• 6-year-old refugee boy dies in blaze in #Thiva accommodation camp

    A 6-year-old boy died on Tuesday night when a fire broke out in a refugee camp on the town on Thiva, some 60 km north of Athens.

    The boy was reportedly leaving with his parents and 4 siblings in a container. Local media reported that the mother reportedly managed to bring another boy and three girls outside but not the boy. The father was not there at the time of the blaze. The family are asylum-seekers from Iran.

    The fire broke out around 9 o’ clock under unknown circumstances. Footage taken at the time of the fire shows a lot of residents to have gathered outside the building on fire.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mD28yBy7k8Q&feature=emb_logo

    According to local media radiothiva, and the Fire Service, it was the camp residents who pulled the dead body of the boy from the spot.

    The Fire Service said firefighters had to be accompanied by police to get into the camp after residents initially prevented them from entering.

    The refugees claimed that firefighters arrived with delay, reportedly threw stones and other items at the trucks, smashing the front window in one of them.

    Eight firemen with four fire engines were finally able to extinguish the blaze in a building in the camp.

    The Fire Service was reportedly not able to conduct inspection due to the angry crowd, a small police unit remains in the area.

    https://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2021/02/24/refugee-boy-dies-fire-camp-thiva

    #incendie #feu #réfugiés #camps_de_réfugiés #décès #mort #Grèce

    –-

    ajouté à la métaliste des incendies dans les camps de réfugiés, notamment en Grèce :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/851143

    • Grèce : incendie dans un camp au nord d’Athènes, un enfant de 6 ans décède

      Un enfant kurde de 6 ans est mort mardi soir dans l’incendie d’un camp de migrants situé à Thèbes, au nord d’Athènes. Les exilés accusent les autorités d’avoir trop tardé à intervenir, mettant plus d’une heure à rejoindre les lieux.

      Un incendie s’est déclaré dans la soirée de mardi 23 février dans un camp de migrants de Thèbes, au nord d’Athènes, provoquant la mort d’un enfant kurde de 6 ans, ont annoncé les pompiers grecs dans un communiqué. Lorsque ces derniers sont arrivés sur les lieux, l’enfant ne respirait déjà plus. Les causes de l’incendie sont pour l’heure inconnues.

      https://twitter.com/AntonisRepanas/status/1364324710901813251

      Selon des témoins cités par le site d’information kurde Pishti News, l’enfant se trouvait à l’intérieur du camp avec sa mère, son frère et ses trois sœurs quand le feu s’est déclenché. La mère aurait réussi à faire sortir quatre de ses enfants mais n’a pas pu sauver son autre fils. Toujours d’après le même média, le corps de l’enfant a été enlevé du bâtiment par les migrants eux-mêmes une heure après le drame.

      Les exilés accusent les pompiers d’avoir tardé à réagir, mettant plus d’une heure à rejoindre les lieux. Les autorités, elles, donnent une autre version. Elles racontent que la police a dû également intervenir car les migrants bloquaient l’accès à la structure qui avait pris feu, empêchant les pompiers de se rendre sur place.

      Les camps de migrants sont régulièrement touchés par des incendies, la plupart accidentels. Il y a trois jours, deux incendies ont détruit deux tentes sans faire de victime dans deux camps de migrants sur l’île de Lesbos.

      L’hiver, quand il fait froid sous les tentes des camps, de nombreux exilés font des feux de bois pour se réchauffer ou utilisent des poêles à l’intérieur de leur habitation précaire, ce qui provoque souvent des accidents.

      Des ONG de défense des droits de l’Homme ont tiré la sonnette d’alarme ces derniers jours sur la détérioration des conditions avec le froid dans les camps de migrants à travers le pays.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/30459/grece-incendie-dans-un-camp-au-nord-d-athenes-un-enfant-de-6-ans-deced

  • ‘Living in this constant nightmare of insecurity and uncertainty’

    DURING the first week of 2021, Katrin Glatz-Brubakk treated a refugee who had tried to drown himself.

    His arms, already covered with scars, were sliced open with fresh cuts.

    He told her: “I can’t live in this camp any more. I’m tired of being afraid all the time, I don’t want to live any more.”

    He is 11 years old. Glatz-Brubakk, a child psychologist at Doctors Without Borders’ (MSF) mental health clinic in Lesbos, tells me he is the third child she’s seen for suicidal thoughts and attempts so far this year.

