#afro-descendants

  • Rapid Response : Decolonizing Italian Cities

    Anti-racism is a battle for memory. Enzo Traverso well underlined how statues brought down in the last year show “the contrast between the status of blacks and postcolonial subjects as stigmatised and brutalised minorities and the symbolic place given in the public space to their oppressors”.

    Material traces of colonialism are in almost every city in Italy, but finally streets, squares, monuments are giving us the chance to start a public debate on a silenced colonial history.

    Igiaba Scego, Italian writer and journalist of Somali origins, is well aware of the racist and sexist violence of Italian colonialism and she points out the lack of knowledge on colonial history.

    “No one tells Italian girls and boys about the squad massacres in Addis Ababa, the concentration camps in Somalia, the gases used by Mussolini against defenseless populations. There is no mention of Italian apartheid (…), segregation was applied in the cities under Italian control. In Asmara the inhabitants of the village of Beit Mekae, who occupied the highest hill of the city, were chased away to create the fenced field, or the first nucleus of the colonial city, an area off-limits to Eritreans. An area only for whites. How many know about Italian apartheid?” (Scego 2014, p. 105).

    In her book, Roma negata. Percorsi postcoloniali nella città (2014), she invites us to visually represent the historical connections between Europe and Africa, in creative ways; for instance, she worked with photographer Rino Bianchi to portray Afro-descendants in places marked by fascism such as Cinema Impero, Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana and Dogali’s stele in Rome.

    Inspired by her book, we decided to go further, giving life to ‘Decolonizing the city. Visual Dialogues in Padova’. Our goal was to question ourselves statues and street names in order to challenge the worldviews and social hierarchies that have made it possible to celebrate/forget the racist and sexist violence of colonialism. The colonial streets of Padova have been re-appropriated by the bodies, voices and gazes of six Italian Afro-descendants who took part in a participatory video, taking urban traces of colonialism out of insignificance and re-signifying them in a creative way.

    Wissal Houbabi, artist “daughter of the diaspora and the sea in between“, moves with the soundtrack by Amir Issa Non respiro (2020), leaving her poetry scattered between Via Cirenaica and Via Libia.

    “The past is here, insidious in our minds, and the future may have passed.

    The past is here, even if you forget it, even if you ignore it, even if you do everything to deny the squalor of what it was, the State that preserves the status of frontiers and jus sanguinis.

    If my people wanted to be free one day, even destiny would have to bend”.

    Cadigia Hassan shares the photos of her Italian-Somali family with a friend of hers and then goes to via Somalia, where she meets a resident living there who has never understood the reason behind the name of that street. That’s why Cadigia has returned to via Somalia: she wants to leave traces of herself, of her family history, of historical intertwining and to make visible the important connections that exist between the two countries.

    Ilaria Zorzan questions the colonial past through her Italo-Eritrean family photographic archive. The Italians in Eritrea made space, building roads, cableways, railways, buildings… And her grandfather worked as a driver and transporter, while her Eritrean grandmother, before marrying her grandfather, had been his maid. Ilaria conceals her face behind old photographs to reveal herself in Via Asmara through a mirror.

    Emmanuel M’bayo Mertens is an activist of the Arising Africans association. In the video we see him conducting a tour in the historic center of Padova, in Piazza Antenore, formerly Piazza 9 Maggio. Emmanuel cites the resolution by which the municipality of Padova dedicated the square to the day of the “proclamation of the empire” by Mussolini (1936). According to Emmanuel, fascism has never completely disappeared, as the Italian citizenship law mainly based on jus sanguinis shows in the racist idea of ​​Italianness transmitted ‘by blood’. Instead, Italy is built upon migration processes, as the story of Antenor, Padova’s legendary founder and refugee, clearly shows.

    Mackda Ghebremariam Tesfau’ questions the colonial map in Piazza delle Erbe where Libya, Albania, Ethiopia and Eritrea are marked as part of a white empire. She says that if people ignore this map it is because Italy’s colonial history is ignored. Moreover, today these same countries, marked in white on the map, are part of the Sub-saharan and Mediterranean migrant routes. Referring then to the bilateral agreements between Italy and Libya to prevent “irregular migrants” from reaching Europe, she argues that neocolonialism is alive. Quoting Aimé Césaire, she declares that “Europe is indefensible”.

    The video ends with Viviana Zorzato, a painter of Eritrean origin. Her house, full of paintings inspired by Ethiopian iconography, overlooks Via Amba Aradam. Viviana tells us about the ‘Portrait of a N-word Woman’, which she has repainted numerous times over the years. Doing so meant taking care of herself, an Afro-descendant Italian woman. Reflecting on the colonial streets she crosses daily, she argues that it is important to know the history but also to remember the beauty. Amba Alagi or Amba Aradam cannot be reduced to colonial violence, they are also names of mountains, and Viviana possesses a free gaze that sees beauty. Like Giorgio Marincola, Viviana will continue to “feel her homeland as a culture” and she will have no flags to bow her head to.

