• Refugee protection at risk

    Two of the words that we should try to avoid when writing about refugees are “unprecedented” and “crisis.” They are used far too often and with far too little thought by many people working in the humanitarian sector. Even so, and without using those words, there is evidence to suggest that the risks confronting refugees are perhaps greater today than at any other time in the past three decades.

    First, as the UN Secretary-General has pointed out on many occasions, we are currently witnessing a failure of global governance. When Antonio Guterres took office in 2017, he promised to launch what he called “a surge in diplomacy for peace.” But over the past three years, the UN Security Council has become increasingly dysfunctional and deadlocked, and as a result is unable to play its intended role of preventing the armed conflicts that force people to leave their homes and seek refuge elsewhere. Nor can the Security Council bring such conflicts to an end, thereby allowing refugees to return to their country of origin.

    It is alarming to note, for example, that four of the five Permanent Members of that body, which has a mandate to uphold international peace and security, have been militarily involved in the Syrian armed conflict, a war that has displaced more people than any other in recent years. Similarly, and largely as a result of the blocking tactics employed by Russia and the US, the Secretary-General struggled to get Security Council backing for a global ceasefire that would support the international community’s efforts to fight the Coronavirus pandemic

    Second, the humanitarian principles that are supposed to regulate the behavior of states and other parties to armed conflicts, thereby minimizing the harm done to civilian populations, are under attack from a variety of different actors. In countries such as Burkina Faso, Iraq, Nigeria and Somalia, those principles have been flouted by extremist groups who make deliberate use of death and destruction to displace populations and extend the areas under their control.

    In states such as Myanmar and Syria, the armed forces have acted without any kind of constraint, persecuting and expelling anyone who is deemed to be insufficiently loyal to the regime or who come from an unwanted part of society. And in Central America, violent gangs and ruthless cartels are acting with growing impunity, making life so hazardous for other citizens that they feel obliged to move and look for safety elsewhere.

    Third, there is mounting evidence to suggest that governments are prepared to disregard international refugee law and have a respect a declining commitment to the principle of asylum. It is now common practice for states to refuse entry to refugees, whether by building new walls, deploying military and militia forces, or intercepting and returning asylum seekers who are travelling by sea.

    In the Global North, the refugee policies of the industrialized increasingly take the form of ‘externalization’, whereby the task of obstructing the movement of refugees is outsourced to transit states in the Global South. The EU has been especially active in the use of this strategy, forging dodgy deals with countries such as Libya, Niger, Sudan and Turkey. Similarly, the US has increasingly sought to contain northward-bound refugees in Mexico, and to return asylum seekers there should they succeed in reaching America’s southern border.

    In developing countries themselves, where some 85 per cent of the world’s refugees are to be found, governments are increasingly prepared to flout the principle that refugee repatriation should only take place in a voluntary manner. While they rarely use overt force to induce premature returns, they have many other tools at their disposal: confining refugees to inhospitable camps, limiting the food that they receive, denying them access to the internet, and placing restrictions on humanitarian organizations that are trying to meet their needs.

    Fourth, the COVID-19 pandemic of the past nine months constitutes a very direct threat to the lives of refugees, and at the same time seems certain to divert scarce resources from other humanitarian programmes, including those that support displaced people. The Coronavirus has also provided a very convenient alibi for governments that wish to close their borders to people who are seeking safety on their territory.

    Responding to this problem, UNHCR has provided governments with recommendations as to how they might uphold the principle of asylum while managing their borders effectively and minimizing any health risks associated with the cross-border movement of people. But it does not seem likely that states will be ready to adopt such an approach, and will prefer instead to introduce more restrictive refugee and migration policies.

    Even if the virus is brought under some kind of control, it may prove difficult to convince states to remove the restrictions that they have introduced during the COVD-19 emergency. And the likelihood of that outcome is reinforced by the fear that the climate crisis will in the years to come prompt very large numbers of people to look for a future beyond the borders of their own state.

    Fifth, the state-based international refugee regime does not appear well placed to resist these negative trends. At the broadest level, the very notions of multilateralism, international cooperation and the rule of law are being challenged by a variety of powerful states in different parts of the world: Brazil, China, Russia, Turkey and the USA, to name just five. Such countries also share a common disdain for human rights and the protection of minorities – indigenous people, Uyghur Muslims, members of the LGBT community, the Kurds and African-Americans respectively.

    The USA, which has traditionally acted as a mainstay of the international refugee regime, has in recent years set a particularly negative example to the rest of the world by slashing its refugee resettlement quota, by making it increasingly difficult for asylum seekers to claim refugee status on American territory, by entirely defunding the UN’s Palestinian refugee agency and by refusing to endorse the Global Compact on Refugees. Indeed, while many commentators predicted that the election of President Trump would not be good news for refugees, the speed at which he has dismantled America’s commitment to the refugee regime has taken many by surprise.

    In this toxic international environment, UNHCR appears to have become an increasingly self-protective organization, as indicated by the enormous amount of effort it devotes to marketing, branding and celebrity endorsement. For reasons that remain somewhat unclear, rather than stressing its internationally recognized mandate for refugee protection and solutions, UNHCR increasingly presents itself as an all-purpose humanitarian agency, delivering emergency assistance to many different groups of needy people, both outside and within their own country. Perhaps this relief-oriented approach is thought to win the favour of the organization’s key donors, an impression reinforced by the cautious tone of the advocacy that UNHCR undertakes in relation to the restrictive asylum policies of the EU and USA.

    UNHCR has, to its credit, made a concerted effort to revitalize the international refugee regime, most notably through the Global Compact on Refugees, the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework and the Global Refugee Forum. But will these initiatives really have the ‘game-changing’ impact that UNHCR has prematurely attributed to them?

    The Global Compact on Refugees, for example, has a number of important limitations. It is non-binding and does not impose any specific obligations on the countries that have endorsed it, especially in the domain of responsibility-sharing. The Compact makes numerous references to the need for long-term and developmental approaches to the refugee problem that also bring benefits to host states and communities. But it is much more reticent on fundamental protection principles such as the right to seek asylum and the notion of non-refoulement. The Compact also makes hardly any reference to the issue of internal displacement, despite the fact that there are twice as many IDPs as there are refugees under UNHCR’s mandate.

    So far, the picture painted by this article has been unremittingly bleak. But just as one can identify five very negative trends in relation to refugee protection, a similar number of positive developments also warrant recognition.

    First, the refugee policies pursued by states are not uniformly bad. Countries such as Canada, Germany and Uganda, for example, have all contributed, in their own way, to the task of providing refugees with the security that they need and the rights to which they are entitled. In their initial stages at least, the countries of South America and the Middle East responded very generously to the massive movements of refugees out of Venezuela and Syria.

    And while some analysts, including the current author, have felt that there was a very real risk of large-scale refugee expulsions from countries such as Bangladesh, Kenya and Lebanon, those fears have so far proved to be unfounded. While there is certainly a need for abusive states to be named and shamed, recognition should also be given to those that seek to uphold the principles of refugee protection.

    Second, the humanitarian response to refugee situations has become steadily more effective and equitable. Twenty years ago, it was the norm for refugees to be confined to camps, dependent on the distribution of food and other emergency relief items and unable to establish their own livelihoods. Today, it is far more common for refugees to be found in cities, towns or informal settlements, earning their own living and/or receiving support in the more useful, dignified and efficient form of cash transfers. Much greater attention is now given to the issues of age, gender and diversity in refugee contexts, and there is a growing recognition of the role that locally-based and refugee-led organizations can play in humanitarian programmes.

    Third, after decades of discussion, recent years have witnessed a much greater engagement with refugee and displacement issues by development and financial actors, especially the World Bank. While there are certainly some risks associated with this engagement (namely a lack of attention to protection issues and an excessive focus on market-led solutions) a more developmental approach promises to allow better long-term planning for refugee populations, while also addressing more systematically the needs of host populations.

    Fourth, there has been a surge of civil society interest in the refugee issue, compensating to some extent for the failings of states and the large international humanitarian agencies. Volunteer groups, for example, have played a critical role in responding to the refugee situation in the Mediterranean. The Refugees Welcome movement, a largely spontaneous and unstructured phenomenon, has captured the attention and allegiance of many people, especially but not exclusively the younger generation.

    And as has been seen in the UK this year, when governments attempt to demonize refugees, question their need for protection and violate their rights, there are many concerned citizens, community associations, solidarity groups and faith-based organizations that are ready to make their voice heard. Indeed, while the national asylum policies pursued by the UK and other countries have been deeply disappointing, local activism on behalf of refugees has never been stronger.

    Finally, recent events in the Middle East, the Mediterranean and Europe have raised the question as to whether refugees could be spared the trauma and hardship of making dangerous journeys from one country and continent to another by providing them with safe and legal routes. These might include initiatives such as Canada’s community-sponsored refugee resettlement programme, the ‘humanitarian corridors’ programme established by the Italian churches, family reunion projects of the type championed in the UK and France by Lord Alf Dubs, and the notion of labour mobility programmes for skilled refugee such as that promoted by the NGO Talent Beyond Boundaries.

    Such initiatives do not provide a panacea to the refugee issue, and in their early stages at least, might not provide a solution for large numbers of displaced people. But in a world where refugee protection is at such serious risk, they deserve our full support.

    http://www.against-inhumanity.org/2020/09/08/refugee-protection-at-risk

    #réfugiés #asile #migrations #protection #Jeff_Crisp #crise #crise_migratoire #crise_des_réfugiés #gouvernance #gouvernance_globale #paix #Nations_unies #ONU #conflits #guerres #conseil_de_sécurité #principes_humanitaires #géopolitique #externalisation #sanctuarisation #rapatriement #covid-19 #coronavirus #frontières #fermeture_des_frontières #liberté_de_mouvement #liberté_de_circulation #droits_humains #Global_Compact_on_Refugees #Comprehensive_Refugee_Response_Framework #Global_Refugee_Forum #camps_de_réfugiés #urban_refugees #réfugiés_urbains #banque_mondiale #société_civile #refugees_welcome #solidarité #voies_légales #corridors_humanitaires #Talent_Beyond_Boundaries #Alf_Dubs

    via @isskein
    ping @karine4 @thomas_lacroix @_kg_ @rhoumour

    –—
    Ajouté à la métaliste sur le global compact :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/739556

  • #Pandémie : Le déchainement ! Vaccination en Marche (...forcée) Stratégie du choc
    Grâce aux travail de l’#OMS de la #banque_mondiale et de #bill_gates, tout passe et devient crédible dans la bouche du pire personnage de l’histoire.
    On se croirait dans le bunker qui abrite la cellule de crise de l’Élysée. Le narratif de ce qu’on vit réellement actuellement.
    Je veux qu’ils se jettent sur le vaccin, comme un passager du Lolita Express lorsqu’il voit passer un enfant.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=5&v=4kfCJjDBGAA

    #propagande #enfumage #manipulation #histoire #médias #vaccins #internet #réseaux_sociaux #médias #merdias #masques #muselière #Didier_Raoult #Lancet #argent #santé #gros_sous #capitalisme #big_pharma #laboratoires_pharmacetiques #confinement #pandémies #pandémie #grippe #covid-19 #coronavirus #panique #big_pharma #épidémie #EnMarche

    • Le Bunker de la dernière rafale

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFbyNaAAfZw

      Le Bunker de la dernière rafale est un court métrage français réalisé par Marc Caro et Jean-Pierre Jeunet, sorti en 1981.

      Synopsis : Une équipe de militaires dérangés est confinée dans un bunker. Lorsque l’un d’eux découvre un compteur qui défile à rebours, tous sont affolés. Que se passera-t-il à la fin du décompte ? C’est dans cette ambiance lourde de tension qu’ils sombreront tous, peu à peu, dans la plus profonde des folies.Métaphore de la peur inconsidérée qu’a l’homme de l’inconnu, le très peu de paroles de ce court-métrage, lui confère une certaine universalité.

      Fiche technique :
      Réalisation : Marc Caro & Jean-Pierre Jeunet
      Scénario : Gilles Adrien, Marc Caro & Jean-Pierre Jeunet
      Production : Zootrope
      Son : Marc Caro
      Photographie : Marc Caro, Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Spot
      Montage : Marc Caro & Jean-Pierre Jeunet
      Pays d’origine : France
      Format : noir et blanc - 1,66:1 - mono - 35 mm
      Genre : court métrage, science-fiction
      Durée : 26 minutes
      Date de sortie : 1981 (France)
      Distribution : Jean-Marie de Busscher - Marc Caro - Patrice Succi - Gilles Adrien - Spot - Vincent Ferniot - Thierry Fournier - Zorin - Eric Caro - Jean-Pierre Jeunet - Bruno Richard - Hervé di Rosa

      #Cinéma #court_métrage

  • VIH & #Banque_mondiale

    Les exigences du #FMI, imposant la restriction des dépenses publiques dans le but de relancer les économies, ont des conséquences graves sur la propagation des épidémies et l’accès aux traitements, tandis que le monopole des firmes pharmaceutiques est rarement remis en question, occasionnant des dépenses absurdes et parfaitement évitables. Malgré les échecs répétés des mesures d’austérité néolibérales et le succès du Portugal, qui a pris la voie opposée, les institutions internationales continuent d’imposer leur carcan, au mépris de la vie des personnes.


    https://vacarme.org/article3193.html

    #VIH #HIV #sida #santé #ViiV_Healthcare #big-pharma #industrie_pharmaceutique #licences_volontaires #médicaments #ajustements_structurels #Argentine #austérité #Roche #La_Roche #Grèce #Portugal #Pfizer #système_de_santé #brevets #médicaments_génériques #sofsbuvir #licence_d'office #évasion_fiscale #pandémie

    • Les effets des politiques d’austérité sur les dépenses et services publics de santé en Europe

      Cet article analyse l’évolution des politiques et des dépenses de santé depuis la grande récession (2008-2009) dans les pays européens. Dans un premier temps, l’article analyse les modalités des réformes et des mesures prises dans le secteur de la santé, en particulier depuis le tournant de l’austérité débuté en 2010, qu’il s’agisse de mesures visant à diminuer directement le volume et le prix des soins au moyen d’une limitation des emplois et des rémunérations dans le secteur de la santé ou à travers des réformes plus « structurelles ». La compression des dépenses publiques de santé a été d’autant plus forte que les mesures ont porté sur le facteur travail. Dans un second temps, l’article documente et analyse l’évolution des dépenses de santé. Si la croissance des dépenses (totales et publiques) de santé a été très peu altérée durant la récession de 2008-2009, une rupture est intervenue dans tous les pays après 2009 (l’Allemagne faisant exception). Certains pays « périphériques » ont connu une baisse des dépenses de santé sans équivalent dans l’histoire contemporaine. L’article conclut sur les limites des politiques d’austérité appliquées au champ de la santé, non pas tant au regard de leurs effets sur le soin ou la situation sanitaire, mais au regard même de leur objectif de réduction des déficits publics. Les travaux montrent que les restrictions opérées dans les dépenses publiques de santé, mais aussi celles en matière d’éducation et de protection sociale, ont des effets récessifs désastreux et s’avèrent inefficaces, ou moins efficaces que des réductions d’autres dépenses publiques.

      https://www.cairn.info/revue-de-l-ires-2017-1-page-17.htm

    • Thread sur twitter :
      https://twitter.com/Disclose_ngo/status/1279049745659559938

      Une enquête de @TBIJ, avec @Disclose_ngo et le @guardian révèle que 2,3 milliards d’euros ont été versés à l’industrie de la viande et du lait par la #BERD et #IFC, deux des principales banques d’aide au développement de @Banquemondiale.

      Principal bénéficiaire des financements de l’IFC et de la BERD : la filière laitière, avec plus de 890 millions d’euros investis en 10 ans. Les filières de la #volaille et du #porc ont obtenu 445 millions d’euros chacune.

      et ses partenaires ont découvert que ces #fonds_publics ont été largement mis au service de l’expansion de #multinationales. Des géants de l’#agrobusiness qui les ont utilisés pour construire des #abattoirs et des « #méga-fermes » industrielles à travers le monde.

      Parmi les bénéficiaires se trouve des poids lourds de l’agroalimentaire français. En 2010, la BERD a pris une participation dans les filiales d’Europe de l’Est et d’Asie centrale du groupe @DanoneFR – 25,3 milliards d’euros de CA en 2019.
      En 2016, c’est le @groupe_lactalis, n°1 mondial du lait, qui obtient un prêt de 15 millions d’euros de la part de la BERD. Les fonds ont bénéficié à #Foodmaster, la filiale de Lactalis au Kazakhstan.

      A l’époque, la #BERD annonce que « ce programme permettra à #Foodmaster d’augmenter la production et la qualité des produits laitiers » locaux. Ces dernières années, #Lactalis a été impliqué dans plusieurs scandales, dont la contamination de lait infantile à la salmonelle en 2017.
      Récemment, l’IFC a validé un prêt de 48M d’euros à la société indienne Suguna, le plus gros fournisseur de volaille du pays et l’un des dix plus gros producteurs mondiaux. En 2016, une ferme de Suguna a été accusée d’utiliser un antibiotique pointé du doigt par l’OMS.

      Autant d’investissements en contradiction avec les engagements de la BERD et de l’IFC en faveur de la lutte contre le changement climatique. Incohérence d’autant plus criante que l’élevage industriel est responsable de près de 15% des émissions de gaz à effets de serre.

      #Danone #France #Lactalis #Kazakhstan #produits_laitiers #lait_infantile #Suguna #antibiotiques

    • Le groupe #Carrefour complice de la #déforestation de l’#Amazonie

      Au #Brésil, les supermarchés Carrefour se fournissent en viande de #bœuf auprès d’un géant de l’agroalimentaire baptisé #Minerva. Une multinationale accusée de participer à la déforestation de l’Amazonie, et qui bénéficie du financement de la Banque mondiale.