    At the time we spoke, it was only two weeks into the new year.

    The boy is one of thousands of children living in the new Mavrovouni (also known as Kara Tepe) refugee camp on the Greek island, built after a fire destroyed the former Moria camp in September.

    MSF has warned of a mental health “emergency” among children at the site, where 7,100 refugees are enduring the coldest months of the year in flimsy tents without heating or running water.

    Situated by the coast on a former military firing range, the new site, dubbed Moria 2.0, is completely exposed to the elements with tents repeatedly collapsing and flooding.

    This week winds of up to 100km/h battered the camp and temperatures dropped to zero. Due to lockdown measures residents can only leave once a week, meaning there is no escape, not even temporarily, from life in the camp.
    Camp conditions causing children to break down, not their past traumas

    It is these appalling conditions which are causing children to break down to the point where some are even losing the will to live, Glatz-Brubakk tells me.

    While the 11-year-old boy she treated earlier this year had suffered traumas in his past, the psychologist says he was a resilient child and had been managing well for a long time.

    “But he has been there in Moria now for one year and three months and now he is acutely suicidal.”

    This is also the case for the majority of children who come to the clinic.

    “On our referral form, when children are referred to us we have a question: ‘When did this problem start?’ and approximately 90 per cent of cases it says when they came to Moria.”

    Glatz-Brubakk tells me she’s seen children who are severely depressed, have stopped talking and playing and others who are self-harming.

    Last year MSF noted 50 cases of suicidal thoughts and attempts among children on the island, the youngest of whom was an eight-year-old girl who tried to hang herself.

    It’s difficult to imagine children so young even thinking about taking their lives.

    But in the camp, where there are no activities, no school, where tents collapse in the night, and storms remind children of the war they fled from, more and more little ones are being driven into despair.

    “It is living in this constant nightmare of insecurity and uncertainty that is causing children to break down,” Glatz-Brubakk says.

    “They don’t think it’s going to get better. ‘I haven’t slept for too long, I’ve been worrying every minute of every day for the last year or two’ — when you get to that point of exhaustion, falling asleep and never waking up again is more tempting than being alive.”

    Children play in the mud in the Moria 2 camp [Pic: Mare Liberum]

    Mental health crisis worsening

    While there has always been a mental health crisis on the island, Glatz-Brubakk says the problem has worsened since the fire reduced Moria to ashes five months ago.

    The blaze “retraumatised” many of the children and triggered a spike in mental health emergencies in the clinic.

    But the main difference, she notes, is that many people have now lost any remnant of hope they may have been clinging to.

    Following the fire, the European Union pledged there would be “no more Morias,” and many refugees believed they would finally be moved off the island.

    But it quickly transpired that this was not going to be the case.

    While a total of 5,000 people, including all the unaccompanied minors, have been transferred from Lesbos — according to the Greek government — more than 7,000 remain in Moria 2.0, where conditions have been described as worse than the previous camp.

    “They’ve lost hope that they will ever be treated with dignity, that they will ever have their human rights, that they will be able to have a normal life,” Glatz-Brubakk says.

    “Living in a mud hole as they are now takes away all your feeling of being human, really.”

    Yasser, an 18-year-old refugee from Afghanistan and Moria 2.0 resident, tells me he’s also seen the heavy toll on adults’ mental health.

    “In this camp they are not the same people as they were in the previous camp,” he says. “They changed. They have a different feeling when you look in their eyes.”

    [Pic: Mare Liberum]

    No improvements to Moria 2.0

    The feelings of abandonment, uncertainty and despair have also been exacerbated by failures to make improvements to the camp, which is run by the Greek government.

    It’s been five months since the new camp was built yet there is still no running water or mains electricity.

    Instead bottled water is trucked in and generators provide energy for around 12 hours a day.

    Residents and grassroots NGOs have taken it upon themselves to dig trenches to mitigate the risk of flooding, and shore up their tents to protect them from collapse. But parts of the camp still flood.

    “When it rains even for one or two hours it comes like a lake,” says Yasser, who lives in a tent with his four younger siblings and parents.

    Humidity inside the tents also leaves clothes and blankets perpetually damp with no opportunity to get them dry again.

    Despite temperatures dropping to zero this week, residents of the camp still have no form of heating, except blankets and sleeping bags.

    The camp management have not only been unforgivably slow to improve the camp, but have also frustrated NGOs’ attempts to make changes.

