• #Sabadell : 7 ans plus tard, le #procès contre #Can_Piella est reporté
    https://fr.squat.net/2020/10/30/sabadell-7-ans-plus-tard-le-proces-contre-can-piella-est-reporte

    Salut les amies, Nous tenons à vous informer que mercredi prochain, le 4 novembre, nous allions être jugées. Cinq jours auparavant, notre procès avait été reporté, soi-disant à cause du Covid. Comme vous le savez, Can Piella est un projet communautaire et social qui a été développé pendant trois ans et demi dans la ferme […]

    #Catalogne #Espagne #État_espagnol #Montcada_i_Reixac #occupation_rurale

  • #États-Unis | Pas de #masque, plus d’hospitalisations
    https://www.lapresse.ca/international/etats-unis/2020-10-29/etats-unis/pas-de-masque-plus-d-hospitalisations.php

    Si l’imposition très variable du port du couvre-visage au Tennessee est un casse-tête pour les autorités sanitaires de cet État, elle a au moins l’avantage de fournir des données frappantes sur ses effets sur la courbe d’hospitalisations. Dans une étude publiée le 27 octobre, des chercheurs de l’Université Vanderbilt démontrent que les hospitalisations dans les comtés où le port du masque n’est pas obligatoire ont augmenté de 200 % depuis juillet, soit une hausse beaucoup plus draconienne que dans les autres hôpitaux.

    #covid-19

  • Pumpkin cupcakes
    https://cuisine-libre.fr/pumpkin-cupcakes

    Délicieux cupcakes à la #Citrouille ! Si ce n’est déjà fait, préparer une douzaine de #Muffins à la citrouille et laisser refroidir. Crème au beurre Pendant ce temps, préparer la crème en mélangeant le beurre doux et le fromage frais au batteur. Quand le mélange est bien lisse, incorporer le sucre glace progressivement, toujours en fouettant, puis l’extrait de vanille et une bonne pincée de cannelle. Vous pouvez ajoutez quelques gouttes de colorant alimentaire orange pour une décoration plus originale.… #Sucres, Citrouille, Muffins, #États-Unis / #Sans viande

  • Harvard study says flying can be safer than eating at a restaurant - The Washington Post
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/trafficandcommuting/with-proper-measures-flying-can-be-safer-than-eating-at-a-restaurant-during-the-pandemic-study-says/2020/10/27/01d6d248-17d1-11eb-aeec-b93bcc29a01b_story.html

    The risk of catching the coronavirus on an airplane can be significantly reduced if travelers wash their hands frequently, wear masks at all times, and if airlines clean and sanitize planes thoroughly and ensure there is a constant flow of air throughout the cabin — even when the plane is parked, according to a study released Tuesday. Using these and other measures as part of a layered approach could push the risk of catching the virus on a plane below that of other activities, including grocery shopping and eating at a restaurant, researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health concluded.
    “Though a formidable adversary, SARS-CoV-2 need not overwhelm society’s capacity to adapt and progress,” the report said. “It is possible to gain a measure of control and to develop strategies that mitigate spread of the disease while allowing a careful reopening of sectors of society.”This study, from the industry-funded Aviation Public Health Initiative, is likely to be cited by airlines and plane manufacturers as they continue to try to convince the public that it is safe to fly as long as proper precautions are taken.
    The Harvard study follows the recent release of a Defense Department study that concluded that wearing a mask continuously while flying could reduce the spread of the virus because of how air is filtered and circulated on an airplane. Along with previous research, the two studies further bolster the case for wearing face coverings. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also recently updated its guidance on face coverings to say that it “strongly recommends” that masks be worn on all forms of public and commercial transportation. The Harvard team included experts on environmental health, industrial hygiene and infectious diseases whose goal was to develop a “comprehensive understanding of the intersection between the science informing SARS-CoV-2 transmission and the operations in the aviation environment.”

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#etatsunis#sante#voyageaerien#contamination#economie#recherche#industrieaerienne

  • Virus pushes twin cities El Paso and Juarez to the brink
    https://apnews.com/article/business-virus-outbreak-family-gatherings-north-america-mexico-e066bb7aaf4ad

