#boat_people

  • Immigration Enforcement and the Afterlife of the Slave Ship

    Coast Guard techniques for blocking Haitian asylum seekers have their roots in the slave trade. Understanding these connections can help us disentangle immigration policy from white nationalism.

    Around midnight in May 2004, somewhere in the Windward Passage, one of the Haitian asylum seekers trapped on the flight deck of the U.S. Coast Guard’s USCGC Gallatin had had enough.

    He arose and pointed to the moon, whispering in hushed tones. The rest of the Haitians, asleep or pretending to be asleep, initially took little notice. That changed when he began to scream. The cadence of his words became erratic, furious—insurgent. After ripping his shirt into tatters, he gestured wildly at the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) watchstanders on duty.

    I was one of them.

    His eyes fixed upon mine. And he slowly advanced toward my position.

    I stood fast, enraptured by his lone defiance, his desperate rage. Who could blame him? Confinement on this sunbaked, congested, malodorous flight deck would drive anyone crazy—there were nearly 300 people packed together in a living space approximately 65 feet long and 35 feet wide. We had snatched him and his compatriots from their overloaded sailing vessel back in April. They had endured week after week without news about the status of their asylum claims, about what lay in store for them.

    Then I got scared. I considered the distinct possibility that, to this guy, I was no longer me, but a nameless uniform, an avatar of U.S. sovereignty: a body to annihilate, a barrier to freedom. I had rehearsed in my mind how such a contingency might play out. We were armed only with nonlethal weapons—batons and pepper spray. The Haitians outnumbered us 40 to 1. Was I ready? I had never been in a real fight before. Now a few of the Haitian men were standing alert. Were they simply curious? Was this their plan all along? What if the women and children joined them?

    Lucky for me, one of the meanest devils on the watch intervened on my behalf. He charged toward us, stepping upon any Haitians who failed to clear a path. After a brief hand-to-hand struggle, he subdued the would-be rebel, hauled him down to the fantail, and slammed his head against the deck. Blood ran from his face. Some of the Haitians congregated on the edge of the flight deck to spectate. We fastened the guy’s wrists with zip ties and ordered the witnesses to disperse. The tension in his body gradually dissipated.

    After fifteen minutes, the devil leaned down to him. “Are you done? Done making trouble?” His silence signified compliance.

    Soon after, the Haitians were transferred to the custody of the Haitian Coast Guard. When we arrived in the harbor of Port-au-Prince, thick plumes of black smoke rose from the landscape. We were witnessing the aftermath of the CIA-orchestrated February coup against President Jean-Bertrand Aristide and the subsequent invasion of the country by U.S. Marines under the auspices of international “peacekeeping.” Haiti was at war.

    None of that mattered. Every request for asylum lodged from our boat had been rejected. Every person returned to Haiti. No exceptions.

    The Gallatin left the harbor. I said goodbye to Port-au-Prince. My first patrol was over.

    Out at sea, I smoked for hours on the fantail, lingering upon my memories of the past months. I tried to imagine how the Haitians would remember their doomed voyage, their detention aboard the Gallatin, their encounters with us—with me. A disquieting intuition repeated in my head: the USCG cutter, the Haitians’ sailing vessel, and European slave ships represented a triad of homologous instances in which people of African descent have suffered involuntary concentration in small spaces upon the Atlantic. I dreaded that I was in closer proximity to the enslavers of the past, and to the cops and jailors of the present, than I ever would be to those Haitians.

    So, that night, with the butt of my last cigarette, I committed to cast my memories of the Haitians overboard. In the depths of some unmarked swath of the Windward Passage, I prayed, no one, including me, would ever find them again.

    In basic training, every recruit is disciplined to imagine how the USCG is like every other branch of the military, save one principle: we exist to save lives, and it is harder to save lives than to take them. I was never a very good sailor, but I took this principle seriously. At least in the USCG, I thought, I could evade the worst cruelties of the new War on Terror.

    Perhaps I should have done more research on the USCG’s undeclared long war against Haitian asylum seekers, in order to appreciate precisely what the oath to “defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic” would demand of me. This war had long preceded my term of enlistment. It arguably began in 1804, when the United States refused to acknowledge the newly liberated Haiti as a sovereign nation and did everything it could to insulate its slaving society from the shock waves of Haiti’s radical interpretation of universal freedom. But in our present day, it began in earnest with President Ronald Reagan’s Executive Order 12324 of 1981, also called the Haitian Migrant Interdiction Operation (HMIO), which exclusively tasked the USCG to “interdict” Haitian asylum seekers attempting to enter the United States by sea routes on unauthorized sailing vessels. Such people were already beginning to be derogatorily referred to as “boat people,” a term then borrowed (less derogatorily) into Haitian Kreyòl as botpippel.

    The enforcement of the HMIO and its subsequent incarnations lies almost entirely within the jurisdiction of federal police power acting under the authority of the executive branch’s immigration and border enforcement powers. It does not take place between nations at enmity with one another, but between vastly unequal yet allied powers. Its strategic end is to create a kind of naval blockade, a fluid maritime border around Haiti, which remains under ever-present threat of invasion by a coalition of U.S. and foreign military forces.

    Adding to its asymmetry, the “enemies” to be vanquished on the battlefield are also unconventional: they are not agents of a state, but rather noncombatant individuals who are, in one sense or another, simply acting to save their own lives. During their incarceration aboard USCG cutters, they automatically bear the legal status of “economic migrant,” a person whom authorities deem to be fleeing poverty alone and therefore by definition ineligible for asylum. The meaning of this category is defined solely by reference to its dialectical negation, the “political refugee,” a person whom authorities may (or may not) deem to have a legible asylum claim because they are fleeing state persecution on the basis of race, creed, political affiliation, or sexual orientation. These abstractions are historical artifacts of a half-baked, all-encompassing theory of preemptive deterrence: unless USCG patrols are used to place Haiti under a naval blockade, and unless botpippel are invariably denied asylum, the United States will become flooded with criminals and people who have no means of supporting themselves. By 2003 John Ashcroft and the Bush administration upped the ante, decrying botpippel to be vectors of terrorism. On January 11, 2018, President Donald Trump, during efforts to justify ending nearly all immigration and asylum, described Haiti (which he grouped with African nations) as a “shithole country” where, as he asserted several months prior, “all have AIDS.”

    Haiti is now facing another such crisis. Its president, Jovenel Moïse, having already suspended nearly all elected government save himself, refused to step down at the end of his term on February 7, 2021, despite widespread protests that have shuttered the country. Moïse’s administration is currently being propped up by criminal syndicates, but they are slipping his grasp, and kidnapping for money is now so prevalent that people are terrified to leave their homes. So far, the Biden administration’s response has not been encouraging: though it has instructed ICE to temporarily halt deportations to Haiti, naval blockades remain in force, and the U.S. State Department has expressed the opinion that Moïse should remain in office for at least another year, enforcing the sense that Haiti is once again a U.S. client state.

    With regard to the Coast Guard’s longstanding orders to block Haitians seeking asylum, the modality of killing is not straightforward, but it is intentional. It consists of snatching the Haitian enemy from their vessel, forcing them to subsist in a state of bare life, and finally abandoning them in their home country at gunpoint. Of course, many may survive the ordeal and may even attempt another journey. But especially during acute phases of armed conflict and catastrophe, it is just as likely that—whether at the behest of starvation, disease, or violence—a return to Haiti is a death sentence.

    This banal form of murder is analogous to what Ruth Wilson Gilmore offers as her definition of racism in Golden Gulag (2007): “the state sanctioned or extralegal production and exploitation of group-differentiated vulnerability to premature death.” Based on the extant documentary record, I estimate that the USCG has interdicted at least 120,000 botpippel since the HMIO of 1981 took effect. Those who fell prey to an untimely demise following deportation died because the United States, though repeatedly responsible for undermining Haitian democracy and economic stability, nonetheless refuses to acknowledge that these actions have made Haiti, for many, mortally unsafe. The true death toll will never be known. Countless botpippel have simply disappeared at sea, plunged into a gigantic watery necropolis.

    Since 2004 U.S. officials have brought their forms of border policing strategies and tactics against Haitians to bear on land-based immigration and refugee policies against non-white asylum seekers. One of the most significant technical innovations of enforcement against Haitians was the realization that by detaining them exclusively within a maritime environment, the United States could summarily classify all of them as economic migrants—whose claims for asylum de facto have no standing—and prevent them from lodging claims as political refugees, which are the only claims with any hope of success. They were thus proactively disabled from advancing a request for asylum in a U.S. federal court, with all claims instead evaluated by an INS-designated official aboard the USCG vessel. The New York Times recently reported that, since late 2009, similar techniques have been adopted by Customs and Border Control agents patrolling sea routes along the California coast, which has resulted in a notable escalation of CBP naval patrols and aerial surveillance of the region. And in fact, the USCG has cooperatively supported these efforts by sharing its infrastructure—ports, cutters, and aircraft—and its personnel with CBP. All of this has been with the aim of making sure that asylum seekers never make it to the United States, whether by land or by sea.

    The Trump administration made the most significant use of this set of innovations to date, insisting that asylum claims must be made from camps on the Mexican side of the U.S. border—and therefore automatically invalid by virtue of being limited to the status of economic migrant. Thus, hundreds of thousands of non-white asylum seekers fleeing material precariousness, yes, but also the threat of violence in the Global South are, and will continue to be, caught in carceral webs composed of ICE/CBP goon squads, ruthless INS officials, and perilous tent cities, not to mention the prison guards employed at one of the numerous semi-secret migrant detention centers operating upon U.S. soil for those few who make it across.

    From the perspective of Haitian immigrants and botpippel, this is nothing new. Thousands of their compatriots have already served time at infamous extrajudicial sites such as the Krome detention center in Miami (1980–present), Guantanamo Bay (1991–93), and, most often, the flight decks of USCG cutters. They know that the USCG has long scoured the Windward Passage for Haitians in particular, just as ICE/CBP goon squads now patrol U.S. deserts, highways, and city streets for the undocumented. And they know that Trump’s fantasy of building a “Great Wall” on the U.S.–Mexico border is not so farfetched, because the USCG continues to enforce a maritime one around Haiti.

    The Biden administration has inherited this war and its prisoners, with thousands remaining stuck in legal limbo while hoping—in most cases, without hope—that their asylum claims will advance. Opening alternative paths to citizenship and declaring an indefinite moratorium on deportations would serve as foundations for more sweeping reforms in the future. But the core challenge in this political moment is to envision nothing less than the total decriminalization and demilitarization of immigration law enforcement.

    Botpippel are not the first undocumented people of African descent to have been policed by U.S. naval forces. The legal architecture through which the USCG legitimates the indefinite detention and expulsion of Haitian asylum seekers reaches back to U.S. efforts to suppress the African slave trade, outlawed by Congress in 1807, though domestic slaveholding would continue, and indeed its trade would be not only safeguarded but bolstered by this act.

    This marked a decisive turning point in the history of maritime policing vis-à-vis immigration. Per the Slave Trade Acts of 1794 and 1800, the United States already claimed jurisdiction over U.S. citizens and U.S. vessels engaged in the slave trade within U.S. territorial borders (contemporaneously understood as extending three nautical miles into the ocean). By 1808, however, the United States sought to extend its jurisdiction over the sea itself. Slaver vessels operating around “any river, port, bay, or harbor . . . within the jurisdictional limits of the United States” as well as “on the high seas” were deemed illegal and subject to seizure without compensation. The actual physical distance from U.S. soil that these terms referred to was left purposefully vague. To board a given vessel, a Revenue Cutter captain only had to suspect, rather than conclusively determine, that that vessel eventually intended to offload “international” (i.e., non-native) enslaved people into the United States. The 1819 iteration of the law further stipulated that U.S. jurisdiction included “Africa, or elsewhere.” Hence, in theory, after 1819, the scope of U.S. maritime police operations was simply every maritime space on the globe.

