• #Afghanistan : le domicile d’un ancien interprète de l’armée française attaqué

    La résidence d’un ancien interprète de l’armée française a été visée par des tirs à Kaboul en Afghanistan. L’#attaque s’est produite jeudi dans le quartier #Tchehelsoton de #Kaboul. Les hommes ont pris la fuite après avoir ouvert le feu sans réussir à pénétrer dans sa maison. #Said_Abas fait partie des #anciens_interprètes de l’armée française qui n’a toujours pas obtenu de visa pour la France.

    http://www.rfi.fr/asie-pacifique/20190629-attaque-ancien-interprete-armee-francaise?ref=tw
    #interprètes #armée #France

    sur les interprètes afghans, une métaliste :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/740387

  • Afghan Migration to Germany: History and Current Debates

    In light of the deteriorating security situation in Afghanistan, Afghan migration to Germany accelerated in recent years. This has prompted debates and controversial calls for return.

    Historical Overview
    Afghan migration to Germany goes back to the first half of the 20th century. To a large extent, the arrival of Afghan nationals occurred in waves, which coincided with specific political regimes and periods of conflict in Afghanistan between 1978 and 2001. Prior to 1979 fewer than 2,000 Afghans lived in Germany. Most of them were either businesspeople or students. The trade city of Hamburg and its warehouses attracted numerous Afghan carpet dealers who subsequently settled with their families. Some families who were among the traders that came to Germany at an early stage still run businesses in the warehouse district of the city.[1]

    Following the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979, the number of Afghans seeking refuge and asylum in Germany increased sharply. Between 1980 and 1982 the population grew by around 3,000 persons per year. This was followed by a short period of receding numbers, before another period of immigration set in from 1985, when adherents of communist factions began facing persecution in Afghanistan. Following a few years with lower immigration rates, numbers started rising sharply again from 1989 onwards in the wake of the civil war in Afghanistan and due to mounting restrictions for Afghans living in Iran and Pakistan. Increasing difficulties in and expulsions from these two countries forced many Afghans to search for and move on to new destinations, including Germany.[2] Throughout the 1990s immigration continued with the rise of the Taliban and the establishment of a fundamentalist regime. After reaching a peak in 1995, numbers of incoming migrants from Afghanistan declined for several years. However, they began to rise again from about 2010 onwards as a result of continuing conflict and insecurity in Afghanistan on the one hand and persistently problematic living conditions for Afghans in Iran and Pakistan on the other hand.

    A particularly sharp increase occurred in the context of the ’long summer of migration’[3] in 2015, which continued in 2016 when a record number of 253,485 Afghan nationals were registered in Germany. This number includes established residents of Afghan origin as well as persons who newly arrived in recent years. This sharp increase is also mirrored in the number of asylum claims of Afghan nationals, which reached a historical peak of 127,012 in 2016. Following the peak in 2016 the Afghan migrant population has slightly decreased. Reasons for the numerical decrease include forced and voluntary return to Afghanistan, onward migration to third countries, and expulsion according to the so-called Dublin Regulation. Naturalisations also account for the declining number of Afghan nationals in Germany, albeit to a much lesser extent (see Figures 1 and 2).

    The Afghan Migrant Population in Germany
    Over time, the socio-economic and educational backgrounds of Afghan migrants changed significantly. Many of those who formed part of early immigrant cohorts were highly educated and had often occupied high-ranking positions in Afghanistan. A significant number had worked for the government, while others were academics, doctors or teachers.[4] Despite being well-educated, professionally trained and experienced, many Afghans who came to Germany as part of an early immigrant cohort were unable to find work in an occupational field that would match their professional qualifications. Over the years, levels of education and professional backgrounds of Afghans arriving to Germany became more diverse. On average, the educational and professional qualifications of those who came in recent years are much lower compared to earlier cohorts of Afghan migrants.

    At the end of 2017, the Federal Statistical Office registered 251,640 Afghan nationals in Germany. This migrant population is very heterogeneous as far as persons’ legal status is concerned. Table 1 presents a snapshot of the different legal statuses that Afghan nationals in Germany held in 2017.

    Similar to other European countrie [5], Germany has been receiving increasing numbers of unaccompanied Afghan minors throughout the last decade.[6] In December 2017, the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF) registered 10,453 persons of Afghan origin under the age of 18, including asylum seekers, holders of a temporary residence permit as well as persons with refugee status. The situation of unaccompanied minors is specific in the sense that they are under the auspices of the Children and Youth support services (Kinder- und Jugendhilfe). This implies that unaccompanied Afghan minors are entitled to specific accommodation and the support of a temporary guardian. According to the BAMF, education and professional integration are priority issues for the reception of unaccompanied minors. However, the situation of these migrants changes once they reach the age of 18 and become legally deportable.[7] For this reason, their period of residence in Germany is marked by ambiguity.

    Fairly modest at first, the number of naturalisations increased markedly from the late 1980s, which is likely to be connected to the continuous aggravation of the situation in Afghanistan.[8]

    With an average age of 23.7 years, Germany’s Afghan population is relatively young. Among Afghan residents who do not hold German citizenship there is a gender imbalance with males outweighing females by roughly 80,390 persons. Until recently, most Afghans arrived in Germany with their family. However, the individual arrival of Afghan men has been a dominant trend in recent years, which has become more pronounced from 2012 onwards with rising numbers of Afghan asylum seekers (see Figure 2).[9]

    The Politicization of Afghan Migration
    Prior to 2015, the Afghan migrant population that had not received much public attention. However, with the significant increase in numbers from 2015 onwards, it was turned into a subject of increased debate and politicization. The German military and reconstruction engagement in Afghanistan constitutes an important backdrop to the debates unfolding around the presence of Afghan migrants – most of whom are asylum seekers – in Germany. To a large extent, these debates revolved around the legitimacy of Afghan asylum claims. The claims of persons who, for example, supported German troops as interpreters were rarely questioned.[10] Conversely, the majority of newly arriving Afghans were framed as economic migrants rather than persons fleeing violence and persecution. In 2015, chancellor Angela Merkel warned Afghan nationals from coming to Germany for economic reasons and simply in search for a better life.[11] She underlined the distinction between “economic migrants” and persons facing concrete threats due to their past collaboration with German troops in Afghanistan. The increasing public awareness of the arrival of Afghan asylum seekers and growing skepticism regarding the legitimacy of their presence mark the context in which debates on deportations of Afghan nationals began to unfold.

    Deportations of Afghan Nationals: Controversial Debates and Implementation
    The Federal Government (Bundesregierung) started to consider deportations to Afghanistan in late 2015. Debates about the deportation of Afghan nationals were also held at the EU level and form an integral part of the Joint Way Forward agreement between Afghanistan and the EU. The agreement was signed in the second half of 2016 and reflects the commitment of the EU and the Afghan Government to step up cooperation on addressing and preventing irregular migration [12] and encourage return of irregular migrants such as persons whose asylum claims are rejected. In addition, the governments of Germany and Afghanistan signed a bilateral agreement on the return of Afghan nationals to their country of origin. At that stage it was estimated that around five percent of all Afghan nationals residing in Germany were facing return.[13] To back plans of forced removal, the Interior Ministry stated that there are “internal protection alternatives”, meaning areas in Afghanistan that are deemed sufficiently safe for people to be deported to and that a deterioration of security could not be confirmed for the country as such.[14] In addition, the BAMF would individually examine and conduct specific risk assessments for each asylum application and potential deportees respectively.

    Country experts and international actors such as the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) agree on the absence of internal protection alternatives in Afghanistan, stating that there are no safe areas in the country.[15] Their assessments are based on the continuously deteriorating security situation. Since 2014, annual numbers of civilian deaths and casualties continuously exceed 10,000 with a peak of 11,434 in 2016. This rise in violent incidents has been recorded in 33 of 34 provinces. In August 2017 the United Nations changed their assessment of the situation in Afghanistan from a “post-conflict country” to “a country undergoing a conflict that shows few signs of abating”[16] for the first time after the fall of the Taliban. However, violence occurs unevenly across Afghanistan. In 2017 the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA), registered the highest levels of civilian casualties in Kabul province and Kabul city more specifically. After Kabul, the highest numbers of civilian casualties were recorded in Helmand, Nangarhar, Kandahar, Faryab, Uruzgan, Herat, Paktya, Kunduz, and Laghman provinces.[17]

    Notwithstanding deteriorating security conditions in Afghanistan and parliamentary, non-governmental and civil society protests, Germany’s Federal Government implemented a first group deportation of rejected asylum seekers to Afghanistan in late 2016. Grounds for justification of these measures were not only the assumed “internal protection alternatives”. In addition, home secretary Thomas de Maizière emphasised that many of the deportees were convicted criminals.[18] The problematic image of male Muslim immigrants in the aftermath of the incidents on New Year’s Eve in the city of Cologne provides fertile ground for such justifications of deportations to Afghanistan. “The assaults (sexualized physical and property offences) which young, unmarried Muslim men committed on New Year’s Eve offered a welcome basis for re-framing the ‘refugee question’ as an ethnicized and sexist problem.”[19]

    It is important to note that many persons of Afghan origin spent long periods – if not most or all of their lives – outside Afghanistan in one of the neighboring countries. This implies that many deportees are unfamiliar with life in their country of citizenship and lack local social networks. The same applies to persons who fled Afghanistan but who are unable to return to their place of origin for security reasons. The existence of social networks and potential support structures, however, is particularly important in countries marked by high levels of insecurity, poverty, corruption, high unemployment rates and insufficient (public) services and infrastructure.[20] Hence, even if persons who are deported to Afghanistan may be less exposed to a risk of physical harm in some places, the absence of social contacts and support structures still constitutes an existential threat.