    A record surge in coronavirus cases is pushing hospitals to the brink in the border cities of El Paso and Ciudad Juarez, confronting health officials in Texas and Mexico with twin disasters in the tightly knit metropolitan area of 3 million people. Health officials are blaming the spike on family gatherings, multiple generations living in the same household and younger people going out to shop or conduct business.
    The crisis — part of a deadly comeback by the virus across nearly the entire U.S. — has created one of the most desperate hot spots in North America and underscored how intricately connected the two cities are economically, geographically and culturally, with lots of people routinely going back and forth across the border to shop or visit with family.
    “We are like Siamese cities,” said Juarez resident Roberto Melgoza Ramos, whose son recovered from a bout of COVID-19 after taking a cocktail of homemade remedies and prescription drugs. “You can’t cut El Paso without cutting Juarez, and you can’t cut Juarez without cutting El Paso.”
    In El Paso, authorities have instructed residents to stay home for two weeks and imposed a 10 p.m. curfew, and they are setting up dozens of hospital beds at a convention center. Also, the University Medical Center of El Paso erected heated isolation tents to treat coronavirus patients. As of Tuesday, Ryan Mielke, director of public affairs, said the hospital had 195 COVID-19 patients, compared with fewer than three dozen less than a month ago, and “it continues to grow by the day, by the hour.” In Juarez, the Mexican government is sending mobile hospitals, ventilators and doctors, nurses and respiratory specialists. A hospital is being set up inside the gymnasium of the local university to help with the overflow. Juarez has reported more than 12,000 infections and over 1,100 deaths, but the real numbers are believed to be far higher, because COVID-19 testing is extremely limited. El Paso County recorded about 1,400 new cases Tuesday, just short of the previous day’s record of 1,443. The county had 853 patients hospitalized for the virus on Monday, up from 786 a day earlier.
    Even the mayor of Juarez hasn’t been spared. Armando Cabada was first diagnosed in May and appeared to have recovered, but then landed in the hospital last week with inflamed lungs.Last week, Chihuahua, which includes Juarez, became the only state in Mexico to return to its highest level health alert, or red, under which most nonessential services are shut down and people are encouraged to stay home. A curfew is also in effect in Juarez, but it has proved difficult to enforce in the sprawling city that is home to hundreds of factories that manufacture appliances, auto parts and other products around the clock.
    The U.S. and Mexico agreed months ago to restrict cross-border traffic to essential activity, but there has been little evidence Mexico has blocked anyone from entering. Other Mexican border cities have complained about people entering from U.S. cities that are suffering from virus outbreaks.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#etatsunis#mexique#frontiere#sante#circulationtransfrontaliere#crisesanitaire#politiquemigratoire

  • L’eau devient un produit financier en Californie | Les Echos
    https://www.lesechos.fr/finance-marches/marches-financiers/leau-devient-un-produit-financier-en-californie-1255502

    La Bourse de Chicago et le Nasdaq vont lancer des contrats à terme sur l’eau de Californie. Ces instruments financiers permettront de se couvrir contre la volatilité des prix de cette ressource naturelle sous tension dans l’Etat américain.

    Après avoir fait fortune en anticipant l’effondrement du marché immobilier américain, Michael Burry a concentré ses investissements sur une matière première : l’eau. L’investisseur rendu célèbre par le livre de Micheal Lewis « Le casse du siècle » et le film « The Big Short » expliquait en 2010 avoir investi dans des exploitations agricoles disposant de réserves hydriques sur place.

    En 2020, Wall Street lui donne une nouvelle fois raison : les opérateurs de Bourse, le Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) et le Nasdaq s’apprêtent à lancer d’ici à la fin de l’année des contrats à terme sur l’eau californienne. Une grande première pour cette ressource naturelle, devenue une matière première et un actif au même titre que le blé, le cuivre ou le pétrole.

  • Naples : nuit de révolte contre l’état d’urgence et le couvre-feu – édito d’Infoaut https://www.infoaut.org/editoriale/napoli-una-rivolta-per-non-morire, traduit par ACTA
    https://acta.zone/naples-nuit-de-revolte-contre-letat-durgence-et-le-couvre-feu

    À Naples, vendredi soir, des milliers de personnes ont participé à une manifestation spontanée contre le nouveau couvre-feu annoncé par le président régional Vincenzo De Luca, suivie de plusieurs heures de combats de rue et d’attaques contre des bâtiments publics. Les médias ont immédiatement cherché à y déceler la mainmise des fascistes, des Ultras ou même de la Camorra. Alors que depuis la révolte s’est étendue à plusieurs autres villes d’Italie, nous avons traduit l’édito de nos camarades d’Infoaut qui revient sur la première nuit d’émeute napolitaine, en s’attachant à déconstruire le « confortable récit raciste et colonial » de la presse mainstream.

    Nous avons écrit à chaud sur Facebook à propos de ce qu’il se passait à Naples : « Les rues de cette nuit étaient peut-être spontanées, contradictoires, ambiguës, stratifiées, comme la société dans laquelle nous vivons, comme son revers. Mais à Naples, ce soir, s’est brisée l’hypocrisie derrière laquelle se cache l’incompétence de ceux qui nous gouvernent, l’échec de ce modèle économique face au virus, la violence qu’ont dû endurer ceux qui pendant des mois ont été abandonnés ».
    Comme prévu, l’aboiement médiatique contre ceux qui sont descendus dans la rue ne s’est pas fait attendre. La fumée des gaz lacrymogènes ne s’était toujours pas dissipée que les commentateurs politiques émettaient déjà des hypothèses sur la mainmise de la Camorra et des fascistes, proposant le fétiche habituel des ultras coupables de tous les maux du monde, associant les manifestations d’hier aux No Mask, alors même que le message porté dans la rue était totalement différent. Et une grande partie de la gauche de ce pays s’est blottie dans ce confortable récit raciste et colonial. Un récit linéaire qui, sans rien saisir des tensions, des contradictions et des instances du mouvement, signifie : au fond, ce sont les Napolitains habituels.

    Exorciser la rébellion.

