• Turkey : Hundreds of Refugees Deported to Syria

    EU Should Recognize Turkey Is Unsafe for Asylum Seekers

    Turkish authorities arbitrarily arrested, detained, and deported hundreds of Syrian refugee men and boys to Syria between February and July 2022, Human Rights Watch said today.

    Deported Syrians told Human Rights Watch that Turkish officials arrested them in their homes, workplaces, and on the street, detained them in poor conditions, beat and abused most of them, forced them to sign voluntary return forms, drove them to border crossing points with northern Syria, and forced them across at gunpoint.

    “In violation of international law Turkish authorities have rounded up hundreds of Syrian refugees, even unaccompanied children, and forced them back to northern Syria,” said Nadia Hardman, refugee and migrant rights researcher at Human Rights Watch. “Although Turkey provided temporary protection to 3.6 million Syrian refugees, it now looks like Turkey is trying to make northern Syria a refugee dumping ground.”

    Recent signs from Turkey and other governments indicate that they are considering normalizing relations with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. In May 2022, President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan of Turkey announced that he intends to resettle one million refugees in northern Syria, in areas not controlled by the government, even though Syria remains unsafe for returning refugees. Many of those returned are from government-controlled areas, but even if they could reach them, the Syrian government is the same one that produced over six million refugees and committed grave human rights violations against its own citizens even before uprisings began.

    The deportations provide a stark counterpoint to Turkey’s record of generosity as host to more refugees than any other country in the world and almost four times as many as the whole European Union (EU), for which the EU has provided billions of Euros in funding for humanitarian support and migration management.

    Between February and August, Human Rights Watch interviewed by phone or in person inside Turkey 37 Syrian men and 2 Syrian boys who had been registered for temporary protection in Turkey. Human Rights Watch also interviewed seven relatives of Syrian refugee men and a refugee woman whom Turkish authorities deported to northern Syria during this time.

    Human Rights Watch sent letters with queries and findings to the European Commission, the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs, and the Turkish Interior Ministry. Human Rights Watch received a response from Bernard Brunet, of the EU’s Directorate-General for Neighborhood and Enlargement Negotiations. The content of this letter is reflected in the section on removal centers.

    Turkish officials deported 37 of the people interviewed to northern Syria. All said they were deported together with dozens or even hundreds of others. All said they were forced to sign forms either at removal centers or the border with Syria. They said that officials did not allow them to read the forms and did not explain what the forms said, but all said they understood the forms to be allegedly agreeing to voluntary repatriation. Some said that officials covered the part of the form written in Arabic with their hands. Most said they saw authorities at these removal centers processing other Syrians in the same way.

    Many said that they saw Turkish officials beat other men who had initially refused to sign, so they felt they had no choice. Two men detained at a removal center in Adana said they were given the choice of signing a form and going back to Syria or being detained for a year. Both chose to leave because they could not bear the thought of a year in detention and needed to support their families.

    Ten people were not deported. Some were released and warned that if they did not move back to their city of registration they would be deported if found elsewhere. Others managed to contact lawyers through the intervention of family members to help secure their release. Several are still in removal centers waiting for a resolution to their case, unaware why they are being detained and fearing deportation. Those released described life in Turkey as dangerous, saying that they are staying at home with their curtains closed and limiting movement to avoid the Turkish authorities.

    Deportees were driven to the border from removal centers, sometimes in rides lasting up to 21 hours, handcuffed the whole way. They said they were forced to cross border checkpoints at either Öncüpınar/Bab al-Salam or Cilvegözü/Bab al-Hawa, which lead to non-government- controlled areas of Syria. At the checkpoint, a 26-year-old man from Aleppo recalled a Turkish official telling him, “We’ll shoot anyone who tries cross back.”

    In June 2022, the UN refugee agency, UNHCR, said that 15,149 Syrian refugees had voluntarily returned to Syria so far this year. The local authorities who control Bab al-Hawa and Bab al-Salam border crossings respectively publish monthly numbers of people crossing through their checkpoints from Turkey to Syria. Between February and August 2022, 11,645 people were returned through Bab al-Hawa and 8,404 through Bab al-Salam.

    Turkey is bound by treaty and customary international law to respect the principle of nonrefoulement, which prohibits the return of anyone to a place where they would face a real risk of persecution, torture or other ill-treatment, or a threat to life. Turkey must not coerce people into returning to places where they face serious harm. Turkey should protect the basic rights of all Syrians, regardless of where they are registered and should not deport refugees who are living and working in a city other than where their temporary protection ID and address are registered.

    On October 21, Dr. Savaş Ünlü, head of the Presidency for Migration Management, responded by letter to Human Rights Watch’s letter of October 3 sharing this report’s findings. Emphasizing that Turkey hosts the largest number of refugees in the world, Dr. Ünlü rejected Human Rights Watch’s findings in their totality, calling the allegations baseless. Setting out the services provided by law to people seeking protection in Turkey, he underscored that Turkey “carries out migration management in accordance with national and international law.”

    “The EU and its member states should acknowledge that Turkey does not meet its criteria for a safe third country and suspend its funding of migration detention and border controls until forced deportations cease,” Hardman said. “Declaring Turkey a ‘safe third country’ is inconsistent with the scale of deportations of Syrian refugees to northern Syria. Member states should not make this determination and should focus on relocating asylum seekers by increasing resettlement numbers.”

    Human Rights Watch focused on the deportation of Syrian refugees who had been recognized by Turkey’s temporary protection regime but whom authorities nevertheless deported or threatened with deportation to Syria in 2022. All 47 Syrian refugees whose cases were examined had been living and working in cities across Turkey, the majority in Istanbul, before they were arrested, detained, and in most cases deported. All detainees are identified with pseudonyms for their protection.

    All but two had a Turkish temporary protection ID permit when they lived in Turkey, commonly called a kimlik, which protects Syrian refugees against forced return to Syria. Several said they had both a temporary protection ID and a work permit.

    Refugees, Asylum Seekers, and Migrants in Turkey

    Turkey shelters over 3.6 million Syrians and is the world’s largest refugee-hosting country. Under a geographical limitation that Turkey has applied to its accession to the UN Refugee Convention, Syrians and others coming from countries to the south and east of Turkey’s borders are not granted full refugee status. Syrian refugees are registered under a “temporary protection” regulation, which Turkish authorities say automatically applies to all Syrians seeking asylum.

    Turkey’s Temporary Protection Regulation grants Syrian refugees access to basic services including education and health care but generally requires them to live in the province in which they are registered. Refugees must obtain permission to travel between provinces. In late 2017 and early 2018, Istanbul and nine provinces on the border with Syria suspended registration of newly arriving asylum seekers.

    In February 2022, Turkey’s Deputy Interior Minister Ismail Çataklı said applications for temporary and international protection would not be accepted in 16 provinces: Ankara, Antalya, Aydın, Bursa, Çanakkale, Düzce, Edirne, Hatay, Istanbul, Izmir, Kırklareli, Kocaeli, Muğla, Sakarya, Tekirdağ, and Yalova. He also said residency permit applications by foreigners would not be accepted in any neighborhood in which 25 percent or more of the population consisted of foreigners. He reported that registration had already been closed in 781 neighborhoods throughout Turkey because foreigners in those locations exceeded 25 percent of the population.

    In June, Interior Minister Süleyman Soylu announced that from July 1 onward, the proportion would be reduced to 20 percent and the number of neighborhoods closed to foreigners’ registration increased to 1,200, with cancellation of temporary protection status of Syrians who traveled in the country without applying for permission. Many interviewees explained that they could not find employment in their city of registration and could not survive there but could find work in Istanbul.

    Rising Xenophobia in Turkey

    Over the past two years, there has been an increase in racist and xenophobic attacks against foreigners, notably against Syrians. On August 11, 2021, groups of Turkish residents attacked workplaces and homes of Syrians in a neighborhood in Ankara a day after a Syrian youth stabbed and killed a Turkish youth in a fight.

    In the lead-up to general elections in spring 2023, opposition politicians have made speeches that fuel anti-refugee sentiment and suggest that Syrians should be returned to war-torn Syria. President Erdoğan’s coalition government has responded with pledges to resettle Syrians in Turkish-occupied areas of northern Syria.

    Arrests

    Most of those interviewed were arrested on the streets of Istanbul, and others during raids in their workplaces or homes. The arresting officials sometimes introduced themselves as Turkish police officers, and all demanded to see the refugees’ identification documents.

    Under Turkey’s temporary protection regulation, Syrian refugees are required to live in the province where they first register as refugees. Seventeen of these 47 refugees were living and working in their city of registration, while the rest were living and working in a different province.

    Five refugees said they were arrested because of complaints or spurious allegations from neighbors or employers, ranging from making too much noise to being a terrorist. All refugees said these accusations had no foundation. Four of them were acquitted, released, or deported; one man is still being investigated.

    Detention

    On arrest, Syrian refugees were either taken to local police stations for a short period or directly to a removal center, usually Tuzla Removal Center in Istanbul. Other removal centers included were in Pendik, Adana, Gaziantep, and Urfa. In all cases, Turkish officials confiscated the Syrians’ telephones, wallets, and other personal belongings.

    The authorities refused refugees’ requests to call their family members or lawyers. One man who asked to speak to a lawyer said an officer at the police station said, “‘Did you commit any crime?’ When I said ‘no,’ he said, ‘Then you don’t need to call a lawyer.’”

    All said the Turkish authorities kept them in cramped, unsanitary rooms in various removal centers. Beds were limited and interviewees said they often had to share them. Refugees said they were usually divided according to nationality and were generally held with other Syrians. Boys under 18 were detained with adult men.

    While some removal centers had better conditions than others, all interviewees described a lack of adequate food and access to washroom facilities, as well as other unsanitary conditions. In Tuzla, where the majority of interviewees passed through, Syrians described being held outside in areas described as “basketball courts” for hours on end while waiting to be assigned a space, which was usually inside a cramped metal container.

    “Ahmad” described conditions at Tuzla Removal Center, where he was detained alongside unrelated children in overcrowded metal containers:

    There were six beds in my cell and two or three people had to share each bed, and in my cell, one kid was 16 and one was 17. At first there were 15 of us [in the cell] but then they added more people. We stayed 12 days without taking a shower because they didn’t have one.

    Beatings and Ill-Treatment

    All interviewees said Turkish officials in the removal centers either assaulted them or they witnessed officials kicking or beating other Syrians with their hands or wooden or plastic batons. “Fahad,” a 22-year-old man from Aleppo, described the beatings in Tuzla Removal Center:

    I was beaten in Tuzla…. I dropped my bread by accident and I tried to pick it up from the floor. An officer kicked me and I fell down. He started to beat me with a wooden stick. I couldn’t defend myself. I witnessed beatings of other people. In the evening if people smoked they were beaten. They [the guards] were always humiliating us. One man was smoking … and five guards started to beat him very hard and they made his eye black and blue and beat his back with a stick. And everyone who tried to intervene was beaten.

    “Ahmad,” a 26-year-old man from Aleppo, said Turkish police arrested him at his workplace, a tailor shop in Istanbul, and took him to Tuzla Removal Center where he was severely beaten on multiple occasions:

    I was beaten in Tuzla three times; the last time was the harshest for me. I was arguing about the fact that I should be allowed to go out of the doors of the prison, I should have been allowed time for breaks. So they [the guards] cursed me and insulted me and my family. I said I would complain to their director. I was beaten on my face with a wooden stick, and they [the guards] broke my teeth.

    Ahmad was eventually deported to northern Syria through the Bab al-Salam border crossing and is now staying in Azaz city, currently under the control of the Turkey-backed Syrian Interim Government, an opposition group, as he cannot cross into Syrian government-controlled Aleppo city because he is wanted by the Syrian army. “I fled the war [in Syria] because I am against violence,” he said. “Now they [the Turkish authorities] sent me back here. I just want to be in a safe place.”

    “Hassan,” a 27-year-old former political prisoner and survivor of torture from Damascus, was arrested at his house when his neighbors complained about the noise coming from his apartment. He spent a few months being transferred between various removal centers. At the last one, he was told to sign a voluntary return form. When he refused to sign, Hassan said, “I was put inside a cage, like a cage for a dog. It was metal … approximately 1.5 meters by one meter. When the sun hit the cage it was so hot.”

    When he was first arrested, Hassan managed to contact his wife before his phone was confiscated. She found a lawyer who helped secure his release.

    Forced to Sign “Voluntary Return” Forms

    Many deportees said Turkish officials – either removal center guards, or officials they described as “police” or “jandarma” interchangeably – used violence or the threat of violence to force them into signing “voluntary” return forms.

    Human Rights Watch gathered testimony indicating deportees were forced to sign “voluntary return” forms at removal centers in Adana, Tuzla, Gaziantep, and Diyarbakır, and a migration office in Mersin.

    “Mustafa,” a 21-year-old man from Idlib, was arrested on the streets in the Esenyurt neighborhood of Istanbul. After several days in a removal center in Pendik, he was transferred to Adana, where he was put in a small cell with 33 other Syrian men for a night. In the morning, Mustafa said, a jandarma officer came to take detainees separately to another room:

    When my turn came, they took two of us into a room where there were four officials: a jandarma, a plain-clothed man, the [Adana Removal Center] migration director, and a translator. I saw three people sitting on the floor under the table who had been taken earlier from our cell and their faces were swollen.

    The translator asked the man who was with me to sign some papers, but when he saw one was a voluntary return form he didn’t want to sign. The jandarma and the plain-clothed guy started beating him with their hands and their batons and kicked him. After about 10 minutes they tied his hands and moved him next to the men already on the floor under the table. The translator asked me if I wanted to taste what the others had tasted before me. I said no and signed the paper.

    Mustafa was later deported from Cilvegözü/Bab al-Hawa border crossing and is now staying in al-Bab city in northern Aleppo province.

    Syria Remains Unsafe for Returns

    Most people interviewed said they originated from government-controlled areas in Syria. They said they could not cross from the opposition-controlled areas of northern Syria to their places of origin for fear Syrian security agencies would arbitrarily arrest them and otherwise violate their rights. Those deported to northern Syria told Human Rights Watch they felt “stuck” there, unable to go to home or to forge a life amid the instability of clashes in northern Syria.

    “I cannot go back to Damascus because it is too dangerous,” said “Firaz,” 31, in a telephone interview, who is from the Damascus Countryside and was deported from Turkey in July 2022 and is now living in Afrin in northern Syria. “There is fighting and clashes [in Afrin]. What do I do? Where do I go?”

    In October 2021, Human Rights Watch documented that Syrian refugees who returned to Syria between 2017 and 2021 from Lebanon and Jordan faced grave human rights abuses and persecution at the hands of the Syrian government and affiliated militias, demonstrating that Syria is not safe for returns.

    While active hostilities may have decreased in recent years, the Syrian government has continued to inflict the same abuses onto citizens that led them to flee in the first place, including arbitrary detention, mistreatment, and torture. In September, the UN Commission of Inquiry on Syria once again concluded that Syria is not safe for returns.

    In addition to the fear of arrest and persecution, 10 years of conflict have decimated Syria’s infrastructure and social services, resulting in massive humanitarian needs. Over 13 million Syrians needed humanitarian assistance as of early 2021. Millions of people in northeast and northwest Syria, many of whom are internally displaced, rely on the cross-border flow of food, medicine, and other lifesaving assistance.

    International Law

    Turkey is a party to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) and the European Convention on Human Rights, both of which prohibit arbitrary arrest and detention and inhuman and degrading treatment. If Turkey detains a person to deport them but there is no realistic prospect of doing so, including because they would face harm in the destination country, or the person is unable to challenge their removal, the detention is arbitrary.

    Turkey’s treaty obligations under the European Convention, the ICCPR, the Convention Against Torture, and the 1951 Refugee Convention also require it to uphold the principle of nonrefoulement, which prohibits the return of anyone to a place where they would face a real risk of persecution, torture or other ill-treatment, or a threat to life.

    Turkey may not use violence or the threat of violence or detention to coerce people to return to places where they face harm. This includes Syrian asylum seekers, who are entitled to automatic protection under Turkish law, including any who have been blocked from registration for temporary protection since late 2017. It is important that it also applies to refugees who have sought employment outside the province in which they are registered. Children should never be detained for reasons solely related to their immigration status, or detained alongside unrelated adults.

    EU Funding of Turkey’s Migration Management

    The implementation of the March 2016 EU-Turkey deal, which aimed to control the number of migrants reaching the EU by sending them back to Turkey, is based on the flawed premise that Turkey would be a safe third country to which to return Syrian asylum seekers. However, Turkey has never met the EU’s safe third country criteria as defined by EU law. The recent violent deportations show that any Syrian forcibly returned from the EU to Turkey would face a risk of onward refoulement to Syria.

    In June 2021, the Greek government adopted a Joint Ministerial Decision determining that Turkey was safe third country for asylum seekers from Syria, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Somalia.

    Turkey’s removal centers have been constructed and maintained with significant funding from the European Union. Prior to 2016, under the Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA I and IPA II), the EU provided more than €89 million for the construction, renovation, or other support of removal centers in Turkey. Some €54 million of this funding in 2007 and 2008 was for the construction of seven removal centers in six provinces with a capacity for 3,750 people. In 2014, it provided another €6.7 million for renovation and refurbishment of 17 removal centers. In 2015, the EU provided about €29 million for the construction of six new removal centers with a capacity for 2,400 people.

    Following the first €3 billion committed to Turkey as part of the EU-Turkey deal of March 2016, the EU’s Facility for Refugees in Turkey (FRiT) provided €60 million to the then-Directorate General for Migration Management to “support Turkey in the management, reception and hosting of migrants, in particular irregular migrants detected in Turkey, as well as migrants returned from EU Member States territories to Turkey.” This funding was used for the construction and refurbishment of the Çankırı removal center and for staffing 22 other removal centers.

    The EU provided another €22.3 million to the DGMM for improving services and physical conditions in removal centers, including funding for “the safe and organized transfer of irregular migrants and refugees within Turkey,” and €3.5 million for “capacity-building assistance aimed at strengthening access to rights and services.”

    On December 21, 2021, the European Commission announced a €30 million financing decision to support the Turkish Interior Ministry’s Presidency of Migration Management’s “capacity building and improving the standards and conditions for migrants in Turkey’s hosting centers … to improve the management of reception and hosting centers in line with human rights standards and gender-sensitive approaches” and to ensure “safe and dignified transfer of irregular migrants.”

    https://www.hrw.org/news/2022/10/24/turkey-hundreds-refugees-deported-syria

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #réfugiés_syriens #Turquie #renvois #expulsions #retour_au_pays #déportation #arrestations #rétention #détention_administrative

    –—

    ajouté à la métaliste Sur le #retour_au_pays / #expulsions de #réfugiés_syriens...
    https://seenthis.net/messages/904710

  • L’#Odyssée_d'Hakim T01

    L’histoire vraie d’Hakim, un jeune Syrien qui a dû fuir son pays pour devenir « réfugié » . Un témoignage puissant, touchant, sur ce que c’est d’être humain dans un monde qui oublie parfois de l’être.L’histoire vraie d’un homme qui a dû tout quitter : sa famille, ses amis, sa propre entreprise... parce que la guerre éclatait, parce qu’on l’avait torturé, parce que le pays voisin semblait pouvoir lui offrir un avenir et la sécurité. Un récit du réel, entre espoir et violence, qui raconte comment la guerre vous force à abandonner votre terre, ceux que vous aimez et fait de vous un réfugié.Une série lauréate du Prix Franceinfo de la Bande Dessinée d’Actualité et de Reportage.

    https://www.editions-delcourt.fr/bd/series/serie-l-odyssee-d-hakim/album-l-odyssee-d-hakim-t01

    Tome 2 :


    https://www.editions-delcourt.fr/bd/series/serie-l-odyssee-d-hakim/album-l-odyssee-d-hakim-t02

    Tome 3 :


    https://www.editions-delcourt.fr/bd/series/serie-l-odyssee-d-hakim/album-odyssee-d-hakim-t03-de-la-macedoine-la-france

    #BD #bande_dessinée #livre

    #réfugiés #réfugiés_syriens #asile #migrations #parcours_migratoires #itinéraire_migratoire #Syrie #histoire #guerre_civile #printemps_arabe #manifestation #Damas #Bachal_al-Assad #violence #dictature #contestation #révolution #répression #pénurie #arrestations_arbitraires #prison #torture #chabihas #milices #déplacés_internes #IDPs #Liban #Beyrouth #Amman #Jordanie #Turquie #Antalya #déclassement #déclassement_social #Balkans #route_des_Balkans #Grèce

  • La #Pologne érigera une clôture en barbelés à sa frontière avec le #Bélarus

    La Pologne a annoncé lundi qu’elle allait ériger une « solide #clôture » de barbelés, haute de 2,5 mètres, à la frontière polono-bélarusse et y augmenter ses effectifs militaires pour empêcher les migrants de pénétrer sur son sol.

    La Pologne a annoncé lundi qu’elle allait ériger une « solide clôture » de barbelés, haute de 2,5 mètres, à la frontière polono-bélarusse et y augmenter ses effectifs militaires pour empêcher les migrants de pénétrer sur son sol.

    Varsovie et les trois pays baltes (la Lituanie, la Lettonie et l’Estonie) dénoncent ensemble une « attaque hybride » organisée par le Bélarus qui, selon eux, encourage les migrants à passer illégalement sur le territoire de l’Union européenne.

    Le ministre polonais de la Défense, Mariusz Blaszczak, a précisé lundi qu’une nouvelle clôture « à l’instar de celle qui a fait ses preuves à la frontière serbo-hongroise », composée de quelques spirales superposées de fils barbelés, doublerait la première barrière à fil unique qui s’étend déjà sur environ 130 kilomètres, soit sur près d’un tiers de la longueur de la frontière entre les deux pays.

    « Les travaux commenceront dès la semaine prochaine », a déclaré M. Blaszczak à la presse.

    Le ministre a annoncé que les effectifs militaires à la frontière allaient prochainement doubler, pour atteindre environ 2.000 soldats dépêchés sur place afin de soutenir la police des frontières.

    « Nous nous opposerons à la naissance d’une nouvelle voie de trafic d’immigrés, via le territoire polonais », a-t-il insisté.

    Les quatre pays de la partie orientale de l’Union européenne ont exhorté lundi l’Organisation des Nations unies à prendre des mesures à l’encontre du Bélarus.

    Les Premiers ministres d’Estonie, de Lettonie, de Lituanie et de Pologne ont assuré dans une déclaration commune que l’afflux des migrants avait été « planifié et systématiquement organisé par le régime d’Alexandre Loukachenko ».

    Des milliers de migrants, pour la plupart originaires du Moyen-Orient, ont franchi la frontière bélarusso-européenne ces derniers mois, ce que l’Union européenne considère comme une forme de représailles du régime bélarusse face aux sanctions de plus en plus sévères que l’UE lui impose.

    « Il est grand temps de porter la question du mauvais traitement infligé aux migrants sur le territoire bélarusse à l’attention des Nations unies, notamment du Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies », peut-on lire dans la déclaration.

    Les quatre pays affirment qu’ils accorderont toute la protection nécessaire aux réfugiés traversant la frontière, conformément au droit international, mais ils demandent également d’« éventuelles nouvelles mesures restrictives de la part de l’UE pour empêcher toute nouvelle immigration illégale organisée par l’Etat bélarusse ».

    Dans de nombreux cas, les autorités de Minsk repoussent les migrants vers la frontière de l’UE, ce qui a déjà conduit à des situations inextricables.

    Un groupe de migrants afghans reste ainsi bloqué depuis deux semaines sur une section de la frontière entre la Pologne et le Bélarus.

    Des organisations polonaises des droits de l’Homme et l’opposition libérale accusent le gouvernement nationaliste-conservateur polonais de refuser de secourir les personnes ayant besoin d’aide et d’ainsi violer le droit international.

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/fil-dactualites/230821/la-pologne-erigera-une-cloture-en-barbeles-sa-frontiere-avec-le-belarus

    #frontières #murs #barrières_frontalières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Biélorussie #militarisation_de_la_frontière

    –-
    voir aussi la métaliste sur la situation à la frontière entre la #Pologne et la #Biélorussie (2021) :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/935860

    • On the EU’s eastern border, Poland builds a fence to stop migrants

      Polish soldiers were building a fence on the border with Belarus on Thursday, as the European Union’s largest eastern member takes steps to curb illegal border crossings despite criticism that some migrants are being treated inhumanely.

      Brussels has accused Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko of using migrants as part of a “hybrid war” designed to put pressure on the bloc over sanctions it has imposed, and building the wall is part of Poland’s efforts to beef up border security on the EU’s eastern flank.

      “Almost 3 km of fencing has been erected since yesterday,” Defence Minister Mariusz Blaszczak said on Twitter, adding that almost 1,800 soldiers were supporting the border guard.

      Blaszczak said on Monday that a new 2.5 metre high solid fence would be built, modelled on the one built by Prime Minister Viktor Orban on Hungary’s border with Serbia.

      On Thursday Reuters saw soldiers next the frontier stringing wire through barbed wire to hook it to posts.

      Poland has received sharp criticism over its treatment of a group of migrants who have been stuck on the Belarus border for over two weeks, living in the open air with little food and water and no access to sanitary facilities.

      On Wednesday refugee charity the Ocalenie Foundation said 12 out of 32 migrants stuck on the border were seriously ill and one was close to death.

      “No fence or wire anywhere in the world has stopped any people fleeing war and persecution,” said Marianna Wartecka from the foundation who was at the border on Thursday.

      Poland says responsibility for the migrants lies with Belarus. The prime minister said this week that a convoy of humanitarian offered by Poland had been refused by Minsk.

      Surveys show that most Poles are against accepting migrants, and Poland’s ruling nationalists Law and Justice (PiS) made a refusal to accept refugee quotas a key plank of its election campaign when it swept to power in 2015.

      An IBRiS poll for private broadcaster Polsat on Wednesday showed that almost 55% of respondents were against accepting migrants and refugees, while over 47% were in favour of a border wall.

      “Our country cannot allow such a large group of people to break our laws,” said Emilia Krystopowicz, a 19-year-old physiotherapy student, in Krynki, a village next the border.

      Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko has accused Poland and Lithuania of fuelling the migrant issue on the borders.

      https://www.reuters.com/world/europe/eus-eastern-border-poland-builds-fence-stop-migrants-2021-08-26

    • Poland to build anti-refugee wall on Belarus border

      Poland has become the latest European country to start building an anti-refugee wall, with a new fence on its border with Belarus.

      The 2.5-metre high wall would be modelled on one built by Hungary on its border with Serbia in 2015, Polish defence minister Mariusz Blaszczak said.

      “We are dealing with an attack on Poland. It is an attempt to trigger a migration crisis,” he told press at a briefing near the Belarus frontier on Monday (23 August).

      “It is [also] necessary to increase the number of soldiers [on the border] ... We will soon double the number of soldiers to 2,000,” he added.

      “We will not allow the creation of a route for the transfer of migrants via Poland to the European Union,” he said.

      The minister shared photos of a 100-km razor-wire barrier, which Poland already erected in recent weeks.

      Some 2,100 people from the Middle East and Africa tried to enter Poland via Belarus in the past few months in what Blaszczak called “a dirty game of [Belarus president Alexander] Lukashenko and the Kremlin” to hit back at EU sanctions.

      “These are not refugees, they are economic migrants brought in by the Belarusian government,” deputy foreign minister Marcin Przydacz also said on Monday.

      Some people were pushed over the border by armed Belarusian police who fired in the air behind them, according to Polish NGO Minority Rights Group.

      Others were pushed back by Polish soldiers, who should have let them file asylum claims, while another 30-or-so people have been stuck in no man’s land without food or shelter.

      “People were asking the [Polish] border guards for protection and the border guards were pushing them back,” Piotr Bystrianin from the Ocalenie Foundation, another Polish NGO, told the Reuters news agency.

      “That means they were in contact and that means they should give them the possibility to apply for protection ... It’s very simple,” he said.

      “We have been very concerned by ... people being stranded for days,” Shabia Mantoo, a spokeswoman for the UN refugee agency, the UNHCR, also said.

      But for its part, the Polish government had little time for moral niceties.

      “The statements and behaviour of a significant number of Polish politicians, journalists, and NGO activists show that a scenario in which a foreign country carrying out such an attack against Poland will receive support from allies in our country is very real,” Polish deputy foreign minister Paweł Jabłoński said.

      Belarus has also been pushing refugees into Lithuania and Latvia, with more than 4,000 people recently crossing into Lithuania.

      “Using immigrants to destabilise neighbouring countries constitutes a clear breach of international law and qualifies as a hybrid attack against ... Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, and thus against the entire European Union,” the Baltic states and Poland said in a joint statement on Monday.

      Lithuania is building a 3-metre high, 508-km wall on its Belarus border in a €152m project for which it wants EU money.

      The wall would be completed by September 2022, Lithuanian prime minister Ingrida Simonyte said on Monday.

      “The physical barrier is vital for us to repel this hybrid attack,” she said.
      Fortress Europe

      The latest upsurge in wall-building began with Greece, which said last week it had completed a 40-km fence on its border with Turkey to keep out potential Afghan refugees.

      And Turkey has started building a 3-metre high concrete barrier on its 241-km border with Iran for the same reason.

      “The Afghan crisis is creating new facts in the geopolitical sphere and at the same time it is creating possibilities for migrant flows,” Greece’s citizens’ protection minister Michalis Chrisochoidis said.

      Turkey would not become Europe’s “refugee warehouse”, Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan said.

      https://euobserver.com/world/152711

    • Comme la Lituanie, la Pologne veut sa barrière anti-migrants à la frontière biélorusse

      Varsovie et Vilnius veulent construire des barrières contre les migrants qui transitent par le Bélarus, tandis que la situation humanitaire continue de se détériorer à la frontière orientale de l’Union européenne.

      La pression augmente pour faire de l’Union une forteresse. Vendredi 8 octobre, douze pays, dont la Pologne et la Lituanie, ont réclamé d’une seule voix que l’Union européenne finance la construction de barrières à ses frontières externes. Il s’agit de l’Autriche, la Bulgarie, Chypre, la République tchèque, le Danemark, l’Estonie, la Grèce, la Hongrie, la Lituanie, la Lettonie, la Pologne et la Slovaquie.

      « Je ne suis pas contre », a répondu la commissaire aux Affaires intérieures Ylva Johansson. « Mais quant à savoir si on devrait utiliser les fonds européens qui sont limités, pour financer la construction de clôtures à la place d’autres choses tout aussi importantes, c’est une autre question ».