      Chaque année, le Brésil exporte près de deux millions de tonnes de viande de boeuf. Pour assurer un tel niveau de production, l’élevage intensif est devenu la norme : partout à travers le pays, des méga-fermes dévorent la forêt amazonienne pour étendre les zones de pâturages.

      L’organisation internationale Trase, spécialisée dans l’analyse des liens entre les chaînes d’approvisionnement et la déforestation, a publié en 2019 une étude indiquant que l’industrie de la viande bovine au Brésil est responsable du massacre de 5 800 km2 de terres chaque année. Cette déforestation massive met en danger la faune et la flore, accélère les dérèglements climatiques et favorise les incendies, souvent localisés dans les zones d’élevage.

      Parmi les géants du bœuf brésilien qui sont aujourd’hui dans le viseur de plusieurs ONG : Minerva. Cette société inconnue en France est l’un des leaders de l’exportation de viande transformée, réfrigérée et congelée vers les marchés du Moyen-Orient, d’Asie ou d’Europe. Selon nos informations, l’un de ses principaux clients n’est autre que le groupe français Carrefour, qui a fait du Brésil son deuxième marché après la France.

      Fin 2019, après les incendies qui ont dévasté l’Amazonie, Noël Prioux, le directeur général de Carrefour au Brésil, s’est fendu d’une lettre à ses fournisseurs brésiliens, dont Minerva. Il souhaitait s’assurer que la viande de bœuf fournie par Minerva, mais aussi JBS et Marfrig, ne provenait pas d’élevages installés dans des zones déboisées. Quelques mois plus tôt, en juin, Carrefour s’était engagé à ce que « 100% de sa viande fraîche brésilienne » soit issue d’élevages non liés à la déforestation.

      Contacté par Disclose, Carrefour qualifie Minerva de fournisseur « occasionnel » au Brésil. Selon un responsable de la communication du groupe, Carrefour Brasil » a demandé à l’ensemble de ses fournisseurs de la filière bœuf un plan d’action pour répondre à l’engagement de lutte contre la déforestation. Dès que le groupe a connaissance de preuves de pratiques de déforestation, il cesse immédiatement d’acheter les produits dudit fournisseur. »

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ACsayFkw_Y&feature=emb_logo

      Le groupe continue pourtant à se fournir en viande bovine auprès de Minerva, mis en cause dans un rapport de Greenpeace Brésil au début du mois de juin. Selon l’ONG, l’entreprise aurait acheté des milliers de bovins à une exploitation appelée « Barra Mansa ». Laquelle est soupçonnée de se fournir auprès d’éleveurs accusés de déforestation. À l’image de la ferme de Paredão, installée dans le Parc national Serra Ricardo, dont la moitié des 4000 hectares de terrain auraient été déboisés illégalement. Barra Mansa, située à quelques kilomètres à peine, y a acheté 2 000 bovins, qui ont été achetés à leur tour par Minerva, le fournisseur de Carrefour au Brésil. Les analyses de données effectuées par Trase indiquent, elles aussi, qu’il existerait un lien direct entre les chaînes d’approvisionnement de Minerva et la déforestation de plus de 100 km2 de terres chaque année ; Minerva conteste ces conclusions.

      Minerva bénéficie du soutien de la Banque mondiale

      En décembre 2019, notre partenaire, The Bureau of Investigative Journalism (TBIJ), et le quotidien britannique The Guardian ont révélé que la Banque mondiale et son bras financier, la Société internationale financière (IFC), soutiennent directement l’activité de Minerva. Une participation financière initiée en 2013, date de la signature d’un prêt de 85 millions de dollars entre Minerva et l’IFC. Objectif affiché à l’époque : « Soutenir [le] développement [de Minerva] au Brésil, au Paraguay, en Uruguay et probablement en Colombie ». En clair, une institution d’aide au développement finance un géant mondial du bœuf soupçonné de participer à la déforestation de l’Amazonie. Le tout, avec de l’argent public.

      Selon des experts de l’ONU interrogés par le BIJ, la Banque mondiale doit absolument reconsidérer ses investissements au sein de Minerva. « Compte tenu de la crise climatique mondiale, la Banque mondiale devrait veiller à ce que tous ses investissements soient respectueux du climat et des droits de l’Homme et doit se retirer des industries qui ne respectent pas ces critères », a déclaré David Boyd, le rapporteur spécial des Nations Unies pour les droits de l’homme et l’environnement. Une position également défendue par son prédécesseur, le professeur de droit international John Knox : « Le financement international de projets contribuant à la déforestation et la détérioration du climat est totalement inexcusable ».

      Contactée, l’IFC explique avoir « investi dans Minerva afin de promouvoir une croissance pérenne (…) dans le but de créer une industrie bovine plus durable ». L’organisation assure que sa participation dans l’entreprise a permis à Minerva de prendre « des mesures pour améliorer la traçabilité de son approvisionnement auprès de ses fournisseurs directs », précisant qu’aujourd’hui « 100 % de ses achats directs proviennent de zones qui n’ont pas été déforestées. » Quid, dès lors, des fournisseurs indirects ? Ceux qui font naître et élèvent les bovins, avant qu’ils n’arrivent aux ranchs qui les enverront à l’abattoir ? Ils constituent de fait le premier maillon de la chaîne d’approvisionnement.

      Taciano Custódio, responsable du développement durable de Minerva, reconnaît lui-même qu’ « à ce jour, aucun des acteurs de l’industrie n’est en mesure de localiser les fournisseurs indirects ». Il en rejette la faute sur l’administration brésilienne et l’absence de réglementation en la matière, tout en justifiant la déforestation : « Les pays d’Amérique du Sud possèdent encore un grand pourcentage de forêts et de terres non défrichées qui peuvent être exploitées légalement et de manière durable. Certains pays invoquent notamment la nécessité d’agrandir leur territoire de production afin de pouvoir développer la santé et l’éducation publiques et investir dans des infrastructures. ».

      Depuis le début de l’année 2020, plus de 12 000km2 de forêt ont disparu. Soit une augmentation de 55% par rapport à l’année dernière sur la même période.

      https://disclose.ngo/fr/news/au-bresil-le-groupe-carrefour-lie-a-la-deforestation-de-lamazonie

  • World Bank reallocates $33.6 million to help Iraq’s fight against COVID-19 - Kurdistan 24

    On Tuesday, the World Bank announced the allocation of $33.6 million as part of its Emergency Operation for Development Project (EODP) in emergency response to assist Iraqi health sector to better fight the COVID-19 pandemic.

    #Covid-19#Iraq#Banque_Mondiale#Soutien_économique#santé#migrant#migration

    https://www.kurdistan24.net/en/news/5c2485c9-cd4b-4009-bff3-f46430f3b105

  • Une partie de l’#aide_au_développement des pays pauvres est détournée vers les paradis fiscaux

    Trois chercheurs ont étudié les #flux_financiers de vingt-deux Etats, dans un rapport publié par la Banque mondiale.

    C’est en découvrant qu’une hausse des #cours_du_pétrole entraînait un afflux de capitaux vers les paradis fiscaux que #Bob_Rijkers, économiste à la #Banque_mondiale, a eu cette idée de recherche : et si l’aide au développement produisait les mêmes effets ? La réponse est oui.

    A la question « Les élites captent-elles l’aide au développement ? », le rapport publié, mardi 18 février, par la Banque mondiale (http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/493201582052636710/pdf/Elite-Capture-of-Foreign-Aid-Evidence-from-Offshore-Bank-Accoun) conclut : « Les versements d’aides vers les pays les plus dépendants coïncident avec une augmentation importante de #transferts vers des #centres_financiers_offshore connus pour leur opacité et leur gestion privée de fortune. »

    Autrement dit, une partie de l’#aide_publique_au_développement dans les pays pauvres est détournée vers les paradis fiscaux. Le #taux_de_fuite présumée s’élève en moyenne à 7,5 %.

    Un article publié, le 13 février, par le magazine britannique The Economist laisse entendre que les hauts responsables de la Banque mondiale n’ont pas franchement apprécié les conclusions des trois chercheurs, dont deux sont indépendants. La publication du #rapport aurait été bloquée, en novembre 2019, par l’état-major de l’institution dont le siège est à Washington, ce qui aurait précipité le départ de son économiste en chef, #Pinelopi_Goldberg, qui a annoncé sa démission, début février, seulement quinze mois après sa nomination.

    « Coïncidence » plutôt qu’un lien de causalité

    « Il est possible que la Banque mondiale l’ait irritée en décidant de bloquer la publication d’une étude de son équipe », écrit The Economist, citant d’autres hypothèses, comme la réorganisation de la Banque, qui place désormais l’économiste en chef sous la tutelle de la nouvelle directrice opérationnelle, Mari Pangestu. Dans le courriel envoyé le 5 février en interne pour annoncer sa démission, et auquel Le Monde a eu accès, Mme Goldberg reconnaît seulement que sa décision était « difficile » à prendre, mais qu’il était temps pour elle de retourner enseigner à l’université américaine de Yale (Connecticut).

    #Niels_Johannesen, l’un des coauteurs de l’étude, qui enseigne à l’université de Copenhague et n’est pas employé à la Banque mondiale, l’a d’abord mise en ligne sur son site Internet, avant de la retirer quelques jours plus tard, afin qu’elle soit modifiée et, finalement, approuvée cette semaine par l’Institution.

    Dans la première version, les auteurs expliquent que les versements d’aides sont la « cause » des transferts d’argent vers les #centres_offshore, tandis que dans la version finale, ils préfèrent évoquer une « #coïncidence » plutôt qu’un #lien_de_causalité. « Les modifications ont été approuvées par les auteurs, et je suis satisfait du résultat final », tient à préciser Niels Johannesen. Dans un communiqué publié, mardi 18 février, la Banque mondiale, qui publie près de 400 études chaque année, explique « prendre très au sérieux la corruption et les risques fiduciaires qui lui sont liés ».

    Les chercheurs ont croisé les données de la #Banque_des_règlements_internationaux (#BRI), à savoir les flux financiers entre les paradis fiscaux et vingt-deux pays pauvres, avec les #déboursements que ces derniers reçoivent de la Banque mondiale. Les deux coïncident sur un intervalle trimestriel. Les pays pauvres qui reçoivent une aide publique au développement équivalente à 1 % de leur produit intérieur brut voient leurs transferts vers les centres offshore augmenter en moyenne de 3 % par rapport à ceux qui ne reçoivent aucune assistance.

    « Elites économiques »

    Les auteurs ont éliminé d’autres hypothèses pouvant expliquer ces transferts massifs. Ils ont vérifié qu’aucun événement exceptionnel, comme une crise économique ou une catastrophe naturelle, ne justifiait une sortie de capitaux plus élevée que d’ordinaire, et ont constaté que cette hausse ne bénéficiait pas à d’autres centres financiers plus transparents, comme l’Allemagne ou la France.

    Vingt-deux pays pauvres, dont une majorité se trouvent en #Afrique, ont été inclus dans l’étude pour donner à l’échantillon une taille suffisamment importante, d’où la difficulté d’en tirer des leçons sur un pays en particulier. Autre limite : les données sont collectées à partir de 1990 et ne vont pas au-delà de 2010. « Certains pays sont réticents à ce que la BRI nous fournisse des données récentes », regrette M. Johannesen.

    Malgré toutes ces limitations, les auteurs de l’étude estiment qu’« il est presque certain que les bénéficiaires de cet argent, envoyé vers les centres offshore au moment où leur pays reçoit une aide au développement, appartiennent à l’élite économique ». Les populations de ces pays pauvres ne détiennent souvent aucun compte bancaire, encore moins à l’étranger.

    https://www.lemonde.fr/economie/article/2020/02/21/dans-les-pays-pauvres-le-versement-de-l-aide-au-developpement-coincide-avec-
    #développement #coopération_au_développement #paradis_fiscaux #corruption #follow_the_money #détournement_d'argent #APD

    signalé par @isskein
    ping @reka @simplicissimus @fil

  • Europe spends billions stopping migration. Good luck figuring out where the money actually goes

    How much money exactly does Europe spend trying to curb migration from Nigeria? And what’s it used for? We tried to find out, but Europe certainly doesn’t make it easy. These flashy graphics show you just how complicated the funding is.
    In a shiny new factory in the Benin forest, a woman named Blessing slices pineapples into rings. Hundreds of miles away, at a remote border post in the Sahara, Abubakar scans travellers’ fingerprints. And in village squares across Nigeria, Usman performs his theatre show about the dangers of travelling to Europe.

    What do all these people have in common?

    All their lives are touched by the billions of euros European governments spend in an effort to curb migration from Africa.

    Since the summer of 2015,
    Read more about the influx of refugees to Europe in 2015 on the UNHCR website.
    when countless boats full of migrants began arriving on the shores of Greece and Italy, Europe has increased migration spending by billions.
    Read my guide to EU migration policy here.
    And much of this money is being spent in Africa.

    Within Europe, the political left and right have very different ways of framing the potential benefits of that funding. Those on the left say migration spending not only provides Africans with better opportunities in their home countries but also reduces migrant deaths in the Mediterranean. Those on the right say migration spending discourages Africans from making the perilous journey to Europe.

    However they spin it, the end result is the same: both left and right have embraced funding designed to reduce migration from Africa. In fact, the European Union (EU) plans to double migration spending under the new 2021-2027 budget, while quadrupling spending on border control.

    The three of us – journalists from Nigeria, Italy and the Netherlands – began asking ourselves: just how much money are we talking here?

    At first glance, it seems like a perfectly straightforward question. Just add up the migration budgets of the EU and the individual member states and you’ve got your answer, right? But after months of research, it turns out that things are nowhere near that simple.

    In fact, we discovered that European migration spending resembles nothing so much as a gigantic plate of spaghetti.

    If you try to tease out a single strand, at least three more will cling to it. Try to find where one strand begins, and you’ll find yourself tangled up in dozens of others.

    This is deeply concerning. Though Europe maintains a pretence of transparency, in practice it’s virtually impossible to hold the EU and its member states accountable for their migration expenditures, let alone assess how effective they are. If a team of journalists who have devoted months to the issue can’t manage it, then how could EU parliament members juggling multiple portfolios ever hope to?

    This lack of oversight is particularly problematic in the case of migration, an issue that ranks high on European political agendas. The subject of migration fuels a great deal of political grandstanding, populist opportunism, and social unrest. And the debate surrounding the issue is rife with misinformation.

    For an issue of this magnitude, it’s crucial to have a clear view of existing policies and to examine whether these policies make sense. But to be able to do that, we need to understand the funding streams: how much money is being spent and what is it being spent on?

    While working on this article, we spoke to researchers and officials who characterised EU migration spending as “opaque”, “unclear” and “chaotic”. We combed through countless websites, official documents, annual reports and budgets, and we submitted freedom of information requests
    in a number of European countries, in Nigeria, and to the European commission. And we discovered that the subject of migration, while not exactly cloak-and-dagger stuff, is apparently sensitive enough that most people preferred to speak off the record.

    Above all, we were troubled by the fact that no one seems to have a clear overview of European migration budgets – and by how painfully characteristic this is of European migration policy as a whole.
    Nigeria – ‘a tough cookie’

    It wasn’t long before we realised that mapping out all European cash flows to all African countries would take us years. Instead, we decided to focus on Nigeria, Africa’s most populous country and the continent’s strongest economy, as well as the country of origin of the largest group of African asylum seekers in the EU. “A tough cookie” in the words of one senior EU official, but also “our most important migration partner in the coming years”.

    But Nigeria wasn’t exactly eager to embrace the role of “most important migration partner”. After all, migration has been a lifeline for Nigeria’s economy: last year, Nigerian migrants living abroad sent home $25bn – roughly 6% of the country’s GNP.

    It took a major European charm offensive to get Nigeria on board – a “long saga” with “more than one tense meeting”, according to a high-ranking EU diplomat we spoke to.

    The European parliament invited Muhammadu Buhari, the Nigerian president, to Strasbourg in 2016. Over the next several years, one European dignitary after another visited Nigeria: from Angela Merkel,
    the German chancellor, to Matteo Renzi,
    the Italian prime minister, to Emmanuel Macron,
    the French president, to Mark Rutte,

    the Dutch prime minister.

    Three guesses as to what they all wanted to talk about.
    ‘No data available’

    But let’s get back to those funding streams.

    The EU would have you believe that everything fits neatly into a flowchart. When asked to respond to this article, the European commission told us: “We take transparency very seriously.” One spokesperson after another, all from various EU agencies, informed us that the information was “freely available online”.

    But as Wilma Haan, director of the Open State Foundation, notes: “Just throwing a bunch of stuff online doesn’t make you transparent. People have to be able to find the information and verify it.”

    Yet that’s exactly what the EU did. The EU foundations and agencies we contacted referred us to dozens of different websites. In some cases, the information was relatively easy to find,
    but in others the data was fragmented or missing entirely. All too often, our searches turned up results such as “data soon available”
    or “no data available”.

    The website of the Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund (AMIF) – worth around €3.1bn – is typical of the problems we faced. While we were able to find a list of projects funded by AMIF online,

    the list only contains the names of the projects – not the countries in which they’re carried out. As a result, there’s only one way to find out what’s going on where: by Googling each of the project names individually.

    This lack of a clear overview has major consequences for the democratic process, says Tineke Strik, member of the European parliament (Green party). Under the guise of “flexibility”, the European parliament has “no oversight over the funds whatsoever”. Strik says: “In the best-case scenario, we’ll discover them listed on the European commission’s website.”

    At the EU’s Nigerian headquarters, one official explained that she does try to keep track of European countries’ migration-related projects to identify “gaps and overlaps”. When asked why this information wasn’t published online, she responded: “It’s something I do alongside my daily work.”
    Getting a feel for Europe’s migration spaghetti

    “There’s no way you’re going to get anywhere with this.”