    The way in which Italy lost the colonies – that is with the fall of fascism instead of going through a formal decolonization process – prevented Italy from being aware of the role it played during colonialism. Alessandra Ferrini, in her ‘Negotiating amnesia‘,refers to an ideological collective amnesia: the sentiment of an unjust defeat fostered a sense of self-victimisation for Italians, removing the responsibility from them as they portrayed themselves as “brava gente” (good people). This fact, as scholars such as Nicola Labanca have explained, has erased the colonial period from the collective memory and public sphere, leaving colonial and racist culture in school textbooks, as the historian Gianluca Gabrielli (2015) has shown.

    This difficulty in coming to terms with the colonial past was clearly visible in the way several white journalists and politicians reacted to antiracist and feminist movements’ request to remove the statue of journalist Indro Montanelli in Milan throughout the BLM wave. During the African campaign, Montanelli bought the young 12-year-old-girl “Destà” under colonial concubinage (the so‑called madamato), boasting about it even after being accused by feminist Elvira Banotti of being a rapist. The issue of Montanelli’s highlights Italy’s need to think critically over not only colonial but also race and gender violence which are embedded in it.

    Despite this repressed colonial past, in the last decade Italy has witnessed a renewed interest stemming from bottom-up local movements dealing with colonial legacy in the urban space. Two examples are worth mentioning: Resistenze in Cirenaica (Resistances in Cyrenaica) in Bologna and the project “W Menilicchi!” (Long live Menilicchi) in Palermo. These instances, along with other contributions were collected in the Roots§Routes 2020 spring issue, “Even statues die”.

    Resistenze in Cirenaica has been working in the Cyrenaica neighbourhood, named so in the past due to the high presence of colonial roads. In the aftermath of the second world war the city council decided unanimously to rename the roads carrying fascist and colonial street signs (except for via Libya, left as a memorial marker) with partisans’ names, honouring the city at the centre of the resistance movement during the fascist and Nazi occupation. Since 2015, the collective has made this place the centre of an ongoing laboratory including urban walks, readings and storytelling aiming to “deprovincialize resistances”, considering the battles in the ex-colonies as well as in Europe, against the nazi-fascist forces, as antiracist struggles. The publishing of Quaderni di Cirene (Cyrene’s notebooks) brought together local and overseas stories of people who resisted fascist and colonial occupation, with the fourth book addressing the lives of fighter and partisan women through a gender lens.

    In October 2018, thanks to the confluence of Wu Ming 2, writer and storyteller from Resistenze in Cirenaica, and the Sicilian Fare Ala collective, a public urban walk across several parts of the city was organized, with the name “Viva Menilicchi!”. The itinerary (19 kms long) reached several spots carrying names of Italian colonial figures and battles, explaining them through short readings and theatrical sketches, adding road signs including stories of those who have been marginalized and exploited. Significantly, W Menilicchi! refers to Palermitan socialists and communists’ battle cry supporting king Menelik II who defeated the Italian troops in Aduwa in 1896, thus establishing a transnational bond among people subjected to Italian invasion (as Jane Schneider explores in Italy’s ‘Southern Question’: Orientalism in One Country, South Italy underwent a socio-economic occupation driven by imperial/colonial logics by the north-based Kingdom of Italy) . Furthermore, the urban walk drew attention to the linkage of racist violence perpetrated by Italians during colonialism with the killings of African migrants in the streets of Palermo, denouncing the white superiority on which Italy thrived since its birth (which run parallel with the invasion of Africa).

    These experiences of “odonomastic guerrillas” (street-name activists) have found creative ways of decolonising Italian history inscribed in cities, being aware that a structural change requires not only time but also a wide bottom-up involvement of inhabitants willing to deal with the past. New alliances are developing as different groups network and coordinate in view of several upcoming dates, such as February 19th, which marks the anniversary of the massacre of Addis Ababa which occurred in 1937 at the hands of Italian viceroy Rodolfo Graziani.

    References:
    Gabrielli G. (2015), Il curriculo “razziale”: la costruzione dell’alterità di “razza” e coloniale nella scuola italiana (1860-1950), Macerata: Edizioni Università di Macerata.
    Labanca, N. (2002) Oltremare. Storia dell’espansione coloniale italiana, Bologna: Il Mulino.
    Scego, I. (2014) Roma negata. Percorsi postcoloniali nella città, Roma: Ediesse.
    Schneider J (ed.) (1998) Italy’s ‘Southern Question’: Orientalism in One Country, London: Routledge.

    https://archive.discoversociety.org/2021/02/06/rapid-response-decolonizing-italian-cities

    #décolonisation #décolonial #colonialisme #traces_coloniales #Italie #Italie_coloniale #colonialisme_italien #statues #Padova #Padoue #afro-descendants #Cadigia_Hassan #via_Somalia #Ilaria_Zorzan #Emmanuel_M’bayo_Mertens #Mackda_Ghebremariam_Tesfau #Piazza_delle_erbe #Viviana_Zorzato #Via_Amba_Aradam #Giorgio_Marincola #Alessandra_Ferrini

    ping @postcolonial @cede

    –—

    ajouté à la métaliste sur l’Italie coloniale :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/871953

    • #Negotiating_Amnesia

      Negotiating Amnesia is an essay film based on research conducted at the Alinari Archive and the National Library in Florence. It focuses on the Ethiopian War of 1935-36 and the legacy of the fascist, imperial drive in Italy. Through interviews, archival images and the analysis of high-school textbooks employed in Italy since 1946, the film shifts through different historical and personal anecdotes, modes and technologies of representation.