      La question migratoire agite particulièrement en Pologne, soumise à une pression inédite sur sa frontière orientale, avec le Bélarus. Le 7 octobre, le vice-Premier ministre Jarosław Kaczyński, qui préside aussi la commission des affaires de sécurité nationale et de défense, a confirmé la construction d’une barrière permanente le long de la frontière polono-biélorusse. Lors d’une conférence de presse tenue au siège de l’unité des gardes-frontières de Podlachie, frontalière avec la Biélorussie, il a expliqué : « Nous avons discuté des décisions déjà prises, y compris dans le domaine financier, pour construire une barrière très sérieuse. Le genre de barrière qu’il est très difficile de franchir. L’expérience européenne, l’expérience de plusieurs pays, par exemple la Hongrie et la Grèce, montre que c’est la seule méthode efficace ».

      La Pologne a débuté les travaux en août dernier et des barbelés ont déjà été tirés sur des sections sensibles de la frontière polono-biélorusse. Lorsqu’elle aura atteint son terme, la barrière fera 180 kilomètres de long et plus de deux mètres de haut.

      La Lituanie, autre pays frontalier de la Biélorussie, a elle aussi déroulé les barbelés et alloué 152 millions d’euros pour la construction d’une barrière de quatre mètres de haut, sur cinq cents kilomètres, qui doit être prête en septembre 2022.

      Le gouvernement national-conservateur du Droit et Justice (PiS) a réagi par la manière forte à la pression migratoire inédite sur ses frontières. Plusieurs milliers de soldats ont été déployés pour prêter main-forte aux gardes-frontières.

      Le Sénat a adopté le 8 octobre un amendement qui autorise l’expulsion immédiate des étrangers interpellés après avoir franchi la frontière irrégulièrement, sans examiner leur demande de protection internationale. En clair, il s’agit de passer un vernis de légalité sur la pratique dit de « pushback » qui contrevient aux règles internationales, mais utilisées ailleurs sur la frontière de l’UE, parfois très violemment, comme en témoigne la diffusion récente de vidéos à la frontière de la Croatie.
      Loukachenko accusé de trafic d’êtres humains

      Varsovie et Vilnius accusent de concert le président autocrate du Bélarus, Alexandre Loukachenko, de chercher à ouvrir une nouvelle route migratoire vers l’Europe, dans le but de se venger de leur soutien actif à l’opposition bélarusse en exil et des sanctions européennes consécutives aux élections frauduleuses d’août 2020.

      « Ce sont les immigrants économiques qui arrivent. Ils sont amenés dans le cadre d’une opération organisée par les autorités biélorusses avec l’assentiment clair de la Fédération de Russie. Les agences de sécurité biélorusses le tolèrent totalement et y sont présentes », a noté Jarosław Kaczyński. « Ces personnes sont conduites vers des endroits où elles auront une chance de traverser la frontière. Parfois, des officiers biélorusses participent personnellement au franchissement des barrières et à la coupure des fils », a-t-il ajouté.

      « Des centaines de milliers de personnes seront acheminées à notre frontière orientale », a avancé le ministre polonais de l’Intérieur Mariusz Kamiński, au mois de septembre.
      Soutien de la Commission européenne

      La Commission européenne dénonce, elle aussi, « un trafic de migrants parrainé par l’État [biélorusse] ». Le 5 octobre, Ylva Johansson, commissaire européenne chargée des affaires intérieures, a déclaré que « le régime utilise des êtres humains d’une manière sans précédent, pour faire pression sur l’Union européenne. […] Ils attirent les gens à Minsk. Qui sont ensuite transportés vers la frontière. Dans des mini-fourgonnettes banalisées. ».

      C’est aussi une manne économique pour Minsk, a détaillé Ylva Johansson. « Les gens viennent en voyages organisés par l’entreprise touristique d’État Centrkurort. Ils séjournent dans des hôtels agréés par l’état. Ils paient des dépôts de plusieurs milliers de dollars, qu’ils ne récupèrent jamais ».
      La situation humanitaire se dégrade

      L’hiver approche et les températures sont passées sous zéro degré les nuits dernières en Podlachie, la région du nord-est de la Pologne, frontalière avec la Biélorussie. Des groupes d’immigrants qui tentent de se frayer un chemin vers l’Union européenne errent dans les forêts de part et d’autre de la frontière qui est aussi celle de l’Union. « Ce [samedi] soir il fait -2 degrés en Podlachie. Des enfants dorment à même le sol, quelque part dans nos forêts. Des enfants déportés vers ces forêts sur ordre des autorités polonaises », affirme le Groupe frontalier (Grupa Granica).

      Une collecte a été lancée pour permettre à une quarantaine de médecins volontaires d’apporter des soins de première urgence aux migrants victimes d’hypothermie, de blessures, d’infections ou encore de maladies chroniques. Avec les trente mille euros levés dès la première journée (près de soixante mille euros à ce jour), trois équipes ont débuté leurs opérations de sauvetage. « Nous voulons seulement aider et empêcher les gens à la frontière de souffrir et de mourir », explique le docteur Jakub Sieczko à la radio TOK FM. Mais le ministère de l’Intérieur leur refuse l’accès à la zone où a été décrété un état d’urgence au début du mois de septembre, tenant éloignés journalistes et humanitaires de la tragédie en cours.

      Quatre personnes ont été retrouvées mortes – vraisemblablement d’hypothermie – dans l’espace frontalier, le 19 septembre, puis un adolescent irakien cinq jours plus tard. La fondation pour le Salut (Ocalenie) a accusé les gardes-frontières polonais d’avoir repoussé en Biélorussie le jeune homme en très mauvaise santé et sa famille quelques heures plus tôt.

      A ce jour, ce flux migratoire n’est en rien comparable à celui de l’année 2015 via la « Route des Balkans », mais il est dix fois supérieur aux années précédentes. Samedi, 739 tentatives de franchissement illégal de la frontière ont été empêchées par les gardes-frontières polonais, qui ont enregistré plus de 3 000 tentatives d’entrée irrégulière au mois d’août, et près de 5 000 en septembre.

      https://courrierdeuropecentrale.fr/comme-la-lituanie-la-pologne-veut-aussi-sa-barriere-anti-mig

    • EU’s job is not to build external border barriers, says Commission vice president

      Yes to security coordination and technology; no to ‘cement and stones,’ says Margaritis Schinas.

      The European Commission is ready to support member countries in strengthening the bloc’s external borders against the “hybrid threat” posed by international migrant flows but doesn’t want to pay for the construction of physical border barriers, Commission Vice President Margaritis Schinas said Thursday.

      Rather than defending borders with “cement and stones,” Schinas said in an interview at POLITICO’s Health Care Summit, the EU can usefully provide support in the form of security coordination and technology.

      Highlighting how divisive the issue is of the use of EU funds for physical barriers, which EU leaders discussed at length at a summit last Friday morning, Schinas’ line is different from the one expressed by his party in the European Parliament, the center-right EPP, and by his own country, Greece.

      He was responding to comments by Manfred Weber, chairman of the European Parliament’s EPP group, in support of a letter, first reported by POLITICO’s Playbook, by 12 member countries, including countries like Greece, Denmark and Hungary, to finance a physical barrier with EU money.

      Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said after last week’s Council summit that no EU money would be spent to build “barbed wire and walls.”

      “The Commission position is very clear. We are facing a new kind of threat on our external border. This is a hybrid threat,” said Schinas. “The obvious thing for the European Union to do is to make sure that those who seek to attack Europe by weaponizing human misery know that we will defend the border … I think that, so far, we have managed to do it.”

      “At the same time we do have resources that will allow us to help member states to organize their defences — not of course by financing the cement and the stones and the physical obstacles of walls,” he added.

      “But we have the capacity to assist and finance member states for the broader ecosystem of border management at the European Union external border,” said Schinas, referring to setting up command centers and deploying equipment such as thermal cameras. “This is how we will do it. If there is one lesson that this situation has taught us [it] is that migration is a common problem. It cannot be delegated to our member states.”

      Eastern member states have accused authoritarian leader Alexander Lukashenko of flying thousands of people into Belarus and then sending them on hazardous journeys into EU territory. Polish lawmakers approved €350 million in spending last week to build a wall along the country’s border with Belarus.

      https://www.politico.eu/article/eus-job-is-not-to-build-external-border-barriers-says-commission-vice-presi

    • Poland Begins Constructing Border Walls To Deter Asylum-Seeking Refugees

      Poland has begun the construction of a new border wall, estimated to cost $400 million and likely to be completed by June 2022. The wall will stand 5.5 meters high (six yards) and will have a final length of 186 km (115 miles).

      “Our intention is for the damage to be as small as possible,” border guard spokeswoman Anna Michalska assured Poland’s PAP news agency on January 25th. “Tree felling will be limited to the minimum required. The wall itself will be built along the border road.”

      While the Polish border forces are taking extra precautions not to disrupt the nature surrounding the border, there have been concerns about the human rights of asylum-seeking refugees. Over the past decade, there has been a rise in Middle Eastern and African refugees entering European Union countries, primarily through Eastern European territories. Standards set by the United Nations state that it is not illegal to seek refugee status in another country if an individual is in danger within their home country; however, Poland has sent numerous troops to its borders to deter asylum seekers trying to enter the nation on foot from Belarus. Poland has accused Belarus of encouraging asylum seekers to use the state as a passage into E.U. countries that may be a more favorable residency. The Belarusian government has denied these accusations, stating that Poland’s current attempts to restrict the number of refugees allowed in its country are inhumane and a human rights issue. Poland has since claimed that the “easy journey” allowed by Belarus’s government, and potentially supported by its ally Russia, is a non-militant attack against not only Poland, but the rest of the E.U.

      As the two countries continue in their conflict, the asylum seekers – individuals from around the world in need of safety and shelter – are being caught in the crossfire.

      Over the past months, Poland has increased border security, built a razor-wire fence along a large majority of the border, closed off border territories from the media and advocacy groups, and approved a new law allowing the border guard to force asylum seekers back into Belarus. Due to the recent changes, the number of refugees entering Poland has decreased, but this does not mean that the number of asylum seekers in need of aid from E.U. countries has decreased. Numerous groups still try to cross the treacherous border; the Polish border guard estimates that there are seventeen crossings just in the span of 24 hours. Al Jazeera reported on the 25th that Polish border security caught a group of fourteen asylum seekers, the majority of them fleeing Middle Eastern countries, cutting through a portion of the wire fence. These individuals, like many asylum seekers discovered along the border, have been “detained” until the Polish government decides whether to grant them refugee status or force them to return to Belarus.

      While Poland’s frustration with the uneven distribution of asylum seekers entering their country compared to others within the E.U. is understandable, its poor treatment of those in need of aid and protection is unacceptable. Rather than raising arms and security, Poland and the European Union must explore options of refugee resettlement that appease Polish desires for an equal dispersal of refugees throughout Europe without turning away people who need real government assistance. No matter its attitude towards Belarus, Poland must not turn its punishment towards those in need of refuge.

      https://theowp.org/poland-begins-constructing-border-walls-to-deter-asylum-seeking-refugees

    • "The Iron Forest" - building the walls to scar the nature

      If I could bring one thing from my hometown, it would be the fresh air of the conifers from “my” forest. This is the statement my friends have heard me say many times, in particular when I feel nostalgic about my hometown.

      Augustów, where I am from, lies in the midst of Augustów Primeval Forest, in the North-East of Poland — a region referred to as the “green lungs” of Poland. It is an enormous virgin forest complex stretching across the border with Lithuania and connecting with other forests in the region.

      When I was 10, I went on a school trip to a neighbouring Bialowieza forest — a UNESCO heritage site with its largest European bison population. I still remember the tranquillity and magnificence of its landscape including stoic bison. I never would have thought that some years later, the serenity of this place will face being destroyed by the wall built on the Polish and Belarusian border, following the recent events of the refugee crisis.

      Today, I am a mental health scientist with a background in Psychology and Psychological Medicine. I am also a Pole from the North-East of Poland. Embracing both identities, in this blog, I would like to talk about “building walls” and what it means from a psychological perspective.
      Building Walls and Social Identity

      Following the humanitarian crisis which recently took place on the border between Belarus and Poland, we are now witnessing Poland building a wall which would prevent asylum seekers from Syria, Iraqi Kurdistan and Afghanistan, to cross the border.

      The concept of building a wall to separate nations isn’t new. I am sure you have heard about the Berlin wall separating East and West Germany, the Israeli West Bank Barrier between Israel and Palestine, or more recently the wall between Mexico and the US. In fact, according to Elisabeth Vallet, a professor at the University of Quebec-Montreal, since World War II the number of border walls jumped from 7 to at least 70! So, how can we explain this need to separate?

      In her article for the New Yorker on “Do walls change how we think”, Jessica Wapner talks about the three main purposes of the walls which are “establishing peace, preventing smuggling, and terrorism”. It is based on the premises of keeping “the others” away, the others that are threatening to “us”, our safety, integrity and identity. These motivations form the basis for the political agenda of nationalism.

      Using the words of the famous psychologist, Elliot Aronson, humans are social animals, and we all have the need to belong to a group. This has been well described by the Social Identity Theory which claims that positive evaluation of the group we belong to helps us to maintain positive self-image and self-esteem. Negative evaluation of the “the other,” or the outgroup, further reaffirms the positive image of your own group — the intergroup bias. As such, strong social identity helps us feel safe and secure psychologically, which is handy in difficult times such as perceived threat posed by another nation or any other crisis. However, it often creates a “psychological illusion” as in attempt to seek that comfort, we distort the reality placing ourselves and our group in a more favourable light. This, in turn, only worsens the crisis, as described by Vamik Volkan, a psychiatrist and the president of the International Society of Political Psychology, in the article by Jessica Wapner.

      The disillusionment of walls

      In reality, history shows consistently that building walls have only, and many, negative consequences. The positive ones, well, are an illusion: based on the false sense of psychological protection.

      In 1973, a German psychiatrist #Dietfried_Müller-Hegemann, published a book, “#Wall_disease”, in which he talked about the surge of mental illness in people living “in the shadow” of the wall. Those who lived in the proximity of the Berlin wall showed higher rates of paranoia, psychosis, depression, alcoholism and other mental health difficulties. And the psychological consequences of the Iron Curtain lingered long after the actual wall was gone: in 2005, a group of scientists were interested in the mental representation of the distances between the cities in Germany among the German population. They demonstrated systematic overestimations of distances between German cities that were situated across the former Iron Curtain, compared with the estimated difference between cities all within the East or the West Germany. For example, people overestimated the distance between Dusseldorf and Magdeburg, but not between Dusseldorf and Hannover, or between Magdeburg and Leipzig.

      What was even more interesting is that this discrepancy was stronger in those who had a negative attitude towards the reintegration! These findings show that even when the physical separation is no longer present, the psychological distance persists.

      Building walls is a perfect strategy to prevent dialogue and cooperation and to turn the blind eye to what is happening on the other side — if I can’t see it, it doesn’t exist.

      It embodies two different ideologies that could not find the way to compromise and resorted to “sweeping the problem under the carpet”. From a psychoanalytical point of view, it refers to denial — a defence mechanism individuals experience and apply when struggling to cope with the demands of reality. It is important and comes to the rescue when we truly struggle, but, inevitably, it needs to be addressed for recovery to be possible. Perhaps this analogy applies to societies too.

      It goes without saying that the atmosphere created by putting the walls up is that of fear of “the other” and hostility. Jessica Wapner describes it very well in her article for the New Yorker, as she talks about the dystopian atmosphere of the looming surveillance and the mental illness that goes with it.

      And lastly, I wouldn’t want to miss a very important point related to the wall of interest in this blog — the Poland-Belarus wall. In this particular case, we will not only deal with the partition between people, but also between animals and within the ecosystem of the forest, which is likely to have a devastating effect on the environment and the local society.

      Bringing this blog to conclusion, I hope that we can take a step back and reflect on what history and psychology tell us about the needs and motivations to “build walls”, both physically and metaphorically, and the disillusionment and devastating consequences it might have: for people, for society, and for nature.

      https://www.inspirethemind.org/blog/the-iron-forest-building-the-walls-to-scar-the-nature
      #santé_mentale

    • Poland’s border wall to cut through Europe’s last old-growth forest

      Work has begun on a 116-mile long fence on the Polish-Belarusian border. Scientists call it an environmental “disaster.”

      The border between Poland and Belarus is a land of forests, rolling hills, river valleys, and wetlands. But this once peaceful countryside has become a militarized zone. Prompted by concerns about an influx of primarily Middle Eastern migrants from Belarus, the Polish government has begun construction on a massive wall across its eastern border.

      Human rights organizations and conservation groups have decried the move. The wall will be up to 18 feet tall (5.5 meters) and stretch for 116 miles (186 kilometers) along Poland’s eastern border, according to the Polish Border Guard, despite laws in place that the barrier seems to violate. It’s slated to plow through fragile ecosystems, including Białowieża Forest, the continent’s last lowland old-growth woodland.

      If completed within the next few months as planned, the wall would block migration routes for many animal species, such as wolves, lynx, red deer, recovering populations of brown bears, and the largest remaining population of European bison, says Katarzyna Nowak, a researcher at the Białowieża Geobotanical Station, part of the University of Warsaw. This could have wide-ranging impacts, since the Polish-Belarus border is one of the most important corridors for wildlife movement between Eastern Europe and Eurasia, and animal species depend on connected populations to stay genetically healthy.

      Border fences are rising around the world, the U.S.-Mexico wall being one of the most infamous. A tragic irony of such walls is that while they do reliably stop the movement of wildlife, they do not entirely prevent human migration; they generally only delay or reroute it. And they don’t address its root causes. Migrants often find ways to breach walls, by going over, under, or through them.

      Nevertheless, time after time, the specter of migrants crossing borders has caused governments to ignore laws meant to protect the environment, says John Linnell, a biologist with the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research.

      Polish border wall construction will entail heavy traffic, noise, and light in pristine borderland forests, and the work could also include logging and road building.

      “In my opinion, this is a disaster,” says Bogdan Jaroszewicz, director of the Białowieża Geobotanical Station.
      Fomenting a crisis

      The humanitarian crisis at the border began in summer 2021, as thousands of migrants began entering Belarus, often with promises by the Belarusian government of assistance in reaching other locations within Europe. But upon arrival in Belarus, many were not granted legal entry, and thousands have tried to cross into Poland, Latvia, and Lithuania. Migrants have often been intercepted by Polish authorities and forced back to Belarus. At least a dozen migrants have died of hypothermia, malnourishment, or other causes.

      Conflict between Belarus and the EU flared when Alexander Lukashenko claimed victory in the August 2020 presidential election, despite documented claims the election results were falsified. Mass protests and crackdowns followed, along with several rounds of EU sanctions. Poland and other governments have accused Belarus of fomenting the current border crisis as a sort of punishment for the sanctions.

      In response, the Polish government declared a state of emergency on the second of September, which remains in place. Many Polish border towns near the Belarusian border are only open to citizens and travel is severely restricted; tourists, aid workers, journalists, and anybody who doesn’t live or permanently work in the area cannot generally visit or even move through.

      That has made life difficult for the diverse array of people who live in this multi-ethnic, historic border region. Hotels and inns have gone out of business. Researchers trying to do work in the forest have been approached by soldiers at gunpoint demanding to know what they are doing there, says Michał Żmihorski, an ecologist who directs the Mammal Research Institute, part of the Polish Academy of Sciences, based in Białowieża.

      The Polish government has already built a razor-wire fence, about seven feet tall, along the border through the Białowieża Forest and much of the surrounding border areas. Reports suggest this fence has already entrapped and killed animals, including bison and moose. The new wall will start at the north edge of the Polish-Belarusian border, abutting Lithuania, and stretch south to the Bug River, the banks of which are already lined with a razor-wire fence.

      “I assume that it already has had a negative impact on many animals,” Żmihorski says. Further wall construction would “more or less cut the forest in half.”

      Some scientists are circulating an open letter to the European Commission, the executive branch of the EU, to try to halt the wall’s construction.

      Primeval forest

      Much of the Białowieża Forest has been protected since the 1400s, and the area contains the last large expanse of virgin lowland forest, of the kind that once covered Europe from the Ural Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean. “It’s the crown jewel of Europe,” Nowak says.

      Oaks, ash, and linden trees, hundreds of years old, tower over a dense, unmanaged understory—where trees fall and rot undisturbed, explains Eunice Blavascunas, an anthropologist who wrote a book about the region. The forest is home to a wide diversity of fungi and invertebrates—over 16,000 species, between the two groups—in addition to 59 mammalian and 250 bird species.

      In the Polish side of the forest, around 700 European bison can be found grazing in low valleys and forest clearings, a precious population that took a century to replenish. There are also wolves, otters, red deer, and an imperiled population of about a dozen lynx. Normally these animals move back and forth across the border with Belarus. In 2021, a brown bear was reported to have crossed over from Belarus.

      Reports suggest the Polish government may enlarge a clearing through Białowieża and other borderland forests. Besides the impact on wildlife, researchers worry about noise and light pollution, and that the construction could introduce invasive plants that would wreak havoc, fast-growing weedy species such as goldenrod and golden root, Jaroszewicz adds.

      But it’s not just about this forest. Blocking the eastern border of Poland will isolate European wildlife populations from the wider expanse of Eurasia. It’s a problem of continental scale, Linnell says, “a critical issue that this [border] is going to be walled off.”

      Walls cause severe habitat fragmentation; prevent animals from finding mates, food, and water; and in the long term can lead to regional extinctions by severing gene flow, Linnell says.
      Against the law?

      The wall construction runs afoul of several national environment laws, but also important binding international agreements, legal experts say.

      For one, Białowieża Forest is a UNESCO World Heritage site, a rare designation that draws international prestige and tourists. As part of the deal, Poland is supposed to abide by the strictures of the World Heritage Convention—which oblige the country to protect species such as bison—and to avoid harming the environment of the Belarusian part of the forest, explains Arie Trouwborst, an expert in environmental law at Tilburg University in the Netherlands.

      It’s conceivable that construction of the wall could lead UNESCO to revoke the forest’s World Heritage status, which would be a huge blow to the country and the region, Trouwborst adds; A natural heritage site has only been removed from the UNESCO list once in history.

      The Polish part of the Białowieża site has also been designated a Natura 2000 protected area under the European Union Habitats Directive, as are a handful of other borderlands forests. The new wall would “seem to sit uneasily with Poland’s obligations under EU law in this regard, which require it to avoid and remedy activities and projects that may be harmful for the species for which the site was designated, [including] European bison, lynx, and wolf,” Trouwborst says.

      EU law is binding, and it can be enforced within Poland or by the EU Court of Justice, which can impose heavy fines, Trouwborst says. A reasonable interpretation of the law suggests that the Polish government, by building a razor-wire fence through Białowieża Forest, is already in breach of the Habitats Directive. The law dictates that potentially harmful projects may in principle only be authorized “where no reasonable scientific doubt remains as to the absence” of adverse impacts. And further wall construction carries obvious environmental harms.

      “One way or another, building a fence or wall along the border without making it permeable to protected wildlife would seem to be against the law,” Trouwborst says.

      The EU Court of Justice has already shown itself capable of ruling on activity in the Białowieża Forest. The Polish government logged parts of the forest from 2016 to 2018 to remove trees infected by bark beetles. But in April 2018, the Court of Justice ruled that the logging was illegal, and the government stopped cutting down trees. Nevertheless, the Polish government this year resumed logging in the outskirts of Białowieża.
      Walls going up

      Poland is not alone. The global trend toward more border walls threatens to undo decades of progress in environmental protections, especially in transboundary, cooperative approaches to conservation, Linnell says.

      Some of the more prominent areas where walls have recently been constructed include the U.S.-Mexico border; the Slovenian-Croatian boundary; and the entire circumference of Mongolia. Much of the European Union is now fenced off as well, Linnell adds. (Learn more: An endangered wolf went in search of a mate. The border wall blocked him.)

      The large uptick in wall-building seems to have taken many conservationists by surprise, after nearly a century of progress in building connections and cooperation between countries—something especially important in Europe, for example, where no country is big enough to achieve all its conservation goals by itself, since populations of plants and animals stretch across borders.

      This rush to build such walls represents “an unprecedented degree of habitat fragmentation,” Linnell says. It also reveals “a breakdown in international cooperation. You see this return to nationalism, countries trying to fix problems internally... without thought to the environmental cost,” he adds.

      “It shows that external forces can threaten to undo the progress we’ve made in conservation... and how fragile our gains have been.”

      https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/polish-belarusian-border-wall-environmental-disaster
      #nature #faune #forêt #flore

      –-
      voir aussi ce fil de discussion sur les effets sur la faune de la construction de barrières frontalières :
      https://seenthis.net/messages/515608

    • Le spectre d’une nouvelle #crise_humanitaire et migratoire à la frontière entre la Pologne et la Biélorussie

      La #clôture construite par la Pologne en réponse à l’afflux de migrants en 2021, n’empêche pas la Russie de continuer à user de l’immigration comme d’une arme pour déstabiliser l’Europe.


      #Minkowce est une bourgade polonaise d’une centaine d’âmes, accolée à la frontière biélorusse, où les rues non goudronnées, les anciennes maisons de bois et leurs vieilles granges donnent l’impression que le temps s’y est arrêté. « On se croirait en Amérique à la frontière avec le Mexique ! », s’amuse pourtant Tadeusz Sloma, un agriculteur à la retraite. Car si dans cette région forestière, l’automne est humide et resplendit de couleurs vives en cette fin d’octobre, une imposante clôture d’acier de 5,5 mètres de hauteur, rappelant celle du Texas, s’élève depuis peu à proximité immédiate du hameau.

      « On finit par s’y habituer et on ne la regarde même plus », relativise M. Sloma, dont le jardin débouche sur la clôture. Ici, le souvenir de l’afflux migratoire de l’automne 2021 et de ses dizaines de milliers de réfugiés reste vif. « Nous jetions de la nourriture aux migrants au-dessus des barbelés, des sacs de couchage, des habits, se rappelle le retraité. Ils nous répondaient : “Thank you ! We love you !” Des femmes enceintes, des enfants… cela faisait mal au cœur. » Mais désormais, dit-il, tous les autochtones approuvent le mur et les mesures sécuritaires. « C’est une situation qui ne pouvait pas durer. On se sent davantage en sécurité. Ça ne se répétera pas. »

      Le long de ce qui était il y a encore peu une des frontières les plus paisibles et les plus sauvages de l’Union européenne (UE), chemine désormais un serpent d’acier, de béton et de barbelés de 186 kilomètres de long. Beaucoup plus imposante que les infrastructures similaires dans les pays Baltes, la clôture traverse la #forêt de #Bialowieza, la dernière forêt primaire d’Europe et ses pâturages de bisons, classée au patrimoine de l’Unesco. Les ONG et les scientifiques dénoncent une catastrophe écologique provoquée par la construction de l’infrastructure, qui traverse des zones où la biodiversité était préservée depuis près de douze mille ans.

      « Guerre hybride »

      Depuis que le régime biélorusse a fait de l’organisation de filières migratoires du Moyen-Orient une arme contre le Vieux Continent, le gouvernement national conservateur polonais a répondu avec la plus grande fermeté, au grand dam des défenseurs des droits humains.

      Pour lutter contre ce qui a été qualifié par les institutions européennes de « #guerre_hybride », la raison d’Etat a pris le dessus sur bien des considérations liées aux libertés civiques, au respect du droit d’asile où à la protection du patrimoine naturel. La guerre en Ukraine n’a pas arrangé les choses, même si le nombre de soldats dans la région est passé de 15 000 au pic de la crise migratoire à 1 600 aujourd’hui.

      Grâce à la lutte contre les filières depuis les pays d’origine, l’arrivée de migrants a considérablement baissé, mais ne s’est jamais tarie : 11 000 tentatives de passages ont été recensées depuis le début de l’année, dont 1 600 au mois octobre. Elles étaient 17 000 en octobre 2021. La clôture, opérationnelle depuis juin, est sur le point d’être équipée de systèmes de surveillance électronique dernier cri, avec lesquels les autorités espèrent la rendre « 100 % étanche. » Il restera néanmoins 230 km de frontière le long du Boug occidental, un cours d’eau difficile à surveiller.

      « Ce qui est frappant, c’est que le profil des migrants a radicalement changé , souligne Katarzyna Zdanowicz, porte-parole des gardes-frontières de la région de Podlachie, au nord-est de la Pologne. L’immense majorité provient désormais d’Afrique subsaharienne et de pays jamais recensés auparavant : Nigeria, Soudan, Congo, Togo, Bénin, Madagascar, Côte d’Ivoire, Kenya, Erythrée. » Autre différence : les migrants ne transitent désormais plus directement par Minsk mais d’abord par Moscou. « Il est clair que la Russie leur facilite la tâche. Les visas russes sont tous récents », ajoute-t-elle.

      Possible hausse des tensions

      A une moindre échelle, l’effroyable industrie migratoire pilotée par Minsk et Moscou continue, et les épaisses forêts marécageuses, surnommées par les migrants « la jungle », voient errer des centaines de personnes par semaine. Les soldats biélorusses jouent les passeurs et s’occupent de la logistique. Ils aident les migrants à franchir le mur, fournissent des échelles, des outils, de quoi creuser des tunnels.

      « Grâce au mur, il y a moins d’incidents , insiste Katarzyna Zdanowicz. Avant, les heurts violents étaient fréquents. Les Biélorusses diffusaient dans des haut-parleurs des pleurs d’enfants pour nous faire craquer. » Le temps où les gardes polonais et biélorusses organisaient chaque année, en bonne camaraderie, des compétitions de kayaks le long de la frontière, paraît aujourd’hui bien loin.

      D’autres signes laissent présager une possible hausse des tensions : la Russie a ouvert, début octobre, l’aéroport de Kaliningrad, l’enclave russe située entre la Pologne et la Lituanie, aux vols internationaux. Les médias russes rapportent que les autorités aéroportuaires ont annoncé leur intention d’ouvrir des liaisons avec les Emirats arabes unis, l’Egypte, l’Ethiopie ou encore la Turquie. Un moyen supplémentaire de pression sur l’UE. Pour l’heure, les autorités polonaises assurent toutefois ne constater « aucun phénomène préoccupant » sur la frontière avec Kaliningrad, pourtant particulièrement difficile à protéger.

      Plus au sud, le village de #Bialowieza vit toujours au rythme des interventions des activistes bénévoles, qui portent assistance en forêt aux réfugiés retrouvés dans des états critiques après des journées d’#errance. Au quartier général de l’organisation « #Grupa_Granica » (« Groupe Frontière »), dans un lieu tenu secret, on recense toujours entre 50 et 120 interventions par semaine, sur une zone relativement restreinte. « Grâce au mur, si l’on peut dire, nous n’avons presque plus de femmes ou d’enfants, c’est une différence par rapport à l’année dernière, confie Oliwia, une activiste qui souhaite rester anonyme. Mais nous avons davantage de jambes et de bras cassés, de blessés graves par les barbelés. »

      « Nous avons vu trop d’horreurs »

      Autre différence, la #répression des activistes par les services spéciaux s’est considérablement accrue. « L’aide est de plus en plus criminalisée. On essaye de nous assimiler à des passeurs, alors que nous n’enfreignons pas la loi. Nous sommes surveillés en permanence. » Chacun des militants a un numéro de téléphone écrit au marqueur indélébile sur l’avant-bras : le contact d’un avocat. Les #arrestations_violentes sont devenues monnaie courante. Il y a peu, le local d’une organisation partenaire, le Club de l’intelligentsia catholique (KIK), a été perquisitionné, des membres ont été arrêtés et du matériel confisqué.