    This was the response from a Correspondent member who researches government funding when we announced this project several months ago. Not exactly the most encouraging words to start our journey. Still, over the past few months, we’ve done our best to make as much progress as we could.

    Let’s start in the Netherlands, Maite’s home country. When we tried to find out how much Dutch tax money is spent in Nigeria on migration-related issues, we soon found ourselves down yet another rabbit hole.

    The Dutch ministry of foreign affairs, which controls all funding for Dutch foreign policy, seemed like a good starting point. The ministry divides its budget into centralised and decentralised funds. The centralised funds are managed in the Netherlands administrative capital, The Hague, while the decentralised funds are distributed by Dutch embassies abroad.

    Exactly how much money goes to the Dutch embassy in the Nigerian capital Abuja is unclear – no information is available online. When we contacted the embassy, they weren’t able to provide us with any figures, either. According to their press officer, these budgets are “fragmented”, and the total can only be determined at the end of the year.

    The ministry of foreign affairs distributes centralised funds through its departments. But migration is a topic that spans a number of different departments: the department for stabilisation and humanitarian aid (DSH), the security policy department (DVB), the sub-Saharan Africa department (DAF), and the migration policy bureau (BMB), to name just a few. There’s no way of knowing whether each department spends money on migration, let alone how much of it goes to Nigeria.

    Not to mention the fact that other ministries, such as the ministry of economic affairs and the ministry of justice and security, also deal with migration-related issues.

    Next, we decided to check out the Dutch development aid budget
    in the hope it would clear things up a bit. Unfortunately, the budget isn’t organised by country, but by theme. And since migration isn’t one of the main themes, it’s scattered over several different sections. Luckily, the document does contain an annex (https://www.rijksoverheid.nl/documenten/begrotingen/2019/09/17/hgis---nota-homogene-groep-internationale-samenwerking-rijksbegroting-) that goes into more detail about migration.

    In this annex, we found that the Netherlands spends a substantial chunk of money on “migration cooperation”, “reception in the region” and humanitarian aid for refugees.

    And then there’s the ministry of foreign affairs’ Stability Fund,
    the ministry of justice and security’s budget for the processing and repatriation of asylum seekers, and the ministry of education, culture and science’s budget for providing asylum seekers with an education.

    But again, it’s impossible to determine just how much of this funding finds its way to Nigeria. This is partly due to the fact that many migration projects operate in multiple countries simultaneously (in Nigeria, Chad and Cameroon, for example). Regional projects such as this generally don’t share details of how funding is divided up among the participating countries.

    Using data from the Dutch embassy and an NGO that monitors Dutch projects in Nigeria, we found that €6m in aid goes specifically to Nigeria, with another €19m for the region as a whole. Dutch law enforcement also provides in-kind support to help strengthen Nigeria’s border control.

    But hold on, there’s more. We need to factor in the money that the Netherlands spends on migration through its contributions to the EU.

    The Netherlands pays hundreds of millions into the European Development Fund (EDF), which is partly used to finance migration projects. Part of that money also gets transferred to another EU migration fund: the EUTF for Africa.
    The Netherlands also contributes directly to this fund.

    But that’s not all. The Netherlands also gives (either directly or through the EU) to a variety of other EU funds and agencies that finance migration projects in Nigeria. And just as in the Netherlands, these EU funds and agencies are scattered over many different offices. There’s no single “EU ministry of migration”.

    To give you a taste of just how convoluted things can get: the AMIF falls under the EU’s home affairs “ministry”

    (DG HOME), the Development Cooperation Instrument (DCI) falls under the “ministry” for international cooperation and development (DG DEVCO), and the Instrument contributing to Stability and Peace (IcSP) falls under the European External Action Service (EEAS). The EU border agency, Frontex, is its own separate entity, and there’s also a “ministry” for humanitarian aid (DG ECHO).

    Still with me?

    Because this was just the Netherlands.

    Now let’s take a look at Giacomo’s country of origin, Italy, which is also home to one of Europe’s largest Nigerian communities (surpassed only by the UK).

    Italy’s ministry of foreign affairs funds the Italian Agency for Development Cooperation (AICS), which provides humanitarian aid in north-eastern Nigeria, where tens of thousands of people have been displaced by the Boko Haram insurgency. AICS also finances a wide range of projects aimed at raising awareness of the risks of illegal migration. It’s impossible to say how much of this money ends up in Nigeria, though, since the awareness campaigns target multiple countries at once.

    This data is all available online – though you’ll have to do some digging to find it. But when it comes to the funds managed by Italy’s ministry of the interior, things start to get a bit murkier. Despite the ministry having signed numerous agreements on migration with African countries in recent years, there’s little trace of the money online. Reference to a €92,000 donation for new computers for Nigeria’s law enforcement and immigration services was all we could find.

    Things get even more complicated when we look at Italy’s “Africa Fund”, which was launched in 2017 to foster cooperation with “priority countries along major migration routes”. The fund is jointly managed by the ministry of foreign affairs and the ministry of the interior.

    Part of the money goes to the EUTF for Africa, but the fund also contributes to United Nations (UN) organisations, such as the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and the International Organization for Migration (IOM), as well as to the Italian ministry of defence and the ministry of economy and finance.

    Like most European governments, Italy also contributes to EU funds and agencies concerned with migration, such as Frontex, Europol, and the European Asylum Support Office (EASO).

    And then there are the contributions to UN agencies that deal with migration: UNHCR, the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), IOM, the UN Development Programme (UNDP), and the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), to name just a few.

    Now multiply all of this by the number of European countries currently active in Nigeria. Oh, and let’s not forget the World Bank,

    which has only recently waded into the waters of the migration industry.

    And then there are the European development banks. And the EU’s External Investment Plan, which was launched in 2016 with the ambitious goal of generating €44bn in private investments in developing countries, with a particular focus on migrants’ countries of origin. Not to mention the regional “migration dialogues”
    organised in west Africa under the Rabat Process and the Cotonou Agreement.

    This is the European migration spaghetti.
    How we managed to compile a list nonetheless

    By now, one thing should be clear: there are a staggering number of ministries, funds and departments involved in European migration spending. It’s no wonder that no one in Europe seems to have a clear overview of the situation. But we thought that maybe, just maybe, there was one party that might have the overview we seek: Nigeria. After all, the Nigerian government has to be involved in all the projects that take place there, right?

    We decided to ask around in Nigeria’s corridors of power. Was anyone keeping track of European migration funding? The Ministry of Finance? Or maybe the Ministry of the Interior, or the Ministry of Labour and Employment?

    Nope.

    We then tried asking Nigeria’s anti-trafficking agency (NAPTIP), the Nigeria Immigration Service (NIS), the Nigerians in Diaspora Commission, and the National Commission for Refugees, Migrants and Internally Displaced Persons (NCFRMI).

    No luck there, either. When it comes to migration, things are just as fragmented under the Nigerian government as they are in Europe.

    In the meantime, we contacted each of the European embassies in Nigeria.
    This proved to be the most fruitful approach and yielded the most complete lists of projects. The database of the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI)
    was particularly useful in fleshing out our overview.

    So does that mean our list is now complete? Probably not.

    More to the point: the whole undertaking is highly subjective, since there’s no official definition of what qualifies as a migration project and what doesn’t.

    For example, consider initiatives to create jobs for young people in Nigeria. Would those be development projects or trade projects? Or are they actually migration projects (the idea being that young people wouldn’t migrate if they could find work)?

    What about efforts to improve border control in northern Nigeria? Would they fall under counterterrorism? Security? Institutional development? Or is this actually a migration-related issue?

    Each country has its own way of categorising projects.

    There’s no single, unified standard within the EU.

    When choosing what to include in our own overview, we limited ourselves to projects that European countries themselves designated as being migration related.

    While it’s certainly not perfect, this overview allows us to draw at least some meaningful conclusions about three key issues: where the money is going, where it isn’t going, and what this means for Nigeria.
    1) Where is the money going?

    In Nigeria, we found

    If you’d like to work with the data yourself, feel free to download the full overview here.
    50 migration projects being funded by 11 different European countries, as well as 32 migration projects that rely on EU funding. Together, they amount to more than €770m in funding.

    Most of the money from Brussels is spent on improving Nigerian border control:
    more than €378m. For example, the European Investment Bank has launched a €250m initiative

    to provide all Nigerians with biometric identity cards.

    The funding provided by individual countries largely goes to projects aimed at creating employment opportunities

    in Nigeria: at least €92m.

    Significantly, only €300,000 is spent on creating more legal opportunities to migrate – less than 0.09% of all funding.

    We also found 47 “regional” projects that are not limited to Nigeria, but also include other countries.
    Together, they amount to more than €775m in funding.
    Regional migration spending is mainly focused on migrants who have become stranded in transit and is used to return them home and help them to reintegrate when they get there. Campaigns designed to raise awareness of the dangers of travelling to Europe also receive a relatively large proportion of funding in the region.

    2) Where isn’t the money going?

    When we look at the list of institutions – or “implementing agencies”, as they’re known in policy speak – that receive money from Europe, one thing immediately stands out: virtually none of them are Nigerian organisations.

    “The EU funds projects in Nigeria, but that money doesn’t go directly to Nigerian organisations,” says Charles Nwanelo, head of migration at the NCFRMI.

    See their website here.
    “Instead, it goes to international organisations, such as the IOM, which use the money to carry out projects here. This means we actually have no idea how much money the EU is spending in Nigeria.”

    We hear the same story again and again from Nigerian government officials: they never see a cent of European funding, as it’s controlled by EU and UN organisations. This is partially a response to corruption within Nigerian institutions – Europe feels it can keep closer tabs on its money by channelling it through international organisations. As a result, these organisations are growing rapidly in Nigeria. To get an idea of just how rapidly: the number of people working for the IOM in Nigeria has more than quadrupled over the past two years.

    Of course, this doesn’t mean that Nigerian organisations are going unfunded. Implementing agencies are free to pass funding along to Nigerian groups. For example, the IOM hires Nigerian NGOs to provide training for returning migrants and sponsors a project that provides training and new software to the Nigerian immigration service.

    Nevertheless, the system has inevitably led to the emergence of a parallel aid universe in which the Nigerian government plays only a supporting role. “The Nigerian parliament should demand to see an overview of all current and upcoming projects being carried out in their country every three months,” says Bob van Dillen, migration expert at development organisation Cordaid.

    But that would be “difficult”, according to one German official we spoke to, because “this isn’t a priority for the Nigerian government. This is at the top of Europe’s agenda, not Nigeria’s.”

    Most Nigerian migrants to Europe come from Edo state, where the governor has been doing his absolute best to compile an overview of all migration projects. He set up a task force that aims to coordinate migration activities in his state. The task force has been largely unsuccessful because the EU doesn’t provide it with any direct funding and doesn’t require member states to cooperate with it.

    3) What are the real-world consequences for Nigeria?

    We’ve established that the Nigerian government isn’t involved in allocating migration spending and that local officials are struggling to keep tabs on things. So who is coordinating all those billions in funding?

    Each month, the European donors and implementing agencies mentioned above meet at the EU delegation to discuss their migration projects. However, diplomats from multiple European countries have told us that no real coordination takes place at these meetings. No one checks to see whether projects conflict or overlap. Instead, the meetings are “more on the basis of letting each other know”, as one diplomat put it.

    One German official noted: “What we should do is look together at what works, what doesn’t, and which lessons we can learn from each other. Not to mention how to prevent people from shopping around from project to project.”

    Other diplomats consider this too utopian and feel that there are far too many players to make that level of coordination feasible. In practice, then, it seems that chaotic funding streams inevitably lead to one thing: more chaos.
    And we’ve only looked at one country ...

    That giant plate of spaghetti we just sifted through only represents a single serving – other countries have their own versions of Nigeria’s migration spaghetti. Alongside Nigeria, the EU has also designated Mali, Senegal, Ethiopia and Niger as “priority countries”. The EU’s largest migration fund, the EUTF, finances projects in 26 different African countries. And the sums of money involved are only going to increase.

    When we first started this project, our aim was to chart a path through the new European zeal for funding. We wanted to track the flow of migration money to find answers to some crucial questions: will this funding help Nigerians make better lives for themselves in their own country? Will it help reduce the trafficking of women? Will it provide more safe, legal ways for Nigerians to travel to Europe?

    Or will it primarily go towards maintaining the international aid industry? Does it encourage corruption? Does it make migrants even more vulnerable to exploitation along the way?

    But we’re still far from answering these questions. Recently, a new study by the UNDP

    called into question “the notion that migration can be prevented or significantly reduced through programmatic and policy responses”.

    Nevertheless, European programming and policy responses will only increase in scope in the coming years.

    But the more Europe spends on migration, the more tangled the spaghetti becomes and the harder it gets to check whether funds are being spent wisely. With the erosion of transparency comes the erosion of democratic oversight.

    So to anyone who can figure out how to untangle the spaghetti, we say: be our guest.

    https://thecorrespondent.com/154/europe-spends-billions-stopping-migration-good-luck-figuring-out-where-the-money-actually-goes/171168048128-fac42704
    #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Nigeria #EU #EU #Union_européenne #externalisation #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #Frontex #Trust_fund #Pays-Bas #argent #transparence (manque de - ) #budget #remittances #AMIF #développement #aide_au_développement #European_Development_Fund (#EDF) #EUTF_for_Africa #European_Neighbourhood_Instrument (#ENI) #Development_Cooperation_Instrument (#DCI) #Italie #Banque_mondiale #External_Investment_Plan #processus_de_rabat #accords_de_Cotonou #biométrie #carte_d'identité_biométrique #travail #développement #aide_au_développement #coopération_au_développement #emploi #réintégration #campagnes #IOM #OIM

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation des frontières :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749
    Et ajouté à la métaliste développement/migrations :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733358

    ping @isskein @isskein @pascaline @_kg_

    • Résumé en français par Jasmine Caye (@forumasile) :

      Pour freiner la migration en provenance d’Afrique les dépenses européennes explosent

      Maite Vermeulen est une journaliste hollandaise, cofondatrice du site d’information The Correspondent et spécialisée dans les questions migratoires. Avec deux autres journalistes, l’italien Giacomo Zandonini (Italie) et le nigérian Ajibola Amzat, elle a tenté de comprendre les raisons derrières la flambée des dépenses européennes sensées freiner la migration en provenance du continent africain.

      Depuis le Nigéria, Maite Vermeulen s’est intéressée aux causes de la migration nigériane vers l’Europe et sur les milliards d’euros déversés dans les programmes humanitaires et sécuritaires dans ce pays. Selon elle, la politique sécuritaire européenne n’empêchera pas les personnes motivées de tenter leur chance pour rejoindre l’Europe. Elle constate que les fonds destinés à freiner la migration sont toujours attribués aux mêmes grandes organisations gouvernementales ou non-gouvernementales. Les financements européens échappent aussi aux évaluations d’impact permettant de mesurer les effets des aides sur le terrain.

      Le travail de recherche des journalistes a duré six mois et se poursuit. Il est financé par Money Trail un projet qui soutient des journalistes africains, asiatiques et européens pour enquêter en réseau sur les flux financiers illicites et la corruption en Afrique, en Asie et en Europe.

      Les Nigérians ne viennent pas en Europe pour obtenir l’asile

      L’équipe a d’abord tenté d’élucider cette énigme : pourquoi tant de nigérians choisissent de migrer vers l’Europe alors qu’ils n’obtiennent quasiment jamais l’asile. Le Nigéria est un pays de plus de 190 millions d’habitants et l’économie la plus riche d’Afrique. Sa population représente le plus grand groupe de migrants africains qui arrivent en Europe de manière irrégulière. Sur les 180 000 migrants qui ont atteint les côtes italiennes en 2016, 21% étaient nigérians. Le Nigéria figure aussi régulièrement parmi les cinq premiers pays d’origine des demandeurs d’asile de l’Union européenne. Près de 60% des requérants nigérians proviennent de l’Etat d’Edo dont la capitale est Bénin City. Pourtant leurs chance d’obtenir un statut de protection sont minimes. En effet, seuls 9% des demandeurs d’asile nigérians reçoivent l’asile dans l’UE. Les 91% restants sont renvoyés chez eux ou disparaissent dans la nature.

      Dans l’article Want to make sense of migration ? Ask the people who stayed behind, Maite Vermeulen explique que Bénin City a été construite grâce aux nigérians travaillant illégalement en Italie. Et les femmes sont peut-être bien à l’origine d’un immense trafic de prostituées. Elle nous explique ceci :

      “Pour comprendre le présent, il faut revenir aux années 80. À cette époque, des entreprises italiennes étaient établies dans l’État d’Edo. Certains hommes d’affaires italiens ont épousé des femmes de Benin City, qui sont retournées en Italie avec leur conjoint. Ils ont commencé à exercer des activités commerciales, à commercialiser des textiles, de la dentelle et du cuir, de l’or et des bijoux. Ces femmes ont été les premières à faire venir d’autres femmes de leur famille en Italie – souvent légalement, car l’agriculture italienne avait cruellement besoin de travailleurs pour cueillir des tomates et des raisins. Mais lorsque, à la fin des années 80, la chute des prix du pétrole a plongé l’économie nigériane à l’arrêt, beaucoup de ces femmes d’affaires ont fait faillite. Les femmes travaillant dans l’agriculture ont également connu une période difficile : leur emploi est allé à des ouvriers d’Europe de l’Est. Ainsi, de nombreuses femmes Edo en Italie n’avaient qu’une seule alternative : la prostitution. Ce dernier recours s’est avéré être lucratif. En peu de temps, les femmes ont gagné plus que jamais auparavant. Elles sont donc retournées à Benin City dans les années 1990 avec beaucoup de devises européennes – avec plus d’argent, en fait, que beaucoup de gens de leur ville n’en avaient jamais vu. Elles ont construit des appartements pour gagner des revenus locatifs. Ces femmes étaient appelées « talos », ou mammas italiennes. Tout le monde les admirait. Les jeunes femmes les considéraient comme des modèles et voulaient également aller en Europe. Certains chercheurs appellent ce phénomène la « théorie de la causalité cumulative » : chaque migrant qui réussit entraîne plus de personnes de sa communauté à vouloir migrer. A cette époque, presque personne à Benin City ne savait d’où venait exactement l’argent. Les talos ont commencé à prêter de l’argent aux filles de leur famille afin qu’elles puissent également se rendre en Italie. Ce n’est que lorsque ces femmes sont arrivées qu’on leur a dit comment elles devaient rembourser le prêt. Certaines ont accepté, d’autres ont été forcées. Toutes gagnaient de l’argent. Dans les premières années, le secret des mammas italiennes était gardé au sein de la famille. Mais de plus en plus de femmes ont payé leurs dettes – à cette époque, cela prenait environ un an ou deux – et elles ont ensuite décidé d’aller chercher de l’argent elles-mêmes. En tant que « Mamas », elles ont commencé à recruter d’autres femmes dans leur ville natale. Puis, lentement, l’argent a commencé à manquer à Benin City : un grand nombre de leurs femmes travaillaient dans l’industrie du sexe en Italie.”