    Sonia Nandzik, co-founder of ReFOCUS Media Labs, an organisation which teaches asylum-seekers to become citizen journalists, tells me that plans by NGOs to provide low-energy heated blankets for residents back in December were rejected.

    Camp management decided small heaters would be a better option. “But they are still not there,” Nandzik tells me.

    “Now they are afraid that the power fuses will not take it and there will be a fire. So there is very little planning, this is a big problem,” she says.

    UNHCR says it has purchased 950 heaters, which will be distributed once the electricity network at the site has been upgraded. But this all feels too little, too late.

    Other initiatives suggested by NGOs like building tents for activities and schools have also been rejected.

    The Greek government, which officially runs the camp, has repeatedly insisted that conditions there are far better than Moria.

    Just this week Greek migration ministry secretary Manos Logothetis claimed that “no-one is in danger from the weather in the temporary camp.”

    While the government claims the site is temporary, which may explain why it has little will to improve it, the 7,100 people stuck there — of whom 33 per cent are children — have no idea how long they will be kept in Moria 2.0 and must suffer the failures and delays of ministers in the meantime.

    “I would say it’s becoming normal,” Yasser says, when asked if he expected to be in the “temporary” camp five months after the fire.

    “I know that it’s not good to feel these situations as normal but for me it’s just getting normal because it’s something I see every day.”

    Yasser is one of Nandzik’s citizen journalism students. Over the past few months, she says she’s seen the mental health of her students who live in the camp worsen.

    “They are starting to get more and more depressed, that sometimes they do not show up for classes for several days,” she says, referring to the ReFOCUS’s media skills lessons which now take place online.

    One of her students recently stopped eating and sleeping because of depression.

    Nandzik took him to an NGO providing psychosocial support, but they had to reject his case.

    With only a few mental health actors on the island, most only have capacity to take the most extreme cases, she says.

    “So we managed to find a psychologist for him that speaks Farsi but in LA because we were seriously worried about him that if we didn’t act now it is going to go to those more severe cases.”

    [Pic: Mare Liberum]

    No escape or respite

    What makes matters far worse is that asylum-seekers have no escape or respite from the camp. Residents can only leave the camp for a period of four hours once per week, and only for a limited number of reasons.

    A heavy police presence enforces the strict lockdown, supposedly implemented to stop the spread of Covid-19.

    While the officers have significantly reduced the horrific violence that often broke out in Moria camp, their presence adds to the feeling of imprisonment for residents.

    “The Moria was a hell but since people have moved into this new camp, the control of the place has increased so if you have a walk, it feels like I have entered a prison,” Nazanin Furoghi, a 27-year-old Afghan refugee, tells me.

    “It wouldn’t be exaggerating if I say that I feel I am walking in a dead area. There is no joy, no hope — at least for me it is like this. Even if before I enter the camp I am happy, after I am feeling so sad.”

    Furoghi was moved out of the former Moria camp with her family to a flat in the nearby town of Mytilene earlier last year. She now works in the new camp as a cultural mediator.

    Furoghi explains to me that when she was living in Moria, she would go out with friends, attend classes and teach at a school for refugee children at a nearby community centre from morning until the evening.

    Families would often bring food to the olive groves outside the camp and have picnics.

    Those rare moments can make all the difference, they can make you feel human.

    “But people here, they don’t have any kind of activities inside the camp,” she explains.“There is not any free environment around the camp, it’s just the sea and the beach and it’s very windy and it’s not even possible to have a simple walk.”

    Parents she speaks to tell her that their children have become increasingly aggressive and depressed. With little else to do and no safe place to play, kids have taken to chasing cars and trucks through the camp.

    Their dangerous new game is testament to children’s resilience, their ability to play against all odds. But Nazanin finds the sight incredibly sad.

    “This is not the way children should have to play or have fun,” she says, adding that the unhygienic conditions in the camp also mean the kids often catch skin diseases.

    The mud also has other hidden dangers. Following tests, the government confirmed last month that there are dangerous levels of lead contamination in the soil, due to residue from bullets from when the site was used as a shooting range. Children and pregnant women are the most at risk from the negative impacts of lead exposure.

    [Pic: Mare Liberum]

    The cruelty of containment

    Asylum-seekers living in camps on the Aegean islands have been put under varying degrees of lockdown since the outbreak in March.