      « Nous ne sommes plus en crise migratoire, ajoute Oliwia. Les gardes et l’armée devraient être plus contenus, faire respecter les procédures. Mais ils sont au contraire plus agressifs. La crise humanitaire, elle, est toujours là, et elle va s’accroître avec l’hiver. »

      En #Podlachie, l’aide aux migrants repose principalement sur les épaules des militants bénévoles et de certains autochtones. Elle est financée par des campagnes de dons, et les moyens tendent à se tarir. Nombreux sont ceux qui déplorent l’absence de soutien des grandes organisations humanitaires internationales.

      L’année tumultueuse qui s’est écoulée a laissé des traces dans les mentalités des populations locales, empreintes d’un ras-le-bol généralisé, d’une atmosphère d’extrême méfiance de l’étranger et d’omerta sur les sujets sensibles. « Après plus d’une année à agir, nous sommes tous exténués physiquement et psychiquement , conclut Olivia. Nous avons vu trop d’horreurs. »

      https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2022/10/29/a-la-frontiere-entre-la-pologne-et-la-bielorussie-le-spectre-d-une-nouvelle-
      #criminalisation_de_l'aide #criminalisation_de_la_solidarité

  • Friends of the Traffickers Italy’s Anti-Mafia Directorate and the “Dirty Campaign” to Criminalize Migration

    Afana Dieudonne often says that he is not a superhero. That’s Dieudonne’s way of saying he’s done things he’s not proud of — just like anyone in his situation would, he says, in order to survive. From his home in Cameroon to Tunisia by air, then by car and foot into the desert, across the border into Libya, and onto a rubber boat in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, Dieudonne has done a lot of surviving.

    In Libya, Dieudonne remembers when the smugglers managing the safe house would ask him for favors. Dieudonne spoke a little English and didn’t want trouble. He said the smugglers were often high and always armed. Sometimes, when asked, Dieudonne would distribute food and water among the other migrants. Other times, he would inform on those who didn’t follow orders. He remembers the traffickers forcing him to inflict violence on his peers. It was either them or him, he reasoned.

    On September 30, 2014, the smugglers pushed Dieudonne and 91 others out to sea aboard a rubber boat. Buzzing through the pitch-black night, the group watched lights on the Libyan coast fade into darkness. After a day at sea, the overcrowded dinghy began taking on water. Its passengers were rescued by an NGO vessel and transferred to an Italian coast guard ship, where officers picked Dieudonne out of a crowd and led him into a room for questioning.

    At first, Dieudonne remembers the questioning to be quick, almost routine. His name, his age, his nationality. And then the questions turned: The officers said they wanted to know how the trafficking worked in Libya so they could arrest the people involved. They wanted to know who had driven the rubber boat and who had held the navigation compass.

    “So I explained everything to them, and I also showed who the ‘captain’ was — captain in quotes, because there is no captain,” said Dieudonne. The real traffickers stay in Libya, he added. “Even those who find themselves to be captains, they don’t do it by choice.”

    For the smugglers, Dieudonne explained, “we are the customers, and we are the goods.”

    For years, efforts by the Italian government and the European Union to address migration in the central Mediterranean have focused on the people in Libya — interchangeably called facilitators, smugglers, traffickers, or militia members, depending on which agency you’re speaking to — whose livelihoods come from helping others cross irregularly into Europe. People pay them a fare to organize a journey so dangerous it has taken tens of thousands of lives.

    The European effort to dismantle these smuggling networks has been driven by an unlikely actor: the Italian anti-mafia and anti-terrorism directorate, a niche police office in Rome that gained respect in the 1990s and early 2000s for dismantling large parts of the Mafia in Sicily and elsewhere in Italy. According to previously unpublished internal documents, the office — called the Direzione nazionale antimafia e antiterrorismo, or DNAA, in Italian — took a front-and-center role in the management of Europe’s southern sea borders, in direct coordination with the EU border agency Frontex and European military missions operating off the Libyan coast.

    In 2013, under the leadership of a longtime anti-mafia prosecutor named Franco Roberti, the directorate pioneered a strategy that was unique — or at least new for the border officers involved. They would start handling irregular migration to Europe like they had handled the mob. The approach would allow Italian and European police, coast guard agencies, and navies, obliged by international law to rescue stranded refugees at sea, to at least get some arrests and convictions along the way.

    The idea was to arrest low-level operators and use coercion and plea deals to get them to flip on their superiors. That way, the reasoning went, police investigators could work their way up the food chain and eventually dismantle the smuggling rings in Libya. With every boat that disembarked in Italy, police would make a handful of arrests. Anybody found to have played an active role during the crossing, from piloting to holding a compass to distributing water or bailing out a leak, could be arrested under a new legal directive written by Roberti’s anti-mafia directorate. Charges ranged from simple smuggling to transnational criminal conspiracy and — if people asphyxiated below deck or drowned when a boat capsized — even murder. Judicial sources estimate the number of people arrested since 2013 to be in the thousands.

    For the police, prosecutors, and politicians involved, the arrests were an important domestic political win. At the time, public opinion in Italy was turning against migration, and the mugshots of alleged smugglers regularly held space on front pages throughout the country.

    But according to the minutes of closed-door conversations among some of the very same actors directing these cases, which were obtained by The Intercept under Italy’s freedom of information law, most anti-mafia prosecutions only focused on low-level boat drivers, often migrants who had themselves paid for the trip across. Few, if any, smuggling bosses were ever convicted. Documents of over a dozen trials reviewed by The Intercept show prosecutions built on hasty investigations and coercive interrogations.

    In the years that followed, the anti-mafia directorate went to great lengths to keep the arrests coming. According to the internal documents, the office coordinated a series of criminal investigations into the civilian rescue NGOs working to save lives in the Mediterranean, accusing them of hampering police work. It also oversaw efforts to create and train a new coast guard in Libya, with full knowledge that some coast guard officers were colluding with the same smuggling networks that Italian and European leaders were supposed to be fighting.

    Since its inception, the anti-mafia directorate has wielded unparalleled investigative tools and served as a bridge between politicians and the courts. The documents reveal in meticulous detail how the agency, alongside Italian and European officials, capitalized on those powers to crack down on alleged smugglers, most of whom they knew to be desperate people fleeing poverty and violence with limited resources to defend themselves in court.

    Tragedy and Opportunity

    The anti-mafia directorate was born in the early 1990s after a decade of escalating Mafia violence. By then, hundreds of prosecutors, politicians, journalists, and police officers had been shot, blown up, or kidnapped, and many more extorted by organized crime families operating in Italy and beyond.

    In Palermo, the Sicilian capital, prosecutor Giovanni Falcone was a rising star in the Italian judiciary. Falcone had won unprecedented success with an approach to organized crime based on tracking financial flows, seizing assets, and centralizing evidence gathered by prosecutor’s offices across the island.

    But as the Mafia expanded its reach into the rest of Europe, Falcone’s work proved insufficient.

    In September 1990, a Mafia commando drove from Germany to Sicily to gun down a 37-year-old judge. Weeks later, at a police checkpoint in Naples, the Sicilian driver of a truck loaded with weapons, explosives, and drugs was found to be a resident of Germany. A month after the arrests, Falcone traveled to Germany to establish an information-sharing mechanism with authorities there. He brought along a younger colleague from Naples, Franco Roberti.

    “We faced a stone wall,” recalled Roberti, still bitter three decades later. He spoke to us outside a cafe in a plum neighborhood in Naples. Seventy-three years old and speaking with the rasp of a lifelong smoker, Roberti described Italy’s Mafia problem in blunt language. He bemoaned a lack of international cooperation that, he said, continues to this day. “They claimed that there was no need to investigate there,” Roberti said, “that it was up to us to investigate Italians in Germany who were occasional mafiosi.”

    As the prosecutors traveled back to Italy empty-handed, Roberti remembers Falcone telling him that they needed “a centralized national organ able to speak directly to foreign judicial authorities and coordinate investigations in Italy.”

    “That is how the idea of the anti-mafia directorate was born,” Roberti said. The two began building what would become Italy’s first national anti-mafia force.

    At the time, there was tough resistance to the project. Critics argued that Falcone and Roberti were creating “super-prosecutors” who would wield outsize powers over the courts, while also being subject to political pressures from the government in Rome. It was, they argued, a marriage of police and the judiciary, political interests and supposedly apolitical courts — convenient for getting Mafia convictions but dangerous for Italian democracy.

    Still, in January 1992, the project was approved in Parliament. But Falcone would never get to lead it: Months later, a bomb set by the Mafia killed him, his wife, and the three agents escorting them. The attack put to rest any remaining criticism of Falcone’s plan.

    The anti-mafia directorate went on to become one of Italy’s most important institutions, the national authority over all matters concerning organized crime and the agency responsible for partially freeing the country from its century-old crucible. In the decades after Falcone’s death, the directorate did what many in Italy thought impossible, dismantling large parts of the five main Italian crime families and almost halving the Mafia-related murder rate.

    And yet, by the time Roberti took control in 2013, it had been years since the last high-profile Mafia prosecution, and the organization’s influence was waning. At the same time, Italy was facing unprecedented numbers of migrants arriving by boat. Roberti had an idea: The anti-mafia directorate would start working on what he saw as a different kind of mafia. The organization set its sights on Libya.

    “We thought we had to do something more coordinated to combat this trafficking,” Roberti remembered, “so I put everyone around a table.”

    “The main objective was to save lives, seize ships, and capture smugglers,” Roberti said. “Which we did.”

    Our Sea

    Dieudonne made it to the Libyan port city of Zuwara in August 2014. One more step across the Mediterranean, and he’d be in Europe. The smugglers he paid to get him across the sea took all of his possessions and put him in an abandoned building that served as a safe house to wait for his turn.

    Dieudonne told his story from a small office in Bari, Italy, where he runs a cooperative that helps recent arrivals access local education. Dieudonne is fiery and charismatic. He is constantly moving: speaking, texting, calling, gesticulating. Every time he makes a point, he raps his knuckles on the table in a one-two pattern. Dieudonne insisted that we publish his real name. Others who made the journey more recently — still pending decisions on their residence permits or refugee status — were less willing to speak openly.

    Dieudonne remembers the safe house in Zuwara as a string of constant violence. The smugglers would come once a day to leave food. Every day, they would ask who hadn’t followed their orders. Those inside the abandoned building knew they were less likely to be discovered by police or rival smugglers, but at the same time, they were not free to leave.

    “They’ve put a guy in the refrigerator in front of all of us, to show how the next one who misbehaves will be treated,” Dieudonne remembered, indignant. He witnessed torture, shootings, rape. “The first time you see it, it hurts you. The second time it hurts you less. The third time,” he said with a shrug, “it becomes normal. Because that’s the only way to survive.”

    “That’s why arresting the person who pilots a boat and treating them like a trafficker makes me laugh,” Dieudonne said. Others who have made the journey to Italy report having been forced to drive at gunpoint. “You only do it to be sure you don’t die there,” he said.

    Two years after the fall of Muammar Gaddafi’s government, much of Libya’s northwest coast had become a staging ground for smugglers who organized sea crossings to Europe in large wooden fishing boats. When those ships — overcrowded, underpowered, and piloted by amateurs — inevitably capsized, the deaths were counted by the hundreds.

    In October 2013, two shipwrecks off the coast of the Italian island of Lampedusa took over 400 lives, sparking public outcry across Europe. In response, the Italian state mobilized two plans, one public and the other private.

    “There was a big shock when the Lampedusa tragedy happened,” remembered Italian Sen. Emma Bonino, then the country’s foreign minister. The prime minister “called an emergency meeting, and we decided to immediately launch this rescue program,” Bonino said. “Someone wanted to call the program ‘safe seas.’ I said no, not safe, because it’s sure we’ll have other tragedies. So let’s call it Mare Nostrum.”

    Mare Nostrum — “our sea” in Latin — was a rescue mission in international waters off the coast of Libya that ran for one year and rescued more than 150,000 people. The operation also brought Italian ships, airplanes, and submarines closer than ever to Libyan shores. Roberti, just two months into his job as head of the anti-mafia directorate, saw an opportunity to extend the country’s judicial reach and inflict a lethal blow to smuggling rings in Libya.

    Five days after the start of Mare Nostrum, Roberti launched the private plan: a series of coordination meetings among the highest echelons of the Italian police, navy, coast guard, and judiciary. Under Roberti, these meetings would run for four years and eventually involve representatives from Frontex, Europol, an EU military operation, and even Libya.

    The minutes of five of these meetings, which were presented by Roberti in a committee of the Italian Parliament and obtained by The Intercept, give an unprecedented behind-the-scenes look at the events on Europe’s southern borders since the Lampedusa shipwrecks.

    In the first meeting, held in October 2013, Roberti told participants that the anti-mafia offices in the Sicilian city of Catania had developed an innovative way to deal with migrant smuggling. By treating Libyan smugglers like they had treated the Italian Mafia, prosecutors could claim jurisdiction over international waters far beyond Italy’s borders. That, Roberti said, meant they could lawfully board and seize vessels on the high seas, conduct investigations there, and use the evidence in court.

    The Italian authorities have long recognized that, per international maritime law, they are obligated to rescue people fleeing Libya on overcrowded boats and transport them to a place of safety. As the number of people attempting the crossing increased, many Italian prosecutors and coast guard officials came to believe that smugglers were relying on these rescues to make their business model work; therefore, the anti-mafia reasoning went, anyone who acted as crew or made a distress call on a boat carrying migrants could be considered complicit in Libyan trafficking and subject to Italian jurisdiction. This new approach drew heavily from legal doctrines developed in the United States during the 1980s aimed at stopping drug smuggling.

    European leaders were scrambling to find a solution to what they saw as a looming migration crisis. Italian officials thought they had the answer and publicly justified their decisions as a way to prevent future drownings.

    But according to the minutes of the 2013 anti-mafia meeting, the new strategy predated the Lampedusa shipwrecks by at least a week. Sicilian prosecutors had already written the plan to crack down on migration across the Mediterranean but lacked both the tools and public will to put it into action. Following the Lampedusa tragedy and the creation of Mare Nostrum, they suddenly had both.

    State of Necessity

    In the international waters off the coast of Libya, Dieudonne and 91 others were rescued by a European NGO called Migrant Offshore Aid Station. They spent two days aboard MOAS’s ship before being transferred to an Italian coast guard ship, Nave Dattilo, to be taken to Europe.

    Aboard the Dattilo, coast guard officers asked Dieudonne why he had left his home in Cameroon. He remembers them showing him a photograph of the rubber boat taken from the air. “They asked me who was driving, the roles and everything,” he remembered. “Then they asked me if I could tell him how the trafficking in Libya works, and then, they said, they would give me residence documents.”

    Dieudonne said that he was reluctant to cooperate at first. He didn’t want to accuse any of his peers, but he was also concerned that he could become a suspect. After all, he had helped the driver at points throughout the voyage.

    “I thought that if I didn’t cooperate, they might hurt me,” Dieudonne said. “Not physically hurt, but they could consider me dishonest, like someone who was part of the trafficking.”

    To this day, Dieudonne says he can’t understand why Italy would punish people for fleeing poverty and political violence in West Africa. He rattled off a list of events from the last year alone: draught, famine, corruption, armed gunmen, attacks on schools. “And you try to convict someone for managing to escape that situation?”

    The coast guard ship disembarked in Vibo Valentia, a city in the Italian region of Calabria. During disembarkation, a local police officer explained to a journalist that they had arrested five people. The journalist asked how the police had identified the accused.

    “A lot has been done by the coast guard, who picked [the migrants] up two days ago and managed to spot [the alleged smugglers],” the officer explained. “Then we have witness statements and videos.”

    Cases like these, where arrests are made on the basis of photo or video evidence and statements by witnesses like Dieudonne, are common, said Gigi Modica, a judge in Sicily who has heard many immigration and asylum cases. “It’s usually the same story. They take three or four people, no more. They ask them two questions: who was driving the boat, and who was holding the compass,” Modica explained. “That’s it — they get the names and don’t care about the rest.”

    Modica was one of the first judges in Italy to acquit people charged for driving rubber boats — known as “scafisti,” or boat drivers, in Italian — on the grounds that they had been forced to do so. These “state of necessity” rulings have since become increasingly common. Modica rattled off a list of irregularities he’s seen in such cases: systemic racism, witness statements that migrants later say they didn’t make, interrogations with no translator or lawyer, and in some cases, people who report being encouraged by police to sign documents renouncing their right to apply for asylum.

    “So often these alleged smugglers — scafisti — are normal people who were compelled to pilot a boat by smugglers in Libya,” Modica said.

    Documents of over a dozen trials reviewed by The Intercept show prosecutions largely built on testimony from migrants who are promised a residence permit in exchange for their collaboration. At sea, witnesses are interviewed by the police hours after their rescue, often still in a state of shock after surviving a shipwreck.

    In many cases, identical statements, typos included, are attributed to several witnesses and copied and pasted across different police reports. Sometimes, these reports have been enough to secure decadeslong sentences. Other times, under cross-examination in court, witnesses have contradicted the statements recorded by police or denied giving any testimony at all.

    As early as 2015, attendees of the anti-mafia meetings were discussing problems with these prosecutions. In a meeting that February, Giovanni Salvi, then the prosecutor of Catania, acknowledged that smugglers often abandoned migrant boats in international waters. Still, Italian police were steaming ahead with the prosecutions of those left on board.

    These prosecutions were so important that in some cases, the Italian coast guard decided to delay rescue when boats were in distress in order to “allow for the arrival of institutional ships that can conduct arrests,” a coast guard commander explained at the meeting.

    When asked about the commander’s comments, the Italian coast guard said that “on no occasion” has the agency ever delayed a rescue operation. Delaying rescue for any reason goes against international and Italian law, and according to various human rights lawyers in Europe, could give rise to criminal liability.

    NGOs in the Crosshairs

    Italy canceled Mare Nostrum after one year, citing budget constraints and a lack of European collaboration. In its wake, the EU set up two new operations, one via Frontex and the other a military effort called Operation Sophia. These operations focused not on humanitarian rescue but on border security and people smuggling from Libya. Beginning in 2015, representatives from Frontex and Operation Sophia were included in the anti-mafia directorate meetings, where Italian prosecutors ensured that both abided by the new investigative strategy.

    Key to these investigations were photos from the rescues, like the aerial image that Dieudonne remembers the Italian coast guard showing him, which gave police another way to identify who piloted the boats and helped navigate.

    In the absence of government rescue ships, a fleet of civilian NGO vessels began taking on a large number of rescues in the international waters off the coast of Libya. These ships, while coordinated by the Italian coast guard rescue center in Rome, made evidence-gathering difficult for prosecutors and judicial police. According to the anti-mafia meeting minutes, some NGOs, including MOAS, routinely gave photos to Italian police and Frontex. Others refused, arguing that providing evidence for investigations into the people they saved would undermine their efficacy and neutrality.

    In the years following Mare Nostrum, the NGO fleet would come to account for more than one-third of all rescues in the central Mediterranean, according to estimates by Operation Sophia. A leaked status report from the operation noted that because NGOs did not collect information from rescued migrants for police, “information essential to enhance the understanding of the smuggling business model is not acquired.”

    In a subsequent anti-mafia meeting, six prosecutors echoed this concern. NGO rescues meant that police couldn’t interview migrants at sea, they said, and cases were getting thrown out for lack of evidence. A coast guard admiral explained the importance of conducting interviews just after a rescue, when “a moment of empathy has been established.”

    “It is not possible to carry out this task if the rescue intervention is carried out by ships of the NGOs,” the admiral told the group.

    The NGOs were causing problems for the DNAA strategy. At the meetings, Italian prosecutors and representatives from the coast guard, navy, and Interior Ministry discussed what they could do to rein in the humanitarian organizations. At the same time, various prosecutors were separately fixing their investigative sights on the NGOs themselves.

    In late 2016, an internal report from Frontex — later published in full by The Intercept — accused an NGO vessel of directly receiving migrants from Libyan smugglers, attributing the information to “Italian authorities.” The claim was contradicted by video evidence and the ship’s crew.

    Months later, Carmelo Zuccaro, the prosecutor of Catania, made public that he was investigating rescue NGOs. “Together with Frontex and the navy, we are trying to monitor all these NGOs that have shown that they have great financial resources,” Zuccaro told an Italian newspaper. The claim went viral in Italian and European media. “Friends of the traffickers” and “migrant taxi service” became common slurs used toward humanitarian NGOs by anti-immigration politicians and the Italian far right.

    Zuccaro would eventually walk back his claims, telling a parliamentary committee that he was working off a hypothesis at the time and had no evidence to back it up.

    In an interview with a German newspaper in February 2017, the director of Frontex, Fabrice Leggeri, refrained from explicitly criticizing the work of rescue NGOs but did say they were hampering police investigations in the Mediterranean. As aid organizations assumed a larger percentage of rescues, Leggeri said, “it is becoming more difficult for the European security authorities to find out more about the smuggling networks through interviews with migrants.”

    “That smear campaign was very, very deep,” remembered Bonino, the former foreign minister. Referring to Marco Minniti, Italy’s interior minister at the time, she added, “I was trying to push Minniti not to be so obsessed with people coming, but to make a policy of integration in Italy. But he only focused on Libya and smuggling and criminalizing NGOs with the help of prosecutors.”

    Bonino explained that the action against NGOs was part of a larger plan to change European policy in the central Mediterranean. The first step was the shift away from humanitarian rescue and toward border security and smuggling. The second step “was blaming the NGOs or arresting them, a sort of dirty campaign against them,” she said. “The results of which after so many years have been no convictions, no penalties, no trials.”

    Finally, the third step was to build a new coast guard in Libya to do what the Europeans couldn’t, per international law: intercept people at sea and bring them back to Libya, the country from which they had just fled.

    At first, leaders at Frontex were cautious. “From Frontex’s point of view, we look at Libya with concern; there is no stable state there,” Leggeri said in the 2017 interview. “We are now helping to train 60 officers for a possible future Libyan coast guard. But this is at best a beginning.”

    Bonino saw this effort differently. “They started providing support for their so-called coast guard,” she said, “which were the same traffickers changing coats.”
    Rescued migrants disembarking from a Libyan coast guard ship in the town of Khoms, a town 120 kilometres (75 miles) east of the capital on October 1, 2019.

    Same Uniforms, Same Ships

    Safe on land in Italy, Dieudonne was never called to testify in court. He hopes that none of his peers ended up in prison but said he would gladly testify against the traffickers if called. Aboard the coast guard ship, he remembers, “I gave the police contact information for the traffickers, I gave them names.”

    The smuggling operations in Libya happened out in the open, but Italian police could only go as far as international waters. Leaked documents from Operation Sophia describe years of efforts by European officials to get Libyan police to arrest smugglers. Behind closed doors, top Italian and EU officials admitted that these same smugglers were intertwined with the new Libyan coast guard that Europe was creating and that working with them would likely go against international law.

    As early as 2015, multiple officials at the anti-mafia meetings noted that some smugglers were uncomfortably close to members of the Libyan government. “Militias use the same uniforms and the same ships as the Libyan coast guard that the Italian navy itself is training,” Rear Adm. Enrico Credendino, then in charge of Operation Sophia, said in 2017. The head of the Libyan coast guard and the Libyan minister of defense, both allies of the Italian government, Credendino added, “have close relationships with some militia bosses.”

    One of the Libyan coast guard officers playing both sides was Abd al-Rahman Milad, also known as Bija. In 2019, the Italian newspaper Avvenire revealed that Bija participated in a May 2017 meeting in Sicily, alongside Italian border police and intelligence officials, that was aimed at stemming migration from Libya. A month later, he was condemned by the U.N. Security Council for his role as a top member of a powerful trafficking militia in the coastal town of Zawiya, and for, as the U.N. put it, “sinking migrant boats using firearms.”

    According to leaked documents from Operation Sophia, coast guard officers under Bija’s command were trained by the EU between 2016 and 2018.

    While the Italian government was prosecuting supposed smugglers in Italy, they were also working with people they knew to be smugglers in Libya. Minniti, Italy’s then-interior minister, justified the deals his government was making in Libya by saying that the prospect of mass migration from Africa made him “fear for the well-being of Italian democracy.”

    In one of the 2017 anti-mafia meetings, a representative of the Interior Ministry, Vittorio Pisani, outlined in clear terms a plan that provided for the direct coordination of the new Libyan coast guard. They would create “an operation room in Libya for the exchange of information with the Interior Ministry,” Pisani explained, “mainly on the position of NGO ships and their rescue operations, in order to employ the Libyan coast guard in its national waters.”

    And with that, the third step of the plan was set in motion. At the end of the meeting, Roberti suggested that the group invite representatives from the Libyan police to their next meeting. In an interview with The Intercept, Roberti confirmed that Libyan representatives attended at least two anti-mafia meetings and that he himself met Bija at a meeting in Libya, one month after the U.N. Security Council report was published. The following year, the Security Council committee on Libya sanctioned Bija, freezing his assets and banning him from international travel.

    “We needed to have the participation of Libyan institutions. But they did nothing, because they were taking money from the traffickers,” Roberti told us from the cafe in Naples. “They themselves were the traffickers.”
    A Place of Safety

    Roberti retired from the anti-mafia directorate in 2017. He said that under his leadership, the organization was able to create a basis for handling migration throughout Europe. Still, Roberti admits that his expansion of the DNAA into migration issues has had mixed results. Like his trip to Germany in the ’90s with Giovanni Falcone, Roberti said the anti-mafia strategy faltered because of a lack of collaboration: with the NGOs, with other European governments, and with Libya.

    “On a European level, the cooperation does not work,” Roberti said. Regarding Libya, he added, “We tried — I believe it was right, the agreements [the government] made. But it turned out to be a failure in the end.”

    The DNAA has since expanded its operations. Between 2017 and 2019, the Italian government passed two bills that put the anti-mafia directorate in charge of virtually all illegal immigration matters. Since 2017, five Sicilian prosecutors, all of whom attended at least one anti-mafia coordination meeting, have initiated 15 separate legal proceedings against humanitarian NGO workers. So far there have been no convictions: Three cases have been thrown out in court, and the rest are ongoing.

    Earlier this month, news broke that Sicilian prosecutors had wiretapped journalists and human rights lawyers as part of one of these investigations, listening in on legally protected conversations with sources and clients. The Italian justice ministry has opened an investigation into the incident, which could amount to criminal behavior, according to Italian legal experts. The prosecutor who approved the wiretaps attended at least one DNAA coordination meeting, where investigations against NGOs were discussed at length.

    As the DNAA has extended its reach, key actors from the anti-mafia coordination meetings have risen through the ranks of Italian and European institutions. One prosecutor, Federico Cafiero de Raho, now runs the anti-mafia directorate. Salvi, the former prosecutor of Catania, is the equivalent of Italy’s attorney general. Pisani, the former Interior Ministry representative, is deputy head of the Italian intelligence services. And Roberti is a member of the European Parliament.

    Cafiero de Raho stands by the investigations and arrests that the anti-mafia directorate has made over the years. He said the coordination meetings were an essential tool for prosecutors and police during difficult times.

    When asked about his specific comments during the meetings — particularly statements that humanitarian NGOs needed to be regulated and multiple admissions that members of the new Libyan coast guard were involved in smuggling activities — Cafiero de Raho said that his remarks should be placed in context, a time when Italy and the EU were working to build a coast guard in a part of Libya that was largely ruled by local militias. He said his ultimate goal was what, in the DNAA coordination meetings, he called the “extrajudicial solution”: attempts to prove the existence of crimes against humanity in Libya so that “the United Nation sends troops to Libya to dismantle migrants camps set up by traffickers … and retake control of that territory.”

    A spokesperson for the EU’s foreign policy arm, which ran Operation Sophia, refused to directly address evidence that leaders of the European military operation knew that parts of the new Libyan coast guard were also involved in smuggling activities, only noting that Bija himself wasn’t trained by the EU. A Frontex spokesperson stated that the agency “was not involved in the selection of officers to be trained.”

    In 2019, the European migration strategy changed again. Now, the vast majority of departures are intercepted by the Libyan coast guard and brought back to Libya. In March of that year, Operation Sophia removed all of its ships from the rescue area and has since focused on using aerial patrols to direct and coordinate the Libyan coast guard. Human rights lawyers in Europe have filed six legal actions against Italy and the EU as a result, calling the practice refoulement by proxy: facilitating the return of migrants to dangerous circumstances in violation of international law.

    Indeed, throughout four years of coordination meetings, Italy and the EU were admitting privately that returning people to Libya would be illegal. “Fundamental human rights violations in Libya make it impossible to push migrants back to the Libyan coast,” Pisani explained in 2015. Two years later, he outlined the beginnings of a plan that would do exactly that.

    The Result of Mere Chance

    Dieudonne knows he was lucky. The line that separates suspect and victim can be entirely up to police officers’ first impressions in the minutes or hours following a rescue. According to police reports used in prosecutions, physical attributes like having “a clearer skin tone” or behavior aboard the ship, including scrutinizing police movements “with strange interest,” were enough to rouse suspicion.

    In a 2019 ruling that acquitted seven alleged smugglers after three years of pretrial detention, judges wrote that “the selection of the suspects on one side, and the witnesses on the other, with the only exception of the driver, has almost been the result of mere chance.”

    Carrying out work for their Libyan captors has cost other migrants in Italy lengthy prison sentences. In September 2019, a 22-year-old Guinean nicknamed Suarez was arrested upon his arrival to Italy. Four witnesses told police he had collaborated with prison guards in Zawiya, at the immigrant detention center managed by the infamous Bija.

    “Suarez was also a prisoner, who then took on a job,” one of the witnesses told the court. Handing out meals or taking care of security is what those who can’t afford to pay their ransom often do in order to get out, explained another. “Unfortunately, you would have to be there to understand the situation,” the first witness said. Suarez was sentenced to 20 years in prison, recently reduced to 12 years on appeal.

    Dieudonne remembered his journey at sea vividly, but with surprising cool. When the boat began taking on water, he tried to help. “One must give help where it is needed.” At his office in Bari, Dieudonne bent over and moved his arms in a low scooping motion, like he was bailing water out of a boat.