      Aujourd’hui, l’Union européenne considère le Nigéria comme son plus important “partenaire migratoire”et depuis quelques années les euros s’y déversent à flots afin de financer des programmes des sécurisation des frontières, de création d’emploi, de lutte contre la traite d’être humains et des programmes de sensibilisation sur les dangers de la migration vers l’Europe.
      Le “cartel migratoire” ou comment peu d’organisation monopolisent les projets sur le terrain

      Dans un autre article intitulé A breakdown of Europe’s € 1.5 billion migration spending in Nigeria, les journalistes se demandent comment les fonds européens sont alloués au Nigéria. Encore une fois on parle ici des projets destinés à freiner la migration. En tout ce sont 770 millions d’euros investis dans ces “projets migration”. En plus, le Nigéria bénéficie d’autres fonds supplémentaires à travers les “projets régionaux” qui s’élèvent à 775 millions d’euros destinés principalement à coordonner et organiser les retours vers les pays d’origines. Mais contrairement aux engagements de l’Union européenne les fonds alloués aux projets en faveur de la migration légale sont très inférieurs aux promesses et représentent 0.09% des aides allouées au Nigéria.

      A qui profitent ces fonds ? Au “cartel migratoire” constitué du Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés (HCR), de l’Organisation internationale des migrations (OIM), de l’UNICEF, de l’Organisation internationale du travail (OIL), de l’Organisation internationale des Nations Unies contre la drogue et le crime (UNODC). Ces organisations récoltent près de 60% des fonds alloués par l’Union européenne aux “projets migration” au Nigéria et dans la région. Les ONG et les consultants privés récupèrent 13% du total des fonds alloués, soit 89 millions d’euros, le double de ce qu’elles reçoivent en Europe.
      Les montants explosent, la transparence diminue

      Où va vraiment l’argent et comment mesurer les effets réels sur les populations ciblées. Quels sont les impacts de ces projets ? Depuis 2015, l’Europe a augmenté ses dépenses allouées à la migration qui s’élèvent désormais à plusieurs milliards.

      La plus grande partie de ces fonds est attribuée à l’Afrique. Dans l’article Europe spends billions stopping migration. Good luck figuring out where the money actually goes, Maite Vermeulen, Ajibola Amzat et Giacomo Zandonini expliquent que l’UE prévoit de doubler ces dépenses dans le budget 2021-2027 et quadrupler les dépenses sur le contrôle des frontières.

      Des mois de recherche n’ont pas permis de comprendre comment étaient alloués les fonds pour la migration. Les sites internet sont flous et de nombreux bureaucrates européens se disent incapables concilier les dépenses car la transparence fait défaut. Difficile de comprendre l’allocation précise des fonds de l’Union européenne et celle des fonds des Etats européens. Le tout ressemble, selon les chercheurs, à un immense plat de spaghettis. Ils se posent une question importante : si eux n’y arrivent pas après des mois de recherche comment les députés européens pourraient s’y retrouver ? D’autres chercheurs et fonctionnaires européens qualifient les dépenses de migration de l’UE d’opaques. La consultation de nombreux sites internet, documents officiels, rapports annuels et budgets, et les nombreuses demandes d’accès à l’information auprès de plusieurs pays européens actifs au Nigéria ainsi que les demandes d’explications adressées à la Commission européenne n’ont pas permis d’arriver à une vision globale et précise des budgets attribués à la politique migratoire européenne. Selon Tineke Strik, député vert au parlement européen, ce manque de clarté a des conséquences importantes sur le processus démocratique, car sans vision globale précise, il n’y a pas vraiment de surveillance possible sur les dépenses réelles ni sur l’impact réel des programmes sur le terrain.

      https://thecorrespondent.com/154/europe-spends-billions-stopping-migration-good-luck-figuring-out-where-the-money-actually-goes/102663569008-2e2c2159

  • #Georges_Corm. La mainmise du #FMI et de la #Banque_mondiale se rapproche
    http://magazine.com.lb/index.php/fr/component/k2/item/19346-georges-corm-la-mainmise-du-fmi-et-de-la-banque-mondiale-se-rappr

    La sortie de crise qui se rapproche c’est la mainmise du FMI et de la Banque mondiale et encore plus de politique d’#austérité, ce qui réduit d’autant plus les recettes de l’Etat. Les conférences de Paris I, Paris II, Paris III, Paris IV ont contribué à engager l’économie libanaise dans la mauvaise voie

    Les manifestants réclament la démission du gouvernement et la constitution d’un gouvernement de #technocrates susceptibles de sauver l’économie. Qu’en pensez-vous ?
    Un gouvernement technocrate est un mythe, pas une solution. Derrière les technocrates, il y a toujours un #politique.

    #Liban

    • Comment évaluez-vous le plan de sauvetage de Saad Hariri, sa sortie de crise ?

      On continue dans les mêmes errements et dans les mêmes politiques économiques absolument absurdes, avec cette future source de gaspillage et d’endettement qui s’appelle CEDRE et qui ne va qu’aggraver la mainmise de certains pays occidentaux qui prétendent nous aider sur le plan économique. Ça suffit de faire des investissements, il faut d’abord améliorer les investissements existants, et non pas chercher à gaspiller de l’argent dans des projets où les entrepreneurs de travaux publics s’en mettront plein les poches. CEDRE, ce ne sont que des emprunts.

      CEDRE n’est que l’un des points du plan. Ne pensez-vous pas que 0,63% de déficit et un budget sans taxes ni impôts sont de bonnes mesures ?

      Je peux vous faire un budget dans lequel j’ai du surplus budgétaire alors qu’en réalité je sais très bien que je vais faire du déficit. On peut toujours réduire le déficit artificiellement dans le projet de budget. Nous avons un ministre des Finances très fantaisiste qui est dictateur dans son ministère. C’est un très grave problème d’affermer le ministère des Finances à un des principaux partis connus pour ses gaspillages et sa mauvaise gestion.

      Que pensez-vous du volet privatisations du plan ?

      C’est appauvrir l’Etat complètement, alors que la seconde source de revenus de l’Etat provient des télécoms. Si on veut encore plus affaiblir l’Etat, on les privatise.

      Vous ne croyez pas à ce plan donc ?

      Ce n’est même pas un plan. Un plan doit être réfléchi, avec une bonne connaissance de l’économie, de ce qu’il faut réformer à l’intérieur de l’économie. C’est la domination du néo-libéralisme avec des gens qui ont plein de prétextes pour s’en mettre plein les poches. On a un gouvernement autiste qui n’a rien changé à sa politique économique, comme un train aveugle.

    • En revanche, pas un mot sur l’apparent dépassement du confessionnalisme par ces immenses manifestations qui ont eu lieu partout et par toutes les confessions, ce qui est tout de même un élément inédit, pour que le peuple libanais puisse enfin peser (en tant qu’ensemble de citoyens, et non de sujets confessionnels) sur les orientations politiques.

  • La Banque mondiale tire la sonnette d’alarme sur la pollution de l’eau

    La qualité de l’eau, polluée par les nitrates, les métaux lourds et
    les microplastiques, est devenue « une crise invisible » qui touche
    pays riches comme pays pauvres, s’alarme la Banque mondiale dans un rapport publié mardi.

    « Cette mauvaise qualité de l’eau peut coûter jusqu’à un tiers de la
    croissance économique potentielle dans les régions les plus touchées, affirme l’institution de développement.

    Son président, David Malpass, a appelé les gouvernements « à prendre des mesures urgentes pour s’attaquer à la pollution de l’eau afin que les pays puissent croître plus vite d’une façon plus durable et équitable ».

    Pays riches comme pays pauvres subissent de hauts niveaux de pollution de l’eau, rappelle le rapport publié mardi, intitulé Qualité inconnue : « Il est clair que le statut de pays à haut revenu n’immunise pas contre des problèmes de qualité de l’eau. »

    – Lire la suite de l’article de Virginie Montet - Agence France-Presse
    à Washington sur le site du quotidien Canadien Le Devoir, 21 août
    2019 ;

    https://www.ledevoir.com/societe/environnement/560999/la-banque-mondiale-tire-la-sonnette-d-alarme-sur-la-pollution-de-l-eau-une

    • @reka pour la photo

      Même la Banque Mondiale ?! OK, alors je l’ajoute à la troisième compilation :
      https://seenthis.net/messages/680147

      #effondrement #collapsologie #catastrophe #fin_du_monde #it_has_begun #Anthropocène #capitalocène
      –---------------------------------------------------------
      Le texte en entier pour éviter le 1/2 #paywall :

      La Banque mondiale tire la sonnette d’alarme sur la pollution de l’eau
      Virginie Montet, Le Devoir, le 21 août 2019

      La qualité de l’eau, polluée par les nitrates, les métaux lourds et les microplastiques, est devenue « une crise invisible » qui touche pays riches comme pays pauvres, s’alarme la Banque mondiale dans un rapport publié mardi.

      Cette mauvaise qualité de l’eau peut coûter jusqu’à un tiers de la croissance économique potentielle dans les régions les plus touchées, affirme l’institution de développement.

      Son président, David Malpass, a appelé les gouvernements « à prendre des mesures urgentes pour s’attaquer à la pollution de l’eau afin que les pays puissent croître plus vite d’une façon plus durable et équitable ».

      Pays riches comme pays pauvres subissent de hauts niveaux de pollution de l’eau, rappelle le rapport publié mardi, intitulé Qualité inconnue : « Il est clair que le statut de pays à haut revenu n’immunise pas contre des problèmes de qualité de l’eau. »

      « Non seulement une diminution de la pollution ne va pas de pair avec la croissance économique, mais l’éventail de polluants tend à augmenter avec la prospérité d’un pays », note le document.

      Ainsi, aux États-Unis, un millier de nouveaux produits chimiques sont déversés dans l’environnement chaque année, soit trois nouveaux types de produits chaque jour.

      La Banque mondiale appelle dans ce rapport à mieux savoir mesurer la qualité de l’eau dans le monde et à ce que cette information soit systématiquement diffusée au public. « Les citoyens ne peuvent pas agir s’ils ne sont pas informés de la situation », dit le rapport.

      Il rappelle que plus de 80 % des eaux usées dans le monde — 95 % dans certains pays en développement — sont déversées dans l’environnement sans être traitées.

      « Peu de pays en développement surveillent correctement la qualité de l’eau », déplorent aussi les auteurs.

      La Banque mondiale estime qu’il y a « un besoin urgent pour d’importants investissements dans des usines de traitement des eaux, spécialement dans les régions très peuplées ».

      Parmi les polluants les plus répandus et dangereux, le rapport cite l’azote qui, utilisé dans les fertilisants pour l’agriculture, se répand dans les rivières, les lacs et les océans, se transformant en nitrates. Ceux-ci sont responsables d’une destruction de l’oxygène dans l’eau (hypoxie) et de l’apparition de zones mortes.

      Les dépôts d’azote oxydé peuvent être fatals aux enfants, affirme le rapport, comme dans le cas du syndrome du bébé bleu, où trop de nitrates ingérés par l’eau potable entraînent un manque d’oxygène dans le sang.

      Une étude menée dans 33 pays en Afrique, en Inde et au Vietnam a montré que les enfants exposés à de hauts niveaux de nitrates pendant leurs trois premières années grandissaient moins.

      « Une interprétation de ces conclusions suggère que les subventions pour financer les engrais entraînent des dommages pour la santé humaine qui sont aussi grands, peut-être même plus grands, que les bénéfices qu’ils apportent à l’agriculture », ajoute le rapport.

      La salinité des eaux dans les zones côtières de faible altitude, sur des terres irriguées et en zone urbaine, a aussi des impacts nocifs pour la santé, notamment celle des enfants et des femmes enceintes.

      Le problème est particulièrement aigu au Bangladesh, où 20 % de la mortalité infantile dans les régions côtières est attribuée à l’eau salée.

      La pollution par les microplastiques est aussi détectée désormais dans 80 % des sources naturelles, 81 % des eaux du robinet municipales et dans 93 % des eaux embouteillées, relève encore la Banque mondiale. Elle regrette qu’on ne dispose pas encore de suffisamment d’informations pour déterminer le seuil à partir duquel ces polluants sont inquiétants pour la santé.

      Au rang des polluants dangereux figurent aussi les métaux lourds comme l’arsenic, qui contamine les eaux de régions où il y a une activité minière comme au Bengale — en Inde —, dans le nord du Chili ou en Argentine.

      Le plomb en fait partie avec « l’exemple grave et récent de Flint au Michigan » (nord des États-Unis). En 2014, en changeant son approvisionnement en eau à partir de la rivière Flint au lieu du lac Huron, la ville a utilisé une eau plus acide qui a corrodé les tuyaux de plomb, exposant la population à une intoxication à ce métal. Chez les enfants, le plomb peut altérer le développement du cerveau.

  • Suite mexicaine (III)

    Georges Lapierre

    https://lavoiedujaguar.net/Suite-mexicaine-III

    La guerre sociale au Mexique
    Première partie : un survol de la question

    La guerre sociale apparaît comme une constance de la vie mexicaine, elle n’est pas la « révolution qui vient », elle est un acharnement : acharnement à défendre ce qui a été construit dans l’ombre, acharnement à reconstruire une vie sociale entre les uns et les autres. Cette vie sociale qui s’est construite dans les marges de la civilisation de l’argent se trouve menacée par l’irrésistible ascension de la civilisation de l’argent. Ce mouvement irrépressible de la domination est en passe de coloniser les derniers noyaux, les derniers bastions, de la vie communale, d’une vie sociale autonome reposant sur la réciprocité et non sur la séparation entre ceux qui auraient la pensée dans sa fonction sociale (les capitalistes) et ceux qui en seraient dépossédés — vaste histoire de l’humanité à laquelle j’ai consacré par ailleurs quelques notes brouillonnes.

    Cette extension de la civilisation de l’argent, qui est la forme qu’a pu prendre le mouvement de la domination à son apogée, a pris des proportions énormes, à tel point qu’elle a suscité des réactions et des guerres à caractère religieux avec le fondamentalisme musulman ; pourtant la religion des clercs est déjà l’expression d’une pensée séparée, un moment de l’aliénation, et, en ce sens, facilement récupérable, quand elle ne se présente pas comme l’avant-garde du mouvement de la domination et de la séparation. (...)

    #Mexique #domination #aliénation #capitalisme #Taibo_II #États-Unis #banques #dette #FMI #Banque_mondiale #Chiapas #Oaxaca #résistance

    • https://www.lorientlejour.com/article/1174205/un-hydrogeologue-repond-au-cdr-pourquoi-stocker-de-leau-superficielle

      Dans le feuilleton à rebondissements de la construction du barrage de Bisri (la vallée entre Jezzine et le Chouf), un nouvel épisode vient de s’inscrire avec une réponse du Conseil du développement et de la reconstruction à des détracteurs du barrage après une éruption violente d’eau souterraine lors de la construction d’un puits destiné au village de Chehim dans l’Iqlim el-Kharroub. Le creusement d’un des puits s’était heurté à une couche de roches calcaires fissurées et fracturées, parcourues de zones caverneuses et de cours d’eau, ce qui a endommagé la structure en cours, selon les informations de l’hydrogéologue Samir Zaatiti à L’Orient-Le Jour. Les détracteurs du barrage, dont il fait partie, se demandent pourquoi stocker une si grande quantité d’eau venue d’ailleurs quand la région est si riche en eau souterraine accessible, d’autant plus que le sous-sol de la vallée pourrait ne pas supporter un poids si considérable.

      Le barrage de Bisri, rappelons-le, sera conçu pour stocker 125 millions de mètres cubes d’eau. Le projet devrait être exécuté par le CDR sur six millions de mètres carrés, pour un budget de plus de 1,2 milliard de dollars assurés par un prêt de la Banque mondiale. Il rencontre une vive opposition de la part des écologistes comme des habitants de la région : les détracteurs du barrage font valoir qu’il s’agit d’une vallée d’une grande beauté, dotée d’une biodiversité impressionnante et renfermant des vestiges historiques de première importance. De plus, ils invoquent tour à tour le fait que la vallée est traversée par l’une des failles géologiques les plus importantes du pays, mais aussi qu’elle possède un système d’eau souterraine qui aurait permis une exploitation différente, moins coûteuse pour l’environnement.

      La réponse du CDR à ces avis contraires, notamment après l’épisode du puits, s’est concentrée à démontrer que « le barrage de Bisri est la meilleure solution technique et économique pour assurer de l’eau au Grand Beyrouth » et que « s’il fallait assurer la même quantité d’eau par les puits, il faudrait en creuser 200, ce qui n’est pas justifiable étant donné le coût que cela impliquerait ». Le CDR assure qu’il n’est pas étonnant que l’eau ait jailli à l’endroit du puits en question, puisque toutes les études avaient montré la richesse de l’endroit en eaux souterraines. « Il ne sert à rien de dire que le niveau élevé de l’eau souterraine est un argument en faveur des détracteurs du barrage, puisque ce fait a toujours été connu », poursuit le communiqué.