    Recent research has shown the devastating impact of these restrictions on mental health. A report by the International Rescue Committee, published in December, found that self-harm among people living in camps on Chios, Lesbos and Samos increased by 66 per cent following restrictions in March.

    One in three were also said to have contemplated suicide. The deteriorating mental health crisis on the islands is also rooted in the EU and Greek government’s failed “hot-spot” policies, the report found.

    Asylum-seekers who arrive on the Aegean islands face months if not years waiting for their cases to be processed.

    Passing this time in squalid conditions wears down people’s hopes, leading to despair and the development of psychiatric problems.

    “Most people entered the camp as a healthy person, but after a year-and-a-half people have turned into a patient with lots of mental health problems and suicidal attempts,” Foroghi says.

    “So people have come here getting one thing, but they have lost many things.”

    [Pic: Mare Liberum]

    Long-term impacts

    Traumatised children are not only unable to heal in such conditions, but are also unable to develop the key skills they need in adult life, Glatz-Brubakk says.

    This is because living in a state of constant fear and uncertainty puts a child’s brain into “alert mode.”

    “If they stay long enough in this alert mode their development of the normal functions of the brain like planning, structure, regulating feeling, going into healthy relationships will be impaired — and the more trauma and the longer they are in these unsafe conditions, the bigger the impact,” she says.

    Yasser tells me if he could speak to the Prime Minister of Greece, his message would be a warning of the scars the camp has inflicted on them.

    “You can keep them in the camp and be happy on moving them out but the things that won’t change are what happened to them,” he says.

    “What will become their personality, especially children, who got impacted by the camp so much? What doesn’t change is what I felt, what I experienced there.”

    Glatz-Brubakk estimates that the majority of the 2,300 children in the camp need professional mental health support.

    But MSF can only treat 300 patients a year. And even with support, living in conditions that create ongoing trauma means they cannot start healing.

    [Pic: Mare Liberum]

    Calls to evacuate the camps

    This is why human rights groups and NGOs have stressed that the immediate evacuation of the island is the only solution. In a letter to the Greek ombudsman this week, Legal Centre Lesvos argues that the conditions at the temporary site “reach the level of inhuman and degrading treatment,” and amount to “an attack on “vulnerable’ migrants’ non-derogable right to life.”

    Oxfam and the Greek Council for Refugees have called for the European Union to share responsibility for refugees and take in individuals stranded on the islands.

    But there seems to be little will on behalf of the Greek government or the EU to transfer people out of the camp, which ministers claimed would only be in use up until Easter.

    For now at least it seems those with the power to implement change are happy to continue with the failed hot-spot policy despite the devastating impact on asylum-seekers.

    “At days I truly despair because I see the suffering of the kids, and when you once held hands with an eight, nine, 10-year-old child who doesn’t want to live you never forget that,” Glatz-Brubakk tells me.

    “And it’s a choice to keep children in these horrible conditions and that makes it a lot worse than working in a place hit by a natural catastrophe or things you can’t control. It’s painful to see that the children are paying the consequences of that political choice.”

    #Greece #Kara_Tepe #Mavrovouni #Moria #mental_health #children #suicide #trauma #camp #refugee #MSF

    https://thecivilfleet.wordpress.com/2021/02/21/living-in-this-constant-nightmare-of-insecurity-and-uncerta

  • KACHACH, AU-DESSUS DE #ZAATARI

    Dans le camp de réfugiés de Zaatari, l’exil n’en finit plus de durer. Parmi les réfugiés, une communauté s’est reformée : les #Kachach, les éleveurs d’#oiseaux culturellement méprisés, font revivre une tradition millénaire délaissée , dans ce camp planté au milieu du désert et que nul n’est censé quitter. Et leurs oiseaux ramènent une part de #rêve qui éclaire cette longue #attente.

    https://vimeo.com/297919049


    #film #film_documentaire #camps_de_réfugiés #réfugiés #asile #migrations

  • Mental health ’emergency’ among child refugees in Greece
    Katy Fallon

    Concerns mount for children who have witnessed violence, a devastating camp fire, and other horrors in Greece.

    Names marked with an asterisk* have been changed to protect identities.

    Lesbos, Greece – Laleh*, an eight-year-old Afghan girl, is one of the thousands of children who live in the new, temporary camp on Lesbos, which was established in the wake of a devastating fire that destroyed the notorious Moria camp last September.