    “Should they condemn me too?” he asked. He finds it ironic that it was the Libyans who eventually arrested Bija on human trafficking charges this past October. The Italians and Europeans, he said with a laugh, were too busy working with the corrupt coast guard commander. (In April, Bija was released from prison after a Libyan court absolved him of all charges. He was promoted within the coast guard and put back on the job.)

    Dieudonne thinks often about the people he identified aboard the coast guard ship in the middle of the sea. “I told the police the truth. But if that collaboration ends with the conviction of an innocent person, it’s not good,” he said. “Because I know that person did nothing. On the contrary, he saved our lives by driving that raft.”

    https://theintercept.com/2021/04/30/italy-anti-mafia-migrant-rescue-smuggling

    #Méditerranée #Italie #Libye #ONG #criminalisation_de_la_solidarité #solidarité #secours #mer_Méditerranée #asile #migrations #réfugiés #violence #passeurs #Méditerranée_centrale #anti-mafia #anti-terrorisme #Direzione_nazionale_antimafia_e_antiterrorismo #DNAA #Frontex #Franco_Roberti #justice #politique #Zuwara #torture #viol #Mare_Nostrum #Europol #eaux_internationales #droit_de_la_mer #droit_maritime #juridiction_italienne #arrestations #Gigi_Modica #scafista #scafisti #état_de_nécessité #Giovanni_Salvi #NGO #Operation_Sophia #MOAS #DNA #Carmelo_Zuccaro #Zuccaro #Fabrice_Leggeri #Leggeri #Marco_Minniti #Minniti #campagne #gardes-côtes_libyens #milices #Enrico_Credendino #Abd_al-Rahman_Milad #Bija ##Abdurhaman_al-Milad #Al_Bija #Zawiya #Vittorio_Pisani #Federico_Cafiero_de_Raho #solution_extrajudiciaire #pull-back #refoulement_by_proxy #refoulement #push-back #Suarez

    ping @karine4 @isskein @rhoumour

  • Gérald Darmanin a maquillé les chiffres des interpellations lors de la manifestation à Paris
    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/131220/gerald-darmanin-maquille-les-chiffres-des-interpellations-lors-de-la-manif


    Lors de la manifestation contre la loi Sécurité globale, à Paris, le 12 décembre. © Fabien Pallueau/NurPhoto via AFP
    Droit de manifester ? Prends ça !

    Au terme d’une manifestation sévèrement réprimée, le ministre de l’intérieur a annoncé l’interpellation de 142 « individus ultra-violents ». C’est faux. Les éléments réunis par Mediapart montrent que les policiers ont procédé à des arrestations arbitraires dans un cortège pacifique.

    Pendant toute la manifestation parisienne contre la proposition de loi « Sécurité globale », Gérald Darmanin a pianoté sur son iPhone. À 14 h 12, un quart d’heure avant le départ du cortège, le ministre de l’intérieur lançait, sur son compte Twitter, le décompte d’une journée qui s’annonçait riche en arrestations : « Déjà 24 interpellations », postait-il, en joignant à son message une photo d’un tournevis et d’une clé à molette, deux outils « qui n’ont pas leur place dans une manifestation ».

    Une heure et demie plus tard, M. Darmanin reprend son portable. « 81 interpellations désormais, à 15 h 50 », annonce-t-il, sans photo d’outils cette fois, mais en parlant d’« individus ultra-violents ». À 17 h 50, le chiffre monte à « 119 interpellations », « des casseurs venus nombreux ». Pour finir, à 18 h 56, à « 142 interpellations » officielles, chiffre repris dans le bandeau des chaînes d’info en continu.

    Il aura pourtant fallu moins de 24 heures pour que la communication du ministre de l’intérieur, dont les résultats médiocres depuis son arrivée Place Beauvau font jaser jusque dans son propre camp, se dégonfle comme un ballon de baudruche.

    Selon les éléments et témoignages recueillis par Mediapart, les personnes interpellées dans le cortège parisien étaient en grande partie des manifestants pacifiques, qui ne sont d’ailleurs par poursuivis pour des faits de violences – ce qui prouve que la stratégie policière était bien de foncer dans le tas et de procéder à des arrestations arbitraires. Des journalistes indépendants ont également été arrêtés au cours des différentes charges, alors qu’ils étaient parfaitement identifiables.

    Les chiffres communiqués par le parquet de Paris, dimanche soir, donnent la mesure de la manipulation de communication orchestrée par la place Beauvau : alors que 39 procédures ont dores et déjà classées sans suite, seulement six manifestants seront jugés en comparution immédiate. Le parquet a aussi procédé à 27 rappels à la loi, estimant qu’il n’y avait pas matière à renvoyer devant les tribunaux. Une personne a accepté une CRPC (procédure de plaider coupable), 30 gardes à vue sont toujours en cours, et deux enquêtes visant deux personnes remises en liberté n’ont pas encore été classées.

    Sur les 19 mineurs arrêtés, le parquet a dores et déjà classé neuf enquêtes. Cinq autres dossiers ont été traité par un simple rappel à la loi, tandis que quatre jeunes sont convoqués devant le délégué procureur. Les investigations se poursuivent dans un seul cas.

    Alexis Baudelin fait partie des 142 personnes arrêtées au cours de la manifestation. Son cas a été jugé suffisamment emblématique pour que le Syndicat indépendant des commissaires de police (SICP) relaie une vidéo de son interpellation avec le commentaire suivant : « Les ordres de la préfecture de police sont clairs : empêcher toute constitution de Black bloc ! Ces factieux viennent semer la violence et le chaos. Ils sapent les manifestations. Nous nous félicitons des interpellations de ces individus très violents ! »

    Malgré les certitudes du syndicat des commissaires, Alexis Baudelin n’a même pas été poursuivi par le parquet. Il a été relâché samedi soir, cinq heures après son interpellation, sans la moindre charge, non sans avoir rappelé quelques règles de droit aux policiers. Et pour cause : Alexis Baudelin exerce la profession d’avocat, ce que les forces de l’ordre ignoraient puisqu’il ne défilait pas en robe.

    Le jeune homme a été interpellé lors d’une des nombreuses charges des voltigeurs des brigades de répression des actions violentes motorisées (Brav-M), venus scinder la manifestation juste après son départ (relire le récit de la manifestation ici). Ainsi que le montre une vidéo qu’il a lui-même filmée, l’avocat a été violemment attrapé par le cou et sorti du cortège, sans que les policiers ne soient en mesure d’expliquer les raisons de son interpellation. Avant d’être arrêté, Alexis Baudelin avait protesté contre une violente charge policière (ce qui n’est pas interdit) et portait avec lui un drapeau noir (ce qui n’a également rien d’illégal). 

    « Les policiers m’ont ensuite menotté mais ils se rendaient bien compte qu’ils n’avaient rien contre moi », témoigne-t-il auprès Mediapart. Pendant cinq heures, M. Baudelin est ensuite déplacé de commissariat en commissariat avec d’autres manifestants, qui « se demandaient comme [lui] ce qu’on pouvait bien leur reprocher ». Finalement présenté à un officier de police judiciaire du commissariat du XIVe arrondissement, l’avocat est relâché, sans même avoir été placé en garde à vue. « J’ai été arrêté puis retenu pendant cinq heures de manière totalement arbitraire, sans même qu’un fait me soit reproché », dénonce-t-il.

    Interrogé par Mediapart, le parquet de Paris indique que sur les 142 personnes arrêtées en marge de la manifestation, 123 ont été placées en garde à vue. C’est notamment le cas du journaliste indépendant Franck Laur, finalement libéré sans charge dimanche en début d’après-midi. « Il paraît que je suis parmi les 142 casseurs recensés par Gérald Darmanin », cingle le journaliste au terme de sa garde à vue, avant de raconter les circonstances de son interpellation : « J’ai été interpellé au cours d’une charge en fin de manifestation, à 18 heures, sur la place de la République [où s’est terminée la manifestation – ndlr]. Je filmais, j’étais identifiable comme journaliste, j’ai été frappé à coups de matraques et j’ai dit un mot qu’il ne fallait pas », indique-t-il.

    M. Laur est placé en garde à vue dans le commissariat du VIIIe arrondissement pour « outrage » mais aussi pour des faits de « port d’arme de catégorie D », en raison de son masque à gaz. Ces charges ont ensuite été abandonnées sans même que le journaliste ne soit entendu sur les faits. « On est venu me chercher en geôle ce dimanche et on m’a dit : “Votre garde à vue est terminée” », raconte-t-il. Franck Laur doit en revanche passer un IRM dans les prochains jours : « J’ai été amené à l’Hôtel-Dieu samedi soir pour passer une radio. Ils pensent que j’ai deux vertèbres fissurées en raison des coups de matraque », explique-t-il.

    Au commissariat, Franck Laur a partagé la cellule de Thomas Clerget, un autre journaliste indépendant membre du collectif Reporters en colère (REC). Lui aussi a été libéré sans charge ce dimanche après avoir été suspecté du délit de « participation à un groupement en vue de commettre des dégradations ou violences ». « J’ai été arrêté au cours d’une charge totalement gratuite, au milieu de gens qui marchaient. J’ai été matraqué par terre à la tête et à l’épaule », raconte cet habitué de la couverture des manifestations, qui a « eu l’impression que les policiers allaient à la pêche à l’interpellation ».

    Un homme frappé à la tête lors de la manifestation du samedi 12 décembre, à Paris. © Fabien Pallueau/NurPhoto via AFP
    Un communiqué de presse diffusé ce dimanche par le collectif REC et 15 autres organisations (dont la Ligue des droits de l’homme, la CGT et des syndicats de journalistes) a dénoncé un « déploiement policier et militaire brutalisant et attentatoire au droit de manifester ». Organisations bientôt rejointes dans leur constat par des élu·e·s comme Bénédicte Monville, conseillère régionale écologiste en Île-de-France. « Ma fille a été arrêtée hier alors qu’elle quittait la manifestation la police a chargé elle filmait, un policier la saisit et ils l’ont emmenée. Plusieurs personnes témoignent qu’elle n’a rien dit, opposé aucune résistance mais elle est en GAV pour “outrage” », a dénoncé l’élue sur Twitter. La mère d’un autre manifestant lui a répondu en faisant part de la même incompréhension : « Mon fils Théo a lui aussi été arrêté en tout début de manifestation, il est en GAV avec votre fille, commissariat du 20ième. Ils n’ont pas de faits à lui reprocher, juste des supposées intentions ».

    « La grande majorité des personnes arrêtées ne comprennent pas ce qu’elles font au commissariat », appuie Me Arié Alimi, dont le cabinet assiste une quinzaine d’interpelés. L’avocat estime que « ces personnes ont été interpelées alors qu’elles participaient tranquillement à une manifestation déclarée, cela signe la fin du droit de manifester ». Les avocats interrogés par Mediapart ignorent ce qui a pu pousser les policiers à arrêter certains manifestants pacifiques plutôt que d’autres, même si certains indices semblent se dessiner. Par exemple, des manifestants interpelés avaient des parapluies noirs, ce qui peut être utiliser pour former un black bloc (pour se changer à l’abri des drones et des caméras), mais est avant tout un accessoire contre la pluie (il pleuvait à Paris hier). « On a l’impression que les manifestants ont été arrêtés au petit bonheur la chance », témoigne Me Camille Vannier.

    Parmi les signataires du communiqué diffusé par le collectif REC figure aussi l’association altermondialiste Attac, dont un militant, Loïc, a aussi été interpelé à la fin de la manifestation, place de la République. « On discutait tranquillement ensemble quand les policiers ont commencé à charger, matraques en l’air. On s’est mis à courir. Ils voulaient visiblement vider la place, mais il n’y avait pas eu la moindre sommation », raconte Pascal, un autre membre d’Attac présent lors de l’arrestation. Au terme de 24 heures de garde à vue, Loïc a été remis en liberté dimanche soir sans charge, a informé son association.

    Un autre journaliste, le reporter Adrien Adcazz, qui travaille pour le média Quartier général, a pour sa part vu sa garde à vue prolongée ce dimanche soir. « Une décision totalement abusive », dénonce son avocat David Libeskind. « Vers 16 heures, sur le boulevard de Sébastopol, mon client a été pris dans une charge. Il a crié : “Journaliste ! Journaliste !” », précise l’avocat, qui indique que si son client n’avait pas de carte de presse (qui n’est pas obligatoire pour les journalistes), il avait bien un ordre de mission de son employeur.

    Selon Me Libeskind, Adrien Adcazz a été entendu pour des faits de « participation à un groupement en vue de commettre des dégradations ou violences », de « dissimulation de son visage » (en raison du cache-cou noir qu’il portait), de « rébellion » et de « refus d’obtempérer ». Le 12 septembre, lors d’une précédente manifestation, Adrien Adcazz avait déjà été interpelé pour des faits similaires, avant que l’enquête ne soit classée sans suite, signale son avocat.
    Un autre client de David Libeskind, street-medic d’une cinquantaine d’années mobilisé pour soigner les manifestants victimes de violences policières, est sorti de garde à vue dimanche soir avec un « rappel à la loi » du procureur de la République pour « participation à un groupement en vue de commettre des dégradations ou violences ».

    Depuis les manifestations contre la loi Travail en 2016, la « participation à un groupement en vue de commettre des dégradations ou violences » est une infraction « systématiquement utilisée » par les officiers de police judiciaire, relève l’avocat Xavier Sauvignet, qui a assisté cinq manifestants interpelés samedi à Paris. Ce délit sanctionne le fait pour une personne de participer sciemment à un groupement, même formé de façon temporaire, en vue de la préparation de violences volontaires contre les personnes ou de dégradations de biens.

    « La problématique, c’est qu’une fois que les personnes sont renvoyées devant un tribunal, elles sont bien souvent relaxées faute de preuves tangibles », indique Me Sauvignet. Alors, le parquet opte bien souvent pour un « rappel à la loi », une « pseudo-peine sans possibilité de se défendre », dénonce l’avocat, mais qui présente l’avantage de gonfler les statistiques du ministère de l’intérieur. Cette mesure présente d’autres conséquences, complète Xavier Sauvignet : « Cela a un double effet d’intimidation à l’égard des manifestants et d’affichage à l’égard de l’extérieur. »

    Oh la la, quel titre d’article idiot chez Mediapart. La blague sur BFM (?) passe pas, et l’essentiel non plus.

    https://seenthis.net/messages/891067
    https://seenthis.net/messages/891063
    https://seenthis.net/messages/891037

    Instauré en décembre 2016 (merci #PS) ces procédures de rappel à la loi sont bien trop souvent acceptées alors qu’elles constituent une reconnaissance de culpabilité (en violation du #principe_de_contradictoire censé régir la justice : le droit à une #défense), un #aveu (la "reine des preuves"...) et ouvrent le champ à la "récidive légale" (des peines aggravées). Le chantage est le suivant. Il faut choisir de l’accepter sous peine de procès, il s’agit d’être débarrassé, de pouvoir sortir (soit-disant) "sans suite", ou de risquer de comparaître, de vivre une longue procédure et d’être condamné.
    De fait, il est possible de refuser le rappel à la loi et ni les avocats ni les collectifs ne le disent assez.
    Un tel refus n’est pas nécessairement suivi de procès puisque le parquet sait qu’il doit ouvrir une procédure dont le résultat n’est pas garanti a priori, une procédure qui a toutes chances d’être perdante (sinon ils auraient lancé la procédure, ben oui). C’est vrai dans tous les cas, sauf si on est du bon côté du manche et que cette procédure est proposée en guise de "plaider coupable" pour moins cher. Et c’est encore plus vrai avec un chef d’accusation du type « participation à un groupement en vue de commettre des dégradations ou violences », car c’est un délit d’intention que le ministère public aurait à étayer, un délit douteux au possible.

    #manifestation #répression #police #maintien_de_l'ordre #justice #arrestations_arbitraires #arrestations_préventives #rappel_à_la_loi #délits_imaginaires

  • Marche des Libertés du 12 décembre jusqu’au retrait total ! - un suivi par Paris-luttes.info, @paris
    https://paris-luttes.info/suivi-de-la-marche-des-libertes-du-14580

    La marche des libertés n’est pas interdite, elle partira de Place du Châtelet à 14h30, en passant par Boulevard de Sébastopol, Boulevard Saint-Denis, Boulevard Saint-Martin, Place de la République.

    Dispositif policier important autour de la place du Châtelet : trois canons à eau sont de sortie. Fouilles de sacs pour tout le monde et pas mal de contrôles.

    [dès 14:47] Les flics, en nombre disproportionné, s’ennuient et interpellent en masse. Papa flic Darmanin se vante déjà de 24 interpellations.

    Le cortège a été entièrement nassé du début à la fin, chargé dès la place du Châtelet. Plusieurs incursions policières ont saucissonné cette nasse en tronçons. Opérant des arrestations dès l’arrivé des manifestants et durant toute la durée de la manif, les policiers ont accueillis le cortège à République au canon à eau et à la grenade lacrymogène, sans sommations là non plus.

    La « coordination contre la sécurité globale » a refusé d’appeler à cette initiative https://seenthis.net/messages/888955

    ces deux #banderoles ont été chargées puis confisquées par les #FDO, plusieurs arrestations dans ces groupes

    Matraqué, ce musicien de la #FanfareInvisible qui jouait du tambour a été présenté comme... un manifestant maquillé ("oh là. ces images sont choquantes" ont-ils dit d’abord) par BFM (Beauté Française du Maquillage ?)

    « On revient un petit instant sur ces images d’un homme maculé de sang, c’est du maquillage, on vous rassure, pour l’instant pas de blessé »

    Entretien vidéo :
    https://twitter.com/CerveauxNon/status/1337799934171635718

    « Le policier qui m’a fouillé m’a franchement fouillé le slip, le sexe, l’anus »

    Nous avons rencontré un manifestant qui s’est confié au sortir de la manifestation sur l’#agression_sexuelle qu’il venait de subir par un policier.

    Louis Witter, @LouisWitter sur cuicui

    Place de la République, canons à eau hors champ

    #PPLSécuritéGlobale #marche_des_libertés #manifestation #libertés_publiques #police #répression #arrestations #arrestations-préventives

    • Le Parisien sur touiteur

      142 personnes ont été interpellées à Paris. Pour le ministre de l’Intérieur, la « stratégie de fermeté #anti-casseurs » a « permis de les en empêcher, de protéger les commerçants »

      5000 manifestants selon la pref, « quelques centaines » selon divers #media (dont Ouest-France), 10 000 selon les organisateurs.

      À 20H, à en croire le nombre et la fréquence des sirènes de police qui retentissent dans la ville, alors que la place de la République a été évacuée par la force depuis près de deux heures, il semble que des manifestants sortis des nasses successives soient encore dans les rues de l’est parisien.

      #Paris

    • Par des charges arbitraires à Paris, la police provoque l’insécurité globale
      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/121220/par-des-charges-arbitraires-paris-la-police-provoque-l-insecurite-globale

      Quelques milliers de personnes ont manifesté à Paris contre les lois « liberticides » d’Emmanuel Macron. La police a décidé de décourager les manifestants en les chargeant indistinctement dès le départ du cortège, provoquant panique et blessures.

      « C’est dur d’avoir 20 ans en 2020 », et de vouloir manifester en France. Ce ne sont pas Jeanne, Marie, Emma et Juliette qui diront le contraire. Ces quatre amies, toutes âgées de 20 ans, ont quitté le cortège avant même la fin de la manifestation contre les projets « liberticides » du président Emmanuel Macron, samedi 12 décembre à Paris. « C’est horrible, on s’est fait charger quatre fois sans aucune raison. De samedi en samedi, c’est de pire en pire », expliquaient-elles en rentrant chez elles, désabusées.

      Les étudiantes n’étaient venues avec aucune autre intention que celle de défendre leurs libertés, pancartes en main. Elles ne ressentent « aucune haine contre la police. À un moment, on est même allées voir des CRS, en leur demandant poliment pourquoi ils faisaient cela ». Sans réponse. « Pour nous, c’est de l’intimidation », considèrent-elles. Et cela marche : « On n’ira pas à la prochaine manif. »

      Comme elles, quelques milliers de personnes se sont rassemblées, ce samedi 12 décembre, à Paris, à l’appel de différents mouvements mobilisés contre la proposition de loi « sécurité globale » mais aussi du collectif contre l’islamophobie, qui conteste la loi « confortant le respect des principes de la République » (ex-loi séparatisme). Un premier appel, à l’initiative d’un groupe de gilets jaunes, avait été interdit par la préfecture de police de Paris. En régions, des milliers de manifestants se sont rassemblés dans une quarantaine de villes, à l’appel notamment de la coordination #StopLoiSécuritéGlobale qui ne s’est pas associée à la mobilisation parisienne, faute de garanties de sécurité après les échauffourées du week-end dernier.

      La manifestation parisienne a été émaillée d’incidents très tôt, quand les forces de l’ordre ont décidé de charger le cortège juste après son départ de la place du Châtelet, sans raisons apparentes. La stratégie de maintien de l’ordre déployée à Paris lors de la grande manifestation du samedi 28 novembre, où les forces de police étaient restées à distance, n’était qu’une parenthèse. Depuis la semaine dernière, sur ordre du préfet Didier Lallement, les policiers reviennent au contact, comme lors des manifestations des gilets jaunes.

      Sur son compte Twitter, la préfecture de police a expliqué que les forces de l’ordre étaient « intervenues au milieu du cortège […] pour empêcher la constitution d’un groupe de black-blocs violents ». Par vagues successives, les CRS, gendarmes mobiles, mais aussi les voltigeurs des Brigades de répression des actions violentes motorisées (BRAV-M) ont ainsi foncé dans le tas le long du boulevard de Sébastopol, sans faire le tri entre les manifestants et les personnes qu’ils souhaitaient interpeller.

      Une stratégie qui a fait monter la tension pendant de longues minutes et provoqué des blessures chez les manifestants. Comme ce musicien frappé au visage (voir photo ci-dessus). Sur BFM TV, une journaliste a expliqué en direct que le sang qui coulait sur son visage était « du maquillage, on vous rassure », avant de présenter ses excuses samedi soir. En effet, le jeune homme a bien reçu un coup de matraque alors qu’il se trouvait de dos au début d’une charge policière.
      À 17 h 50, trois heures et demie après le début de la manifestation, « 119 » personnes avaient été interpellées, selon le ministre de l’intérieur Gérald Darmanin, parlant de « casseurs venus nombreux ».

      Tout au long du défilé dans le centre de Paris, un impressionnant dispositif policier a été déployé pour contrôler les moindres faits et gestes des manifestants. Des barrages avaient été disposés (fouille de tous les manifestants) aux entrées de la place du Châtelet, cernée par les cordons de CRS et les canons à eau. Même dispositif à l’arrivée de la manifestation, place de la République, cerclée de grilles anti-émeutes. Entre les deux dispositifs, les manifestants ont pu défiler en rangs d’oignons, encadrés par les contingents de CRS et gendarmes mobiles qui sont même allés jusqu’à rythmer l’avancée du cortège. Au premier coup de sifflet : on avance. Au second : on s’arrête. Et ainsi de suite, jusqu’à faire perdre au cortège, déjà sonné par les charges du départ, tout son dynamisme.

      À l’avant de la manifestation, le camion n’a pour autant pas cessé de cracher des slogans : « Y’en a marre, y’en a marre ! Stop aux lois liberticides ! Stop à l’islamophobie ! » Lucien, 23 ans, se réjouit que la contestation converge entre la PPL Sécurité globale et la loi séparatisme : « Nous sommes face à un seul phénomène : le développement d’un État policier qui se construit à l’encontre des minorités, et principalement des musulmans », estime-t-il. Pierre, un « jeune cadre dynamique » de 26 ans venu de Lyon, conteste cette approche : « J’ai un positionnement plus nuancé, je manifeste contre la loi sécurité globale, qui peut servir à maîtriser les mouvements sociaux, pas contre la loi séparatisme. »

      Une des charges au début de la manifestation sur le boulevard de Sébastopol. © AR

      Les raisons de manifester sont en réalité multiples. « Nous sommes une génération qui n’a jamais eu d’acquis, on n’a plus de but. Nos parents ont travaillé pour offrir une meilleure éducation à leurs enfants, nous on est face à la crise sociale, climatique, sanitaire, on ne connaît pas la notion de “monde meilleur”, on essaie juste de retenir nos libertés », analyse pour sa part Michèle, urbaniste de 27 ans, en relevant le nombre important de jeunes dans le cortège. À l’inverse, les drapeaux de syndicats ou d’organisations politiques se font rares, à l’exception d’un fourgon du Nouveau parti anticapitaliste (NPA).

      « On ne se sent pas en sécurité mais nous n’avons pas d’autres choix que de manifester. Ce qu’il se passe en ce moment est très grave. Dans dix ans, je veux pouvoir me dire que j’étais là, pour défendre nos droits et libertés », abonde Mila, 23 ans, en service civique chez France Terre d’asile, en listant l’accumulation de violences policières dont se sont fait l’écho les médias ces dernières semaines. « J’étais place de la République avec Utopia 56 [lors de l’évacuation brutale d’un campement de migrants – ndlr], je n’avais jamais ressenti une telle violence », explique-t-elle.

      Un peu plus loin, Magalie se tient sur le bord de la manifestation, « j’essaie de me protéger des charges ». À 41 ans, cette enseignante en Seine-Saint-Denis, « militante de longue date », ne cache pas son inquiétude : « Plus cela va, moins on a de droits. Je n’ai vraiment pas envie que tout parte à vau-l’eau, mais je crois que nous sommes proches de la révolte. »

    • « Régler par tous les moyens le problème [du #black_bloc]. » aurait dit Macron après la manifestation du 5 décembre dernier. Et le Canard de prédire, à l’instar d’un syndicat de police, « un résultat judiciaire proche de zéro », faisant mine de ne pas savoir, par exemple, que 500 personnes ont été condamnées à de la taule lors du mouvement des Gilets jaunes.

      Ce soir, 42 #GAV sur les 147 interpellations. Dont bon nombre pour « visage dissimulé » (bonnet + masque...), selon Vies Volées (collectif de familles victimes de crimes policiers https://www.viesvolees.org/le-collectif), @ViesVolees sur cui.

      Trumpisation chez les amis d’Action française ? Aujourd’hui, Darmanin publie 4 tweets et en retweete 4 autre pour vanter l’action des FDO à Paris.

    • Libérez nos camarades ! [reçu par mel]

      Aujourd’hui, à la manifestation parisienne contre les lois liberticides et racistes, contre les violences policières et l’islamophobie, notre camarade Ahamada Siby, du Collectif des Sans-Papiers de Montreuil (CSPM), a été arrêté par la police et emmené au commissariat du 13ème arrondissement. Nous apprenons qu’il a été arrêté parce que, selon la police, il aurait agressé un flic ? C’est rigoureusement impossible. D’autant plus que, quelques minutes plus tôt, il était allé voir tranquillement la police pour demander à pouvoir quitter la manifestation, en raison de sa blessure au genou.

      Pour nous qui connaissons Ahamada Siby, cette accusation est ridicule. Malheureusement nous savons parfaitement que dans ce régime, avec ce gouvernement, les flics pensent pouvoir agir comme bon leur semble, et qu’ils seront protégés. Ils inventent, et sauf vidéo démontant leur version, leur parole fait foi. C’est ainsi que cela se passe jusqu’à présent, et c’est aussi pour ça qu’Ahamada manifeste contre la loi sécurité globale comme contre la loi séparatisme.

      Ahamada Siby est l’un des 273 habitants du hangar situé au 138 rue de Stalingrad, un lieu qui sert de foyer après leur expulsion de l’AFPA en octobre 2019, et où l’électricité ne fonctionne plus depuis plusieurs mois.

      C’est un camarade très actif dans toutes les luttes actuelles. Celles des sans-papiers bien sûr, à Montreuil comme ailleurs, mais aussi contre les violences policières et les lois liberticides : il a fait toutes les manifestations contre la loi « sécurité globale ». Il a également participé à la marche pour Adama Traoré le 18 juillet dernier, animant comme souvent le cortège du CSPM, ou encore à des manifestations pour l’hôpital public.

      À travers lui, c’est tout le mouvement social qui est visé.

      Hier soir encore, vendredi 11 décembre à #Montreuil, il animait au mégaphone le cortège de la marche des sans-papiers.

      Nous lançons donc un appel à témoins : si vous avez filmé la scène de l’arrestation, ou les minutes qui ont précédé, contactez-nous.

      Nous savons qu’il ne suffit pas d’expliquer qu’il s’agit une fois de plus d’un abus de pouvoir ; pour obtenir la libération d’Ahamada Siby, nous devons manifester notre solidarité.

      Nous apprenons également ce soir que plusieurs membres des Brigades de Solidarité Populaire de Montreuil sont en garde à vue au commissariat du 13ème arrondissement.

      Nous exigeons la libération immédiate de nos camarades Ahamada Siby et BSP.
      Une présence bruyante en soutien est la bienvenue dès maintenant.

      🔊🔥Nous appelons surtout à un rassemblement de TOUTES et TOUS devant le commissariat du 13ème arrondissement (métro Place d’Italie) DEMAIN dimanche 13 décembre à 12h.🔥🔥🔥

      Collectif des Sans-Papiers de Montreuil (CSPM), Montreuil Rebelle, NPA Montreuil

      #délits_imaginaires

    • Stratégie des forces de l’ordre à Paris : « Efficace d’un point de vue technique, mais inquiétant d’un point de vue politique », selon un sociologue [Olivier Fillieule]
      https://www.francetvinfo.fr/politique/proposition-de-loi-sur-la-securite-globale/strategie-des-forces-de-l-ordre-a-paris-c-est-efficace-d-un-point-de-vu

      Pourquoi aujourd’hui, a-t-on autant de violences dans les manifestations ? Parce que le pouvoir ne veut plus tolérer des illégalismes en manifestation qui, jusqu’à présent, étaient considérés dans la doctrine du maintien de l’ordre comme des soupapes de sécurité. Il vaut mieux avoir un abribus qui pète et qui brûle, voire dans les manifestations d’agriculteurs, une grille de préfecture arrachée et 3 tonnes de purin dans la cour qui vont coûter un million d’euros que d’avoir un blessé. C’est cette manière de penser le maintien de l’ordre sur laquelle on a fonctionné pendant les 40 dernières années. Aujourd’hui, on s’achemine vers quelque chose de beaucoup plus dur, de plus en plus tendu, avec un risque de mort d’un côté comme de l’autre. Ce qui n’est pas souhaitable.

      note : les 42 personnes gardées à vue ont été dispersées dans un grand nombre de commissariats parisiens de 10 arrondissements (5e, 7e, 8e, 11e, 12e, 13e, 14e, 15e, 18e et 20e), ce qui complique la solidarité et la défense.
      à 13h ce dimanche, au moins un avocat et un journaliste ont été libérés

      #maintien_de_l'ordre #illégalismes

    • DÉFOULOIR RÉPRESSIF CONTRE LA MARCHE DES LIBERTÉS À PARIS - Acta
      https://acta.zone/defouloir-repressif-contre-la-marche-des-libertes-a-paris

      (...) la Loi Sécurité Globale est une réponse politique directe à l’intensification de la conflictualité sociale caractéristique de la dernière séquence (2016-2020) ; elle est aussi plus profondément le symptôme de la crise de légitimité d’un État français incapable de produire du consentement. On ne peut toutefois pas l’envisager sans considérer sa combinaison avec la Loi Séparatisme dont l’objectif évident est d’empêcher toute convergence entre l’ébullition que connaissent les classes populaires blanches et la révolte du prolétariat non-blanc.