    Revenue Cutter Service captains turned the lack of any description in the 1808 law or its successive iterations about what should be done with temporarily masterless slaves into an advantage. They did what they would have done to any fugitive Black person at the time: indefinitely detain them until higher authorities determined their status, and thereby foreclose the possibility of local Black people conspiring to shuttle them to freedom. During confinement, captured Africans were compelled to perform labor as if they were slaves. For instance, those captured from the Spanish-flagged Antelope (1820) spent seven years toiling at a military fort in Savannah, Georgia, as well as on the local U.S. marshal’s plantation. As wards of the state, they were human only insofar as U.S. officials had a duty to force them to remain alive. Of those “rescued” from the Antelope, 120 ultimately died in captivity and 2 went missing. Following litigation, 39 survivors were sold to U.S. slaveowners to compensate Spanish and Portuguese claimants who had stakes in the Antelope and her enslaved cargo. Per the designs of the American Colonization Society, the remaining 120 Africans were freed upon condition that they be immediately deported to New Georgia, Liberia.

    This anti-Black martial abolitionism was therefore a project framed around the unification of two countervailing tendencies. While white planters consistently pushed to extend racial slavery into the southern and western frontiers, white northern financiers and abolitionists were in favor of creating the most propitious conditions for the expansion of free white settlements throughout America’s urban and rural milieus. Black people were deemed unfit for freedom not only because of their supposed inborn asocial traits, but because their presence imperiled the possibility for white freedom. To actualize Thomas Jefferson’s “Empire of Liberty,” the United States required immigration policies that foreshortened Black peoples’ capacities for social reproduction and thereby re-whitened America.

    This political aim was later extended in legislation passed on February 19, 1862, which authorized President Abraham Lincoln—who intended to solve the contradictions that led to the Civil War by sending every Black person in America back to Africa—to use U.S. naval forces to capture, detain, and deport undocumented people of East Asian/Chinese descent (“coolies”) while at sea. Henceforth, “the free and voluntary emigration of any Chinese subject” to the U.S. was proscribed unless a ship captain possessed documents certified by a consular agent residing at the foreign port of departure. At the time, the principal means for Chinese emigrants to obtain authorization would have been at behest of some corporation seeking expendable, non-white laborers contractually bound to work to death in mines and on railroads on the western frontiers—Native American lands stolen through imperialist warfare. White settlers presupposed that these Asians’ residency was provisional and temporary—and then Congress codified that principle into law in 1870, decreeing that every person of East Asian/Chinese descent, anywhere in the world, was ineligible for U.S. citizenship.

    Twelve years later, An Act to Regulate Immigration (1882) played upon the notion that non-white immigration caused public disorder. Through the use of color-blind legal language, Section 2 of this law specified that the United States must only accept immigrants who were conclusively not “convict[s], lunatic[s], idiot[s], or any person unable to take care of himself or herself without becoming a public charge.” The burden of proof lay on non-white immigrants to prove how their racial backgrounds were not already prima facie evidence for these conditions. Section 4 also stipulated that “all foreign convicts except those convicted of political offenses, upon arrival, shall be sent back to the nations to which they belong and from whence they came.” By which means a non-white person could demonstrate the “political” character of a given conviction were cleverly left undefined.

    It was not a giant leap of imagination for the United States to apply these precedents to the maritime policing of Haitian asylum seekers in the 1980s. Nor should we be surprised that the logic of anti-Black martial abolitionism shapes present-day U.S. immigration policy.

    Political philosopher Peter Hallward estimates that paramilitary death squads executed at least a thousand supporters of Lavalas, President Aristide’s party, in the weeks following Aristide’s exile from Haiti on February 29, 2004. The first kanntè (Haitian sailing vessel) the Gallatin sighted one morning in early April had likely departed shortly thereafter.

    The first people from our ship that the Haitians met were members of the boarding team, armed with pistols, M-16s, shotguns, and zip ties. Their goal was to compel the hundred or so aboard the kanntè to surrender their vessel and allow us to deposit them on the flight deck of our ship. Negotiations can take hours. It is not uncommon for some to jump overboard, rather than allow boarding to occur uninhibited. If immediate acquiescence is not obtained, we will maneuver ourselves such that any further movement would cause the small boat to “ram” the Gallatin—an attack on a U.S. military vessel.

    On the Gallatin, we waited for uptake, outfitted with facemasks and rubber gloves. One at a time, we aided the Haitian adults to make the final step from the small boat to the deck of the cutter. We frisked them for weapons and then marched them to the fantail to undergo initial processing. Most of them appeared exhausted and confused—but compliant. Some may have already been in fear for their lives. One night aboard the USCGC Dallas, which hovered in Port-au-Prince Bay as a deportation coordination outpost and as a temporary detention site for Haitians awaiting immediate transfer to Haitian Coast Guard authorities, my friend and his shipmates asked their Kreyòl interpreter how he managed to obtain compliance from the botpippel. “I tell them you will hurt or kill them if they do not obey,” he joked, “so, of course, they listen.”

    Boarding all the Haitians took from midday until midnight. One of the last ones I helped aboard, a man dressed in a suit two sizes too large, looked into my eyes and smiled. He gently wept, clasped my hand tightly, and embraced me. I quickly pushed him off and pointed to the processing station at the fantail, leading him by the wrist to join the others. He stopped crying.

    Three things happened at the processing station. First, Haitians deposited the last of their belongings with the interpreter, ostensibly for safekeeping. Who knows if anyone got their things back. Second, a Kreyòl translator and one of the officers gave them a cursory interview about their asylum claims, all the while surrounded by armed sentries, as well as other Haitians who might pass that intelligence onto narcotics smugglers, paramilitary gangs, or state officials back in Haiti. Lastly, they received a rapid, half-assed medical examination—conducted in English. So long as they nodded, or remained silent, they passed each test and were shuffled up to the flight deck.

    We retired for the night after the boarding team set fire to the kanntè as a hazard to navigation. The Haitians probably didn’t know that this was the reason we unceremoniously torched their last hope for escape before their very eyes.

    About a week later, we found another kanntè packed with around seventy Haitians and repeated the process. Another USCG cutter transferred a hundred more over to the Gallatin. Our flight deck was reaching full capacity.

    We arrived at one kanntè too late. It had capsized. Pieces of the shattered mast and little bits of clothing and rubbish were floating around the hull. No survivors. How long had it been? Sharks were spotted circling at a short depth below the vessel.

    The Gallatin’s commanders emphasized that our mission was, at its core, humanitarian in nature. We were duty-bound to provide freshwater, food, and critical medical care. During their time aboard, Haitians would be treated as detainees and were not to be treated, or referred to, as prisoners. The use of force was circumscribed within clear rules of engagement. The Haitians were not in any way to be harmed or killed unless they directly threatened the ship or its sailors. Unnecessary violence against them could precipitate an internal review, solicit undue international criticism, and imperil the deportationist efficiency of INS officials. We were told that our batons and pepper spray were precautionary, primarily symbolic.

    It sounded like all I had to do was stand there and not screw anything up.

    Over the course of several watches, I concluded that, in fact, our job was also to relocate several crucial features of the abysmal living conditions that obtained on the kanntè onto the Gallatin’s flight deck. Though the flight deck was 80 feet by 43 feet, we blocked the edges to facilitate the crew’s movement and to create a buffer between us and the Haitians. Taking this into account, their living space was closer to 65 feet by 35 feet. For a prison population of 300 Haitians, each individual would have had only 7 feet 7 inches square to lie down and stand up. On the diagram of the eighteenth-century British slaver Brooks, the enslaved were each allocated approximately 6 feet 10 inches square, scarcely less than on the Gallatin. (Historian Marcus Rediker thinks that the Brooks diagram probably overstates the amount of space the enslaved were given.)

    Although some cutters will drape tarps over the flight deck to shield the Haitians from the unmediated effects of the sun, the Gallatin provided no such shelter. We permitted them to shower, once, in saltwater, without soap. The stench on the flight deck took on a sweet, fetid tinge.

    The only place they could go to achieve a modicum of solitude and to escape the stench was the makeshift metal toilet on the fantail. (On slave ships, solitude was found by secreting away to a hidden compartment or small boat to die alone; the “necessary tubs” that held human excrement were contained in the slave holds below deck.) They were permitted to use the toilet one at a time in the case of adults, and two at a time in the case of children and the elderly. For what was supposed to be no longer than five minutes, they had an opportunity to stretch, relax, and breathe fresh sea air. Nevertheless, these moments of respite took place under observation by the watchstander stationed at the toilet, not to mention the numerous Haitian onlookers at the rear of the flight deck.

    Despite our commanders’ reticence on the matter, the ever-present fear of revolt hovered underneath the surface of our standing orders. We were to ensure order and discipline through counterinsurgency protocols and techniques of incarceration that one might find in any U.S. prison. The military imperative aboard the Gallatin was to produce a sense of radical uncertainty and temporal disorientation in the Haitians, such that they maintain hope for an asylum claim that had already been rejected.

    In this context, there were four overlapping components to the security watch.

    The first component of the ship’s securitization was constant surveillance. We were not supposed to take our eyes off the Haitians for one moment. During the watch, we would regularly survey the flight deck for any signs of general unrest, conspiracy, or organized protest. Any minor infraction could later contribute to the eruption of a larger riot, and thus needed to be quickly identified and neutralized. We also had to observe their behavior for indications that one of them intended to jump overboard or harm another Haitian. All that said, we found a used condom one day. Surveillance is never total.

    The second was the limitation we placed on communication. We shrouded all USCG practices in a fog of secrecy. Conversing with the Haitians through anything other than hand signals and basic verbal commands was forbidden; physical contact was kept at bare minimum. Nonofficial speech among the watch was proscribed. Watchstanders were stripped of their identity, save their uniform, from which our nametags were removed. It was critical that botpippel forever be unable to identify us.

    Secrecy preemptively disabled the Haitians from collectively piecing together fragments of information about where our vessel had been, where it was now, and where it was going. Officially, the concern was that they might exploit the situation to gather intelligence about our patrol routes and pass this information to human or narcotics smugglers. We militated against their mapping out how the ship operated, its layout and complement, where living spaces and the armory were located, and so on. These were standard tactics aboard slaver vessels. As freed slave and abolitionist Olaudah Equiano observed, “When the ship we were in had got in all her cargo . . . we were all put under deck, so that we could not see how they managed the vessel.”

    On the Gallatin, the command also strove to maintain strict control over the narrative. They blocked sailors’ access to the open Internet and censored letters from home that contained news of global or domestic politics (and even just bad personal news). Knowledge of whether a particular asylum claim had failed or succeeded was hidden from all. A watchstander harboring political solidarity with—as opposed to mere empathy and pity for—the Haitians might compromise operational capacities, good judgment, and core loyalty to the USCG.

    Our third securitization strategy was to produce false knowledge of the future. The Haitians were led to believe that they were merely waiting aboard the ship because their asylum claims were still being vigorously debated by diplomatic entities in Washington. Their continued compliance was predicated on this differential of knowledge. They could not realize that they were moving in circles, being returned slowly to Haiti. If they lost all hope, we presumed they would eventually resist their intolerable conditions through violent means.

    Hence, our fourth securitization measure: USCG personnel were permitted to inflict several limited forms of physical and symbolic violence against the Haitians, not only in response to perceived noncompliance, but also as a means of averting the need to inflict even greater violence in the future.

    If it were not classified as a matter of national security, we might have a better grasp of how many times such instances occur aboard USCG vessels. I open this essay with a story of how we subdued and punished one person for resisting the rules. But it is known that punishment is sometimes inflicted on entire groups. A telling example took place on January 30, 1989, when the USCG captured the Dieu Devant with 147 Haitians aboard. One of them, Fitzroy Joseph, later reported in congressional hearings that, after they expressed a fear of being killed if returned to Haiti, USCG personnel “began wrestling with the Haitians and hitting their hands with their flashlights.” This was followed by threats to release pepper spray. Marie Julie Pierre, Joseph’s wife, corroborated his testimony, adding:

    [We were] asked at once if we feared returning to Haiti and everyone said yes we did. We said ‘down with Avril, up with Bush.’ We were threatened with tear gas but they didn’t use it. Many people were crying because they were so afraid. [Ti Jak] was hit by the officers because he didn’t want to go back. They handcuffed him. The Coast Guard grabbed others by the neck and forced them to go to the biggest boat. My older brother was also hit and treated like a chicken as they pulled him by the neck.

