• Facebook Has Been a Disaster for the World
    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/18/opinion/facebook-democracy.html

    How much longer are we going to allow its platform to foment hatred and undermine democracy ? For years, Myanmar’s military used Facebook to incite hatred and genocidal violence against the country’s mostly Muslim Rohingya minority group, leading to mass death and displacement. It took until 2018 for Facebook to admit to and apologize for its failure to act. Two years later, the platform is, yet again, sowing the seeds for genocidal violence. This time it’s in Ethiopia, where the recent (...)

    #Facebook #manipulation #violence #extrême-droite

  • The #Rohingya. A humanitarian emergency decades in the making

    The violent 2017 ouster of more than 700,000 Rohingya from Myanmar into Bangladesh captured the international spotlight, but the humanitarian crisis had been building for decades.

    In August 2017, Myanmar’s military launched a crackdown that pushed out hundreds of thousands of members of the minority Rohingya community from their homes in northern Rakhine State. Today, roughly 900,000 Rohingya live across the border in southern Bangladesh, in cramped refugee camps where basic needs often overwhelm stretched resources.

    The crisis has shifted from a short-term response to a protracted emergency. Conditions in the camps have worsened as humanitarian services are scaled back during the coronavirus pandemic. Government restrictions on refugees and aid groups have grown, along with grievances among local communities on the margins of a massive aid operation.

    The 2017 exodus was the culmination of decades of restrictive policies in Myanmar, which have stripped Rohingya of their rights over generations, denied them an identity, and driven them from their homes.

    Here’s an overview of the current crisis and a timeline of what led to it. A selection of our recent and archival reporting on the Rohingya crisis is available below.
    Who are the Rohingya?

    The Rohingya are a mostly Muslim minority in western Myanmar’s Rakhine State. Rohingya say they are native to the area, but in Myanmar they are largely viewed as illegal immigrants from neighbouring Bangladesh.

    Myanmar’s government does not consider the Rohingya one of the country’s 135 officially recognised ethnic groups. Over decades, government policies have stripped Rohingya of citizenship and enforced an apartheid-like system where they are isolated and marginalised.
    How did the current crisis unfold?

    In October 2016, a group of Rohingya fighters calling itself the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army, or ARSA, staged attacks on border posts in northern Rakhine State, killing nine border officers and four soldiers. Myanmar’s military launched a crackdown, and 87,000 Rohingya civilians fled to Bangladesh over the next year.

    A month earlier, Myanmar’s de facto leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, had set up an advisory commission chaired by former UN secretary-general Kofi Annan to recommend a path forward in Rakhine and ease tensions between the Rohingya and ethnic Rakhine communities.

    On 24 August 2017, the commission issued its final report, which included recommendations to improve development in the region and tackle questions of citizenship for the Rohingya. Within hours, ARSA fighters again attacked border security posts.

    Myanmar’s military swept through the townships of northern Rakhine, razing villages and driving away civilians. Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya fled to Bangladesh in the ensuing weeks. They brought with them stories of burnt villages, rape, and killings at the hands of Myanmar’s military and groups of ethnic Rakhine neighbours. The refugee settlements of southern Bangladesh now have a population of roughly 900,000 people, including previous generations of refugees.

    What has the international community said?

    Multiple UN officials, rights investigators, and aid groups working in the refugee camps say there is evidence of brutal levels of violence against the Rohingya and the scorched-earth clearance of their villages in northern Rakhine State.

    A UN-mandated fact-finding mission on Myanmar says abuses and rights violations in Rakhine “undoubtedly amount to the gravest crimes under international law”; the rights probe is calling for Myanmar’s top generals to be investigated and prosecuted for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes.

    The UN’s top rights official has called the military purge a “textbook case of ethnic cleansing”. Médecins Sans Frontières estimates at least 6,700 Rohingya were killed in the days after military operations began in August 2017.

    Rights groups say there’s evidence that Myanmar security forces were preparing to strike weeks and months before the August 2017 attacks. The evidence included disarming Rohingya civilians, arming non-Rohingya, and increasing troop levels in the area.
    What has Myanmar said?

    Myanmar has denied almost all allegations of violence against the Rohingya. It says the August 2017 military crackdown was a direct response to the attacks by ARSA militants.

    Myanmar’s security forces admitted to the September 2017 killings of 10 Rohingya men in Inn Din village – a massacre exposed by a media investigation. Two Reuters journalists were arrested while researching the story. In September 2018, the reporters were convicted of breaking a state secrets law and sentenced to seven years in prison. They were released in May 2019, after more than a year behind bars.

    Myanmar continues to block international investigators from probing rights violations on its soil. This includes barring entry to the UN-mandated fact-finding mission and the UN’s special rapporteurs for the country.
    What is the situation in Bangladesh’s refugee camps?

    The swollen refugee camps of southern Bangladesh now have the population of a large city but little of the basic infrastructure.

    The dimensions of the response have changed as the months and years pass: medical operations focused on saving lives in 2017 must now also think of everyday illnesses and healthcare needs; a generation of young Rohingya have spent another year without formal schooling or ways to earn a living; women (and men) reported sexual violence at the hands of Myanmar’s military, but today the violence happens within the cramped confines of the camps.

    The coronavirus has magnified the problems and aid shortfalls in 2020. The government limited all but essential services and restricted aid access to the camps. Humanitarian groups say visits to health centres have dropped by half – driven in part by fear and misunderstandings. Gender-based violence has risen, and already-minimal services for women and girls are now even more rare.

    The majority of Rohingya refugees live in camps with population densities of less than 15 square metres per person – far below the minimum international guidelines for refugee camps (30 to 45 square metres per person). The risk of disease outbreaks is high in such crowded conditions, aid groups say.

    Rohingya refugees live in fragile shelters in the middle of floodplains and on landslide-prone hillsides. Aid groups say seasonal monsoon floods threaten large parts of the camps, which are also poorly prepared for powerful cyclones that typically peak along coastal Bangladesh in May and October.

    The funding request for the Rohingya response – totalling more than $1 billion in 2020 – represents one of the largest humanitarian appeals for a crisis this year. Previous appeals have been underfunded, which aid groups said had a direct impact on the quality of services available.

    What’s happening in Rakhine State?

    The UN estimates that 470,000 non-displaced Rohingya still live in Rakhine State. Aid groups say they continue to have extremely limited access to northern Rakhine State – the flashpoint of 2017’s military purge. There are “alarming” rates of malnutrition among children in northern Rakhine, according to UN agencies.

    Rohingya still living in northern Rakhine face heavy restrictions on working, going to school, and accessing healthcare. The UN says remaining Rohingya and ethnic Rakhine communities continue to live in fear of each other.

    Additionally, some 125,000 Rohingya live in barricaded camps in central Rakhine State. The government created these camps following clashes between Rohingya and Rakhine communities in 2012. Rohingya there face severe restrictions and depend on aid groups for basic services.

    A separate conflict between the military and the Arakan Army, an ethnic Rakhine armed group, has brought new displacement and civilian casualties. Clashes displaced tens of thousands of people in Rakhine and neighbouring Chin State by early 2020, and humanitarian access has again been severely restricted. In February 2020, Myanmar’s government re-imposed mobile internet blackouts in several townships in Rakhine and Chin states, later extending high-speed restrictions until the end of October. Rights groups say the blackout could risk lives and make it even harder for humanitarian aid to reach people trapped by conflict. Amnesty International has warned of a looming food insecurity crisis in Rakhine.

    What’s next?

    Rights groups have called on the UN Security Council to refer Myanmar to the International Criminal Court to investigate allegations of committing atrocity crimes. The UN body has not done so.

    There are at least three parallel attempts, in three separate courts, to pursue accountability. ICC judges have authorised prosecutor Fatou Bensouda to begin an investigation into one aspect: the alleged deportation of the Rohingya, which is a crime against humanity under international law.

    Separately, the West African nation of The Gambia filed a lawsuit at the International Court of Justice asking the UN’s highest court to hold Myanmar accountable for “state-sponsored genocide”. In an emergency injunction granted in January 2020, the court ordered Myanmar to “take all measures within its power” to protect the Rohingya.

    And in a third legal challenge, a Rohingya rights group launched a case calling on courts in Argentina to prosecute military and civilian officials – including Aung San Suu Kyi – under the concept of universal jurisdiction, which pushes for domestic courts to investigate international crimes.

    Bangladesh and Myanmar have pledged to begin the repatriation of Rohingya refugees, but three separate deadlines have come and gone with no movement. In June 2018, two UN agencies signed a controversial agreement with Myanmar – billed as a first step to participating in any eventual returns plan. The UN, rights groups, and refugees themselves say Rakhine State is not yet safe for Rohingya to return.

    With no resolution in sight in Myanmar and bleak prospects in Bangladesh, a growing number of Rohingya women and children are using once-dormant smuggling routes to travel to countries like Malaysia.

    A regional crisis erupted in 2020 as multiple countries shut their borders to Rohingya boats, citing the coronavirus, leaving hundreds of people stranded at sea for weeks. Dozens are believed to have died.

    Bangladesh has raised the possibility of transferring 100,000 Rohingya refugees to an uninhabited, flood-prone island – a plan that rights groups say would effectively create an “island detention centre”. Most Rohingya refuse to go, but Bangladeshi authorities detained more than 300 people on the island in 2020 after they were rescued at sea.

    The government has imposed growing restrictions on the Rohingya as the crisis continues. In recent months, authorities have enforced orders barring most Rohingya from leaving the camp areas, banned the sale of SIM cards and cut mobile internet, and tightened restrictions on NGOs. Local community tensions have also risen. Aid groups report a rise in anti-Rohingya hate speech and racism, as well as “rapidly deteriorating security dynamics”.

    Local NGOs and civil society groups are pushing for a greater role in leading the response, warning that international donor funding will dwindle over the long term.

    And rights groups say Rohingya refugees themselves have had little opportunity to participate in decisions that affect their futures – both in Bangladesh’s camps and when it comes to the possibility of returning to Myanmar.

    https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/in-depth/myanmar-rohingya-refugee-crisis-humanitarian-aid-bangladesh
    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Birmanie #Myanmar #chronologie #histoire #génocide #Bangladesh #réfugiés_rohingya #Rakhine #camps_de_réfugiés #timeline #time-line #Arakan_Rohingya_Salvation_Army (#ARSA) #nettoyage_ethnique #justice #Cour_internationale_de_Justice (#CIJ)

  • Un #rapport de l’ONU s’inquiète de l’augmentation des #violences_sexuelles liées aux #conflits

    Malgré une décennie de lutte, l’#ONU constate que les violences sexuelles restent une #arme_de_guerre dans de nombreux conflits et qu’elles continuent d’augmenter sur toute la planète. L’ONU analyse dans son dernier rapport (https://news.un.org/fr/story/2020/07/1073341) les violations constatées dans 19 pays, principalement contre des jeunes #filles et des #femmes.

    Les violences sexuelles augmentent dans la plupart des #conflits_armés. C’est ce qui ressort du dernier rapport de l’ONU sur les violences sexuelles liées aux conflits publié en juillet dernier.

    Le rapport insiste sur le fait que ce type de violence a un impact direct sur les déplacements en masse de populations, la montée de l’extrémisme, des inégalités et des discriminations entre les hommes et les femmes. Par ailleurs, selon l’ONU, les violences sexuelles sont particulièrement répandues dans des contextes de détention, de captivité et de migration.

    Fin 2019, plus de 79 millions de personnes se trouvaient déplacées dans le monde. Cela signifie que près d’un pourcent de la population mondiale a dû abandonner son domicile à cause d’un conflit ou de persécutiosn. L’an denier, le nombre de déplacés a augmenté, tout comme le niveau de violences sexuelles se produisant sur des sites accueillant des déplacés.

    Ces violences ont notamment lieu quand des femmes et des filles mineures fuient des attaques. Ce 11ème rapport du Secrétaire général de l’ONU (en anglais) sur ce sujet se penche particulièrement sur les violences sexuelles utilisées comme tactiques de guerre ou comme une arme utilisée par les réseaux terroristes.

    Il dresse la situation dans 19 pays, entre janvier et décembre 2019, et se base sur des cas documentés par les Nations unies.

    En tout, 2 838 cas de violences sexuelles ont été rapportés dans ces 19 pays. Dans 110 cas, soit environ 4 % des cas, les victimes sont des hommes ou des garçons.

    #Afghanistan

    En 2019, la Mission d’assistance des Nations unies en Afghanistan (MANUA) a documenté 102 cas de violences sexuelles : 27 étaient liées au conflit qui oppose le pouvoir aux rebelles Talibans, touchant 7 femmes, 7 filles et 13 garçons.

    Alors que la plupart des agressions sont attribuées aux Talibans, les forces de sécurité et des milices pro-gouvernementales ont également été impliquées.

    #Centrafrique

    La Mission des Nations unies en Centrafrique (MINUSCA) a confirmé 322 incidents de violences sexuelles liées aux conflits, affectant 187 femmes, 124 filles, 3 hommes, 2 garçons, et 6 femmes d’âge inconnu. Parmi ces cas, 174 sont des viols ou tentatives de viol et 15 cas sont des mariages forcés.

    Le gouvernement de Bangui a signé avec les groupes armés, en février 2019, un accord de paix qui appelle à la fin de toutes formes de violences liées au sexe. Mais les signataires continuent d’utiliser la violence sexuelle comme moyen de terroriser les civils, conclut le rapport de l’ONU.

    #Colombie

    En 2019, un organisme de l’État venant en aide aux victimes a recensé 356 victimes de violences sexuelles liées aux conflits dans un pays où sévissent de nombreux groupes criminels et armés. Dans quasiment 90 % des cas, il s’agissait de femmes et de filles. Près de la moitié des victimes avaient des origines africaines.

    51 cas d’abus ont été commis sur des enfants (31 filles et 20 garçons). Dans au moins une dizaine de cas, les agresseurs présumés appartenaient au groupe rebelle de l’Armée de libération nationale ou à d’autres groupes armés et organisations criminelles.

    #RDC

    En 2019, la mission de l’ONU en #République_démocratique_du_Congo (MONUSCO), a documenté 1 409 cas de violences sexuelles liées aux conflits, ce qui représente une hausse de 34 % depuis 2018.

    Parmi ces cas, 955 sont attribués à des groupes armés. Mais des membres de l’armée congolaise sont eux aussi impliqués dans 383 agressions. Enfin, la police nationale est responsable dans 62 cas.

    #Irak

    Au cours de l’année 2019, des civils qui étaient détenus par l’organisation de l’État islamique (OEI) en Syrie ont continué à retourner en Irak. Certains sont des survivants de violences sexuelles.

    En novembre dernier, le gouvernement régional du Kurdistan irakien a publié des statistiques sur les cas de disparition dans la communauté des Yazidis depuis 2014. Plus de 6 400 Yazidis ont ainsi été enlevés. Parmi eux près de 3 500 ont été libérés, en grande partie des femmes et des filles.

    Une commission crée en 2014 par les autorités régionales kurdes pour faire la lumière sur les crimes commis par l’OEI a enregistré plus de 1 000 cas de violences sexuelles liées aux conflits. Ces abus ont en grande partie touché les femmes et filles yazidies.