    Debates on and executions of deportations to Afghanistan have been accompanied by parliamentary opposition on the one hand and street-level protests on the other hand. Non-governmental organisations such as Pro Asyl and local refugee councils have repeatedly expressed their criticism of forced returns to Afghanistan.[21] The execution of deportations has been the responsibility of the federal states (Ländersache). This leads to significant variations in the numbers of deportees. In light of a degrading security situation in Afghanistan, several governments of federal states (Landesregierungen) moreover paused deportations to Afghanistan in early 2017. Concomitantly, recognition rates of Afghan asylum seekers have continuously declined.[22]

    A severe terrorist attack on the German Embassy in Kabul on 31 May 2017 led the Federal Government to revise its assessment of the security situation in Afghanistan and to temporarily pause deportations to the country. According to chancellor Merkel, the temporary ban of deportations was contingent on the deteriorating security situation and could be lifted once a new, favourable assessment was in place. While pausing deportations of rejected asylum seekers without criminal record, the Federal Government continued to encourage voluntary return and deportations of convicted criminals of Afghan nationality as well as individuals committing identity fraud during their asylum procedure.

    The ban of deportations of rejected asylum seekers without criminal record to Afghanistan was lifted in July 2018, although the security situation in the country continues to be very volatile.[23] The decision was based on a revised assessment of the security situation through the Foreign Office and heavily criticised by the centre left opposition in parliament as well as by NGOs and churches. Notwithstanding such criticism, the attitude of the Federal Government has been rigorous. By 10 January 2019, 20 group deportation flights from Germany to Kabul were executed, carrying a total number of 475 Afghans.[24]

    Assessing the Situation in Afghanistan
    Continuing deportations of Afghan nationals are legitimated by the assumption that certain regions in Afghanistan fulfil the necessary safety requirements for deportees. But how does the Federal Government – and especially the BAMF – come to such arbitrary assessments of the security situation on the one hand and individual prospects on the other hand? While parliamentary debates about deportations to Afghanistan were ongoing, the news magazine Spiegel reported on how the BAMF conducts security assessments for Afghanistan. According to their revelations, BAMF staff hold weekly briefings on the occurrence of military combat, suicide attacks, kidnappings and targeted killings. If the proportion of civilian casualties remains below 1:800, the level of individual risk is considered low and insufficient for someone to be granted protection in Germany.[25] The guidelines of the BAMF moreover rule that young men who are in working age and good health are assumed to find sufficient protection and income opportunities in Afghanistan’s urban centres, so that they are able to secure to meet the subsistence level. Such possibilities are even assumed to exist for persons who cannot mobilise family or other social networks for their support. Someone’s place or region of origin is another aspect considered when assessing whether or not Afghan asylum seekers are entitled to remain in Germany. The BAMF examines the security and supply situation of the region where persons were born or where they last lived before leaving Afghanistan. These checks also include the question which religious and political convictions are dominant at the place in question. According to these assessment criteria, the BAMF considers the following regions as sufficiently secure: Kabul, Balkh, Herat, Bamiyan, Takhar, Samangan and Panjshir.[26]

    Voluntary Return
    In addition to executing the forced removal of rejected Afghan asylum seekers, Germany encourages the voluntary return of Afghan nationals.[27] To this end it supports the Reintegration and Emigration Programme for Asylum Seekers in Germany which covers travel expenses and offers additional financial support to returnees. Furthermore, there is the Government Assisted Repatriation Programme, which provides financial support to persons who wish to re-establish themselves in their country of origin. The International Organisation for Migration (IOM) organises and supervises return journeys that are supported by these programmes. Since 2015, several thousand Afghan nationals left Germany with the aid of these programmes. Most of these voluntary returnees were persons who had no legal residence status in Germany, for example persons whose asylum claim had been rejected or persons holding an exceptional leave to remain (Duldung).

    Outlook
    The continuing conflict in Afghanistan not only causes death, physical and psychological hurt but also leads to the destruction of homes and livelihoods and impedes access to health, education and services for large parts of the Afghan population. This persistently problematic situation affects the local population as much as it affects migrants who – voluntarily or involuntarily – return to Afghanistan. For this reason, migration out of Afghanistan is likely to continue, regardless of the restrictions which Germany and other receiving states are putting into place.

    http://www.bpb.de/gesellschaft/migration/laenderprofile/288934/afghan-migration-to-germany
    #Allemagne #Afghanistan #réfugiés_afghans #histoire #asile #migrations #réfugiés #chiffres #statistiques #renvois #expulsions #retour_volontaire #procédure_d'asile
    ping @_kg_

  • How US “#good_guys” wiped out an Afghan family — The Bureau of Investigative Journalism
    https://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/stories/2019-06-03/us-bomb-kills-afghan-family

    The US denied repeatedly that it had bombed Masih’s house, or even that any airstrike in his area had taken place. But using satellite imagery, photos and open source content, we proved that denial false. Following our investigation, the military has now admitted that it did conduct a strike in that location, but it still denies it resulted in civilian deaths.

    #etats-unis #crimes #civils #victimes_civiles #afghanistan

  • U.S. military stops tracking key metric on Afghan war as situation deteriorates - Reuters
    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-afghanistan-military-idUSKCN1S734C

    Les #États-Unis ont cessé de mesurer le degré de contrôle du territoire du pays par le gouvernement de Kaboul soutenu par l’Occident.
    https://news-24.fr/les-etats-unis-etablissent-des-indicateurs-cles-pour-la-surveillance-des-gou

    La Mission de soutien à l’#OTAN Resolute, dirigée par les États-Unis, a cessé de mesurer le degré de contrôle du territoire du pays par le gouvernement de Kaboul soutenu par l’Occident, a écrit John Sopko, Inspecteur général pour la reconstruction en #Afghanistan (SIGAR) un rapport trimestriel.

    [...]

    Sopko, dont le rôle est de surveiller la manière dont les États-Unis dépensent de l’argent pour leur présence militaire en Afghanistan, a déclaré à Reuters que cette décision du commandement était un autre coup porté à la transparence déjà amoindrie de la politique de Washington dans le pays.

    #leadership

    • Experts said that the move to stop tracking the key data was worrying because Washington had publicly set a benchmark which would now be difficult to measure.

      In November 2017, the top U.S. general in Afghanistan at the time set a goal of driving back Taliban insurgents enough for the government to control at least 80 percent of the country within two years.

      “If the military is not going to be tracking that data anymore, that is going to make it a lot more difficult to get a sense as to how strong the Taliban is,” Michael Kugelman, with the Woodrow Wilson Center, said.

      “That may well be the military’s intention,” he said.

  • U.S. War_Crimes in #Afghanistan Won’t Be Investigated — The Spark #1080
    https://the-spark.net/np1080601.html #CPI #crime_de_guerre #violence_sexuelle

    In 2017, the prosecutor for the #International_Criminal_Court (#ICC), Fatou Bensouda, asked to open an investigation into war crimes and crimes against humanity in Afghanistan. She said these were carried out by all sides, including the U.S. and the U.S.-backed government.

    She said, “There is reasonable basis to believe that, since May 2003, members of the U.S. armed forces and the #CIA have committed #war_crimes of #torture and #cruel_treatment, outrages upon personal dignity, and rape and other forms of #sexual_violence pursuant to a policy approved by U.S. authorities.” And she submitted more than 20,000 pages of evidence to back up her charges.

    But no surprise – the U.S. blocked this investigation. First, they revoked Bensouda’s visa, effectively kicking her out of the country. Then, in April of this year, the judges at the court rejected her request to investigate. They noted that they have been unable to get the U.S. to cooperate, and said the ICC should “use its resources prioritizing activities that would have a better chance to succeed.”

    Yes, the ICC has a better chance of “success” – but only if its investigations fit the interests of U.S. #imperialism!

  • La #Suisse renvoie à nouveau des réfugiés vers des #zones_de_guerre

    La Suisse a repris en mars dernier les renvois de réfugiés politiques vers des zones de guerre, indique dimanche le SonntagsBlick. Le journal se réfère à un document interne du Secrétariat d’Etat aux migrations.

    « Après une suspension de presque deux ans, le premier #rapatriement sous #escorte_policière a eu lieu en mars 2019 », est-il écrit dans le document publié par l’hebdomadaire alémanique.