      https://vimeo.com/429591146?embedded=true&source=vimeo_logo&owner=3319920



      https://www.alessandraferrini.info/negotiating-amnesia

      En un coup d’oeil, l’expansion coloniale italienne :

      #amnésie #film #fascisme #impérialisme #Mussolini #Benito_Mussolini #déni #héritage #mémoire #guerre #guerre_d'Ethiopie #violence #Istrie #photographie #askaris #askari #campagna_d'Africa #Tito_Pittana #Mariano_Pittana #mémoire #prostitution #madamato #madamisme #monuments #Romano_Romanelli #commémoration #mémoriel #Siracusa #Syracuse #nostalgie #célébration #Axum #obélisque #Nuovo_Impero_Romano #Affile #Rodolfo_Graziani #Pietro_Badoglio #Uomo_Nuovo #manuels_scolaires #un_posto_al_sole #colonialismo_straccione #italiani_brava_gente #armes_chimiques #armes_bactériologiques #idéologie

    • My Heritage ?

      My Heritage? (2020) is a site-specific intervention within the vestibule of the former Casa d’Italia in Marseille, inaugurated in 1935 and now housing the Italian Cultural Institute. The installation focuses on the historical and ideological context that the building incarnates: the intensification of Fascist imperial aspirations that culminated in the fascistization of the Italian diaspora and the establishment of the Empire in 1936, as a result of the occupation of Ethiopia. As the League of Nations failed to intervene in a war involving two of its members, the so-called Abyssinian Crisis gave rise to a series of conflicts that eventually led to the WW2: a ‘cascade effect’. On the other hand, the attack on the ‘black man’s last citadel’ (Ras Makonnen), together with the brutality of Italian warfare, caused widespread protests and support to the Ethiopian resistance, especially from Pan-African movements.

      Placed by the entrance of the exhibition Rue d’Alger, it includes a prominent and inescapable sound piece featuring collaged extracts from texts by members of the London-based Pan-African association International African Friends of Ethiopia - CLR James, Ras Makonnen, Amy Ashwood Garvey - intertwined with those of British suffragette Sylvia Pankhurst and Italian anarchist Silvio Corio, founders of the newspaper New Times and Ethiopian News in London.

      Through handwritten notes and the use of my own voice, the installation is a personal musing on heritage as historical responsibility, based on a self-reflective process. My voice is used to highlight such personal process, its arbitrary choice of sources (related to my position as Italian migrant in London), almost appropriated here as an act of thinking aloud and thinking with these militant voices. Heritage is therefore intended as a choice, questioning its nationalist uses and the everlasting and catastrophic effects of Fascist foreign politics. With its loudness and placement, it wishes to affect the visitors, confronting them with the systemic violence that this Fascist architecture outside Italy embodies and to inhibit the possibility of being seduced by its aesthetic.



      https://www.alessandraferrini.info/my-heritage

      #héritage

    • "Decolonizziamo le città": il progetto per una riflessione collettiva sulla storia coloniale italiana

      Un video dal basso in cui ogni partecipante produce una riflessione attraverso forme artistiche differenti, come l’arte figurativa, la slam poetry, interrogando questi luoghi e con essi “noi” e la storia italiana

      Via Eritrea, Viale Somalia, Via Amba Aradam, via Tembien, via Adua, via Agordat. Sono nomi di strade presenti in molte città italiane che rimandano al colonialismo italiano nel Corno d’Africa. Ci passiamo davanti molto spesso senza sapere il significato di quei nomi.

      A Padova è nato un progetto che vuole «decolonizzare la città». L’idea è quella di realizzare un video partecipativo in cui ogni partecipante produca una riflessione attraverso forme artistiche differenti, come l’arte figurativa, la slam poetry, interrogando questi luoghi e con essi “noi” e la storia italiana. Saranno coinvolti gli studenti del laboratorio “Visual Research Methods”, nel corso di laurea magistrale “Culture, formazione e società globale” dell’Università di Padova e artisti e attivisti afrodiscendenti, legati alla diaspora delle ex-colonie italiane e non.

      «Stavamo preparando questo laboratorio da marzo», racconta Elisabetta Campagni, che si è laureata in Sociologia a marzo 2020 e sta organizzando il progetto insieme alla sua ex relatrice del corso di Sociologia Visuale Annalisa Frisina, «già molto prima che il movimento Black Lives Matter riportasse l’attenzione su questi temi».

      Riscrivere la storia insieme

      «Il dibattito sul passato coloniale italiano è stato ampiamente ignorato nei dibattiti pubblici e troppo poco trattato nei luoghi di formazione ed educazione civica come le scuole», si legge nella presentazione del laboratorio, che sarà realizzato a partire dall’autunno 2020. «C’è una rimozione grandissima nella nostra storia di quello che ricordano questi nomi, battaglie, persone che hanno partecipato a massacri nelle ex colonie italiane. Pochi lo sanno. Ma per le persone che arrivano da questi paesi questi nomi sono offensivi».

      Da qui l’idea di riscrivere una storia negata, di «rinarrare delle vicende che nascondono deportazioni e uccisioni di massa, luoghi di dolore, per costruire narrazioni dove i protagonisti e le protagoniste sono coloro che tradizionalmente sono stati messi a tacere o sono rimasti inascoltati», affermano le organizzatrici.