    Le problème est qu’à notre époque, chaque fois que surgit un phénomène autonome de conflictualité sociale prolongée, qu’il s’agisse des Forconi ou des Gilets jaunes, celui-ci apparaît sous des formes impures, ambivalentes et contradictoires. Souvent se retrouvent dans la rue des personnes qui, théoriquement du moins, sont censées avoir des intérêts opposés, et plus souvent encore, ces contradictions se consomment justement dans la rue. Il est donc beaucoup plus facile de les considérer comme des phénomènes fascistes simplement parce que Roberto Fiore [fondateur et dirigeant du mouvement néofasciste Forza Nuova] essaie de s’en approprier la paternité avec un tweet depuis son confortable fauteuil à Rome, ou comme des actions coordonnées par la Camorra (sans que l’on sache clairement dans quel but), plutôt que d’essayer de les comprendre et d’y prendre part pour contribuer à leur évolution.

    Comme quelqu’un l’a noté à juste titre sur Facebook, le récit mainstream est assez similaire à celui qui avait été fait il y a quelques années devant la crise des déchets. La responsabilité de la crise est mise sur le dos de la population qui, inquiète pour sa santé, se rebelle contre l’incompétence et la corruption des institutions et des entreprises privées, puis finalement apparaît comme par magie l’infiltration du crime organisé dans les manifestations pour les délégitimer et les réduire à un phénomène de pure délinquance. Un scénario déjà vu qui se répète chaque fois que les gens ne s’adaptent pas à la gestion de l’urgence par le haut.

    Oui, car depuis des mois, nous entendons répéter dans le jargon martial que « nous sommes en guerre contre le Covid ». Mais comme on sait, la guerre est la plus hypocrite des activités humaines. Les colonels à la recherche d’un consensus facile crient à travers les écrans que c’est de notre faute si le virus se propage. Pendant ce temps, les « soldats » de cette guerre continuent d’être envoyés au front avec des chaussures en carton et une pétoire pour deux. Une guerre hypocrite, comme nous le disions, dans laquelle le problème serait ce que les gens font entre 23 heures et 5 heures du matin (ils dorment la plupart du temps) et non le fait qu’ils tombent malades au travail, dans les transports, à l’école, à l’hôpital et même dans les files d’attente pour se faire tester. Voilà donc le couvre-feu, encore un mot d’état de siège, revenu en quelques semaines dans le langage commun, encore une mesure ad hoc pour ne pas perdre la face au vu de l’augmentation des infections et en même temps pour ne pas contrarier les vrais coresponsables de cette situation, ceux qui depuis des mois demandent de tout rouvrir à tout prix, ceux qui veulent maintenant licencier à tout prix : les patrons de la Confindustria et ce ramassis de bandits qui dans notre pays s’appellent des entrepreneurs.

    Non, nous ne sommes pas devenus « agambeniens » du jour au lendemain, nous croyons toujours, encore plus face à ce qui s’est passé, qu’il ne s’agit pas d’une simple grippe, que la première tâche pour nous est de prendre soin de nous-mêmes et des autres afin que le virus ne se propage pas. Nous pensons que cela ne doit pas se faire par obéissance envers le pouvoir établi, mais par amour pour les faibles et les opprimés, pour ceux qui sont abandonnés, pour ceux qui souffrent dans la lutte contre le virus. Parce que nous savons très bien que c’est nous, ceux d’en bas, qui payons le plus dans cette crise causée par l’économie mondialisée, les privatisations, la dévastation de l’environnement, la transformation de la santé en marchandise. Mais prendre soin de soi et des autres signifie ne pas ignorer d’un geste égoïste ceux qui ont perdu leur emploi dans cette crise, ceux qui risquent de perdre leur maison et leurs proches. Cela signifie se battre à leurs côtés, car tant que la gestion de l’urgence sera uniquement aux mains du politique, tant que les seuls à faire entendre leur voix seront les industriels, alors c’est nous qui compterons dans nos rangs les morts et les malades, que ce soit du Covid ou de la faim. Il est temps de revenir à l’idée que la santé est un fait social global et que la rébellion est le symptôme que quelque chose doit changer.

  • Lawsuit Alleges NFL’s Concussion Settlement Discriminates Against Black Players - WSJ
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/lawsuit-alleges-nfls-concussion-settlement-discriminates-against-black-players-

    (Août 2020)

    Les compensations pour commotion cérébrale des joueurs de football étasunien utilisent l’#intelligence_artificielle de manière telle que ces compensations différent selon la couleur de la peau : les fonctions intellectuelles avant toute commotion sont considérées plus faibles chez les noirs...

    A group of Black former NFL players has filed a federal lawsuit alleging that the National Football League’s much-contested concussion settlement with players blocked some Black claimants from securing payouts by using an evaluation process that assumed they had lower cognitive functioning when healthy than white players.

    #IA #programmation #biais #racisme #sans_vergogne #états-unis

  • How Straight Talk Helped One State Control #COVID - Scientific American
    https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-straight-talk-helped-one-state-control-covid

    ... late last year I heard about a cluster of fevers in December. And the chorus of warning voices grew between Christmas and New Year’s. As soon as we all returned from the New Year’s break on January 2 or 3, my office started to prepare. By February 8, we had distributed PPE [personal protective equipment] to nursing homes, hospitals and first responders. We had our contract tracing plan all mapped out. This was weeks ahead of our first documented case of COVID-19 on March 12.

    How important are testing and contact tracing to your response?