    Counterintuitively, our nonlethal weapons functioned as more efficient instruments of counterinsurgency than lethal weapons. Brandishing firearms might exacerbate an already tense situation in which the Haitians outnumbered the entire ship’s complement. It could also provide an opportunity for the Haitians to seize and turn our own guns against us (or one another). In contrast, losing a baton and a can of pepper spray represented a relatively minor threat to the ship’s overall security. In the event of an actual riot, the command could always mobilize armed reinforcements. From the perspective of the command, then, the first responders on watch were, to some extent, expendable. Nevertheless, sentries bearing firearms were on deck when we approached Haiti and prepared for final deportation. That is, the precise moment the Haitians realized their fate.

    Like the enslaved Africans captured by the Revenue Cutter Service, botpippel were human to us only insofar as we had to compel them, through the threat or actuality of violence, to remain alive. The Haitians ate our tasteless food and drank our freshwater—otherwise they would starve, or we might beat them for going on a hunger strike. They tended to remain silent and immobile day and night—otherwise they would invite acts of exemplary punishment upon themselves. The practices of confinement on the Gallatin represent a variant of what historian Stephanie Smallwood describes as a kind of “scientific empiricism” that developed aboard slave ships, which “prob[ed] the limits to which it is possible to discipline the body without extinguishing the life within.” Just as contemporary slavers used force to conserve human commodities for sale, so does the USCG use force to produce nominally healthy economic migrants to exchange with Haitian authorities.

    The rational utilization of limited forms of exemplary violence was an integral aspect of this carceral science. Rediker shows how slaver captains understood violence along a continuum that ranged from acceptably severe to unacceptably cruel. Whereas severity was the grounds of proper discipline as such, an act was cruel only if it led “to catastrophic results [and] sparked reactions such as mutiny by sailors or insurrection by slaves.” In turn, minor acts of kindness, such as dispensing better food or allowing slightly more free time to move above deck, were conditioned by these security imperatives. Furthermore, they exerted no appreciable change to the eventuality that the person would be sold to a slaveowner, for kindness was a self-aggrandizing ritual performance of authority that intended to lay bare the crucial imbalance of power relations at hand. This was, Rediker maintains, “as close as the owners ever came to admitting that terror was essential to running a slave ship.”

    The USCG’s undeclared long war against Haitian asylum seekers is but one front of a much longer war against people of African descent in the Americas. The entangled histories of the African slave trade and anti-Black martial abolitionism reveal how this war intimately shaped the foundations and racist intentions that underlay modern U.S. immigration and refugee policy writ large. And the Gallatin, her sailors, and the Haitians who were trapped on the flight deck, are, in some small way, now a part of this history, too.

    The Biden administration has the power to decisively end this war—indeed, every war against non-white asylum seekers. Until then, botpippel will continue to suffer the slave ships that survive into the present.

    https://bostonreview.net/race/ryan-fontanilla-immigration-enforcement-and-afterlife-slave-ship

    #esclavage #héritage #migrations #contrôles_migratoires #Haïti #gardes-côtes #nationalisme_blanc #USA #Etats-Unis #migrations #frontières #asile #réfugiés #USCG #Haitian_Migrant_Interdiction_Operation (#HMIO) #botpippel #boat_people

    #modèle_australien #pacific_solution

    ping @karine4 @isskein @reka

    • Ce décret de #Reagan mentionné dans l’article rappelle farouchement la loi d’#excision_territoriale australienne :

      But in our present day, it began in earnest with President Ronald Reagan’s Executive Order 12324 of 1981, also called the Haitian Migrant Interdiction Operation (HMIO), which exclusively tasked the USCG to “interdict” Haitian asylum seekers attempting to enter the United States by sea routes on unauthorized sailing vessels. Such people were already beginning to be derogatorily referred to as “boat people,” a term then borrowed (less derogatorily) into Haitian Kreyòl as botpippel.

      Excision territoriale australienne :


      https://seenthis.net/messages/416996

      –—

      Citation tirée du livre de McAdam et Chong : « Refugees : why seeking asylum is legal and Australia’s policies are not » (p.3)

      “Successive governments (aided by much of the media) have exploited public anxieties about border security to create a rhetorical - and, ultimately, legislative - divide between the rights of so-called ’genuine’ refugees, resettled in Australia from camps and settlements abroad, and those arriving spontaneously in Australia by boat.”

  • Face à la haine et aux amalgames : « Redonner ses lettres de noblesse à la solidarité et à l’#hospitalité française »

    Elle appelle cela « l’#hospitalité_citoyenne ». #Julia_Montfort, journaliste et réalisatrice, a accueilli, comme beaucoup d’autres Français, un « migrant », Abdelhaq, originaire du Tchad. Elle raconte cette rencontre à Basta !, rencontre dont elle a tiré une web-série, #Carnets_de_solidarité. Son histoire nous rappelle que, loin des scènes indignes de harcèlement policier ou de commentaires racistes, des dizaines de milliers de citoyens font preuve de solidarité.

    Julia Montfort appelle cela « l’hospitalité citoyenne ». Comme beaucoup d’autres personnes en France, elle a ouvert sa porte pour accueillir un « migrant », Abdelhaq. Il avait alors 21 ans et ne devait rester que quelques jours. Il aura finalement vécu un an et demi chez Julia et Cédric, son mari. De cette expérience personnelle est alors née l’envie de raconter ce mouvement de #solidarité qui a gagné de nombreux foyers français – une réalité trop souvent invisibilisée – pendant que les politiques en œuvre choisissent trop souvent de harceler, humilier, reléguer dans la rue les exilés en quête d’accueil, ne serait-ce que temporaire. Réalisatrice, elle en a tiré une web-série passionnante, Carnets de Solidarité, qui offre la meilleure des réponses, en actes, à tous les préjugés, tous les cynismes ou toutes les haines qui s’accumulent sur ce sujet.

    Basta ! : Le point de départ de votre travail, c’est le #récit_intime de l’accueil d’Abdelhaq, chez vous, dans votre appartement. Avec le recul, qu’avez-vous appris de cette expérience d’hospitalité ?

    Julia Montfort [1] : Beaucoup de choses. Nous n’avons pas accueilli un citoyen français avec des références culturelles partagées : Abdelhaq est le fils d’un berger nomade, dans le sud du Tchad, qui parle un dialecte dérivé de l’arabe – le kebet – dont la vie consistait à garder les chèvres de son père ou à aller récolter du miel, autant dire une vie diamétralement opposée à la mienne. Tout nous séparait, et nous avons appris à trouver des #liens, à construire des ponts entre nos deux cultures.

    J’ai réalisé la portée de ce geste dès que j’ai ouvert ma porte devant ce grand gaillard de plus d’1 m 90, et que j’ai compris que le #langage ne nous permettrait pas de communiquer. Il apprenait les rudiments du français, mais il ne faisait pas de phrases, je ne parvenais même pas à savoir s’il aimait les pâtes. De fait, ce genre de situation permet aussi d’en apprendre beaucoup sur soi-même et sur notre rapport à l’autre. Cela m’offre aujourd’hui un ancrage très différent dans le présent.

    Il y a cette anecdote significative, lorsque vous racontez que vous hésitez plusieurs jours avant de lui signaler qu’il ne priait pas dans la bonne direction…

    Il se tournait exactement à l’opposé de la Mecque, nous ne savions pas comment lui annoncer, cela nous pesait, alors qu’au final, Abdelhaq a juste explosé de rire lorsque nous lui avons montré la boussole ! Une partie de notre complicité est née ce jour-là… Abdelhaq a une pratique très ouverte de sa religion, c’est notamment une façon de maintenir un lien avec son pays. Quand il est arrivé à Paris, son premier réflexe a été d’aller dans une mosquée, où il a pu être hébergé. C’est un peu son repère, son cadre. Mais depuis, on a constaté qu’il s’intéressait beaucoup aux autres religions.
    De notre côté, nous sommes parfaitement athées, et c’est probablement la première fois que j’ai côtoyé quelqu’un de religieux aussi longtemps, et aussi intimement. La probabilité que je puisse, à Paris, me retrouver directement confrontée à la réalité de la vie d’Abdelhaq était tout de même très faible, jusqu’à présent. Cela cultive une certaine #ouverture_d’esprit, et cela a généré aussi beaucoup de #respect entre nous.

    Pour autant, vous ne faites pas l’impasse sur les difficultés qui se présentent, aussi, à travers cette expérience. « L’hospitalité n’est pas un geste naturel, c’est une #épreuve », dites-vous.

    Il ne faut pas enjoliver cette expérience par principe, cela n’a rien de simple d’accueillir un étranger chez soi. Il faut s’ouvrir à lui, accepter qu’il entre dans notre #intimité, c’est une relation qui demande beaucoup d’énergie. Faire entrer l’exil à la maison, c’est aussi faire entrer des vies brisées et tous les problèmes qui accompagnent ces parcours du combattant… Et c’est compliqué quand, au petit-déjeuner, vous devez affronter son regard dans le vide, que vous voyez qu’il n’est pas bien. Tout paraît assez futile. J’ai parfois eu l’impression de plonger avec Abdelhaq. C’est le principe même de l’empathie, partager l’#émotion de l’autre. Mais quand c’est sous votre toit, il n’y a pas d’échappatoire, c’est au quotidien face à vous.

    Dans votre récit, vous utilisez très souvent les termes de « #générosité », de « #bienveillance », d’ « #humanité », comme si vous cherchiez à leur redonner une importance qu’ils ne semblent plus vraiment avoir, dans la société. Faut-il travailler à repolitiser ces valeurs, selon vous ?

    On pense toujours que la solidarité, l’#altruisme, l’#entraide, tout ça n’est que l’apanage des faibles. Ce seraient des vertus désuètes, bonnes pour les « bisounours ». Il a en effet fallu que j’assume, à l’écriture, de redonner des lettres de noblesse à ces mots-là. Car on a bien vu que tous ces petits #gestes, cette empathie, ces regards, ce n’était pas anodin pour Abdelhaq. On a vu comment cette solidarité qui s’est organisée avec les voisins l’a porté, lui a permis de se regarder autrement, de retrouver des prises sur le réel. Petit à petit, on l’a vu changer, reprendre pied. Et ça, c’est considérable.
    Et partant de là, on peut aussi se demander ce qui nous empêche d’appliquer cela à toutes nos relations – personnellement, j’essaye désormais d’être plus attentive à cette forme de #bienveillance dans mes échanges avec mes voisins ou mes amis, au travail. Cela semble toujours une évidence un peu simple à rappeler, mais c’est vertueux. C’est même l’un des principaux enseignements que nous avons tiré de notre expérience, à notre échelle : au-delà des difficultés, cela fait du bien de faire du bien. Diverses études documentent les bienfaits pour la santé de ces #émotions positives ressenties, cela porte même un nom – le « #helper’s_high », l’euphorie de celui qui aide. Donc oui, la solidarité fait du bien, et il faut en parler.

    De fait, votre initiative a rapidement fait la preuve de son effet multiplicateur auprès du voisinage, c’est ce que vous appelez la « #contagion_solidaire ».

    C’est à partir de ce moment-là que je me suis dit qu’il y avait quelque chose à raconter de cette expérience personnelle. Il ne faut pas oublier qu’à l’époque, le discours sur « l’invasion » battait son plein. En 2017-2018, on est en plein dans la séquence où l’on entend partout que les migrants sont trop nombreux, qu’ils sont dangereux, qu’ils vont nous voler notre pain, notre travail et notre identité. Or à mon échelle, à Bagnolet, au contact de différentes classes sociales, j’ai vu le regard des gens changer et ce mouvement de solidarité se mettre en place, autour de nous. Et c’était d’autant plus significatif que nous étions officiellement devenus « hors-la-loi » puisque nous n’avions pas le droit d’héberger un sans-papier… De fait, lorsqu’on a reçu une enveloppe avec de l’argent pour payer le pass Navigo d’Abdelhaq, nous avons compris que nous étions plusieurs à accepter de transgresser cette règle absurde. Et à entrer ensemble dans l’absurdité du « #délit_de_solidarité ».