    En novembre dernier, le Secrétariat d’Etat aux migrations (#SEM) a également expulsé un demandeur d’asile en #Somalie - une première depuis des années. Le SEM indique dans le même document que la Suisse figure parmi les pays européens les plus efficaces en matière d’exécution des expulsions : elle atteint une moyenne de 56% des requérants d’asile déboutés renvoyés dans leur pays d’origine, alors que ce taux est de 36% au sein de l’Union européenne.
    Retour des Erythréens encore « inacceptable »

    L’opération de contrôle des Erythréens admis provisoirement - lancée par la conseillère fédérale Simonetta Sommaruga lorsqu’elle était encore en charge de la Justice - n’a pratiquement rien changé à leur situation, écrit par ailleurs la SonntagsZeitung : sur les 2400 dossiers examinés par le SEM, seuls quatorze ont abouti à un retrait du droit de rester. « Il y a plusieurs facteurs qui rendent un ordre de retour inacceptable », déclare un porte-parole du SEM dans le journal. Parmi eux, l’#intégration avancée des réfugiés en Suisse garantit le droit de rester, explique-t-il.

    Réfugiés « voyageurs » renvoyés

    La NZZ am Sonntag relate pour sa part que le SEM a retiré l’asile politique l’année dernière à 40 réfugiés reconnus, parce qu’ils avaient voyagé dans leur pays d’origine. La plupart d’entre eux venaient du #Vietnam. Il y a également eu quelques cas avec l’Erythrée et l’Irak. Les autorités suisses avaient été mises au courant de ces voyages par les #compagnies_aériennes, qui ont l’obligation de fournir des données sur leurs passagers.

    https://www.rts.ch/info/suisse/10381705-la-suisse-renvoie-a-nouveau-des-refugies-vers-des-zones-de-guerre.html
    #efficacité #renvois #expulsions #asile #migrations #réfugiés #guerres #machine_à_expulsions #statistiques #chiffres #UE #EU #Europe #Erythrée #réfugiés_érythréens #voyage_au_pays #machine_à_expulser

    • La Suisse bat des #records en matière de renvois

      La Suisse transfère nettement plus de personnes vers d’autres Etats-Dublin que ce qu’elle n’en reçoit. Parfois aussi vers des Etats dont la situation de sécurité est précaire, comme l’#Afghanistan et la #Somalie.

      La Suisse a renvoyé près de 57% des demandeurs d’asile. Dans l’Union européenne, cette valeur s’élève à 37%. Aucun autre pays n’a signé autant d’accord de réadmission que la Suisse, soit 66, a rappelé à Keystone-ATS Daniel Bach, porte-parole du SEM, revenant sur une information du SonntagsBlick. De plus, elle met en oeuvre de manière conséquente l’accord de Dublin, comme le montre un document de l’office, daté du 11 avril.

      Cet accord fonctionne très bien pour la Suisse, peut-on y lire. Elle transfère sensiblement plus de personnes vers d’autres Etats-Dublin que ce qu’elle n’en reçoit. Les renvois vers des Etats dont la situation de sécurité est précaire, comme l’Afghanistan et la Somalie, sont rares, précise le document. L’hebdomadaire alémanique en conclut que la Suisse renvoie « à nouveau vers des régions de guerre ». Ce que contredit le SEM.

      La Suisse s’efforce d’exécuter, individuellement, des renvois légaux vers ces pays, précise le document du SEM. Et de lister un vol extraordinaire vers l’Irak en 2017, un renvoi sous escorte policière vers la Somalie en 2018 et vers l’Afghanistan en mars 2019.

      L’Afghanistan n’est pas considéré entièrement comme zone de guerre. Certaines régions, comme la capitale Kaboul, sont considérées comme raisonnables pour un renvoi, d’autres non. Cette évaluation n’a pas changé, selon le porte-parole. La même chose vaut pour la Somalie. Le SEM enquête sur les dangers de persécution au cas par cas.

      La Suisse suit une double stratégie en matière de renvoi. Elle participe à la politique européenne et aux mesures et instruments communs d’une part. D’autre part, elle mise sur la collaboration bilatérale avec les différents pays de provenance, par exemple en concluant des accords de migration.

      https://www.letemps.ch/suisse/suisse-bat-records-matiere-renvois
      #renvois_Dublin #Dublin #accords_de_réadmission

    • Schweiz schafft wieder in Kriegsgebiete aus

      Reisen nach Somalia und Afghanistan sind lebensgefährlich. Doch die Schweiz schafft in diese Länder aus. Sie ist darin Europameister.

      Der Trip nach Afghanistan war ein totaler Flop. Die ­Behörden am Hauptstadt-Flughafen von Kabul hatten sich quergestellt und die Schweizer Polizisten gezwungen, den Asylbewerber, den die Ordnungshüter eigentlich in seine Heimat zurückschaffen wollten, wieder mitzunehmen. Nach dieser gescheiterten Ausschaffung im September 2017 versuchte die Schweiz nie wieder, einen abgewiesenen Asylbewerber gegen seinen Willen nach Afghanistan abzuschieben.

      Erst vor wenigen Wochen änderte sich das: «Nach fast zweijähriger Blockade konnte im März 2019 erstmals wieder eine polizeilich begleitete Rückführung durchgeführt werden», so das Staatssekretariat für Migration (SEM) in einem internen Papier, das SonntagsBlick vorliegt.

      Ausschaffungen sind lebensgefährlich

      Die Entwicklung war ganz nach dem Geschmack der neuen Chefin: «Dank intensiver Verhandlungen» sei die «zwangsweise Rückkehr nach Afghanistan» wieder möglich, lobte Karin Keller-Sutter jüngst bei einer Rede anlässlich ihrer ersten 
100 Tage als Bundesrätin.

      Afghanistan, das sich im Krieg mit Taliban und Islamischem Staat (IS) befindet, gilt als Herkunftsland mit prekärster Sicherheitslage. Ausschaffungen dorthin sind höchst umstritten – anders gesagt: lebensgefährlich.

      Auch der Hinweis des Aussendepartements lässt keinen Zweifel: «Von Reisen nach Afghanistan und von Aufenthalten jeder Art wird abgeraten.» Diese Woche entschied der Basler Grosse Rat aus humanitären Gründen, dass ein junger Afghane nicht nach Österreich abgeschoben werden darf – weil er von dort in seine umkämpfte Heimat weitergereicht worden wäre.
      Erste Rückführung nach Somalia

      Noch einen Erfolg vermeldet das SEM: Auch nach Somalia war im November wieder die polizeiliche Rückführung eines Asylbewerbers gelungen – zum ersten Mal seit Jahren.

      Somalia fällt in die gleiche Kategorie wie Afghanistan, in die Kategorie Lebensgefahr. «Solange sich die Lage vor Ort nicht nachhaltig verbessert, sollte die Schweiz vollständig auf Rückführungen nach Afghanistan und Somalia verzichten», warnt Peter Meier von der Schweizerischen Flüchtlingshilfe.

      Das SEM hält dagegen: Wer rückgeführt werde, sei weder persönlich verfolgt, noch bestünden völkerrechtliche, humanitäre oder technische Hindernisse. Ob es sich bei den Abgeschobenen um sogenannte Gefährder handelt – also um potenzielle Terroristen und ­Intensivstraftäter – oder lediglich um harmlose Flüchtlinge, lässt das SEM offen.
      56 Prozent werden zurückgeschafft

      Was die beiden Einzelfälle andeuten, gilt gemäss aktuellster Asylstatistiken generell: Wir sind Abschiebe-Europameister! «Die Schweiz zählt auf europäischer Ebene zu den effizientesten Ländern beim Wegweisungsvollzug», rühmt sich das SEM im besagten internen Papier. In Zahlen: 56 Prozent der abgewiesenen Asylbewerber werden in ihr Herkunftsland zurückgeschafft. Der EU-Durchschnitt liegt bei 36 Prozent.

      Die Schweiz beteiligt sich nämlich nicht nur an der europäischen Rückkehrpolitik, sondern hat auch direkte Abkommen mit 64 Staaten getroffen; dieses Jahr kamen Äthiopien und Bangladesch hinzu: «Dem SEM ist kein Staat bekannt, der mehr Abkommen abgeschlossen hätte.»

      Zwar ist die Schweiz stolz auf ihre humanitäre Tradition, aber nicht minder stolz, wenn sie in Sachen Ausschaffung kreative Lösungen findet. Zum Beispiel: Weil Marokko keine Sonderflüge mit gefesselten Landsleuten akzeptiert, verfrachtet die Schweiz abgewiesene Marokkaner aufs Schiff – «als fast einziger Staat Europas», wie das SEM betont. Oder diese Lösung: Während die grosse EU mit Nigeria seit Jahren erfolglos an einem Abkommen herumdoktert, hat die kleine Schweiz seit 2011 ihre Schäfchen im Trockenen. Das SEM nennt seinen Deal mit Nigeria «ein Musterbeispiel» für die nationale Migrationspolitik.
      Weniger als 4000 Ausreisepflichtige

      Entsprechend gering sind die Pendenzen im Vollzug. Zwar führen ­Algerien, Äthiopien und Eritrea die Liste der Staaten an, bei denen Abschiebungen weiterhin auf Blockaden stossen. Aber weniger als 4000 Personen fielen Ende 2018 in die Kategorie abgewiesener Asylbewerber, die sich weigern auszureisen oder deren Heimatland sich bei Ausschaffungen querstellt. 2012 waren es beinahe doppelt so viele. Nun sind es so wenige wie seit zehn Jahren nicht mehr.