    #Libye

    La mission de l’ONU en Libye (MANUL) n’a pu vérifier que 7 cas de violences sexuelles qui ont touché 4 femmes, deux filles et un homme activiste pour les droits des LGBTQ.

    D’après le rapport, les femmes retenues dans le centre de détention très controversé de #Mitiga n’ont aucune possibilité de contester la légalité de leur détention. Ce centre est contrôlé par la « Force de dissuasion » qui est placée sous la responsabilité du ministère libyen de l’Intérieur.

    Quatre prisonnières ont été violées et forcées de se montrer nues. L’activiste pour les droits des LGBTQ a été victime d’un viol en groupe perpétré par des gardiens de la Force de dissuasion.

    La MANUL a aussi rapporté des schémas de violences et d’exploitation sexuelles, d’extorsion et de trafic de migrants dans des centres de détention de #Zaouïa, #Tadjourah, #Garian, #Tariq_al_Sikka à #Tripoli et #Khoms qui sont liés aux autorités chargées de la lutte contre la migration illégale.

    Certaines femmes et filles migrants sont exposées au risque d’être vendues pour des travaux forcés ou être exploitées sexuellement dans des réseaux criminels internationaux, dont certains sont liés aux groupes armées présents en Libye. A Tariq al-Sikka, deux filles, frappées en public, ont été victimes d’abus sexuels.

    #Mali

    En 2019, la force onusienne au Mali (MINUSMA) a enquêté sur 27 cas de violences sexuelles liées aux conflits, commis contre 15 femmes, 11 filles et un homme. Des accusations d’esclavage sexuel, de mariages forcés, de castration et de grossesses forcées ont également été rapportées.

    #Birmanie (#Myanmar)

    L’absence de responsabilité pour des violences sexuelles perpétrées contre la minorité musulmane #Rohingyas reste de mise.

    Une mission d’enquête sur les violences sexuelles en Birmanie a montré que ce genre d’agressions étaient une marque de fabrique de l’armée birmane lors des opérations qu’elle a menées en 2016 et 2017.

    De plus, comme le rappelle le rapport de l’ONU, les abus sexuels commis contre les femmes et filles Rohingyas étaient une #tactique_de_guerre qui avait pour objectif d’intimider, de terroriser et de punir les populations civiles.

    #Somalie

    La mission de l’ONU en Somalie (ONUSOM) a confirmé près de 240 cas de violences sexuelles liées aux conflits, dont l’immense majorité contre des mineures. Elles sont en majorité attribuées à des hommes armés non identifiés, au groupe des #Shebabs somaliens, mais aussi à des forces de #police locales et à l’armée somalienne. Près de la moitié de ces abus ont été commis dans l’État de #Jubaland, dans le sud-ouest du pays.

    #Soudan_du_Sud

    La mission onusienne de maintien de la paix au Soudan du Sud (MINUSS) a documenté 224 cas de violences sexuelles liées aux conflits, touchant 133 femmes, 66 filles, 19 hommes et 6 garçons.
    Soudan

    En 2019, l’opération de l’ONU au #Darfour (MINUAD) a constaté 191 cas de violences sexuelles contre des femmes et des filles. Les viols et tentatives de viol ont constitué près de 80 % des cas.

    Les agressions ont été attribuées à des nomades armés, des membres de l’#Armée_de_libération_du_Soudan et à des miliciens. Les forces de sécurité du gouvernement, dont les forces armés soudanaises et la police ont également été impliquées.

    #Nigeria

    En 2019, l’ONU a recensé 826 allégations de violences sexuelles liées aux conflits, dont des viols et des #mariages_forcés.

    La quasi-totalité de ces cas sont attribués à des #groupes_armés, dont #Boko_Haram et la #Civilian_Joint_Task_Force, une #milice d’autodéfense. Les forces de sécurité de l’État sont impliquées dans 12% des cas.

    Les efforts de l’ONU restent vains

    En avril 2019, une résolution (https://www.un.org/press/fr/2019/cs13790.doc.htm) adoptée par le Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies reconnait le besoin d’une approche centrée sur les survivants pour informer et mettre en place des mesures pour lutter contre les violences sexuelles liées aux conflits.

    La #résolution ne peut que constater que « malgré le condamnation répétées des violences, dont les violences sexuelles contre des femmes et des enfants dans des situations de conflit, et malgré l’appel à toutes les parties prenantes dans les conflits armés pour qu’elles cessent ce genre d’actes, ces derniers continuent de se produire. »

    Le rapport conclut en rappelant que l’#impunité accompagne souvent les #abus et que les efforts des parties impliquées dans un conflit à suivre les résolutions de l’ONU restent très faibles.

    https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/26635/un-rapport-de-l-onu-s-inquiete-de-l-augmentation-des-violences-sexuell
    #guerres #guerre #viols

    ping @odilon

    • Violence sexuelle liée aux conflits : l’ONU plaide pour une nouvelle décennie d’action

      Il faut continuer à garder les crimes de violence sexuelle dans les conflits et leurs auteurs sous les projecteurs de la communauté internationale, a plaidé vendredi Pramilla Patten, la Représentante spéciale du Secrétaire général de l’ONU sur la violence sexuelle dans les conflits.

      « Comme le dit la célèbre maxime juridique : justice doit être rendue et être vue comme étant rendue. Les survivantes doivent être considérées par leur société comme les détentrices de droits qui seront, en fin de compte, respectés et appliqués », a déclaré Mme Patten lors d’un débat du Conseil de sécurité sur ce thème.

      Outre Mme Patten, l’Envoyée spéciale du Haut-Commissaire des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés, Angelina Jolie et deux responsables d’ONG, Khin Omar, fondatrice et présidente de Progressive Voice s’exprimant au nom du groupe de travail des ONG sur les femmes, la paix et la sécurité, et Nadia Carine Thérèse Fornel-Poutou, présidente de l’Association des femmes juristes de la République centrafricaine, ont pris la parole devant le Conseil.

      Selon la Représentante spéciale, le débat au Conseil de sécurité ouvre la voie à une nouvelle décennie d’action décisive, selon trois axes :

      Premièrement, l’autonomisation des survivantes et des personnes à risque grâce à des ressources accrues et à une prestation de services de qualité, afin de favoriser et de créer un environnement propice dans lequel elles peuvent signaler les violations en toute sécurité et demander réparation.

      Deuxièmement, agir sur la base des rapports et des informations reçus pour faire en sorte que les parties prenantes respectent les normes internationales.

      Troisièmement, le renforcement de la responsabilité en tant que pilier essentiel de la prévention et de la dissuasion, garantissant que lorsque les parties prenantes ne respectent pas leurs engagements, elles sont dûment tenues de rendre des comptes.

      « La prévention est la meilleure réponse. Pourtant, nous avons du mal à mesurer - ou même à définir - les progrès du pilier prévention de ce programme. Le respect est un exemple concret : la violence sexuelle persiste non pas parce que les cadres et obligations existants sont inadéquats, mais parce qu’ils sont mal appliqués », a souligné Mme Patten.

      « La résolution 1820 de 2008 ne demandait rien de moins que ‘la cessation immédiate et complète par toutes les parties aux conflits armés de tous les actes de violence sexuelle contre les civils’. Cette résolution a écrit une nouvelle norme et a tracé une ligne rouge. Maintenant, nous devons démontrer clairement quelles sont les conséquences quand elle est franchie », a-t-elle ajouté.
      Aller au-delà de la rhétorique

      De son côté, Angelina Jolie a rappelé la résolution 2467 adoptée par le Conseil de sécurité l’an dernier.

      « C’était la première à placer les survivantes, leurs besoins et leurs droits au centre de toutes les mesures. Mais les résolutions, les mots sur papier, ne sont que des promesses. Ce qui compte, c’est de savoir si les promesses sont tenues », a dit l’actrice américaine devant les membres du Conseil de sécurité.

      Celle qui est également réalisatrice de films a noté que la résolution 2467 a promis des sanctions, la justice et des réparations pour les victimes et la reconnaissance des enfants nés de viol.

      « Ce sont toutes des promesses qui doivent être tenues. Je vous exhorte donc tous à vous réengager aujourd’hui à tenir ces promesses : aller au-delà de la rhétorique et mettre en œuvre vos décisions », a dit Angelina Jolie.

      « Je vous prie de demander des comptes aux auteurs, d’aborder les causes profondes et structurelles de la violence et de la discrimination sexistes dans vos pays. Et s’il vous plaît, augmentez d’urgence le financement des programmes qui répondent aux besoins de tous les survivants, et en particulier des victimes invisibles - les enfants », a ajouté la star du cinéma qui a fait preuve ces 20 dernière années d’un engagement pour les causes humanitaires, notamment en faveur des réfugiés et des droits des femmes et enfants.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/26635/un-rapport-de-l-onu-s-inquiete-de-l-augmentation-des-violences-sexuell

  • Victoire d’Apple qui ne doit pas rembourser 13 milliards d’avantages fiscaux à l’Irlande
    _ Apple n’a finalement dû payer que 1% d’impôts irlandais sur ses bénéfices européens en 2003. Et en 2014, ce taux a encore diminué jusqu’à 0,005%
    https://www.rtbf.be/info/economie/detail_ue-contre-apple-la-justice-se-prononce-sur-les-13-milliards-d-avantages-

    C’est une victoire importante pour le géant du numérique Apple et pour le gouvernement irlandais. La justice européenne a annulé la décision de la Commission exigeant le remboursement à l’Irlande de 13 milliards d’euros d’avantages fiscaux.

    Selon le Tribunal de la Cour de justice de l’Union européenne, la Commission n’est pas parvenue à démontrer « l’existence d’un avantage économique sélectif » _ accordé par l’Etat irlandais à Apple. Cette décision constitue un cuisant revers pour la Commission européenne et sa vice-présidente Margrethe Vestager dans sa volonté de combattre la concurrence fiscale entre Etats qui profite aux multinationales. La Commission peut encore introduire un appel.

    L’Irlande et Apple se réjouissent
    Le gouvernement irlandais et Apple se sont immédiatement félicités de la décision des juges de Luxembourg. « Nous saluons le jugement de la Cour européenne » , a souligné le ministère irlandais des Finances dans un communiqué. Il répète qu’il « n’y a jamais eu de traitement spécial » pour Apple, taxé selon les règles en vigueur dans le pays.
    Selon Apple, « cette affaire ne portait pas sur le montant des impôts que nous payons, mais sur l’endroit où nous devons les payer. Nous sommes fiers d’être le plus grand contribuable au monde, car nous connaissons le rôle important que joue le versement d’impôts dans la société » , a déclaré le groupe à la pomme.

    Un taux de 0,005% sur les bénéfices
    L’affaire remonte au 30 août 2016 : alors Commissaire européenne à la Concurrence, Margrethe Vestager décide de frapper un grand coup. Selon l’enquête de la Commission, Apple a rapatrié en Irlande entre 2003 et 2014 l’ensemble des revenus engrangés en Europe (ainsi qu’en Afrique, au Moyen-Orient et en Inde) car l’entreprise y bénéficiait d’un traitement fiscal favorable, grâce à un accord passé avec les autorités de Dublin. Le groupe a ainsi échappé à la quasi-totalité des impôts dont il aurait dû s’acquitter sur cette période, soit environ 13 milliards d’euros, selon les calculs de la Commission.

    Margrethe Vestager dénonçait alors sans ménagement https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/fr/ip_16_2923 ces arrangements douteux entre le gouvernement irlandais et le géant technologique : « L’enquête de la Commission a conclu que l’Irlande avait accordé des avantages fiscaux illégaux à Apple, ce qui a permis à cette dernière de payer nettement moins d’impôts que les autres sociétés pendant de nombreuses années.  » La Commission a établi qu’Apple n’a finalement dû payer que 1% d’impôts irlandais sur ses bénéfices européens en 2003. Et en 2014, ce taux a encore diminué jusqu’à 0,005%, autrement dit, Apple ne paie pratiquement plus d’impôts sur ses bénéfices en Europe.

    Pour arriver à ce résultat, l’Irlande a détourné la possibilité de conclure des rulings, des arrangements fiscaux avec une société. La Commission relevait que " pratiquement tous les bénéfices de vente enregistrés par les deux sociétés étaient affectés en interne à un « siège ». L’appréciation de la Commission a montré que ces « sièges » n’existaient que sur le papier et n’auraient pas pu générer de tels bénéfices.  " Ce traitement fiscal préférentiel créé un avantage accordé à Apple envers ses concurrents. Cet avantage constitue une « aide d’Etat » illégale, puisqu’elle se fait aux dépens d’autres entreprises soumises à des conditions moins favorables.

    L’Irlande : eldorado des multinationales
    Pour Dublin néanmoins, il n’y avait rien d’illégal. Connue pour ses positions « pro-business », l’Irlande a attiré sur l’île de nombreuses multinationales, pourvoyeuses d’emplois, grâce à une fiscalité avantageuse. C’est d’ailleurs pour cette raison que l’Irlande, comme Apple, a fait appel de la décision. « La Commission a outrepassé ses pouvoirs et violé la souveraineté » irlandaise concernant l’impôt sur les sociétés, avait affirmé Dublin. Quant au patron d’Apple, Tim Cook, il avait qualifié l’affaire de « foutaise politique ».

    L’arrêt pris aujourd’hui est susceptible d’appel. La vice-présidente de la Commission a déclaré qu’elle allait « étudier avec attention le jugement et réfléchir aux prochaines étapes » , sans toutefois dire si la Commission allait faire appel de cet arrêt. Généralement, lorsque les affaires font l’objet d’un pourvoi devant la Cour, la décision définitive intervient environ 16 mois après. Donc dans le cas d’Apple, au cours de l’année 2021. « La Commission européenne maintient son objectif de voir toutes les entreprises payer leur juste part d’impôts » , a ajouté Mme Vestager.

    Pour la Danoise Margrethe Vestager, bête noire des Gafa et surnommée la « tax lady » par le président américain Donald Trump, précisément à cause du cas d’Apple, cette décision vient cependant affaiblir sa politique menée contre une série de multinationales ayant bénéficié d’un traitement fiscal jugé trop favorable.

    La taxe sur le numérique toujours en suspend
    Dans deux affaires similaires, les juges européens avaient tranché dans des sens différents. Ils avaient déjà réfuté les arguments de la Commission européenne concernant la chaîne américaine de cafés Starbucks, sommée de rembourser jusqu’à 30 millions d’euros d’arriérés d’impôts aux Pays-Bas. En revanche, dans le cas de Fiat, ils avaient donné raison à Bruxelles, qui exigeait du groupe italien le versement au Luxembourg d’une somme identique pour avantages fiscaux indus.

    #apple en #Irlande , #paradis_fiscal légal vis à vis de l’#UE #union_européenne Margrethe_Vestager #impôts #fraude_fiscal #multinationnales #gafa

    • Coronavirus : l’inquiétude monte chez les fabricants asiatiques de produits de mode
      https://fr.fashionnetwork.com/news/Coronavirus-l-inquietude-monte-chez-les-fabricants-asiatiques-de-

      Les moyens de subsistance de millions de travailleurs asiatiques de l’habillement sont actuellement menacés par les annulations de commandes des grandes marques de mode , ce qui inquiète à la fois les syndicats, les chercheurs et les militants locaux, qui craignent que la pandémie n’ait des effets délétères sur ce secteur régulièrement pointé du doigt pour ses violations du droit du travail.