    « La chronique des actions en faveur de l’accueil des migrants montre une évolution au sein des sociétés européennes. Par leur ampleur et l’engagement qui les sous-tend, les formes de solidarité et d’hospitalité que l’on y observe s’apparentent de plus en plus à un mouvement social » affirme l’anthropologue Michel Agier, que vous citez dans votre livre. De fait, à l’échelle de la France, votre enquête tend à montrer que les démarches d’#accueil sont bien plus nombreuses et conséquentes qu’on ne le laisse souvent croire, vous parlez même d’une « #révolution_silencieuse ». Peut-on dresser une sociologie de ce mouvement social émergent ?

    C’est encore un peu tôt, on n’a pas assez de recul, on manque de chiffres. De nombreux chercheurs travaillent là-dessus, mais c’est un mouvement encore difficile à évaluer et à analyser. La plupart des gens restent discrets, par crainte de l’illégalité mais aussi par humilité, souvent. Mais lorsque j’ai présenté la bande-annonce avec l’objet de mon travail, j’ai été submergé de messages en retour, sur internet. Et de toute la France. J’ai réalisé qu’il y avait un défaut de #narration, et un défaut de connexion les uns avec les autres. La plupart agisse, chacun de leur côté, sans s’organiser de manière collective. Des mouvements et des plateformes se sont créés, sur internet, mais cette solidarité reste encore très « électron libre ». Il n’y a pas véritablement de #réseau_citoyen, par exemple.

    Pour ma part, ce que j’ai vu, c’est une France particulièrement bigarrée. J’ai vu des gens de tous les milieux, pas nécessairement militants, et beaucoup de #familles. En général, ils racontent avoir eu un déclic fort, comme par exemple avec la photo du petit #Aylan. Ce sont des gens qui ressentent une #urgence de faire quelque chose, qui se disent qu’ils « ne-peuvent-pas-ne-rien-faire ». La certitude, c’est qu’il y a énormément de #femmes. L’impulsion est souvent féminine, ce sont souvent elles qui tendent en premier la main.

    Ce #mouvement_citoyen est aussi, malheureusement, le reflet de l’#inaction_politique sur le sujet. Cette dynamique peut-elle continuer longtemps à se substituer aux institutions ?

    Il y a un #burn-out qui guette, et qui est largement sous-estimé, chez ces citoyens accueillants. Ils s’épuisent à « l’attache ». À l’origine, cette solidarité a vraiment été bricolé, avec les moyens du bord, et dans la précipitation. Et même si elle remplit un rôle fondamental, ça reste du #bricolage. Or ce n’est pas aux citoyens de pallier à ce point les défaillances de l’#État, ce n’est pas normal que nous ayons à héberger un demandeur d’asile qui se retrouve à la rue… La réalité, c’est qu’aujourd’hui, très régulièrement en France, on ne notifie pas leurs droits aux gens qui arrivent. Or toute personne qui pose le pied en France a le droit de demander l’asile, c’est une liberté fondamentale. Commençons donc, déjà, par respecter le #droit_d’asile !

    Je crois qu’on ne se rend pas bien compte de ce qui se passe, parce que cela se joue dans des zones de frontières, loin de Paris, donc cela reste assez discret. Mais on est face à quelque chose d’assez considérable en termes de violations de #droits_humains, en France, actuellement : à la fois dans le fait de bafouer ces droits fondamentaux, mais aussi dans le fait de criminaliser les personnes qui leur viennent en aide… Et pendant ce temps-là, on remet la légion d’honneur à Nathalie Bouchart, la maire de Calais, qui avait interdit les distributions d’eau pour les exilés ? Il y a quand même quelque chose qui cloche, dans ce pays.

    Cela n’a pas toujours été comme ça, rappelez-vous, en évoquant notamment l’exemple des « #Boat_People » (en 1979, l’accueil de 120 000 réfugiés vietnamiens et cambodgiens avaient obtenu un large consensus national, ndlr). Qu’est-il arrivé à cette grande « tradition française d’hospitalité », depuis ?

    Le contexte est très différent, par rapport aux Boat people. À l’époque, cela semblait sûrement circonscrit, tant dans le nombre que dans le temps. Aujourd’hui, la multiplication des conflits, un peu partout dans le monde, alimente cette idée que c’est un puits sans fond, qu’on va être submergé si on commence à accueillir trop largement… Plus fondamentalement, on le sait bien, une certaine #rhétorique s’est imposée dans les discours, sur ces questions : on parle de « flux », de « pompe aspirante », et tout ce vocable n’est plus l’apanage de l’extrême droite, on le retrouve dans la bouche des gouvernants. Tout ça insinue et conforte l’horrible mythe de « l’#appel_d’air ». Je crois qu’on oublie parfois combien les #discours_politiques contribuent à forger un cadre de pensée. Et en face, il y a un véritable défaut de pédagogie, on ne traite jamais de ces sujets à l’école, on ne produit pas de #contre-discours. Donc effectivement, c’est important de le rappeler : on a su accueillir, en France.

    Après l’assassinat terroriste du professeur Samuel Paty, vendredi 16 octobre, le débat public a pris des airs de course aux amalgames, avec une tendance à peine cachée à essentialiser toute une catégorie de population (demandeur d’asile, mineurs isolés...) comme de potentiels terroristes. Qu’est-ce que cela vous inspire, en tant qu’accueillante ?

    La #peur légitime et le #danger, bien réel, du #terrorisme ne doivent pas nous faire plonger dans une grande #confusion, en bonne partie entretenue par ma propre profession. Les journalistes ont une part de #responsabilité en entretenant ce lien dangereux, insufflé par nos gouvernants, qui envisagent la migration sous le spectre uniquement sécuritaire depuis les attentats terroristes de 2015. Nous avons besoin de #recul, et de #nuances, pour ne pas tomber dans la #stigmatisation à tout-va de tout un pan de la population, et éviter les #amalgames simplistes du type "immigration = terrorisme". Ce pur discours d’extrême droite n’est basé sur aucune étude formelle, et pourtant il s’est installé dans les esprits au point que ces femmes et ces hommes sont victimes d’un changement de perception. Hier considérés comme des personnes en détresse, ils sont désormais vus dans leur ensemble comme de potentiels terroristes car un assassin – ayant commis un acte effroyable – a préalablement été demandeur d’asile et a obtenu son statut de réfugié... Il s’agit d’un itinéraire meurtrier individuel. Les demandeurs d’asile, les mineurs isolés, les réfugiés sont les premiers à pâtir de ces amalgames. Les entend-on ? Très rarement. Leur #parole est souvent confisquée, ou bien nous parlons à leur place.

    Alors, il faut le rappeler : ces personnes exilées et arrivées en France aspirent simplement à s’intégrer et à mener une vie « normale », si tant est qu’elle puisse vraiment l’être après tout ce qu’elles ont traversé, et avec la douleur du #déracinement. Et ces étrangers, nous les côtoyons au quotidien sans même le savoir : ils livrent nos repas à domicile, se forment à des métiers dans des secteurs en tension où la main d’œuvre manque, ils changent les draps dans les hôtels. Nombre de médecins réfugiés furent en première ligne pendant le confinement... Ce qui me préoccupe aujourd’hui, c’est justement de ramener de la mesure dans ce débat toxique et dangereux en humanisant ces destins individuels.

    https://www.bastamag.net/Redonner-ses-lettres-de-noblesse-a-la-solidarite-et-a-l-hospitalite-franca

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • "Réfugiés", « migrants », « exilés » ou « demandeur d’asile » : à chaque mot sa fiction, et son ombre portée

    Alors que les violences policières contre un campement éphémère de personnes exilées font scandale, comment faut-il nommer ceux dont les tentes ont été déchiquetées ?

    Nombreuses et largement unanimes, les réactions qui ont suivi l’intervention de la police, lundi 23 novembre au soir, place de la République à Paris, condamnent la violence des forces de l’ordre. De fait, après cette intervention pour déloger le campement éphémère installé en plein Paris dans le but de donner de l’écho à l’évacuation récente d’un vaste camp de réfugiés sur les contreforts du périphérique, les images montrent les tentes qui valsent, les coups qui pleuvent, des matraques qui cognent en cadence, et de nombreux soutiens nassés en pleine nuit ainsi que la presse. Survenu en plein débat sur la loi de sécurité globale, et après de longs mois d’un travail tous azimuts pour poser la question des violences policières, l’épisode a quelque chose d’emblématique, qui remet au passage l’enjeu de l’accueil migratoire à la Une des médias.

    Une occasion utile pour regarder et penser la façon dont on nomme ceux qui, notamment, vivent ici dans ces tentes-là. Durant toute la soirée de lundi, la réponse policière à leur présence sur la place de la République a été amplement commentée, en direct sur les réseaux sociaux d’abord, puis sur les sites de nombreux médias. Si certains utilisaient le mot “migrants” désormais ordinaire chez les journalistes, il était frappant de voir que d’autres termes prenaient une place rare à la faveur de l’événement à chaud. Et en particulier, les mots “réfugiés” et “exilés”.

    En ligne, Utopia56, le collectif à l’origine de l’opération, parle de “personnes exilées”. Chez Caritas France (ex-Secours catholique), c’est aussi l’expression qu’utilise par exemple, sur la brève bio de son compte twitter, la salariée de l’humanitaire en charge des projets “solidarité et défense des droits des personnes exilées”. Ce lexique n’a rien de rare dans le monde associatif : la Cimade parle aussi de longue date de “personnes exilées”, la Fédération des acteurs de solidarités qui chapeaute 870 associations de même, et chez chez Act up par exemple, on ne dit pas non plus “migrants” mais “exilés”. Dans la classe politique, la nuit de violences policières a donné lieu à des déclarations de protestation où il n’était pas inintéressant d’observer l’usage des mots choisis dans le feu de l’action, et sous le projecteur des médias : plutôt “exilés” chez les écologistes, via le compte twitter “groupeecoloParis”, tandis qu’Anne Hidalgo, la maire de Paris, parlait quant à elle de “réfugiés”.

    Du côté des médias, le terme poussé par le monde associatif n’a sans doute jamais aussi bien pris qu’à chaud, dans l’épisode de lundi soir : sur son compte Twitter, CNews oscillait par exemple entre “migrants” et “personnes exilées”... au point de se faire tacler par ses abonnés - il faudrait plutôt dire “clandestins”. Edwy Plenel panachait pour sa part le lexique, le co-fondateur de Médiapart dénonçant au petit matin la violence dont avaient fait l’objet les “migrants exilés”.

    Peu suspect de gauchisme lexical, Gérald Darmanin, ministre de l’Intérieur, affirmait de son côté saisir l’IGPN pour une enquête sur cette évacuation d’un “campement de migrants”, tandis que le mot s’affichait aussi sur la plupart des pages d’accueil des sites de médias. Comme si le terme “migrants” était devenu un terme générique pour dire cette foule anonyme de l’immigration - sans que, le plus souvent, on interroge en vertu de quels critères ? Cet épisode de l’évacuation violente de la place de la République est en fait l’occasion idéale pour regarder la façon dont le mot “migrants” s’est disséminé, et remonter le film pour comprendre comment il a été forgé. Car ce que montre la sociologue Karen Akoka dans un livre qui vient justement de paraître mi-novembre (à La Découverte) c’est que cette catégorie est avant tout une construction dont la sociogenèse éclaire non seulement notre façon de dire et de penser, mais surtout des politiques publiques largement restées dans l’ombre.
    Les mots de l’asile, ces constructions politiques

    L’Asile et l’exil, ce livre formidable tiré de sa thèse, est à mettre entre toutes les mains car précisément il décortique en quoi ces mots de l’immigration sont d’abord le fruit d’un travail politique et d’une construction historique (tout aussi politique). Les acteurs de cette histoire appartiennent non seulement à la classe politique, mais aussi aux effectifs des officiers qui sont recrutés pour instruire les demandes. En centrant son travail de doctorat sur une sociohistoire de l’Ofpra, l’Office français de protection des réfugiés et des apatrides, créé en 1952, la chercheuse rappelle qu’il n’est pas équivalent de parler d’exil et d’asile, d’exilés, de demandeurs d’asile, de migrants ou de réfugiés. Mais l’ensemble de sa démonstration éclaire en outre toute la part d’artifice que peut receler ce raffinage lexical qui a permis à l’Etat de construire des catégories d’aspirants à l’exil comme on labelliserait des candidats plus ou moins désirables. Face aux "réfugiés", légitimes et acceptables depuis ce qu’on a construit comme une forme de consensus humaniste, les "migrants" seraient d’abord là par émigration économique - et moins éligibles. Tout son livre consiste au fond en une déconstruction méthodique de la figure du réfugié désirable.