      Zum Vergleich: Deutschland meldete im gleichen Zeitraum mehr als 200’000 ausreisepflichtige Personen. Diese Woche beschloss die Bundesregierung weitere Gesetze für eine schnellere Abschiebung.

      Hinter dem Bild einer effizienten Schweizer Abschiebungsmaschinerie verbirgt sich ein unmenschliches Geschäft: Es geht um zerstörte Leben, verlorene Hoffnung, um Ängste, Verzweiflung und Not. Rückführungen sind keine Flugreisen, sondern eine schmutzige Angelegenheit – Spucke, Blut und Tränen inklusive. Bei Sonderflügen wird unter Anwendung von Gewalt gefesselt, es kommt zu Verletzungen bei Asylbewerbern wie Polizisten. Selten hört man davon.
      Gezielte Abschreckung

      Die Schweiz verfolge eine Vollzugspraxis, die auf Abschreckung ziele und nicht vor Zwangsausschaffungen in Länder mit prekärer Sicherheits- und Menschenrechtslage haltmache, kritisiert Peter Meier von der Flüchtlingshilfe: «Das Justizdepartement gibt dabei dem ­innenpolitischen Druck nach.»

      Gemeint ist die SVP, die seit Jahren vom Asylchaos spricht. Das Dublin-System, das regeln soll, welcher Staat für die Prüfung eines Asylgesuchs zuständig ist, funktioniere nicht, so einer der Vorwürfe. «Selbst jene, die bereits in einem anderen Land registriert wurden, können oft nicht zurückgeschickt werden», heisst es im Positionspapier der SVP zur Asylpolitik.

      Das SEM sieht auch das anders: «Für kaum ein europäisches Land funktioniert Dublin so gut wie für die Schweiz», heisst es in dem internen Papier. Man überstelle deutlich mehr Personen an Dublin-Staaten, als man selbst von dort aufnehme. Die neusten Zahlen bestätigen das: 1760 Asylbewerber wurden im letzten Jahr in andere Dublin-Staaten überstellt. Nur 885 Menschen nahm die Schweiz von ihnen auf.

      «Ausnahmen gibt es selbst bei 
besonders verletzlichen Personen kaum», kritisiert die Flüchtlings­hilfe; die Dublin-Praxis sei äusserst restriktiv.

      Das Schweizer Abschiebewesen hat offenbar viele Seiten, vor allem aber ist es gnadenlos effizient.

      https://www.blick.ch/news/politik/erste-abschiebungen-seit-jahren-nach-afghanistan-und-somalia-schweiz-schafft-w

  • CASE LAW ON RETURN OF ASYLUM SEEKERS TO AFGHANISTAN, 2017-2018

    This document compiles information from selected European countries, specifically, Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, The Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland and United Kingdom. It covers cases from 2017 and 2018 that relate to the return of Afghan nationals, assessed in light of their personal circumstances and the security situation in the country. Whilst every effort has been put into finding relevant case law, the cases cited are, by no means, exhaustive. Where court decisions were not available in English ECRE has supplied a translation.

    #Afghanistan #retour_au_pays #expulsions #renvois #asile #migrations #réfugiés #réfugiés_afghans #Autriche #Belgique #Finlande #France #Allemagne #Pays-Bas #Norvège #Suède #Suisse #UK #Angleterre

    ping @karine4

  • Record sans précédent du nombre de #civils tués en #Afghanistan en 2018
    https://www.france24.com/fr/20190224-afghanistan-onu-record-victimes-civiles-2018-taliban

    « C’est la première fois que les opérations aériennes se traduisent par la mort de plus de 500 civils », note le rapport, attribuant 393 décès à la coalition internationale de l’#Otan et 118 à l’armée de l’air afghane.

    Pour la seule année 2018, « à peu près le même nombre de civils sont morts des suites de bombardements que les années 2014, 2015 et 2016 combinées », note l’#ONU.

    L’aviation américaine, qui soutient l’armée de l’air afghane, a considérablement intensifié ses frappes aériennes en 2018. Selon le Centre de commandement de l’US Air force, 7 362 missiles et drones ont visé les positions ennemies, soit près du double de l’année précédente, déjà record.

    UN : American airstrikes contribute to record number of children, civilians killed in Afghanistan - News - Stripes
    https://www.stripes.com/news/un-american-airstrikes-contribute-to-record-number-of-children-civilians-ki

    [...] pro-government forces — which include the U.S. military — were shown to have killed more Afghan children last year than their adversaries, which UNAMA said was largely due to U.S. airstrikes.

    #victimes_civiles #enfants #crimes #états-unis

  • US ‘To End Contacts’ With Afghan NSA Over His Recent Remarks | TOLOnews
    https://www.tolonews.com/afghanistan/us-%E2%80%98-end-contacts%E2%80%99-afghan-nsa-over-his-recent-remarks

    Mohib in a Washington news conference on March 14 accused the US Special Envoy Zalmay Khalilzad of “delegitimizing” the Kabul government by excluding it from peace negotiations with the #Taliban and acting like a “viceroy”. He also said that the US has created an information vacuum regarding the peace talks with the Taliban. 

    According to the Reuters report, the day after Mohib made his comments, David Hale — the US undersecretary of state for political affairs — told Ghani by phone that Mohib would no longer be received in Washington and that US civilian and military officials would not do business with him.

    #afghanistan #etats-unis

  • Under Peace Plan, U.S. Military Would Exit #Afghanistan Within Five Years - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/28/us/politics/afghanistan-military-withdrawal.html

    #Taliban negotiators deeply oppose the proposal for American counterterrorism troops to remain in Afghanistan for up to five years, and officials were unsure if a shorter period of time would be accepted by the militants’ rank and file.

    #etats-unis #paix

  • As Afghanistan’s capital grows, its residents scramble for clean water

    Twice a week, Farid Rahimi gets up at dawn, wraps a blanket around his shoulders to keep warm, gathers his empty jerrycans, and waits beside the tap outside his house in a hillside neighbourhood above Kabul.

    Afghanistan’s capital is running dry – its groundwater levels depleted by an expanding population and the long-term impacts of climate change. But its teeming informal settlements continue to grow as decades-long conflict and – more recently – drought drive people like Rahimi into the cities, straining already scarce water supplies.

    With large numbers migrating to Kabul, the city’s resources are overstretched and aid agencies and the government are facing a new problem: how to adjust to a shifting population still dependent on some form of humanitarian assistance.


    https://www.irinnews.org/feature/2019/02/19/afghanistan-capital-residents-scramble-clean-water-climate-change
    #eau #eau_potable #Afghanistan #Kaboul #sécheresse #climat #changement_climatique #IDPs #déplacés_internes #migrations #réfugiés #urban_matter #urban_refugees #réfugiés_urbains

  • #métaliste de #campagnes de #dissuasion à l’#émigration

    Une analyse de ces campagnes par #Antoine_Pécoud
    https://seenthis.net/messages/763546

    Un entretien avec des représentants de l’ODM (Suisse, maintenant SEM) et de l’OIM sur le lien entre cinéma et campagnes de dissuasion à la migration :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/763642

    –---------------------
    En #Guinée, l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations contrôle des frontières et les âmes :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/757474
    #OIM #IOM #organisation_internationale_contre_les_migrations

    Toujours l’OIM, mais en #Tunisie :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/732291

    Et au #Cameroun, OIM, as usual :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/763640

    Au #Sénégal, avec le soutien de l’#Espagne (2007) :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/763670

    Campagne #aware_migrants, financée par l’#Italie :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/520420

    Une campagne de l’#Australie
    https://seenthis.net/messages/474986
    #Etats-Unis #film
    Il y a aussi la campagne #No_way :
    https://seenthis.net/tag/no_way

    Financée par l’#Allemagne, une campagne en #Afghanistan :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/464281#message588432
    https://seenthis.net/messages/464281#message592615
    https://seenthis.net/messages/432534

    Les campagnes de la #Suisse :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/385940
    notamment dans les #Balkans mais aussi en #Afrique_de_l'Ouest (#Cameroun, #Nigeria)

    Campagne des #Etats-Unis :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/269673#message274426
    https://seenthis.net/messages/269673#message274440
    #USA

    Une campagne du #Danemark :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/385940#message397757

    #campagne #migrations #vidéos

    ping @isskein @_kg_ @reka

  • Pour le #TAF, s’opposer aux talibans n’est pas une #opinion_politique : asile refusé

    Parce qu’il refuse de commettre des violences pour le compte des talibans, « Qassim » est détenu et torturé. Il s’échappe et demande l’asile en Suisse. Son état de santé psychique atteste de son vécu traumatique mais le SEM rejette sa demande. Pour le TAF, le récit de « Qassim » est crédible et le risque de #persécution est vraisemblable, mais ne constitue pas un #motif_d’asile. « Qassim » se voit donc refuser l’asile et obtient une #admission_provisoire.

    https://odae-romand.ch/fiche/pour-le-taf-sopposer-aux-talibans-nest-pas-une-opinion-politique-asile-r
    #réfugiés_afghans #Afghanistan #Suisse #asile #migrations #réfugiés #talibans #torture #vraisemblance #statut_de_réfugié #droit_d'asile

  • Réfugiés afghans en France, #taux_de_protection

    En étudiant les statistiques d’Eurostat je constate quelque chose d’étonnant : le pourcentage d’accord de protection baisse étrangement sur les 2e et 3e trimestre 2018, en France.
    Le taux de reconnaissance en France est stable depuis plusieurs années, entre 80 et 85%, mais au 2e trimestre 2018 il baisse à 79%, et descend jusqu’à 59% au 3e trimestre. Pas de statistiques encore dispo pour le 4e trimestre.
    Je joins le graphique réalisé à partir des données Eurostat, avez-vous une idée pour expliquer ça ?