      Dans un tel contexte, la gauche – Jean-Luc Mélenchon en tête – montre, une fois de plus, son aveuglement vis-à-vis de la réalité effective du tournant autoritaire et sa déconnexion avec le mouvement réel. Son incapacité à en saisir les dynamiques l’amène à une position de complicité objective avec le gouvernement. La répression qui s’est abattue aujourd’hui est aussi le fruit de cette complicité, et de la défection des organisations traditionnelles du mouvement ouvrier. Face à cela, on se réjouit que les rencontres entre l’anti-racisme politique, les gilets jaunes et les différentes formes d’auto-organisation de la jeunesse issue du cortège de tête soient en capacité de tenir la rue et de ne pas glisser dans la tombe que la gauche est en train de nous creuser.

      Une charge policière s’empare de la banderole des brigades de solidarité populaire

  • Libertés, casse et communication politique
    à quoi joue la coordination contre la sécurité globale ?
    https://lundi.am/Libertes-casse-et-communication-politique

    Nous avons reçu plusieurs témoignages concernant la première marche des libertés qui s’est tenue ce samedi. Pèle-mèle ils pointaient les retournements de veste d’une partie de la gauche (aujourd’hui à l’unisson sur la question de la loi), s’offusquaient des discours de dissociation qui ont accompagné les affrontements de fin de parcours, ou pointaient l’absence de recul critique quant aux pratiques mises en oeuvres (de la casse au « smartphone levé »). Le texte que nous avons choisi a à la fois le mérite de traiter de l’ensemble de ces sujets, et de ne pas partir de la marche parisienne qui a concentré toutes les attentions. Plus qu’une critique d’un communiqué que l’on pourrait juger anecdotique il faut le voir comme une amorce de réflexion sur les stratégies de luttes et de divisions.

    Nous avons battu le pavé contre la loi liberticide dite de sécurité globale. Ce samedi de manifestation, qui était aussi celui de la réouverture des commerces, s’est déroulé dans la capitale des Gaules sous un soleil radieux !

    Désolé : on s’abaisse au même niveau de poncifs que le communiqué dont on va discuter.

    Nous avons manifesté donc, et constaté, avec joie, que l’inattendu mouvement contre une loi sécuritaire prenait de l’ampleur. C’est rare. Et c’est rare de se dire que la rue pourrait, si ce n’est gagner, au moins arracher enfin un bout d’honneur perdu.

    "Rentrer" de manif aujourd’hui c’est souvent rentrer dans un autre espace-temps, celui des réseaux sociaux et leurs folies post-manifestation. Cette fois, en plus des stratégies de com’ gouvernementales et de la tentative d’exister d’une extrême-droite plutôt aphone ces derniers jours, il y avait quelques autres raisons d’être dégouté. On pourrait parler de tel « photographe de terrain », qui sans une once de recul critique ou d’intelligence, met sur le même plan « casseurs » et BRAV parce que tous deux l’empêcheraient de filmer. Ou de l’ancien journaliste du JDD et créateur de Loopsider, qui tombe dans le piège pourtant grossier tendu par un syndicat de police visant à mettre sur le même plan les bastons entre CRS et manifestants et le tabassage de Michel Zecler. Surtout, il y eut, posté par David Dufresne sur Twitter, le "communiqué des organisateurs".

    Ce fameux communiqué [1] publié par la coordination [2] évoque notamment la manifestation où nous étions : celle de Lyon, pour en dénoncer "fermement", les "violences".

    Revenant de manifester, d’avoir inhalé notre dose de gaz, comme on en a l’habitude à Lyon depuis au moins 4 ans (d’ailleurs n’était-ce pas aussi contre ça que l’on était dans la rue ?), quelle joie de nous voir ainsi condamnés "fermement" (par extension). Naïvement, puisque ce sont nos corps, nos voix, que l’on avait mis en mouvement ce samedi, on pensait que c’était un peu notre manif. Des proprios se ramènent avec un acte notarié : ils condamnent .

    #loi_de_sécurité_globale #maintien_de_l'ordre #journalisme

    • Précision : après quelques remarques, David Dufresne a retiré le communiqué le soir même de son fil. J’ai pas la ref sous le coude car mon twitter est down pour la seconde soirée d’affilée mais j’ai pu le constater de mes yeux-vu. Et le communiqué a surtout été propulsé par le SNJ-CGT (et très peu relayé tant il était gênant)

    • MANIFESTATION À PARIS CE SAMEDI 12 DÉCEMBRE : LA COORDINATION STOP LOI SÉCURITÉ GLOBALE S’ABSTIENT
      https://www.sortiraparis.com/actualites/a-paris/articles/238012-manifestation-a-paris-ce-samedi-12-decembre-la-coordination-sto

      La coordination Stop Loi Sécurité Globale « n’organisera pas de mobilisation ce samedi 12 décembre à Paris ». Tel est le message communiqué ce mercredi 9 décembre par la coordination qui regroupe syndicats et organisations opposées aux lois relatives à la « sécurité globale » et sur les « Séparatismes ». Les entités enjoignent aux sympathisants de continuer la mobilisation « sur tout le territoire national », mais pas à Paris.

      C’est la première fois que ces associations et collectifs décident de ne pas battre le pavé dans la capitale pour protester contre des projets de loi qu’ils considèrent comme « liberticides ». Après avoir réuni « des centaines de milliers de personnes dans plus de 100 villes en France pour dénoncer une dérive sécuritaire très inquiétante » comme ils le soulignent dans leur communiqué, ses responsables considèrent que « les conditions de sécurité des manifestants et manifestantes ne sont pas assurées ». C’est pourquoi la coordination « n’organisera pas de mobilisation ce samedi 12 décembre à Paris ».

      Monsieur Mélenchon sur touiteur
      https://twitter.com/JLMelenchon/status/1337382503427043331

      Je soutiens la décision du collectif #StopLoiSecuriteGlobale d’annuler la marche de samedi à Paris. L’insécurité créée par #Lallement, Alliance et Black Bloc ne permet plus de manifester paisiblement. Les ennemis de la liberté et Macron marquent un point.

      La semaine dernière, ce n’est pas seulement David Dufresne qui a dépublié le communiqué hostile à une partie des manifestants et à certaines pratiques dont il est question plus haut mais bien l’ensemble de ses auteurs (la « coordination » contre la loi sécurité globale, un cartel d’organisations et des individualités, dont de nombreux #journalistes).

      #gauche (et maladroit) #manifestation

    • Face aux atteintes à la liberté d’informer, et l’instauration d’une surveillance de masse, des mobilisations sont prévues le 12 décembre dans toute la France. Voici la carte des rassemblements prévus et le communiqué de la coordination
      « StopLoiSecuriteGlobale », dont Basta ! est membre.
      https://www.bastamag.net/carte-des-rassemblements-contre-la-loi-securite-globale-StopLoiSecuriteGlo
      Stop Loi Sécurité Globale
      https://stoploisecuriteglobale.fr

    • La coordination « StopLoiSecuriteGlobale » est composée de syndicats, sociétés, collectifs, associations de journalistes et de réalisateurs.trices, confédérations syndicales, associations, organisations de défense de droits humains, comités de familles de victimes, de collectifs de quartiers populaires, d’exilés, de Gilets jaunes. [...]

      Après la manifestation parisienne du 5 décembre, et du fait de la stratégie de la terre brûlée mise en place par la préfecture de police, la coordination #StopLoiSecuriteGlobale considère que les conditions de sécurité des manifestants et manifestantes ne sont pas assurées et n’organisera pas de mobilisation ce samedi 12 décembre à Paris. [...]

      La coordination exige d’être reçue dans les plus brefs délais par le président de la République(...)

      Cette fois on évite de dénoncer « le black bloc », les manifestants, comme c’est poli ! Postures bureaucratiques et éthique bourgeoise unies toutes ensemble dans une hypocrisie neuneu sans autre objectif que de se montrer respectables et vertueuses. La honte.
      Ces orgas et ces gens se refusent à assumer la protection des manifestants qui seront là demain, avec les manifestants eux-mêmes... tout en se déclarant désireuses de négocier. On croit rêver....
      Pour clore 68, il avait fallu d’abord que la CGT s’aligne un tant soit peu sur les grévistes, les salons du Grenelle gaulliste ne viennent qu’ensuite. Le conservateur patron de FO Bergeron a dit pendant des décennies au pouvoir « écoutez-moi sinon ça va péter ». Mais sur ce coup, alors qu’y compris un point de vue instrumental imposerait à nos dignes représentants de prendre appuis sur ce grand nombre qu’ils prétendent représenter, on lâche les manifestants avant même la première lacrymo, la première arrestation.

      #sans_vergogne

  • En #Géorgie, la #frontière avec l’#Azerbaïdjan au cœur de l’« affaire des cartographes »

    A la veille des élections législatives du 31 octobre, ce scandale impliquant le parti d’opposition pourrait peser sur le scrutin.

    Il y a encore un an et demi, Zviad Naniachvili grimpait chaque matin sur la crête qui sépare la Géorgie de l’Azerbaïdjan pour voir le soleil se lever sur les montagnes. Ce guide géorgien de 37 ans a grandi là, au pied du #monastère orthodoxe de #David_Garedja, un complexe spectaculaire d’églises et de cellules troglodytes fondé au VIe siècle. Le site, creusé dans la roche, s’étire sur plusieurs hectares de part et d’autre de la frontière, dans un paysage désertique. Jusqu’ici, tout le monde pouvait s’y promener librement. C’est désormais impossible.

    Depuis la visite, en avril 2019, de la présidente géorgienne, Salomé Zourabichvili, proche du parti au pouvoir, Rêve géorgien, des #gardes-frontières azerbaïdjanais ont fait leur apparition sur la crête, empêchant touristes et pèlerins de visiter la partie du monastère située de l’autre côté de la frontière. « C’est comme si quelqu’un vivait chez moi », déplore Zviad Naniachvili, en levant les yeux vers la cime.

    La chef de l’Etat, flanquée de deux hommes en armes, avait appelé à régler « de toute urgence » la question de la #délimitation des frontières, ravivant les tensions autour de ce sujet sensible : les Géorgiens affirment que ce site historique, culturel et religieux leur appartient, ce que contestent les Azerbaïdjanais, pour lesquels ces hauteurs ont une importance stratégique.

    Devant la porte en bois gravée de la grotte où vécut David Garedja, l’un des pères assyriens venus évangéliser la Géorgie, trois jeunes filles en jupe plissée entonnent un chant sacré face aux #montagnes. « Dieu va tout arranger », veut croire l’une.

    A l’approche des élections législatives du samedi 31 octobre, le #monastère est désormais au cœur d’un scandale susceptible de peser sur le scrutin. L’histoire, aux ramifications complexes, cristallise les crispations qui traversent la société géorgienne, plus polarisée que jamais, sur fond de « fake news » et de tensions régionales avec le conflit au #Haut-Karabakh, enclave séparatiste en Azerbaïdjan.

    Deux cartographes arrêtés

    L’affaire a éclaté trois semaines avant le premier tour. Le 7 octobre, deux #cartographes, anciens membres de la commission gouvernementale chargée de négocier la démarcation de la frontière, ont été arrêtés et placés en #détention provisoire – une mesure exceptionnellement sévère.

    #Iveri_Melachvili et #Natalia_Ilicheva sont accusés par le procureur général de Géorgie d’avoir voulu céder des terres à l’Azerbaïdjan entre 2005 et 2007, lorsque l’ex-président Mikheïl Saakachvili était au pouvoir. Ils auraient caché la bonne carte, datée de 1938, pour en utiliser une autre à la place, défavorable à la Géorgie, lui faisant perdre 3 500 hectares. Les deux cartographes, qui clament leur innocence, encourent dix à quinze ans de prison.

    Ces #arrestations surprises, survenues en pleine campagne électorale, électrisent le débat à quelques jours du scrutin. Qualifié de « #traître », le parti de l’opposition, emmené par Mikheïl Saakachvili, le Mouvement national uni, dénonce une « manipulation politique » du parti au pouvoir – dirigé par le milliardaire Bidzina Ivanichvili – visant à le discréditer avant le scrutin.

    La nature politique de cette affaire ne fait aucun doute non plus pour les ONG. Quinze d’entre elles, dont Transparency International et Open Society Foundation, ont ainsi conjointement dénoncé, le 9 octobre, une « enquête à motivation politique ». Elles pointent le « timing de l’enquête », en période préélectorale, les commentaires du parti au pouvoir, qui « violent la présomption d’innocence », et « l’approche sélective » des investigations, certains témoins majeurs n’étant pas auditionnés. Ces ONG exhortent ainsi les autorités à « cesser de manipuler des sujets sensibles pour la population avant les élections ».

    « Cette affaire est une tragédie personnelle pour les deux cartographes, mais, au-delà, c’est l’indépendance de la justice, inexistante, qui est en question, souligne Ivane Chitachvili, avocat à Transparency International. Tant que notre système restera un instrument politique aux mains du gouvernement, cela continuera. »

    « Attiser le sentiment nationaliste et religieux »

    Des membres du gouvernement, dont le ministre de la défense, Irakli Garibachvili, et des représentants de l’Eglise orthodoxe, proche de la Russie, accusent même les deux cartographes d’avoir tenté de vendre le monastère de David Garedja lui-même. Le site religieux n’est pourtant mentionné nulle part dans les 1 500 pages du dossier judiciaire. « Ils parlent du monastère pour embrouiller les gens et les prendre par l’émotion, en attisant leur sentiment nationaliste ou religieux, analyse Ivane Chitachvili.

    La stratégie fonctionne auprès d’une partie de la population, qui compte 84 % d’orthodoxes. Tamuna Biszinachvili, une vigneronne de 32 ans venue en famille visiter le monastère, en est convaincue : « Notre ancien gouvernement a fait une énorme connerie. » Ce qu’elle a lu sur Facebook et ses échanges avec un moine l’ont persuadée que cette histoire était vraie. C’est même pour cela qu’elle a tenu à venir avec ses enfants aujourd’hui : « Je veux leur montrer le monastère avant que les Azerbaïdjanais prennent cette terre. Notre terre. »

    Sur les hauteurs du monastère, Goram, un réserviste de 24 ans venu déposer quelques bougies, n’accorde au contraire aucun crédit à ces accusations. « Qui peut croire à cette histoire ? Aucune terre n’a pu être cédée, puisqu’il n’y a même pas d’accord sur la frontière ! », rappelle-t-il.

    De fait, voilà près de trente ans, depuis la chute de l’URSS, que la Géorgie et l’Azerbaïdjan négocient leur frontière, centimètre par centimètre, en exhumant de vieilles cartes. Les deux tiers ont fini par faire l’objet d’un #accord technique, un tiers est toujours en discussion, mais rien n’a encore jamais été ratifié.

    Rôle trouble de la #Russie

    Assis derrière la table à manger de sa cellule troglodyte, un moine orthodoxe en robe noire et à la longue barbe brune se prend la tête à deux mains, affligé par l’affaire des cartographes. Derrière lui, une guirlande « happy birthday » pendille entre deux icônes. Quelques morceaux de pain et un bidon en plastique rempli de vin traînent encore sur la table après les agapes.

    Persuadé d’être surveillé, le père redoute de parler, mais accepte, sous le couvert de l’anonymat, de livrer son point de vue, en rupture avec celui de ses supérieurs. « C’est la visite de la présidente qui a déclenché tout ça », se lamente-t-il. Sans oser le nommer, il soupçonne également « un grand pays » d’avoir « intérêt à créer un #conflit » dans la région. L’affaire des cartographes lui « rappelle les purges soviétiques, quand 60 % des prisonniers étaient des détenus politiques ». La comparaison revient souvent dans ce dossier.

    Plus divisés que jamais, les Géorgiens oscillent entre colère et consternation. « Ceux qui n’ont pas subi un lavage de cerveau savent bien que cette histoire est absurde, soupire Chota Gvineria, chercheur au Centre de recherche sur la politique économique (EPCR), basé à Tbilissi. Le bureau du procureur est directement subordonné au gouvernement, qui utilise deux innocentes victimes pour manipuler l’opinion avant les élections. »

    Cet ancien diplomate pointe également le rôle trouble de la Russie, où la #carte prétendument « dissimulée » par les cartographes a soudain été retrouvée par un homme d’affaire, #David_Khidacheli, ancien vice-président du conglomérat russe #Sistema, qui l’a transférée à la Géorgie. A travers cette affaire, « Moscou veut déstabiliser la région et créer un conflit entre la Géorgie et l’Azerbaïdjan pour renforcer son influence », analyse le chercheur. Malgré ce #différend_frontalier, Bakou garde de bonnes relations avec Tbilissi, son partenaire stratégique.

    Pour Guiorgui Mchvenieradze, directeur de l’ONG Georgian Democracy Initiative et avocat du cartographe Iveri Melachvili, « cette affaire est inacceptable au XXIe siècle ». Devenu à son tour la cible d’une campagne de dénigrement, il affirme qu’il est « clair et net que les activistes et trolls sont extrêmement mobilisés, notamment sur Facebook, pour diffuser des “fake news” » sur ce dossier, et le faire passer lui aussi pour un « traître qui veut vendre le monastère ». Le procès des cartographes doit s’ouvrir le 4 décembre.

    https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2020/10/29/en-georgie-la-frontiere-avec-l-azerbaidjan-au-c-ur-de-l-affaire-des-cartogra
    #cartographie #frontières #cartographe #nationalisme

    via @fil

  • Vague d’arrestations d’opposants à l’huile de palme à Bornéo - Sauvons la Forêt
    https://www.sauvonslaforet.org/actualites/9832/vague-darrestations-dopposants-a-lhuile-de-palme-a-borneo?mtu=500780

    Effendi Buhing, un chef traditionnel du peuple #Dayak_Tomun, a été arrêté par la police le 26 août 2020 à #Bornéo. Au total, six #Autochtones qui résistent à l’#accaparement de leurs #terres et aux #déboisements dans la #forêt de #Kinipan ont été interpelés au cours des derniers jours.

    « Nous nous défendons contre l’huile de palme » déclarait le chef traditionnel Effendi Buhing dans le cadre des recherches pour notre pétition pour aider les Dayak. « La forêt de Kinipan est notre vie. Nous nous sommes plaints par écrit, avons emprunté la voie judiciaire et manifesté pacifiquement. Malgré tout, un producteur d’#huile_de_palme détruit notre forêt. »

    #industrie_palmiste

  • #ChileDespertó
    Le Chili : 30 ans après la fin de la dictature

    Depuis le 17 octobre dernier, des millions de Chilien.ne.s sont dans les rues pour protester contre le gouvernement en place de Sebastián #Piñera, dont le #néolibéralisme extrême est hérité de la dictature d’Augusto Pinochet (1973-1990). C’est pour un nouveau modèle de société mais aussi contre la #répression_étatique que les Chilien.es se mobilisent. En effet, depuis cette date, les violations des droits de l’homme se multiplient de la part des #forces_armées et de la police : #arrestations_sommaires, #violences_sexuelles, #assassinats, #blessures graves sont rapportés par les ONG nationales et internationales pour le respect des droits de l’homme.

    Face à l’urgence chilienne, l’équipe d’espagnol de l’IEP de Grenoble et leurs étudiants ont jugé nécessaire de communiquer. Un contact via les réseaux sociaux a été établi avec plusieurs photographes chiliens amateurs basés sur Santiago. Ceux-ci ont répondu à l’appel dans l’objectif de donner de la #visibilité, au-delà des frontières, à la situation actuelle dans leur pays. Ce projet de soutien au Chili entend diffuser une vision nationale-populaire de la crise sociale, grâce à ces clichés qui sont autant d’actes artistiques de résistance.
    Ce travail est le fruit d’une collaboration riche entre les enseignants d’espagnol et les bibliothécaires de Sciences Po Grenoble en charge de la médiation culturelle, qui ont réalisé ce site afin de finaliser ce projet malgré les contraintes de confinement. C’est pourquoi l’évènement, qui aurait dû avoir lieu dans l’institut, est ainsi proposé en exposition virtuelle.

    https://sites.google.com/iepg.fr/chiledesperto

    Les photographes :
    #Luis_Fernández_Garrido
    #Camilo_Aragón_Guajardo
    #Patricio_Acuña_Pérez
    #Yerko_Jofre_Amaru
    #Roberto_Vega_Sotelo

    –-> zéro #femmes (sic)
    #femmes_photographes

    https://sites.google.com/iepg.fr/chiledesperto/lexpo/les-photographes

    #Chili #exposition #droits_humains #police #héritage #dictature #résistance #visibilisation #photographie

    ping @reka @albertocampiphoto

  • Multinationals are using violence as weapon in the COVID-19 lockdown to dispossess communities – Witness radio Witness radio
    https://witnessradio.org/multinationals-are-using-violence-as-weapon-in-the-covid-19-lockdown-t

    As Uganda begins a 32 day COVID – 19 Lockdown, multinational companies dispossessing more than 35000 natives off their land, have resorted to the use of violence to grab land for poor communities. During the previous weekend, Agilis Partners limited and Great Season Company as well as their agents severely beat William Katusiime, violently and arbitrarily arrested two people namely Sipiriano Baluma and Haweka Martin. Katusiime is a member of a community being dispossessed by Agilis Partners while Haweka and Baluma are members of a community being illegally and violently evicted by Great Seasons Company respectively.

    Last week, Ugandan government ordered the closure of schools, suspended religious gatherings across the country in an attempt to prevent the spread of coronavirus. On March, 22nd, Uganda registered coronavirus first case.

  • Attestation en règle pour faire ses courses de la semaine, contrôle du sac à la sortie du supermarché par la police, 360 € d’amende pour 2 paquets de gâteaux jugés ne pas être de première nécessité.

    Je sais maintenant pourquoi j’avais cette peur sourde au ventre en allant faire les courses hier. Mes proches se demandaient si je vrillais pas parano.

    Non.

    Peut être que je sens un peu en avance certains trucs... et c’est souvent perturbant ou lourd à porter. (Thread)

    https://twitter.com/isAshPsy/status/1242556982042791942?s=20

  • Pour sortir du #confinement, un plan d’urgence anticapitaliste

    Par bien des aspects, la #crise_sanitaire en cours est un révélateur de l’incapacité du #capitalisme européen à résoudre les grands problèmes de l’humanité. L’#Italie, la #France et l’#Espagne sont les pays où le virus frappe le plus fort car le #système_sanitaire a été ravagé par les politiques austéritaires depuis au moins une décennie. En France, ce sont 69.000 lits qui ont été supprimés à l’hôpital entre 2003 et 2017, 4.000 en 2018. Par souci d’économie, les réserves stratégiques de masques et de respirateurs ont été supprimées (près d’un milliard de masques dans les années 2000 - supprimé par Xavier Bertrand en 2011). Toujours par souci d’économie, la recherche publique sur les coronavirus n’a pas été soutenue et un temps précieux a été perdu dans la possibilité de trouver des traitements efficaces. La rigueur budgétaire et la recherche du profit sont les principaux responsables de la situation dans laquelle nous nous trouvons.

    Confinement ou immunité collective ?

    Face à la pandémie, les gouvernements hésitent entre deux solutions. La première, minoritaire, défendue par les gouvernement britanniques et néerlandais est l’acquisition d’une immunité de groupe. Cette immunité à l’avantage d’éviter les nouvelles épidémies. Selon les connaissances que nous avons du virus (R0 ~ 2.5), cela nécessite que 60% de la population entre en contact avec le virus et en soit immunisée. Ce processus est très bien décrit par le groupe de modélisation de l’équipe ETE (Laboratoire MIVEGEC, CNRS, IRD, Université de Montpellier) (http://alizon.ouvaton.org/Rapport2_Immunisation.html). Une fois ce taux atteint, la population dans son ensemble (y compris les personnes non immunisées) est protégée contre une nouvelle épidémie.

    Cependant, sans mesure de contrôle, les projections montrent qu’entre 81 et 89% de la population pourrait être infectée. Soit entre 20% et 30% de plus que le seuil pour atteindre l’immunité collective. Cela représente potentiellement 20 millions de personnes infectées en plus dans un pays comme la France.

    Nous ne connaissons pas précisément le taux de létalité du virus. Les chiffres dont nous disposons sont tous biaisés, et a priori largement surestimés, par l’absence de tests systématiques dans la population. Plus on dépiste, plus on détecte des personnes contaminées présentant peu ou pas de symptômes, plus ce taux est bas. Mais aussi bas soit ce taux, lorsqu’il est multiplié par des dizaines de millions de personnes, les morts se compteraient très probablement en centaines de milliers. Par ailleurs, l’austérité budgétaire et l’affaiblissement des systèmes de santé doivent être intégrés dans l’équation. La létalité du Covid-19 est visiblement provoquée par un choc cytokinique qui nécessite une prise en charge en soin intensifs avec respirateurs. Plus la pénurie de respirateurs est grande, plus la mortalité est haute, plus les équipes médicales doivent choisir qui maintenir en vie et qui sacrifier par manque de moyens. C’est sûrement ce qui explique les taux de mortalité très élevés par rapport à d’autres pays en Italie, en Espagne et dans une moindre mesure en France (bien que cela pourrait s’aggraver au pic de l’épidémie) qui sont mal équipés en nombre de lits en « soins aigus ».

    Dans la plupart des pays, ces chiffres ne sont pas assumables par les gouvernements en place. Et ce sont ces projections qui ont poussé partout le pouvoir à confiner les populations malgré la crise économique majeure et les conséquences sociales dramatiques que cela entraine.

    En effet, la distanciation sociale permet de ralentir la progression du virus, d’aplatir le pic, et donc de diminuer l’afflux de malades en détresse à l’hôpital. Ce processus est décrit de façon très intuitive dans le Washington Post (https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/world/corona-simulator). La distanciation sociale peut recourir à plusieurs mécanismes, de la fermeture des écoles jusqu’au confinement total. L’étude publiée le 16 mars par l’Imperial College COVID-19 Response Team (https://www.imperial.ac.uk/media/imperial-college/medicine/sph/ide/gida-fellowships/Imperial-College-COVID19-NPI-modelling-16-03-2020.pdf) réalise des projections du nombre de lits occupés en soins intensifs en fonction de plusieurs scénarios de confinements. Si cette étude est forcément incomplète, notamment car les courbes dépendent du moment où les mesures sont mises en œuvre, cela nous montre que les mesures de confinement, dans le cas où aucun traitement ne serait trouvé, devraient s’étaler jusqu’à la fin de l’année 2021 pour que la population atteigne les 60% d’immunisés. Dans le cas contraire, tout relâchement du confinement pourrait correspondre à un nouveau développement incontrôlé de l’épidémie dans la population.

    Mais comment imaginer que la situation que nous vivons depuis une semaine en France se poursuivent pendant des mois ? Ce n’est tenable ni économiquement, ni socialement. Ce n’est pas le propos de cet article (pour cela voir le texte de Mimosa Effe : https://npa2009.org/idees/societe/le-confinement-la-destruction-du-lien-social-et-ses-consequences), mais le #confinement_de_classe que nous vivons actuellement doit s’arrêter. Toute vie sociale est stoppée alors qu’il faut continuer à travailler. Même si nous arrêtions toutes les productions non indispensables, ce serait tout de même des millions de travailleurs.euses qui devraient continuer à faire tourner l’hôpital, l’électricité, l’eau, le traitement des ordures ou l’alimentation – mais aussi tous les autres métiers qui permettent à ces secteurs de fonctionner ! Et cela dans un contexte d’atomisation total de notre camp avec tous les reculs sociaux et l’Etat policier total qui vont avec. A cela s’ajoute les dégâts psychologiques, les violences domestiques faites aux femmes ou la situation criminelle que sont en train de vivre les migrant.e.s, les prisonniers.ères et les sans-abris.

    Nous l’avons vu, le confinement est d’abord imposé par la faillite de notre système de santé et l’impréparation au risque de pandémie qui sont dues à l’austérité imposée par les gouvernements successifs en France et en Europe. Dans la forme qu’il prend, généralisé dans la vie sociale mais pas au travail, de classe, policier, il est la solution que les capitalistes pensent avoir trouvé pour limiter la casse et maintenir au maximum leur place dans la concurrence internationale. Mais la gestion capitaliste de cette épidémie est marquée par l’impossibilité de planifier une quelconque sortie de crise. Un gouvernement anticapitaliste, au service de la population, motivé par la santé plutôt que par les profits, pourrait mettre en place une toute autre politique.

    Existe-t-il une troisième voie ? De toute urgence prendre des mesures anticapitalistes pour sortir du confinement !

    Il ne s’agit pas ici de dire que le confinement pourrait être levé du jour au lendemain. Nous l’avons vu, étant donné les conditions d’impréparation des gouvernements et la dégradation des capacités de l’hôpital public à supporter une telle épidémie, le confinement était la seule solution pour éviter une mortalité élevée. En ce sens, toutes les initiatives syndicales ou de travailleurs.euses pour stopper le travail - et se protéger - dans les productions non-essentielles sont fondamentales. Le slogan « nos vies valent plus que leurs profits » prend ici tout son sens. Il est également fondamental de dénoncer le gouvernement qui nous explique qu’il faut renforcer le confinement mais continuer à travailler, bien au-delà des secteurs essentiels à la lutte contre l’épidémie. Pénicaud, Macron, Philippe sont plus préoccupé.e.s par le maintien des profits que par notre santé. Les scandaleuses mesures contre le droit du travail, les 35h, nos congés, articulées au renforcement de l’Etat policier, ont été prise au moment où la sidération était la plus haute dans la population.

    Mais il est indispensable maintenant de déterminer quelles sont les conditions qui permettraient d’envisager la levée du confinement à très court terme :

    – Il faut de tout urgence pratiquer le dépistage de masse. D’ailleurs, entre les lignes, le Ministre Olivier Veran reconnait lors de sa dernière conférence de presse (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wpGjmCkLDHs

    ) que le confinement ne pourra être levé que lorsqu’il sera possible d’effectuer plus de dépistages revenant sur la communication gouvernementale qui affirmait que le dépistage n’était plus un outil en phase 3. Le dépistage de masse permet de n’isoler que les malades et leur entourage. Il permet également une prise en charge précoce des patients considérés comme « à risque » et ainsi de diminuer la létalité du virus. Le problème, c’est que le fournisseur n’arrive pas à suivre la demande en kit de dépistage (https://www.thermofisher.com/order/catalog/product/11732088#/11732088). Il faut donc de toute urgence organiser la production de kits de dépistages en réquisitionnant les entreprises du secteur et en passant outre les brevets.