    They’re essential. Though we’ve had relatively few cases, we have 100 people tracing, and we have plans to hire more. Since May, we’ve partnered with a Maine-based laboratory, IDEXX, that has a very deep bench in reagents. So unlike some states, we’ve had no problems getting reagents for #tests. Everyone in the state 12 months or older can get tested at no cost, no questions asked.

    Do you think part of Maine’s success comes from its being relatively rural and remote?

    Not really. Other rural states such as Idaho, the Dakotas, West Virginia have much higher rates. That suggests that geography doesn’t have much explanatory power.

    What metrics do you rely on to measure success?

    Our goal is not to eradicate the disease but to suppress the virus to put us in a favorable position for vaccination. Our test positivity rate is consistently under 1 percent, and for weeks it [remained] under 0.6 percent. That’s the lowest in the U.S., and we think that puts us in a good position.

    What went wrong with the federal government’s response to the virus?

    It’s unclear…. We do know that on February 25, when [Nancy] Messonnier, [head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases], warned Americans to prepare for a pandemic, she was threatened [with firing by President Donald Trump in a call to the Secretary of Health and Human Services, according to reporting by the Wall Street Journal], and the CDC started to take a back seat.

    What would be your first step in changing the federal response?

    Stop candy coating. The communication approach has been filtered through what folks in Washington, D.C., want the intended impact to be: it’s outcome driven, and that doesn’t work. They have to stop shaping the message to conform with what they think people want to believe.

    Can you a give concrete example of this distorted messaging?

    The rollout of [the antiviral] #remdesivir, as though it were “mission accomplished.” We actually knew very little at that time about whether the drug worked in the treatment of COVID-19. This happened with other therapies as well.

    You give regular press briefings on public radio, as well as daily interviews on Maine AM radio. What do you hope to accomplish with these frequent interactions with the press and public?

    All too often, government is on the defensive, and our first inclination is to say, ‘Here’s what [the government has] done; here’s what we need to do.’ But in a high-anxiety, low-trust situation like this, you have to empower people to act. Every five or six weeks, I take stock of where we are and come up with a couple of key asks of the people in Maine. For example, this week, I asked them to commit to get a flu shot. It’s a concrete call to action, something everyone can do for themselves and their family. And it builds confidence and trust.

    #Maine #etats-unis #responsable

  • #Madrid: #expulsion de l’Ateneo Libertario de Vallekas
    https://fr.squat.net/2020/10/23/madrid-expulsion-de-lateneo-libertario-de-vallekas

    Le 23 octobre à 7 heures du matin, de nombreux camions anti-émeute se sont présentés au centre social pour procéder à son expulsion. Le collectif appelle à un rassemblement cet après-midi à 20 heures dans le parc d’Amos Acero. Ce matin, la menace qui pesait sur l’Ateneo Libertario de Vallekas s’est concrétisée. À 6 heures […]

    #Ateneo_Libertario_de_Vallekas #Calle_Párroco_Don_Emilio_Franco_nº_59 #Espagne #État_espagnol #La_13-14 #manifestation #Vallecas

  • ‘It’s like they’re waiting for us to die’: why Covid-19 is battering Black Chicagoans | US news | The Guardian
    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/oct/23/covid-19-battering-black-chicagoans
    https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/8d0245b3ebc5ce72e1e87416c6b9f253144d615a/0_266_4013_2409/master/4013.jpg?width=1200&height=630&quality=85&auto=format&fit=crop&overlay-ali

    Phillip Thomas, a Black, 48-year-old Chicagoan, was a “great guy” according to his sister Angela McMiller. He was loved by his family and well-liked by his co-workers at Walmart, where he had worked for nine years.
    “I didn’t know about how many friends he had until he passed away,” said Angela. Thomas, who was diabetic, died from Covid-19 this past March.
    After being sick for two weeks and self-quarantining at the recommendation of his doctor, instead of being given an examination, Phillip was then rushed to the hospital, where he died the next day.
    Naba’a Muhammad, 59, a writer and Chicago South Shore neighborhood resident, with a lung disease, also contracted coronavirus and was hospitalized.But while he was fortunate to access the necessary care, he immediately noted health disparities facing other Black Chicagoans in his community.
    “Here you have [Donald Trump] who’s got a helicopter flying him to a special wing of a hospital for help when Black people can’t even get an Uber to the emergency room or a Covid test,” he said, referring to the president’s world-class care at the Walter Reed national military medical center on the outskirts of Washington DC, after being diagnosed with coronavirus in early October.
    Closed Chicago theater in Chicago in March. Almost 1 billion people were confined to their homes worldwide in March as the global coronavirus death toll topped 12,000 and US states rolled out stay-at-home measures already imposed across swathes of Europe.
    In Chicago, Covid-19 is battering Black communities. Despite only accounting for 30% of the city’s population, Black people make up 60% of Covid cases there and have the highest mortality rate out of any racial or ethnic group. Most Chicago Covid-19 deaths are hyper-concentrated in majority-Black neighborhoods such as Austin on the West Side and Englewood and Auburn Gresham on the South Side.
    “The racial and ethnic gaps we’re seeing of who gets the virus and who dies from it are not a surprise,” said Linda Rae Murray, a Chicago doctor, academic, social justice advocate and former president of the American Public Health Association as well as the former chief medical officer of the Cook county department of public health.“They are a reflection of structural racism that exists in our society and inequities that are baked into our country.”
    Chicago is a hyper-segregated city, blighted by yawning divides across many socio-economic conditions.The coronavirus experiences of Black Chicagoans are so starkly different from residents in whiter, wealthier communities it has observers asking: do conditions in majority African American neighborhoods make being Black, effectively, a pre-existing condition there?Muhammad thinks so: “[It] is very true,” he said, adding: “But that truth demands a response. We can’t simply accept that this is going to happen to us.”Many Black neighborhoods in Chicago, as elsewhere in America, experience higher rates of unemployment and poverty while also being less likely to receive pandemic aid, giving them even less of a safety net than usual in a disease outbreak