    J’ai vérifié, à l’échelle européenne je ne constate pas de baisse similaire, au 3e trimestre 2018 il y a même plutôt une augmentation (54%, alors qu’on est plutôt dans les 46% de taux moyens sur les 10 précédents trimestres.

    En Allemagne, le taux d’obtention est lui aussi assez stable (dans les 45%), malgré une baisse énorme des demandes pour les afghans (46 745 demandes au premier trimestre 2017, et 2890 demandes au 4e trimestre 2018).


    #taux_de_reconnaissance #asile #migrations #réfugiés #statistiques #2017 #2018 #2016 #réfugiés_afghans #Afghanistan

    –-> Email de David Torondel, reçu via la mailing-list Migreurp

  • Report to the EU Parliament on #Frontex cooperation with third countries in 2017

    A recent report by Frontex, the EU’s border agency, highlights the ongoing expansion of its activities with non-EU states.

    The report covers the agency’s cooperation with non-EU states ("third countries") in 2017, although it was only published this month.

    See: Report to the European Parliament on Frontex cooperation with third countries in 2017: http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/feb/frontex-report-ep-third-countries-coop-2017.pdf (pdf)

    It notes the adoption by Frontex of an #International_Cooperation_Strategy 2018-2020, “an integral part of our multi-annual programme” which:

    “guides the Agency’s interactions with third countries and international organisations… The Strategy identified the following priority regions with which Frontex strives for closer cooperation: the Western Balkans, Turkey, North and West Africa, Sub-Saharan countries and the Horn of Africa.”

    The Strategy can be found in Annex XIII to the 2018-20 Programming Document: http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/feb/frontex-programming-document-2018-20.pdf (pdf).

    The 2017 report on cooperation with third countries further notes that Frontex is in dialogue with Senegal, #Niger and Guinea with the aim of signing Working Agreements at some point in the future.

    The agency deployed three Frontex #Liaison_Officers in 2017 - to Niger, Serbia and Turkey - while there was also a #European_Return_Liaison_Officer deployed to #Ghana in 2018.

    The report boasts of assisting the Commission in implementing informal agreements on return (as opposed to democratically-approved readmission agreements):

    "For instance, we contributed to the development of the Standard Operating Procedures with #Bangladesh and the “Good Practices for the Implementation of Return-Related Activities with the Republic of Guinea”, all forming important elements of the EU return policy that was being developed and consolidated throughout 2017."

    At the same time:

    “The implementation of 341 Frontex coordinated and co-financed return operations by charter flights and returning 14 189 third-country nationals meant an increase in the number of return operations by 47% and increase of third-country nationals returned by 33% compared to 2016.”

    Those return operations included Frontex’s:

    “first joint return operation to #Afghanistan. The operation was organised by Hungary, with Belgium and Slovenia as participating Member States, and returned a total of 22 third country nationals to Afghanistan. In order to make this operation a success, the participating Member States and Frontex needed a coordinated support of the European Commission as well as the EU Delegation and the European Return Liaison Officers Network in Afghanistan.”

    http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/feb/frontex-report-third-countries.htm
    #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers
    #Balkans #Turquie #Afrique_de_l'Ouest #Afrique_du_Nord #Afrique_sub-saharienne #Corne_de_l'Afrique #Guinée #Sénégal #Serbie #officiers_de_liaison #renvois #expulsions #accords_de_réadmission #machine_à_expulsion #Hongrie #Belgique #Slovénie #réfugiés_afghans

    • EP civil liberties committee against proposal to give Frontex powers to assist non-EU states with deportations

      The European Parliament’s civil liberties committee (LIBE) has agreed its position for negotiations with the Council on the new Frontex Regulation, and amongst other things it hopes to deny the border agency the possibility of assisting non-EU states with deportations.

      The position agreed by the LIBE committee removes Article 54(2) of the Commission’s proposal, which says:

      “The Agency may also launch return interventions in third countries, based on the directions set out in the multiannual strategic policy cycle, where such third country requires additional technical and operational assistance with regard to its return activities. Such intervention may consist of the deployment of return teams for the purpose of providing technical and operational assistance to return activities of the third country.”

      The report was adopted by the committee with 35 votes in favour, nine against and eight abstentions.

      When the Council reaches its position on the proposal, the two institutions will enter into secret ’trilogue’ negotiations, along with the Commission.

      Although the proposal to reinforce Frontex was only published last September, the intention is to agree a text before the European Parliament elections in May.

      The explanatory statement in the LIBE committee’s report (see below) says:

      “The Rapporteur proposes a number of amendments that should enable the Agency to better achieve its enhanced objectives. It is crucial that the Agency has the necessary border guards and equipment at its disposal whenever this is needed and especially that it is able to deploy them within a short timeframe when necessary.”

      European Parliament: Stronger European Border and Coast Guard to secure EU’s borders: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/news/en/press-room/20190211IPR25771/stronger-european-border-and-coast-guard-to-secure-eu-s-borders (Press release, link):

      “- A new standing corps of 10 000 operational staff to be gradually rolled out
      - More efficient return procedures of irregular migrants
      - Strengthened cooperation with non-EU countries

      New measures to strengthen the European Border and Coast Guard to better address migratory and security challenges were backed by the Civil Liberties Committee.”

      See: REPORT on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European Border and Coast Guard and repealing Council Joint Action n°98/700/JHA, Regulation (EU) n° 1052/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council and Regulation (EU) n° 2016/1624 of the European Parliament and of the Council: http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/feb/ep-libe-report-frontex.pdf (pdf)

      The Commission’s proposal and its annexes can be found here: http://www.statewatch.org/news/2018/sep/eu-soteu-jha-proposals.htm

      http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/feb/ep-new-frontex-libe.htm

  • Cartographie | La migration des mineurs non accompagnés
    https://asile.ch/2019/01/03/cartographie-la-migration-des-mineurs-non-accompagnes-2

    Combien sont-ils ces enfants partis seul·es sur les routes de l’exil ? D’où viennent-ils ? Comment les accueille-t-on et les protège-t-on ? Eurostat développe et publie des statistiques sur les mineurs non accompagnés [1]. Des données qui permettent de spatialiser notre regard sur cet aspect de la migration internationale. Ce dossier cartographique a été réalisé par Philippe […]

  • Quoi qu’il en soit, Trump ne quittera pas la Syrie et l’Afghanistan Stephen Gowans - 2 Janvier 2019 - Investigaction
    https://www.investigaction.net/fr/117672

    Il ne fait que transférer le fardeau sur les alliés et compter davantage sur les mercenaires

    Le retrait annoncé des troupes américaines de #Syrie et la diminution des troupes d’occupation en #Afghanistan ne correspondent très probablement pas à l’abandon par les #États-Unis de leurs objectifs au #Moyen-Orient, mais bien plutôt à l’adoption de nouveaux moyens pour atteindre les buts que la politique étrangère américaine vise depuis longtemps. Plutôt que de renoncer à l’objectif américain de dominer les mondes arabe et musulman par un système colonialiste et une occupation militaire directe, le président #Donald_Trump ne fait que mettre en œuvre une nouvelle politique – une politique basée sur un transfert plus important du fardeau du maintien de l’#Empire sur ses alliés et sur des soldats privés financés par les monarchies pétrolières.

    Le modus operandi de Trump en matière de relations étrangères a été constamment guidé par l’argument que les alliés des États-Unis ne parviennent pas à peser leur poids et devraient contribuer davantage à l’architecture de la sécurité américaine. Recruter des alliés arabes pour remplacer les troupes américaines en Syrie et déployer des #mercenaires (appelés par euphémisme des fournisseurs de sécurité) sont deux options que la Maison-Blanche examine activement depuis l’année dernière. De plus, il existe déjà une importante présence alliée et mercenaire en Afghanistan et le retrait prévu de 7000 soldats américains de ce pays ne réduira que marginalement l’empreinte militaire occidentale.