      Le strade «rinarrate»

      I luoghi del video a Padova saranno soprattutto nella zona del quartiere Palestro, dove c’è una grande concentrazione di strade con nomi che rimandano al colonialismo. Si andrà in via Amba Aradam, il cui nome riporta all’altipiano etiope dove nel febbraio 1936 venne combattuta una battaglia coloniale dove gli etiopi vennero massacrati e in via Amba Alagi.

      Una tappa sarà nell’ex piazza Pietro Toselli, ora dedicata ai caduti della resistenza, che ci interroga sul legame tra le forme di resistenza al fascismo e al razzismo, che unisce le ex-colonie all’Italia. In Italia il dibattito si è concentrato sulla statua a Indro Montanelli, ma la toponomastica che ricorda il colonialismo è molta e varia. Oltre alle strade, sarà oggetto di discussione la mappa dell’impero coloniale italiano situata proprio nel cuore della città, in Piazza delle Erbe, ma che passa spesso inosservata.

      Da un’idea di Igiaba Scego

      Come ci spiega Elisabetta Campagni, l’idea nasce da un libro di Igiaba Scego che anni fa ha pubblicato alcune foto con afrodiscendenti che posano davanti ai luoghi che celebrano il colonialismo a Roma come la stele di Dogali, vicino alla stazione Termini, in viale Luigi Einaudi.

      Non è il primo progetto di questo tipo: il collettivo Wu Ming ha lanciato la guerriglia odonomastica, con azioni e performance per reintitolare dal basso vie e piazze delle città o aggiungere informazioni ai loro nomi per cambiare senso all’intitolazione. La guerriglia è iniziata a Bologna nel quartiere della Cirenaica e il progetto è stato poi realizzato anche a Palermo. Un esempio per il laboratorio «Decolonizzare la città» è stato anche «Berlin post colonial», l’iniziativa nata da anni per rititolare le strade e creare percorsi di turismo consapevole.

      Il progetto «Decolonizzare la città» sta raccogliendo i voti sulla piattaforma Zaalab (https://cinemavivo.zalab.org/progetti/decolonizzare-la-citta-dialoghi-visuali-a-padova), con l’obiettivo di raccogliere fondi per la realizzazione del laboratorio.

      https://it.mashable.com/cultura/3588/decolonizziamo-le-citta-il-progetto-per-una-riflessione-collettiva-sull

      #histoire_niée #storia_negata #récit #contre-récit

    • Decolonizzare la città. Dialoghi Visuali a Padova

      Descrizione

      Via Amba Alagi, via Tembien, via Adua, via Agordat. Via Eritrea, via Libia, via Bengasi, via Tripoli, Via Somalia, piazza Toselli… via Amba Aradam. Diversi sono i nomi di luoghi, eventi e personaggi storici del colonialismo italiano in città attraversate in modo distratto, senza prestare attenzione alle tracce di un passato che in realtà non è ancora del tutto passato. Che cosa significa la loro presenza oggi, nello spazio postcoloniale urbano? Se la loro origine affonda le radici in un misto di celebrazione coloniale e nazionalismo, per capire il significato della loro permanenza si deve guardare alla società contemporanea e alle metamorfosi del razzismo.

      Il dibattito sul passato coloniale italiano è stato ampiamente ignorato nei dibattiti pubblici e troppo poco trattato nei luoghi di formazione ed educazione civica come le scuole. L’esistenza di scritti, memorie biografiche e racconti, pur presente in Italia, non ha cambiato la narrazione dominante del colonialismo italiano nell’immaginario pubblico, dipinto come una breve parentesi storica che ha portato civiltà e miglioramenti nei territori occupati (“italiani brava gente”). Tale passato, però, è iscritto nella toponomastica delle città italiane e ciò ci spinge a confrontarci con il significato di tali vie e con la loro indiscussa presenza. Per questo vogliamo partire da questi luoghi, e in particolare da alcune strade, per costruire una narrazione dal basso che sia frutto di una ricerca partecipata e condivisa, per decolonizzare la città, per reclamare una lettura diversa e critica dello spazio urbano e resistere alle politiche che riproducono strutture (neo)coloniali di razzializzazione degli “altri”.

      Il progetto allora intende sviluppare una riflessione collettiva sulla storia coloniale italiana, il razzismo, l’antirazzismo, la resistenza di ieri e di oggi attraverso la realizzazione di un video partecipativo.

      Esso è organizzato in forma laboratoriale e vuole coinvolgere studenti/studentesse del laboratorio “Visual Research Methods” (corso di laurea magistrale “Culture, formazione e società globale”) dell’Università di Padova e gli/le artisti/e ed attivisti/e afrodiscendenti, legati alla diaspora delle ex-colonie italiane e non.

