• Glasgow launches detailed study of its historical links with transatlantic slavery

    THIRTY years ago, Glasgow gave the name “#Merchant_City” to a historic quarter of the city centre.

    Few eyebrows were raised at the time but, as Susan Aitken, the present leader of Glasgow City Council, said this week, such a move would today be “unthinkable”, for Merchant City, a popular residential, shopping and leisure area, has streets named after merchants – tobacco lords, and members of the “sugar aristocracy” – who profited on a substantial scale from the slave trade.

    As the historian Professor Michael Lynch observed a decade ago, “nowhere in Britain does the built environment act as a more overt reminder of the ’Horrible Traffik’ than the streets and buildings of Glasgow’s Merchant City”.

    This week the council became the first in the UK to launch a major academic study into historic bequests linked to transatlantic slavery.

    To be carried out by Dr Stephen Mullen, a noted academic historian who has studied the city’s links with the trade, it will leave no stone unturned.

    There will be four specific stages. A detailed audit will be carried out into historic bequests made to Glasgow Town Council, to see if there are any connections with transatlantic slavery. Statues, street-names, buildings and Lords Provost with any such connections will also be examined.

    Records relating to the City Chambers, a striking Victorian building completed in 1888, will be scrutinised to see what proportion of funds came from donors with connections to the slave trade.

    The fourth area will compile evidence to inform any future strategy for Glasgow itself. The council says that Dr Mullen’s year-long study will lead to a wide-ranging public consultation on its findings and on how Glasgow should move forward.

    The move comes a few months after Glasgow University said it would pay £20 million in reparative justice over the next 20 years to atone for its historical links to the transatlantic slave trade.

    A detailed report into the issue, co-authored by Dr Mullen and thought to be the first of its kind in the UK, found that though the university never owned enslaved people or traded in goods they produced, it “indirectly benefited from racial slavery” by anything between £16.7 million and £198 million in today’s money.

    One of the donors to the university was the celebrated inventor, James Watt, the son of a West India merchant and slave-trader, who supported him in his career. Watt also worked for his father as a mercantile agent in Glasgow during the 1750s. His statue has stood in George Square, within sight of the City Chambers, for some 200 years.

    Speaking on Thursday, Dr Mullen, who in 2009 wrote an influential book, “It Wisnae Us: The Truth About Glasgow and Slavery”, discussed the extent to which Glasgow’s links with the transatlantic slave trade are embedded in the modern city.

    He said: "Some street names are well known. We already know that Buchanan Street was named after a slave-trader. We already know that Glassford Street [in the Merchant City] was named after John Glassford, whose Shawfield Mansion was on the site.

    “We already know from the Glassford portrait in the People’s Palace that a young enslaved boy lived on that street. We already know that the Cunninghame Mansion [on Royal Exchange Square – the core of which is now the Gallery of Modern Art – was built by a tobacco lord and had successive associations with colonial merchants.”

    Dr Mullen added: “The exact nature of the slavery connections of these individuals will be confirmed and further research could elucidate hitherto unknown connections of individuals connected to other streets, buildings and/or statues”.

    He said his study would be the “first systematic attempt at a holistic study of these aspects of Glasgow’s built heritage”.

    In terms of statues, he said he currently was unaware of any dedicated to tobacco lords or members of the “sugar aristocracy”, though some examples might yet arise. For the time being, he did not believe that Glasgow has the same celebration of slave-traders as does Bristol, with Edward Colston.

    Dr Mullen noted that cities such as Bristol, London and Liverpool have already renamed bridges and international museums, or have erected additional plaques, to recognise the presence of slave-owners and enslaved people in certain sites.

    “Cities in the USA, such as Philadelphia,” he added, “have also developed strategies to address the unacknowledged slavery past of prominent figures such as George Washington. These strategies will be taken into consideration.”

    Ms Aitken, the council leader, acknowledged that the authority would face criticism, from ancestors of those “deeply affected” by the slave trade, or from others accusing it of “needless self-flagellation or of dredging up aspects of our past that we can’t change, in the cause of political correctness.”