    – De toute urgence également, il faut injecter des moyens dans la santé et l’hôpital public pour augmenter les capacités de prise en charge des patients en détresse respiratoire. C’est l’inverse des politiques menées jusqu’alors qui font fonctionner l’hôpital comme une entreprise, en flux tendu, incapable de s’adapter à des situations d’urgence. Pour l’instant, le gouvernement a débloqué 2 milliards d’euros pour l’hôpital. Dans le même temps, il injecte 43 milliards dans l’économie et garantit 350 milliards d’euros aux entreprises privées !

    – Pour augmenter le nombre de lits en soins intensifs et protéger celles et ceux qui travaillent il faut réorganiser en profondeur l’appareil industriel pour planifier les productions utiles à résoudre la crise sanitaire : masques, respirateurs, oxygène… En ce sens, il faut soutenir l’action de la CGT qui demande la réouverture et la nationalisation de Luxfer, seule usine d’Europe à produire des bouteilles d’oxygène médical fermées. C’est un bon exemple qui pourrait se poser pour d’autres productions.

    Enfin, l’attention est captée à une échelle assez large sur la mise en place d’un traitement. Le plus prometteur, la chloroquine (ou son dérive l’hydroxy chloroquine) est testée dans plusieurs pays et de nombreux services hospitaliers, y compris en France, ont commencé à l’utiliser sur des malades. Ce médicament semble réduire la charge virale et la durée du portage du virus. Si ce traitement s’avère efficace, la question de la nationalisation de l’industrie pharmaceutique va devenir compréhensible à une échelle très large.C’est peut-être la peur de cette évidence qui motive les grands groupes du secteur à anticiper en proposant de fournir ce traitement gratuitement, que ce soit #Sanofi (https://www.francetvinfo.fr/sante/maladie/coronavirus/coronavirus-sanofi-pret-a-offrir-aux-autorites-francaises-des-millions-) ou #Novartis (https://www.lefigaro.fr/flash-eco/coronavirus-novartis-offre-130-millions-de-doses-de-chloroquine-20200320) !

    Ainsi, nous pouvons affirmer que le confinement aurait pu être largement réduit, voire évité, en généralisant les dépistages, en développant les capacités d’accueil de l’hôpital public et en accélérant les tests sur des traitements antiviraux.

    Ce plan d’urgence n’est possible à court terme que si l’on s’affronte au capitalisme. Il faut reprendre le contrôle, sans indemnité ni rachat, sur l’appareil productif, notamment dans le domaine de la santé, des protections pour les salariés, de l’industrie pharmaceutique et biochimique.

    Macron et son gouvernement, LR et le PS avant lui, portent une lourde responsabilité dans la situation actuelle. L’heure de solder les comptes arrivent. Les réponses anticapitalistes pourraient alors apparaître comme une solution à une échelle inédite jusqu’alors. Pour cela, sans attendre la fin du confinement, il nous faut renforcer les réseaux de solidarité, les réseaux militants pour recommencer à agir dans la situation.

    https://npa2009.org/idees/sante/pour-sortir-du-confinement-un-plan-durgence-anticapitaliste
    #anticapitalisme #anti-capitalisme #austérité #hôpitaux #lits #masques #réserves_stratégiques #stock #respirateurs #recherche #rigueur_budgétaire #immunité_collective #immunité_de_groupe #létalité #taux_de_létalité #tests #dépistage #choc_cytokinique #distanciation_sociale #flattening_the_curve #aplatir_la_courbe #vie_sociale #travail #atomisation #Etat_policier #impréparation #troisième_voie #droit_du_travail #dépistage_de_masse #soins_intensifs #industrie #nationalisation #Luxfer #chloroquine #industrie_pharmaceutique #responsabilité

    ping @simplicissimus @fil @reka

    –------

    Citation sélectionnée pour @davduf :

    Le confinement de classe que nous vivons actuellement doit s’arrêter. Toute vie sociale est stoppée alors qu’il faut continuer à travailler. Même si nous arrêtions toutes les productions non indispensables, ce serait tout de même des millions de travailleurs.euses qui devraient continuer à faire tourner l’hôpital, l’électricité, l’eau, le traitement des ordures ou l’alimentation – mais aussi tous les autres métiers qui permettent à ces secteurs de fonctionner ! Et cela dans un contexte d’atomisation total de notre camp avec tous les reculs sociaux et l’Etat policier total qui vont avec. A cela s’ajoute les dégâts psychologiques, les violences domestiques faites aux femmes ou la situation criminelle que sont en train de vivre les migrant.e.s, les prisonniers.ères et les sans-abris.

    • Le confinement, la destruction du #lien_social et ses conséquences

      Le 19 mars l’Assemblée rejetait l’amendement visant à prolonger le délai d’#avortement pendant la crise sanitaire. Si ce n’est finalement que peu étonnant de la part des députés LREM, ce rejet est révélateur de quelque chose de plus profond. Le confinement de la population va mettre en danger massivement les #femmes et les #classes_populaires de manière générale.

      Quelle que soit la façon dont certains ont essayé de le tourner, le confinement est profondément inégalitaire. Il y a ceux et celles qui ont un logement pour se confiner et les autres qui n’en ont pas, celles et ceux qui ont un logement décent et les autres qui ont un logement insalubre, celles et ceux qui ont une maison avec un jardin et celles et ceux qui doivent se pencher à la fenêtre pour respirer de l’air frais.

      Le message du gouvernement à l’aide de mesures coercitives violentes (oui les amendes sont effectives et en Seine-Saint-Denis elles ont conduit à des arrestations et des garde-à-vue) fait croire à la portée individuelle du confinement sans prise en charge collective de ses répercussions. Face à cela, certainEs ont essayé de mettre en place des réseaux de solidarité dans les immeubles, dans les quartiers, ... Si ces réseaux sont nécessaires et même indispensables, ils ne contrebalancent pas les problèmes qui se posent avec le confinement et qui vont forcément causer là aussi des morts, et parfois ils confortent même dans l’idée qu’il faut nécessairement rester chez soi : promener son chien, faire du jogging serait dangereux. Le propos de cet article n’est pas de dire que le confinement est inutile pour contrer le Covid-19 mais que le confinement n’est pas viable à moyen terme, c’est pourquoi la sortie de crise ne peut venir que de la mise en place d’un plan d’urgence visant à dépister et à soigner ce qui veut dire concrètement donner des moyens aux personnels de santé et des moyens de protection à la population.

      Le confinement face à l’organisation sociale de la dernière phase du capitalisme

      Le confinement dans l’histoire n’a jamais été une partie de plaisir, mais elle pose question dans le capitalisme tel qu’il s’organise aujourd’hui. Depuis les trente dernières années : on peut dire que la tendance à détruire les structures familiales est plutôt lourde. Les foyers composés de personnes seules s’élèvent à 35% des foyers (20% des femmes et 15% des hommes) auxquels se rajoutent presque 9% de familles monoparentales (dont le gros du contingent est composé de femmes). La grande majorité des foyers composés d’une personne seule ont plus de 65 ans (plus de 70%)1. Le problème c’est qu’avec cette épidémie ce sont ces mêmes personnes considérées comme vulnérables qui vont donc se retrouver complètement isolées.

      De l’autre côté, l’on sait aussi qu’un ménage sur douze vit dans un logement surpeuplé, 18% des logements sont considérés comme trop bruyant (donc mal isolés), 22% n’ont pas de système de chauffage efficient et près de 13% ont des problèmes d’humidité.2

      Le confinement produit aussi des rapports au travail qui accentuent ce qui existait auparavant : d’une part il y a ceux qui télétravaillent et ceux qui continuent de travailler dans des conditions de sécurité face au virus alarmantes et avec l’idée que le travail s’accompagne de toute une série de mesures restrictives.3 Mais à cela, il faut encore ajouter que le télétravail n’est pas le même pour tout le monde (que l’on soit cadre ou que l’on fasse un travail administratif) surtout quand l’on se retrouve face à un travail qui s’accompagne de plus en plus d’une perte de sens, d’autant plus qu’il envahit la sphère privée et que les loisirs sont considérablement réduits. Quant aux précaires, aux étudiantEs, à celles et ceux qui travaillaient sans contrat de travail, c’est une situation dramatique qui s’ouvre sans qu’aucune aide ne soit prévue si ce n’est un chômage auxquels ils n’ont pas tous droit.

      De plus, le système capitaliste entraîne une détresse psychologique : la dépression, le suicide ou les tentatives de suicides vont s’accentuer avec la perte de lien social, la perte d’activités émancipatrices et une vie tournée autour du travail.

      Toute la prise en charge associative, comme du service public de ses éléments là, comme de la prise en charge de l’extrême pauvreté va être ou drastiquement réduite voire inexistante.

      Dans le confinement, les femmes trinquent (et meurent !)

      Outre la question de l’avortement dont nous avons parlé plus haut, les femmes vont subir une répercussion violente du confinement. Elles assumeront plus de tâches ménagères qu’à l’ordinaire et de tâches de soin, et on le sait ce sont elles qui dans la plupart des foyers assumeront le suivi de « l’école à la maison » et d’occuper les enfants, sans compter les familles monoparentales ou les mères se retrouveront seules face à l’éducation de leurs enfants.

      Le confinement va augmenter les violences intra-familiales et en particulier les violences conjugales, c’est déjà ce qu’a révélé l’expérience du Wuhan4. Là encore, ces violences seront encore moins prises en charge qu’avant puisque le 3919 ne fonctionne plus pendant cette crise contrairement à ce qu’avait annoncé Marlène Schiappa.5 Au sixième jour du confinement, cette tendance est d’ailleurs aussi relatée par la FCPE ce dimanche.6

      Le manque d’accès à l’avortement pourra provoquer des recherches de solutions mettant en danger les femmes subissant des grossesses non-désirées quand celles-ci ne provoqueront tout simplement pas le suicide.

      Dans le même temps, on pourra noter que les adolescents LGBT confrontés en permanence à l’homophobie pourraient là aussi augmenter les tentatives de suicides et les suicides, alors même que c’est déjà une cause importante de suicides chez les adolescentEs.

      Ajoutons à cela que des secteurs largement féminisés se trouve en première ligne de la gestion de la maladie : infirmières, caissières, ...

      L’isolement des individus entraîne une baisse de la conscience de classe

      Le confinement produit un rapport de force dégradé de manière objective. En ce moment, des lois d’exception sont en train de passer à l’Assemblée diminuant nos droits, sans possibilité de riposte et si la légitimité du gouvernement reste affaiblie, les mesures prises rencontrent au moins une part de consentement. Si c’est le cas, c’est bien parce que la crise que l’on rencontre, a de grosses difficultés à être résolue par le système sans faire des milliers de morts.

      Individuellement, les gens ne peuvent pas se protéger et pour une grande majorité restent donc chez eux de peur (et cette peur est fondée) de devenir malade ou de l’être déjà et de contaminer d’autres personnes. Le problème c’est que sans dépistage massif et traitement le confinement risque de durer longtemps.

      Or, isolément, les gens ne peuvent d’une part pas s’organiser (ce qui dégrade le rapport de force) et de l’autre entraîne une baisse de la conscience de classe dans ce qu’elle a de plus simple car c’est l’organisation du travail qui fonde objectivement cette conscience. De plus, le confinement, repose sur le consentement d’une population à être confinée : c’est d’ailleurs par les réseaux sociaux, mais aussi dans la presse ou dans son entourage une pression sociale à « Restez chez vous », mais aussi à prendre le temps de lire ou de se cultiver.

      De fait cette pression sociale, construit alors le modèle de ceux qui y arriveraient en étant forts, en ayant accès à de la culture ou à des habitudes culturelles. Les vieux qui vivent seuls, les dépressifs, les pauvres, ceux qui n’ont pas accès à la culture se retrouveraient alors mis à l’amende.

      Pour l’instant, cette idéologie ne se fait que sous forme de pression, mais elle pourrait produire autre chose, elle passerait alors du consentement à la collaboration : elle est déjà en partie à l’œuvre de manière minoritaire, elle passe par la délation de celles et ceux qui sortent et la volonté d’un durcissement des mesures coercitives.

      Le confinement ne peut qu’être une mesure à court terme, sinon les effets violents décrits auront des effets durables, surtout si, comme c’est le cas aujourd’hui le mouvement ouvrier ne riposte pas.

      https://npa2009.org/idees/societe/le-confinement-la-destruction-du-lien-social-et-ses-consequences
      #confinés #non-confinés #inégalités #logement #mesures_coercitives #amendes #Seine-Saint-Denis #arrestations #garde_à_vue #rester_chez_soi #isolement #télétravail #chômage #détresse_psychologique #santé_mentale #école_à_la_maison #soins #care #tâches_ménagères #conscience_de_classe #lois_d’exception

  • En #Algérie, près de 11000 #migrants_subsahariens expulsés en #2019

    L’Algérie poursuit les expulsions de migrants subsahariens vers le nord du Niger, comme tout au long de l’année 2019. Après des #arrestations au cours de la semaine dernière, un convoi de plusieurs centaines de personnes était en route ce mercredi pour la frontière.

    Transmise le 13 janvier aux responsables de 30 régions du pays par le ministère des Affaires étrangères, une circulaire publiée dans la presse explique le déroulement d’une opération d’expulsion de migrants subsahariens vers la frontière avec le Niger.

    Des bus ont convergé des régions du nord et du centre du pays vers la ville de Ghardaïa, à 600 kilomètres au sud d’Alger. Le 13 janvier au soir, selon un témoin, plusieurs dizaines de bus transportant des migrants étaient arrivés dans la ville. Ces personnes ont été arrêtées par les forces de sécurité dans les jours précédents.

    Réseaux de mendicité

    La plupart sont originaires du Niger. Alger s’appuie sur un accord passé avec Niamey en 2014 (http://www.rfi.fr/hebdo/20151016-niger-algerie-reprise-expulsions-departs-volontaires-agadez-tamanrasset) pour rapatrier ces personnes, impliquées dans des réseaux de #mendicité, que l’Algérie considère comme des réseaux criminels. Mais au cours des arrestations, les forces de l’ordre arrêtent aussi des ressortissants d’autres nationalités.

    En 2019, des expulsions ont eu lieu chaque mois. Selon les données de l’Organisation internationale des migrations qui enregistre les migrants qui le souhaitent à leur arrivée dans le nord du Niger, presque 11 000 personnes ont été expulsées de janvier à novembre, dont 358 qui n’étaient pas nigériennes.


    www.rfi.fr/afrique/20200115-algerie-reprise-expulsions-migrants-niger ##migrants_sub-sahariens
    #Niger #renvois #expulsions #statistiques #chiffres #migrants_nigériens #déportation #refoulement #refoulements

    ping @karine4 @_kg_
    signalé par @pascaline via la mailing-list Migreurop

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur les expulsions de l’Algérie vers le Niger :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/748397

  • 24 social media users put in pre-trial detention over tweets in critical of Syria incursion

    Turkish courts have arrested 24 social media users since the beginning of Turkey’s incursion into northeast Syria on Oct. 9 on charges of conducting a “smear campaign” against the military offensive, the state-run Anadolu news agency reported.

    A total of 186 users have been detained thus far, the report indicated, adding that 40 of them were released pending trial, while the remaining 124 were still in police custody.

    Cyber units under Turkey’s Interior Ministry have been conducting online patrolling to identify social media posts that would be considered criminal activity, the report added.

    Turkey launched the military offensive after the US withdrawal from the area east of the Euphrates River, a territory held by Kurdish militia who are considered terrorists by the Turkish government.

    https://turkeypurge.com/24-social-media-users-put-in-pre-trial-detention-over-tweets-in-critica
    #répression #Turquie #arrestations #Syrie #incursion #Kurdistan #Kurdes #offensive_militaire #résistance #réseaux_sociaux

    ... ça ressemble à une nouvelle #purge (#déjà_vu)

  • UN Human Rights Council Should Address Human Rights Crisis in Cambodia at its 42nd Session

    Dear Excellency,

    The undersigned civil society organizations, representing groups working within and outside Cambodia to advance human rights, rule of law, and democracy, are writing to alert your government to an ongoing human rights crisis in Cambodia and to request your support for a resolution ensuring strengthened scrutiny of the human rights situation in the country at the upcoming 42nd session of the UN Human Rights Council (the “Council”).

    National elections in July 2018 were conducted after the Supreme Court, which lacks independence, dissolved the major opposition party, the Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP). Many believe that this allowed the ruling Cambodian People’s Party (CPP) under Prime Minister Hun Sen to secure all 125 seats in the National Assembly and effectively establish one-party rule. Since the election, respect for human rights in Cambodia has further declined. Key opposition figures remain either in detention – such as CNRP leader Kem Sokha, who is under de facto house arrest – or in self-imposed exile out of fear of being arrested. The CNRP is considered illegal and 111 senior CNRP politicians remain banned from engaging in politics. Many others have continued to flee the country to avoid arbitrary arrest and persecution.

    Government authorities have increasingly harassed opposition party members still in the country, with more than 147 former CNRP members summoned to court or police stations. Local authorities have continued to arrest opposition members and activists on spurious charges. The number of prisoners facing politically motivated charges in the country has remained steady since the election. The government has shuttered almost all independent media outlets, and totally controls national TV and radio stations. Repressive laws – including the amendments to the Law on Political Parties, the Law on Non-Governmental Organizations, and the Law on Trade Unions – have resulted in severe restrictions on the rights to freedom of expression, peaceful assembly and association.

    It is expected that a resolution will be presented at the 42nd session of the Human Rights Council in September to renew the mandate of the UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Cambodia for another two years. We strongly urge your delegation to ensure that the resolution reflects the gravity of the situation in the country and requests additional monitoring and reporting by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). Mandated OHCHR monitoring of the situation and reporting to the Council, in consultation with the Special Rapporteur, would enable a comprehensive assessment of the human rights situation in Cambodia, identification of concrete actions that the government needs to take to comply with Cambodia’s international human rights obligations, and would allow the Council further opportunities to address the situation.

    Since the last Council resolution was adopted in September 2017, the situation of human rights in Cambodia, including for the political opposition, human rights defenders, and the media, has drastically worsened. Developments since the 2018 election include:

    Crackdown on Political Opposition

    On March 12, 2019, the Phnom Penh Municipal Court issued arrest warrants for eight leading members of the opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party who had left Cambodia ahead of the July 2018 election – Sam Rainsy, Mu Sochua, Ou Chanrith, Eng Chhai Eang, Men Sothavarin, Long Ry, Tob Van Chan, and Ho Vann. The charges were based on baseless allegations of conspiring to commit treason and incitement to commit felony. In September 2018, authorities transferred CNRP head Kem Sokha after more than a year of pre-trial detention in a remote prison to his Phnom Penh residence under highly restrictive “judicial supervision” that amounts to house arrest. Cambodian law has no provision for house arrest and there is no evidence that Sokha has committed any internationally recognizable offense.

    During 2019, at least 147 arbitrary summonses were issued by the courts and police against CNRP members or supporters. Summonses seen by human rights groups lack legal specifics, containing only vague references to allegations that the person summoned may have violated the Supreme Court ruling that dissolved the CNRP in November 2017.

    Human Rights Defenders and Peaceful Protesters

    In November 2018, Prime Minister Hun Sen stated that criminal charges would be dropped against all trade union leaders related to the government’s January 2014 crackdown on trade unions and garment workers in which security forces killed five people. However, the following month, a court convicted six union leaders – Ath Thorn, Chea Mony, Yang Sophorn, Pav Sina, Rong Chhun, and Mam Nhim – on baseless charges and fined them. An appeals court overturned the convictions in May 2019, but in July 2019 the court announced its verdict in absentia convicting Kong Atith, newly elected president of the Coalition of Cambodian Apparel Workers Democratic Union (CCAWDU), of intentional acts of violence in relation to a 2016 protest between drivers and the Capitol Bus Company. The court imposed a three-year suspended sentence, which will create legal implications under Article 20 of the Law on Trade Unions, which sets out among others that a leader of a worker union cannot have a felony or misdemeanor conviction.

    In December 2018, Thai authorities forcibly returned Cambodian dissident Rath Rott Mony to Cambodia. Cambodian authorities then prosecuted him for his role in a Russia Times documentary “My Mother Sold Me,” which describes the failure of Cambodian police to protect girls sold into sex work. He was convicted of “incitement to discriminate” and in July 2019 sentenced to two years in prison.

    In March 2018, the government enacted a lese majeste (insulting the king) clause into the Penal Code, and within a year four people had been jailed under the law and three convicted. All the lese majeste cases involved people expressing critical opinions on Facebook or sharing other people’s Facebook posts. The government has used the new law, along with a judiciary that lacks independence, as a political tool to silence independent and critical voices in the country.

    In July 2019, authorities detained two youth activists, Kong Raya and Soung Neakpoan, who participated in a commemoration ceremony on the third anniversary of the murder of prominent political commentator Kem Ley in Phnom Penh. The authorities charged both with incitement to commit a felony, a provision commonly used to silence activists and human rights defenders. Authorities arrested seven people in total for commemorating the anniversary; monitored, disrupted, or canceled commemorations around the country; and blocked approximately 20 members of the Grassroots Democracy Party on their way to Takeo province – Kem Ley’s home province.

    Attacks on Journalists and Control of the Media

    Prior to the July 2018 election, the Cambodian government significantly curtailed media freedom, online and offline. In 2017, authorities ordered the closure of 32 FM radio frequencies that aired independent news programs by Radio Free Asia (RFA) and Voice of America. RFA closed its offices in September 2017, citing government harassment as the reason for its closure. The local Voice of Democracy radio was also forced to go off the air.

    Since 2017, two major independent newspapers, the Phnom Penh Post and The Cambodia Daily, were subjected to dubious multi-million-dollar tax bills, leading the Phnom Penh Post to be sold to a businessman with ties to Hun Sen and The Cambodia Daily to close.

    Social media networks have come under attack from increased government surveillance and interventions. In May 2018, the government adopted a decree on Publication Controls of Website and Social Media Processing via Internet and the Law on Telecommunications, which allow for arbitrary interference and surveillance of online media and unfettered government censorship. Just two days before the July 2018 elections, authorities blocked the websites of independent media outlets – including RFA and VOA – which human rights groups considered an immediate enforcement of the new decree.

    Since then, Cambodian authorities have proceeded with the politically motivated prosecution of two RFA journalists, Yeang Sothearin and Uon Chhin. They were arrested in November 2017 on fabricated espionage charges connected to allegations that the two men continued to report for RFA after RFA’s forced closure of its Cambodia office. They were held in pre-trial detention until August 2018. Their trial began in July 2019 and a verdict on the espionage charges is expected late August. They face up to 16 years in prison.

    *

    The Cambodian government’s actions before and since the July 2018 election demonstrate a comprehensive campaign by the ruling CPP government to use violence, intimidation and courts that lack judicial independence to silence or eliminate the political opposition, independent media, and civil society groups critical of the government.

    We strongly urge your government to acknowledge the severity of the human rights situation and the risks it poses to Cambodia’s fulfillment of its commitments to respect human rights and rule of law as set out in the Paris Peace Accords 1991. It is crucial that concerned states explicitly condemn the Cambodian government’s attacks on human rights norms and take steps to address them.

    For these reasons, we call on the Human Rights Council to adopt a resolution requesting the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights to monitor and report on the situation of human rights in Cambodia and outline actions the government should take to comply with its international human rights obligations. The High Commissioner should report to the Council at its 45th session followed by an Enhanced Interactive Dialogue with participation of the Special Rapporteur on Cambodia, other relevant UN Special Procedures, and members of local and international civil society.

    We further recommend that your government, during the Council’s September session, speaks out clearly and jointly with other governments against ongoing violations in Cambodia.

    We remain at your disposal for any further information.

    With assurances of our highest consideration,

    Amnesty International
    ARTICLE 19
    ASEAN Parliamentarians for Human Rights (APHR)
    Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (FORUM-ASIA)
    Asian Legal Resource Centre (ALRC)
    Cambodian Alliance of Trade Unions (CATU)
    Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR)
    Cambodian Food and Service Workers’ Federation (CFSWF)
    Cambodian Human Rights and Development Association (ADHOC)
    Cambodian League for the Promotion & Defense of Human Rights (LICADHO)
    Cambodian Youth Network (CYN)
    Cambodia’s Independent Civil Servants Association (CICA)
    Center for Alliance of Labor and Human Rights (CENTRAL)
    CIVICUS: World Alliance for Citizen Participation
    Civil Rights Defenders (CRD)
    Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ)
    Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative (CHRI)
    FIDH – International Federation for Human Rights
    Fortify Rights
    Human Rights Now
    Human Rights Watch (HRW)
    International Commission of Jurists (ICJ)
    Independent Democracy of Informal Economy Association (IDEA)
    International Service for Human Rights (ISHR)
    Lawyers’ Rights Watch Canada (LRWC)
    National Democratic Institute (NDI)
    Reporters Without Borders (Reporters Sans Frontières - RSF)
    World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT)

    https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/08/30/un-human-rights-council-should-address-human-rights-crisis-cambodia-its-42nd-se
    #Cambodge #droits_humains #arrestations #opposition #liberté_d'expression #censure #presse #médias #lese_majeste #Kem_Ley #Rath_Rott_Mony #Kong_Raya #Soung_Neakpoan #réseaux_sociaux

  • For Syrians in #Istanbul, fears rise as deportations begin

    Turkey is deporting Syrians from Istanbul to Syria, including to the volatile northwest province of #Idlib, according to people who have been the target of a campaign launched last week against migrants who lack residency papers.

    The crackdown comes at a time of rising rhetoric and political pressure on the country’s 3.6 million registered Syrian refugees to return home. Estimates place hundreds of thousands of unregistered Syrians in Turkey, many living in urban areas such as Istanbul.

    Refugee rights advocates say deportations to Syria violate customary international law, which prohibits forcing people to return to a country where they are still likely to face persecution or risk to their lives.

    Arrests reportedly began as early as 13 July, with police officers conducting spot-checks in public spaces, factories, and metro stations around Istanbul and raiding apartments by 16 July. As word spread quickly in Istanbul’s Syrian community, many people shut themselves up at home rather than risk being caught outside.

    It is not clear how many people have been deported so far, with reported numbers ranging from hundreds to a thousand.

    “Deportation of Syrians to their country, which is still in the midst of armed conflict, is a clear violation of both Turkish and international law.”

    Turkey’s Ministry of Interior has said the arrests are aimed at people living without legal status in the country’s most populous city. Istanbul authorities said in a Monday statement that only “irregular migrants entering our country illegally [will be] arrested and deported.” It added that Syrians registered outside Istanbul would be obliged to return to the provinces where they were first issued residency.

    Mayser Hadid, a Syrian lawyer who runs a law practice catering to Syrians in Istanbul, said that the “deportation of Syrians to their country, which is still in the midst of armed conflict, is a clear violation of both Turkish and international law,” including the “return of Syrians without temporary protection cards.”

    Istanbul authorities maintain that the recent detentions and deportations are within the law.

    Starting in 2014, Syrian refugees in Turkey have been registered under “temporary protection” status, which grants the equivalency of legal residency and lets holders apply for a work permit. Those with temporary protection need special permission to work or travel outside of the area where they first applied for protection.

    But last year, several cities across the country – including Istanbul – stopped registering newly-arrived Syrians.

    In the Monday statement, Istanbul authorities said that Syrians registered outside of the city must return to their original city of registration by 20 August. They did not specify the penalty for those who do not.

    Barely 24 hours after the beginning of raids last week, Muhammad, a 21-year-old from Eastern Ghouta in Syria, was arrested at home along with his Syrian flatmates in the Istanbul suburb of Esenler.

    Muhammad, who spoke by phone on the condition of anonymity for security reasons – as did all Syrian deportees and their relatives interviewed for this article – said that Turkish police officers had forced their way into the building. “They beat me,” he said. “I wasn’t even allowed to take anything with me.”

    Muhammad said that as a relatively recent arrival, he couldn’t register for temporary protection and had opted to live and work in Istanbul without papers.

    After his arrest, Muhammad said, he was handcuffed and bundled into a police van, and transferred to a detention facility on the eastern outskirts of the city.

    There, he said, he was forced to sign a document written in Turkish that he couldn’t understand and on Friday was deported to Syria’s Idlib province, via the Bab al-Hawa border crossing.
    Deportation to Idlib

    Government supporters say that Syrians have been deported only to the rebel-held areas of northern Aleppo, where the Turkish army maintains a presence alongside groups that it backs.

    A representative from Istanbul’s provincial government office did not respond to a request for comment, but Youssef Kataboglu, a pro-government commentator who is regarded as close to the government, said that “Turkey only deports Syrians to safe areas according to the law.”

    He denied that Syrians had been returned to Idlib, where a Syrian government offensive that began in late April kicked off an upsurge in fighting, killing more than 400 civilians and forcing more than 330,000 people to flee their homes. The UN said on Monday alone, 59 civilians were killed, including 39 when a market was hit by airstrikes.

    Kataboglu said that deportation to Idlib would “be impossible.”

    Mazen Alloush, a representative of the border authorities on the Syrian side of the Bab al-Hawa crossing that links Turkey with Idlib, said that more than 3,800 Syrians had entered the country via Bab al-Hawa in the past fortnight, a number he said was not a significant change from how many people usually cross the border each month.

    The crossing is controlled by rebel authorities affiliated to Tahrir a-Sham, the hardline Islamist faction that controls most of Idlib.

    “A large number of them were Syrians trying to enter Turkish territory illegally,” who were caught and forced back across, Alloush said, but also “those who committed offences in Turkey or requested to return voluntarily.”

    “We later found out that he’d been deported to Idlib.”

    He added that “if the Turkish authorities are deporting [Syrians] through informal crossings or crossings other than Bab al-Hawa, I don’t have information about it.”

    Other Syrians caught up in the crackdown, including those who did have the proper papers to live and work in Istanbul, confirmed that they had been sent to Idlib or elsewhere.

    On July 19, Umm Khaled’s son left the family’s home without taking the documents that confirm his temporary protection status, she said. He was stopped in the street by police officers.

    “They [the police] took him,” Umm Khaled, a refugee in her 50s originally from the southern Damascus suburbs, said by phone. “We later found out that he’d been deported to Idlib.”

    Rami, a 23-year-old originally from eastern Syria’s Deir Ezzor province, said he was deported from Istanbul last week. He was carrying his temporary protection status card at the time of his arrest, he added.