    Les tout premiers mots de l’introduction de ce livre (qu’il faut lire en entier) remontent à 2015 : cette année-là, Al-Jazeera annonçait que désormais, celles et ceux qui traversent la Méditerranée seront pour de bon des “réfugiés”. Et pas des “migrants”, contrairement à l’usage qui était alors en train de s’installer dans le lexique journalistique à ce moment d’explosion des tentatives migratoires par la mer. Le média qatari précisait que “migrants” s’apparentait à ses yeux à un “outil de deshumanisation”. On comprenait en fait que “réfugié” était non seulement plus positif, mais aussi plus légitime que “migrant”.

    En droit, c’est la Convention de Genève qui fait les “réfugiés” selon une définition que vous pouvez consulter ici. Avant ce texte qui remonte à 1951, on accueillait aussi des réfugiés, quand se négociait, au cas par cas et sous les auspices de la Société des nations, la reconnaissance de groupes éligibles. Mais le flou demeure largement, notamment sur ce qui, en pratique, départirait le “réfugié” de “l’étranger”. A partir de 1952, ces réfugiés répondent à une définition, mais surtout à des procédures, qui sont principalement confiées à l’Ofpra, créé dans l’année qui suit la Convention de Genève. L’autrice rappelle qu’à cette époque où l’Ofpra passe d’abord pour une sorte de “consulat des régimes disparus”, il y a consensus pour considérer que l’institution doit elle-même employer des réfugiés chargés de décider du sort de nouveaux candidats à l’asile. A l’époque, ces procédures et ces arbitrages n’intéressent que très peu de hauts fonctionnaires. Ca change progressivement à mesure que l’asile se politise, et la décennie 1980 est une bonne période pour observer l’asile en train de se faire. C’est-à-dire, en train de se fabriquer.

    La construction du "réfugié militant"

    Sur fond d’anticommunisme et d’intérêt à relever la tête après la guerre coloniale perdue, la France décidait ainsi au début des années 80 d’accueillir 130 000 personnes parmi celles qui avaient fui l’un des trois pays de l’ex-Indochine (et en particulier, le Vietnam). On s’en souvient encore comme des “boat people”. Ils deviendront massivement des “réfugiés”, alors que le mot, du point de vue juridique, renvoie aux critères de la Convention de Genève, et à l’idée de persécutions avérées. Or Karen Akoka rappelle que, bien souvent, ces procédures ont en réalité fait l’objet d’un traitement de gros. C’est-à-dire, qu’on n’a pas toujours documenté, dans le détail, et à l’échelle individuelle, les expériences vécues et la position des uns et des autres. Au point de ne pas trop chercher à savoir par exemple si l’on avait plutôt affaire à des victimes ou à des bourreaux ? Alors que le génocide khmer rouge commençait à être largement connu, l’idée que ces boat people massivement arrivés par avion camperaient pour de bon la figure du “bon réfugié” avait cristallisé. La chercheuse montre aussi que ceux qui sont par exemple arrivés du Vietnam avaient fait l’objet d’un double tri : par les autorités françaises d’une part, mais par le régime vietnamien d’autre part… et qu’il avait été explicitement convenu qu’on exclurait les militants politiques.

    Or dans l’imaginaire collectif comme dans le discours politique, cette représentation du réfugié persécuté politiquement est toujours très active. Elle continue souvent de faire écran à une lecture plus attentive aux tris opérés sur le terrain. Et empêche par exemple de voir en quoi on a fini par se représenter certaines origines comme plus désirables, par exemple parce qu’il s’agirait d’une main-d’œuvre réputée plus docile. Aujourd’hui, cette image très puissante du "réfugié militant" reste arrimée à l’idée d’une histoire personnelle légitime, qui justifierait l’étiquetage de certains “réfugiés” plutôt que d’autres. C’est pour cela qu’on continue aujourd’hui de réclamer aux demandeurs d’asile de faire la preuve des persécutions dont ils auraient fait l’objet.

    Cette enquête approfondie s’attèle à détricoter ce mirage du "bon réfugié" en montrant par exemple que, loin de répondre à des critères objectifs, cette catégorie est éminemment ancrée dans la Guerre froide et dans le contexte post-colonial. Et qu’elle échappe largement à une approche empirique rigoureuse, et critique. Karen Akoka nous dépeint la Convention de Genève comme un cadre qui se révèle finalement assez flou, ou lâche, pour avoir permis des lectures et des usages oscillatoires au gré de l’agenda diplomatique ou politique. On le comprend par exemple en regardant le sort de dossiers qu’on peut apparenter à une migration économique. Sur le papier, c’est incompatible avec le label de “réfugié”. Or dans la pratique, la ligne de partage entre asile d’un côté, et immigration de l’autre, ne semble plus si étanche lorsqu’on regarde de près qui a pu obtenir le statut dans les années 1970. On le comprend mieux lorsqu’on accède aux logiques de traitement dans les années 70 et 80 : elles n’ont pas toujours été les mêmes, ni été armées du même zèle, selon l’origine géographique des candidats. Edifiant et très pédagogique, le sixième chapitre du livre d’Akoka s’intitule d’ailleurs “L’Asile à deux vitesses”.

    L’autrice accorde par exemple une attention particulière à la question des fraudes. Pas seulement à leur nombre, ou à leur nature, mais aussi au statut que les institutions ont pu donner à ces fraudes. Ainsi, Karen Akoka montre l’intérêt qu’a pu avoir l’Etat français, à révéler à grand bruit l’existence de “filières zaïroises” à une époque où la France cherchait à endiguer l’immigration d’origine africaine autant qu’à sceller une alliance avec le Zaïre de Mobutu. En miroir, les entretiens qu’elle a menés avec d’anciens fonctionnaires de l’Ofpra dévoilent qu’on a, au contraire, cherché à dissimuler des montages frauduleux impliquant d’ex-Indochinois.

    Les "vrais réfugiés"... et les faux

    Entre 1970 et 1990, les chances de se voir reconnaître “réfugié” par l’Ofpra ont fondu plus vite que la banquise : on est passé de 90% à la fin des années 70 à 15% en 1990. Aujourd’hui, ce taux est remonté (de l’ordre de 30% en 2018), mais on continue de lire que c’est le profil des demandeurs d’asile qui aurait muté au point d’expliquer que le taux d’échec explose. Ou que la démarche serait en quelque sorte détournée par de “faux demandeurs d’asile”, assez habiles pour instrumentaliser les rouages de l’Ofpra en espérant passer entre les gouttes… au détriment de “vrais réfugiés” qu’on continue de penser comme tels. Karen Akoka montre qu’en réalité, c’est plutôt la manière dont on instruit ces demandes en les plaçant sous l’égide de politiques migratoires plus restrictives, mais aussi l’histoire propre de ceux qui les instruisent, qui expliquent bien plus efficacement cette chute. Entre 1950 et 1980 par exemple, nombre d’officiers instructeurs étaient issus des mêmes pays que les requérants. C’était l’époque où l’Ofpra faisait davantage figure de “consulat des pays disparus”, et où, par leur trajectoire personnelle, les instructeurs se trouvaient être eux-mêmes des réfugiés, ou les enfants de réfugiés. Aujourd’hui ce sont massivement des agents français, fonctionnaires, qui traitent les dossiers à une époque où l’on ne subordonne plus les choix au Rideau de fer, mais plutôt sous la houlette d’une politique migratoire et de ce qui a sédimenté dans les politiques publiques comme “le problème islamiste”.

    Rassemblé ici au pas de course mais très dense, le travail de Karen Akoka est un exemple vibrant de la façon dont l’histoire, et donc une approche pluridisciplinaire qui fait la part belle aux archives et à une enquête d’histoire orale, enrichit dans toute son épaisseur un travail entamé comme sociologue. Du fait de la trajectoire de l’autrice, il est aussi un exemple lumineux de tout ce que peut apporter une démarche réflexive. Ca vaut pour la façon dont on choisit un mot plutôt qu’un autre. Mais ça vaut aussi pour la manière dont on peut déconstruire des façons de penser, ou des habitudes sur son lieu de travail, par exemple. En effet, avant de soutenir sa thèse en 2012, Karen Akoka a travaillé durant cinq ans pour le HCR, le Haut commissariat aux réfugiés des Nations-Unies. On comprend très bien, à la lire, combien elle a pu d’abord croire, et même nourrir, certaines fausses évidences. Jusqu’à être “mal à l’aise” avec ces images et ces chimères qu’elle entretenait, depuis son travail - qui, en fait, consistait à “fabriquer des réfugiés”. Pour en éliminer d’autres.

    https://www.franceculture.fr/societe/refugies-migrants-exiles-ou-demandeur-dasile-a-chaque-mot-sa-fiction-e

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #catégorisation #catégories #mots #terminologie #vocabulaire #Ofpra #France #histoire #légitimité #migrants_économiques #réfugié_désirable #déshumanisation #Convention_de_Genève #politisation #réfugié_militant #Indochine #boat_people #bon_réfugié #Vietnam #militants #imaginaire #discours #persécution #persécution_politique #preuves #guerre_froide #immigration #fraudes #abus #Zaïre #filières_zaïroises #Mobutu #vrais_réfugiés #faux_réfugiés #procédure_d'asile #consulat_des_pays_disparus #politique_migratoire
    #Karen_Akoka
    ping @isskein @karine4 @sinehebdo @_kg_

    • ...même jour que l’envoi de ce post on a discuté en cours Licence Géo le séjour d’Ahmed publié en forme de carte par Karen Akoka dans l’atlas migreurop - hasard ! Et à la fin de son exposé un étudiant proposait par rapport aux catégories : Wie wäre es mit « Mensch » ? L’exemple du campement à Paris - des pistes ici pour approfondir !

    • Ce qui fait un réfugié

      Il y aurait d’un côté des réfugiés et de l’autre des migrants économiques. La réalité des migrations s’avère autrement complexe souligne la politiste #Karen_Akoka qui examine en détail comment ces catégories sont historiquement, socialement et politiquement construites.

      L’asile est une notion juridique précieuse. Depuis le milieu du XXe siècle, elle permet, à certaines conditions, de protéger des individus qui fuient leur pays d’origine en les qualifiant de réfugiés. Mais l’asile est aussi, à certains égards, une notion dangereuse, qui permet paradoxalement de justifier le fait de ne pas accueillir d’autres individus, les rejetant vers un autre statut, celui de migrant économique. L’asile devenant alors ce qui permet la mise en œuvre d’une politique migratoire de fermeture. Mais comment faire la différence entre un réfugié et un migrant économique ? La seule manière d’y prétendre consiste à s’intéresser non pas aux caractéristiques des personnes, qu’elles soient rangées dans la catégorie de réfugié ou de migrant, mais bien plutôt au travail qui consiste à les ranger dans l’une ou l’autre de ces deux catégories. C’est le grand mérite de « #L’Asile_et_l’exil », le livre important de Karen Akoka que de proposer ce renversement de perspective. Elle est cette semaine l’invitée de La Suite dans Les Idées.

      Et c’est la metteuse en scène Judith Depaule qui nous rejoint en seconde partie, pour évoquer « Je passe » un spectacle qui aborde le sujet des migrations mais aussi pour présenter l’Atelier des artistes en exil, qu’elle dirige.

      https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/la-suite-dans-les-idees/ce-qui-fait-un-refugie

      #livre #catégorisation #catégories #distinction #hiérarchisation #histoire #ofpra #tri #subordination_politique #politique_étrangère #guerre_froide #politique_migratoire #diplomatie

    • La fabrique du demandeur d’asile

      « Il y a les réfugiés politiques, et c’est l’honneur de la France que de respecter le droit d’asile : toutes les communes de France en prennent leur part. Il y a enfin ceux qui sont entrés illégalement sur le territoire : ceux-là ne sont pas des réfugiés, mais des clandestins qui doivent retourner dans leur pays », disait déjà Gerald Darmanin en 2015. Mais pourquoi risquer de mourir de faim serait-il moins grave que risquer de mourir en prison ? Pourquoi serait-il moins « politique » d’être victime de programmes d’ajustement structurels que d’être victime de censure ?