    But asking Dr Mullen to study the city’s troubling historical links was the right thing to do, she added. Pointing out that slavery fortunes continued after the system was abolished in the West Indies in 1834, she said, “I believe that as a city we now have to know the reach of that slave-economy wealth. We need to know how to properly address our past, and we need to know to allow Glasgow to move forward from its past”.

    The announcement received an enthusiastic welcome from Sir Geoff Palmer, Professor Emeritus in the School of Life Sciences at Edinburgh’s Heriot-Watt University and a noted human rights activist. “We cannot change the past - that is impossible - but what we can change are the consequences of the past”, he said.

    Ms Aitken told The Herald that there would be “no more ‘Merchant Cities’, no more things being named after people like John Glassford”.

    She added that discussions were taking place as to whether a line could now be drawn under the name of Buchanan.

    This could affect the huge Barclays Bank development in the Tradeston district. “The developers are calling it Buchanan Wharf. I’m not able to say anything specific about that but what I can say is that these are conversations that we are having, and I think there are open ears and open minds to this conversation”.

    She believes there is a lingering sense of “discomfort” in Glasgow around the legacy of slavery.

    “We should be deeply uncomfortable about what happened, and about Glasgow’s role was.

    “But we need Glaswegians, and future generations of them, to have a sense of comfort in confronting it - comfort in understanding that this is something we cannot ignore. We cannot just say, ‘It was a long time ago’.

    “We want them to have comfort in the knowledge that we’re doing the right thing by not only uncovering as many of the facts as we can establish now, but most of all in understanding what the impact is now”.

    She added: “There will be a lot of Glaswegians who will have no problem in understanding that when you look at what is happening to African Americans in terms of the Black Lives Matter campaign, and the dreadful things that they see … We have no difficulty in intellectually making the connection with slavery, and what was done to African Americans, and what they have suffered in the years since, and seeing that this is part of a continuum of racism".

    She added: “What the concrete outcomes will be of this new study are open to question. Maybe by this time next year, by the time of Black History Month, we will be getting closer to answering that question.

    “Stephen’s work will be almost completed and we will have been having those conversations with the city, and we may have answers around maybe changing some street names, or maybe elucidating some street names rather than changing them.” ‘Elucidating’ could mean displaying supplementary historical background information.

    Ms Aitken accepted that there was a “difference of opinion in those things’ and said her own view leans more towards elucidation than to changing street names.

    “Most importantly, those people who are still living with this legacy [of slavery] need to tell us what is the best thing for them”.

    She said she “genuinely doesn’t know” whether the council will consider making any sort of reparations. Reparations did not always have to be strictly financial.They could take the form of the council embedding what it learns from Dr Mullen’s work in the curriculum - “making sure that ignorance stops with this generation”.

    Reparation could also mean “investing in the people who continue to live with that legacy and addressing that legacy”.

    More immediately, the Glasgow Life organisation will appoint a curator who will develop a strategy for the interpretation of slavery and empire in Glasgow Museums. A display on the legacies of empire, race and globalisation will take place in the City Chambers.

    “It’s not about having an exhibition here and an exhibition there,” Ms Aitken said. “It’s about having on display, right the way through everything, a consciousness of that legacy and that history, and that that it is reflected in the language that we use”.

    https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/18026659.glasgow-launches-detailed-study-historical-links-transatlantic-slavery/?ref=twtrec
    #histoire #esclavage #Glasgow #toponymie #toponymie_politique #architecture #James_Watt #université #Buchanan_Street #Buchanan #Glassford_Street #John_Glassford #Shawfield_Mansion #Cunninghame_Mansion #esclavagistes #villes #géographie_urbaine #urban_matter #héritage #mémoire #statues #noms_de_rue #économie #Barclays_Bank #Buchanan_Wharf

    ping @reka

  • #BNP_Paribas financera jusqu’en 2024 un groupe américain spécialisé dans la détention des migrants

    En Europe, BNP Paribas s’enorgueillit d’aider les réfugiés. Aux États-Unis, la première banque française finance pourtant depuis 2003 le groupe GEO, numéro un des prisons privées spécialisé dans la détention des migrants, au cœur de nombreux scandales. Elle a annoncé son désengagement financier… en 2024.