      Pour ce qui est des roches fissurées et des grands vides de centaines de mètres sous terre, « il s’agit d’allégations sorties droit de l’imagination de certains », poursuit le texte. « Le travail sur ces puits se poursuivra puisque le niveau élevé constaté actuellement est dû à l’intensité des précipitations cette année et qu’il devrait baisser durant la période d’étiage ou lors de saisons plus sèches », souligne également le CDR. Il précise également que ce projet de creuser quatre puits ainsi que de construire une station de pompage fait partie du projet du barrage et qu’il servira à assurer une quantité supplémentaire d’eau en cas de besoin, le barrage devant également alimenter le caza de Jezzine et l’Iqlim el-Kharroub

  • Pauvreté: la misère des indicateurs

    Alors que l’#ONU s’était félicitée de la diminution de l’#extrême_pauvreté de moitié, la pauvreté, elle, aurait au contraire augmenté depuis 1990. Tout dépend des critères retenus.

    Eradiquer l’extrême pauvreté et réduire de moitié la pauvreté dans le monde. Tels sont les deux premiers buts que se sont fixés les Nations Unies d’ici à 2030 dans le cadre des Objectifs du développement durable (#Agenda_2030). Est-ce réaliste ? Tout dépend de la façon dont seront calculés les résultats !

    En 2015, l’ONU avait annoncé avoir atteint sa cible fixée en l’an 2000 : l’extrême pauvreté avait été réduite de moitié. Pourtant, son mode de calcul est largement contesté aujourd’hui. Non seulement, il n’est pas aisé de mesurer la pauvreté, mais la méthode choisie peut répondre avant tout à des considérations idéologiques et politiques.

    Selon le multimilliardaire #Bill_Gates, s’appuyant sur les chiffres de l’ONU, le monde n’a jamais été meilleur qu’aujourd’hui. Selon d’autres voix critiques, la pauvreté a en réalité progressé depuis les années 1980. Où est la vérité ?

    Le Courrier a voulu en savoir davantage en interrogeant #Sabin_Bieri, chercheuse au Centre pour le développement et l’environnement de l’université de Berne. La spécialiste était invitée récemment à Genève dans le cadre d’une table ronde consacrée à la lutte contre la pauvreté, organisée par la Fédération genevoise de coopération.

    L’ONU s’était félicitée de la réduction de l’extrême pauvreté de moitié (Objectifs du millénaire). Est- ce que cela correspond à la réalité des faits ?

    Sabin Bieri : Si l’on prend le critère qu’elle a choisi pour l’évaluer (élaboré par la #Banque_mondiale), à savoir un revenu de 1,25 dollar par jour pour vivre (1,9 à partir de 2005), c’est effectivement le cas, en pourcentage de la population mondiale. Mais pour arriver à ce résultat, la Banque mondiale a dû modifier quelques critères, comme considérer la situation à partir de 1990 et pas de 2000.

    Ce critère de 1,9 dollar par jour pour évaluer l’extrême pauvreté est-il pertinent justement ?

    Ce chiffre est trop bas. Il a été choisi en fonction de quinze pays parmi les plus pauvres du monde, tout en étant pondéré dans une certaine mesure par le pouvoir d’achat dans chaque pays. Ce seuil n’est vraiment pas adapté à tous les pays.

    Et si une personne passe à trois dollars par jour, cela ne signifie pas que sa qualité de vie se soit vraiment améliorée. De surcroît, la majeure partie de cette réduction de l’extrême pauvreté a été réalisée en #Chine, surtout dans les années 1990. Si on enlève la Chine de l’équation, la réduction de l’extrême pauvreté a été beaucoup plus modeste, et très inégale selon les continents et les pays. On ne peut donc plus s’en prévaloir comme un succès de la politique internationale ! L’extrême pauvreté a beaucoup augmenté en #Afrique_sub-saharienne en particulier.

    Tout cela est-il vraiment utile alors ?

    Il est pertinent de parvenir à une comparaison globale de la pauvreté. Je vois surtout comme un progrès le discours public qui a émergé dans le cadre de ces Objectifs du millénaire. La réduction de l’extrême pauvreté est devenue une préoccupation centrale. La communauté internationale ne l’accepte plus. Un débat s’en est suivi. Accepte-t-on de calculer l’extrême pauvreté de cette manière ? Comment faire autrement ? C’est là que j’y vois un succès.

    Dans ses travaux, le chercheur britannique #Jason_Hickel considère que la Banque mondiale et l’ONU ont choisi ces chiffres à des fins idéologiques et politiques pour justifier les politiques néolibérales imposées aux pays du Sud depuis la fin des années 1980. Qu’en pensez-vous ?

    Ce n’est pas loin de la réalité. Ce sont des #choix_politiques qui ont présidé à la construction de cet #indice, et son évolution dans le temps. La Banque mondiale et le #Fonds_monétaire_international ont mené des politiques d’#austérité très dures qui ont été vertement critiquées. Si on avait montré que la pauvreté avait augmenté dans le même temps, cela aurait questionné l’efficacité de ces mesures. Au-delà, ces #chiffres sur l’extrême pauvreté sont utilisés par nombre de personnalités, comme le professeur de l’université d’Harvard #Steven_Pinker pour justifier l’#ordre_mondial actuel.

    Certains experts en #développement considèrent qu’il faudrait retenir le seuil de 7,4 dollars par jour pour mesurer la pauvreté. A cette aune, si l’on retire les performances de la Chine, non seulement la pauvreté aurait augmenté en chiffres absolus depuis 1981, mais elle serait restée stable en proportion de la population mondiale, à environ 60%, est-ce exact ?

    Oui, c’est juste. Nombre de pays ont fait en sorte que leurs citoyens puissent vivre avec un peu plus de 2 dollars par jour, mais cela ne signifie pas qu’ils aient vraiment augmenté leur #standard_de_vie. Et le plus grand souci est que les #inégalités ont augmenté depuis les années 1990.

    Une mesure plus correcte de la pauvreté existe : l’#Indice_de_la_pauvreté_multidimensionnelle (#IPM). Qui l’a développé et comment est-il utilisé aujourd’hui dans le monde ?

    Cet indice a été créé à l’université d’Oxford. Adapté par l’ONU en 2012, il est composé de trois dimensions, #santé, #éducation et #standard_de_vie, chacune représentée par plusieurs indicateurs : le niveau de #nutrition, la #mortalité_infantile, années d’#école et présence à l’école, et le #niveau_de_vie (qui prend en compte l’état du #logement, l’existence de #sanitaires, l’accès à l’#électricité, à l’#eau_potable, etc.). L’indice reste suffisamment simple pour permettre une #comparaison au niveau mondial et évaluer l’évolution dans le temps. Cela nous donne une meilleure idée de la réalité, notamment pour les pays les moins avancés. Cela permet en théorie de mieux orienter les politiques.

    https://lecourrier.ch/2019/06/13/pauvrete-la-misere-des-indicateurs
    #indicateurs #pauvreté #statistiques #chiffres #ressources_pédagogiques #dynamiques_des_suds

    ping @reka @simplicissimus

    • J’explique régulièrement que l’argument monétaire est globalement de la grosse merde pour évaluer la pauvreté. Ce qu’on évalue, en réalité, c’est la marchandisation de populations qui étaient jusqu’à présent épargnées et donc une réelle augmentation de la pauvreté inhérente au fonctionnement du capitalisme.

      Un exemple simple pour comprendre : une famille de petits paysans qui vivent plus ou moins en autosuffisance.

      Ils ont un toit sur la tête (mais pas forcément l’eau courante et l’électricité) et ils cultivent et élèvent une grande part de leur alimentation. Les excédents ou produits d’artisanat permettent éventuellement d’acquérir des merdes modernes sur le marché monétarisé, mais majoritairement, ils échangent avec des gens comme eux.
      Ils sont classés extrêmement pauvres par la BM, parce qu’ils n’ont pas 2$/jour.

      Maintenant, ils sont dépossédés de leur lopin de terre, expulsés par le proprio ou à la recherche d’une vie plus moderne en ville.
      En ville, ils n’ont plus de toit sur la tête et tous leurs besoins fondamentaux sont soumis à la nécessité d’avoir de l’argent. S’ils se prostituent ou louent leur bras pour les jobs pourris et dangereux que personne ne veut, ils pourront éventuellement gagner assez pour manger un jour de plus (pas pour se loger ou subvenir à leurs besoins vitaux), ils n’auront jamais été aussi démunis et proches de la mort, mais du point de vue de la BM, ils sont sortis de la grande pauvreté parce qu’ils se vendent pour plus de 2$/jour.

      L’IPM est mieux adapté, mais je doute qu’on l’utilise beaucoup pour se vanter du soit-disant recul de la pauvreté dans le monde !

    • En fait, si, en France, être pauvre prive de l’accès à beaucoup de choses.
      Prenons le RSA 559,74€ pour une personne seule, moins le forfait logement de 67,17 (en gros 12% du montant), soit, royalement 492,57€ → 16,42€/jour pour les mois à 30 jours.

      Ceci n’est pas de l’argent de poche. En admettant que l’on touche l’APL au taquet, ce qui n’est jamais évident, on peut ajouter 295,05€ max d’APL à Paris et 241,00 pour un bled quelconque de province. Comparez avec le montant des loyers pratiqués, le prix des factures (eau, énergie, au même prix pour tout le monde) et demandez-vous comment fait la personne pour seulement se nourrir correctement.

    • Être pauvre monétairement est surtout du au fait que seules les banques sont autorisées a créer la monnaie (€)
      Mais rien nous empêche de créer notre propre monnaie (sans banque ni état), une monnaie créée à égalité par les citoyens pour les citoyens. Un vrai Revenu Universel n’est pas compliqué a mettre en place, ce sont seulement des chiffres dans des ordinateurs (comme pour l’€).
      Une nouvelle monnaie pour un nouveau monde ;)
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjoYIz_3JLI

  • Agriculture en RDC : un collectif d’associations appelle à soutenir les familles plutôt que les industriels
    https://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2019/04/17/agriculture-en-rdc-un-collectif-d-associations-appelle-a-soutenir-les-famill

    « Nous demandons à la Banque mondiale et à la Banque africaine de développement de soutenir en priorité l’agriculture familiale et le désenclavement des zones rurales », a déclaré ce collectif de quatre associations au cours d’une conférence de presse mardi à Kinshasa.

    Ces associations demandent à la Banque mondiale de « tirer les leçons de la débâcle » du parc agro-industriel de Bukanga Lonzo, une exploitation de 75 000 hectares lancée en 2014 sous la présidence de Joseph Kabila à 220 km à l’est de la capitale. Avec l’appui d’un partenaire sud-africain, Africom Commodities, les autorités congolaises voulaient dépasser la petite agriculture de subsistance.
    « Concentration de la richesse »

    Le projet n’a jamais véritablement été mis en œuvre hormis l’ouverture de six points de vente à Kinshasa, mégalopole de 12 millions d’habitants. La production est au point mort. Africom réclame à la RDC le remboursement de 20 millions de dollars (17,67 millions d’euros).

    Africom est une entreprise sud-africaine
    #agriculture #agro-industrie

  • Des documents internes du gouvernement des #États-Unis présentent les grandes lignes d’un programme de « #guerre économique » contre le #Venezuela (The Grayzone) — Ben NORTON
    https://www.legrandsoir.info/des-documents-internes-du-gouvernement-des-etats-unis-presentent-les-g

    Dans le manuel de guerre non conventionnelle, l’Army Special Operations Forces (ARSOF) écrit que les Etats-Unis « peuvent utiliser la puissance financière comme une arme en temps de conflit jusqu’à une guerre générale à grande échelle ». Et il a noté que « la manipulation de la force financière des États-Unis peut influencer les politiques et la coopération de gouvernements étrangers » - c’est-à-dire forcer ces gouvernements à se conformer à la politique américaine.

    Les institutions qui aident le gouvernement américain à y parvenir, a poursuivi l’ARSOF, sont la #Banque_mondiale, le #Fonds_monétaire_international (#FMI) et l’Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques (#OCDE).

  • The Highest Bidder Takes It All: The World Bank’s Scheme to Privatize the Commons

    The Highest Bidder Takes It All: The World Bank’s Scheme to Privatize the Commons details how the Bank’s prescribes reforms, via a new land indicator in the #Enabling_the_Business_of_Agriculture (#EBA) project, promotes large-scale land acquisitions and the expansion of agribusinesses in the developing world. This new indicator is now a key element of the larger EBA project, which dictates pro-business reforms that governments should conduct in the agricultural sector. Initiated as a pilot in 38 countries in 2017, the land indicator is expected to be expanded to 80 countries in 2019. The project is funded by the US and UK governments and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

    The EBA’s main recommendations to governments include formalizing private property rights, easing the sale and lease of land for commercial use, systematizing the sale of public land by auction to the highest bidder, and improving procedures for #expropriation. Countries are scored on how well they implement the Bank’s policy advice. The scores then help determine the volume of aid money and foreign investment they receive.

    Amidst myriad flaws detailed in the report is the Bank’s prescription to developing countries’ governments, particularly in Africa, to transfer public lands with “potential economic value” to private, commercial use, so that the land can be put to its supposed “best use.” Claiming that low-income countries do not manage public land in an effective manner, the Bank pushes for the privatization of public land as the way forward. This ignores the fact that millions of rural poor live and work on these lands, which are essential for their livelihoods while representing ancestral assets with deep social and cultural significance.

    The Highest Bidder Takes It All is released as part of the Our Land Our Business campaign, made up of 280 organizations worldwide, demanding an end to the Enabling Business of Agriculture program.


    https://www.oaklandinstitute.org/highest-bidder-takes-all-world-banks-scheme-privatize-commons
    #Banque_mondiale #privatisation #terres #commons #communs #rapport #agriculture #industrie_agro-alimentaire #agro-business #land_grabbing #accaparement_des_terres #réformes #aide_au_développement #développement #commodification #économie #marchandisation #valeur_économique #néo-libéralisme

    signalé par @fil
    cc @odilon

  • Indonesia: The World Bank’s Failed East Asian Miracle | The Oakland Institute
    https://www.oaklandinstitute.org/indonesia-world-bank-failed-east-asian-miracle

    Indonesia, host of the 2018 annual meetings of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF), for years has been heralded as a major economic success by the Bank and rewarded for its pro-business policy changes through the World Bank’s Doing Business reports. Between 2016 and 2018 alone, Indonesia climbed an astounding 34 positions in the ranks. These reforms, however, have come at a massive cost for both people and the planet.

    Indonesia: The World Bank’s Failed East Asian Miracle details how Bank-backed policy reforms have led to the displacement, criminalization, and even murder of smallholder farmers and indigenous defenders to make way for mega-agricultural projects. While Indonesia’s rapidly expanding palm oil sector has been heralded as a boon for the economy, its price tag includes massive deforestation, widespread loss of indigenous land, rapidly increasing greenhouse gas emissions, and more.

    #Indonésie #Banque_mondiale #industrie_palmiste #terres #assassinats

  • Le #Bangladesh, un exemple de #migration climatique - Le Courrier
    https://lecourrier.ch/2018/09/18/le-bangladesh-un-exemple-de-migration-climatique

    Pour faire face aux crises climatique et alimentaire, le gouvernement promeut des entreprises privées du secteur agro-alimentaire, plus d’investissements dans les #semences, des fertilisants et des équipements, en adoptant des semences hybrides et en imposant les #OGM au nom de la #sécurité_alimentaire. Le Bangladesh a déjà lancé la première culture d’OGM Brinjal en 2014. Une pomme de terre OGM est dans les tuyaux et le gouvernement a annoncé en 2018 des plans pour la commercialisation du premier riz génétiquement modifié Golden Rice. Ceci plutôt que protéger les paysans et encourager la petite #agriculture agro-écologique.

    La stratégie de la #Banque_mondiale et d’autres bailleurs de fonds internationaux pour la « sécurité alimentaire » gérée par les entreprises est risquée pour l’agriculture dans le contexte du changement climatique. Leur intérêt véritable, derrière cette politique, est de permettre aux entreprises transnationales de semences et d’#agrochimie d’accéder aux marchés agricoles du Bangladesh. Par conséquent, il est important de promouvoir les droits des paysans à des semences et d’autonomiser les communautés afin qu’elles puissent protéger leur propre mode de subsistance. Promouvoir la #souveraineté_alimentaire est la meilleure alternative pour la #politique_agricole actuelle au Bangladesh.

    #mafia #agrobusiness #climat

  • L’esprit du Turc mécanique
    http://jefklak.org/lesprit-du-turc-mecanique

    Au Moyen-Orient, et sous couvert de lutte contre la pauvreté, le néolibéralisme exploite l’occupation et la guerre pour en retirer une main-d’œuvre la moins chère possible. Dans les territoires occupés de Palestine ou les camps de réfugié·es syrien·nes, les plans de développement de la Banque mondiale n’hésitent plus à promouvoir la sous-traitance de microtâches numériques pour le compte de grandes firmes internationales.

    Pour des rémunérations de misère et sans protection sociale, les plus vulnérables sont aujourd’hui forcé·es de jouer le jeu du « Turc mécanique » : travailler dans l’ombre pour faire croire aux populations occidentales que les nouvelles technologies fonctionnent comme par magie.