      Dans son livre L’asile et l’exil, une histoire de la distinction réfugiés migrants (La découverte, 2020), Karen Akoka revient sur la construction très idéologique de cette hiérarchisation, qui est liée à la définition du réfugié telle qu’elle a été décidée lors de la Convention de Genève de 1951, à l’issue d’âpres négociations.

      Cette dichotomie réfugié politique/migrant économique paraît d’autant plus artificielle que, jusqu’aux années 1970, il suffisait d’être russe, hongrois, tchécoslovaque – et un peu plus tard de venir d’Asie du Sud-Est, du Cambodge, du Laos ou du Vietnam – pour décrocher le statut de réfugié, l’objectif premier de la France étant de discréditer les régimes communistes. Nul besoin, à l’époque, de montrer qu’on avait été individuellement persécuté ni de nier la dimension économique de l’exil.

      Aujourd’hui, la vaste majorité des demandes d’asile sont rejetées. Qu’est ce qui a changé dans les années 1980 ? D’où sort l’obsession actuelle des agents de l’OFPRA (l’Office français de protection des réfugiés et apatrides) pour la fraude et les « faux » demandeurs d’asile ?

      Plutôt que de sonder en vain les identités et les trajectoires des « demandeurs d’asile » à la recherche d’une introuvable essence de migrant ou de réfugié, Karen Akoka déplace le regard vers « l’offre » d’asile. Avec la conviction que les étiquettes en disent moins sur les exilés que sur ceux qui les décernent.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bvcc0v7h2_w&feature=emb_logo

      https://www.hors-serie.net/Aux-Ressources/2020-12-19/La-fabrique-du-demandeur-d-asile-id426

    • « Il n’est pas possible d’avoir un système d’asile juste sans politique d’immigration ouverte »

      La chercheuse Karen Akoka a retracé l’histoire du droit d’asile en France. Elle montre que l’attribution de ce statut a toujours reposé sur des intérêts politiques et diplomatiques. Et que la distinction entre les « vrais » et les « faux » réfugiés est donc discutable.

      Qui étaient les personnes qui ont été violemment évacuées du camp de la place de la République, il y a quatre semaines ? Ceux qui les aident et les défendent utilisent le mot « exilés », pour décrire une condition qui transcende les statuts administratifs : que l’on soit demandeur d’asile, sans-papiers, ou sous le coup d’une obligation de quitter le territoire français, les difficultés restent sensiblement les mêmes. D’autres préfèrent le mot « illégaux », utilisé pour distinguer ces étrangers venus pour des raisons économiques du seul groupe que la France aurait la volonté et les moyens d’accueillir : les réfugiés protégés par le droit d’asile. Accordé par l’Office français de protection des réfugiés et apatrides (Ofpra) depuis 1952, ce statut permet aujourd’hui de travailler et de vivre en France à celles et ceux qui peuvent prouver une persécution ou une menace dans leur pays d’origine. Pour les autres, le retour s’impose. Mais qui décide de l’attribution du statut, et selon quels critères ?

      Pour le savoir, Karen Akoka a retracé l’histoire de l’Ofpra. Dressant une galerie de portraits des membres de l’institution, retraçant le regard porté sur les Espagnols, les Yougoslaves, les boat-people ou encore les Zaïrois, elle montre dans l’Asile et l’Exil (La Découverte) que l’asile a toujours été accordé en fonction de considérations politiques et diplomatiques. Elle remet ainsi en cause l’idée que les réfugiés seraient « objectivement » différents des autres exilés, et seuls légitimes à être dignement accueillis. De quoi prendre conscience (s’il en était encore besoin) qu’une autre politique d’accueil est possible.
      Comment interprétez-vous les images de l’évacuation du camp de la place de la République ?

      Quand on ne connaît pas la situation des personnes exilées en France, cela peut confirmer l’idée que nous serions en situation de saturation. Il y aurait trop de migrants, la preuve, ils sont dans la rue. Ce n’est pas vrai : si ces personnes sont dans cette situation, c’est à cause de choix politiques qui empêchent toute forme d’intégration au tissu social. Depuis les années 90, on ne peut plus légalement travailler quand on est demandeur d’asile. On est donc dépendant de l’aide publique. Avec le règlement européen de Dublin, on ne peut demander l’asile que dans le premier pays de l’Union européenne dans lequel on s’enregistre. Tout cela produit des illégaux, qui se trouvent par ailleurs enfermés dans des statuts divers et complexes. Place de la République, il y avait à la fois des demandeurs d’asile, des déboutés du droit d’asile, des « dublinés », etc.
      Y a-t-il encore des groupes ou des nationalités qui incarnent la figure du « bon réfugié » ?

      Aujourd’hui, il n’y a pas de figure archétypale du bon réfugié au même titre que le dissident soviétique des années 50-60 ou le boat-people des années 80. Il y a tout de même une hiérarchie des nationalités qui fait que les Syriens sont perçus le plus positivement. Mais avec une différence majeure : alors qu’on acheminait en France les boat-people, les Syriens (comme beaucoup d’autres) doivent traverser des mers, franchir des murs… On fait tout pour les empêcher d’arriver, et une fois qu’ils sont sur place, on les reconnaît à 90 %. Il y a là quelque chose de particulièrement cynique.
      Vos travaux reviennent à la création de l’Ofpra en 1952. Pourquoi avoir repris cette histoire déjà lointaine ?

      Jusqu’aux années 80, l’Ofpra accordait le statut de réfugié à 80 % des demandeurs. Depuis les années 90, environ 20 % l’obtiennent. Cette inversion du pourcentage peut amener à la conclusion qu’entre les années 50 et 80, les demandeurs d’asile étaient tous de « vrais » réfugiés, et que depuis, ce sont majoritairement des « faux ». Il était donc important d’étudier cette période, parce qu’elle détermine notre perception actuelle selon laquelle l’asile aurait été dénaturé. Or il apparaît que cette catégorie de réfugié a sans cesse été mobilisée en fonction de considérations diplomatiques et politiques.

      La question de l’asile n’a jamais été neutre. En contexte de guerre froide, le statut de réfugié est attribué presque automatiquement aux personnes fuyant des régimes communistes que l’on cherche à décrédibiliser. Lorsqu’on est russe, hongrois ou roumain, ou plus tard vietnamien, cambodgien ou laotien, on est automatiquement reconnu réfugié sans qu’il soit nécessaire de prouver que l’on risque d’être persécuté ou de cacher ses motivations économiques. Ce qui apparaît comme de la générosité est un calcul politique et diplomatique. Les 80 % d’accords de l’époque sont autant pétris de considérations politiques que les 80 % de rejets aujourd’hui.
      Ces considérations conduisent alors à rejeter les demandes émanant de certaines nationalités, même dans le cas de régimes communistes et/ou autoritaires.

      Il y a en effet d’importantes différences de traitement, qui s’expliquent principalement par l’état des relations diplomatiques. La France est réticente à accorder l’asile aux Yougoslaves ou aux Portugais, car les relations avec Tito ou Salazar sont bonnes. Il n’y a d’ailleurs même pas de section portugaise à l’Ofpra ! Mais au lieu de les rejeter massivement, on les dirige vers les procédures d’immigration. La France passe des accords de main- d’œuvre avec Belgrade, qui permettent d’orienter les Yougoslaves vers la régularisation par le travail et de faire baisser le nombre de demandeurs d’asile.

      Grâce aux politiques d’immigration ouvertes on pouvait donc diriger vers la régularisation par le travail les nationalités rendues « indésirables » en tant que réfugiés en raison des relations diplomatiques. On pouvait prendre en compte les questions de politique étrangère, sans que cela ne nuise aux exilés. Aujourd’hui, on ne peut plus procéder comme cela, puisque la régularisation par le travail a été bloquée. Les rejets ont donc augmenté et la question du « vrai-faux » est devenu le paradigme dominant. Comme il faut bien justifier les rejets, on déplace la cause des refus sur les demandeurs en disséquant de plus en plus les biographies pour scruter si elles correspondent ou non à la fiction d’une identité de réfugié supposée neutre et objective.

      Cela montre qu’il n’est pas possible d’avoir un système d’asile juste sans politique d’immigration ouverte, d’abord parce que les catégories de réfugiés et de migrants sont poreuses et ne reflètent qu’imparfaitement la complexité des parcours migratoires, ensuite parce qu’elles sont largement façonnées par des considérations politiques.
      Vous identifiez les années 80 comme le moment où change la politique d’asile. Comment se déroule cette évolution ?

      Les changements de cette période sont liés à trois grands facteurs : la construction de l’immigration comme un problème qui arrime la politique d’asile à l’impératif de réduction des flux migratoires ; la fin de la guerre froide qui diminue l’intérêt politique à l’attribution du statut ; et la construction d’une crise de l’Etat social, dépeint comme trop dépensier et inefficace, ce qui justifie l’austérité budgétaire et la rigueur juridique dans les institutions en charge des étrangers (et plus généralement des pauvres). L’Ofpra va alors passer d’un régime des réfugiés, marqué par un fort taux d’attribution du statut, des critères souples, une activité tournée vers l’accompagnement des réfugiés en vue de leur intégration, à un régime des demandeurs d’asile orienté vers une sélection stricte et la production de rejets qui s’appuient sur des exigences nouvelles. Désormais, les demandeurs doivent montrer qu’ils risquent d’être individuellement persécutés, que leurs motivations sont purement politiques et sans aucune considération économique. Ils doivent aussi fournir toujours plus de preuves.
      Dans les années 80, ce n’était pas le cas ?

      La particularité de la décennie 80 est qu’elle voit coexister ces deux régimes, en fonction des nationalités. Les boat-people du Laos, du Cambodge et du Vietnam reçoivent automatiquement le statut de réfugié sur la seule base de leur nationalité. Et pour cause, non seulement on retrouve les questions de guerre froide, mais s’ajoutent des enjeux postcoloniaux : il faut que la figure de l’oppresseur soit incarnée par les anciens colonisés et non plus par la France. Et n’oublions pas les besoins de main- d’œuvre, toujours forts malgré les restrictions de l’immigration de travail mises en place dès les années 70. L’arrivée de ces travailleurs potentiels apparaît comme une opportunité, d’autant qu’on les présume dociles par stéréotype. Au même moment, les Zaïrois, qui fuient le régime du général Mobutu, sont massivement rejetés.
      Pourquoi ?

      Après les indépendances, la France s’efforce de maintenir une influence forte en Afrique, notamment au Zaïre car c’est un pays francophone où la France ne porte pas la responsabilité de la colonisation. C’est également un pays riche en matières premières, qui fait figure de rempart face aux Etats communistes qui l’entourent. Les Zaïrois qui demandent l’asile doivent donc montrer qu’ils sont individuellement recherchés, là où prévalait auparavant une gestion par nationalité. L’Ofpra surmédiatise les fraudes des Zaïrois, alors qu’il étouffe celles des boat-people. On a donc au même moment deux figures absolument inversées. Dans les années 90, la gestion de l’asile bascule pour tous dans le système appliqué aux Zaïrois. Cette rigidification entraîne une augmentation des fraudes, qui justifie une nouvelle surenchère d’exigences et de contrôles dans un cercle vicieux qui perdure jusqu’aujourd’hui.
      Il faut ajouter le fait que l’Ofpra devient un laboratoire des logiques de management.

      L’Ofpra est longtemps resté une institution faible. Il était peu considéré par les pouvoirs publics, en particulier par sa tutelle, les Affaires étrangères, et dirigé par les diplomates les plus relégués de ce ministère. Au début des années 90, avec la construction de l’asile comme « problème », des sommes importantes sont injectées dans l’Ofpra qui s’ennoblit mais sert en retour de lieu d’expérimentation des stratégies de management issues du secteur privé. Les agents sont soumis à des exigences de productivité, de standardisation, et à la segmentation de leur travail. On leur demande notamment de prendre un certain nombre de décisions par jour (deux à trois aujourd’hui), faute de quoi ils sont sanctionnés.