    BNP Paribas, première banque française et une des plus grandes du monde, se targue d’être « la banque qui aide les réfugiés » en Europe. « Depuis 2015, BNP Paribas soutient une vingtaine d’entrepreneurs sociaux et associations engagés dans l’accueil des réfugiés, expliquait l’an dernier Le Journal du dimanche. Au total, près de 12 millions d’euros seront déboursés d’ici à 2021. »

    Sur son site, la célèbre banque au logo vert s’engage même à doubler les dons versés par ses clients à son propre fonds d’aide aux réfugiés, créé en 2012. « Le drame des réfugiés est une catastrophe humanitaire majeure, qui mobilise de nombreuses associations et bénévoles, explique le PDG de la banque, Jean-Laurent Bonafé. […] BNP Paribas est à leurs côtés. »

    Aux États-Unis, la banque est plutôt du côté de ceux qui les enferment. Selon In The Public Interest, un centre de recherche sur les privatisations situé en Californie, elle participe en effet depuis seize ans, et de manière active, au financement du groupe GEO, le géant américain des prisons privées.

    GEO, dont le siège social est en Floride, incarne l’incroyable essor du secteur du complexe pénitentiaire depuis trente ans aux États-Unis, qui comptent 2,3 millions de prisonniers – 655 pour 100 000 habitants, un record mondial.

    Un cinquième du chiffre d’affaires annuel de GEO (2,3 milliards de dollars, 2 milliards d’euros) provient de la détention des migrants au #Texas, en #Louisiane ou en #Californie, pour le compte de l’agence gouvernementale #ICE (#Immigration_and_Customs_Enforcement).

    Depuis 2003, cette activité de crédit, dont la banque ne s’est jamais trop vantée, lui a fait gagner beaucoup d’argent. « Sans doute des dizaines de millions de dollars », évalue pour Mediapart Kevin Connor, chercheur au Public Accountability Initiative de Buffalo (New York), qui a épluché les contrats souscrits par les banques avec les mastodontes de la détention privée aux États-Unis. Une estimation prudente, car les clauses des contrats de financement entre GEO et BNP Paribas restent secrètes.

    L’administration Trump, qui a criminalisé l’immigration, cherche à terroriser les migrants et à tarir les demandes d’asile. Elle enferme en continu environ 50 000 migrants, pour beaucoup originaires d’Amérique latine, un record historique.

    En 2018, 400 000 migrants au total ont été détenus par les gardes-frontières et l’agence ICE. Environ 70 % des migrants détenus par ICE le sont par des groupes privés comme GEO, #CoreCivic ou #Caliburn. Depuis deux décennies, l’industrie des prisons privées, en perte de vitesse à la fin des années 1990, a profité à plein de la criminalisation des migrants.

    « La détention des migrants aux États-Unis a été quasiment sous-traitée au privé, nous explique Lauren-Brooke Eisen, chercheuse au Brennan Center for Justice de l’université de New York, auteure de Inside Private Prisons (Columbia University Press, non traduit). En aggravant la crise à la frontière, les politiques de l’administration Trump ont soutenu cette industrie. » Sitôt élu, Trump a d’ailleurs annulé un ordre de l’administration Obama limitant le recours aux prisons privées.

    Pour ces groupes privés dépendant des contrats publics, cajoler les politiques est une nécessité. Pour la seule année 2018, GEO a dépensé 2,8 millions de dollars de #lobbying et de dons à des politiques, la plupart des républicains.

    Le groupe a également versé 250 000 dollars pour la cérémonie d’investiture de Trump, et fait un don de 225 000 dollars au comité d’action politique ayant financé la campagne de l’actuel président, un geste qualifié d’« illégal » par l’ONG Campaign Legal Center, #GEO étant un sous-traitant du gouvernement.