      Il progetto si propone di creare una narrazione visuale partecipata, in cui progettazione, riprese e contenuti siano discussi in maniera orizzontale e collaborativa tra i e le partecipanti. Gli/Le attivisti/e e artisti/e afrodiscendenti con i/le quali studenti e studentesse svolgeranno le riprese provengono in parte da diverse città italiane e in parte vivono a Padova, proprio nel quartiere in questione. Ognuno/a di loro produrrà insieme agli studenti e alle studentesse una riflessione attraverso forme artistiche differenti (come l’arte figurativa, la slam poetry…), interrogando tali luoghi e con essi “noi” e la storia italiana. I partecipanti intrecciano così le loro storie personali e familiari, la storia passata dell’Italia e il loro attivismo quotidiano, espresso con l’associazionismo o con diverse espressioni artistiche (Mackda Ghebremariam Tesfaù, Wissal Houbabi, Theophilus Marboah, Cadigia Hassan, Enrico e Viviana Zorzato, Ilaria Zorzan, Ada Ugo Abara ed Emanuel M’bayo Mertens di Arising Africans). I processi di discussione, scrittura, ripresa, selezione e montaggio verranno documentati attraverso l’utilizzo di foto e filmati volti a mostrare la meta-ricerca, il processo attraverso cui viene realizzato il video finale, e le scelte, di contenuto e stilistiche, negoziate tra i diversi attori. Questi materiali verranno condivisi attraverso i canali online, con il fine di portare a tutti coloro che sostengono il progetto una prima piccola restituzione che renda conto dello svolgimento del lavoro.

      Le strade sono un punto focale della narrazione: oggetto dei discorsi propagandistici di Benito Mussolini, fulcro ed emblema del presunto e mitologico progetto di civilizzazione italiana in Africa, sono proprio le strade dedicate a luoghi e alle battaglie dove si sono consumate le atrocità italiane che sono oggi presenze fisiche e allo stesso tempo continuano ad essere invisibilizzate; e i nomi che portano sono oggi largamente dei riferimenti sconosciuti. Ripercorrere questi luoghi fisici dando vita a dialoghi visuali significa riappropriarsi di una storia negata, rinarrare delle vicende che nascondono deportazioni e uccisioni di massa, luoghi di dolore, per costruire narrazioni dove i protagonisti e le protagoniste sono coloro che tradizionalmente sono stati messi a tacere o sono rimasti inascoltati.

      La narrazione visuale partirà da alcuni luoghi – come via Amba Aradam e via lago Ascianghi – della città di Padova intitolati alla storia coloniale italiana, in cui i protagonisti e le protagoniste del progetto daranno vita a racconti e performances artistiche finalizzate a decostruire la storia egemonica coloniale, troppo spesso edulcorata e minimizzata. L’obiettivo è quello di favorire il prodursi di narrazioni dal basso, provenienti dalle soggettività in passato rese marginali e che oggi mettono in scena nuove narrazioni resistenti. La riappropriazione di tali luoghi, fisica e simbolica, è volta ad aprire una riflessione dapprima all’interno del gruppo e successivamente ad un pubblico esterno, al fine di coinvolgere enti, come scuole, associazioni e altre realtà che si occupano di questi temi sul territorio nazionale. Oltre alle strade, saranno oggetto di discussione la mappa dell’impero coloniale italiano situata proprio nel cuore della città, in Piazza delle Erbe, e l’ex piazza Toselli, ora dedicata ai caduti della resistenza, che ci interroga sul legame tra le forme di resistenza al fascismo e al razzismo, che unisce le ex-colonie all’Italia.

      Rinarrare la storia passata è un impegno civile e politico verso la società contemporanea. Se anche oggi il razzismo ha assunto nuove forme, esso affonda le sue radici nella storia nazionale e coloniale italiana. Questa storia va rielaborata criticamente per costruire nuove alleanze antirazziste e anticolonialiste.

      Il video partecipativo, ispirato al progetto “Roma Negata” della scrittrice Igiaba Scego e di Rino Bianchi, ha l’obiettivo di mostrare questi luoghi attraverso narrazioni visuali contro-egemoniche, per mettere in discussione una storia ufficiale, modi di dire e falsi miti, per contribuire a dare vita ad una memoria critica del colonialismo italiano e costruire insieme percorsi riflessivi nuovi. Se, come sostiene Scego, occupare uno spazio è un grido di esistenza, con il nostro progetto vogliamo affermare che lo spazio può essere rinarrato, riletto e riattraversato.

      Il progetto vuole porsi in continuità con quanto avvenuto sabato 20 giugno, quando a Padova, nel quartiere Palestro, si è tenuta una manifestazione organizzata dall’associazione Quadrato Meticcio a cui hanno aderito diverse realtà locali, randunatesi per affermare la necessita’ di decolonizzare il nostro sguardo. Gli interventi che si sono susseguiti hanno voluto riflettere sulla toponomastica coloniale del quartiere Palestro, problematizzandone la presenza e invitando tutti e tutte a proporre alternative possibili.

      https://cinemavivo.zalab.org/progetti/decolonizzare-la-citta-dialoghi-visuali-a-padova

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axEa6By9PIA&t=156s

  • #Récit_national

    This installation aims to reflect on the space that is left in the current french society for the descendents of enslaved people.

    Mixing documentary and fiction, the artist, a french white female, started to work from18th century paintings depicting the families of ship owners and industrialists that grew wealthy through slave trade and slavery. These portraits are currently in numerous museums in France.

    Considering that the wealth appearing on them was stolen, #Elisa_Moris_Vai asked young enslaved people’s descendents thanks to a classified ad to pose in the style of the paintings. Creating in this way fictional pictures, the work questions the legitimacy of that wealth. That part blends with contemporary video pieces in which the same people stare at the spectator, giving a personal statement.