      Magasins fermés, chute des ventes : de nombreuses enseignes occidentales annulent leurs commandes ou demandent des remises à leurs fournisseurs asiatiques, notamment au Cambodge ou au Bangladesh. Résultat, de nombreux employés du secteur ont été licenciés, ou ont dû accepter de travailler sans salaire. 

      Selon plusieurs observateurs de l’industrie de la mode, 60 millions de travailleurs pourraient avoir du mal à surmonter la crise, à moins que davantage de marques ne prennent leurs responsabilités. Des poids lourds comme Adidas, H&M et le propriétaire de Zara, Inditex ont promis de payer intégralement toutes leurs commandes, qu’elles soient livrées ou encore en production, selon le Consortium pour les droits des travailleurs (WRC), qui a mené une étude sur 27 des plus importants détaillants de mode mondiaux.

Toutefois, le groupe de surveillance américain a constaté qu’environ la moitié d’entre eux n’avaient pris aucun engagement de ce type pour honorer leurs contrats. Plusieurs détaillants, dont Asos, C&A, Edinburgh Woollen Mill, Gap et Primark, ont déclaré à la Thomson Reuters Foundation qu’ils avaient été contraints de suspendre ou d’annuler certaines commandes, tout en assurant maintenir le contact avec leurs fournisseurs afin d’atténuer l’impact économique de ces annulations.

      Côté fabricants, autre son de cloche. À les entendre, ceux-ci ne font pas le poids face à leurs interlocuteurs occidentaux, ce qui pourrait entraîner des pertes d’emplois. « On n’a jamais pu vraiment négocier avec les acheteurs », indique ainsi un important fournisseur de vêtements du sud de l’Inde, qui préfère garder l’anonymat pour protéger son entreprise.


      Face au tollé général provoqué par ces annulations, plusieurs marques ont accepté de rétablir certaines commandes — pas toutes —, tandis que d’autres ont exigé des remises, des délais de paiement ou se sont contentées de laisser leurs fournisseurs dans l’incertitude, rapporte Penelope Kyritsis, directrice adjointe au WRC. « Ne pas s’engager à honorer l’intégralité de ses commandes, c’est adopter une conduite irresponsable envers ses fournisseurs », tranche-t-elle.



      Il y a quelque temps, le WRC estimait que les annulations de commandes représentaient un manque à gagner de plus de 24 milliards de dollars (près de 22 milliards d’euros) pour les fournisseurs ; ce chiffre est probablement redescendu après les revirements de certaines marques. Mais selon la Fédération internationale de l’industrie textile, les commandes ont baissé de près d’un tiers dans le secteur de l’habillement. « La pandémie de Covid-19, à l’instar de la catastrophe du Rana Plaza, révèle comment les chaînes d’approvisionnement profitent aux entreprises au détriment des fournisseurs et, par conséquent, des travailleurs », conclut Penelope Kyritsis.

La catastrophe du Rana Plaza, du nom de cet immeuble au Bangladesh dont l’effondrement avait tué 1135 travailleurs de l’habillement en 2013, avait déclenché plusieurs initiatives pour améliorer les conditions et les droits du travail à l’échelle mondiale — les experts sont cependant divisés sur le rythme et la portée de ces réformes. Certains observateurs de l’industrie estiment que l’attention suscitée par la crise sanitaire pourrait donner un nouveau souffle à la mobilisation, quand d’autres craignent que la pandémie n’érode les avancées récentes sur le terrain.

      Des réputations en danger
      Les revenus du secteur de l’habillement, qui s’élèvent à 2500 milliards de dollars, pourraient chuter de 30 % en 2020, selon un récent rapport du cabinet de conseil en gestion McKinsey, qui prévient que les entreprises de mode pourraient être les plus touchées par la crise qui s’annonce.

Les marques de vêtements, les syndicats et les organisations patronales ont annoncé la semaine dernière la création d’un groupe de travail, convoqué par les Nations Unies, afin d’aider les fabricants à payer leurs salariés et à survivre à la crise, tout en garantissant l’accès des travailleurs aux soins de santé et à la protection sociale. Toutefois, selon le WRC, certains des détaillants qui soutiennent l’initiative n’ont pas atteint son objectif — garantir que toutes les commandes, livrées ou en cours de production, soient payées dans les temps.

"Visiblement, certaines marques préfèrent soigner leur image publique plutôt que d’honorer leurs contrats", ironise Fiona Gooch, conseillère politique principale au sein du groupe de défense Traidcraft Exchange. « Les détaillants se servent du Covid-19 pour mettre en danger leurs fournisseurs et exiger des remises... certains se comportent comme des voyous », tranche-t-elle, à quelques jours de la Fête du Travail. « Ces mauvais comportements pourraient nuire à leur réputation, après la crise ».

En revanche, les entreprises qui font preuve d’équité et de transparence sur les droits des travailleurs pendant cette période troublée pourraient attirer de nouveaux investisseurs, prédisent plusieurs experts en placement de fonds. Ce mois-ci, un groupe de 286 investisseurs pesant plus de 8200 milliards de dollars d’actifs a exhorté les entreprises à protéger autant que possible leurs relations avec leurs fournisseurs, et à garantir les droits des travailleurs dans leurs chaînes d’approvisionnement.


      Des remises et des annulations 
Selon deux fournisseurs bangladais, qui s’expriment sous couvert d’anonymat, certains détaillants — notamment la société britannique Edinburgh Woollen Mill (EWM) — ont exigé des rabais allant jusqu’à 70 %, un chiffre qui ferait perdre de l’argent aux fabricants sur ces commandes.

Selon un propriétaire d’usine indien, EWM aurait exigé une remise de 50 %, en précisant que le paiement restant ne serait versé qu’après la vente de 70 % des marchandises en question. « EWM adopte un comportement opportuniste, abusif et contraire à l’éthique », déplore-t-il, ajoutant que la plupart de ses autres acheteurs occidentaux ont « agi raisonnablement » dans le cadre des négociations engagées autour de leurs commandes.

Un porte-parole du groupe EWM — qui contrôle également des marques comme Jane Norman et Peacocks — assure que des négociations sont en cours avec ses fournisseurs pour trouver une solution « qui leur convienne ». « Ce n’est pas ce que nous souhaiterions faire en temps normal, mais les circonstances actuelles sont telles que cela devient nécessaire », plaide-t-il.

De nombreuses marques ont fait valoir des clauses de force majeure dans leurs contrats, invoquant des circonstances extraordinaires et imprévues pour annuler leurs commandes. Mais selon plusieurs experts juridiques, il faut encore déterminer si la pandémie peut justifier le recours à cette clause, déclenchée habituellement par les guerres ou les catastrophes naturelles.

Pour l’Organisation internationale des employeurs (OIE), le plus grand réseau de défense du secteur privé au monde, de manière générale, les marques ont agi de manière responsable dans le cadre des négociations avec leurs fournisseurs. « Toutes les marques et tous les acheteurs sont sous pression... des arrangements flexibles ont été mis en place et fonctionnent déjà, dans une certaine mesure au moins », assure le secrétaire général de l’OIE, Roberto Suárez Santos. « La situation est difficile pour tout le monde ».


      Vers un recul des droits des travailleurs ?
      Selon un rapport publié cette semaine par le cabinet de conseil en gestion des risques Verisk Maplecroft, les travailleurs du secteur de l’habillement récemment licenciés pourraient se tourner vers des emplois précaires, où ils risqueraient d’être victimes de travail forcé, voire d’imposer le même traitement à leurs enfants pour remédier à la perte de leurs revenus.

Dans des pays comme la Birmanie, certaines usines ont licencié des ouvriers syndiqués en invoquant une baisse des commandes, tout en conservant des employés non syndiqués, selon des militants qui craignent que la pandémie ne provoque également une érosion des droits, qui pourrait passer inaperçue dans la tourmente actuelle. « Nous devons veiller à ce que les droits et les conditions de travail des ouvriers ne soient pas remis en cause par la crise », martèle Aruna Kashyap, avocate principale de la division consacrée aux droits des femmes de Human Rights Watch, qui exige également que la santé des travailleurs soit prise en compte.

Alors que la plupart des usines fonctionnent toujours au Cambodge et que des centaines d’entre elles ont rouvert au Bangladesh cette semaine, plusieurs défenseurs des droits des travailleurs se disent inquiets face à la faible application des mesures de distanciation physique et d’hygiène. Au Cambodge, par exemple, des petites mains s’inquiètent pour leur santé au travail, mais rappellent qu’elles ont des familles à nourrir. Au Bangladesh, une source du ministère du Travail reconnaît que les quelque 500 usines qui ont repris leurs activités ne sont pas en mesure de faire respecter les mesures de distanciation physique par leurs salariés.

Garantir la sécurité des employés sur leur lieu de travail, c’est justement l’un des objectifs du groupe de travail soutenu par l’ONU, qui exhorte par ailleurs les donateurs, les institutions financières et les gouvernements à accélérer l’accès au crédit, aux allocations de chômage et aux compléments de revenus. Pour ces militants, il est nécessaire que les régimes d’aide et de sécurité sociale des pays producteurs de vêtements soient en partie financés par les marques elles-mêmes, et que la réglementation des pays occidentaux contraigne les entreprises à éradiquer les pratiques commerciales déloyales, l’exploitation et l’esclavage moderne.

Mais pour Jenny Holdcroft, du syndicat IndustriALL qui regroupe 50 millions de membres dans le monde entier, la lumière jetée sur les difficultés des travailleurs du secteur et la réaction inégale des marques face à la crise pourrait s’avérer insuffisante pour transformer en profondeur les chaînes d’approvisionnement. « Si l’on examine toute l’histoire de l’industrie de l’habillement, il est peu probable qu’un véritable changement arrive suite à la crise », prophétise ainsi la secrétaire générale adjointe de l’organisation.

"Les dynamiques et les rapports de pouvoir à l’oeuvre dans le secteur permettent aux marques de s’en tirer malgré leurs comportements autocentrés. Il faut que nous placions la barre plus haut pour l’ensemble de l’industrie de l’habillement... tout en empêchant les entreprises les moins éthiques de continuer leurs activités".



      La Thomson Reuters Foundation entretient un partenariat avec la Laudes Foundation, elle-même affiliée à l’enseigne C&A.

      #mode #esclavage #travail #économie #Inde #Birmanie #Cambodge #Banglades

    • La richissime famille Benetton cède les autoroutes italiennes
      https://fr.businessam.be/la-richissime-famille-benetton-cede-les-autoroutes-italiennes

      Le groupe Atlantia, contrôlé par la dynastie commerciale Benetton, transfère la gestion des autoroutes italiennes à l’État. Cet accord fait suite à la tragédie de l’effondrement du pont Morandi, à Gênes, il y a deux ans.
      La société d’autoroutes Aspi (Autostrade per l’Italia) est transférée à un véhicule d’investissement du gouvernement italien, la Cassa Depositi e Prestiti (CDP).
      Aspi exploitait jusqu’ici plus de 3.000 kilomètres d’autoroutes en tant que société de péage. Elle était également le gestionnaire du pont de Gênes, qui s’est effondré en août 2018. Une catastrophe qui a coûté la vie à 43 personnes. Les Benetton ont pointé du doigt à de multiples reprises. Les enquêtes préliminaires ont en effet révélé de graves lacunes en matière de maintenance. Des critiques envers sa famille qui n’ont pas été au goût du patriarche, Luciano Benetton.
      . . . . . . .
      #Benetton #Italie #pont_morandi #gênes #ponte_morandi #catastrophe d’une #privatisation #pont #infrastructures #effondrement #autostrade #autoroutes #benetton

  • Des cyclistes rohingyas partagent des informations clés sur la COVID19 dans les camps de réfugiés de Cox’s Bazar | Organisation internationale pour les migrations
    https://www.iom.int/fr/news/des-cyclistes-rohingyas-partagent-des-informations-cles-sur-la-covid19-dans-les

    La distanciation physique est un aspect crucial dans la lutte contre la pandémie de COVID-19. Mais cela pose des problèmes pour la circulation des informations clés à un moment où il est essentiel d’être bien informé pour préserver la santé publique.
    C’est là qu’interviennent les bicyclettes et les rickshaws.
    À Cox’s Bazar, le plus grand camp de réfugiés du monde, l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) continue d’explorer de nouvelles façons de transmettre des messages clés aux Rohingyas et aux membres des communautés d’accueil dans tout le district. Des initiatives telles que la diffusion de messages à bord de rickshaws et le système de serveur vocal interactif de l’OIM font d’énormes progrès pour garantir que le public soit tenu informé.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#birmanie#rohingya

  • Myanmar, Laos Face Fresh Inflows of Returning Migrant Workers From Thailand
    #Covid-19#Birmanie#Thailande#Laos#retour#migrant#migration
    https://www.rfa.org/english/news/myanmar/migrant-workers-05012020175855.html

    About 20,000 migrant workers poured into Myanmar through a central land border crossing in recent days, returning from jobs in neighboring Thailand amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, a state official said Friday — a day that several countries in Southeast Asia celebrate as Labor Day.

  • Rohingya, la mécanique du crime

    Des centaines de villages brûlés, des viols, des massacres et 700 000 Rohingyas qui quittent la Birmanie pour prendre le chemin de l’exil. Rapidement, l’ONU alerte la communauté internationale et dénonce un « nettoyage ethnique ». Ces événements tragiques vécus par les Rohingyas ne sont que l’achèvement d’une politique de discrimination déjà ancienne. Ce nettoyage ethnique a été prémédité et préparé il y a des années par les militaires birmans. Ce film raconte cette mécanique infernale.

    http://www.film-documentaire.fr/4DACTION/w_fiche_film/57765_1
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2OjbDcBfPk


    #film #documentaire #film_documentaire #opération_nettoyage #armée_birmane #feu #incendie #réfugiés #2017 #Bangladesh #répression #Arakan #nettoyage_ethnique #génocide #préméditation #planification #moines #islamophobie #xénophobie #racisme #crime_contre_l'humanité #camp_de_réfugiés #camps_de_réfugiés #violence #crime #viol #Tula_Toli #massacre #Maungdaw #milices #crimes_de_guerre #colonisation #Ashin_Wirathu #immigrants_illégaux #2012 #camps_de_concentration #Koe_Tan_Kauk #ARSA (#armée_du_salut_des_Rohingya) #métèques #déni #Inn_Dinn #roman_national #haine #terres #justice #Aung_San_Suu_Kyi #retour_au_pays #encampement
    #terminologie #mots #stigmatisation
    –-> « La #haine passe du #discours aux actes »

    #ressources_naturelles #uranium #extractivisme #nickel —> « Pour exploiter ces ressources, vous ne pouvez pas avoir des gens qui vivent là »
    (#géographie_du_vide)

    #Carte_de_vérification_nationale —> donnée à ceux qui acceptent de retourner en #Birmanie. En recevant cette carte, ils renient leur #nationalité birmane.