    #exploitation_participative #travail_numérique #précarité #Banque_mondiale #moyen-orient #nouvelles_technologies

  • #Accaparement_de_terres : le groupe #Bolloré accepte de négocier avec les communautés locales
    –-> un article qui date de 2014, et qui peut intéresser notamment @odilon, mais aussi d’actualité vue la plainte de Balloré contre le journal pour diffamation. Et c’est le journal qui a gagné en Cour de cassation : https://www.bastamag.net/Bollore-perd-definitivement-son-premier-proces-en-diffamation-intente-a

    Des paysans et villageois du Sierra-Leone, de #Côte_d’Ivoire, du #Cameroun et du #Cambodge sont venus spécialement jusqu’à Paris. Pour la première fois, le groupe Bolloré et sa filiale luxembourgeoise #Socfin, qui gère des #plantations industrielles de #palmiers_à_huile et d’#hévéas (pour le #caoutchouc) en Afrique et en Asie, ont accepté de participer à des négociations avec les communautés locales fédérées en « alliance des riverains des plantations Bolloré-Socfin ». Sous la houlette d’une association grenobloise, Réseaux pour l’action collective transnationale (ReAct), une réunion s’est déroulée le 24 octobre, à Paris, avec des représentants du groupe Bolloré et des communautés touchées par ces plantations.

    Ces derniers dénoncent les conséquences de l’acquisition controversée des terres agricoles, en Afrique et en Asie. Ils pointent notamment du doigt des acquisitions foncières de la #Socfin qu’ils considèrent comme « un accaparement aveugle des terres ne laissant aux riverains aucun espace vital », en particulier pour leurs cultures vivrières. Ils dénoncent également la faiblesse des compensations accordées aux communautés et le mauvais traitement qui serait réservé aux populations. Les représentants africains et cambodgiens sont venus demander au groupe Bolloré et à la Socfin de garantir leur #espace_vital en rétrocédant les terres dans le voisinage immédiat des villages, et de stopper les expansions foncières qui auraient été lancées sans l’accord des communautés.

    https://www.bastamag.net/Accaparement-de-terres-le-groupe-Bollore-accepte-de-negocier-avec-les
    #terres #Sierra_Leone #huile_de_palme

    • Bolloré, #Crédit_agricole, #Louis_Dreyfus : ces groupes français, champions de l’accaparement de terres
      –-> encore un article de 2012

      Alors que 868 millions de personnes souffrent de sous-alimentation, selon l’Onu, l’accaparement de terres agricoles par des multinationales de l’#agrobusiness ou des fonds spéculatifs se poursuit. L’équivalent de trois fois l’Allemagne a ainsi été extorqué aux paysans africains, sud-américains ou asiatiques. Les plantations destinées à l’industrie remplacent l’agriculture locale. Plusieurs grandes entreprises françaises participent à cet accaparement, avec la bénédiction des institutions financières. Enquête.

      Au Brésil, le groupe français Louis Dreyfus, spécialisé dans le négoce des matières premières, a pris possession de près de 400 000 hectares de terres : l’équivalent de la moitié de l’Alsace, la région qui a vu naître l’empire Dreyfus, avec le commerce du blé au 19ème siècle. Ces terres sont destinées aux cultures de canne à sucre et de soja. Outre le Brésil, le discret empire commercial s’est accaparé, via ses filiales Calyx Agro ou LDC Bioenergia [1], des terres en Uruguay, en Argentine ou au Paraguay. Si Robert Louis Dreyfus, décédé en 2009, n’avait gagné quasiment aucun titre avec l’Olympique de Marseille, club dont il était propriétaire, il a fait de son groupe le champion français toute catégorie dans l’accaparement des terres.

      Le Groupe Louis-Dreyfus – 56 milliards d’euros de chiffre d’affaires [2] – achète, achemine et revend tout ce que la terre peut produire : blé, soja, café, sucre, huiles, jus d’orange, riz ou coton, dont il est le « leader » mondial via sa branche de négoce, Louis-Dreyfus Commodities. Son jus d’orange provient d’une propriété de 30 000 ha au Brésil. L’équivalent de 550 exploitations agricoles françaises de taille moyenne ! Il a ouvert en 2007 la plus grande usine au monde de biodiesel à base de soja, à Claypool, au Etats-Unis (Indiana). Il possède des forêts utilisées « pour la production d’énergie issue de la biomasse, l’énergie solaire, la géothermie et l’éolien ». Sans oublier le commerce des métaux, le gaz naturel, les produits pétroliers, le charbon et la finance.

      Course effrénée à l’accaparement de terres

      En ces périodes de tensions alimentaires et de dérèglements climatiques, c’est bien l’agriculture qui semble être l’investissement le plus prometteur. « En 5 ans, nous sommes passés de 800 millions à 6,3 milliards de dollars d’actifs industriels liés à l’agriculture », se réjouissait le directeur du conglomérat, Serge Schoen [3]. Le groupe Louis Dreyfus illustre la course effrénée à l’accaparement de terres agricoles dans laquelle se sont lancées de puissantes multinationales. Sa holding figure parmi les cinq premiers gros traders de matières premières alimentaires, avec Archer Daniels Midland (États-Unis), Bunge (basé aux Bermudes), Cargill (États-Unis) et le suisse Glencore. Ces cinq multinationales, à l’acronyme ABCD, font la pluie et le beau temps sur les cours mondiaux des céréales [4].

      L’exemple de Louis Dreyfus n’est pas isolé. États, entreprises publiques ou privées, fonds souverains ou d’investissements privés multiplient les acquisitions – ou les locations – de terres dans les pays du Sud ou en Europe de l’Est. Objectif : se lancer dans le commerce des agrocarburants, exploiter les ressources du sous-sol, assurer les approvisionnements alimentaires pour les États, voire bénéficier des mécanismes de financements mis en œuvre avec les marchés carbone. Ou simplement spéculer sur l’augmentation du prix du foncier. Souvent les agricultures paysannes locales sont remplacées par des cultures industrielles intensives. Avec, à la clé, expropriation des paysans, destruction de la biodiversité, pollution par les produits chimiques agricoles, développement des cultures OGM... Sans que les créations d’emplois ne soient au rendez-vous.

      Trois fois la surface agricole de la France

      Le phénomène d’accaparement est difficile à quantifier. De nombreuses transactions se déroulent dans le plus grand secret. Difficile également de connaître l’origine des capitaux. Une équipe de la Banque mondiale a tenté de mesurer le phénomène. En vain ! « Devant les difficultés opposées au recueil des informations nécessaires (par les États comme les acteurs privés), et malgré plus d’un an de travail, ces chercheurs ont dû pour l’évaluer globalement s’en remettre aux articles de presse », explique Mathieu Perdriault de l’association Agter.

      Selon la base de données Matrice foncière, l’accaparement de terres représenterait 83 millions d’hectares dans les pays en développement. L’équivalent de près de trois fois la surface agricole française (1,7% de la surface agricole mondiale) ! Selon l’ONG Oxfam, qui vient de publier un rapport à ce sujet, « une superficie équivalant à celle de Paris est vendue à des investisseurs étrangers toutes les 10 heures », dans les pays pauvres [5].

      L’Afrique, cible d’un néocolonialisme agricole ?

      L’Afrique, en particulier l’Afrique de l’Est et la République démocratique du Congo, est la région la plus convoitée, avec 56,2 millions d’hectares. Viennent ensuite l’Asie (17,7 millions d’ha), puis l’Amérique latine (7 millions d’ha). Pourquoi certains pays se laissent-il ainsi « accaparer » ? Sous prétexte d’attirer investissements et entreprises, les réglementations fiscales, sociales et environnementales des pays les plus pauvres sont souvent plus propices. Les investisseurs se tournent également vers des pays qui leur assurent la sécurité de leurs placements. Souvent imposées par les institutions financières internationales, des clauses garantissent à l’investisseur une compensation de la part de l’État « hôte » en cas d’expropriation. Des clauses qui peuvent s’appliquer même en cas de grèves ou de manifestations.

      Les acteurs de l’accaparement des terres, privés comme publics, sont persuadés – ou feignent de l’être – que seul l’agrobusiness pourra nourrir le monde en 2050. Leurs investissements visent donc à « valoriser » des zones qui ne seraient pas encore exploitées. Mais la réalité est tout autre, comme le montre une étude de la Matrice Foncière : 45% des terres faisant l’objet d’une transaction sont des terres déjà cultivées. Et un tiers des acquisitions sont des zones boisées, très rentables lorsqu’on y organise des coupes de bois à grande échelle. Des terres sont déclarées inexploitées ou abandonnées sur la foi d’imageries satellites qui ne prennent pas en compte les usages locaux des terres.

      40% des forêts du Liberia sont ainsi gérés par des permis à usage privés [6] (lire aussi notre reportage au Liberia). Ces permis, qui permettent de contourner les lois du pays, concernent désormais 20 000 km2. Un quart de la surface du pays ! Selon Oxfam, 60% des transactions ont eu lieu dans des régions « gravement touchées par le problème de la faim » et « plus des deux tiers étaient destinées à des cultures pouvant servir à la production d’agrocarburants comme le soja, la canne à sucre, l’huile de palme ou le jatropha ». Toujours ça que les populations locales n’auront pas...

      Quand AXA et la Société générale se font propriétaires terriens

      « La participation, largement médiatisée, des États au mouvement d’acquisition massive de terre ne doit pas masquer le fait que ce sont surtout les opérateurs privés, à la poursuite d’objectifs purement économiques et financiers, qui forment le gros bataillon des investisseurs », souligne Laurent Delcourt, chercheur au Cetri. Les entreprises publiques, liées à un État, auraient acheté 11,5 millions d’hectares. Presque trois fois moins que les investisseurs étrangers privés, propriétaires de 30,3 millions d’hectares. Soit la surface de l’Italie ! Si les entreprises états-uniennes sont en pointe, les Européens figurent également en bonne place.

      Banques et assurances françaises se sont jointes à cette course à la propriété terrienne mondiale. L’assureur AXA a investi 1,2 milliard de dollars dans la société minière britannique Vedanta Resources PLC, dont les filiales ont été accusées d’accaparement des terres [7]. AXA a également investi au moins 44,6 millions de dollars dans le fond d’investissement Landkom (enregistré dans l’île de Man, un paradis fiscal), qui loue des terres agricoles en Ukraine. Quant au Crédit Agricole, il a créé – avec la Société générale – le fonds « Amundi Funds Global Agriculture ». Ses 122 millions de dollars d’actifs sont investis dans des sociétés telles que Archer Daniels Midland ou Bunge, impliquées comme le groupe Louis Dreyfus dans l’acquisition de terres à grande échelle. Les deux banques ont également lancé le « Baring Global Agriculture Fund » (133,3 millions d’euros d’actifs) qui cible les sociétés agro-industrielles. Les deux établissement incitent activement à l’acquisition de terres, comme opportunité d’investissement. Une démarche socialement responsable ?

      Vincent Bolloré, gentleman farmer

      Après le groupe Louis Dreyfus, le deuxième plus gros investisseur français dans les terres agricoles se nomme Vincent Bolloré. Son groupe, via l’entreprise Socfin et ses filiales Socfinaf et Socfinasia, est présent dans 92 pays dont 43 en Afrique. Il y contrôle des plantations, ainsi que des secteurs stratégiques : logistique, infrastructures de transport, et pas moins de 13 ports, dont celui d’Abidjan. L’empire Bolloré s’est développée de façon spectaculaire au cours des deux dernières décennies « en achetant des anciennes entreprises coloniales, et [en] profitant de la vague de privatisations issue des "ajustements structurels" imposés par le Fonds monétaire international », constate le Think tank états-unien Oakland Institute.

      Selon le site du groupe, 150 000 hectares plantations d’huile de palme et d’hévéas, pour le caoutchouc, ont été acquis en Afrique et en Asie. L’équivalent de 2700 exploitations agricoles françaises ! Selon l’association Survie, ces chiffres seraient en deçà de la réalité. Le groupe assure ainsi posséder 9 000 ha de palmiers à huile et d’hévéas au Cameroun, là où l’association Survie en comptabilise 33 500.

      Expropriations et intimidations des populations

      Quelles sont les conséquences pour les populations locales ? Au Sierra Leone,
      Bolloré a obtenu un bail de 50 ans sur 20 000 hectares de palmier à huile et 10 000 hectares d’hévéas. « Bien que directement affectés, les habitants de la zone concernée semblent n’avoir été ni informés ni consultés correctement avant le lancement du projet : l’étude d’impact social et environnemental n’a été rendue publique que deux mois après la signature du contrat », raconte Yanis Thomas de l’association Survie. En 2011, les villageois tentent de bloquer les travaux sur la plantation. Quinze personnes « ont été inculpées de tapage, conspiration, menaces et libérées sous caution après une âpre bataille judiciaire. » Bolloré menace de poursuivre en justice pour diffamation The Oakland Institute, qui a publié un rapport en 2012 sur le sujet pour alerter l’opinion publique internationale.

      Au Libéria, le groupe Bolloré possède la plus grande plantation d’hévéas du pays, via une filiale, la Liberia Agricultural Company (LAC). En mai 2006, la mission des Nations Unies au Libéria (Minul) publiait un rapport décrivant les conditions catastrophiques des droits humains sur la plantation : travail d’enfants de moins de 14 ans, utilisation de produits cancérigènes, interdiction des syndicats, licenciements arbitraires, maintien de l’ordre par des milices privées, expulsion de 75 villages…. La LAC a qualifié les conclusions de la Minul « de fabrications pures et simples » et « d’exagérations excessives ». Ambiance... Plusieurs années après le rapport des Nations Unies, aucune mesure n’a été prise par l’entreprise ou le gouvernement pour répondre aux accusations.

      Une coopératives agricole qui méprise ses salariés

      Autre continent, mêmes critiques. Au Cambodge, la Socfinasia, société de droit luxembourgeois détenue notamment par le groupe Bolloré a conclu en 2007 un joint-venture qui gère deux concessions de plus de 7 000 hectares dans la région de Mondulkiri. La Fédération internationale des Droits de l’homme (FIDH) a publié en 2010 un rapport dénonçant les pratiques de la société Socfin-KCD. « Le gouvernement a adopté un décret spécial permettant l’établissement d’une concession dans une zone anciennement protégée, accuse la FIDH. Cette situation, en plus d’autres violations documentées du droit national et des contrats d’investissement, met en cause la légalité des concessions et témoigne de l’absence de transparence entourant le processus d’approbation de celles-ci. » Suite à la publication de ce rapport, la Socfin a menacé l’ONG de poursuites pour calomnie et diffamation.

      Du côté des industries du sucre, la situation n’est pas meilleure. Depuis 2007, le géant français du sucre et d’éthanol, la coopérative agricole Tereos, contrôle une société mozambicaine [8]. Tereos exploite la sucrerie de Sena et possède un bail de 50 ans (renouvelable) sur 98 000 hectares au Mozambique. Le contrat passé avec le gouvernement prévoit une réduction de 80% de l’impôt sur le revenu et l’exemption de toute taxe sur la distribution des dividendes. Résultat : Tereos International réalise un profit net de 194 millions d’euros en 2010, dont 27,5 millions d’euros ont été rapatriés en France sous forme de dividendes. « De quoi mettre du beurre dans les épinards des 12 000 coopérateurs français de Tereos », ironise le journaliste Fabrice Nicolino. Soit un dividende de 2 600 euros par agriculteur français membre de la coopérative. Pendant ce temps, au Mozambique, grèves et manifestations se sont succédé dans la sucrerie de Sena : bas salaires (48,4 euros/mois), absence d’équipements de protection pour les saisonniers, nappe phréatique polluée aux pesticides... Ce doit être l’esprit coopératif [9].

      Fermes et fazendas, nouvelles cibles de la spéculation

      Connues ou non, on ne compte plus les entreprises et les fonds d’investissement français qui misent sur les terres agricoles. Bonduelle, leader des légumes en conserve et congelés, possède deux fermes de 3 000 hectares en Russie où il cultive haricots, maïs et pois. La célèbre marque cherche à acquérir une nouvelle exploitation de 6 000 ha dans le pays. Fondée en 2007 par Jean-Claude Sabin, ancien président de la pieuvre Sofiproteol (aujourd’hui dirigée par Xavier Beulin président de la FNSEA), Agro-énergie Développement (AgroEd) investit dans la production d’agrocarburants et d’aliments dans les pays en développement. La société appartient à 51% au groupe d’investissement LMBO, dont l’ancien ministre de la Défense, Charles Millon, fut l’un des directeurs. Les acquisitions de terres agricoles d’AgroEd en Afrique de l’Ouest sont principalement destinées à la culture du jatropha, transformé ensuite en agrocarburants ou en huiles pour produits industriels. Mais impossible d’obtenir plus de précisions. Les sites internet de LMBO et AgroED sont plus que discrets sur le sujet. Selon une note de l’OCDE, AgroEd aurait signé un accord avec le gouvernement burkinabé concernant 200 000 hectares de Jatropha, en 2007, et négocient avec les gouvernements du Bénin, de Guinée et du Mali.

      « Compte tenu de l’endettement massif des États et des politiques monétaires très accommodantes, dans une optique de protection contre l’inflation, nous recommandons à nos clients d’investir dans des actifs réels et notamment dans les terres agricoles de pays sûrs, disposant de bonnes infrastructures, comme l’Argentine », confie au Figaro Franck Noël-Vandenberghe, le fondateur de Massena Partners. Ce gestionnaire de fortune français a crée le fond luxembourgeois Terra Magna Capital, qui a investi en 2011 dans quinze fermes en Argentine, au Brésil, au Paraguay et en Uruguay. Superficie totale : 70 500 hectares, trois fois le Val-de-Marne ! [10]

      Le maïs aussi rentable que l’or

      Conséquence de ce vaste accaparement : le remplacement de l’agriculture vivrière par la culture d’agrocarburants, et la spéculation financière sur les terres agricoles. Le maïs a offert, à égalité avec l’or, le meilleur rendement des actifs financiers sur ces cinq dernières années, pointe une étude de la Deutsche Bank. En juin et juillet 2012, les prix des céréales se sont envolés : +50 % pour le blé, +45% pour le maïs, +30 % pour le soja, qui a augmenté de 60 % depuis fin 2011 ! Les prix alimentaires devraient « rester élevés et volatils sur le long terme », prévoit la Banque mondiale. Pendant ce temps, plus d’un milliard d’individus souffrent de la faim. Non pas à cause d’une pénurie d’aliments mais faute d’argent pour les acheter.

