politique. Leurs démarcations politiques ne sont pas audibles. Si elles l’étaient, les débats se joueraient aussi sur le rapport à l’économie libérale capitaliste et la #justice sociale. On verrait alors apparaître des différences fondamentales entre le groupe des « autres », qui s’opposerait sur leur conception de ce que devrait être notre #économie pour répondre aux enjeux du climat, sur l’#intervention attendue (ou non) de l’#État, sur la prise en compte des #inégalités face aux changements climatiques.

    #capitalisme

  • On Foreign Policy, Bernie Stands Alone
    https://jacobinmag.com/2019/10/foreign-policy-bernie-sanders-elizabeth-warren-2020-presidential-campaig

    Throughout her speeches and writings on foreign policy, #Warren makes it abundantly clear that she wants to “protect American interests first and foremost.” Similar to all post–Cold War US presidents, she is dedicated to preserving US “global leadership,” a euphemism for empire that became popular in the Vietnam War’s wake. Her “Foreign Policy for All” is, in essence, a foreign policy for all Americans that takes the nation-state as the natural subject of politics and history.

    #Sanders, in contrast, adopts an explicitly global understanding of the United States’ world role. For him, the purpose of US foreign policy is not to reaffirm US “leadership,” but to create “a global community in which people have the decent jobs, food, clean water, education, health care and housing they need.” In a radical departure from the nationalist rhetoric of Warren — and American politics generally — Sanders emphasizes his desire “to reconceptualize a global order based on human solidarity, an order that recognizes that every person on this planet shares a common humanity.” Where Warren’s campaign says she will “stand up for the American economy, fight to protect American workers, and defend American values,” Sanders’s campaign states that “he will change the terms of the global economy to lift up workers everywhere, reversing the race to the bottom” that compels “American workers to compete with desperate workers in Vietnam who make less than a dollar an hour and migrant computer workers in Malaysia who are working as modern-day slaves.” As this suggests, Sanders, unlike Warren, is a globalist in the best sense of the term.

    #candidats #potus #etats-unis

  • Le lâchage des #Kurdes de Syrie par Donald Trump, une erreur stratégique
    https://www.franceinter.fr/emissions/geopolitique/geopolitique-08-octobre-2019

    Face à l’ampleur des réactions négatives, le Président a fait volte-face : il a affirmé, contre toute évidence, qu’il n’avait pas donné son feu vert à la #Turquie pour intervenir en #Syrie, et a limité l’ampleur du retrait de troupes.

    #états-unis