    Le conflit entre le secrétaire américain à la Défense #Jim_Mattis et Trump quant à leurs visions du monde est perçu à tort comme l’expression d’opinions contradictoires sur les objectifs américains plutôt que sur la manière de les atteindre. Mattis privilégie la poursuite des buts impériaux des États-Unis par la participation significative de l’armée américaine tandis que Trump favorise la pression sur les alliés pour qu’ils assument une plus grande partie du fardeau que constitue l’entretien de l’empire américain, tout en embauchant des fournisseurs de sécurité pour combler les lacunes. Le but de Trump est de réduire la ponction de l’Empire sur les finances américaines et d’assurer sa base électorale, à qui il a promis, dans le cadre de son plan « #America_First », de ramener les soldats américains au pays.

    Fait significatif, le plan de Trump est de réduire les dépenses des activités militaires américaines à l’étranger, non pas comme fin en soi mais comme moyen de libérer des revenus pour l’investissement intérieur dans les infrastructures publiques. De son point de vue, les dépenses pour la république devraient avoir la priorité sur les dépenses pour l’#Empire. « Nous avons [dépensé] 7 mille milliards de dollars au Moyen-Orient », s’est plaint le président américain auprès des membres de son administration. « Nous ne pouvons même pas réunir mille milliards de dollars pour l’infrastructure domestique. »[1] Plus tôt, à la veille de l’élection de 2016, Trump se plaignait que Washington avait « gaspillé 6 trillions de dollars en guerres au Moyen-Orient – nous aurions pu reconstruire deux fois notre pays – qui n’ont produit que plus de terrorisme, plus de mort et plus de souffrance – imaginez si cet argent avait été dépensé dans le pays. […] Nous avons dépensé 6 trillions de dollars, perdu des milliers de vies. On pourrait dire des centaines de milliers de vies, parce qu’il faut aussi regarder l’autre côté. » [2]

    En avril de cette année, Trump « a exprimé son impatience croissante face au coût et à la durée de l’effort pour stabiliser la Syrie » et a parlé de l’urgence d’accélérer le retrait des troupes américaines. [3] Les membres de son administration se sont empressés « d’élaborer une stratégie de sortie qui transférerait le fardeau américain sur des partenaires régionaux ». [4]

    La conseiller à la Sécurité nationale, #John_Bolton, « a appelé Abbas Kamel, le chef par intérim des services de renseignement égyptiens pour voir si le Caire contribuerait à cet effort ». [5] Puis l’#Arabie_ saoudite, le #Qatar et les Émirats arabes unis ont été « approchés par rapport à leur soutien financier et, plus largement, pour qu’ils contribuent ». Bolton a également demandé « aux pays arabes d’envoyer des troupes ». [6] Les satellites arabes ont été mis sous pression pour « travailler avec les combattants locaux #kurdes et arabes que les Américains soutenaient » [7] – autrement dit de prendre le relais des États-Unis.

    Peu après, #Erik_Prince, le fondateur de #Blackwater USA, l’entreprise de mercenaires, a « été contactée de manière informelle par des responsables arabes sur la perspective de construire une force en Syrie ». [8] À l’été 2017, Prince – le frère de la secrétaire américaine à l’Éducation #Betsy_De_Vos – a approché la Maison Blanche sur la possibilité de retirer les forces étasuniennes d’Afghanistan et d’envoyer des mercenaires combattre à leur place. [9] Le plan serait que les monarchies pétrolières du golfe Persique paient Prince pour déployer une force mercenaire qui prendrait la relève des troupes américaines.

    En avril, Trump a annoncé : « Nous avons demandé à nos partenaires d’assumer une plus grande responsabilité dans la sécurisation de leur région d’origine. » [10] La rédaction en chef du Wall Street Journal a applaudi cette décision. Le plan de Trump, a-t-il dit, était « la meilleure stratégie » – elle mobiliserait « les opposants régionaux de l’Iran », c’est-à-dire les potentats arabes qui gouvernent à la satisfaction de Washington en vue du projet de transformer « la Syrie en un Vietnam pour l’Ayatollah ». [11]

    En ce moment, il y a 14 000 soldats américains reconnus en Afghanistan, dont la moitié, soit 7 000, seront bientôt retirés. Mais il y a aussi environ 47 000 soldats occidentaux dans le pays, y compris des troupes de l’#OTAN et des mercenaires (14 000 soldats américains, 7 000 de l’OTAN [12] et 26 000 soldats privés [13]). Diviser la contribution étasunienne de moitié laissera encore 40 000 hommes de troupes occidentales comme force d’occupation en Afghanistan. Et la réduction des forces américaines peut être réalisée facilement en engageant 7000 remplaçants mercenaires, payés par les monarques du golfe Persique. « Le retrait », a rapporté The Wall Street Journal, « pourrait ouvrir la voie à un plus grand nombre d’entrepreneurs privés pour assumer des rôles de soutien et de formation », comme le souligne « la campagne de longue date d’Erik Prince ». Le Journal a noté que le frère de la secrétaire à l’Éducation « a mené une campagne agressive pour convaincre M. Trump de privatiser la guerre ». [14]

    La démission de Mattis a été interprétée comme une protestation contre Trump, qui « cède un territoire essentiel à la Russie et à l’Iran » [15] plutôt que comme un reproche à Trump de se reposer sur des alliés pour porter le fardeau de la poursuite des objectifs étasuniens en Syrie. La lettre de démission du secrétaire à la Défense était muette sur la décision de Trump de rapatrier les troupes américaines de Syrie et d’Afghanistan et insistait plutôt sur « les alliances et les partenariats ». Elle soulignait les préoccupations de Mattis sur le fait que le changement de direction de Trump n’accordait pas suffisamment d’attention au « maintien d’alliances solides et de signes de respect » à l’égard des alliés. Alors que cela a été interprété comme un reproche d’avoir abandonné le fer de lance américain en Syrie, les Kurdes, Mattis faisait référence aux « alliances et aux partenariats » au pluriel, ce qui indique que ses griefs vont plus loin que les relations des États-Unis avec les Kurdes. Au contraire, Mattis a exprimé des préoccupations cohérentes avec une plainte durable dans le milieu de la politique étrangère américaine selon laquelle les efforts incessants de Trump pour faire pression sur ses alliés afin qu’ils supportent davantage le coût du maintien de l’Empire aliènent les alliés des Américains et affaiblissent le « système d’alliances et de partenariats » qui le composent. [16]

    L’idée, aussi, que la démission de Mattis est un reproche à Trump pour l’abandon des Kurdes, est sans fondement. Les Kurdes ne sont pas abandonnés. Des commandos britanniques et français sont également présents dans le pays et « on s’attend à ce qu’ils restent en Syrie après le départ des troupes américaines ». [17] Mattis semble avoir été préoccupé par le fait qu’en extrayant les forces américaines de Syrie, Trump fasse peser plus lourdement le poids de la sécurisation des objectifs étasuniens sur les Britanniques et les Français, dont on ne peut guère attendre qu’ils tolèrent longtemps un arrangement où ils agissent comme force expéditionnaire pour Washington tandis que les troupes américaines restent chez elles. À un moment donné, ils se rendront compte qu’ils seraient peut-être mieux en dehors de l’alliance américaine. Pour Mattis, soucieux depuis longtemps de préserver un « système global d’alliances et de partenariats » comme moyen de « faire progresser un ordre international le plus propice à la sécurité, à la prospérité et aux valeurs [des États-Unis], le transfert du fardeau par Trump ne parvient guère à « traiter les alliés avec respect » ou à « faire preuve d’un leadership efficace », comme Mattis a écrit que Washington devrait le faire dans sa lettre de démission.