    #NaTaLa —> nom utilisé par les #musulmans pour distinguer les #bouddhistes qui ont été #déplacés du reste de la Birmanie vers la région de l’Arkana. C’est les musulmans qui ont été obligés de construire, avec leur main-d’oeuvre et leur argent, les maisons pour les colons bouddhistes : « Ils nous ont enlevé le pain de la bouche et au final ils nous ont tués ». Ces colons ont participé au #massacre du village de Inn Dinn.

    A partir de la minute 36’00 —> #effacement des #traces dans le #paysage, maisons rohingya détruites et remplacées par un camp militaire —> photos satellites pour le prouver

    A partir de la minute 45’35 : la colonisation sur les #terres arrachées aux Rohingya (le gouvernement subventionne la construction de nouveaux villages par des nouveaux colons)

    ping @karine4 @reka

  • Israel’s dirty arms deals with Myanmar - Haaretz Editorial - Israel News | Haaretz.com
    https://www.haaretz.com/opinion/editorial/israel-s-dirty-arms-deals-with-myanmar-1.6429524

    Official Israel does not allow the publication of reports on the arming of Myanmar. In a hearing on petitions to the High Court of Justice filed in the last year and a half by human rights activists and attorney Eitay Mack against Israel’s weapons sales to Myanmar, the Defense Ministry argued that the court had no authority to rule on defense exports. Israeli spokesmen justified the supplying of weapons with the claim that “both sides committed war crimes,” claims that were rejected in the UN report. The court’s ruling on the petition is classified, but according to testimony from Myanmar the weapons sales are continuing, even in the midst of the crimes.

    Israel has a long history of arming dark regimes, from Latin America through the Balkans and Africa, to Asia. The findings of the UN panel’s report require an examination of this method, whose economic benefits cannot serve as a counterweight to the atrocities. Attorney General Avichai Mendelblit must order an investigation to determine whether the individuals who approved the arms sales to Myanmar were complicit in genocide in accordance with Israel’s 1950 Law for the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. In addition, he must see to it that the findings are made public.

  • The Gambia v #Myanmar at the International Court of Justice: Points of Interest in the Application

    On 11 November 2019, The Gambia filed an application at the International Court of Justice against Myanmar, alleging violation of obligations under the Genocide Convention.

    This legal step has been in the works for some time now, with the announcement by the Gambian Minister of Justice that instructions had been given to counsel in October to file the application. As a result, the application has been much anticipated. I will briefly go over some legally significant aspects of the application.

    On methodology, the application relies heavily on the 2018 and 2019 reports of the Independent International Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar (FFM) for much of the factual basis of the assertions – placing emphasis on the conclusions of the FFM in regard to the question of genocide. What struck me particularly is the timeline of events as the underlying factual basis of the application, commencing with the ‘clearance operations’ in October 2016 and continuing to date. This is the same timeframe under scrutiny at the International Criminal Court, but different from the FFM (which has now completed its mandate), and the Independent Investigative Mechanism for Myanmar (IIMM). The IIMM was explicitly mandated to inquire into events from 2011 onwards, while the FFM interpreted its mandate to commence from 2011. While these are clearly distinct institutions with vastly different mandates, there may well be points of overlap and a reliance on some of the institutions in the course of the ICJ case. (See my previous Opinio Juris post on potential interlinkages).

    For the legal basis of the application, The Gambia asserts that both states are parties to the Genocide Convention, neither have reservations to Article IX, and that there exists a dispute between it and Myanmar – listing a number of instances in which The Gambia has issued statements about and to Myanmar regarding the treatment of the Rohingya, including a note verbal in October 2019. (paras. 20 – 23) The Gambia asserts that the prohibition of genocide is a jus cogens norm, and results in obligations erga omnes and erga omnes partes, leading to the filing of the application. (para. 15) This is significant as it seeks to cover both bases – that the obligations arise towards the international community as a whole, as well as to parties to the convention.

    On the substance of the allegations of genocide, the application lays the groundwork – the persecution of the Rohingya, including denial of rights, as well as hate propaganda, and then goes on to address the commission of genocidal acts. The application emphasizes the mass scale destruction of villages, the targeting of children, the widespread use of rape and sexual assault, situated in the context of the clearance operations of October 2016, and then from August 2017 onwards. It also details the denial of food and a policy of forced starvation, through displacement, confiscation of crops, as well as inability to access humanitarian aid.

    Violations of the following provisions of the Genocide Convention are alleged: Articles I, III, IV, V and VI. To paraphrase, these include committing genocide, conspiracy to commit, direct and public incitement, attempt to commit, complicity, failing to prevent, failure to punish, and failure to enact legislation). (para. 111)

    As part of the relief asked for, The Gambia has asked that the continuing breach of the Genocide Convention obligations are remedied, that wrongful acts are ceased and that perpetrators are punished by a competent tribunal, which could include an international penal tribunal – clearly leaving the door open to the ICC or an ad hoc tribunal. In addition, as part of the obligation of reparation, The Gambia asks for safe and dignified return of the Rohingya with full citizenship rights, and a guarantee of non-repetition. (para. 112) This is significant in linking this to a form of reparations, and reflects the demands of many survivors.

    The Gambia makes detailed submissions in its request for provisional measures, in keeping with the evolving jurisprudence of the court. It addresses the compelling circumstances that necessitate provisional measures and cites the 2019 FFM report in assessing a grave and ongoing risk to the approximately 600,000 Rohingya that are in Myanmar. Importantly, it also cites the destruction of evidence as part of the argument (para. 118), indicating the necessity of the work of the IIMM in this regard.

    In addressing ‘plausible rights’ for the purpose of provisional measures, the application draws upon the case ofBelgium v Senegal, applying mutatis mutandis the comparison to the Convention against Torture. In that case, the court held that obligations in relation to the convention for the prohibition of torture would apply erga omnes partes – thereby leading to the necessary argument that in fact the rights of The Gambia also need to be protected by the provisional measures order. (para. 127) (For more on this distinction between erga omnesand erga omnes partes, see this post) The Gambia requests the courts protection in light of the urgency of the matter.

    As a last point, The Gambia has appointed Navanethem Pillay as an ad hoc judge. (para. 135) With her formidable prior experience as President of the ICTR, a judge at the ICC, and head of the OHCHR, this experience will be a welcome addition to the bench. (And no, as I’ve been asked many times, unfortunately we are not related!)

    The filing of the application by The Gambia is a significant step in the quest for accountability – this is the route of state accountability, while for individual responsibility, proceedings continue at the ICC, as well as with emerging universal jurisdiction cases. Success at the ICJ is far from guaranteed, but this is an important first step in the process.

    http://opiniojuris.org/2019/11/13/the-gambia-v-myanmar-at-the-international-court-of-justice-points-of-in
    #Birmanie #justice #Rohingya #Gambie #Cour_internationale_de_justice

    • Rohingyas : feu vert de la #CPI à une enquête sur des crimes présumés

      La #Cour_pénale_internationale (CPI) a donné jeudi son feu vert à une enquête sur les crimes présumés commis contre la minorité musulmane rohingya en Birmanie, pays confronté à une pression juridique croissante à travers le monde.

      Les juges de la Cour, chargée de juger les pires atrocités commises dans le monde, ont donné leur aval à la procureure de la CPI, #Fatou_Bensouda, pour mener une enquête approfondie sur les actes de #violence et la #déportation alléguée de cette minorité musulmane, qui pourrait constituer un #crime_contre_l'humanité.

      En août 2017, plus de 740.000 musulmans rohingyas ont fui la Birmanie, majoritairement bouddhiste, après une offensive de l’armée en représailles d’attaques de postes-frontières par des rebelles rohingyas. Persécutés par les forces armées birmanes et des milices bouddhistes, ils se sont réfugiés dans d’immenses campements de fortune au Bangladesh.

      Mme Bensouda a salué la décision de la Cour, estimant qu’elle « envoie un signal positif aux victimes des atrocités en Birmanie et ailleurs ».

      « Mon enquête visera à découvrir la vérité », a-telle ajouté dans un communiqué, en promettant une « enquête indépendante et impartiale ».

      La Cour pénale internationale (CPI) a donné jeudi son feu vert à une enquête sur les crimes présumés commis contre la minorité musulmane rohingya en Birmanie, pays confronté à une pression juridique croissante à travers le monde.

      De leur côté, les juges de la CPI, également basée à La Haye, ont évoqué des allégations « d’actes de violence systématiques », d’expulsion en tant que crime contre l’humanité et de persécution fondée sur l’appartenance ethnique ou la religion contre les Rohingya.

      Bien que la Birmanie ne soit pas un État membre du Statut de Rome, traité fondateur de la Cour, celle-ci s’était déclarée compétente pour enquêter sur la déportation présumée de cette minorité vers le Bangladesh, qui est lui un État partie.

      La Birmanie, qui a toujours réfuté les accusations de nettoyage ethnique ou de génocide, avait « résolument » rejeté la décision de la CPI, dénonçant un « fondement juridique douteux ».

      En septembre 2018, un examen préliminaire avait déjà été ouvert par la procureure, qui avait ensuite demandé l’ouverture d’une véritable enquête, pour laquelle les juges ont donné jeudi leur feu vert.

      Les investigations pourraient à terme donner lieu à des mandats d ?arrêt contre des généraux de l’armée birmane.

      Des enquêteurs de l’ONU avaient demandé en août 2018 que la justice internationale poursuive le chef de l’armée birmane et cinq autres hauts gradés pour « génocide », « crimes contre l’humanité » et « crimes de guerre ». Des accusations rejetées par les autorités birmanes.

      https://www.courrierinternational.com/depeche/rohingyas-feu-vert-de-la-cpi-une-enquete-sur-des-crimes-presu

    • Joint statement of Canada and the Kingdom of the Netherlands

      Canada and the Kingdom of the Netherlands welcome The Gambia’s application against Myanmar before the International Court of Justice (ICJ) on the alleged violation of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (Genocide Convention). In order to uphold international accountability and prevent impunity, Canada and the Netherlands hereby express their intention to jointly explore all options to support and assist The Gambia in these efforts.

      The Genocide Convention embodies a solemn pledge by its signatories to prevent the crime of genocide and hold those responsible to account. As such, Canada and the Netherlands consider it their obligation to support The Gambia before the ICJ, as it concerns all of humanity.

      In 2017, the world witnessed an exodus of over 700,000 Rohingya from Rakhine State. They sought refuge from targeted violence, mass murder and sexual and gender based violence carried out by the Myanmar security forces, the very people who should have protected them.

      For decades, the Rohingya have suffered systemic discrimination and exclusion, marred by waves of abhorrent violence. These facts have been corroborated by several investigations, including those conducted by the UN Independent Fact Finding Mission for Myanmar and human rights organizations. They include crimes that constitute acts described in Article II of the Genocide Convention.

      In light of this evidence Canada and the Kingdom of the Netherlands therefore strongly believe this is a matter that is rightfully brought to the ICJ to provide international legal judgment on whether acts of genocide have been committed. We call upon all States Parties to the Genocide Convention to support The Gambia in its efforts to address these violations.

      https://www.government.nl/documents/diplomatic-statements/2019/12/09/joint-statement-of-canada-and-the-kingdom-of-the-netherlands
      #Canada #Pays-Bas

  • Myanmar risks losing forests to oil palm, but there’s time to pivot
    https://news.mongabay.com/2019/11/myanmar-risks-losing-forests-to-oil-palm-but-theres-time-to-pivot/?n3wsletter

    To examine the actual extent of planted and unplanted areas accurately, the researchers used Google Earth Engine to obtain image collections over several months. They then used thousands of reference data points to calculate the oil palm area and other land cover through Sentinel-1 and Sentinel-2 satellite data for 2018 and 2019. They later refined the images for high accuracy using software and algorithms to create cloud-free image composites.

    With this data, the researchers found discrepancies between the actual oil palm plantations and what the plantation companies have reported to the government when they investigated the concessions and boundaries in the Tanintharyi region. Moreover, unplanted areas within oil palm concessions in Myanmar were not always clear.

    #Birmanie #plantations #industrie_palmiste

  • Le #Bangladesh veut-il noyer ses #réfugiés_rohingyas ?

    Confronté à la présence sur son territoire d’un million de réfugiés musulmans chassés de Birmanie par les crimes massifs de l’armée et des milices bouddhistes, Dacca envisage d’en transférer 100 000 sur une île prison, dans le golfe du Bengale, menacée d’inondation par la mousson. Ce projet vient relancer les interrogations sur le rôle controversé de l’Organisation des Nations unies en #Birmanie.
    Dans les semaines qui viennent, le gouvernement du Bangladesh pourrait transférer plusieurs milliers de réfugiés rohingyas, chassés de Birmanie entre 2012 et 2017, dans une #île du #golfe_du_Bengale menacée de submersion et tenue pour « inhabitable » par les ONG locales. Préparé depuis des mois par le ministère de la gestion des catastrophes et des secours et par la Commission d’aide et de rapatriement des réfugiés, ce #transfert, qui devrait dans un premier temps concerner 350 familles – soit près de 1 500 personnes – puis s’étendre à 7 000 personnes, devrait par la suite être imposé à près de 100 000 réfugiés.

    Selon les agences des Nations unies – Haut-Commissariat aux réfugiés (HCR) et Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) –, plus de 950 000 s’entassent aujourd’hui au Bangladesh dans plusieurs camps de la région de #Cox’s_Bazar, près de la frontière birmane. Près de 710 000 membres de cette minorité musulmane de Birmanie, ostracisée par le gouvernement de #Naypidaw, sont arrivés depuis août 2017, victimes du #nettoyage_ethnique déclenché par l’armée avec l’appui des milices villageoises bouddhistes.

    Les #baraquements sur #pilotis déjà construits par le gouvernement bangladais sur l’#île de #Bhasan_Char, à une heure de bateau de la terre ferme la plus proche, dans le #delta_du_Meghna, sont destinés à héberger plus de 92 000 personnes. En principe, les réfugiés désignés pour ce premier transfert doivent être volontaires.

    C’est en tout cas ce que les autorités du Bangladesh ont indiqué aux agences des Nations unies en charge des réfugiés rohingyas. Mais l’ONG régionale Fortify Rights, qui a interrogé, dans trois camps de réfugiés différents, quatorze personnes dont les noms figurent sur la liste des premiers transférables, a constaté qu’en réalité, aucune d’entre elles n’avait été consultée.

    « Dans notre camp, a déclaré aux enquêteurs de Fortify Rights l’un des délégués non élus des réfugiés chargé des relations avec l’administration locale, aucune famille n’accepte d’être transférée dans cette île. Les gens ont peur d’aller vivre là-bas. Ils disent que c’est une île flottante. » « Île qui flotte », c’est d’ailleurs ce que signifie Bhasan Char dans la langue locale.

    Les réfractaires n’ont pas tort. Apparue seulement depuis une vingtaine d’années, cette île, constituée d’alluvions du #Meghna, qui réunit les eaux du Gange et du Brahmapoutre, émerge à peine des eaux. Partiellement couverte de forêt, elle est restée inhabitée depuis son apparition en raison de sa vulnérabilité à la mousson et aux cyclones, fréquents dans cette région de la mi-avril à début novembre. Cyclones d’autant plus redoutés et destructeurs que l’altitude moyenne du Bangladesh ne dépasse pas 12 mètres. Selon les travaux des hydrologues locaux, la moitié du pays serait d’ailleurs submergée si le niveau des eaux montait seulement d’un mètre.