    L’industrie est coutumière des allers-retours entre public et privé : le groupe Caliburn, récemment épinglé par Amnesty International pour sa gestion de la prison géante pour mineurs migrants de #Homestead (Floride), a même embauché l’ancien secrétaire à la sécurité nationale #John_Kelly, qui fut directement en charge de la politique migratoire au début de la présidence Trump – et continua à la superviser lorsqu’il devint chef de cabinet du président…

    D’après un rapport publié en novembre 2016 par In The Public Interest, BNP Paribas, de concert avec de grandes banques américaines, a joué un rôle actif depuis seize ans auprès de GEO :

    « Risques immédiats » pour les migrants

    BNP a en effet participé depuis 2003 à plusieurs tours de table permettant de dégager, via des crédits renouvelables (« #revolving_credits »), des prêts à terme (« #term_loans ») ou la souscription d’obligations (« #bonds »), d’énormes lignes de crédit pour GEO – des centaines de millions de dollars à chaque fois –, ensuite utilisées par le groupe pour acheter des sociétés, accaparer de nouvelles prisons, ou financer ses activités courantes.

    À la suite d’un nouvel accord passé l’an dernier, GEO dispose désormais d’un crédit renouvelable de 900 millions de dollars avec six banques (BNP Paribas, #Bank_of_America, #Barclays, #JPMorgan_Chase, #SunTrust, #Wells_Fargo). Il a souscrit avec les mêmes établissements un prêt à terme de 800 millions de dollars.

    « Pour les prisons privées, ces prêts massifs sont un peu des cartes de crédit, explique Shahrzad Habibi, directrice de la recherche de In The Public Interest. Pour éviter de payer l’impôt sur les sociétés, les groupes comme GEO ont un statut de trust d’investissement immobilier (REIT) qui leur impose de distribuer une grande partie de leurs profits à leurs actionnaires. » Faute de cash disponible, ils dépendent donc largement des crédits extérieurs.

    Pour ce service, les établissements bancaires sont grassement rémunérés : selon des documents transmis au régulateur américain, GEO a payé l’an dernier 150 millions de dollars d’intérêts à ses différents créditeurs.

    Une partie, non connue, de cette somme est allée à #BNP, qui touche aussi des #redevances substantielles en tant qu’« agent administratif » pour certaines de ses opérations. « Ces redevances, dont on ne connaît pas les détails, se chiffrent en centaines de milliers, potentiellement en millions de dollars », explique le chercheur Kevin Connor.

    Contacté, BNP Paribas assure ne pas « communiqu[er] les informations relatives aux crédits de [ses] clients ». Mais les prêts de la banque ne constituent, selon une porte-parole, que « 3 % du total » des financements du groupe GEO, et « une part négligeable » des revenus de BNP.

    Ces derniers mois, les images de migrants entassés dans des centres de détention surpeuplés et sordides ont ému le monde entier. Pour éviter de voir leur image de marque entachée, des géants de Wall Street (JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, SunTrust, etc.), pressés depuis des années de se désengager du secteur par des activistes, ont annoncé les uns après les autres qu’ils cessaient de financer le secteur des prisons privées.
    BNP Paribas a récemment suivi leur exemple. « BNP Paribas a pris la décision, comme plusieurs banques américaines, de ne plus intervenir sur le marché du financement des #prisons_privées. Désormais la banque n’engagera plus de financement dans ce secteur », nous a confirmé la banque, à la suite d’un article paru début juillet dans le quotidien belge L’Écho.

    Elle « honorera » toutefois « son engagement contractuel vis-à-vis de GEO », c’est-à-dire les crédits en cours, qui prennent fin en 2024.

    Pendant cinq ans, BNP Paribas continuera donc de financer les investissements et les dépenses courantes d’un groupe contesté, dont le nom est entaché par de multiples scandales.