    "I was in the street in Esenler when the police stopped me and asked for my identity card,” he recalled in a phone conversation from inside Syria. “They checked it, and then asked me to get on a bus.”

    Several young Syrian men already on board the bus were also carrying protection documents with them, Rami said.

    “The police tied our hands together with plastic cords,” he added, describing how the men were then driven to a nearby police station and forced to give fingerprints and sign return documents.

    Rami said he was later sent to northern Aleppo province.
    Rising anti-Syrian sentiment

    The country has deported Syrians before, and Human Rights Watch and other organisations have reported that Turkish security forces regularly intercept and return Syrian refugees attempting to enter the country. As conflict rages in and around Idlib, an increasing number of people are still trying to get into Turkey.

    Turkey said late last year that more than 300,000 Syrians have returned to their home country voluntarily.

    A failed coup attempt against President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan in July 2016 led to an emergency decree that human rights groups say was used to arrest individuals whom the government perceived as opponents. Parts of that decree were later passed into law, making it easier for authorities to deport foreigners on the grounds that they are either linked to terrorist groups or pose a threat to public order.

    The newest wave of deportations after months of growing anti-Syrian sentiment in political debate and on the streets has raised more questions about how this law might be used, as well as the future of Syrian refugees in Turkey.

    In two rounds of mayoral elections that ended last month with a defeat for Erdoğan’s ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP), the winning candidate, Ekrem İmamoğlu of the Republican People’s Party (CHP), repeatedly used anti-Syrian rhetoric in his campaign, capitalising on discontent towards the faltering economy and the increasingly contentious presence of millions of Syrian refugees.

    Shortly after the elections, several incidents of mob violence against Syrian-owned businesses took place. Widespread anti-Syrian sentiment has also been evident across social media; after the mayoral election trending hashtags on Twitter reportedly included “Syrians get out”.

    As the deportations continue, the families of those sent back are wondering what they can do.

    “By God, what did he do [wrong]?” asked Umm Khaled, speaking of her son, now in war-torn Idlib.

    “His mother, father, and all his sisters are living here legally in Turkey,” she said. “What are we supposed to do now?”

    https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/news/2019/07/23/syrians-istanbul-fears-rise-deportations-begin
    #Turquie #asile #migrations #réfugiés_syriens #réfugiés #Syrie #renvois #expulsions #peur

    • Des milliers de migrants arrêtés à Istanbul en deux semaines

      Mardi, le ministre de l’intérieur a indiqué que l’objectif de son gouvernement était d’expulser 80 000 migrants en situation irrégulière en Turquie, contre 56 000 l’an dernier.

      C’est un vaste #coup_de_filet mené sur fond de fort sentiment antimigrants. Les autorités turques ont annoncé, mercredi 24 juillet, avoir arrêté plus de 6 000 migrants en deux semaines, dont des Syriens, vivant de manière « irrégulière » à Istanbul.

      « Nous menons une opération depuis le 12 juillet (…). Nous avons attrapé 6 122 personnes à Istanbul, dont 2 600 Afghans. Une partie de ces personnes sont des Syriens », a déclaré le ministre de l’intérieur, Suleyman Soylu, dans une interview donnée à la chaîne turque NTV. Mardi, ce dernier a indiqué que l’objectif de son gouvernement était d’expulser 80 000 migrants en situation irrégulière en Turquie, contre 56 000 l’an dernier.

      M. Soylu a démenti que des Syriens étaient expulsés vers leur pays, déchiré par une guerre civile meurtrière depuis 2011, après que des ONG ont affirmé avoir recensé des cas de personnes renvoyées en Syrie. « Ces personnes, nous ne pouvons pas les expulser. (…) Lorsque nous attrapons des Syriens qui ne sont pas enregistrés, nous les envoyons dans des camps de réfugiés », a-t-il affirmé, mentionnant un camp dans la province turque de Hatay, frontalière de la Syrie. Il a toutefois assuré que certains Syriens choisissaient de rentrer de leur propre gré en Syrie.

      La Turquie accueille sur son sol plus de 3,5 millions de Syriens ayant fui la guerre, dont 547 000 sont enregistrés à Istanbul. Les autorités affirment n’avoir aucun problème avec les personnes dûment enregistrées auprès des autorités à Istanbul, mais disent lutter contre les migrants vivant dans cette ville alors qu’ils sont enregistrés dans d’autres provinces, voire dans aucune province.

      Le gouvernorat d’Istanbul a lancé lundi un ultimatum, qui expire le 20 août, enjoignant les Syriens y vivant illégalement à quitter la ville. Un groupement d’ONG syriennes a toutefois indiqué, lundi, que « plus de 600 Syriens », pour la plupart titulaires de « cartes de protection temporaires » délivrées par d’autres provinces turques, avaient été arrêtés la semaine dernière à Istanbul et renvoyés en Syrie.

      La Coalition nationale de l’opposition syrienne, basée à Istanbul, a déclaré mardi qu’elle était entrée en contact avec les autorités turques pour discuter des dernières mesures prises contre les Syriens, appelant à stopper les « expulsions ». Son président, Anas al-Abda, a appelé le gouvernement turc à accorder un délai de trois mois aux Syriens concernés pour régulariser leur situation auprès des autorités.

      Ce tour de vis contre les migrants survient après la défaite du parti du président Recep Tayyip Erdogan lors des élections municipales à Istanbul, en juin, lors desquelles l’accueil des Syriens s’était imposé comme un sujet majeur de préoccupation les électeurs.

      Pendant la campagne, le discours hostile aux Syriens s’était déchaîné sur les réseaux sociaux, avec le mot-dièse #LesSyriensDehors. D’après une étude publiée début juillet par l’université Kadir Has, située à Istanbul, la part des Turcs mécontents de la présence des Syriens est passée de 54,5 % en 2017 à 67,7 % en 2019.

      https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2019/07/24/des-milliers-de-migrants-arretes-a-istanbul-en-deux-semaines_5492944_3210.ht
      #arrestation #arrestations

    • Turkey Forcibly Returning Syrians to Danger. Authorities Detain, Coerce Syrians to Sign “Voluntary Return” Forms

      Turkish authorities are detaining and coercing Syrians into signing forms saying they want to return to Syria and then forcibly returning them there, Human Rights Watch said today. On July 24, 2019, Interior Minister Süleyman Soylu denied that Turkey had “deported” Syrians but said that Syrians “who voluntarily want to go back to Syria” can benefit from procedures allowing them to return to “safe areas.”

      Almost 10 days after the first reports of increased police spot-checks of Syrians’ registration documents in Istanbul and forced returns of Syrians from the city, the office of the provincial governor released a July 22 statement saying that Syrians registered in one of the country’s other provinces must return there by August 20, and that the Interior Ministry would send unregistered Syrians to provinces other than Istanbul for registration. The statement comes amid rising xenophobic sentiment across the political spectrum against Syrian and other refugees in Turkey.

      “Turkey claims it helps Syrians voluntarily return to their country, but threatening to lock them up until they agree to return, forcing them to sign forms, and dumping them in a war zone is neither voluntary nor legal,” said Gerry Simpson, associate Emergencies director. “Turkey should be commended for hosting record numbers of Syrian refugees, but unlawful deportations are not the way forward.”

      Turkey shelters a little over 3.6 million Syrian Refugees countrywide who have been given temporary protection, half a million of them in Istanbul. This is more refugees than any other country in the world and almost four times as many as the whole European Union (EU).

      The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) says that “the vast majority of Syrian asylum-seekers continue to … need international refugee protection” and that it “calls on states not to forcibly return Syrian nationals and former habitual residents of Syria.”

      Human Rights Watch spoke by phone with four Syrians who are in Syria after being detained and forcibly returned there.

      One of the men, who was from Ghouta, in the Damascus countryside, was detained on July 17 in Istanbul, where he had been living unregistered for over three years. He said police coerced him and other Syrian detainees into signing a form, transferred them to another detention center, and then put them on one of about 20 buses headed to Syria. They are now in northern Syria.

      Another man, from Aleppo, who had been living in Gaziantep in southeast Turkey since 2013, said he was detained there after he and his brother went to the police to complain about an attack on a shop that they ran in the city. He said the police transferred them from the Gaziantep Karşıyaka police station to the foreigners’ deportation center at Oğuzeli, holding them there for six days and forcing them to sign a deportation form without telling them what it was. On July 9, the authorities forcibly returned the men to Azaz in Syria via the Öncüpınar/Bab al Salama border gate near the Turkish town of Kilis, Human Rights Watch also spoke by phone with two men who said the Turkish coast guard and police intercepted them at checkpoints near the coast as they tried to reach Greece, detained them, and coerced them into signing and fingerprinting voluntary repatriation forms. The authorities then deported them to Idlib and northern Aleppo governorate.

      One of the men, a Syrian from Atmeh in Idlib governorate who registered in the Turkish city of Gaziantep in 2017, said the Turkish coast guard intercepted him on July 9. He said [“Guvenlik”] “security” held him with other Syrians for six days in a detention facility in the town of Aydın, in western Turkey. He said the guards verbally abused him and other detainees, punched him in the chest, and coerced him into signing voluntary repatriation papers. Verbally abusive members of Turkey’s rural gendarmerie police forces [jandarma] deported him on July 15 to Syria with about 35 other Syrians through the Öncüpınar/Bab al-Salameh border crossing.

      He said that there were others in the Aydin detention center who had been there for up to four months because they had refused to sign these forms.

      The second man said he fled Maarat al-Numan in 2014 and registered in the Turkish city of Iskenderun. On July 4, police stopped him at a checkpoint as he tried to reach the coast to take a boat to Greece and took him to the Aydin detention facility, where he said the guards beat some of the other detainees and shouted and cursed at them.

      He said the detention authorities confiscated his belongings, including his Turkish registration card, and told him to sign forms. When he refused, the official said they were not deportation forms but just “routine procedure.” When he refused again, he was told he would be detained indefinitely until he agreed to sign and provided his fingerprints. He said that the guards beat another man who had also refused, so he felt he had no choice but to sign. He was then put on a bus for 27 hours with dozens of other Syrians and deported through the Öncüpınar/Bab al-Salameh border crossing.

      In addition, journalists have spoken with a number of registered and unregistered Syrians who told them by phone from Syria that Turkish authorities detained them in the third week of July, coerced them into signing and providing a fingerprint on return documents. The authorities then deported them with dozens, and in some cases as many as 100, other Syrians to Idlib and northern Aleppo governorate through the Cilvegözü/Bab al-Hawa border crossing.

      More than 400,000 people have died because of the Syrian conflict since 2011, according to the World Bank. While the nature of the fighting in Syria has changed, with the Syrian government retaking areas previously held by anti-government groups and the battle against the Islamic State (ISIS) winding down, profound civilian suffering and loss of life persists.

      In Idlib governorate, the Syrian-Russian military alliance continues to indiscriminately bomb civilians and to use prohibited weapons, resulting in the death of at least 400 people since April, including 90 children, according to Save the Children. In other areas under the control of the Syrian government and anti-government groups, arbitrary arrests, mistreatment, and harassment are still the status quo.

      The forcible returns from Turkey indicate that the government is ready to double down on other policies that deny many Syrian asylum seekers protection. Over the past four years, Turkey has sealed off its border with Syria, while Turkish border guards have carried out mass summary pushbacks and killed and injured Syrians as they try to cross. In late 2017 and early 2018, Istanbul and nine provinces on the border with Syria suspended registration of newly arriving asylum seekers. Turkey’s travel permit system for registered Syrians prohibits unregistered Syrians from traveling from border provinces they enter to register elsewhere in the country.

      Turkey is bound by the international customary law of nonrefoulement, which prohibits the return of anyone to a place where they would face a real risk of persecution, torture or other ill-treatment, or a threat to life. This includes asylum seekers, who are entitled to have their claims fairly adjudicated and not be summarily returned to places where they fear harm. Turkey may not coerce people into returning to places where they face harm by threatening to detain them.

      Turkey should protect the basic rights of all Syrians, regardless of registration status, and register those denied registration since late 2017, in line with the Istanbul governor’s July 22 statement.

      On July 19, the European Commission announced the adoption of 1.41 billion euros in additional assistance to support refugees and local communities in Turkey, including for their protection. The European Commission, EU member states with embassies in Turkey, and the UNHCR should support Turkey in any way needed to register and protect Syrians, and should publicly call on Turkey to end its mass deportations of Syrians at the border and from cities further inland.

      “As Turkey continues to shelter more than half of registered Syrian refugees globally, the EU should be resettling Syrians from Turkey to the EU but also ensuring that its financial support protects all Syrians seeking refuge in Turkey,” Simpson said.

      https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/07/26/turkey-forcibly-returning-syrians-danger
      #retour_volontaire

    • Turquie : à Istanbul, les réfugiés vivent dans la peur du racisme et de la police

      Depuis quelques semaines, le hashtag #StopDeportationsToSyria (#SuriyeyeSınırdışınaSon) circule sur les réseaux sociaux. Il s’accompagne de témoignages de Syriens qui racontent s’être fait arrêter par la police turque à Istanbul et renvoyer en Syrie. Les autorités turques ont décidé de faire la chasse aux réfugiés alors que les agressions se multiplient.

      Le 21 juillet, alors qu’il fait ses courses, le jeune Amjad Tablieh se fait arrêter par la police turque à Istanbul. Il n’a pas sa carte de protection temporaire – kimlik – sur lui et la police turque refuse d’attendre que sa famille la lui apporte : « J’ai été mis dans un bus avec d’autres syriens. On nous a emmenés au poste de police de Tuzla et les policiers on dit que nous serions envoyés à Hatay [province turque à la frontière syrienne] ». La destination finale sera finalement la Syrie.

      Étudiant et disposant d’un kimlik à Istanbul, Amjad ajoute que comme les autres syriens arrêtés ce jour-là, il a été obligé de signer un document reconnaissant qu’il rentrait volontairement en Syrie. Il tient à ajouter qu’il a « vu des personnes se faire frapper pour avoir refusé de signer ce document ». Étudiant en architecture, Hama est arrivé à Istanbul il y a quatre mois pour s’inscrire à l’université. Il a été arrêté et déporté car son kimlik a été délivré à Gaziantep, près de la frontière avec la Syrie. Amr Dabool, également enregistré dans la ville de Gaziantep, a quant à lui été expulsé en Syrie alors qu’il tentait de se rendre en Grèce.
      Pas de statut de réfugié pour les Syriens en Turquie

      Alors que des récits similaires se multiplient sur les réseaux sociaux, le 22 juillet, les autorités d’Istanbul ont annoncé que les Syriens disposant de la protection temporaire mais n’étant pas enregistrés à Istanbul avaient jusqu’au 20 août pour retourner dans les provinces où ils sont enregistrés, faute de quoi ils seront renvoyés de force dans des villes choisies par le ministère de l’Intérieur. Invité quelques jours plus tard à la télévision turque, le ministre de l’intérieur Süleyman Soylu a nié toute expulsion, précisant que certains Syriens choisissaient « de rentrer de leur propre gré en Syrie ».

      Sur les 3,5 millions de Syriens réfugiés en Turquie, ils sont plus de 500 000 à vivre à Istanbul. La grande majorité d’entre eux ont été enregistrés dans les provinces limitrophes avec la Syrie (Gaziantep ou Urfa) où ils sont d’abord passés avant d’arriver à Istanbul pour travailler, étudier ou rejoindre leur famille. Depuis quelques jours, les contrôles se renforcent pour les renvoyer là où ils sont enregistrés.

      Pour Diane al Mehdi, anthropologue et membre du Syrian Refugees Protection Network, ces refoulements existent depuis longtemps, mais ils sont aujourd’hui plus massifs. Le 24 juillet, le ministre de l’intérieur a ainsi affirmé qu’une opération visant les réfugiés et des migrants non enregistrés à Istanbul avait menée à l’arrestation, depuis le 12 juillet, de 1000 Syriens. Chaque jour, environ 200 personnes ont été expulsées vers le nord de la Syrie via le poste frontière de Bab al-Hawa, précise la chercheuse. « Ces chiffres concernent principalement des Syriens vivant à Istanbul », explique-t-elle.

      Le statut d’« invité » dont disposent les Syriens en Turquie est peu clair et extrêmement précarisant, poursuit Diane al Mehdi. « Il n’y a pas d’antécédents légaux pour un tel statut, cela participe à ce flou et permet au gouvernement de faire un peu ce qu’il veut. » Créé en 2013, ce statut s’inscrivait à l’époque dans une logique de faveur et de charité envers les Syriens, le gouvernement ne pensant alors pas que la guerre en Syrie durerait. « À l’époque, les frontières étaient complètement ouvertes, les Syriens avaient le droit d’être enregistrés en Turquie et surtout ce statut comprenait le principe de non-refoulement. Ces trois principes ont depuis longtemps été bafouées par le gouvernement turc. »

      Aujourd’hui, les 3,5 millions de Syriens réfugiés en Turquie ne disposent pas du statut de réfugié en tant que tel. Bien que signataire de la Convention de Genève, Ankara n’octroie le statut de réfugié qu’aux ressortissants des 47 pays membres du Conseil de l’Europe. La Syrie n’en faisant pas partie, les Syriens ont en Turquie un statut moins protecteur encore que la protection subsidiaire : il est temporaire et révocable.
      #LesSyriensDehors : « Ici, c’est la Turquie, c’est Istanbul »

      Si le Président Erdoğan a longtemps prôné une politique d’accueil des Syriens, le vent semble aujourd’hui avoir tourné. En février 2018, il déclarait déjà : « Nous ne sommes pas en mesure de continuer d’accueillir 3,5 millions de réfugiés pour toujours ». Et alors qu’à Istanbul la possibilité d’obtenir le kimlik a toujours été compliquée, depuis le 6 juillet 2019, Istanbul n’en délivre officiellement plus aucun selon Diane al Mehdi.

      Même si le kimlik n’offre pas aux Syriens la possibilité de travailler, depuis quelques années, les commerces aux devantures en arabe sont de plus en plus nombreux dans rues d’Istanbul et beaucoup de Syriens ont trouvé du travail dans l’économie informelle, fournissant une main-d’œuvre bon marché. Or, dans un contexte économique difficile, avec une inflation et un chômage en hausse, les travailleurs syriens entrent en concurrence avec les ressortissants turcs et cela accroît les tensions sociales.

      Au printemps dernier, alors que la campagne pour les élections municipales battait son plein, des propos hostiles accompagnés des hashtags #SuriyelilerDefoluyor (« Les Syriens dehors ») ou #UlkemdeSuriyeliIstemiyorum (« Je ne veux pas de Syriens dans mon pays ») se sont multipliés sur les réseaux sociaux. Le candidat d’opposition et aujourd’hui maire d’Istanbul Ekrem Imamoglu, étonné du nombre d’enseignes en arabe dans certains quartiers, avait lancé : « Ici, c’est la Turquie, c’est Istanbul ».

      Après la banalisation des propos anti-syriens, ce sont les actes de violence qui se sont multipliés dans les rues d’Istanbul. Fin juin, dans le quartier de Küçükçekmece, une foule d’hommes a attaqué des magasins tenus par des Syriens. Quelques jours plus tard, les autorités d’Istanbul sommaient plus de 700 commerçants syriens de turciser leurs enseignes en arabe. Publié dans la foulée, un sondage de l’université Kadir Has à Istanbul a confirmé que la part des Turcs mécontents de la présence des Syriens est passée de 54,5 % en 2017 à 67,7 % en 2019.
      Climat de peur

      Même s’ils ont un kimlik, ceux qui ne disposent pas d’un permis de travail - difficile à obtenir - risquent une amende d’environs 550 euros et leur expulsion vers la Syrie s’ils sont pris en flagrant délit. Or, la police a renforcé les contrôles d’identités dans les stations de métro, les gares routières, les quartiers à forte concentration de Syriens mais aussi sur les lieux de travail. Cette nouvelle vague d’arrestations et d’expulsions suscite un climat de peur permanente chez les Syriens d’Istanbul. Aucune des personne contactée n’a souhaité témoigner, même sous couvert d’anonymat.

      « Pas protégés par les lois internationales, les Syriens titulaires du kimlik deviennent otages de la politique turque », dénonce Syrian Refugees Protection Network. Et l’[accord signé entre l’Union européenne et Ankara au printemps 2016 pour fermer la route des Balkans n’a fait que détériorer leur situation en Turquie. Pour Diane al-Mehdi, il aurait fallu accorder un statut qui permette aux Syriens d’avoir un avenir. « Tant qu’ils n’auront pas un statut fixe qui leur permettra de travailler, d’aller à l’école, à l’université, ils partiront en Europe. » Selon elle, donner de l’argent - dont on ne sait pas clairement comment il bénéficie aux Syriens - à la Turquie pour que le pays garde les Syriens n’était pas la solution. « Évidemment, l’Europe aurait aussi dû accepter d’accueillir plus de Syriens. »

      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Turquie-a-Istanbul-les-refugies-vivent-dans-la-peur-du-racisme-et

    • En Turquie, les réfugiés syriens sont devenus #indésirables

      Après avoir accueilli les réfugiés syriens à bras ouverts, la Turquie change de ton. Une façon pour le gouvernement Erdogan de réagir aux crispations qu’engendrent leur présence dans un contexte économique morose.

      Les autorités avaient donné jusqu’à mardi soir aux migrants sans statut légal pour régulariser leur situation, sous peine d’être expulsés. Mais selon plusieurs ONG, ces expulsions ont déjà commencé et plus d’un millier de réfugiés ont déjà été arrêtés. Quelque 600 personnes auraient même déjà été reconduites en Syrie.

      « Les policiers font des descentes dans les quartiers, dans les commerces, dans les maisons. Ils font des contrôles d’identité dans les transports en commun et quand ils attrapent des Syriens, ils les emmènent au bureau de l’immigration puis les expulsent », décrit Eyup Ozer, membre du collectif « We want to live together initiative ».

      Le gouvernement turc dément pour sa part ces renvois forcés. Mais cette vague d’arrestations intervient dans un climat hostile envers les 3,6 millions de réfugiés syriens installés en Turquie.

      Solidarité islamique

      Bien accueillis au début de la guerre, au nom de la solidarité islamique défendue par le président turc Recep Tayyip Erdogan dans l’idée de combattre Bachar al-Assad, ces réfugiés syriens sont aujourd’hui devenus un enjeu politique.

      Retenus à leur arrivée dans des camps, parfois dans des conditions difficiles, nombre d’entre eux ont quitté leur point de chute pour tenter leur chance dans le reste du pays et en particulier dans les villes. A Istanbul, le poumon économique de la Turquie, la présence de ces nouveaux-venus est bien visible. La plupart ont ouvert des commerces et des restaurants, et leurs devantures, en arabe, agacent, voire suscitent des jalousies.

      « L’économie turque va mal, c’est pour cette raison qu’on ressent davantage les effets de la crise syrienne », explique Lami Bertan Tokuzlu, professeur de droit à l’Université Bilgi d’Istanbul. « Les Turcs n’approuvent plus les dépenses du gouvernement en faveur des Syriens », relève ce spécialiste des migrations.
      Ressentiment croissant

      Après l’euphorie économique des années 2010, la Turquie est confrontée depuis plus d’un an à la dévaluation de sa monnaie et à un taux de chômage en hausse, à 10,9% en 2018.

      Dans ce contexte peu favorable et alors que les inégalités se creusent, la contestation s’est cristallisée autour de la question des migrants. Celle-ci expliquerait, selon certains experts, la déroute du candidat de Recep Tayyip Erdogan à la mairie d’Istanbul.

      Conscient de ce ressentiment dans la population et des conséquences potentielles pour sa popularité, le président a commencé à adapter son discours dès 2018. L’ultimatum lancé à ceux qui ont quitté une province turque où ils étaient enregistrés pour s’installer à Istanbul illustre une tension croissante.

      https://www.rts.ch/info/monde/10649380-en-turquie-les-refugies-syriens-sont-devenus-indesirables.html

    • Europe’s Complicity in Turkey’s Syrian-Refugee Crackdown

      Ankara is moving against Syrians in the country—and the European Union bears responsibility.

      Under the cover of night, Turkish police officers pushed Ahmed onto a large bus parked in central Istanbul. In the darkness, the Syrian man from Damascus could discern dozens of other handcuffed refugees being crammed into the vehicle. Many of them would not see the Turkish city again.

      Ahmed, who asked that his last name not be used to protect his safety, was arrested after police discovered that he was registered with the authorities not in Istanbul, but in a different district. Turkish law obliges Syrian refugees with a temporary protection status to remain in their locale of initial registration or obtain separate permission to travel, and the officers reassured him he would simply be transferred back to the right district.

      Instead, as dawn broke, the bus arrived at a detention facility in the Istanbul suburb of Pendik, where Ahmed said he was jostled into a crowded cell with 10 others and no beds, and received only one meal a day, which was always rotten. “The guards told us we Syrians are just as rotten inside,” he told me. “They kept shouting that Turkey will no longer accept us, and that we will all go back to Syria.”

      Ahmed would spend more than six weeks in the hidden world of Turkey’s so-called removal centers. His account, as well as those of more than half a dozen other Syrians I spoke to, point to the systemic abuse, the forced deportations, and, in some cases, the death of refugees caught in a recent crackdown here.
      More Stories

      Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte addresses the upper house of parliament.
      Italy’s Transition From One Weak Government to Another
      Rachel Donadio
      A cyclist heads past the houses of Parliament in central London.
      Boris Johnson Is Suspending Parliament. What’s Next for Brexit?
      Yasmeen Serhan Helen Lewis Tom McTague
      Robert Habeck and Annalena Baerbock, the German Greens leaders, at a news conference in Berlin
      Germany’s Future Is Being Decided on the Left, Not the Far Right
      Noah Barkin
      A Cathay Pacific plane hovers beside the flag of Hong Kong.
      Angering China Can Now Get You Fired
      Michael Schuman

      Yet Turkey is not the only actor implicated. In a deeper sense, the backlash also exposes the long-term consequences of the European Union’s outsourcing of its refugee problem. In March 2016, the EU entered into a controversial deal with Turkey that halted much of the refugee influx to Europe in return for an aid package worth €6 billion ($6.7 billion) and various political sweeteners for Ankara. Preoccupied with its own border security, EU decision makers at the time were quick to reassure their critics that Turkey constituted a “safe third country” that respected refugee rights and was committed to the principle of non-refoulement.

      As Europe closed its doors, Turkey was left with a staggering 3.6 million registered Syrian refugees—the largest number hosted by any country in the world and nearly four times as many as all EU-member states combined. While Turkish society initially responded with impressive resilience, its long-lauded hospitality is rapidly wearing thin, prompting President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s government to take measures that violate the very premise of the EU-Turkey deal.

      Last month, Turkish police launched operations targeting undocumented migrants and refugees in Istanbul. Syrian refugees holding temporary protection status registered in other Turkish districts now have until October 30 to leave Istanbul, whereas those without any papers are to be transferred to temporary refugee camps in order to be registered.

      Both international and Turkish advocates of refugee rights say, however, that the operation sparked a wave of random arrests and even forced deportations. The Istanbul Bar Association, too, reported its Legal Aid Bureau dealt with 3.5 times as many deportation cases as in June, just before the operation was launched. UNHCR, the UN’s refugee agency, and the European Commission have not said whether they believe Turkey is deporting Syrians. But one senior EU official, who asked for anonymity to discuss the issue, estimated that about 2,200 people were sent to the Syrian province of Idlib, though he said it was unclear whether they were forcibly deported or chose to return. The official added that, were Turkey forcibly deporting Syrians, this would be in explicit violation of the principle of non-refoulement, on which the EU-Turkey deal is conditioned.

      The Turkish interior ministry’s migration department did not respond to questions about the allegations. In a recent interview on Turkish television, Interior Minister Süleyman Soylu said that “it is not possible for us to deport any unregistered Syrian” and insisted that returns to Syria were entirely voluntary.

      Ahmed and several other Syrian refugees I spoke to, however, experienced firsthand what voluntary can look like in practice.

      After being transferred from the facility in Pendik to a removal center in Binkılıç, northwest of Istanbul, Ahmed said he was pressured into signing a set of forms upon arrival. The female official in charge refused to explain the papers’ contents, he said. As Ahmed was about to sign and fingerprint the last document, he noticed she was deliberately using her fingers to cover the Arabic translation of the words voluntary return. When he retracted his finger, she called in the guards, who took Ahmed to a nearby bathroom with another Syrian who had refused to sign. There, he said, the two were intimidated for several hours, and he was shown images of a man who had been badly beaten and tied to a chair with plastic tape. According to Ahmed, an official told him, “If you don’t sign, you’ll end up like that.”

      The other Syrian present at the time, Hussein, offered a similar account. In a phone interview from Dubai, where he escaped to after negotiating deportation to Malaysia instead of Syria, Hussein, who asked to be identified by only his first name to protect relatives still in Turkey, detailed the abuse in the same terms as Ahmed, and added that he was personally beaten by one of the guards. When the ordeal was over, both men said, the other Syrians who had arrived with them were being taken to a bus, apparently to be deported.

      Ahmed was detained in Binkılıç for a month before being taken to another removal center in nearby Kırklareli, where he said he was made to sleep outside in a courtyard together with more than 100 other detainees. The guards kept the toilets locked throughout the day, he said, so inmates had to either wait for a single 30-minute toilet break at night or relieve themselves where they were sleeping. When Ahmed fell seriously ill, he told me, he was repeatedly denied access to a doctor.

      After nine days in Kırklareli, the nightmare suddenly ended. Ahmed was called in by the facility’s management, asked who he was, and released when it became clear he did in fact hold temporary protection status, albeit for a district other than Istanbul. The Atlantic has seen a photo of Ahmed’s identity card, as well as his release note from the removal center.

      The EU has funded many of the removal centers in which refugees like Ahmed are held. As stated in budgets from 2010 and 2015, the EU financed at least 12 such facilities as part of its pre-accession funding to Turkey. And according to a 2016 report by an EU parliamentary delegation, the removal center in Kırklareli in which Ahmed was held received 85 percent of its funding from the EU. The Binkılıç facility, where Syrians were forced to sign return papers, also received furniture and other equipment funded by Britain and, according to Ahmed, featured signs displaying the EU and Turkish flags.

      It is hard to determine the extent to which the $6.7 billion allocated to Ankara under the 2016 EU-Turkey deal has funded similar projects. While the bulk of it went to education, health care, and direct cash support for refugees, a 2018 annual report also refers to funding for “a removal center for 750 people”—language conspicuously replaced with the more neutral “facility for 750 people” in this year’s report.

      According to Kati Piri, the European Parliament’s former Turkey rapporteur, even lawmakers like her struggle to scrutinize the precise implementation of EU-brokered deals on migration, which include agreements not just with Turkey, but also with Libya, Niger, and Sudan.