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#etatsunis#chicago#sante#inegalite#minorite#race#santepublique#accessante#race

  • Modeling #COVID-19 scenarios for the United States | Nature Medicine
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-020-1132-9

    Projections of current non-pharmaceutical intervention strategies by state—with social distancing mandates reinstated when a threshold of 8 deaths per million population is exceeded (reference scenario)—suggest that, cumulatively, 511,373 (469,578–578,347) lives could be lost to COVID-19 across the United States by 28 February 2021. We find that achieving universal mask use (95% mask use in public) could be sufficient to ameliorate the worst effects of epidemic resurgences in many states.

    Universal mask use could save an additional 129,574 (85,284–170,867) lives from September 22, 2020 through the end of February 2021, or an additional 95,814 (60,731–133,077) lives assuming a lesser adoption of mask wearing (85%), when compared to the reference scenario.

    #masques

  • 545 enfants de migrants toujours séparés de leurs parents : le symbole des années Trump
    https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2020/10/22/545-enfants-de-migrants-toujours-separes-de-leurs-parents-le-symbole-des-ann

    Plus fondamentalement, les temps ont changé, et Joe Biden aussi. Il s’est engagé à ne pas construire « un mètre supplémentaire » de mur et a promis de réunir les familles et de respecter la « dignité des migrants ». Pour lutter contre l’immigration clandestine, il préfère les moyens électroniques à un mur coûteux – la partie « utile », c’est-à-dire hors désert et montagnes, est presque entièrement réalisée tandis que le Rio Grande est quasi infranchissable. Il entend régler le cas des quelque 800 000 Américains arrivés mineurs aux Etats-Unis (les « dreamers ») qui n’ont toujours pas de statut stable et proclamer un moratoire de cent jours sur les expulsions. Il a toujours défendu l’aide aux pays d’Amérique centrale, là où Donald Trump voulait la couper en pleine crise migratoire. M. Biden s’est engagé à recevoir 125 000 réfugiés par an, alors que M. Trump a abaissé ce chiffre pour 2020 à 18 000, note le Wall Street Journal.
    L’immigration légale s’est, elle aussi, effondrée, avec la fermeture des consulats pendant le Covid-19 et la suspension des entrées de personnes ayant obtenu la carte verte. Sans avoir passé au Congrès la moindre législation, le président Trump a réussi à faire reculer massivement l’immigration légale au cours des trois premières années de son mandat : le nombre de cartes vertes – permis de résidence et de travail permanent — octroyées a reculé d’un quart, passant de 618 000, dernière année du mandat d’Obama, à 462 000 en 2019. Les permis de travail ont reculé de 16 %, tombant de 10,4 millions à 8,7 millions.
    « Donald Trump n’a pas changé la loi, mais il a fait plus de mal que quiconque avant lui », déplore Roxanne Levine, associée du cabinet d’avocat Tarter Krinsky & Drogin, spécialiste de l’immigration. Bureaucratie tatillonne, hausse des frais, des délais, multiplication des entretiens de vérification, changement de quotas, modification du statut des membres de la famille : le harcèlement administratif a payé, au dam des universités et des entreprises high-tech, en quête d’étudiants et de main-d’œuvre. Joe Biden, lui, entend réformer le système des visas et établir un chemin pour la régularisation des 11 millions de clandestins établis aux Etats-Unis. Son programme a pour titre : « Sécuriser nos valeurs en tant que nation d’immigrants ».

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#etatsunis#politiquemigratoire#election#sante#immigration#economie

  • Cuomo Lifts Some Lockdown Rules in N.Y.C. Hot Spots as Rates Drop - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/10/21/nyregion/nyc-reopening-restrictions.html

    Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo announced on Wednesday that some lockdowns in New York City neighborhoods with rising coronavirus cases would be eased, allowing the reopening of schools and businesses that had been shuttered.
    But stringent restrictions remained in place for other neighborhoods at the heart of the outbreaks in Brooklyn, as well as for several communities in Rockland and Orange Counties. Another neighborhood, Ozone Park in Queens, was added to the list requiring limitations on activity.
    It was an acknowledgment that while progress had been made during two weeks of lockdowns, targeted restrictions — which include attendance limitations at mass gatherings and houses of worship — remained necessary to keep isolated outbreaks from engulfing New York City, the former epicenter of the nation’s pandemic.
    The changes seemed bound to add more confusion over the tiered, three-color system of zoned restrictions, a classification that was additionally complicated on Wednesday when the governor unveiled a new “microcluster strategy.”
    It included a statewide system of four tiers, grouped by geographic regions and population. Each tier has its own benchmarks for rates of infection, which, along with other factors, will indicate when locations can enter and exit levels of restrictions.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#newyork#etatsunis#confinement#cluster#epicentre#retsrictionsanitaire#circulation

  • US election 2020: Trump’s impact on immigration - in seven charts - BBC News
    https://www.bbc.com/news/election-us-2020-54638643

    The number of people admitted to the US as refugees each year is determined by a system of quotas, the size of which are ultimately defined by the president. People seeking to move to the US as refugees must make their applications from outside the country, and need to convince US officials that they are vulnerable to persecution at home.