    Le président russe #Vladimir_Poutine a accueilli l’annonce de Trump avec scepticisme. « Nous ne voyons pas encore de signes du retrait des troupes américaines », a-t-il déclaré. « Depuis combien de temps les États-Unis sont-ils en Afghanistan ? Dix-sept ans ? Et presque chaque année, ils disent qu’ils retirent leurs troupes. » [18] Le #Pentagone parle déjà de déplacer les troupes américaines « vers l’#Irak voisin, où environ 5000 soldats étasuniens sont déjà déployés », et qui ‘déferleront’ en Syrie pour des raids spécifiques ». [19] Cette force pourrait aussi « retourner en Syrie pour des missions spéciales si des menaces graves surgissent » [20] ce qui pourrait inclure les tentatives de l’armée syrienne de récupérer son territoire occupé par les forces #kurdes. De plus, le Pentagone conserve la capacité de continuer de mener des « frappes aériennes et de réapprovisionner les combattants kurdes alliés avec des armes et du matériel » depuis l’Irak. [21]

    Trump n’a jamais eu l’intention d’apporter à la présidence une redéfinition radicale des objectifs de la politique étrangère américaine, mais seulement une manière différente de les atteindre, une manière qui profiterait de ses prouesses autoproclamées de négociation. Les tactiques de négociation de Trump n’impliquent rien de plus que de faire pression sur d’autres pour qu’ils paient la note, et c’est ce qu’il a fait ici. Les Français, les Britanniques et d’autres alliés des Américains remplaceront les bottes étasuniennes sur le terrain, avec des mercenaires qui seront financés par les monarchies pétrolières arabes. C’est vrai, la politique étrangère des États-Unis, instrument pour la protection et la promotion des profits américains, a toujours reposé sur quelqu’un d’autre pour payer la note, notamment les Américains ordinaires qui paient au travers de leurs impôts et, dans certains cas, par leurs vies et leurs corps en tant que soldats. En tant que salariés, ils ne tirent aucun avantage d’une politique façonnée par « des #élites_économiques et des groupes organisés représentant les intérêts des entreprises », comme les politologues Martin Gilens et Benjamin I. Page l’ont montré dans leur enquête de 2014 portant sur plus de 1700 questions politiques américaines. Les grandes entreprises, concluaient les chercheurs, « ont une influence considérable sur la politique gouvernementale, tandis que les citoyens moyens et les groupes fondés sur les intérêts des masses n’ont que peu d’influence ou pas d’influence du tout ». [22] Autrement dit, les grandes entreprises conçoivent la politique étrangère à leur avantage et en font payer le coût aux Américains ordinaires. 

    C’est ainsi que les choses devraient être, selon Mattis et d’autres membres de l’élite de la politique étrangère américaine. Le problème avec Trump, de leur point de vue, est qu’il essaie de transférer une partie du fardeau qui pèse actuellement lourdement sur les épaules des Américains ordinaires sur les épaules des gens ordinaires dans les pays qui constituent les éléments subordonnés de l’Empire américain. Et alors qu’on s’attend à ce que les alliés portent une partie du fardeau, la part accrue que Trump veut leur infliger nuit est peu favorable au maintien des alliances dont dépend l’Empire américain. 

    Notes :
    1. Bob Woodward, Fear : Trump in the White House, (Simon & Shuster, 2018) 307.

    2. Jon Schwarz, “This Thanksgiving, I’m Grateful for Donald Trump, America’s Most Honest President,” The Intercept, November 21, 2018.

    3. Michael R. Gordon, “US seeks Arab force and funding for Syria,” The Wall Street Journal, April 16, 2018.

    4. Gordon, April 16, 2018.

    5. Gordon, April 16, 2018.

    6. Gordon, April 16, 2018.

    7. Gordon, April 16, 2018.

    8. Gordon, April 16, 2018.

    9. Michael R. Gordon, Eric Schmitt and Maggie Haberman, “Trump settles on Afghan strategy expected to raise troop levels,” The New York Times, August 20, 2017.

    10. Gordon, April 16, 2018.

    11. The Editorial Board, “Trump’s next Syria challenge,” The Wall Street Journal, April 15, 2018.

    12. Julian E. Barnes, “NATO announces deployment of more troops to Afghanistan,” The Wall Street Journal, June 29, 2017.

    13. Erik Prince, “Contractors, not troops, will save Afghanistan,” The New York Times, August 30, 2017.

    14. Craig Nelson, “Trump withdrawal plan alters calculus on ground in Afghanistan,” The Wall Street Journal, December 21, 2018.

    15. Helene Cooper, “Jim Mattis, defense secretary, resigns in rebuke of Trump’s worldview,” The New York Times, December 20, 2018.

    16. “Read Jim Mattis’s letter to Trump : Full text,” The New York Times, December 20, 2018.

    17. Thomas Gibbons-Neff and Eric Schmitt, “Pentagon considers using special operations forces to continue mission in Syria,” The New York Times, December 21, 2018.

    18. Neil MacFarquhar and Andrew E. Kramer, “Putin welcomes withdrawal from Syria as ‘correct’,” The New York Times, December 20, 2018.

    19. Thomas Gibbons-Neff and Eric Schmitt, “Pentagon considers using special operations forces to continue mission in Syria,” The New York Times, December 21, 2018.

    20. Gibbons-Neff and Schmitt, December 21, 2018.

    21. Gibbons-Neff and Schmitt, December 21, 2018.

    22. Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page, “Testing Theories of American Politics : Elites, Interest Groups, and Average Citizens,” Perspectives on Politics, Fall 2014.
    Traduit par Diane Gilliard
    Source : https://gowans.wordpress.com/2018/12/22/no-matter-how-it-appears-trump-isnt-getting-out-of-syria-and-afgha

  • C.I.A.’s Afghan Forces Leave a Trail of Abuse and Anger - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/31/world/asia/cia-afghanistan-strike-force.html

    NADER SHAH KOT, #Afghanistan — Razo Khan woke up suddenly to the sight of assault rifles pointed at his face, and demands that he get out of bed and onto the floor.

    Within minutes, the armed raiders had separated the men from the women and children. Then the shooting started.

    As Mr. Khan was driven away for questioning, he watched his home go up in flames. Within were the bodies of two of his brothers and of his sister-in-law Khanzari, who was shot three times in the head. Villagers who rushed to the home found the burned body of her 3-year-old daughter, Marina, in a corner of a torched bedroom.

    The men who raided the family’s home that March night, in the district of Nader Shah Kot, were members of an Afghan strike force trained and overseen by the Central Intelligence Agency in a parallel mission to the United States military’s, but with looser rules of engagement.

    #milices #CIA

    • Notorious CIA-Backed Units Will Remain in Afghanistan
      https://truthout.org/articles/as-trump-orders-us-out-of-afghanistan-notorious-cia-backed-units-will-rema

      Last fall, the chief prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC), Fatou Bensouda, asked the court’s Pre-Trial Chamber to open a formal investigation into the possible commission of war crimes and crimes against humanity committed by parties to the war in Afghanistan, including US persons.

      Bensouda’s preliminary examination found “a reasonable basis to believe” that “war crimes of torture and ill-treatment” had been committed “by US military forces deployed to Afghanistan and in secret detention facilities operated by the Central Intelligence Agency, principally in the 2003-2004 period, although allegedly continuing in some cases until 2014.”

      Bensouda noted these alleged crimes “were not the abuses of a few isolated individuals,” but rather “part of approved interrogation techniques in an attempt to extract ‘actionable intelligence’ from detainees.” She concluded there was “reason to believe” that crimes were “committed in the furtherance of a policy or policies … which would support US objectives in the conflict in Afghanistan.”

      #impunité #crimes #Etats-Unis

  • « Je suis devenu fou, je veux retourner au bled » : les migrants qui optent pour un #retour_volontaire

    L’aide au retour volontaire a concerné en 2018 plus de 10 000 personnes, dont beaucoup d’Afghans.

    Il a les yeux rouge vif. A plusieurs reprises, il demande s’il pourra aller aux toilettes après l’enregistrement. Dans un hall de l’aéroport Roissy-Charles-de-Gaulle, Noorislam Oriakhail vit ses derniers moments en France, fébrile. Il prend l’avion pour la première fois de sa vie. Au bout du voyage : l’Afghanistan. Comme 1 055 Afghans en 2018, des hommes majoritairement, Noorislam a choisi de rentrer. Ils étaient déjà 970 à avoir opté pour un « retour volontaire » depuis la France en 2017. Volet peu connu de la politique d’éloignement des étrangers en situation irrégulière, l’aide au retour volontaire a concerné cette année plus de 10 000 personnes au total, un chiffre en hausse de 58 % sur un an.

    Après les Albanais et devant les Moldaves, les Afghans sont les plus concernés par ce dispositif mis en œuvre par l’Office français de l’immigration et de l’intégration (OFII). Une situation qui s’explique : ils sont les premiers demandeurs d’asile en 2018. En outre, précise Didier Leschi, le directeur général de l’OFII, « lorsqu’ils arrivent en France, ils ont déjà déposé en moyenne près de deux demandes d’asile en Europe, principalement en Allemagne et en Suède, où elle a été rejetée ». Ils entrent donc dans la catégorie dite des « Dublinés », ne peuvent pas demander l’asile en France avant un délai de six à dix-huit mois. Dans l’intervalle, ils sont en situation irrégulière.

    L’OFII assume une politique volontariste à leur endroit : « Nous les démarchons pour leur proposer l’aide au retour, d’autant que les retours forcés sont très difficiles », reconnaît Didier Leschi. Au premier semestre, avec 23 éloignements, le taux d’exécution des obligations de quitter le territoire français prononcées à l’encontre des Afghans atteignait 4 %. En plus d’être moins onéreux qu’un éloignement forcé, les retours volontaires ont beaucoup plus de succès.

    « Trop de pression »

    Noorislam est « fatigué » de ne pas parvenir à s’extirper d’une situation précaire. D’un voyage entamé en 2006 et financé par son père et un oncle, il est arrivé « jeune et fort » sur le continent, avec l’Angleterre en ligne de mire. « C’était un rêve, reconnaît-il. J’ai essayé cinq ou six fois avant de réussir à monter dans un camion. » Outre-Manche, il est pris en charge en tant que mineur. Mais, à sa majorité, sa demande d’asile est rejetée et il devient « illégal ».