    Ruddy, Maëla, Lorenza, Lydie, Léa, Jérôme, Claude, Dimitri, Leïla and Christelle come from Guadeloupe, the Reunion island, French Guiana, Martinique, Haiti and Dominica. They are photographer, student, director, consultant, project manager, musician, management accountant, actresses. They are young, commited, talented. They are France.

    https://elisamorisvai.com/work/recit-national-national-narrative
    #contre-récit #nationalisme #art #art_et_politique #afro-descendants #photographie #portraits #peinture #fictionnalisation #esclavage #histoire #historicisation #identité #identité_nationale #Noirs #couleur_de_peau #tableau

    ping @isskein @karine4 @cede @albertocampiphoto
    via @reka

  • #Ku_Klux_Klan - Une #histoire américaine. Naissance d’un empire invisible (1/2)

    L’histoire méconnue du plus ancien groupe terroriste et raciste des États-Unis.

    Le Ku Klux Klan, société secrète née en 1865, a traversé les décennies et a toujours su renaître de ses cendres. Son histoire a défrayé la chronique. 150 ans de haine, de racisme et d’horreur. 150 ans d’exclusion, de violence et de fureur.

    Pour retracer en détail les quatre vies successives du Ku Klux Klan, David Korn-Brzoza a rassemblé un impressionnant fonds d’archives, alimenté en partie par celles du mouvement lui-même, et rencontré une dizaine d’interlocuteurs : un membre repenti de l’organisation, des vétérans de la lutte pour les droits civiques, le juge pugnace qui, quatorze ans après l’attentat de Birmingham, a poursuivi et condamné ses auteurs, ainsi que différents chercheurs et analystes. En montrant ainsi combien le mouvement et ses crimes incarnent une histoire et des valeurs collectives, il jette une lumière crue sur cette part d’ombre que l’Amérique blanche peine encore à reconnaître.

    https://boutique.arte.tv/detail/ku-klux-klan-une-histoire-americaine

    #film #documentaire #film_documentaire
    #USA #Etats-Unis #KKK #plantation #esclavage #afro-américains #citoyenneté #Pulaski #société_secrète #violence #White_League #meurtres #lynchages #coups_de_fouet #terrorisme #intimidation #soumission #Nathan_Bedford_Forrest #politicide #assassinats #droits_civiques #Ku-Klux_Bill #loi_martiale #ségrégation #domination_raciale #milices_armées #ordre_social #The_birth_of_a_nation (#Griffith) #William_Joseph_Simmons #Woodrow_Wilson #business #Hiram_Wesley_Evans #Harry_Truman #Truman #Immigration_bill (1924) #The_Fiery_Cross #The_Search_Light #mouvement_social #David_Stephenson #Madge_Oberholtzer #Edward_Young_Clark #Bund #racisme #Stone_Mountain #Samuel_Green #suprématie_blanche #cérémonie_de_naturalisation #superman #Stetson_Kennedy #organisation_subversive #Afro-descendants

  • Why we need to coach and mentor black academics.

    Recently, I co-wrote a blog for SUMS Consulting about the benefits of coaching for academics leading teams and departments at this challenging time. A friend contacted me and suggested I write about the benefits of coaching and mentoring for black and other under-represented groups in academia. Great idea, I thought, but I can’t write about the lived experience of this, so we agreed to write this together. Thank you, Alice, for sharing your thoughts and experiences.

    This article focuses on one particular issue, for a much broader understanding of the experiences of black academics referenced briefly here, I would recommend the articles and activities discussed on https://blackbritishacademics.co.uk

    Ellie’s view as a coach and a former Dean for Diversity and Inclusion.

    “Higher education in the U.K. is structurally and, in many cases, institutionally racist. If it were not, we would have more than 140 black professors out of 21,000. There would be more than 1 or 2 black professors at most U.K. Universities and black academics would make up for more than 2% of the total working at U.K. universities. There would be some, rather than none at all, black staff employed at the most senior levels of leadership in British universities in 2018-19, which ministers described as “unacceptable”, and more than 75 out of 3600 university governors would be black. There wouldn’t be more than 20% difference in the percentage of black students who are awarded a 1st or 2i degree compared to their white peers.

    This is not news, but it is a reality that has hardly changed for years despite many awareness-raising efforts (there have been some improvements in the degree awarding, but the difference remains). And yes, I know many racial inequalities occur before people get to universities that need to be addressed, but even when black students enter with the same grades, they are still awarded lower degrees – so yes, universities are doing additional harm and putting additional barriers in place to black students and staff. Black students cite an academic staff body that looks wholly unlike them and in some cases has little understanding of racial identity as a contributing factor.

    It is clear that something more than awareness-raising needs to happen. Often this takes the form of initiating specific mentoring or coaching programmes for black staff, or more widely for staff from ethnicity groups currently under-represented. Sometimes, these schemes are viewed negatively as being “deficit model,” i.e. focusing on “fixing the black academic”, rather than addressing structural and institutional inequalities and racism.