    #migration #asile #états-unis #trump

  • La Grande Transformation (VII)

    Georges Lapierre

    https://lavoiedujaguar.net/La-Grande-Transformation-VII

    Aperçus critiques sur le livre de Karl Polanyi
    La Grande Transformation
    (à suivre)

    Au sujet de l’idéologie des trois fonctions mise en exergue par Georges Dumézil, nous ne savons pas si cette cosmovision vient de la réalité ou si elle est une vision idéologique de la réalité qui serait suggérée et imposée par les conquérants indo-européens faisant en sorte que la réalité (sociale) issue de leur conquête ne puisse plus être contestée et s’impose comme incritiquable. Nous pouvons nous poser la même question au sujet de l’existence de la nature. Est-ce une idéologie ou une cosmovision ? Quand l’idéologie est partagée par tous, alors elle est en voie de devenir une cosmovision, c’est ce qui se passe avec la nature. La nature n’est pas un concept donné, c’est un concept laborieusement acquis par le plus grand nombre dans une société qui s’adonne entièrement au commerce, c’est alors qu’il devient une cosmovision. Pourtant le concept même d’un virus pénétrant l’intimité du sujet devrait nous conduire à percevoir avec plus de subtilité l’interaction entre notre environnement et nous, nous et notre environnement, entre « culture » et « nature », pour reprendre les concepts généralement utilisés de nos jours par les anthropologues. Nous nous apercevrions alors que la frontière est désormais plus floue que nous ne le pensions, qu’elle est plus un acte de volonté de notre part qu’une réalité. (...)

    #Karl_Polanyi #Georges_Dumézil #Maurice_Godelier #cosmovision #culture #asservissement #aliénation #État #État

  • Drill, gangs et réseaux sociaux
    https://laviedesidees.fr/Forrest-Stuart-Ballad-of-the-Bullet.html

    À propos de : Forrest Stuart, Ballad of the Bullet : Gangs, Drill Music, and the Power of Online Infamy, Princeton University Press. La ville d’Al Capone reprend du galon dans le crime, et le met en #musique. C’est la “drill”, nouvelle forme de rap qui prétend documenter la vie des rues et la criminalité violente.

    #International #États-Unis #criminalité
    https://laviedesidees.fr/IMG/docx/20201019_drill.docx
    https://laviedesidees.fr/IMG/pdf/20201019_drill.pdf

  • What Does It Mean If a Vaccine Is ‘Successful’ ? | WIRED
    https://www.wired.com/story/what-does-it-mean-if-a-vaccine-is-successful

    Aux #états-unis, alors même que de l’#argent_public à été massivement injecté, la #FDA a laissé les #laboratoires_pharmaceutiques définir les critères d’efficacité de leur(s) propre(s) #vaccin(s) contre le #SARS_Cov2 ; par exemple chez Pfizer il suffira d’avoir significativement moins de #COVID-19 non graves que dans le bras placebo pour conclure à l’efficacité du vaccin ..., avec, de plus, comme corollaire la possibilité de pouvoir arrêter leur essai lors des résultats intérimaires et d’homologuer le vaccin. quitte à voir apparaître des effets secondaires graves par la suite.

    Par ailleurs il n’existe aucun essai comparant les candidats vaccins entre eux, pour le plus grand bonheur des labos bien sûr..

    L’#OMS a bien prévu des essais rigoureux en #Europe avec des comparaisons entre produits, mais les choses ont à peine démarré..

    It’s worth it to do these things [comparaison entre vaccins]. And the companies don’t want us to do it. They’d much prefer being oligopolists than to compete,” Bach says. Head-to-head tests would let the market compare their products, and the companies would have no way of spinning the results. (He pitched the idea in an op-ed in Stat.) “They don’t want binary events that would cause their market to evaporate,” Bach says. “Here we have a situation where we have financed a lot of the development, there’s a lot of government IP, we’ve given advance marketing commitments—which are guarantees of revenue—and we’re paying for the distribution. We’ve run the table on reasons why the government should have an interest in managing and guiding the science.”

    Yet that only happened in one case—the government-run trial of the antiviral drug remdesivir. It didn’t happen with any other therapeutics, and hasn’t happened with vaccines. Instead, the regulatory agencies let the pharmaceutical companies define the terms of their own trials. “It makes me bonkers that we think we should let the companies decide on the study designs, because their incentives are off,” Bach says. “When we know definitively that X or Y are not what we want, and we want something slightly different, that’s where the government is supposed to step in and modify the market’s behavior.”