    Dans la ville de Loughborough (centre de l’Angleterre), Noorislam s’enfonce, affaibli par des soucis de santé. Le petit sac à dos qui lui fait office d’unique bagage après plus d’une décennie en Europe est « rempli de médicaments ». Le jeune homme souffre d’une dystrophie de la rétine – une maladie génétique caractérisée par un déficit visuel très important – et, depuis un an et demi, il explique avoir des problèmes d’incontinence. « Les médecins disent que c’est dans ma tête, assure-t-il, en montrant sa boîte d’antidépresseurs. Si je n’avais pas été malade, j’aurais pu m’en sortir mais, vu ma situation, je lutte pour tout. »

    « Si je n’avais pas été malade, j’aurais pu m’en sortir mais, vu ma situation, je lutte pour tout », témoigne Noorislam Oriakhail avant de monter dans l’avion

    Avec le sentiment d’avoir « perdu [son] temps », Noorislam s’est glissé dans un camion en janvier pour faire le chemin inverse de celui réussi il y a dix ans. Arrivé à Calais, après une nuit dans « le froid et la pluie », il croise des agents de l’OFII. Il est hébergé et on l’informe sur l’asile et le retour volontaire. « J’avais deux semaines pour choisir ou je devais quitter le centre », se souvient-il. Après des atermoiements, Noorislam s’oriente vers l’asile. Mais il est « dubliné », ce qui signifie qu’il risque d’être transféré vers l’Angleterre ou, à défaut, d’errer plusieurs mois avant de pouvoir déposer une demande en France. Il jette l’éponge. « C’est trop de pression », confie-t-il. Le jeune homme rentre en Afghanistan mais, en réalité, il ne doit pas s’y attarder. Sa famille s’est installée au Pakistan alors qu’il était enfant. « Mon père m’a dit qu’il m’aiderait à passer la frontière. »

    Le jour où Noorislam a embarqué, un autre Afghan devait prendre l’avion, mais il ne s’est jamais présenté. En 2018, quelque 1 500 personnes se sont ainsi désistées après avoir demandé une aide au retour. « Ce sont des gens qui peuvent être instables psychologiquement, justifie Didier Leschi. Il y a quelques semaines, un Pakistanais a fait une crise d’angoisse et a dû être débarqué avant le décollage. Depuis, il veut repartir. »

    Qu’est-ce qui motive un retour au pays ? « On ne connaît pas le parcours de ces gens », reconnaît Nadira Khemliche, adjointe au chef du service voyagiste de l’OFII, qui accompagne les candidats au départ à Roissy ou à Orly, jusqu’à leur embarquement sur des vols commerciaux. Nadira Khemliche ne distingue que des profils, les Arméniens qui voyagent en famille, les Chinois qui ont des vols tous les jours, les Ethiopiens qu’elle ne croise que deux ou trois fois l’an… « Parfois, on se demande pourquoi ils veulent rentrer en sachant qu’il y a des bombes chez eux, confie-t-elle. Mais bon, ici, ils n’ont rien. » « Quel est le choix réel de ces gens ?, s’interroge Clémence Richard, en charge des questions « expulsions » à la Cimade. Ils sont à la rue, épuisés socialement, précarisés administrativement. »

    Candidatures marginales

    Pour promouvoir le retour volontaire, l’OFII se déplace sur des campements, dans des centres d’hébergement du 115 ou des centres de demandeurs d’asile dans lesquels s’éternisent des déboutés. L’office tient même des stands dans des salons « diasporiques ». Le retour volontaire donne droit à un billet d’avion et à un « pécule » dont le montant varie. Les Afghans ont actuellement droit à 1 650 euros. Un programme européen permet aussi de financer un projet de réinsertion à hauteur de 3 500 euros.

    Sur un pan de mur de son bureau, à Calais, Laura Defachel, agent du retour volontaire et de la réinsertion de l’OFII, a accroché des photos d’hommes devant des troupeaux de bêtes, dans les montagnes afghanes. « Beaucoup ont saisi l’opportunité pour se lancer dans l’élevage, ouvrir une épicerie ou un magasin de pièces détachées, devenir taxi, assure-t-elle. C’est déterminant pour ceux qui sont partis de leur pays avec la promesse de faire mieux. » Depuis deux mois, toutefois, ce programme a été suspendu, dans l’attente d’un renouvellement. En 2016, l’année du démantèlement de la « jungle », le bureau de Calais a monté plus de 500 dossiers de départs volontaires, les trois quarts en direction de l’Afghanistan et du Pakistan.

    Les candidats au départ restent toutefois marginaux. « Ce sont surtout les personnes épuisées qui ne souhaitent pas demander l’asile en France ou des personnes qui rentrent pour des raisons familiales », analyse Laura Defachel. Elle se souvient de cet homme qui a souhaité partir après la mort de son frère, qui avait fait le voyage avec lui. Il était monté à bord d’un camion et, réalisant qu’il ne prenait pas la direction de l’Angleterre, est descendu en marche. Il s’est tué sur l’autoroute.

    Warseem Mohamad Kareem rentre dans la première catégorie. « C’est Londres ou l’Afghanistan », résume-t-il. Alors qu’il s’apprête à embarquer pour un vol retour, le jeune homme de 27 ans dit avoir dépensé 11 000 dollars (9 645 euros) pour rejoindre l’Europe. Arrivé en France il y a trois mois, il s’est retrouvé dans un cul-de-sac, à Calais et à Grande-Synthe, dans des tentes ou sous un pont. Avec des passeurs afghans ou kurdes, il a tenté vingt ou trente fois de monter dans des camions pour l’Angleterre. A chaque fois, il a été attrapé par la police.

    Le froid, la pluie, la police qui le chasse tous les matins, l’échec ont finalement eu raison de sa détermination. Lors du dernier démantèlement de Grande-Synthe, il a croisé les maraudeurs de l’OFII. « Nous avons faim de paix, pas d’argent », dit-il à l’agent qui lui remet, dans la salle d’embarquement, une enveloppe de billets. Warseem ne s’interdit pas de revenir, un jour. Il semble ignorer qu’il fait l’objet d’une obligation de quitter le territoire et d’une interdiction de retour pendant un an. Une pratique que toutes les préfectures ne mettent pas en œuvre, mais que l’OFII souhaite développer pour éviter les désistements et les retours. Des méthodes « déloyales », dénonce Clémence Richard : « Cela supprime de fait le droit au désistement. En outre, ces personnes ne rentrent pas dans les catégories de la loi susceptibles de se voir prononcer une interdiction de retour, c’est illégal et ça a aussi des conséquences graves, car cela rend quasi impossible toute demande de visa ultérieure. »

    A court d’argent et d’aide

    En matière de départ volontaire, la contrainte affleure. A partir du 1er janvier 2019, dans le cadre de la loi asile et immigration votée en 2018, les agents de l’OFII iront promouvoir l’aide au retour dans les centres de rétention administrative. Partir de gré, pour ne pas risquer de partir de force. C’est peut-être le dilemme qui aurait fini par se poser à Noorullah Nori. Débouté de l’asile en Allemagne, puis en France, à court d’argent et d’aide, il a signé pour un retour en Afghanistan, après quatre ans en Europe.

    « Moi aussi l’OFII m’a proposé le retour, mais jamais je ne rentrerai », jure Karimi, un Afghan qui a accompagné Noorullah à l’aéroport, après l’avoir recueilli tandis qu’il dormait à la rue. Passé par les errances d’un « Dubliné », Karimi est désormais réfugié en France. A voix basse, il dit à propos de son compatriote : « Il a des problèmes psychologiques. Il est resté longtemps sans parler à personne, avec des pensées négatives. » Il n’est pas le seul, dans le hall de Roissy, à sembler accuser le coup. Un autre Afghan a été déposé à l’aéroport par des infirmiers hospitaliers, prenant de court les agents de l’OFII qui n’avaient pas été informés et ont dû se procurer un fauteuil roulant tandis que l’homme, apathique, laissait son regard se perdre dans le vide, immobile.

    Un Soudanais s’apprête aussi à embarquer. Son air triste intrigue deux Afghans qui veulent savoir ce qui l’accable. Salah Mohamed Yaya a 19 ans. Il dit que depuis des mois il n’a plus de traitement contre le VIH. Cela fait deux ans qu’il est en France, passé par Toulouse, Paris, Nantes, les foyers pour mineurs, la rue, l’hôpital. « Je suis devenu fou, dit-il. Je veux retourner au bled. » Salah n’a pas fait de demande d’asile, sans que l’on sache s’il a vraiment été informé qu’il pouvait le faire. La veille de son départ, il a dormi porte de Villette. Il sent encore le feu de bois.

    https://www.lemonde.fr/societe/article/2018/12/31/je-suis-devenu-fou-je-veux-retourner-au-bled_5403872_3224.html

    #retour_au_pays #réfugiés_afghans #France #Afghanistan #asile #migrations #réfugiés