    Whilst I absolutely agree that we should be pushing to remove the systemic barriers as rapidly as possible – we also need to support black academics in situ now. This is about treating black academics equitably whilst we dismantle the systemic racism. Considering the middle panel of the figure below (origin unknown but widely circulated in the past week), what targeted coaching and mentoring schemes do is provide appropriate size boxes for people to stand on, recognising that these are different for different people. At the same time, we remove the fence so that individual support is not needed in the same way. Black staff, both historically and currently, do not benefit from the same informal or formal support network as white staff.

    Mentoring schemes can work, and in cases where you have a senior white academic mentoring a junior black academic, there can sometimes be great benefits in both directions – that has certainly been my experience of coaching people attending BAME staff development programmes. Sometimes though, there can be too big a distance, and complications when mentoring is within line management structures, in which case coaching can provide a safe, non-judgemental and confidential space that supports development more effectively.”

    Alice’s view as a mature black female PhD candidate

    “Whether it is called proper supervision or training on the job or managing how you deal with feelings, or how you talk, coaching is essential. I have benefitted from being coached and also from coaching people myself. These are my personal experiences and might not be exclusive to every black person.

    In my other life, I worked in Mozambique, and I benefitted a lot with mentoring and coaching as at first, I could not speak the Portuguese language. Although the mentoring was somewhat unorthodox –mainly through the Young African Diplomats Group - it helped me understand how systems in the diplomatic networks in Maputo worked. These were things which you could not find in a scripted politics or the diplomatic handbook, but a verbal and code of conduct you could find in this young African diplomats group. It was simple things like ’taking my hand’ to go to Feira Popular - a mingling place for the local people in which diplomats went with reservations or how to socialise with the staff at Ministry of Foreign Affairs or the local organisation. Through that coaching, I managed to know local organisation which led me to win an award given to me by the then President Chissano.

    In the U.K., when I arrived as a refugee, I worked in social care as a carer and I had a good supervisor. She used her spare time to coach me about the dos and don’ts in social care as I had never worked in social care. Slowly I gained confidence, and my supervisor helped me apply for my first role as an assistant social worker as she believed that I was skilled and ’clever’, her words not mine. I then had an assistant manager who gave me a mentor who is the one who coached me about social work, and later I decided to go to University to become a Social Worker. All these women were not black.

    I have seen similar growth in confidence in those I have coached in the past. I used to coach and train black women who worked as personal assistants in Southern Africa. The women benefitted and had a way of connecting with others, and it also built their self-esteem and confidence in their work. In Reading where I now live, I have been a chairperson and also volunteer at refugees at the Reading Refugee Support Group (RRSG). I had the opportunity to be involved in the Women Learning Together, a Europen Union Grundtvig project. An article which describes the case was written ‘Wisdom is like a baobab tree: no individual can embrace it Working and Learning together towards empowerment of female refugees’ (Harkema & Beijer, 2012). I accompanied a few women refugees from (RRSG) to Belgium, Netherlands, Denmark, to attend the ’learning together’ conferences. Most of the women were seeking work and had qualifications mainly from their own original countries. In total, they were fifty female refugees of all races from at least 40 different countries who participated in the conferences. The women shared their experiences of life in Europe and their ambitions. Some had been engineers, lecturers, businesswoman, teachers and other careers but unfortunately, they had to leave their jobs and countries ending up as refugees. My past experiences in work never gave me work in the U.K., and I had to start again. The sessions mainly focused on coaching the women on how to evolve and find their purpose. Some of the sessions brought tears, but mostly it gave them tools to be able to know their strengths and weaknesses. One of the white ladies originally from Eastern Europe- a refugee is now a project manager for the Syrian resettlement scheme.

    But confidence is about context. I am an experienced public speaker and had worked for a long time when I decided to go back to academia, yet as a PhD candidate in Human Geography researching Identity and Transnational Activities for Young People from Zimbabwe in the U.K., I found it so difficult to present my academic work and speak in seminars or conferences. As a natural public speaker who talks in conferences with over 100 people despite never having had any formal training, it might sound unreal to be able to struggle to speak in academia. Yet sometimes things like a black person’s accent, using the wrong words in a sentence not knowing how to respond to that one ‘bowtie while male academia’ or madam ’I know it all’ white woman in the audience can only make it difficult to excel. It might seem minute to others, but it can also affect how you write and produce work.

    The space I occupy as a mature black women PhD candidate does not give me the same opportunity like the young white PhD student who is coming straight from University. Some are often identified earlier on doing their undergraduate or masters by their lecturers and supported to apply for a PhD scholarship which rarely happens with black students. I have observed that in some departments, the white PhD students are given a chance to teach while they are studying, mentored, shadowed, and more time and money is invested in their skill-building. This is a way of coaching them for their future job and setting a solid foundation for them. They build relationships with their supervisors and lecturers. Most jobs are found through networking, and it is the same in academia and who best to help you network, learning the system than somebody with a wealth of experience at your own University. This is not about ‘white saviour’ or ‘fixing black academics’ it is about identifying potential and also dismantling the structures that have perpetually disenfranchised black people to attain.