    #santé #santé_publique #pharma #big_pharma #marché #dérégulation #délétère

  • N.F.L. Team Thrown by False Positive Covid-19 Tests - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/live/2020/10/16/world/covid-coronavirus

    Regardless of race and ethnicity, those aged 65 and older represented the vast majority — 78 percent — of all coronavirus deaths over those four months.The geographic impact of coronavirus deaths shifted from May to August as well, moving from the Northeast to the South and West. And though the virus moved into parts of the country with higher numbers of Hispanic residents, the report’s data showed that alone does not entirely account for the increase in percentage of deaths among Hispanics nationwide.“Covid-19 remains a major public health threat regardless of age or race and ethnicity,” the report states. It attributes an increased risk among racial and ethnic groups who might be more likely to live in places where the coronavirus is more easily spread, such as multigenerational and multifamily households, as well as hold jobs requiring in-person work, have more limited access to health care and who experience discrimination.
    In July, federal data made available after The New York Times sued the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revealed a clearer and more complete picture of the racial inequalities of the virus: Black and Latino people have been disproportionately affected by the coronavirus in a widespread manner that spans the country, throughout hundreds of counties in urban, suburban and rural areas, and across all age groups.

    #covid-19#migration#migrant#etatsunis#sante#inegalite#minorite#race#ethnicité#discrimnation#accessante

  • Par rapport aux autres pays de l’#OCDE, les #états-unis sont ceux qui ont le moins amélioré leur taux de #mortalité #COVID-19 au fil des mois, au point de dépasser celui des pays qui était supérieur au leur au départ.

    COVID-19 and Excess All-Cause Mortality in the US and 18 Comparison Countries | Global Health | JAMA | JAMA Network
    https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2771841

    While the US had a lower COVID-19 mortality rate than high-mortality countries during the early spring, after May 10, all 6 high-mortality countries had fewer deaths per 100 000 than the US. For instance, between May 10 and September 19, 2020, Italy’s death rate was 9.1/100 000 while the US’s rate was 36.9/100 000. If the US had comparable death rates with most high-mortality countries beginning May 10, it would have had 44 210 to 104 177 fewer deaths (22%-52%) (Table 1). If the US had comparable death rates beginning June 7, it would have had 28% to 43% fewer reported deaths (as a percentage overall).

    In the 14 countries with all-cause mortality data, the patterns found for COVID-19–specific deaths were similar for excess all-cause mortality (Table 2). In countries with moderate COVID-19 mortality, excess all-cause mortality remained negligible throughout the pandemic. In countries with high COVID-19 mortality, excess all-cause mortality reached as high as 102.1/100 000 in Spain, while in the US it was 71.6/100 000. However, since May 10 and June 7, excess all-cause mortality was higher in the US than in all high-mortality countries (Table 2).

    #milliers_de_milliards

    • COVID -19 : Un excès de mortalité de 20% oui mais | santé log
      https://www.santelog.com/actualites/covid-19-un-exces-de-mortalite-de-20-oui-mais

      « Déconfiner » au bon moment est le premier enseignement de l’étude qui suggère que les politiques de déconfinement dès début avril dans certains États sont peut-être responsables des pics constatés en juin et juillet dans ces mêmes états : « Un signal d’alarme qui doit nous inciter à ne pas répéter cette erreur à l’avenir ». Ici, si les auteurs ne peuvent prouver la relation de cause à effet entre les déconfinements précoces et ces « poussées épidémiques estivales ». Mais cela semble tout à fait probable et la plupart des modèles sont en faveur de mesures plus affirmées, écrivent les chercheurs.

      [...]

      « Certaines personnes qui n’ont jamais été infectées sont décédées à cause des dysfonctionnements causés par la pandémie ». Ainsi de nombreuses urgences aiguës, suites de maladies chroniques comme le diabète ou troubles émotionnels ayant conduit à des overdoses ou des suicides n’ont pas pu être normalement pris en charge. L’analyse montre notamment :
      une augmentation significative des décès liés à la démence et aux maladies cardiaques : les décès liés à la maladie d’Alzheimer et à la démence ont ainsi fortement augmenté non seulement en mars et en avril, au début de la pandémie mais à nouveau en juin et en juillet au début de la seconde vague de COVID-19.

      Les données et analyses à plus long terme pourraient révéler un impact plus large de la pandémie sur les taux de mortalité. Les patients cancéreux dont la chimiothérapie a été interrompue, les femmes dont la mammographie a été retardée - les décès évitables et précoces pourraient augmenter dans les années à venir...

      Les décès ne sont qu’une mesure possible de la santé

      Comme récemment leurs collègues de l’Université de Floride du Sud (USF), les chercheurs de Virginie soulignent que le nombre d’années de vie en bonne santé perdues, en raison de la pandémie est une mesure probablement plus légitime des conséquences sanitaires de COVID-19. Car de nombreuses personnes qui survivent à la pandémie, faute de traitement à temps, vont vivre avec des complications à vie. C’est notamment le cas de victimes d’AVC non prises en charge, de patients diabétiques ayant développé des complications durant le confinement, ou encore des personnes souffrant de détresse émotionnelle ou de syndrome de stress post-traumatique….
       
      « Ce n’est donc pas une pandémie impliquant un virus unique », indiquent les chercheurs, mais une crise de santé publique avec des effets systémiques et durables, dont l’équipe va poursuivre la surveillance à long terme.