    « Ce projet est inhumain, a confié aux journalistes du Bangla Tribune, un officier de la marine du Bangladesh stationné dans l’île, dont l’accès est interdit par l’armée. Même la marée haute submerge aujourd’hui une partie de l’île. En novembre1970, le cyclone Bhola n’a fait aucun survivant sur l’île voisine de Nijhum Dwip. Et Bhasan Char est encore plus bas sur l’eau que Nijhum Dwip. » « Un grand nombre de questions demeurent sans réponses, observait, après une visite sur place en janvier dernier, la psychologue coréenne Yanghee Lee, rapporteure spéciale de l’ONU pour la situation des droits de l’homme en Birmanie. Mais la question principale demeure de savoir si cette île est véritablement habitable. »

    « Chaque année, pendant la mousson, ont confié aux enquêteurs de Human Rights Watch les habitants de l’île voisine de Hatiya, une partie de Bhasan Char est érodée par l’eau. Nous n’osons même pas y mettre les pieds. Comment des milliers de Rohingyas pourraient-ils y vivre ? » Par ailleurs, la navigation dans les parages de l’île est jugée si dangereuse, par temps incertain, que les pêcheurs du delta hésitent à s’y aventurer. Les reporters d’un journal local ont dû attendre six jours avant que la météo devienne favorable et qu’un volontaire accepte de les embarquer.

    À toutes ces objections des ONG, d’une partie de la presse locale et de plusieurs agences des Nations unies, le gouvernement bangladais répond que rien n’a été négligé. Une digue, haute de près de trois mètres et longue de 13 km, a été érigée autour de l’enclave de 6,7 km² affectée à l’hébergement des Rohingyas. Chacune des 120 unités de logement du complexe comprend douze bâtiments sur pilotis, une mare et un abri en béton destiné à héberger 23 familles en cas de cyclone et à recevoir les réserves de produits alimentaires. Conçus, selon les architectes, pour résister à des vents de 260 km/h, les abris pourront aussi être utilisés comme salles de classe, centres communautaires et dispensaires.

    Construit en parpaings, chaque bâtiment d’habitation contient, sous un toit de tôle métallique, seize chambres de 3,5 m sur 4 m, huit W.-C., deux douches et deux cuisines collectives. Destinées à héberger des familles de quatre personnes, les chambres s’ouvrent sur une coursive par une porte et une fenêtre à barreaux. Un réseau de collecte de l’eau de pluie, des panneaux solaires et des générateurs de biogaz sont également prévus. Des postes de police assureront la sécurité et 120 caméras de surveillance seront installées par la marine.

    Compte tenu des conditions de navigation très difficiles dans l’estuaire de la Meghna et du statut militarisé de l’île, la liberté de mouvement des réfugiés comme leur aptitude à assurer leur subsistance seront réduites à néant. « Bhasan Char sera l’équivalent d’une prison », estimait en mars dernier Brad Adams, directeur pour l’Asie de Human Rights Watch.
    Aung San Suu Kyi n’a pas soulevé un sourcil

    Aucun hôpital n’est prévu sur l’île. En cas d’urgence, les malades ou les blessés devront être transférés vers l’hôpital de l’île de Hatiya, à une heure de bateau lorsque le temps le permet. Faute de production locale, la quasi-totalité de l’alimentation devra être acheminée depuis le continent. La densité de population de ce complexe dont les blocs, disposés sur un plan orthogonal, sont séparés par d’étroites allées rectilignes, dépassera, lorsqu’il sera totalement occupé, 65 000 habitants au kilomètre carré, soit six fois celle du cœur de New York.

    On le voit, ce « paradis pour les Rohingyas », selon le principal architecte du projet, Ahmed Mukta, qui partage son activité entre Dacca et Londres, tient davantage du cauchemar concentrationnaire submersible que du tremplin vers une nouvelle vie pour les réfugiés birmans du Bangladesh. Ce n’est pourtant pas faute de temps et de réflexion sur la nature et la gestion du complexe. L’idée de transférer les réfugiés birmans sur Bhasan Char circulait depuis 2015 parmi les responsables birmans. À ce moment, leur nombre ne dépassait pas 250 000.

    Alimentés depuis 1990 par un chapelet de flambées de haine anti-musulmanes que le pouvoir birman tolérait quand il ne les allumait pas lui-même, plusieurs camps s’étaient créés dans la région de Cox’s Bazar pour accueillir les réfugiés chassés par la terreur ou contraints à l’exil par leur statut spécial. Musulmans dans un pays en écrasante majorité bouddhiste, les Rohingyas se sentent depuis toujours, selon l’ONU, « privés de leurs droits politiques, marginalisés économiquement et discriminés au motif de leur origine ethnique ».

    Le projet s’était apparemment endormi au fond d’un tiroir lorsqu’en août 2017, après la véritable campagne de nettoyage ethnique déclenchée par Tatmadaw (l’armée birmane) et ses milices, près de 740 000 Rohingyas ont fui précipitamment l’État de Rakhine, (autrefois appelé Arakan) où ils vivaient pour se réfugier de l’autre côté de la frontière, au Bangladesh, auprès de leurs frères, exilés parfois depuis plus de vingt-cinq ans. En quelques jours, le nombre de Rohingyas dans le district de Cox’s Bazar a atteint un million de personnes et le camp de réfugiés de Kutupalong est devenu le plus peuplé de la planète.

    Nourrie par divers trafics, par le prosélytisme des émissaires islamistes, par la présence de gangs criminels et par l’activisme des agents de l’Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) à la recherche de recrues pour combattre l’armée birmane, une insécurité, rapidement jugée incontrôlable par les autorités locales, s’est installée dans la région. Insécurité qui a contribué à aggraver les tensions entre les réfugiés et la population locale qui reproche aux Rohingyas de voler les petits boulots – employés de restaurant, livreurs, conducteurs de pousse-pousse – en soudoyant les policiers et en acceptant des salaires inférieurs, alors qu’ils ne sont officiellement pas autorisés à travailler.

    Cette situation est d’autant plus inacceptable pour le gouvernement de Dacca que Cox’s Bazar et sa plage de 120 km constituent l’une des rares attractions touristiques du pays.

    Pour mettre un terme à ce chaos, le gouvernement de Dacca a d’abord compté sur une campagne de retours volontaires et ordonnés des Rohingyas en Birmanie. Il y a un an, 2 200 d’entre eux avaient ainsi été placés sur une liste de rapatriement. Tentative vaine : faute d’obtenir des garanties de sécurité et de liberté du gouvernement birman, aucun réfugié n’a accepté de rentrer. Le même refus a été opposé aux autorités en août dernier lorsqu’une deuxième liste de 3 500 réfugiés a été proposée. Selon les chiffres fournis par le gouvernement birman lui-même, 31 réfugiés seulement sont rentrés du Bangladesh entre mai 2018 et mai 2019.

    Les conditions, le plus souvent atroces, dans lesquelles les Rohingyas ont été contraints de fuir en août 2017 et ce qu’ils soupçonnent de ce qui les attendrait au retour expliquent largement ces refus. Selon le rapport de la Mission d’établissement des faits de l’ONU remis au Conseil des droits de l’homme le 8 août 2019 [on peut le lire ici], les Rohingyas ont été victimes, un an plus tôt, de multiples « crimes de droit international, y compris des crimes de génocide, des crimes contre l’humanité et des crimes de guerre ».

    Selon ce document, « la responsabilité de l’État [birman – ndlr] est engagée au regard de l’interdiction des crimes de génocide et des crimes contre l’humanité, ainsi que d’autres violations du droit international des droits de l’homme et du droit international humanitaire ».

    Le rapport précise que « la mission a établi une liste confidentielle de personnes soupçonnées d’avoir participé à des crimes de droit international, y compris des crimes de génocide, des crimes contre l’humanité et des crimes de guerre, dans les États de Rakhine, kachin et shan depuis 2011. Cette liste […] contient plus d’une centaine de noms, parmi lesquels ceux de membres et de commandants de la Tatmadaw, de la police, de la police des frontières et des autres forces de sécurité, y compris de fonctionnaires de l’administration pénitentiaire, ainsi que les noms de représentants des autorités civiles, au niveau des districts, des États et du pays, de personnes privées et de membres de groupes armés non étatiques. […] La liste mentionne aussi un grand nombre d’entités avec lesquelles les auteurs présumés de violations étaient liés, notamment certaines unités des forces de sécurité, des groupes armés non étatiques et des entreprises ».

    On comprend dans ces conditions que, rien n’ayant changé depuis cet été sanglant en Birmanie où Aung San Suu Kyi, prix Nobel de la paix 1991, n’a pas levé un sourcil devant ces crimes, les Rohingyas préfèrent l’incertain chaos de leur statut de réfugiés à la certitude d’un retour à la terreur. Et refusent le rapatriement. Ce qui a conduit, début 2018, la première ministre bangladaise Sheikh Hasina à sortir de son tiroir le projet de transfert, en sommeil depuis 2015, pour le mettre en œuvre « en priorité ».

    Près de 300 millions de dollars ont été investis par Dacca dans ce projet, destiné dans un premier temps à réduire la population des camps où la situation est la plus tendue. Selon le représentant du gouvernement à Cox’s Bazar, Kamal Hossain, les opérations de transfert pourraient commencer « fin novembre ou début décembre ».

    Au cours d’une récente réunion à Dacca entre des représentants du ministère des affaires étrangères du Bangladesh et des responsables des Nations unies, les officiels bangladais auraient « conseillé » à leurs interlocuteurs d’inclure Bhasan Char dans le plan de financement de l’ONU pour 2020, sans quoi le gouvernement de Dacca pourrait ne pas approuver ce plan. Les responsables des Nations unies à Dacca ont refusé de confirmer ou démentir, mais plusieurs d’entre eux, s’exprimant officieusement, ont indiqué qu’ils étaient soumis « à une forte pression pour endosser le projet de Bhasan Char ».

    Interrogé sur la possibilité d’organiser le transfert des réfugiés sans l’aval des Nations unies, le ministre bangladais des affaires étrangères Abul Kalam Abdul Momen a répondu : « Oui, c’est possible, nous pouvons le faire. » La première ministre, de son côté, a été plus prudente. En octobre, elle se contentait de répéter que son administration ne prendrait sa décision qu’après avoir consulté les Nations unies et les autres partenaires internationaux du Bangladesh.

    L’un de ces partenaires, dont l’aide en matière d’assistance humanitaire est précieuse pour Dacca, vient de donner son avis. Lors d’une intervention fin octobre à la Chambre des représentants, Alice G. Wells, secrétaire adjointe du bureau de l’Asie du Sud et du Centre au Département d’État, a demandé au gouvernement du Bangladesh d’ajourner tout transfert de réfugiés vers Bhasan Char jusqu’à ce qu’un groupe d’experts indépendants détermine si c’est un lieu approprié. Washington ayant versé depuis août 2017 669 millions de dollars d’aide à Dacca, on peut imaginer que cette suggestion sera entendue.
    Les « défaillances systémiques » de l’ONU

    Les Nations unies sont pour l’instant discrètes sur ce dossier. On sait seulement qu’une délégation doit se rendre sur l’île les jours prochains. Il est vrai que face à ce qui s’est passé ces dernières années en Birmanie, et surtout face à la question des Rohingyas, la position de l’ONU n’a pas toujours été claire et son action a longtemps manqué de lucidité et d’efficacité. C’est le moins qu’on puisse dire.

    Certes l’actuel secrétaire général, António Guterres, a réagi rapidement et vigoureusement au sanglant nettoyage ethnique qui venait de commencer en Birmanie en adressant dès le 2 septembre 2017 une lettre au Conseil de sécurité dans laquelle il demandait un « effort concerté » pour empêcher l’escalade de la crise dans l’État de Rakhine, d’où 400 000 Rohingyas avaient déjà fui pour échapper aux atrocités.

    Mais il n’a pu obtenir de réaction rapide et efficace du Conseil. Il a fallu discuter deux semaines pour obtenir une réunion et 38 jours de plus pour obtenir une déclaration officielle de pure forme. Quant à obtenir l’envoi sur place d’une équipe d’observateurs de l’ONU en mesure de constater et dénoncer l’usage de la violence, il en était moins question que jamais : la Birmanie s’y opposait et son allié et protecteur chinois, membre du Conseil et détenteur du droit de veto, soutenait la position du gouvernement birman. Et personne, pour des raisons diverses, ne voulait s’en prendre à Pékin sur ce terrain.

    En l’occurrence, l’indifférence des États membres, peu mobilisés par le massacre de Rohingyas, venait s’ajouter aux divisions et différences de vues qui caractérisaient la bureaucratie de l’ONU dans cette affaire. Divergences qui expliquaient largement l’indifférence et la passivité de l’organisation depuis la campagne anti-Rohingyas de 2012 jusqu’au nettoyage ethnique sanglant de 2017.

    Incarnation de cette indifférence et de cette passivité, c’est-à-dire de la priorité que le système des Nations unies en Birmanie accordait aux considérations politiques et économiques sur la sécurité et les besoins humanitaires des Rohingyas, Renata Lok-Dessallien, la représentante de l’ONU en Birmanie depuis 2014, a quitté ses fonctions en octobre 2017, discrètement appelée par New York à d’autres fonctions, en dépit des réticences du gouvernement birman. Mais il était clair, à l’intérieur de l’organisation, qu’elle n’était pas la seule responsable de cette dérive désastreuse.

    Dans un rapport de 36 pages, commandé début 2018 par le secrétaire général et remis en mai dernier, l’économiste et diplomate guatémaltèque Gert Rosenthal, chargé de réaliser un diagnostic de l’action de l’ONU en Birmanie entre 2010 et 2018, constate qu’en effet, l’organisation n’a pas été à son meilleur pendant les années qui ont précédé le nettoyage ethnique d’août 2017 au cours duquel 7 000 Rohingyas au moins ont été tués, plus de 700 000 contraints à l’exil, des centaines de milliers d’autres chassés de leurs villages incendiés et enfermés dans des camps, le tout dans un climat de violence et de haine extrême [le rapport – en anglais – peut être lu ici].

    Selon Gert Rosenthal, qui constate des « défaillances systémiques » au sein de l’ONU, nombre d’agents des Nations unies ont été influencés ou déroutés par l’attitude de Aung San Suu Kyi, icône du combat pour la démocratie devenue, après les élections de 2015, l’alliée, l’otage et la caution des militaires et du clergé bouddhiste. C’est-à-dire la complice, par son silence, des crimes commis en 2017. Mais l’auteur du rapport pointe surtout la difficulté, pour les agences de l’ONU sur place, à choisir entre deux stratégies.

    L’une est la « diplomatie tranquille » qui vise à préserver dans la durée la présence et l’action, même limitée, de l’organisation au prix d’une certaine discrétion sur les obligations humanitaires et les droits de l’homme. L’autre est le « plaidoyer sans concession » qui entend faire respecter les obligations internationales par le pays hôte et implique éventuellement l’usage de mesures « intrusives », telles que des sanctions ou la menace de fermer l’accès du pays aux marchés internationaux, aux investissements et au tourisme.