    Opportunities for and participation in such development activities seem to be less for black students and academics. During my research, some of the young black participants stated that they had had unpleasant racism experiences at University, and they felt that they would not continue to do a PhD. Black women have to juggle a lot of other things in their life because of structures of inequalities in society, and sometimes this has an impact on when they start University if they get scholarships or how they excel in academia. Academia does not acknowledge either this impact of inequality or the emotions that come with post-colonial dilemmas for black people. Instead, the roles remain grounded in societal racism – the ‘master’ defines the roles typically. As an example, in her book ‘Ain’t I Woman’ Hooks (1981) identifies that ‘that in our society white women are given grant money to research black women, but I can find no instance where black women have received funds to research white women’. In 2020 it is still the same; black women due to their identity still struggle in finding acceptance in academia or working in institutions. Crenshaw (1989) eludes to that through her work on the intersectionality that the experiences of black women are ‘double-discrimination’ in how their personal dimension of these racialised identities of being ‘black’ and ‘female’ are objectified throughout and the need for coaching and mentoring remains as strong as ever now.”

    References:

    Crenshaw, K., 1989. Demarginalizing the intersection of race and sex: A black feminist critique of antidiscrimination doctrine, feminist theory and antiracist politics. u. Chi. Legal f., p.139

    hooks, bell (1981) Ain’t I a Woman: Black Women and Feminism, Boston: South End Press

    Saskia J.M. Harkema & Catharina J. Beijer, 2012. “Wisdom is like a baobab tree: no individual can embrace it Working and Learning together towards empowerment of female refugees,” Working Papers 2012/18, Maastricht School of Management: https://ideas.repec.org/p/msm/wpaper/2012-18.html

    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/why-we-need-coach-mentor-black-academics-ellie-highwood/?trackingId=PcV1WRnWQvqnKO7l8aqNfg%3D%3D

    #Noirs #université #mentoring #soutien #Afro-descendants #facs #ESR #égalité #équité #femmes #femmes_noires #intersectionnalité

    ping @isskein @karine4 @cede

  • Audre Lorde - The Berlin Years 1984-1992_Ger+Engl subs on Vimeo
    https://vimeo.com/274444682


    Even twenty years after her death, the influence of the writer and activist Audre Lorde on the Afro-American, feminist and queer movements is extremely lively. A little heeded chapter are her Berlin years from 1984 to 1992, in which Lorde helped Afro-Germans to become more self-confident and commented on the social changes in the city that were marked by the fall of the Berlin Wall and reunification. White Germans challenged them to recognize their privileges and to deal with differences constructively.

    Personal video and audio recordings by Dagmar Schultz allow a special look into the life of private Audre Lorde, but also let fellow students, students and friends have their say. The extraordinary portrait was premiered in the Panorama of the Berlinale 2012.

    #video #documentaire #Audre_Lorde #afroféminisme #Berlin

    @klaus (pas vu même s’il passait chaque semaine en proj prix libre de squat, en tout cas quand j’étais à Berlin en 2013-2014 et qu’on s’est rencontré)

  • Vu ce soir au cinéma...

    #Ouvrir_la_voix

    Ouvrir La Voix, est donc un film documentaire, mais pour moi, ce sont aussi plus de deux années de ma vie dédiées à la réaproppriation de la narration par les femmes noires. Une fois les 45 pré-entretiens menés et les 24 participantes confirmées, j’ai commencé par organiser des soupers à la maison pour qu’elles se rencontrent et apprennent à se connaitre avant de se découvrir dans une narration commune à l’écran

    https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1172129246/ouvrir-la-voix?lang=fr
    https://ouvrirlavoixlefilm.fr/onepage.html

    #Afro-descendants #racisme #homosexualité #homophobie #xénophobie #femmes #Afro #Afropéennes #film #documentaire #luttes #résister #femmes_noires #noirs #intersectionnalité #identité #témoignage #école #éducation #travail #discriminations #communautarisme #LGBT #Amandine_Gay #préjugés #corps #sexualité #cheveux #beauté #origine

  • MRG launches new online resource to mark International Decade for People of African Descent - Minority Rights
    http://minorityrights.org/2015/11/03/mrg-launches-new-online-resource-to-mark-international-decade-for-pe

    Afro-descendants: A Global Picture is a new online resource, launched today by Minority Rights Group International (MRG), to highlight the marginalized histories, current challenges and future prospects of these communities in diverse countries around the world.

    The website is timed to coincide with the International Decade for People of African Descent, officially launched by the United Nations General Assembly in 2015, which aims to strengthen their situation, whilst paying special attention to the themes of recognition, justice and development.

    http://stories.minorityrights.org/afro-descendants

    ‘It is important to see the African #Diaspora in terms of the contribution made throughout the world to the economic, political and social development of a new global society. Afro-descendants have made their homes on every continent, and while there are still challenges to be overcome, the promise is that societies will flourish from their contributions,’ says Gay J. McDougall, who heads MRG’s International Council, and will be speaking today in New York at Confronting the Silence – Perspectives and Dialogue on Structural Racism against People of African Descent Worldwide, an event which forms part of the programme of events the UN is organising to mark the Decade.

    Drawing on a range of case studies, #Afro-descendants: The Global Picture seeks to draw attention to the invisibility and discrimination that persist for people of African descent to this day, as well as celebrating their achievements as activists, artists and citizens.

    As well as showcasing research from the Americas, Asia, Europe, the Middle East and North Africa, the new MRG website features a striking photo story about the little known, but relatively numerous, Siddi community of Karnataka, India and a documentary about embattled Afro-Colombian ancestral gold miners pitted against their government and multinational companies.

    #minorités #invisibles