      Qu’importe ! Au nom du développement, l’accaparement des terres continuent à être encouragé – et financé ! – par les institutions internationales. Suite aux famines et aux émeutes de la faim en 2008, la Banque mondiale a créé un « Programme d’intervention en réponse à la crise alimentaire mondiale » (GFRP). Avec plus de 9 milliards de dollars en 2012, son fonds de « soutien » au secteur agricole a plus que doublé en quatre ans. Via sa Société financière internationale (SFI), l’argent est distribué aux acteurs privés dans le cadre de programme aux noms prometteurs : « Access to land » (accès à la terre) ou « Land market for investment » (marché foncier pour l’investissement).

      Des placements financiers garantis par la Banque mondiale

      Les deux organismes de la Banque mondiale, SFI et FIAS (Service Conseil pour l’Investissement Étranger) facilitent également les acquisitions en contribuant aux grandes réformes législatives permettant aux investisseurs privés de s’installer au Sierra Leone, au Rwanda, au Liberia ou au Burkina Faso… Quels que soient les continents, « la Banque mondiale garantit nos actifs par rapport au risque politique », explique ainsi l’homme d’affaire états-unien Neil Crowder à la BBC en mars 2012, qui rachète des petites fermes en Bulgarie pour constituer une grosse exploitation. « Notre assurance contre les risques politiques nous protège contre les troubles civils ou une impossibilité d’utiliser nos actifs pour une quelconque raison ou en cas d’expropriation. »

      Participation au capital des fonds qui accaparent des terres, conseils et assistances techniques aux multinationales pour améliorer le climat d’investissement des marchés étrangers, négociations d’accords bilatéraux qui créent un environnement favorable aux transactions foncières : la Banque mondiale et d’autres institutions publiques – y compris l’Agence française du développement – favorisent de fait « la concentration du pouvoir des grandes firmes au sein du système agroalimentaire, (...) la marchandisation de la terre et du travail et la suppression des interventions publiques telles que le contrôle des prix ou les subventions aux petits exploitants », analyse Elisa Da Via, sociologue du développement [11].

      Oxfam réclame de la Banque mondiale « un gel pour six mois de ses investissements dans des terres agricoles » des pays en développement, le temps d’adopter « des mesures d’encadrement plus rigoureuses pour prévenir l’accaparement des terres ». Que pense en France le ministère de l’Agriculture de ces pratiques ? Il a présenté en septembre un plan d’action face à la hausse du prix des céréales. Ses axes prioritaires : l’arrêt provisoire du développement des agrocarburants et la mobilisation du G20 pour « assurer une bonne coordination des politiques des grands acteurs des marchés agricoles » Des annonces bien vagues face à l’ampleur des enjeux : qui sont ces « grands acteurs des marchés agricoles » ? S’agit-il d’aider les populations rurales des pays pauvres à produire leurs propres moyens de subsistance ou de favoriser les investissements de l’agrobusiness et des fonds spéculatifs sous couvert de politique de développement et de lutte contre la malnutrition ? Les dirigeants français préfèrent regarder ailleurs, et stigmatiser l’immigration.

      Nadia Djabali, avec Agnès Rousseaux et Ivan du Roy

      Photos : © Eric Garault
      P.-S.

      – L’ONG Grain a publié en mars 2012 un tableau des investisseurs

      – La rapport d’Oxfam, « Notre terre, notre vie » - Halte à la ruée mondiale sur les terres, octobre 2012

      – Le rapport des Amis de la Terre Europe (en anglais), janvier 2012 : How European banks, pension funds and insurance companies are increasing global hunger and poverty by speculating on food prices and financing land grabs in poorer countries.

      – Un observatoire de l’accaparement des terres

      – A lire : Emprise et empreinte de l’agrobusiness, aux Editions Syllepse.
      Notes

      [1] « En octobre 2009, LDC Bioenergia de Louis Dreyfus Commodities a fusionné avec Santelisa Vale, un important producteur de canne à sucre brésilien, pour former LDC-SEV, dont Louis Dreyfus détient 60% », indique l’ONG Grain.

      [2] Le groupe Louis Dreyfus ne publie pas de résultats détaillés. Il aurait réalisé en 2010 un chiffre d’affaires de 56 milliards d’euros, selon L’Agefi, pour un bénéfice net de 590 millions d’euros. La fortune de Margarita Louis Dreyfus, présidente de la holding, et de ses trois enfants, a été évaluée par le journal Challenges à 6,6 milliards d’euros.

      [3] Dans Le Nouvel Observateur.

      [4] L’ONG Oxfam a publié en août 2012 un rapport (en anglais) décrivant le rôle des ABCD.

      [5] Selon Oxfam, au cours des dix dernières années, une surface équivalente à huit fois la superficie du Royaume-Uni a été vendue à l’échelle mondiale. Ces terres pourraient permettre de subvenir aux besoins alimentaires d’un milliard de personnes.

      [6] D’après les ONG Global Witness, Save My Future Foundation (SAMFU) et Sustainable Development Institute (SDI).

      [7] Source : Rapport des Amis de la Terre Europe.

      [8] Sena Holdings Ltd, via sa filiale brésilienne Açúcar Guaraní.

      [9] Une autre coopérative agricole, Vivescia (Ex-Champagne Céréales), spécialisée dans les céréales, investit en Ukraine aux côtés Charles Beigbeder, fondateur de Poweo (via un fonds commun, AgroGeneration). Ils y disposent de 50 000 hectares de terres agricoles en location.

      [10] La liste des entreprises françaises dans l’accaparement des terres n’est pas exhaustive : Sucres & Denrée (Sucden) dans les régions russes de Krasnodar, Campos Orientales en Argentine et en Uruguay, Sosucam au Cameroun, la Compagnie Fruitière qui cultive bananes et ananas au Ghana…

      [11] Emprise et empreinte de l’agrobusiness, aux Editions Syllepse.


      https://www.bastamag.net/Bollore-Credit-agricole-Louis
      #Françafrique #France #spéculation #finance #économie #Brésil #Louis-Dreyfus #Calyx_Agro #LDC_Bioenergia #Uruguay #Argentine #Paraguay #biodiesel #Louis-Dreyfus_Commodities #soja #USA #Etats-Unis #Claypool #agriculture #ABCD #Liberia #AXA #Société_générale #banques #assurances #Landkom #Ukraine #Amundi_Funds_Global_Agriculture #Archer_Daniels_Midland #Bunge #Baring_Global_Agriculture_Fund #Socfinaf #Socfinasia #Liberia_Agricultural_Company #Mondulkiri #éthanol #sucre #Tereos #Sena #Mozambique #Bonduelle #Russie #haricots #maïs #pois #Agro-énergie_Développement #AgroEd # LMBO #Charles_Millon #jatropha #Bénin #Guinée #Mali #Massena_Partners #Terra_Magna_Capital #Franck_Noël-Vandenberghe #agriculture_vivrière #prix_alimentaires #Société_financière_internationale #Access_to_land #Land_market_for_investment #Banque_mondiale #SFI #FIAS #Sierra_Leone #Rwanda #Burkina_Faso #Bulgarie

    • Crime environnemental : sur la piste de l’huile de palme

      L’huile de palme est massivement importée en Europe. Elle sert à la composition d’aliments comme aux agrocarburants. Avec le soutien de la région Languedoc-Roussillon, une nouvelle raffinerie devrait voir le jour à Port-la-Nouvelle, dans l’Aude. À l’autre bout de la filière, en Afrique de l’Ouest, l’accaparement de terres par des multinationales, avec l’expropriation des populations, bat son plein. Basta ! a remonté la piste du business de l’huile de palme jusqu’au #Liberia. Enquête.

      Quel est le point commun entre un résident de Port-la-Nouvelle, petite ville méditerranéenne à proximité de Narbonne (Aude), et un villageois du comté de Grand Cape Mount, au Liberia ? Réponse : une matière première très controversée, l’huile de palme, et une multinationale malaisienne, #Sime_Darby. D’un côté, des habitants de Port-la-Nouvelle voient d’un mauvais œil la création d’« une usine clés en main de fabrication d’huile de palme » par Sime Darby, en partie financée par le conseil régional du Languedoc-Roussillon. À 6 000 km de là, les paysans libériens s’inquiètent d’une immense opération d’accaparement des terres orchestrée par le conglomérat malaisien, en vue d’exploiter l’huile de palme et de l’exporter vers l’Europe, jusqu’à Port-la-Nouvelle en l’occurrence. Un accaparement de terres qui pourrait déboucher sur des déplacements forcés de population et mettre en danger leur agriculture de subsistance.

      Le petit port de l’Aude devrait donc accueillir une raffinerie d’huile de palme. Deux compagnies, la néerlandaise #Vopak et le malaisien #Unimills – filiale du groupe Sime Darby – sont sur les rangs, prêtes à investir 120 millions d’euros, venant s’ajouter aux 170 millions d’euros du conseil régional. La Région promet la création de 200 emplois, quand Sime Darby en annonce 50 pour cette usine qui prévoit d’importer 2 millions de tonnes d’huile de palme par an [1].

      Du Languedoc-Roussillon au Liberia

      Une perspective loin de réjouir plusieurs habitants réunis au sein du collectif No Palme [2]. Ces riverains d’une zone Seveso ont toujours en tête l’importante explosion de juillet 2010 dans la zone portuaire, après qu’un camion transportant du GPL se soit renversé. « La population n’a jamais été consultée ni informée de ce projet de raffinerie, relève Pascal Pavie, de la fédération Nature et Progrès. Ces installations présentent pourtant un risque industriel surajouté. » Le mélange du nitrate d’ammonium – 1 500 tonnes acheminées chaque mois à Port-la-Nouvelle – avec de l’huile végétale constituerait un explosif cocktail. Avec les allers et venues de 350 camions supplémentaires par jour. Cerise sur le gâteau, l’extension du port empièterait sur une zone côtière riche en biodiversité. « Notre collectif s’est immédiatement intéressé au versant international et européen de ce projet », explique Pascal.

      L’opérateur du projet, Sime Darby, est un immense conglomérat malaisien, se présentant comme « le plus grand producteur mondial d’huile de palme ». Présent dans 21 pays, il compte plus de 740 000 hectares de plantations, dont plus d’un tiers au Liberia. Et c’est là que remonte la piste de l’huile que l’usine devra raffiner.

      De Monrovia, la capitale, elle mène à Medina, une ville de Grand Cape Mount. D’immenses panneaux de Sime Darby promettent « un avenir durable ». Scrupuleusement gardés par des forces de sécurité privées recrutées par la compagnie, quelques bâtiments en béton émergent au milieu des pépinières d’huile de palme. C’est là que les futurs employés pourront venir vivre avec leurs familles. 57 « villages de travail » seront construits d’ici à 2025, promet la firme. Mais quid des habitants qui ne travailleront pas dans les plantations ? L’ombre d’un déplacement forcé de populations plane. « Quand Sime Darby a commencé à s’installer, ils ont dit qu’ils nous fourniraient des centres médicaux, des écoles, du logement… Mais nous n’avons rien vu, se désole Radisson, un jeune habitant de Medina qui a travaillé pour l’entreprise. Comment pourraient-ils nous déplacer alors qu’aucune infrastructure n’est prévue pour nous accueillir ? »

      Agriculture familiale menacée

      Le village de Kon Town est désormais entouré par les plantations. Seuls 150 mètres séparent les maisons des pépinières d’huile de palme. « Le gouvernement a accordé des zones de concession à la compagnie sans se rendre sur le terrain pour faire la démarcation », déplore Jonathan Yiah, des Amis de la Terre Liberia. Un accaparement qui priverait les habitants des terres cultivables nécessaires à leur subsistance. Les taux d’indemnisation pour la perte de terres et de cultures sont également sous-évalués. « Comment vais-je payer les frais scolaires de mes enfants maintenant ? », s’insurge une habitante qui ne reçoit qu’un seul sac de riz pour une terre qui, auparavant, donnait du manioc, de l’ananas et du gombo à foison.

      La compagnie Sime Darby se défend de vouloir déplacer les communautés. Pourtant, un extrait de l’étude d’impact environnemental, financée par la compagnie elle-même, mentionne clairement la possibilité de réinstallation de communautés, si ces dernières « entravent le développement de la plantation » [3]. Du côté des autorités, on dément. Cecil T.O. Brandy, de la Commission foncière du Liberia, assure que le gouvernement fait tout pour « minimiser et décourager tout déplacement. Si la compagnie peut réhabiliter ou restaurer certaines zones, ce sera préférable ». Faux, rétorque les Amis de la Terre Liberia. « En laissant une ville au milieu d’une zone de plantations, et seulement 150 mètres autour pour cultiver, plutôt que de leur dire de quitter cette terre, on sait que les habitants finiront par le faire volontairement », dénonce James Otto, de l’ONG. Pour les 10 000 hectares déjà défrichés, l’association estime que 15 000 personnes sont d’ores et déjà affectées.

      Des emplois pas vraiment durables

      L’emploi créé sera-t-il en mesure de compenser le désastre environnemental généré par l’expansion des monocultures ? C’est ce qu’espère une partie de la population du comté de Grand Cape Mount, fortement touchée par le chômage. Sime Darby déclare avoir déjà embauché plus de 2 600 travailleurs permanents, auxquels s’ajouteraient 500 travailleurs journaliers. Quand l’ensemble des plantations seront opérationnelles, « Sime Darby aura créé au moins 35 000 emplois », promet la firme. Augustine, un jeune de Kon Town, y travaille depuis deux ans. D’abord sous-traitant, il a fini par être embauché par la compagnie et a vu son salaire grimper de 3 à 5 dollars US pour huit heures de travail par jour. Tout le monde ne semble pas avoir cette « chance » : 90 % du personnel de l’entreprise disposent de contrats à durée déterminée – trois mois en général – et sous-payés ! Les chiffres varient selon les témoignages, de 50 cents à 3 dollars US par jour, en fonction de la récolte réalisée. « Dans quelle mesure ces emplois sont-ils durables ?, interroge Jonathan, des Amis de la Terre Liberia. Une fois que les arbres seront plantés et qu’ils commenceront à pousser, combien d’emplois l’entreprise pourra-t-elle maintenir ? »

      L’opacité entourant le contrat liant le gouvernement à Sime Darby renforce les tensions [4]. Malgré l’adoption d’une loi sur les droits des communautés, les communautés locales n’ont pas été informées, encore moins consultées. « Sime Darby s’est entretenu uniquement avec les chefs des communautés, raconte Jonathan Yiah. Or, la communauté est une unité diversifiée qui rassemble aussi des femmes, des jeunes, qui ont été écartés du processus de consultation. »

      Contrat totalement opaque

      Même de nombreux représentants d’agences gouvernementales ou de ministères ignorent tout du contenu du contrat, certains nous demandant même de leur procurer une copie. C’est ainsi que notre interlocuteur au ministère des Affaires intérieures a découvert qu’une partie du contrat portait sur le marché des crédits carbone. Des subventions qui iront directement dans la poche de la multinationale, comme le mentionne cet extrait en page 52 du contrat : « Le gouvernement inconditionnellement et irrévocablement (...) renonce, en faveur de l’investisseur, à tout droit ou revendication sur les droits du carbone. »

      « C’est à se demander si les investisseurs son vraiment intéressés par l’huile de palme ou par les crédits carbone », ironise Alfred Brownell, de l’ONG Green Advocates. « Nous disons aux communautés que ce n’est pas seulement leurs terres qui leur sont enlevées, ce sont aussi les bénéfices qui en sont issus », explique Jonathan Yiah.

      La forêt primaire remplacée par l’huile de palme ?

      Les convoitises de la multinationale s’étendent bien au-delà. Le militant écologiste organise depuis des mois des réunions publiques avec les habitants du comté de Gbarpolu, plus au nord. Cette région abrite une grande partie de la forêt primaire de Haute-Guinée. Sime Darby y a obtenu une concession de 159 827 hectares… Du contrat, les habitants ne savaient rien, jusqu’à ce que les Amis de la Terre Liberia viennent le leur présenter. La question de la propriété foncière revient sans cesse. « Comment le gouvernement peut-il céder nos terres à une compagnie alors même que nous détenons des titres de propriété ? », interrogent-ils. La crainte relative à la perte de leurs forêts, de leurs terres agricoles, d’un sol riche en or et en diamants s’installe.

      Lors d’une réunion, au moment où James énonce la durée du contrat, 63 ans – reconductible 30 ans ! –, c’est la colère qui prend le pas. « Que deviendront mes enfants au terme de ces 63 années de contrat avec Sime Darby ? », se désespère Kollie, qui a toujours vécu de l’agriculture, comme 70 % de la population active du pays. Parmi les personnes présentes, certaines, au contraire, voient dans la venue de Sime Darby la promesse d’investissements dans des hôpitaux, des écoles, des routes, mais aussi dans de nouveaux systèmes d’assainissement en eau potable. Et, déjà, la peur de nouveaux conflits germent. « Nous ne voulons de personne ici qui ramène du conflit parmi nous », lance Frederick. Les plaies des deux guerres civiles successives (1989-1996, puis 2001-2003) sont encore ouvertes. Près d’un million de personnes, soit un Libérien sur trois, avaient alors fui vers les pays voisins.

      Mea culpa gouvernemental

      « En signant une série de contrats à long terme accordant des centaines de milliers d’hectares à des conglomérats étrangers, le gouvernement voulait relancer l’économie et l’emploi, analyse James, des Amis de la Terre Liberia. Mais il n’a pas vu toutes les implications ». D’après un rapport de janvier 2012 réalisé par le Centre international de résolution des conflits, près de 40 % de la population libérienne vivraient à l’intérieur de concessions privées ! Aux côtés de Sime Darby, deux autres compagnies, la britannique Equatorial Palm Oil et l’indonésienne Golden Veroleum, ont acquis respectivement 169 000 et 240 000 hectares pour planter de l’huile de palme.