      Cette exigence de rapidité s’accompagne de l’injonction à justifier longuement les décisions positives, tandis qu’auparavant c’était davantage les rejets qui devaient être motivés. Cette organisation productiviste est un facteur d’explication du nombre grandissant de rejets. La division du travail produit une dilution du sentiment de responsabilité qui facilite cette production des rejets. Ce n’est pas que les agents de l’Ofpra fassent mal leur travail. Mais les techniques managériales influent sur leurs pratiques et elles contribuent aux 80 % de refus actuels.
      Quelle est l’influence de la question religieuse sur l’asile ?

      Pour aborder cette question, je suis partie d’un constat : depuis la fin des années 90, un nouveau groupe, composé de femmes potentiellement victimes d’excision ou de mariage forcé et de personnes homosexuelles, a accès au statut de réfugié. Comment expliquer cette ouverture à un moment où la politique menée est de plus en plus restrictive ? On pense bien sûr au changement des « mentalités », mais cette idée, si elle est vraie, me semble insuffisante. Mon hypothèse est que c’est aussi parce que nous sommes passés du problème communiste au problème islamiste comme soubassement idéologique de l’attribution du statut. Par ces nouvelles modalités d’inclusion se rejoue la dichotomie entre un Occident tolérant, ouvert, et un Sud global homophobe, masculiniste, sexiste.

      Cette dichotomie a été réactualisée avec le 11 septembre 2001, qui a donné un succès aux thèses sur le choc des civilisations. On retrouve cette vision binaire dans la façon dont on se représente les guerres en Afrique. Ce seraient des conflits ethniques, flous, irrationnels, où tout le monde tire sur tout le monde, par opposition aux conflits politiques de la guerre froide. Cette mise en opposition permet de sous-tendre l’idée selon laquelle il y avait bien par le passé de vrais réfugiés qui arrivaient de pays avec des problèmes clairs, ce qui ne serait plus le cas aujourd’hui. Cette vision culturaliste des conflits africains permet également de dépolitiser les mouvements migratoires auxquels ils donnent lieu, et donc de délégitimer les demandes d’asile.

      https://www.liberation.fr/debats/2020/12/20/il-n-est-pas-possible-d-avoir-un-systeme-d-asile-juste-sans-politique-d-i

    • Le tri aux frontières

      En retraçant l’histoire de l’Office français de protection des réfugiés et des apatrides, Karen Akoka montre que l’accueil des migrants en France relève d’une distinction non assumée entre « bons » réfugiés politiques et « mauvais » migrants économiques.
      « Pourquoi serait-il plus légitime de fuir des persécutions individuelles que des violences collectives ? Pourquoi serait-il plus grave de mourir en prison que de mourir de faim ? Pourquoi l’absence de perspectives socio-économiques serait-elle moins problématique que l’absence de liberté politique ? »

      (p. 324)

      Karen Akoka, maîtresse de conférences en sciences politique à l’Université Paris Nanterre et associée à l’Institut des sciences sociales du politique, pose dans cet ouvrage des questions essentielles sur les fondements moraux de notre société, à la lumière du traitement réservé aux étrangers demandant une forme de protection sur le territoire français. Les institutions publiques concernées – principalement le ministère des Affaires Étrangères, l’ Office français de protection des réfugiés et apatrides (Ofpra), le ministère de l’Intérieur – attribuent depuis toujours aux requérants un degré variable de légitimité : ce dernier, longtemps lié à la nationalité d’origine, s’incarne en des catégories (réfugié, boat people, demandeur d’asile, migrant…) qui sont censées les distinguer et les classer, et dont le sens, les usages, et les effets en termes d’accès aux droits évoluent dans le temps. Cet ouvrage a le grand mérite de dévoiler les processus organisationnels, les rapports de force, les intérêts politiques, et les principes moraux qui sous-tendent ces évolutions de sens et d’usage des catégories de l’asile.

      Ce dévoilement procède d’une entreprise socio-historique autour de la naissance et du fonctionnement de l’Ofpra, entre les années 1950 et les années 2010, et notamment des pratiques de ses agents. Dans une approche résolument constructiviste, la figure du « réfugié » (et en creux de celui qui n’est pas considéré « réfugié ») émerge comme étant le produit d’un étiquetage dont sont responsables, certes, les institutions, mais qui est finalement délégué aux agents chargés de la mise en œuvre des règles et orientations politiques.

      Comment est-on passé d’une reconnaissance presque automatique du statut de réfugié pour des communautés entières de Russes, Géorgiens, Hongrois dans les années 1960 et 1970, à des taux de rejets très élevés à partir des années 1990 ? À quel moment et pourquoi la preuve d’un risque individuel (et non plus d’une persécution collective) est devenue un requis ? À rebours d’une explication qui suggérerait un changement de profil des requérants, l’auteure nous invite à rentrer dans les rouages de la fabrique du « réfugié » et de ses alter ego : le « demandeur d’asile » et le « migrant économique ». Pour comprendre à quoi cela tient, elle se penche sur le travail des agents qui sont appelés à les ranger dans une de ces multiples catégories, et sur les éléments (moraux, organisationnels, économiques, et politiques) qui influencent leurs arbitrages.
      Un voyage dans le temps au sein de l’OFPRA

      En s’appuyant à la fois sur les archives ouvertes et sur de nombreux entretiens, son livre propose un éclairage sur l’évolution des décisions prises au sein de l’Ofpra, au plus près des profils et des expériences des hommes et femmes à qui cette responsabilité a été déléguée : les agents.

      Karen Akoka propose une reconstruction chronologique des événements et des logiques qui ont régi l’octroi de l’asile en France à partir de l’entre-deux-guerres (chapitre 1), en s’attardant sur la « fausse rupture » que représente la création de l’Ofpra en 1952, à la suite de la ratification de la Convention de Genève (chapitre 2). Elle montre en effet que, loin de représenter un réel changement avec le passé, la protection des réfugiés après la naissance de cette institution continue d’être un enjeu diplomatique et de politique étrangère pendant plusieurs décennies.

      Les chapitres suivants s’attachent à montrer, de façon documentée et parfois à rebours d’une littérature scientifique jusque-là peu discutée (voir Gérard Noiriel, Réfugiés et sans-papiers, Paris, Hachette, 1998), que la création de l’Ofpra n’est pas exemplaire d’un contrôle « purement français » de l’asile : le profil des agents de l’Ofpra compte, et se révèle déterminant pour la compréhension de l’évolution des pourcentages de refus et d’acceptation des demandes. En effet, entre 1952 et la fin des années 1970, des réfugiés et des enfants de réfugiés occupent largement la place d’instructeurs de demandes de leurs compatriotes, dans une période de guerre froide où les ressortissants russes, géorgiens, hongrois sont reconnus comme réfugiés sur la simple base de leur nationalité. Les contre-exemples sont heuristiques et ils montrent les intérêts français en politique étrangère : les Yougoslaves, considérés comme étant des ressortissants d’un régime qui s’était désolidarisé de l’URSS, et les Portugais, dont le président Salazar entretenait d’excellents rapports diplomatiques avec la France, étaient pour la plupart déboutés de leur demande ; y répondre positivement aurait été considéré comme un « acte inamical » vis-à-vis de leurs dirigeants.

      Les années 1980 sont une décennie de transition, pendant laquelle on passe d’un « régime des réfugiés » à un « régime des demandeurs d’asile », où la recherche d’une crainte individuelle de persécution émerge dans les pratiques des agents. Mais toujours pas vis-à-vis de l’ensemble des requérants : des traitements différenciés continuent d’exister, avec d’évidentes préférences nationales, comme pour les Indochinois ou boat people, et des postures de méfiance pour d’autres ressortissants, tels les Zaïrois. Ce traitement discriminatoire découle encore des profils des agents chargés d’instruire les demandes : ils sont indochinois pour les Indochinois, et français pour les Zaïrois. La rhétorique de la fraude, pourtant bien documentée pour les ressortissants indochinois aussi, est largement mobilisée à charge des requérants africains. Elle occupe une place centrale dans le registre gouvernemental dans les années 1990, afin de légitimer des politiques migratoires visant à réduire les flux.

      L’entrée par le profil sociologique des agents de l’Ofpra et par les changements organisationnels internes à cet organisme est éclairante : la proximité culturelle et linguistique avec les publics n’est plus valorisée ; on recherche des agents neutres, distanciés. À partir des années 1990, l’institution fait évoluer les procédures d’instruction des demandes de façon à segmenter les compétences des agents, à déléguer aux experts (juristes et documentaristes), à réduire le contact avec les requérants ; l’organisation introduit progressivement des primes au rendement selon le nombre de dossiers traités, et des sanctions en cas de non remplissage des objectifs ; des modalités informelles de stigmatisation touchent les agents qui accordent trop de statuts de réfugié ; le recrutement d’agents contractuels permet aux cadres de l’Ofpra d’orienter davantage leur façon de travailler. Il apparaît alors qu’agir sur le profil des recrutés et sur leurs conditions de travail est une manière de les « contrôler sans contrôle officiel ».

      L’approche socio-historique, faisant place à différents types de données tels les mémoires, le dépouillement d’archives, et les entretiens, a l’avantage de décrire finement les continuités et les ruptures macro, et de les faire résonner avec les expériences plus micro des agents dans un temps long. Aussi, l’auteure montre que leurs marges de manœuvre sont largement influencées par, d’un côté, les équilibres politiques internationaux, et de l’autre, par l’impact du new public management sur cette organisation.

      Le retour réflexif de l’auteure sur sa propre expérience au sein du HCR, où elle a travaillé entre 1999 et 2004, est aussi le gage d’une enquête où le sens accordé par les interlocuteurs à leurs pratiques est pris au sérieux, sans pour autant qu’elles fassent l’objet d’un jugement moral. Les dilemmes moraux qui parfois traversent les choix et les hésitations des enquêté.e.s éclairent le continuum qui existe entre l’adhésion et la résistance à l’institution. Mobiliser à la fois des extraits d’entretiens de « résistants » et d’« adhérents », restituer la puissance des coûts de la dissidence en termes de réputation auprès des collègues, faire de la place aux bruits de couloirs : voilà les ingrédients d’une enquête socio-historique se rapprochant de la démarche ethnographique.
      Pour en finir avec la dichotomie réfugié/migrant et la morale du vrai/faux

      Une des contributions essentielles de l’ouvrage consiste à déconstruire l’édifice moral de l’asile, jusqu’à faire émerger les paradoxes de l’argument qui consisterait à dire que protéger l’asile aujourd’hui implique de lutter contre les fraudeurs et de limiter l’attribution du statut aux plus méritants. Karen Akoka aborde au fond des enjeux politiques cruciaux pour notre société, en nous obligeant, si encore il en était besoin, à questionner la légitimité de distinctions (entre réfugié et migrant) qui ne sont pas sociologiquement fondées, mais qui servent en revanche des intérêts et des logiques politiques des plus dangereuses, que ce soit pour maquiller d’humanitarisme la volonté cynique de davantage sélectionner les candidats à l’immigration, ou pour affirmer des objectifs populistes et/ou xénophobes de réduction des entrées d’étrangers sur le territoire sous prétexte d’une prétendue trop grande diversité culturelle ou encore d’une faible rentabilité économique.

      Ce livre est une prise de position salutaire contre la rhétorique des « vrais et faux réfugiés », contre la posture de « autrefois c’était différent » (p. 27), et invite à arrêter de porter un regard moralisateur sur les mensonges éventuels des demandeurs : ces mensonges sont la conséquence du rétrécissement des cases de la protection, de la surenchère des horreurs exigées pour avoir une chance de l’obtenir, de la réduction des recours suspensifs à l’éloignement du territoire en cas de refus de l’Ofpra… La portée politique d’une sociohistoire critique des étiquetages est en ce sens évidente, et l’épilogue de Karen Akoka monte en généralité en mettant en perspective la dichotomie réfugié/migrant avec d’autres populations faisant l’objet de tri : le parallèle avec les pauvres et les guichetiers étudiés par Vincent Dubois (La vie au guichet. Relation administrative et traitement de la misère, Paris, Economica, 2003) permet de décloisonner le cas des étrangers pour montrer comment le système justifie la (non)protection des (in)désirables en la présentant comme nécessaire ou inévitable.

      https://www.icmigrations.cnrs.fr/2021/05/25/defacto-026-08

    • Karen Akoka : « Le statut de réfugié en dit plus sur ceux qui l’attribuent que sur ceux qu’il désigne »

      Alors que l’accueil d’exilés afghans divise les pays de l’Union européenne, l’interprétation par la France du droit d’asile n’a pas toujours été aussi restrictive qu’aujourd’hui, explique, dans un entretien au « Monde », la sociologue spécialiste des questions migratoires.