    À première vue, entre ces deux options, le secrétaire général de l’ONU a fait son choix. Après une visite à Cox’s Bazar, en juillet 2018, il affirmait qu’à ses yeux, « les Rohingyas ont toujours été l’un des peuples, sinon le peuple le plus discriminé du monde, sans la moindre reconnaissance de ses droits les plus élémentaires, à commencer par le droit à la citoyenneté dans son propre pays, le Myanmar [la Birmanie] ».

    Il reste à vérifier aujourd’hui si, face à la menace brandie par Dacca de transférer jusqu’à 100 000 réfugiés rohingyas sur une île concentrationnaire et submersible, les Nations unies, c’est-à-dire le système onusien, mais aussi les États membres, choisiront le « plaidoyer sans concession » ou la « diplomatie tranquille ».

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/131119/le-bangladesh-veut-il-noyer-ses-refugies-rohingyas?onglet=full

    #réfugiés #asile #migrations #rohingyas #Bangladesh #camps_de_réfugiés

    ping @reka

    • Bangladesh Turning Refugee Camps into Open-Air Prisons

      Bangladesh Army Chief Gen. Aziz Ahmed said this week that a plan to surround the Rohingya refugee camps in #Cox’s_Bazar with barbed wire fences and guard towers was “in full swing.” The plan is the latest in a series of policies effectively cutting off more than 900,000 Rohingya refugees from the outside world. The refugees have been living under an internet blackout for more than 75 days.

      Bangladesh is struggling to manage the massive refugee influx and the challenges of handling grievances from the local community, yet there is no end in sight because Myanmar has refused to create conditions for the refugees’ safe and voluntary return. But fencing in refugees in what will essentially be open-air prisons and cutting off communication services are neither necessary nor proportional measures to maintain camp security and are contrary to international human rights law.

      Humanitarian aid workers reported the internet shutdown has seriously hampered their ability to provide assistance, particularly in responding to emergencies. The fencing will place refugees at further risk should they urgently need to evacuate or obtain medical and other humanitarian services.

      Refugees told Human Rights Watch the fencing will hinder their ability to contact relatives spread throughout the camps and brings back memories of restrictions on movement and the abuses they fled in Myanmar.

      The internet shutdown has already hampered refugees’ efforts to communicate with relatives and friends still in Myanmar, which is critical for gaining reliable information about conditions in Rakhine State to determine whether it is safe to return home.

      The Bangladesh government should immediately stop its plans to curtail refugees’ basic rights or risk squandering the international goodwill it earned when it opened its borders to a desperate people fleeing the Myanmar military’s brutal campaign of ethnic cleansing.

      https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/11/26/bangladesh-turning-refugee-camps-open-air-prisons
      #internet #barbelés #liberté_de_mouvement

    • Le Bangladesh invoque le Covid-19 pour interner des réfugiés rohingyas sur une île inondable

      La protection des camps de réfugiés birmans contre la pandémie a servi de prétexte au gouvernement de Dacca pour mettre en quarantaine plus de 300 Rohingyas sur une île prison du golfe du Bengale menacée de submersion par la mousson et où il veut transférer 100 000 exilés.

      La lutte contre le coronavirus peut-elle être invoquée par un État pour justifier l’internement de réfugiés sur une île submersible, à la veille du début de la mousson ? Oui. Le gouvernement du Bangladesh vient de le prouver. Le dimanche 3 mai, puis le jeudi 7 mai, deux groupes de 29 puis 280 réfugiés rohingyas dont les embarcations erraient depuis des semaines en mer d’Andaman ont été transférés de force par les garde-côtes sur l’île de #Bhasan_Char – « l’île qui flotte » en bengali, à trois heures de bateau de la côte la plus proche, dans le golfe du Bengale.

      Selon les autorités bangladaises, les réfugiés internés à Bhasan Char avaient fui la Birmanie pour rejoindre la Malaisie, qui les avait refoulés et le chalutier à bord duquel ils se trouvaient était en difficulté dans les eaux du Bangladesh où les garde-côtes locaux les avaient secourus. Mais Human Rights Watch a une autre version. Après avoir visité plusieurs camps de réfugiés rohingyas de la région, les enquêteurs de HRW ont découvert que sept au moins des réfugiés transférés à Bhasan Char avaient déjà été enregistrés comme réfugiés au Bangladesh.

      Ce qui signifie qu’ils ne cherchaient pas à entrer dans le pays, mais à en sortir. Sans doute pour éviter un rapatriement en Birmanie, dont ils ne voulaient à aucun prix, comme l’écrasante majorité des Rohingyas, poussés à l’exil par les persécutions dont ils étaient victimes dans leur pays d’origine. Deux semaines plus tôt, un autre chalutier à bord duquel se trouvaient près de 400 Rohingyas, fuyant la Birmanie, avait été secouru par les garde-côtes après une longue dérive en mer au cours de laquelle une centaine de passagers avaient trouvé la mort.

      Le camp de réfugiés de Kutupalong à Ukhia, au Bangladesh, le 15 mai 2020. © Suzauddin Rubel/AFP

      Sans s’attarder sur ces détails tragiques, le ministre des affaires étrangères du Bangladesh, Abul Kalam Abdul Momen, a avancé une explication strictement sanitaire à la décision de son gouvernement. « Nous avons décidé d’envoyer les rescapés rohingyas sur Bhasan Char pour des raisons de sécurité, a-t-il affirmé le 2 mai. Nous ne savions pas s’ils étaient positifs ou non au Covid-19. S’ils étaient entrés dans le camp de réfugiés de Kutupalong, la totalité de la population aurait été mise en danger. »

      Kutupalong, où s’entassent aujourd’hui, selon le Haut-Commissariat aux réfugiés des Nations unies (HCR), 602 000 Rohingyas, est le plus vaste des 12 principaux camps de réfugiés de la région de Cox Bazar. C’est aussi, actuellement, le camp de réfugiés le plus peuplé de la planète. Depuis les années 1990, cette région frontalière a recueilli la majorité des membres de la minorité ethnique musulmane de Birmanie, historiquement ostracisée et contrainte à l’exil dans le pays voisin par la majorité bouddhiste et le pouvoir birman. Elle en abrite aujourd’hui plus d’un million.

      Aux yeux du gouvernement de Dacca, cette population de réfugiés concentrés sur son sol dans une misère et une promiscuité explosives constitue une véritable bombe à retardement sanitaire. Surtout si on accepte les données officielles – très discutées par les experts en santé publique – selon lesquelles le Bangladesh qui compte 165 millions d’habitants recenserait seulement près de 21 000 cas de Covid-19 et 300 morts, après deux mois de confinement. Jeudi dernier, les deux premiers cas de coronavirus dans les camps de réfugiés de la région de Cox Bazar ont été confirmés. Selon le HCR, l’un est un réfugié, l’autre un citoyen bangladais. Le lendemain, deux autres réfugiés contaminés étaient identifiés. D’après l’un des responsables communautaires des réfugiés près de 5 000 personnes qui auraient été en contact avec les malades testés positifs dans le camp no 5, auraient été mises en quarantaine.

      Mais ces informations n’étaient pas connues du gouvernement de Dacca lorsqu’il a décidé de placer les 309 rescapés en isolement à Bhasan Char. Et, de toutes façons, l’argument sanitaire avancé par les autorités locales n’avait pas été jugé recevable par les responsables locaux du HCR. « Nous disposons à Cox Bazar des installations nécessaires pour assurer la mise en quarantaine éventuelle de ces réfugiés, avait expliqué aux représentants du gouvernement Louise Donovan, au nom de l’agence de l’ONU. Des procédures rigoureuses sont en place. Elles prévoient notamment, pendant la période requise de 14 jours, un examen médical complet dans chacun de nos centres de quarantaine. Nous avons tout l’espace nécessaire et nous pouvons offrir toute l’assistance dont ils ont besoin, dans ces centres où ils bénéficient en plus du soutien de leurs familles et des réseaux communautaires indispensables à leur rétablissement après l’expérience traumatisante qu’ils viennent de vivre. »

      En d’autres termes, pourquoi ajouter au traumatisme de l’exil et d’une traversée maritime dangereuse, à la merci de passeurs cupides, l’isolement sur un îlot perdu, menacé de submersion par gros temps ? À cette question la réponse est cruellement simple : parce que le gouvernement du Bangladesh a trouvé dans cet argument sanitaire un prétexte inespéré pour commencer enfin à mettre en œuvre, sans bruit, un vieux projet contesté du premier ministre Sheikh Hasina qui a déjà investi 276 millions de dollars dans cette opération.

      Projet qui prévoyait le transfert de 100 000 réfugiés – un sur dix – sur Bhasan Char et qui avait été rejeté, jusque-là, par les principaux intéressés – les réfugiés rohingyas – mais aussi par la majorité des ONG actives dans les camps. Avant de faire l’objet de réserves très explicites de plusieurs agences des Nations unies. Au point que trois dates arrêtées pour le début du transfert des réfugiés – mars 2019, octobre 2019 et novembre 2019 – n’ont pas été respectées. Et qu’avant l’arrivée, il y a deux semaines, du premier groupe de 29 rescapés, seuls des militaires de la marine du Bangladesh, qui contrôle l’île, étaient présents sur les lieux.

      Et pour cause. Apparue seulement depuis une vingtaine d’années, cette île, constituée d’alluvions du Meghna qui réunit les eaux du Gange et du Brahmapoutre, émerge à peine des eaux. Partiellement couverte de forêt, elle est restée inhabitée depuis son apparition en raison de sa vulnérabilité à la mousson et aux cyclones, fréquents dans cette région, de la mi-avril à début novembre. Cyclones d’autant plus redoutés et destructeurs que même par beau temps l’île n’offre aucune résistance aux flots. Entre la marée basse et la marée haute, la superficie de Bhasan Char passe de 6 000 hectares à 4 000 hectares.
      « Bhasan Char sera l’équivalent d’une prison »

      « Ce projet est inhumain, a confié aux journalistes du Bangla Tribune un officier de la marine du Bangladesh stationné dans l’île, dont l’accès est interdit par l’armée. En novembre 1970, le cyclone de Bhola n’a fait aucun survivant sur l’île voisine de Nijhum Dwip. Et Bhasan Char est encore plus basse sur l’eau que Nijhum Dwip. » « Un grand nombre de questions demeurent sans réponses, observait après une visite sur place en janvier 2019 la psychologue coréenne Yanghee Lee, rapporteure spéciale de l’ONU pour la situation des droits de l’homme en Birmanie. Mais la question principale demeure de savoir si cette île est véritablement habitable. »

      « Chaque année, pendant la mousson, ont déclaré aux enquêteurs de Human Rights Watch les habitants de l’île voisine de Hatiya, une partie de Bhasan Char est érodée par l’eau. Nous n’osons même pas y mettre les pieds. Comment des milliers de Rohingyas pourraient-ils y vivre ? » Par ailleurs, la navigation dans les parages de l’île est jugée si dangereuse, par temps incertain, que les pêcheurs du delta hésitent à s’y aventurer. Les reporters d’un journal local ont dû attendre six jours avant que la météo devienne favorable et qu’un volontaire accepte de les embarquer.

      À toutes ces objections des ONG, d’une partie de la presse locale, et de plusieurs agences des Nations unies, le gouvernement bangladais répond que rien n’a été négligé. Une digue, haute de près de trois mètres et longue de 13 km a été érigée autour de l’enclave affectée à l’hébergement des Rohingyas. Chacune des 120 unités de logement du complexe comprend 12 bâtiments sur pilotis, une mare, et un abri en béton destiné à héberger 23 familles en cas de cyclone et à recevoir les réserves de produits alimentaires. Conçus, selon les architectes pour résister à des vents de 260 km/h, les abris pourront aussi être utilisés comme salles de classes, centres communautaires et dispensaires.

      Compte tenu des conditions de navigation très difficiles dans l’estuaire du Meghna et du statut militarisé de l’île, la liberté de mouvement des réfugiés, comme leur aptitude à assurer leur subsistance, seront réduites à néant. « Bhasan Char sera l’équivalent d’une prison », estimait, il y a un an Brad Adams, directeur pour l’Asie de Human Rights Watch. Aucun hôpital n’est prévu sur l’île. En cas d’urgence, les malades ou les blessés devront être transférés vers l’hôpital de l’île de Hatiya, à une heure de bateau – lorsque le temps le permet.

      Faute de production locale, la quasi-totalité de l’alimentation devra être acheminée depuis le continent. La densité de population de ce complexe dont les blocs, disposés sur un plan orthogonal, sont séparés par d’étroites allées rectilignes dépassera, lorsqu’il sera totalement occupé, 65 000 habitants au km² : soit six fois celle du cœur de New York. On le voit, ce « paradis pour les Rohingyas » selon le principal architecte du projet, Ahmed Mukta, tient davantage du cauchemar concentrationnaire submersible que du tremplin vers une nouvelle vie pour les réfugiés birmans du Bangladesh.

      Formulée pour la première fois, sans suite, en 2015 par les responsables bangladais, alors que le nombre de réfugiés birmans dans la région de Cox Bazar ne dépassait pas 250 000, l’idée de les transférer sur Bhasan Char est revenue en discussion deux ans plus tard, en août 2017, lorsque la campagne de nettoyage ethnique déclenchée par l’armée birmane et ses milices a chassé près de 740 000 Rohingyas de leurs villages dans l’État de Rakhine et les a contraints à se réfugier de l’autre côté de la frontière, au Bangladesh, auprès de leurs frères, exilés parfois depuis plus de 25 ans.

      Nourrie par divers trafics, par le prosélytisme des émissaires islamistes, par la présence de gangs criminels et par l’activisme des agents de l’Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA), à la recherche de recrues pour combattre l’armée birmane, une insécurité, rapidement jugée incontrôlable par les autorités locales, s’est installée dans la région. Insécurité qui a contribué à aggraver les tensions entre les réfugiés et la population locale qui reproche aux Rohingyas de voler les petits boulots – employés de restaurants, livreurs, conducteurs de pousse-pousse – en soudoyant les policiers et en acceptant des salaires inférieurs, alors qu’ils ne sont officiellement pas autorisés à travailler. Cette situation est d’autant plus inacceptable pour le gouvernement de Dacca que Cox Bazar et sa plage de 120 km constituent l’une des rares attractions touristiques du pays.

      Pour mettre un terme à cette tension, le gouvernement de Dacca a d’abord compté sur une campagne de retours volontaires des Rohingyas en Birmanie. En vain. Faute d’obtenir des garanties de sécurité et de liberté du gouvernement birman, aucun réfugié n’a accepté de rentrer. Le même refus a été opposé aux autorités d’année en année chaque fois qu’une liste de volontaires pour le rapatriement a été proposée. Selon les chiffres fournis par le gouvernement birman lui-même, 31 réfugiés seulement sont rentrés du Bangladesh entre mai 2018 et mai 2019.