      En fait ce compte-rendu est celui d’une autre publication de JAMA, qui se trouve https://seenthis.net/messages/881251

  • Children From Immigrant Families Are Increasingly the Face of Higher Education - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/10/15/us/immigrant-families-students-college.html

    An overwhelming majority of immigrant-origin students are U.S. citizens or legal residents. But they are likely to face barriers and limits on resources that many other students do not.“Being a first-generation college student, it’s a lot of pressure,” said Crystal Tepale, a senior at New Jersey City University who hopes to become a lawyer.Credit...Bryan Anselm for The New York Times.“Going into the college process, these students themselves or their families may not have a lot of knowledge about navigating college applications and the financial aid process,” said Jeanne Batalova, a senior policy analyst at Migration Policy Institute and the lead author of the report.
    Once immigrant-origin students are in school, their dropout rates tend to be higher because many come from poor households.
    “They juggle multiple responsibilities, which makes it more challenging for them to stay in school and complete their degrees on time,” Ms. Batalova said. “If there is a health or family emergency, they lack a safety net to fall back on. That interferes with attending classes and completing assignments.” Immigrants and U.S.-born children of immigrants represented 85 percent of all Asian-American and Pacific Islander students, and 63 percent of Latino students in 2018. About a quarter of Black students were from immigrant families.
    As their numbers swell, the students from immigrant families will only become more important to the long-term financial health of American colleges and universities. Even before the coronavirus pandemic threw the operation of colleges and universities into disarray, there was concern about future enrollment amid the country’s falling fertility rate and declining international student enrollment. The United States has faced intensified competition for international students from countries like Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#etatsunis#immigration#etudiant#economie#sante#politiquemigratoire

    • COVID -19 : Un excès de mortalité de 20% oui mais | santé log
      https://www.santelog.com/actualites/covid-19-un-exces-de-mortalite-de-20-oui-mais

      « Déconfiner » au bon moment est le premier enseignement de l’étude qui suggère que les politiques de déconfinement dès début avril dans certains États sont peut-être responsables des pics constatés en juin et juillet dans ces mêmes états : « Un signal d’alarme qui doit nous inciter à ne pas répéter cette erreur à l’avenir ». Ici, si les auteurs ne peuvent prouver la relation de cause à effet entre les déconfinements précoces et ces « poussées épidémiques estivales ». Mais cela semble tout à fait probable et la plupart des modèles sont en faveur de mesures plus affirmées, écrivent les chercheurs.

      [...]

      « Certaines personnes qui n’ont jamais été infectées sont décédées à cause des dysfonctionnements causés par la pandémie ». Ainsi de nombreuses urgences aiguës, suites de maladies chroniques comme le diabète ou troubles émotionnels ayant conduit à des overdoses ou des suicides n’ont pas pu être normalement pris en charge. L’analyse montre notamment :
      une augmentation significative des décès liés à la démence et aux maladies cardiaques : les décès liés à la maladie d’Alzheimer et à la démence ont ainsi fortement augmenté non seulement en mars et en avril, au début de la pandémie mais à nouveau en juin et en juillet au début de la seconde vague de COVID-19.

      Les données et analyses à plus long terme pourraient révéler un impact plus large de la pandémie sur les taux de mortalité. Les patients cancéreux dont la chimiothérapie a été interrompue, les femmes dont la mammographie a été retardée - les décès évitables et précoces pourraient augmenter dans les années à venir...

      Les décès ne sont qu’une mesure possible de la santé

      Comme récemment leurs collègues de l’Université de Floride du Sud (USF), les chercheurs de Virginie soulignent que le nombre d’années de vie en bonne santé perdues, en raison de la pandémie est une mesure probablement plus légitime des conséquences sanitaires de COVID-19. Car de nombreuses personnes qui survivent à la pandémie, faute de traitement à temps, vont vivre avec des complications à vie. C’est notamment le cas de victimes d’AVC non prises en charge, de patients diabétiques ayant développé des complications durant le confinement, ou encore des personnes souffrant de détresse émotionnelle ou de syndrome de stress post-traumatique….
       
      « Ce n’est donc pas une pandémie impliquant un virus unique », indiquent les chercheurs, mais une crise de santé publique avec des effets systémiques et durables, dont l’équipe va poursuivre la surveillance à long terme.

    • Une difficulté avec ce type d’article, c’est que beaucoup de gens (y compris des journalistes et des politiques) les utilisent pour conclure que beaucoup de gens sont morts à cause du confinement, et pas à cause de Covid.

      Or, le confinement est imposé justement pour limiter (généralement trop tard) l’effondrement du système hospitalier. Avec le confinement on a une désorganisation et une saturation du système de santé. Sans le confinement on aurait un effondrement pur et simple. Dans les deux cas, on aurait donc cet effet « secondaire » de gens qui souffrent ou meurent non pas directement du virus, mais du fait que l’hôpital est inaccessible. Avec cette différence que sans le confinement, on pense que ce serait infiniment pire.

      Le titre de l’article, « Un excès de mortalité de 20% oui mais », d’ailleurs, laisse la porte grande ouverte à ce type de récupération avec son « oui mais ». Parce que « oui mais non », en fait, il n’y a pas grand chose de mystérieux qu’on nous cacherait quand on évoque la « surmortalité » liée à Covid (c’est même pour ça qu’on recourt à cette notion statistique de « surmortalité »).