    Comme le rappelle le Miami Herald, GEO a été « poursuivi à de multiples reprises pour avoir supposément forcé des détenus à travailler pour de la nourriture », a été accusé de « torturer des détenus dans l’Arizona », est épinglé depuis des années pour le taux alarmant de décès dans certains de ses centres gérés pour le compte d’ICE, des conditions sanitaires déplorables, l’abus du recours à l’isolement, le mépris des droits élémentaires des prisonniers. Il détient aussi des familles avec enfants dans son centre texan de #Karnes, une activité décriée depuis les années Obama par les défenseurs des migrants.

    Un rapport de l’inspection générale du Département de la sécurité nationale datant de juin 2019 fait état de « risques immédiats et de violations scandaleuses des standards de détention » dans certains des centres pour migrants de GEO, notamment dans le camp d’#Adelanto (#Californie), qui accueille 2 000 migrants, tristement connu pour ses abus répétés.

    Plusieurs candidats démocrates, comme Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders, Beto O’Rourke ou Kamala Harris, ont indiqué souhaiter interdire les prisons privées s’ils étaient élus.

    Mais si Trump est réélu en novembre 2020, BNP Paribas, Bank of America et les autres, qui ne comptent se retirer qu’à partir de 2024, continueront de prêter à GEO de quoi fonctionner et prospérer tout au long de son deuxième mandat, au cours duquel les humiliations contre les migrants ne manqueront pas de continuer, voire de s’amplifier.

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/220719/bnp-paribas-financera-jusqu-en-2024-un-groupe-americain-specialise-dans-la
    #privatisation #business #détention_administrative #rétention #asile #migrations #réfugiés #USA #Etats-Unis #sous-traitance #hypocrisie

  • Coucou, c’est moi, la #Crise financière, je suis de retour…
    https://reflets.info/coucou-cest-moi-la-crise-financiere-je-suis-de-retour

    Le spectre d’un retour en 2008 est à nos portes. Ça ne date pas d’hier, nous en avons parlé à de multiples reprises ici même. Mais cette fois, ça se précise. Vous avez dû le lire ces derniers jours, la Deutsche Bank est dans une situation catastrophique et en plus, les Etats-Unis veulent lui imposer […]

    #Economie #allemagne #Angela_Merkel #Barclays #Christine_Lagarde #Commerzbank #Crédit_Suisse #Crise_de_la_dette_souveraine #Deusche_Bank #France #produits_dérivés #Subprimes

  • It’s the economy, N°4
    http://africasacountry.com/2016/03/its-the-economy-n4

    Yes, this is a weekly series. #Barclays_Bank dominates this week’s missive. Oh, what is 16 plus 6? Don’t tell us yet. Hold that till the end. (1) This past week, the British bank Barclays announced plans to exit the African market after a formal presence of about a 100 years. The bank currently employs about […]

    #AFRICA_IS_A_COUNTRY #It's_the_economy_stupid

  • Les #eurodéputés à l’école des banquiers
    http://terrainsdeluttes.ouvaton.org/?p=5182

    Et si au lieu d’influencer les députés, on les formait directement à défendre nos intérêts ? A peu de choses près, voilà le credo des banques qui financent l’European Parliamentary […]

    #Organisations_patronales_et_lobbys #Banque #barclays #Bruxelles #citygroup #deustche_bank #EPFSF #European_Parliamentary_financial_services_forum #finance #hsbc #lobbys #parlement_européen #UE

  • Quand #Barclays essayait de censurer le Guardian | Renaud Coureau
    http://owni.fr/2011/06/01/quand-barclays-essayait-de-censurer-le-guardian

    Retour sur un conflit qui a opposé le quotidien anglais The Guardian et la banque Barclays en 2009, dont elle avait révélé les schémas d’évasion fiscale. Ou comment une décision de justice a pu être totalement invalidée par les internautes.

    #Economie #Pouvoirs #évasion_fiscale #guardian #HMRC #Royal_Bank_of_Scotland #royaume_uni #transparence