      Les conditions, le plus souvent atroces, dans lesquelles les Rohingyas ont été contraints de fuir en août 2017 et ce qu’ils soupçonnent de ce qui les attendrait au retour expliquent largement ces refus. Les ONG humanitaires estiment que depuis 2017, 24 000 Rohingyas ont été tués par l’armée birmane et ses milices, et 18 000 femmes et jeunes filles violées. En outre, 115 000 maisons auraient été brûlées et 113 000 autres vandalisées. Selon le rapport de la « Mission d’établissement des faits » de l’ONU remis au Conseil des droits de l’homme en août 2019, les Rohingyas ont été victimes de multiples « crimes de droit international, y compris des crimes de génocide, des crimes contre l’humanité et des crimes de guerre ».
      On comprend dans ces conditions que, rien n’ayant changé depuis cet été sanglant en Birmanie où Aung San Suu Kyi, prix Nobel de la paix 1991, n’a pas soulevé un sourcil devant ces crimes, les Rohingyas se résignent à un destin de réfugiés plutôt que de risquer un retour à la terreur. Mais ils ne sont pas disposés pour autant à risquer leur vie dès le premier cyclone dans un centre de rétention insulaire coupé de tout où ils n’auront aucune chance d’espérer un autre avenir. Les responsables du HCR l’ont compris et, sans affronter ouvertement les autorités locales, ne cessent de répéter depuis un an, comme ils viennent de le faire encore la semaine dernière, qu’il n’est pas possible de transférer qui que ce soit sur Bhasan Char sans procéder à une « évaluation complète et détaillée » de la situation.

      Depuis deux ans, les « plans stratégiques conjoints » proposés par le HCR et l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) pour résoudre la « crise humanitaire » des Rohingyas estiment que sur les trois scénarios possibles – rapatriement, réinstallation et présence de longue durée – le dernier est le plus réaliste. À condition d’être accompagné d’une certaine « décongestion » des camps et d’une plus grande liberté de mouvements accordée aux réfugiés. L’aménagement de Bhasan Char et la volonté obstinée d’y transférer une partie des Rohingyas montrent que le gouvernement de Dacca a une conception particulière de la « décongestion ».

      Sans doute compte-t-il sur le temps – et le soutien de ses alliés étrangers – pour l’imposer aux agences de l’ONU. « Le Bangladesh affronte le double défi de devoir porter assistance aux Rohingyas tout en combattant la propagation du Covid-19, constatait la semaine dernière Brad Adams de Human Rights Watch. Mais envoyer les réfugiés sur une île dangereusement inondable, sans soins médicaux, n’est certainement pas la solution. »

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/160520/le-bangladesh-invoque-le-covid-19-pour-interner-des-refugies-rohingyas-sur

  • Return : voluntary, safe, dignified and durable ?

    Voluntary return in safety and with dignity has long been a core tenet of the international refugee regime. In the 23 articles on ‘Return’ in this issue of FMR, authors explore various obstacles to achieving sustainable return, discuss the need to guard against premature or forced return, and debate the assumptions and perceptions that influence policy and practice. This issue also includes a mini-feature on ‘Towards understanding and addressing the root causes of displacement’.


    https://www.fmreview.org/return

    #revue #retours_volontaires #dignité #retour #retour_au_pays
    #Soudan_du_Sud #réfugiés_sud-soudanais #réfugiés_Rohingya #Rohingya #Inde #Sri_Lanka #réfugiés_sri-lankais #réfugiés_syriens #Syrie #Allemagne #Erythrée #Liban #Turquie #Jordanie #Kenya #réfugiés_Somaliens #Somalie #Dadaab #Myanmar #Birmanie #Darfour #réintégration_économique #réintégration

    ping @isskein @karine4 @_kg_

  • #Rohingya crisis : Villages destroyed for government facilities - BBC News
    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-49596113

    Entire Muslim Rohingya villages in Myanmar have been demolished and replaced by police barracks, government buildings and refugee relocation camps, the BBC has found.

    On a government tour, the BBC saw four locations where secure facilities have been built on what satellite images show were once Rohingya settlements.

    Officials denied building on top of the villages in Rakhine state.

    In 2017 more than 700,000 Rohingya fled Myanmar during a military operation.

    #birmanie

  • Au #Bangladesh, deux ans après l’afflux de #réfugiés_rohingyas, l’#hostilité grandit

    Quand des centaines de milliers de musulmans rohingyas, victimes d’exactions en #Birmanie, ont fui pour se réfugier à partir de l’été 2017 au Bangladesh, les populations locales les ont souvent bien accueillies. Mais deux ans après l’afflux de réfugiés, l’hostilité grandit.

    « Au départ, en tant que membres de la communauté musulmane, nous les avons aidés », raconte Riazul Haque. Cet ouvrier qui habite près de la ville frontalière d’Ukhiya, dans le district de Cox’s Bazar (sud-est du Bangladesh), a permis à une soixantaine de familles de s’établir sur un lopin de terre lui appartenant, pensant qu’elles allaient rester deux ou trois mois maximum.

    « Aujourd’hui, on a l’impression que les Rohingyas encore établis en Birmanie vont bientôt arriver au Bangladesh », s’inquiète-t-il.

    Ukhiya comptait environ 300.000 habitants, mais l’arrivée massive de réfugiés, à partir d’août 2017, a plus que triplé la population.

    La plupart des réfugiés sont logés dans le camp tentaculaire de Kutupalong. D’autres, qui disposent de davantage de ressources, ont tenté de se faire une place dans la société bangladaise.

    Pollution et criminalité en hausse, perte d’emplois : les locaux les accusent de tous les maux.

    « Ils nous volent les petits boulots en soudoyant les forces de l’ordre », assure Mohammad Sojol, qui a perdu son emploi de conducteur de pousse-pousse car, selon lui, les propriétaires des véhicules préfèrent désormais embaucher des réfugiés contre un salaire inférieur, même si ces derniers ne sont officiellement pas autorisés à travailler.

    A la suite de protestations, certains Rohingyas qui s’étaient installés en dehors des camps officiels sont maintenant obligés d’y retourner et leurs enfants sont expulsés des écoles locales.

    – Gangs de la drogue -

    Les Rohingyas, une minorité ethnique musulmane, ont fui les exactions - qualifiées de « génocide » par des enquêteurs de l’ONU - de l’armée birmane et de milices bouddhistes.

    Seule une poignée d’entre eux sont rentrés, craignant pour leur sécurité dans un pays où ils se voient refuser la citoyenneté et sont traités comme des clandestins.

    Le fait que ces réfugiés soient « inactifs dans les camps (les rend) instables », estime Ikbal Hossain, chef intérimaire de la police du district de Cox’s Bazar.

    « Ils reçoivent toutes sortes d’aides, mais ils ont beaucoup de temps libre », relève-t-il, ajoutant que beaucoup sont tombés entre les mains de trafiquants de drogue.

    Des dizaines de millions de comprimés de méthamphétamine (yaba) entrent depuis la Birmanie, un des premiers producteurs au monde de cette drogue de synthèse, au Bangladesh via les camps.

    Et les trafiquants utilisent les Rohingyas comme mules, chargées d’acheminer les stupéfiants dans les villes voisines.

    Au moins 13 Rohingyas, soupçonnés de transporter des milliers de yaba, ont été abattus au cours d’affrontements avec la police.

    Et la présence des gangs de la drogue dans les camps a renforcé l’insécurité et les violences, incitant le Bangladesh à accroître la présence policière.

    Selon la police, le taux de criminalité est ici supérieur aux statistiques nationales du pays, qui enregistre quelque 3.000 meurtres par an pour 168 millions d’habitants.

    318 plaintes au pénal ont été déposées contre des Rohingyas depuis août 2017, dont 31 pour meurtres, d’après Ikbal Hossain. Mais selon des experts, le nombre de crimes dans les camps serait bien supérieur aux chiffres de la police.

    « Nous ne nous sentons pas en sécurité la nuit, mais je ne peux pas quitter ma maison, sinon le reste de mes terres sera également occupé par des réfugiés », déplore Rabeya Begum, une femme au foyer vivant dans le hameau de Madhurchhara, à proximité du camp de Kutupalong.

    Mohib Ullah, un responsable de la communauté rohingya, réfute entretenir de mauvaises relations avec la population locale. « Nous nous entraidons car nous sommes voisins (...) Nous ferions la même chose pour eux ».

    Quelque 3.500 Rohingyas ont été autorisés à rentrer du Bangladesh en Birmanie à compter de jeudi, s’ils le souhaitent.

    En novembre 2018, une précédente tentative de placer quelque 2.200 d’entre eux sur une liste de rapatriement avait échoué, les réfugiés, sans garantie de sécurité en Birmanie, refusant de quitter les camps.

    https://www.liberation.fr/depeches/2019/08/21/au-bangladesh-deux-ans-apres-l-afflux-de-refugies-rohingyas-l-hostilite-g
    #réfugiés #asile #migrations #Rohingyas #camps #camps_de_réfugiés

  • Male rape survivors go uncounted in #Rohingya camps

    ‘I don’t hear people talk about sexual violence against men. But this is also not specific to this response.’
    Nurul Islam feels the pain every time he sits: it’s a reminder of the sexual violence the Rohingya man endured when he fled Myanmar two years ago.

    Nurul, a refugee, says he was raped and tortured by Myanmar soldiers during the military purge that ousted more than 700,000 Rohingya from Rakhine State starting in August 2017.

    “They put me like a dog,” Nurul said, acting out the attack by bowing toward the ground, black tarp sheets lining the bamboo tent around him.

    Nurul, 40, is one of the uncounted male survivors of sexual violence now living in Bangladesh’s cramped refugee camps.

    Rights groups and aid agencies have documented widespread sexual violence against women and girls as part of the Rohingya purge. UN investigators say the scale of Myanmar military sexual violence was so severe that it amounts to evidence of “genocidal intent to destroy the Rohingya population” in and of itself.

    But boys and men like Nurul were also victims. Researchers who study sexual violence in crises say the needs of male survivors have largely been overlooked and neglected by humanitarian programmes in Bangladesh’s refugee camps.

    “There’s a striking division between aid workers and the refugees,” said Sarah Chynoweth, a researcher who has studied male survivors of sexual violence in emergencies around the world, including the Rohingya camps. “Many aid workers say we haven’t heard about it, but the refugees are well aware of it.”

    A report she authored for the Women’s Refugee Commission, a research organisation that advocates for improvements on gender issues in humanitarian responses, calls for aid groups in Bangladesh to boost services for all survivors of sexual violence – recognising that men and boys need help, in addition to women and girls.

    Rights groups say services for all survivors of gender-based violence are “grossly inadequate” and underfunded across the camps – including care for people attacked in the exodus from Myanmar, as well as abuse that happens in Bangladesh’s city-sized refugee camps.

    Stigma often prevents Rohingya men and boys from speaking up, while many aid groups aren’t asking the right questions to find out.

    But there are even fewer services offering male victims like Nurul specialised counselling and healthcare.

    Chynoweth and others who work on the issue say stigma often prevents Rohingya men and boys from speaking up, while many aid groups aren’t asking the right questions to find out – leaving humanitarian groups with scarce data to plan a better response, and male survivors of sexual violence with little help.

    In interviews with organisations working on gender-based violence, health, and mental health in the camps, aid staff told The New Humanitarian that the needs of male rape survivors have rarely been discussed, or that specialised services were unnecessary.

    Mercy Lwambi, women protection and empowerment coordinator at the International Rescue Committee, said focusing on female survivors of gender-based violence is not intended to exclude men.

    “What we do is just evidence-informed,” she said. “We have evidence to show it’s for the most part women and girls who are affected by sexual violence. The numbers of male survivors are usually low.”

    But according to gender-based violence case management guidelines compiled by organisations including the IRC, services should be in place for all survivors of sexual violence, with or without incident data.

    And in the camps, Rohingya refugees know that male survivors exist.

    TNH spoke with dozens of Rohingya refugees, asking about the issue of ”torture against private parts of men”. Over the course of a week, TNH met 21 Rohingya who said they were affected, knew other people who were, or said they witnessed it themselves.

    When fellow refugees reached out to Nurul on behalf of TNH, he decided to share his experiences as a survivor of sexual violence: “Because it happened to men too,” he said.
    Asking the right questions

    After his attack in Myanmar, Nurul said other Rohingya men dragged him across the border to Bangladesh’s camps. When he went to a health clinic, the doctors handed him painkillers. There were no questions about his injury, and he didn’t offer an explanation.

    “I was too ashamed to tell them what had happened,” he said.

    When TNH met him in June, Nurul said he hadn’t received any counselling or care for his abuse.

    But Chynoweth says the problem is more complicated than men being reluctant to out themselves as rape victims, or aid workers simply not acknowledging the severity of sexual violence against men and boys.

    She believes it’s also a question of language.

    When Chynoweth last year started asking refugees if they knew of men who had been raped or sexually abused, most at first said no. When she left out the words “sexual” and “rape” and instead asked if “torture” was done against their “private parts”, people opened up.

    “Many men have no idea that what happened to them is sexual violence,” she said.

    Similarly, when she asked NGO workers in Bangladesh if they had encountered sexual violence against Rohingya men, many would shake their heads. “As soon as I asked if they had treated men with genital trauma, the answer was: ‘Yes, of course,’” she said.

    This suggests that health workers must be better trained to ask the right questions and to spot signs of abuse, Chynoweth said.
    Challenging taboos

    The undercounting of sexual violence against men has long been a problem in humanitarian responses.

    A December 2013 report by the Office of the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict notes that sexual and gender-based violence is often seen as a women’s issue, yet “the disparity between levels of conflict-related sexual violence against women and levels against men is rarely as dramatic as one might expect”.

    A Security Council resolution this year formally recognised that sexual violence in conflict also targets men and boys; Human Rights Watch called it “an important step in challenging the taboos that keep men from reporting their experiences and deny the survivors the assistance they need”.

    But in the Rohingya refugee camps, the issue still flies under the radar.

    Mwajuma Msangi from the UN Population Fund, which chairs the gender-based violence subsector for aid groups in the camps, said sexual violence against men and boys is usually only raised, if at all, during the “any other business” section that ends bimonthly coordination meetings.

    “It hasn’t really come up,” Msangi said in an interview. “It’s good you are bringing this up, we should definitely look into it.”

    TNH asked staff from other major aid groups about the issue, including the UN’s refugee agency UNHCR, which co-manages UN and NGO efforts in the camps, and the World Health Organisation, which leads the health sector. There were few programmes training staff on how to work with male survivors of sexual violence, or offering specialised healthcare or counselling.

    “The [gender-based violence] sector has not been very proactive in training health workers to be honest,” said Donald Sonne Kazungu, Médecins Sans Frontières’ medical coordinator in Cox’s Bazar. “I don’t hear people talk about sexual violence against men. But this is also not specific to this response.”

    "The NGO world doesn’t acknowledge that it happened because there is no data, and there is no data because nobody is asking for it.”

    No data, no response

    For the few organisations that work with male survivors of sexual violence in the camps, the failure to assess the extent of the problem is part of a cycle that prevents solutions.

    "The NGO world doesn’t acknowledge that it happened because there is no data, and there is no data because nobody is asking for it,” said Eva Buzo, country director for Legal Action Worldwide, a European NGO that offers legal support to people in crises, including a women’s organisation in the camps, Shanti Mohila.