      “In this way, the EU becomes co-responsible for human-rights violations,” Piri said in a telephone interview. “Violations against refugees may have decreased on European soil, but that’s because we outsourced them. It’s a sign of Europe’s moral deficit, which deprives us from our credibility in holding Turkey to account.” According to the original agreement, the EU pledged to resettle 72,000 Syrian refugees from Turkey. Three years later, it has taken in less than a third of that number.

      Many within Turkish society feel their country has simply done enough. With an economy only recently out of recession and many Turks struggling to make a living, hostility toward Syrians is on the rise. A recent poll found that those who expressed unhappiness with Syrian refugees rose to 67.7 percent this year, from 54.5 percent in 2017.

      Just as in Europe, opposition parties in Turkey are now cashing in on anti-refugee sentiment. In municipal elections this year, politicians belonging to the secularist CHP ran an explicitly anti-Syrian campaign, and have cut municipal aid for refugees or even banned Syrians’ access to beaches since being elected. In Istanbul, on the very evening the CHP candidate Ekrem İmamoğlu was elected mayor, a jubilantly racist hashtag began trending on Twitter: “Syrians are fucking off” (#SuriyelilerDefoluyor).

      In a statement to The Atlantic, a Turkish foreign-ministry spokesperson said, “Turkey has done its part” when it came to the deal with the EU. “The funds received amount to a fraction of what has been spent by Turkey,” the text noted, adding that Ankara expects “more robust support from the EU” both financially and in the form of increased resettlements of Syrian refugees from Turkey to Europe.

      Though international organizations say that more evidence of Turkey’s actions is needed, Nour al-Deen al-Showaishi argues the proof is all around him. “The bombs are falling not far from here,” he told me in a telephone interview from a village on the outskirts of Idlib, the Syrian region where he said he was sent. Showaishi said he was deported from Turkey in mid-July after being arrested in the Istanbul neighborhood of Esenyurt while having coffee with friends. Fida al-Deen, who was with him at the time, confirmed to me that Showaishi was arrested and called him from Syria two days later.

      Having arrived in Turkey in early 2018, when the governorate of Istanbul had stopped giving out identity cards to Syrians, Showaishi did not have any papers to show the police. Taken to a nearby police station, officers assured him that he would receive an identity card if he signed a couple of forms. When he asked for more detail about the forms, however, they changed tactics and forced him to comply.

      Showaishi was then sent to a removal center in Tuzla and, he said, deported to Syria the same day. He sent me videos to show he was in Idlib, the last major enclave of armed resistance against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. According to the United Nations, the region contains 3 million people, half of them internally displaced, and faces a humanitarian disaster now that Russia and the Assad regime are stepping up an offensive to retake the territory.

      The only way out leads back into Turkey, and, determined to prevent yet another influx of refugees, Ankara has buttressed its border.

      Still, Hisham al-Steyf al-Mohammed saw no other option. The 21-year-old was deported from Turkey in mid-July despite possessing valid papers from the governorate of Istanbul, a photo of which I have seen. Desperate to return to his wife and two young children, he paid a smuggler to guide him back to Turkey, according to Mohammed Khedr Hammoud, another refugee who joined the perilous journey.

      Shortly before sunset on August 4, Hammoud said, a group of 13 refugees set off from the village of Dirriyah, a mile from the border, pausing in the mountains for the opportune moment to cross into Turkey. While they waited, Mohammed knelt down to pray, but moments later, a cloud of sand jumped up next to him. Realizing it was a bullet, the smuggler called for the group to get moving, but Mohammed lay still. “I crawled up to him and put my ear on his heart,” Hammoud told me, “but it wasn’t beating.” For more than an hour, he said, the group was targeted by bullets from Turkish territory, and only at midnight was it able to carry Mohammed’s body away.

      I obtained a photo of Mohammed’s death certificate issued by the Al-Rahma hospital in the Darkoush village in Idlib. The document, dated August 5, notes, “A bullet went through the patient’s right ear, and came out at the level of the left neck.”

      The Turkish interior ministry sent me a statement that largely reiterated an article published in Foreign Policy last week, in which an Erdoğan spokesman said Mohammed was a terror suspect who voluntarily requested his return to Syria. He offered no details on the case, though.

      Mohammed’s father, Mustafa, dismissed the spokesman’s argument, telling me in an interview in Istanbul, “If he really did something wrong, then why didn’t they send him to court?” Since Mohammed had been the household’s main breadwinner, Mustafa said he now struggled to feed his family, including Mohammed’s 3-month-old baby.

      Yet he is not the only one struck by Mohammed’s death. In an interview in his friend’s apartment in Istanbul, where he has returned but is in hiding from the authorities, Ahmed had just finished detailing his week’s long detention in Turkey’s removal centers when his phone started to buzz—photos of Mohammed’s corpse were being shared on Facebook.

      “I know him!” Ahmed screamed, clasping his friend’s arm. Mohammed, he said, had been with him in the removal center in Binkılıç. “He was so hopeful to be released, because he had a valid ID for Istanbul. But when he told me that he had been made to sign some forms, I knew it was already too late.”

      “If I signed that piece of paper,” Ahmed said, “I could have been dead next to him.”

      It is this thought that pushes Ahmed, and many young Syrians like him, to continue on to Europe. He and his friend showed me videos a smuggler had sent them of successful boat journeys, and told me they planned to leave soon.

      “As long as we are in Turkey, the Europeans can pretend that they don’t see us,” Ahmed concluded. “But once I go there, once I stand in front of them, I am sure that they will care about me.”

      https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2019/08/europe-turkey-syria-refugee-crackdown/597013
      #responsabilité

  • #Tunisie : des migrants violentés et arrêtés lors d’une manifestation « pacifique » à #Médenine

    Les forces de l’ordre ont dispersé « avec violence » une manifestation « pacifique » de migrants dans le sud de la Tunisie, à Médenine, jeudi. Ces derniers réclamaient de meilleures conditions de vie et des relocalisations vers l’Europe. Une association d’aide aux étrangers réclame leur libération.

    Une dizaine de migrants ont été arrêtés jeudi 20 juin dans le sud de la Tunisie, à Médenine, alors qu’ils manifestaient pour demander à être accueillis en Europe, selon une ONG tunisienne, qui a dénoncé l’usage d’une force « excessive » par la police.

    Dans un communiqué (https://ftdes.net/ar/communique-medenine, le Forum tunisien des droits économique et sociaux (FTDES) - association qui aide, entre autres, les étrangers en Tunisie - a évoqué l’arrestation de « quelques migrants » et dénoncé l’usage d’une force « excessive » et de #gaz_lacrymogène par les forces de sécurité. « Les forces de l’ordre sont intervenues violemment », dénonce FTDES qui fait état de blessés.

    Selon l’association, la manifestation était « pacifique » et menée par des migrants subsahariens qui demandaient à être accueillis dans un autre pays - en Europe.

    Une femme présente dans la manifestation a témoigné sur Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/Arrakmia/videos/506178630208842/?v=506178630208842). « Je suis Érythréenne, ça fait cinq mois que je suis là ! J’ai vu les forces de l’ordre forcer des personnes à monter dans leurs camionnettes ». Un autre dénonce les violences policières. « On est en Tunisie ou en Libye ? », s’emporte-t-il. « J’ai voulu parler avec un policier et il m’a frappé ! Nous on réclame juste de partir d’ici ! On respecte l’État, on respecte les lois ! »

    Dix migrants arrêtés, selon le ministère de l’Intérieur tunisien

    Sofiène Zaag, porte-parole du ministère de l’Intérieur, a indiqué de son côté que la police avait arrêté dix migrants ayant commis des « actes perturbateurs » lors de cette manifestation non autorisée.

    FTDES a appelé les autorités tunisiennes à libérer toutes les personnes arrêtées et invité les organisations de l’ONU à « assumer leurs responsabilités » et à mettre en place « le maximum de capacités logistique, financière, juridique et diplomatique pour soutenir » ces migrants.

    Deux journalistes présents sur place, qui ont filmé l’intervention sur Facebook, ont également été malmenés par les forces de l’ordre. « Le Forum condamne les attaques et les restrictions imposées aux journalistes dans l’exercice de leurs fonctions ».

    La Tunisie dispose d’un seul centre, géré par le Croissant-rouge à Médenine, pour accueillir les étrangers arrivés clandestinement.

    Environ 1 100 étrangers arrivés clandestinement sont installés à Médenine. Certains sont logés dans ce centre d’accueil, complètement débordé, avec deux fois plus de migrants que de lits, a indiqué à l’AFP le président du bureau régional du Croissant-rouge.

    Le Croissant-rouge a exprimé plusieurs fois son souhait d’agrandir la capacité d’accueil du centre, créé en 2013, où les autorités envoient les étrangers arrêtés sur le chemin de l’Europe, près de la frontière de la Libye voisine ou dans les eaux territoriales de la Tunisie en Méditerranée.

    Pour rappel, en Tunisie, les questions d’asile et de protection sont déléguées au Haut-commissariat pour les réfugiés de l’ONU (HCR). Bien que signataire de la convention de Genève de 1951 relative aux réfugiés, la Tunisie ne s’est pas dotée d’un cadre légal national nécessaire à son application.


    https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/17672/tunisie-des-migrants-violentes-et-arretes-lors-d-une-manifestation-pac
    #violence #manifestation #résistance #arrestations #asile #migrations #réfugiés #violences_policières #police

  • #Grève dans les #92 - Le #facteur n’est pas passé | FUMIGENE MAG
    http://www.fumigene.org/2018/06/06/greve-dans-les-92-le-facteur-nest-pas-passe
    #PTT #postes #poste #la_poste

    texte partagé par collectif oeil sur FB :

    Ce dimanche 16 juin 2019 à 6h, 7 policiers ont sonné à la porte de chez Leo Ks, #photographe et #vidéaste, membre du Collectif OEIL, pour l’interpeller.

    Il a été menotté et emmené en garde à vue au commissariat du XVe arrondissement de Paris. Lors de son interrogatoire, la police lui a reproché des faits de « dégradations au siège de la Poste ». il a été libéré le jour même, un peu avant 20h.

    Vendredi 14 juin, les grévistes de la Poste, en grève depuis 15 mois dans les Hauts-de-Seine, ont occupé le siège de leur entreprise. Par cette action, les postier.es en grève voulaient une nouvelle fois interpeller les cadres de l’entreprise afin de mettre en place de vraies négociations et faire signer le protocole de fin de conflit.

    Leo Ks et NnoMan ont suivi l’action, pour la documenter de l’intérieur, afin de réaliser un reportage photo et vidéo.

    Ils n’ont commis et n’ont été témoins d’aucune dégradation de la part des grévistes.

    Lors de cette action, la police a tenté à plusieurs reprises d’empêcher Leo Ks et NnoMan de filmer ; avant de les retenir plus d’une heure à l’écart, surveillés par deux agents de la #BAC.

    Pendant ce temps, une unité d’intervention procédait à l’évacuation des grévistes, en fracassant la porte à coups de bélier et de masse.

    Ce dimanche matin, le syndicaliste Gaël Quirante, a été lui aussi réveillé par la police puis placé en garde à vue, à la sûreté territoriale.

    La police s’est également rendue chez deux autres postiers (qui n’étaient pas chez eux) et ont placé une sympathisante en garde à vue, elle aussi dans le commissariat du XVe.

    Ces #arrestations, au petit matin, avec de nombreux effectifs de police, chez des grévistes, chez une citoyenne, chez un photographe qui donne la parole à cette lutte, est une nouvelle attaque contre le #mouvement_social, contre celles et ceux qui se révoltent pour leurs droits, et contre la presse indépendante.

    Par ces attaques, ce sont non seulement les #journalistes qui sont visés ; c’est l’ensemble du mouvement qui est pris pour cible avec une volonté claire de criminaliser les luttes sociales et syndicales.

    Nous condamnons ces arrestations, que ce soit à l’encontre de notre collègue et ami, ou à l’encontre de tous les autres, de ceux qui luttent pour leurs droits et pour le maintien de #services_publics pour tous les #citoyens de ce pays.

    Nous espérons la libération immédiate de #Gaël_Quirante ainsi que l’arrêt des #poursuites contre les #grévistes.

    Nous ne baisserons ni les yeux, ni les objectifs de nos appareils photo !

    #Collectif_OEIL.
    #fumigene_le_mag
    #criminalisation_mouvements_sociaux
    #liberté_de_la_presse

    Pitinome
    NnoMan
    Leo Ks
    Maxwell Aurélien James

  • Adama Traoré : un rapport réalisé à la demande de la famille remet en cause l’expertise médicale
    https://www.lemonde.fr/societe/article/2019/03/12/adama-traore-un-rapport-realise-a-la-demande-de-la-famille-remet-en-cause-l-

    Les quatre médecins, dont l’anonymat est protégé par la loi mais qui figurent parmi les principaux spécialistes en France des maladies citées dans le dossier, écartent la théorie d’un décès dû à sa condition médicale. Ils appellent la justice à réexaminer les conditions d’arrestation du jeune homme, dont la mort en 2016 a provoqué un grand mouvement sociétal contre les violences policières.

    #paywall

    • Quatre médecins balayent les conclusions des précédents rapports sur les causes de la mort du jeune homme de 24 ans et mettent en cause ses conditions d’interpellation.

      C’est une course contre la montre autant qu’une bataille de communication. Alors que la justice a fait savoir qu’elle s’apprêtait à clore l’instruction sur « l’affaire Adama Traoré », la famille du défunt joue son va-tout avec une contre-expertise médicale, réalisée à ses frais, qui vient bousculer les certitudes établies sur les causes du décès.

      Les termes médicaux ont beau être complexes, la conclusion de ce travail est limpide. Ce rapport, rédigé par quatre professeurs de médecine interne issus de grands hôpitaux parisiens et que Le Monde a pu consulter, balaye les conclusions des précédents experts, remettant même en cause leur éthique médicale.

      Les quatre médecins, dont l’anonymat est protégé par la loi mais qui figurent parmi les principaux spécialistes en France des maladies citées dans le dossier, écartent la théorie d’un décès dû à sa condition médicale. Ils appellent la justice à réexaminer les conditions d’arrestation du jeune homme, dont la mort en 2016 a provoqué un grand mouvement sociétal [toi même ! ndc] contre les violences policières.

      A quoi est dû le décès d’Adama Traoré, à 24 ans, sur le sol de la gendarmerie de Persan (Val-d’Oise) en juillet 2016 ? La famille reste persuadée que ce sont les méthodes musclées d’interpellation qui ont causé sa mort, quand les #gendarmes assurent n’être pour rien dans la dégradation subite de son état.

      Le précédent rapport, rendu le 14 septembre 2018 par quatre experts désignés par le juge d’instruction, excluait d’ailleurs de facto l’action des forces de l’ordre, expliquant que le jeune homme qui avait couru pour échapper à un contrôle d’identité était décédé à la suite d’un « syndrome asphyxique » causé par une conjonction des deux maladies qu’il présentait : une sarcoïdose de type 2 et un trait drépanocytaire. « Le décès de M. Adama Traoré résulte de l’évolution naturelle d’un état antérieur au décours d’un effort », concluait l’#expertise_médico-légale.

      Cette conclusion, à propos d’un jeune homme sportif, ne tient pas, selon les quatre médecins sollicités par l’avocat de la famille Traoré, Me Yassine Bouzrou. Ces professeurs ont pour eux d’être des spécialistes des deux maladies mises en cause, la sarcoïdose et la drépanocytose, contrairement à leurs confrères qui ont signé le précédent rapport (deux experts de médecine légale, un cardiologue et un pneumologue).

      « Porteur sain »

      Après examen des différentes expertises réalisées, ils affirment sans détour que la condition médicale préalable d’Adama Traoré ne peut pas être la cause de la mort. Concernant la sarcoïdose, ils commencent par rappeler qu’il n’y a jamais eu de décès lié au stade 2 de la maladie, [avant, ndc] celui dont était affecté le jeune homme. « Aucun argument théorique, aucune donnée de littérature et aucune preuve médico-légale ne permettent de soutenir le contraire », écrivent-ils. Même constat pour le trait drépanocytaire, dont Adama Traoré était un « porteur sain ». « Nous affirmons que le décès de M. Adama Traoré ne peut être imputé ni à la sarcoïdose de stade 2, ni au trait drépanocytaire, ni à la conjonction des deux », assènent-ils.

      Les quatre professeurs ne s’arrêtent pas là. Ils remettent en cause le sérieux du travail des autres #experts : « La drépanocytose et la sarcoïdose sont deux pathologies rares, habituellement prises en charge par des médecins spécialisés, en général spécialistes de la médecine interne. Notons que les deux cliniciens ayant participé à l’expertise médico-légale de synthèse n’ont aucune compétence dans ces domaines. »

      Selon eux, le rapport fourmille de contresens : « Les notions théoriques invoquées au sujet de la sarcoïdose et de la drépanocytose sont improprement et faussement utilisées et leurs conclusions sont contraires aux connaissances et recommandations scientifiquement et internationalement validées. »

      Ils reprochent par exemple aux précédents experts d’appuyer leur raisonnement sur la drépanocytose sur des cas très rares de sept patients âgés de 42 à 67 ans, présentant des conditions physiques très dégradées (obésité, diabète, insuffisance rénale ou cardiaque…). « Ces patients ne peuvent en aucun cas être comparés à un jeune homme de 24 ans sans antécédents médicaux notables », expliquent-ils, rappelant qu’il existe actuellement environ 300 millions de porteurs sains vivants dans le monde, et plusieurs milliards depuis le début des études en 1956. « Il est peu probable que cette complication si elle avait été réelle n’ait pas été plus souvent rapportée dans la littérature. »

      Enchaînement médical improbable

      Dans leurs conclusions, les quatre professeurs s’interrogent sur le plan déontologique : « La tentative de validation ou légitimation de cette conclusion en faisant appel à des notions scientifiques théoriques sur la sarcoïdose et la drépanocytose amène à des conclusions biaisées sur le plan intellectuel, voire de l’éthique médicale. » Une charge virulente, dans un milieu hospitalier habituellement feutré.

      Selon eux, les experts cherchent à expliquer par un enchaînement médical improbable – et à vrai dire impossible – les causes de ce décès, alors qu’il existe des explications plus logiques et plus simples, à commencer par celle d’une « #asphyxie mécanique », due aux méthodes d’interpellation. Reprenant le récit de l’arrestation, ils soulèvent que les différentes auditions permettent de constater que le jeune homme a notamment reçu le poids des trois gendarmes sur son corps.

      « Il est étonnant de constater que cette expertise médico-légale ne s’est pas intéressée avec insistance à ces concepts d’asphyxie positionnelle, qui ont été décrits dans plusieurs études s’intéressant aux décès survenus lors d’#arrestations_policières », notent-ils, rappelant que trois des quatre expertises médicales réalisées jusqu’à présent « concluent en l’existence d’un syndrome asphyxique aigu ».

      Quel regard portera le procureur de Paris sur cette contre-expertise que la famille a versé au dossier ? Depuis le 14 décembre 2018, les juges d’instruction ont clos leur enquête et ont transmis le dossier au parquet, où il est « en cours de règlement », selon une source judiciaire. Toutes les demandes de nouveaux actes formulées par la famille ont été rejetées, notamment celle d’une #contre-expertise mandatée par la justice.
      L’hypothèse du non-lieu tenait jusque-là la corde. Les magistrats ont manifestement été convaincus par les conclusions du précédent rapport rendu en septembre 2018, qui exonérait les gendarmes. En témoigne leur décision de ne pas mettre en examen les trois militaires, à la suite de leur audition, fin novembre 2018. Ces derniers ont simplement été placés sous le statut de témoin assisté, pour « non-assistance à personne en péril ».

      La famille d’Adama Traoré demande qu’ils soient à nouveau entendus, notamment pour répondre plus précisément sur les conditions de l’interpellation. Elle demande également qu’une #reconstitution soit organisée sur les lieux de son arrestation, pour prouver que le jeune homme, qui aurait parcouru 400 mètres en dix-huit minutes, n’a pas produit un effort intense susceptible d’être à l’origine de son décès.
      Nicolas Chapuis

      #violences_policières #violence_d'état #Justice

  • Comment les renseignements s’adaptent depuis trois mois au mouvement inédit des « #gilets_jaunes », Catherine Fournier
    https://www.francetvinfo.fr/economie/transports/gilets-jaunes/enquete-comment-les-renseignements-s-adaptent-depuis-trois-mois-au-mouv

    Policiers et gendarmes des services de #renseignement ont dû s’adapter en urgence à l’émergence de cette vague de contestation sociale protéiforme et à des leaders d’un nouveau genre. 

    Ils sont sur les ronds-points, dans les manifestations, assistent à des réunions organisées dans le cadre du grand débat national et aux discussions sur les réseaux sociaux. « Ils », ce ne sont pas « les gilets jaunes » mais ceux qui les observent et les écoutent, les agents des services de renseignement. Depuis trois mois, les policiers du renseignement territorial (RT), ceux de la préfecture de police de Paris mais aussi les gendarmes des brigades sont en première ligne pour recueillir des informations sur ce mouvement social inédit, tant par sa forme que par sa durée.

    « Il a fallu en urgence établir la réalité d’un phénomène qui s’est construit du jour au lendemain, sur les réseaux, rapidement et en nombre », résume Guillaume Ryckewaert, secrétaire national du Syndicat des cadres de la sécurité intérieure. Deux jours seulement avant la première journée de mobilisation, le 17 novembre, le service central du renseignement territorial (SCRT) publie une note de synthèse dans laquelle il décrit un « mouvement d’humeur », « assez désorganisé », avec des initiateurs inconnus des services mais un risque de récupération par les extrêmes.

    #judiciarisation #arrestations_préventives

  • Le monde selon #Xi_Jinping

    Depuis 2012, le désormais « président à vie » Xi Jinping a concentré tous les pouvoirs sur sa personne, avec l’obsession de faire de la #Chine la superpuissance du XXIe siècle. Plongée au coeur de son « rêve chinois ».

    Derrière son apparente bonhomie se cache un chef redoutable, prêt à tout pour faire de la Chine la première puissance mondiale, d’ici au centenaire de la République populaire, en 2049. En mars dernier, à l’issue de vastes purges, Xi Jinping modifie la Constitution et s’intronise « président à vie ». Une concentration des pouvoirs sans précédent depuis la fin de l’ère maoïste. Né en 1953, ce fils d’un proche de Mao Zedong révoqué pour « complot antiparti » choisit à l’adolescence, en pleine tourmente de la Révolution culturelle, un exil volontaire à la campagne, comme pour racheter la déchéance paternelle. Revendiquant une fidélité aveugle au Parti, il gravira en apparatchik « plus rouge que rouge » tous les degrés du pouvoir.
    Depuis son accession au secrétariat général du Parti en 2012, puis à la présidence l’année suivante, les autocritiques d’opposants ont réapparu, par le biais de confessions télévisées. Et on met à l’essai un système de surveillance généralisée censé faire le tri entre les bons et les mauvais citoyens. Inflexible sur le plan intérieur, Xi Jinping s’est donné comme objectif de supplanter l’Occident à la tête d’un nouvel ordre mondial. Son projet des « routes de la soie » a ainsi considérablement étendu le réseau des infrastructures chinoises à l’échelle planétaire. Cet expansionnisme stratégique, jusque-là développé en silence, inquiète de plus en plus l’Europe et les États-Unis.

    Impériale revanche
    Dans ce portrait très documenté du leader chinois, Sophie Lepault et Romain Franklin donnent un aperçu inédit de sa politique et montrent que l’itinéraire de Xi Jinping a façonné ses choix. De Pékin à Djibouti – l’ancienne colonie française est depuis 2017 la première base militaire chinoise à l’étranger – en passant par la mer de Chine méridionale et l’Australie, les réalisateurs passent au crible les projets et les stratégies d’influence du nouvel homme fort de la planète. Nourrie d’images d’archives et de témoignages (de nombreux experts et de dissidents, mais aussi d’un haut gradé proche du pouvoir), leur enquête montre comment Xi Jinping a donné à la reconquête nationaliste de la grandeur impériale chinoise, projet nourri dès l’origine par la République populaire, une spectaculaire ampleur.

    https://www.arte.tv/fr/videos/078193-000-A/le-monde-selon-xi-jinping
    #biographie #démocratie #trauma #traumatisme #Mao #révolution_culturelle #Terres_Jaunes #exil #Prince_Rouge #nationalisme #rêve_chinois #renaissance_nationale #histoire_nationale #totalitarisme #stabilité #idéologie #anti-corruption #lutte_contre_la_corruption #purge #dictature #investissements_à_l'étranger #prêts #dette #KUKA #ports #droits_humains #Australie #infiltration_chinoise #Nouvelle-Zélande #David_Cameron #Jean-Pierre_Raffarin #matières_premières #capitalisme_autoritaire #Ouïghours #arrestations #répression #censure #liberté_d'expression #défilés_militaires #armée #puissance_militaire #Mer_de_Chine_méridionale #îles_de_Spratleys #liberté_de_la_presse #prisonniers_politiques #Hong_Kong

    #Djibouti #base_militaire (de Djibouti)

    #Sri_Lanka —> Au Sri Lanka, le #port de #Hambantota est sous contrôle chinois, ceci pour au moins 99 ans (accord signé avec le Sri Lanka qui n’a pas pu rembourser le prêt que la Chine lui a accorder pour construire le port...)
    #dépendance
    v. aussi :
    Comment la Chine a fait main basse sur le Sri Lanka
    https://www.courrierinternational.com/article/comment-la-chine-fait-main-basse-sur-le-sri-lanka

    Histoire semblable pour le #Port_du_Pirée à #Athènes, en #Grèce ou l’#aéroport de #Toulouse, en #France.

    #Organisation_de_coopération_de_Shangaï :


    https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organisation_de_coop%C3%A9ration_de_Shanghai
    #Grande_unité_mondiale #enrichissement_pour_tous

    Quelques cartes et images tirées du #film #documentaire.

    La #nouvelle_route_de_la_soie et autres investissements chinois dans les infrastructures mondiales de #transport :

    La #Chinafrique :


    #Afrique
    Afrique où la Chine propose la « #solution_chinoise », programme de #développement basé sur le #développement_économique —> « #modèle_chinois de développement »

    Le programme de #surveillance_de_masse :

    Outre la surveillance, mise en place d’un programme appelé « #crédit_social » :

    Le #Système_de_crédit_social est un projet du gouvernement chinois visant à mettre en place d’ici 2020 un système national de #réputation_des_citoyens. Chacun d’entre eux se voit attribuer une note, échelonnée entre 350 et 950 points, dite « crédit social », fondée sur les données dont dispose le gouvernement à propos de leur statut économique et social. Le système repose sur un outil de surveillance de masse et utilise les technologies d’analyse du #big_data. Il est également utilisé pour noter les entreprises opérant sur le marché chinois.

    https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syst%C3%A8me_de_cr%C3%A9dit_social

    Voici ce que cela donne :


    #surveillance #contrôle_de_la_population #vidéosurveillance #reconnaissance_faciale #contrôle_social
    #cartographie #visualisation
    ping @etraces

    ping @reka

  • Manif gilets jaunes : les premières avancées de l’enquête - L’Express
    https://www.lexpress.fr/actualite/societe/manif-gilets-jaunes-les-premieres-avancees-de-l-enquete_2053869.html

    Vol d’un fusil d’assaut, violences contre les forces de l’ordre, pillages... Les pistes de la #police commencent à aboutir.

    C’est un travail de Bénédictin qui porte ses premiers fruits. Après cinq week-ends de mobilisation des gilets jaunes et de multiples arrestations, les enquêteurs de la #police_judiciaire parisienne commencent, selon nos informations, à identifier les auteurs des infractions les plus graves. Le tout nouveau procureur de la République de Paris, Rémy Heitz, avait prévenu sur RTL : « Ceux qui rentrent le samedi (après la manifestation), sans avoir été interpellés, ne sont pas pour autant quittes avec la #justice. (...) Ce n’est pas le régime du ’pas vu, pas pris’. (...) Sur la base des vidéos et des témoignages, la police judiciaire interpellera encore des auteurs d’infraction. » 

    Le 5 décembre, les policiers du premier district, qui couvre le centre et l’ouest de la capitale, ont ainsi retrouvé un individu soupçonné d’être impliqué dans le #vol d’un fusil d’assaut HK G36 appartenant aux forces de l’ordre. Quatre jours plus tôt, en plein chaos, cette arme a été dérobée dans le coffre d’un véhicule de police stationné près de l’Opéra. Le suspect, mis en examen et écroué notamment pour « vol avec violences » et « infraction à la législation sur les armes », détenait une munition du HK G36, d’après une source proche du dossier. « Elle lui aurait été donnée, selon ses explications, par le voleur de l’arme. On essaie de remonter la piste et de déterminer qui est en possession du fusil d’assaut », explique à L’Express une source policière.

    Les « gilets jaunes » les plus violents, progressivement rattrapés par la justice
    https://www.franceinter.fr/justice/les-gilets-jaunes-les-plus-violents-progressivement-rattrapes-par-la-jus

    [...]La brigade criminelle a été saisie pour les actions les plus violentes, mais pour l’instant non résolues contre les forces de l’ordre. « On ne lâchera jamais », disent les enquêteurs. Il s’agit de deux agressions, avec pour victimes « un flic et un gendarme ». « On a vu le collègue gardien de la paix de la préfecture de police littéralement lynché, avec son nez et sa mâchoire fracturés, son fémur amoché ». Un gendarme mobile, visé sur la place de l’Étoile, a d’abord reçu des barrières de sécurité, puis un tir d’une bombe agricole bourrée de clous et de boulons, qui ont transpercé les protections et provoqué des brûlures.

    Les gendarmes évoquent quant à eux l’attaque et l’incendie de la Gendarmerie d’Autoroute de Narbonne, avec du personnel qui a pu s’échapper de peu par l’arrière du bâtiment, juste avant la mise à feu. Les enquêteurs ne veulent rien dire des indices et des vidéos enregistrées de ce 1er décembre. Reste que l’un des principaux chefs d’#enquête est persuadé que les auteurs des faits les plus graves finiront par être rattrapés par la patrouille dans les semaines qui viennent.

  • Les « #arrestations_préventives » ou la fin du #droit_de_manifester

    Samedi, les forces de l’ordre ont multiplié les #arrestations de manifestants de manière préventive : ceux-ci étaient simplement soupçonnés de vouloir participer à un rassemblement violent. Beaucoup ont terminé en #garde_à_vue. La moitié ont fait l’objet d’un #classement_sans_suite. Il n’y avait rien à leur reprocher.

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/101218/les-arrestations-preventives-ou-la-fin-du-droit-de-manifester?onglet=full
    #Gilets_jaunes #it_has_begun