      (#paywall)

      https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2021/08/30/karen-akoka-le-statut-de-refugie-en-dit-plus-sur-ceux-qui-l-attribuent-que-s

  • North Korean ‘ghost ships’ are washing up on the shores of Japan. Why? - The Washington Post
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/north-koreanghost-ships-are-washing-up-on-the-shores-of-japan-why/2017/12/06/261e60ea-da89-11e7-8e5f-ccc94e22b133_story.html

    TOKYO — Three more empty boats were found along Japan’s west coast on Thursday, a day when the snow and the rain made sure the temperature never really rose above freezing. Two bodies reduced to skeletons were found near one, which was upturned on the shore near the city of Oga.

    Another boat, much bigger, was found not far away. And the third, bearing Korean writing, was caught in fishing nets near Sado Island, just off the west coast.

    The previous day, an equally freezing Wednesday, a rickety old wooden boat that also bore a sign in Korean was found bucking around in the rough seas. Discovered nearby: two bodies.

    Another body, mostly just bones, was found up the coast in Akita prefecture Tuesday. Before that, three bodies were recovered near a wooden boat — two of them wearing pins showing the face of Kim Il Sung, the “eternal president” of North Korea.

    Almost every day for the past month, grisly discoveries like these have been made all along Japan’s western coastline, across the sea from North Korea. One boat even had a slogan in Korean declaring: “September is a boat accident prevention month.”

    #boat_people #corée_du_nord #japon

  • Why the language we use to talk about refugees matters so much
    –-> cet article date de juin 2015... je le remets sur seenthis car je l’ai lu plus attentivement, et du coup, je mets en évidence certains passages (et mots-clé).

    In an interview with British news station ITV on Thursday, David Cameron told viewers that the French port of Calais was safe and secure, despite a “#swarm” of migrants trying to gain access to Britain. Rival politicians soon rushed to criticize the British prime minister’s language: Even Nigel Farage, leader of the anti-immigration UKIP party, jumped in to say he was not “seeking to use language like that” (though he has in the past).
    Cameron clearly chose his words poorly. As Lisa Doyle, head of advocacy for the Refugee Council puts it, the use of the word swarm was “dehumanizing” – migrants are not insects. It was also badly timed, coming as France deployed riot police to Calais after a Sudanese man became the ninth person in less than two months to die while trying to enter the Channel Tunnel, an underground train line that runs from France to Britain.

    The way we talk about migrants in turn influences the way we deal with them, with sometimes worrying consequences.

    When considering the 60 million or so people currently displaced from their home around the world, certain words rankle experts more than others. “It makes no more sense to call someone an ’illegal migrant’ than an ’illegal person,’” Human Rights Watch’s Bill Frelick wrote last year. The repeated use of the word “boat people” to describe people using boats to migrate over the Mediterranean or across South East Asian waters presents similar issues.
    “We don’t call middle-class Europeans who take regular holidays abroad ’#EasyJet_people,’ or the super-rich of Monaco ’#yacht_people,’” Daniel Trilling, editor of the New Humanist, told me.

    How people are labelled has important implications. Whether people should be called economic migrants or asylum seekers matters a great deal in the country they arrive in, where it could affect their legal status as they try to stay in the country. It also matters in the countries where these people originated from. Eritrea, for example, has repeatedly denied that the thousands of people leaving the country are leaving because of political pressure, instead insisting that they have headed abroad in search of higher wages. Other countries make similar arguments: In May, Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina said that the migrants leaving her country were “fortune-seekers” and “mentally sick.” The message behind such a message was clear: It’s their fault, not ours.

    There are worries that even “migrant,” perhaps the broadest and most neutral term we have, could become politicized.

    Those living in the migrant camps near #Calais, nicknamed “the #jungle,” seem to understand this well themselves. “It’s easier to leave us living like this if you say we are bad people, not human," Adil, a 24-year-old from Sudan, told the Guardian.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2015/07/30/why-the-language-we-use-to-talk-about-refugees-matters-so-much
    #langage #vocabulaire #terminologie #mots #réfugiés #asile #migrations #essaim #invasion #afflux #déshumanisation #insectes #expatriés #expats #illégal #migrant_illégal #boat_people #migrants_économiques

    cc @sinehebdo

    • The words we use matter—why we shouldn’t use the term ”illegal migrant”

      Words have consequences, especially in situations where strong emotions as well as social and political conflicts are endemic. Raj Bhopal’s rapid response in The BMJ, in which he objected to the use of the phrase “illegal migrant” on the grounds that only actions, not persons, can be deemed “illegal”, merits further reflection and dissection.

      Some people think that those who protest against this phrase are taking sides with migrants in conflict with the law, in a futile attempt to cover up what is going on. On the contrary: the very idea that a person can be illegal is incompatible with the rule of law, which is founded on the idea that everyone has the right to due process and is equal in the eyes of the law. Labelling a person as “illegal” insinuates that their very existence is unlawful. For this reason, bodies including the United Nations General Assembly, International Organization for Migration, Council of Europe, and European Commission have all deemed the phrase unacceptable, recommending instead the terms “irregular” or “undocumented”. It would be more than appropriate for the medical profession, given its social standing and influence, to do the same.

      While people cannot be illegal, actions can: but here too, words have to be chosen carefully. For example, the overwhelming majority of irregular migrants have not entered the country clandestinely; they have either had their asylum application turned down, or have “overstayed” a visa, or breached its conditions. Moreover, it is never correct to label someone’s actions “illegal” before the appropriate legal authority has determined that they are. Until then, the presumption of innocence should apply. Due process must have been followed, including the right to legal advice, representation, and appeal—rights that the UK government, especially where migrants are concerned, has been only too willing to sacrifice on the altar of cost-cutting.

      Even after an official determination that a person is residing unlawfully, we must have confidence in the fairness of the procedures followed before it is safe to assume that the decision was correct. This confidence has been badly shaken by the recent finding that almost half of the UK Home Office’s immigration decisions that go to appeal are overturned. In their zeal to implement the government’s policy of creating a “hostile environment” for people residing unlawfully, some Home Office officials appear to have forgotten that the rule of law still applies in Britain. People who had lived legally in the UK for decades have been suddenly branded as “illegally resident” and denied healthcare because they couldn’t provide four pieces of evidence for each year of residence since they arrived—even when some of the evidence had been destroyed by the Home Office itself. Hundreds of highly skilled migrants including doctors have been denied the right to remain in the UK because minor tax or income discrepancies were taken as evidence of their undesirability under the new Immigration Rules. A recent case in which the Home Office separated a 3-year-old girl from her only available parent, in contravention of its own policies, led to an award for damages of £50,000.

      What of the medical profession’s own involvement? The 2014 Immigration Act links a person’s healthcare entitlement to their residency status. Health professionals in the UK are now required to satisfy themselves that an individual is eligible for NHS care by virtue of being “ordinarily resident in the UK,” the definition of which has been narrowed. In practice, this has meant that people who do not fit certain stereotypes are more likely to be questioned—a potential route to an institutionally racist system. They can instantly be denied not only healthcare, but also the ability to work, hold a bank account or driver’s licence, or rent accommodation. It is unprecedented, and unacceptable, for UK health professionals to be conscripted as agents of state control in this way.

      Given the unrelenting vendetta of sections of the British press against people who may be residing unlawfully, it should also be borne in mind that such migrants cannot “sponge off the welfare state”, since there are virtually no benefits they can claim. They are routinely exposed to exploitation and abuse by employers, while “free choice” has often played a minimal role in creating their situation. (Consider, for example, migrants who lose their right of residence as a result of losing their job, or asylum seekers whose claim has been rejected but cannot return to their country because it is unsafe or refuses to accept them).

      To sum up: abolishing the dehumanising term “illegal migrant” is an important first step, but the responsibility of health professionals goes even further. In the UK they are obliged to collaborate in the implementation of current immigration policy. To be able to do this with a clear conscience, they need to know that rights to residence in the UK are administered justly and humanely. Regrettably, as can be seen from the above examples, this is not always the case.

      https://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2018/10/02/the-words-we-use-matter-why-we-shouldnt-use-the-term-illegal-migrant

  • #Boat_People, Then and Now. Making the #Calais Crossing

    On August 1, 1686, at eight in the morning, a small ship dropped anchor off the Dover shore. Among those who hobbled onto the beach was a 26-year-old Calvinist Frenchman from Calais, Isaac Minet. Minet had finally succeeded in leaving his native country alongside his 65-year-old mother, Susanne, his younger sister Elizabeth, and 15 other men, women, and children. In the Calais region, the accession of Louis XIV, that most Catholic of monarchs, to the French throne heralded an increase in state persecution of the Protestant minority.

    https://files.foreignaffairs.com/styles/large-alt/s3/images/articles/2015/09/07/morieux_boatpeople_calais.jpg?itok=5vr_5H2L
    https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/2015-09-07/boat-people-then-and-now?cid=nlc-twofa-20150910&sp_mid=49519877&sp_r
    #mer #réfugiés #asile #migrations

  • 20th Anniversary of the Arrival at #Bari, Italy of 15,000 Albanian Boat People

    Twenty years ago, on 8 August 1991, several ships carrying approximately 15,000 Albanian migrants succeeded in entering the port of Bari, Italy. The Italian government’s response was harsh. Most of the Albanians were detained in a sports stadium without adequate food, water, or access to bathrooms. Italian authorities dropped supplies to the detained migrants by helicopter. Within several weeks most of the migrants were deported to Albania. Their harsh treatment was criticised by human rights organisations and the Pope, but was justified by the Italian government as necessary to deter further irregular migration from Albania.


    http://migrantsatsea.org/2011/07/29/20th-anniversary-of-the-arrival-at-bari-italy-of-15000-albanian-boat-
    #Italie #histoire_de_la_migration #Albanie #Albanais #boat_people

  • En Asie et en Méditerranée, l’internationale des boat people - L’Obs
    http://tempsreel.nouvelobs.com/monde/20150601.OBS9926/en-asie-et-en-mediterranee-l-internationale-des-boat-people.htm

    MONDOVISION. La simultanéité des deux crises migratoires, en Méditerranée et en Asie du Sud-Est, montre que le phénomène est global et que les réseaux de passeurs sont de véritables multinationales.

    #migration #Asie #Méditerranée

    • #boat_people Je signale que le HCR m’avait consulté il y a quelques années pour assembler avec eux une carte mondiale des boat people. Ils ont finalement renoncé, mais ça vaudrait le coup de s’y remettre. Y compris dans une perspective historique (Vietnam/Cambodge dans les années 1970)

  • #Lampedusa : le camp et la #vidéo de la honte
    http://fr.myeurop.info/2013/12/18/lampedusa-le-camp-et-la-video-de-la-honte-12753

    Ariel Dumont

    Après la diffusion d’images choquantes sur les mauvais traitements infligés aux #migrants dans le centre de rétention de Lampedusa, le commissaire européen aux affaires intérieures menace de couper les aides à l’Italie.

    iLe message expédié ce mercredi au gouvernement d’unité nationale par la commissaire européenne aux affaires intérieures Cecilia Malmström est clair.&n lire la suite

    #Société #Europe #Italie #boat_people #immigration_illégale

  • No more asylum in Australia for those arriving by boat: Rudd

    Asylum seekers who arrive in Australian waters by boat will no longer have the chance to be settled in Australia under new policies announced by prime minister Kevin Rudd. Instead, asylum seekers arriving by boat will be held in an expanded facility at Papua New Guinea’s Manus Island and those who are…

    http://theconversation.com/no-more-asylum-in-australia-for-those-arriving-by-boat-rudd-16238

    #mer #migration #asile #réfugiés #bateau #Australie #Papoue_Nouvelle_Guinée #île_de_Manus