    LAW trains NGO medical staff and outreach workers, teaching them to be aware of signs of abuse among male survivors. It’s also trying to solidify a system through which men and boys can be referred for help. Through the first half of the year, the organisation has interacted with 25 men.

    "It’s really hardly a groundbreaking project, but unfortunately it is,” Buzo said, shrugging her shoulders. “Nobody else is paying attention.”

    But she’s reluctant to advertise her programme in the camps: there aren’t enough services where male victims of sexual violence can access specialised health and psychological care. Buzo said she trusts two doctors that work specifically with male survivors; both were trained by her organisation.

    “It’s shocking how ill-equipped the sector is,” she said, frustrated about her dilemma. “If we identify new survivors, I don’t even know where to refer them to.”

    The issue also underscores a larger debate in the humanitarian sector about whether gender-based violence programmes should focus primarily on women and girls, who face added risks in crises, or also better include men, boys, and the LGBTI community.

    “If we identify new survivors, I don’t even know where to refer them to.”

    Buzo says the lack of services for male survivors in the Rohingya camps points to a reluctance to recognise the need for action out of fear it might come at the expense of services for women – which already suffer from funding shortfalls.

    The Rohingya response could have been a precedent for the humanitarian sector as a whole to better respond to male survivors of sexual violence, according to an aid worker who worked on protection issues in the camps in 2017 as the massive refugee outflow was unfolding.

    When she questioned incoming refugees about sexual violence against women, numerous Rohingya asked what could be done for men who had also been raped, said the aid worker, who asked not to be named as she didn’t have permission to speak on behalf of her organisation.

    “We missed yet another chance to open this issue up,” she said.

    Chynoweth believes health, protection, and counselling programmes for all survivors – female and male – must improve.

    “There aren’t many services for women and girls. The response to all survivors is really poor,” she said. “But we should, and we can do both.”

    http://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/news-feature/2019/09/04/Rohingya-men-raped-Myanmar-Bangladesh-refugee-camps-GBV
    #viol #viols #violences_sexuelles #conflits #abus_sexuels #hommes_violés #réfugiés #asile #migrations #camps_de_réfugiés #Myanmar #Birmanie

  • Un #barrage suisse sème le chaos en #Birmanie

    L’#Upper_Yeywa, un ouvrage hydroélectrique construit par le bureau d’ingénierie vaudois #Stucky, va noyer un village dont les habitants n’ont nulle part où aller. Il favorise aussi les exactions par l’armée. Reportage.

    Le village de #Ta_Long apparaît au détour de la route en gravier qui serpente au milieu des champs de maïs et des collines de terre rouge, donnant à ce paysage un air de Toscane des tropiques. Ses petites demeures en bambou sont encaissées au fond d’un vallon. Les villageois nous attendent dans la maison en bois sur pilotis qui leur sert de monastère bouddhiste et de salle communale. Nous sommes en terre #Shan, une ethnie minoritaire qui domine cette région montagneuse dans le nord-est de la Birmanie.

    « Je préférerais mourir que de partir, lance en guise de préambule Pu Kyung Num, un vieil homme aux bras recouverts de tatouages à l’encre bleue. Je suis né ici et nos ancêtres occupent ces terres depuis plus d’un millénaire. » Mais Ta Long ne sera bientôt plus.

    Un barrage hydroélectrique appelé Upper Yeywa est en cours de construction par un consortium comprenant des groupes chinois et le bureau d’ingénierie vaudois Stucky à une vingtaine de kilomètres au sud-ouest, sur la rivière #Namtu. Lors de sa mise en service, prévue pour 2021, toutes les terres situées à moins de 395 mètres d’altitude seront inondées. Ta Long, qui se trouve à 380 mètres, sera entièrement recouvert par un réservoir d’une soixantaine de kilomètres.

    « La construction du barrage a débuté en 2008 mais personne ne nous a rien dit jusqu’en 2014, s’emporte Nang Lao Kham, une dame vêtue d’un longyi, la pièce d’étoffe portée à la taille, à carreaux rose et bleu. Nous n’avons pas été consultés, ni même informés de son existence. » Ce n’est que six ans après le début des travaux que les villageois ont été convoqués dans la ville voisine de #Kyaukme par le Ministère de l’électricité. On leur apprend alors qu’ils devront bientôt partir.

    Pas de #titres_de_propriété

    En Birmanie, toutes les #terres pour lesquelles il n’existe pas de titres de propriété – ainsi que les ressources naturelles qu’elles abritent – appartiennent au gouvernement central. Dans les campagnes birmanes, où la propriété est communautaire, personne ne possède ces documents. « Nous ne quitterons jamais notre village, assure Nang Lao Kham, en mâchouillant une graine de tournesol. Nous sommes de simples paysans sans éducation. Nous ne savons rien faire d’autre que cultiver nos terres. »

    Le gouvernement ne leur a pas proposé d’alternative viable. « Une brochure d’information publiée il y a quelques années parlait de les reloger à trois kilomètres du village actuel, mais ce site est déjà occupé par d’autres paysans », détaille Thum Ai, du Shan Farmer’s Network, une ONG locale. Le montant de la compensation n’a jamais été articulé. Ailleurs dans le pays, les paysans chassés de leurs terres pour faire de la place à un projet d’infrastructure ont reçu entre six et douze mois de salaire. Certains rien du tout.

    Ta Long compte 653 habitants et 315 hectares de terres arables. Pour atteindre leurs vergers, situés le long de la rivière Namtu, les villageois empruntent de longues pirogues en bois. « La terre est extrêmement fertile ici, grâce aux sédiments apportés par le fleuve », glisse Kham Lao en plaçant des oranges et des pomélos dans un panier en osier.

    Les #agrumes de Ta Long sont connus loin à la ronde. « Mes fruits me rapportent 10 800 dollars par an », raconte-t-elle. Bien au-delà des maigres 3000 dollars amassés par les cultivateurs de riz des plaines centrales. « Depuis que j’ai appris l’existence du barrage, je ne dors plus la nuit, poursuit cette femme de 30 ans qui est enceinte de son troisième enfant. Comment vais-je subvenir aux besoins de mes parents et payer l’éducation de mes enfants sans mes #vergers ? »

    Cinq barrages de la puissance de la Grande Dixence

    La rivière Namtu puise ses origines dans les #montagnes du nord de l’Etat de Shan avant de rejoindre le fleuve Irrawaddy et de se jeter dans la baie du Bengale. Outre l’Upper Yeywa, trois autres barrages sont prévus sur ce cours d’eau. Un autre, le Yeywa a été inauguré en 2010. Ces cinq barrages auront une capacité de près de 2000 mégawatts, l’équivalent de la Grande Dixence.

    Ce projet s’inscrit dans le cadre d’un plan qui a pour but de construire 50 barrages sur l’ensemble du territoire birman à l’horizon 2035. Cela fera passer les capacités hydroélectriques du pays de 3298 à 45 412 mégawatts, selon un rapport de l’International Finance Corporation. Les besoins sont immenses : seulement 40% de la population est connectée au réseau électrique.

    L’Etat y voit aussi une source de revenus. « Une bonne partie de l’électricité produite par ces barrages est destinée à être exportée vers les pays voisins, en premier lieu la #Chine et la #Thaïlande, note Mark Farmaner, le fondateur de Burma Campaign UK. Les populations locales n’en bénéficieront que très peu. » Près de 90% des 6000 mégawatts générés par le projet Myitsone dans l’Etat voisin du Kachin, suspendu depuis 2011 en raison de l’opposition de la population, iront à la province chinoise du Yunnan.

    Les plans de la Chine

    L’Upper Yeywa connaîtra sans doute un sort similaire. « Le barrage est relativement proche de la frontière chinoise, note Charm Tong, de la Shan Human Rights Foundation. Y exporter son électricité représenterait un débouché naturel. » L’Etat de Shan se trouve en effet sur le tracé du corridor économique que Pékin cherche à bâtir à travers la Birmanie, entre le Yunnan et la baie du Bengale, dans le cadre de son projet « #Belt_&_Road ».

    Le barrage Upper Yeywa y est affilié. Il compte deux entreprises chinoises parmi ses constructeurs, #Yunnan_Machinery Import & Export et #Zhejiang_Orient_Engineering. Le suisse Stucky œuvre à leurs côtés. Fondé en 1926 par l’ingénieur Alfred Stucky, ce bureau installé à Renens est spécialisé dans la conception de barrages.

    Il a notamment contribué à l’ouvrage turc #Deriner, l’un des plus élevés du monde. Il a aussi pris part à des projets en #Angola, en #Iran, en #Arabie_saoudite et en #République_démocratique_du_Congo. Depuis 2013, il appartient au groupe bâlois #Gruner.

    Le chantier du barrage, désormais à moitié achevé, occupe les berges escarpées de la rivière. Elles ont été drapées d’une coque de béton afin d’éviter les éboulements. De loin, on dirait que la #montagne a été grossièrement taillée à la hache. L’ouvrage, qui fera entre 97 et 102 mètres, aura une capacité de 320 mégawatts.

    Son #coût n’a pas été rendu public. « Mais rien que ces deux dernières années, le gouvernement lui a alloué 7,4 milliards de kyats (5 millions de francs) », indique Htun Nyan, un parlementaire local affilié au NLD, le parti au pouvoir de l’ancienne Prix Nobel de la paix Aung San Suu Kyi. Une partie de ces fonds proviennent d’un prêt chinois octroyé par #Exim_Bank, un établissement qui finance la plupart des projets liés à « Belt & Road ».

    Zone de conflit

    Pour atteindre le hameau de #Nawng_Kwang, à une vingtaine de kilomètres au nord du barrage, il faut emprunter un chemin de terre cabossé qui traverse une forêt de teck. Cinq hommes portant des kalachnikovs barrent soudain la route. Cette région se trouve au cœur d’une zone de #conflit entre #milices ethniques.

    Les combats opposent le #Restoration_Council_of_Shan_State (#RCSS), affilié à l’#armée depuis la conclusion d’un cessez-le-feu, et le #Shan_State_Progress_Party (#SSPP), proche de Pékin. Nos hommes font partie du RCSS. Ils fouillent la voiture, puis nous laissent passer.

    Nam Kham Sar, une jeune femme de 27 ans aux joues recouvertes de thanaka, une pâte jaune que les Birmans portent pour se protéger du soleil, nous attend à Nawng Kwang. Elle a perdu son mari Ar Kyit en mai 2016. « Il a été blessé au cou par des miliciens alors qu’il ramenait ses buffles », relate-t-elle. Son frère et son cousin sont venus le chercher, mais les trois hommes ont été interceptés par des soldats de l’armée régulière.

    « Ils ont dû porter l’eau et les sacs à dos des militaires durant plusieurs jours, relate-t-elle. Puis, ils ont été interrogés et torturés à mort. » Leurs corps ont été brûlés. « Mon fils avait à peine 10 mois lorsque son papa a été tué », soupire Nam Kham Sar, une larme coulant le long de sa joue.

    Vider les campagnes ?

    La plupart des hameaux alentour subissent régulièrement ce genre d’assaut. En mai 2016, cinq hommes ont été tués par des soldats dans le village voisin de Wo Long. L’armée a aussi brûlé des maisons, pillé des vivres et bombardé des paysans depuis un hélicoptère. En août 2018, des villageois ont été battus et enfermés dans un enclos durant plusieurs jours sans vivres ; d’autres ont servi de boucliers humains aux troupes pour repérer les mines.

    Les résidents en sont convaincus : il s’agit d’opérations de #nettoyage destinées à #vider_les_campagnes pour faire de la place au barrage. « Ces décès ne sont pas des accidents, assure Tun Win, un parlementaire local. L’armée cherche à intimider les paysans. » Une trentaine de militaires sont stationnés en permanence sur une colline surplombant le barrage, afin de le protéger. En mars 2018, ils ont abattu deux hommes circulant à moto.

    Dans la population, la colère gronde. Plusieurs milliers de manifestants sont descendus dans la rue à plusieurs reprises à #Hsipaw, la ville la plus proche du barrage. Les habitants de Ta Long ont aussi écrit une lettre à la première ministre Aung San Suu Kyi, restée sans réponse. En décembre, une délégation de villageois s’est rendue à Yangon. Ils ont délivré une lettre à sept ambassades, dont celle de Suisse, pour dénoncer le barrage.

    « L’#hypocrisie de la Suisse »

    Contacté, l’ambassadeur helvétique Tim Enderlin affirme n’avoir jamais reçu la missive. « Cette affaire concerne une entreprise privée », dit-il, tout en précisant que « l’ambassade encourage les entreprises suisses en Birmanie à adopter un comportement responsable, surtout dans les zones de conflit ».

    La Shan Human Rights Foundation dénonce toutefois « l’hypocrisie de la Suisse qui soutient le #processus_de_paix en Birmanie mais dont les entreprises nouent des partenariats opportunistes avec le gouvernement pour profiter des ressources situées dans des zones de guerre ».

    La conseillère nationale socialiste Laurence Fehlmann Rielle, qui préside l’Association Suisse-Birmanie, rappelle que l’#initiative_pour_des_multinationales_responsables, sur laquelle le Conseil national se penchera jeudi prochain, « introduirait des obligations en matière de respect des droits de l’homme pour les firmes suisses ». Mardi, elle posera une question au Conseil fédéral concernant l’implication de Stucky dans le barrage Upper Yeywa.

    Contactée, l’entreprise n’a pas souhaité s’exprimer. D’autres sociétés se montrent plus prudentes quant à leur image. Fin janvier, le bureau d’ingénierie allemand #Lahmeyer, qui appartient au belge #Engie-Tractebel, a annoncé qu’il se retirait du projet et avait « rompu le contrat » le liant au groupe vaudois.

    https://www.letemps.ch/monde/un-barrage-suisse-seme-chaos-birmanie
    #Suisse #barrage_hydroélectrique #géographie_du_plein #géographie_du_vide #extractivisme
    ping @aude_v @reka

  • Myanmar: Surge in Arrests for Critical Speech | Human Rights Watch
    https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/04/26/myanmar-surge-arrests-critical-speech

    Myanmar’s authorities have in recent weeks engaged in a series of arrests of peaceful critics of the army and government, Human Rights Watch said today. The parliament, which begins its new session on April 29, 2019, should repeal or amend repressive laws used to silence critics and suppress freedom of expression.

    The recent upswing in arrests of satirical performers, political activists, and journalists reflects the rapid decline in freedom of expression in Myanmar under the National League for Democracy (NLD) government. In the latest blow to media freedom, on April 23, the Supreme Court upheld the seven-year prison sentences of two Reuters journalists accused of breaching the Official Secrets Act. Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo, who won Pulitzer prizes earlier in April for their reporting, had been prosecuted in apparent retaliation for their investigation of a massacre of Rohingya villagers in Inn Din, Rakhine State, that implicated the army.

    “Myanmar’s government should be leading the fight against the legal tools of oppression that have long been used to prosecute critics of the military and government,” said Brad Adams, Asia director. “During military rule, Aung San Suu Kyi and many current lawmakers fought for free expression, yet now the NLD majority in parliament has taken almost no steps to repeal or amend abusive laws still being used to jail critics.”

    #Birmanie #liberté_d'expression #répression #prix_nobel_de_la_paix