      Dans le comté de Grand Cape Mount, en décembre 2011, des habitants se sont saisis des clés des bulldozers de Sime Darby afin d’empêcher la poursuite de l’expansion des plantations et d’exiger des négociations. Une équipe interministérielle a depuis été mise en place, où siègent des citoyens du comté. « Oui, il y a eu des erreurs dans l’accord », reconnait-on à la Commission foncière. « Nous essayons de trouver des solutions pour que chacun en sorte gagnant », renchérit-on au ministère des Affaires intérieures. Difficile à croire pour les habitants du comté, qui n’ont rien vu, jusque-là, des grandes promesses philanthropes de Sime Darby.

      De l’huile de palme dans les agrocarburants

      Et si le changement venait des pays où l’on consomme de l’huile de palme ? Retour dans l’Aude, au pied du massif des Corbières. En décembre 2011, Sime Darby a annoncé geler pour un an son projet d’implantation de raffinerie à Port-la-Nouvelle. Les prévisions de commandes d’huile de palme sont en baisse, alors que le coût de l’usine grimpe. L’huile de palme commence à souffrir de sa mauvaise réputation, alimentaire et environnementale. De nombreuses marques l’ont retirée de la composition de leurs produits. L’huile de palme contribuerait à la malbouffe. Une fois solidifiée par injection d’hydrogène, elle regorge d’acides gras qui s’attaquent aux artères : un cauchemar pour les nutritionnistes. Dans les enseignes bios, elle commence également à être pointée du doigt comme l’une des causes de la déforestation, en Indonésie, en Afrique ou en Amérique latine. Pourtant, bien que la grande distribution réduise son besoin en huile de palme, cette dernière demeure aujourd’hui, et de loin, la première huile végétale importée en Europe. Merci les agrocarburants…

      « La consommation moyenne d’un Européen est d’environ 12 litres/an d’huile de palme, ce qui représente un accaparement d’environ 25 m2 de plantation de palmiers à huile dans un autre pays », souligne Sylvain Angerand, des Amis de la Terre France. « Relocaliser l’économie, développer les transports en commun, lutter contre l’étalement urbain seraient autant de mesures structurelles permettant de réduire notre consommation de carburant », propose l’écologiste. Réduire nos besoins ici, en Europe, pourrait diminuer partiellement l’accaparement des terres dans le Sud. À Port-la-Nouvelle, le collectif No Palme planche déjà sur des plans de développement alternatif pour le port. Avec en tête, les témoignages de leurs compères libériens.

      https://www.bastamag.net/Crime-environnemental-sur-la-piste

  • Bolivia Declares ’Total Independence’ From World Bank And IMF
    https://www.mintpressnews.com/bolivias-president-declares-total-independence-world-bank-imf/230062

    Bolivia’s President Evo Morales has been highlighting his government’s independence from international money lending organizations and their detrimental impact the nation, the Telesur TV reported.

    “A day like today in 1944 ended Bretton Woods Economic Conference (USA), in which the IMF and WB were established,” Morales tweeted. “These organizations dictated the economic fate of Bolivia and the world. Today we can say that we have total independence of them.”

    Morales has said Bolivia’s past dependence on the agencies was so great that the International Monetary Fund had an office in government headquarters and even participated in their meetings.

    #bolivie #résistance #fmi #banque_mondiale

  • Batailles commerciales pour éclairer l’#Afrique, par Aurélien Bernier (Le Monde diplomatique, février 2018)
    https://www.monde-diplomatique.fr/2018/02/BERNIER/58354

    Derrière les discours généreux...
    Passée relativement inaperçue lors de la #COP21, qui s’est tenue fin 2015, l’Initiative africaine pour les énergies renouvelables (IAER) rassemble les cinquante-quatre pays du continent. L’objectif affiché par cette coalition, pilotée par l’Union africaine, est « d’atteindre au moins 10 gigawatts [GW] de capacité nouvelle et additionnelle de production d’énergie à partir de sources d’énergies renouvelables d’ici à 2020, et de mobiliser le potentiel africain pour produire au moins 300 GW d’ici à 2030 ». Cela reviendrait à multiplier par près de dix la production actuelle d’énergie renouvelable (cette augmentation devant contribuer à 50 % de la croissance totale de la production d’ici à 2040). Et à augmenter, sans recourir aux énergies fossiles, le taux d’électrification du continent (lire « Alimenter l’Europe ? »).

    Le Japon, l’Union européenne et huit pays occidentaux (Allemagne, Canada, États-Unis, France, Italie, Pays-Bas, Royaume-Uni et Suède) ont promis de consacrer 9,4 milliards d’euros d’ici à 2020 au financement de l’Initiative, dont 3 milliards d’euros annoncés par Paris. En dépit de la provenance des fonds, le cadre fondateur de l’#IAER précise que les pays du continent doivent pouvoir choisir les projets financés et en maîtriser la mise en œuvre ; les entreprises africaines doivent être sollicitées en priorité. L’Initiative est dirigée par un conseil d’administration composé de hauts fonctionnaires majoritairement désignés par les États africains.

    Pourtant, au mois de mars 2017, le professeur Youba Sokona, vice-président du Groupe d’experts intergouvernemental sur l’évolution du climat (#GIEC/#IPCC) chargé de l’unité « projets » de l’IAER, démissionne avec fracas. Le scientifique malien estime que les financeurs ont « mis sur pied une stratégie pour imposer aux Africains des projets automatiquement sélectionnés par les Européens ». Et de citer la première vague de dix-neuf dossiers validés malgré les réserves émises par des membres africains du conseil d’administration de l’Initiative. En parallèle, près de deux cents associations africaines signent une lettre ouverte intitulée « Stop au détournement de l’IAER par l’Europe ». Elles accusent plusieurs pays européens, et particulièrement la France, d’imposer des projets favorisant les intérêts directs de leurs multinationales de l’énergie et de leurs bureaux d’études. Dans un rapport présenté le 20 septembre 2016, Mme Ségolène Royal, alors ministre de l’environnement et présidente de la COP21, n’avait-elle pas identifié 240 projets et programmes dans diverses filières : hydraulique, géothermie, solaire, éolien (1) ?

    Pourquoi tant d’initiatives juxtaposées ? Toutes partagent ce constat : la sous-alimentation de l’Afrique en électricité entrave son développement (lire « Des pénuries incessantes »). Elles affichent toutes les mêmes images d’enfants dont le sourire est éclairé par une ampoule électrique. Elles proposent toutes plus ou moins les mêmes outils : des enceintes pour des discussions d’affaires, des fonds d’investissement ou de garantie, des prêts, des expertises… Et surtout, elles insistent toutes sur l’importance cruciale des partenariats public-privé.

    La générosité des textes fondateurs de ces plates-formes cache des intentions souvent très prosaïques. Depuis les années 1980, les pays occidentaux ouvrent leurs marchés électriques à la concurrence, provoquant une intense guerre commerciale entre les grandes entreprises du secteur. Mais les systèmes électriques du Vieux Continent et ceux de l’Amérique du Nord demeurent en surcapacité de production. Dans ces régions, les perspectives de croissance restent donc relativement faibles. Ce qui n’est pas le cas pour des marchés émergents, comme celui de l’Afrique.

    Afin de favoriser leur expansion, les compagnies étrangères bénéficient du processus de libéralisation engagé depuis près de trente ans sur le continent. Au cours du xxe siècle, la plupart des pays avaient créé des entreprises publiques disposant d’un monopole dans la production, le transport et la distribution du courant. Faute de moyens financiers suffisants, ces services nationaux sont souvent exsangues, incapables de garantir un approvisionnement de qualité. Plutôt que de les soutenir, la #Banque_mondiale, le #Fonds_monétaire_international ou encore la #BAD ont encouragé l’adoption de méthodes de gestion issues du privé et une ouverture progressive à la concurrence.

    [...]

    Bon nombre d’entreprises françaises du CAC 40 se ruent sur le secteur. En juin 2017, le Sénégal raccorde ainsi au réseau la centrale solaire de Senergy, à 130 kilomètres au nord de Dakar. Il s’agit du plus gros projet de ce type en Afrique de l’Ouest. Aux côtés du fonds souverain sénégalais Fonsis, les propriétaires de la centrale sont le fonds d’investissement français Meridiam et le constructeur Solairedirect, filiale du groupe Engie. D’autres sociétés françaises interviennent sur le chantier : Schneider Electric, qui fournit les onduleurs et les transformateurs, Eiffage ou encore Vinci.

    Pour rassurer les investisseurs, on peut également compter sur la finance carbone. Le protocole de #Kyoto, adopté en 1997, a posé les bases d’un système d’achat et de vente de « tonnes équivalent carbone » : les industriels qui dépassent un certain niveau d’#émission de #gaz_à_effet_de_serre doivent acheter des #droits_à_émettre ; à l’inverse, des projets peu #émetteurs se voient délivrer des crédits qu’ils peuvent vendre.

    Poussés par les institutions internationales et les entreprises privées, les pays africains adoptent des législations ad hoc permettant le développement du marché du carbone. Le carbon trading commence à se développer, et avec lui des start-up prometteuses. En 2009, un jeune Français diplômé en droit fonde la société Ecosur Afrique. Établie à l’île Maurice, elle exerce trois activités : le conseil, le développement de projets et le négoce de crédits carbone. Aujourd’hui rebaptisée Aera, la société s’est délocalisée à Paris et revendique 263 millions d’euros de crédits carbone échangés depuis sa création. Un début, puisque, selon son fondateur, « l’Afrique est un réservoir de crédits de #carbone presque inutilisé ».

    [...]

    C’est ainsi que s’explique le très controversé #barrage Grand Inga, en République démocratique du Congo (8). Dans un pays qui concentre près de 40 % des ressources hydroélectriques du continent (ce qui lui vaut le surnom de « château d’eau de l’Afrique »), il s’agit de construire un ouvrage deux fois plus imposant que le barrage chinois des Trois-Gorges, le plus grand du monde.

    La Banque mondiale, la BAD et l’Usaid contribuent aux études de faisabilité de ce projet, dont le coût varie, selon les estimations, entre 80 et 100 milliards de dollars. Le G20 l’a inclus dans sa liste des onze grands chantiers structurants pour la « communauté internationale ». Seuls 20 % de la production seraient destinés à alimenter le marché national ; le reste serait exporté. Grand Inga nécessiterait non seulement d’inonder une superficie importante de terres arables (22 000 hectares), mais aussi de construire 15 000 kilomètres de lignes à très haute tension.

    Il existe déjà des barrages dans cette région, mais les installations n’ont jamais fonctionné correctement, faute de suivi dans les investissements. Plusieurs turbines sont à l’arrêt. Deux projets sont en cours : moderniser les installations existantes et construire le gigantesque barrage de Grand Inga. Ses plus gros clients seraient les mines de la province congolaise du Katanga et celles d’Afrique du Sud, Pretoria connaissant depuis de nombreuses années de graves pénuries d’électricité. À la fin des années 1990, le gouvernement sud-africain envisage un temps la privatisation d’Eskom, l’entreprise publique de production et de distribution d’électricité. Malgré les avertissements de la direction, les autorités ne procèdent pas aux investissements nécessaires à la satisfaction d’une demande intérieure croissante. Les coupures se multiplient.

  • L’ex-directeur du FMI Rodrigo Rato sera jugé pour escroquerie Le Devoir - 17 novembre 2017 - Agence France-Presse
    http://www.ledevoir.com/economie/actualites-economiques/513308/l-ex-directeur-du-fmi-rato-sera-juge-pour-escroquerie

    Madrid — L’ex-directeur du Fonds monétaire international (FMI) Rodrigo Rato sera jugé pour avoir falsifié les comptes et escroqué les investisseurs lors de l’entrée en Bourse de la banque espagnole Bankia en 2011, a annoncé vendredi un tribunal espagnol.

    M. Rato, à la tête de la banque à l’époque des faits, sera jugé avec une trentaine d’autres anciens responsables de Bankia, qui s’était effondrée après son entrée en bourse catastrophique, obligeant l’État à la nationaliser pour la sauver.

    Le parquet anticorruption espagnol a requis en juin cinq ans de prison contre M. Rato, expliquant que l’ancien président de la banque et trois autres anciens dirigeants étaient « spécialement responsables du fait que des informations essentielles sur la véritable situation patrimoniale de Bankia avaient été soustraites au moment de son introduction en bourse ».

    Bankia, créée à partir de la fusion de sept caisses d’épargne en juillet 2011, avait été introduite en Bourse en grande pompe par Rodrigo Rato, ex-directeur du Fonds monétaire international (2004-2007) et ancien ministre espagnol conservateur de l’Économie (1996-2004).

    Dans l’année qui avait suivi, les comptes de Bankia s’étaient avérés catastrophiques et son cours en Bourse avait chuté de plus de 80 %, ruinant des dizaines de milliers de petits actionnaires.

    L’affaire, alliée aux conséquences de la crise économique, avait précipité un sauvetage du secteur bancaire espagnol, effectué grâce à un prêt européen de plus de 41 milliards d’euros, dont 22 milliards pour renflouer la seule Bankia.

    En tant qu’ancien président de Bankia, Rodrigo Rato a déjà été condamné en février à quatre ans et demi de prison pour l’émission de cartes bancaires occultes qui permettaient à leurs titulaires, notamment des dirigeants de la banque, de dépenser sans compter et sans déclarer ces revenus additionnels.

    Il est libre dans l’attente de son procès en appel.

    #FMI #Espagne #Rodrigo_Rato #banques #Bankia #corruption #crise_financière #Parti_Populaire espagnol #PP #banco_santander #banque_mondiale #banque_interaméricaine_de_développement #BID #banque_européenne_d_investissement #BEI #Banque_européenne_pour_la_reconstruction_et_le_développement #BERD #banque_lazard #escroquerie #faux #usage_de_faux

  • CADTM - Pourquoi il est possible de traduire en justice la Banque mondiale
    http://www.cadtm.org/Pourquoi-il-est-possible-de,2344

    Intervention d’Éric Toussaint, président du CADTM Belgique à l’occasion d’une journée consacrée à l’audit de la dette de la République démocratique du Congo (RDC), au sénat belge.

    Est-il possible de traduire la Banque mondiale en justice ?

    Contrairement à une idée répandue, la Banque mondiale ne bénéficie pas en tant qu’institution, en tant que personne morale, d’une immunité. La section 3 de l’article VII de sa charte (articles of agreement) prévoit explicitement que la Banque peut être traduite en justice sous certaines conditions. La Banque peut être jugée notamment devant une instance de justice nationale dans les pays où elle dispose d’une représentation et/ou dans un pays où elle a émis des titres |1|.

    Cette possibilité de poursuivre la Banque en justice a été prévue dès la fondation de la Banque en 1944 et cela n’a pas été modifié jusqu’à présent pour la simple et bonne raison que la Banque finance les prêts qu’elle accorde à ses membres (pays-membres) en recourant à des emprunts (via l’émission de titres -bonds-) sur les marchés financiers. A l’origine, ces titres étaient acquis par des grandes banques privées principalement nord-américaines. Maintenant, d’autres institutions, y compris des fonds de pension et des syndicats, en font aussi l’acquisition.

    Les pays qui ont fondé la Banque mondiale ont considéré qu’ils n’arriveraient pas à vendre des titres de la Banque s’ils ne garantissaient pas aux acheteurs qu’ils pourraient se retourner contre elle en cas de faut de paiement. C’est pour cela qu’il y a une différence fondamentale entre le statut de la Banque et celui du FMI du point de vue de l’immunité. La Banque n’en bénéficie pas car elle recourt aux services des banquiers et des marchés financiers en général. Aucun banquier ne ferait crédit à la Banque mondiale si elle bénéficiait de l’immunité. Par contre, le FMI peut disposer de l’immunité car il finance lui-même ses prêts à partir des quotes-parts versées par ses membres. Si l’immunité n’est pas accordée à la Banque mondiale, ce n’est pas pour des raisons humanitaires, c’est pour offrir des garanties aux bailleurs de fonds.

    Il est donc parfaitement possible de porter plainte contre la Banque dans les nombreux pays (près de 100) où elle dispose de bureaux. C’est possible à Djakarta ou à Dili, capitale du Timor oriental, tout comme à Kinshasa, à Bruxelles, à Moscou ou à Washington car la Banque dispose d’une représentation dans ces pays et dans bien d’autres.

    #Banque_mondiale #FMI #dette #néo-colonialisme

  • In Uzbekistan, the World Bank is masking labour abuses

    Uzbekistan has often used forced labour to bring in the cotton harvest. A new report shows that the World Bank’s continuing investment may only prolong the practice.


    https://www.opendemocracy.net/od-russia/jessica-evans/in-uzbekistan-world-bank-is-masking-labour-abuses
    #travail #exploitation #Banque_mondiale #Ouzbékistan #coton #agriculture

  • Vingt ans après : de la crise asiatique à la crise financière globale, et la prochaine
    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/economie/010717/vingt-ans-apres-de-la-crise-asiatique-la-crise-financiere-globale-et-la-pr

    Le 2 juillet 1997, le décrochage brutal de la devise thaïlandaise, le bath, précipitait le « #miracle_asiatique » dans le fossé. Retour sur cet événement majeur, annonciateur de la crise financière globale survenue en 2007-2008, avec #Michel_Camdessus, son acteur principal, à la tête du Fonds monétaire international.

    #Economie #Banque_mondiale #banques_centrales #Bretton_Woods #chaebols #FMI #Kim_Dae_Jung #Lee_Kuan_Yew #liquidité #Suharto #système_monétaire_international