    She is among several children who are currently being treated at a mental health clinic on Lesbos, which is run by Doctors Without Borders (Medecins Sans Frontieres, or MSF), an organisation which has warned of a mental health “emergency” in the Greek island camps.

    Last year in Moria, a camp known for its poor living conditions, Laleh witnessed a violent fight as she was waiting in a queue for food with her father.

    Her mother Hawa*, 29, said that afterwards, Laleh started having panic attacks and became increasingly withdrawn and uncommunicative.

    The child was since hospitalised because she stopped eating. These days, she finds most activities challenging.

    The family now resides in the new camp in Mavrovouni, a dusty patch of earth where everyone lives in tents. The site is strictly monitored and most residents are only allowed to leave once a week.

    “During the day, she just lies down and closes her eyes,” said Hawa.

    A drawing by a child in Lesbos of the perilous sea journey to Europe undertaken by many migrants and refugees [Courtesy: MSF]

    At night, Laleh wears a nappy because she does not always say if she needs to go to the toilet.

    Something as simple as climbing steps can be difficult and feel overwhelming for her.

    “Before she was always drawing and painting,” Hawa said. “She was very hopeful, she wanted to be a doctor in the future.

    “It’s really hard for me as a mother. Laleh never had this problem before. When it started I was so worried and sad, I didn’t know how to manage,” she said. “She doesn’t really speak, she’s very quiet.”

    The fire which reduced Moria to ashes traumatised the family further.

    “Laleh had a psychogenic [non-epileptic] seizure and she fell down, everyone was shouting and running, it was a very difficult time.”

    A drawing by a child in Lesbos depicting the fire which raced through the Moira refugee camp in September [Courtesy: MSF]

    Laleh has had trouble sleeping and so Hawa lies with her and tells her stories, massaging her head in the hope it will soothe her.

    The family has seen some improvement in Laleh’s condition since she started attending MSF’s clinic, but she is still very withdrawn.

    Hawa said the securitised nature of the camp also has an effect on the children who live there.

    It is yet unclear whether the camp is being policed because of the pandemic and fears that the refugees may contract or spread the coronavirus, or as part of an increasingly securitised approach towards camps on the Greek islands.

    “Most of the children are afraid of the police because there are so many police around, it’s very difficult to go out of the camp and the children believe it’s a prison and that they can’t get out,” she said.

    Hawa herself said she views the camp as a “prison”, adding: “I hope that we leave this camp, this is my only hope for now.”

    Refugees and migrants wait to be transferred to camps on the mainland after their arrival on a passenger ferry from the island of Lesbos at the port of Lavrio, Greece, in September 2020 [File: Costas Baltas/Reuters]

    In 2020, child psychologists at MSF noted 50 cases of children with suicidal ideation and suicide attempts.

    “I never imagined it would be this bad,” said Katrin Glatz-Brubakk, a mental health supervisor for MSF on Lesbos.

    She told Al Jazeera they have seen children with severe depression, suicidal thoughts and that many have stopped playing.

    “As a child psychologist, I get very worried when children don’t play at all and we see a lot of that in the camp,” Glatz-Brubakk said.

    “Many of the children have experienced trauma but if they were moved to a [place with] safe and good [conditions] they would start healing from it. Now they get sicker and sicker because of the conditions they live in.

    “We are basically giving them skills to deal with a situation they should never be living in in the first place, it’s not treatment: it’s survival.”

    #Greece #mental_health #trauma #suicide #children #camps #Lesbos #MSF

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2021/2/11/children-dont-play-at-all-mental-health-crisis-stalks-lesbos

  • Over 1,300 IDPs and refugees arrived in Kurdistan Region in January 2021- KUrdistan 24

    “The displacement process is continuing to Kurdistan Region. On January 2021 nearly 1,307 IDPs and Refugees arrived in the Kurdistan Region,” the JCC said.

    According to the JCC report the return to the region’s displacement camps is due to poor living conditions, lack of job opportunities and lack of services, instability, and security in their places of origin.

    Iraq’s economy, including that of the Kurdistan Region, has further suffered from an economic crisis due to the coronavirus pandemic and the resulting drop in oil prices.

    https://www.kurdistan24.net/en/story/23943-Over-1,300-IDPs-and-refugees-arrived-in-Kurdistan-Region-in-Janua

    #Covid-19#Irak#camp#guerre#Santé#réfugiés#déplacés#migration#KRG

  • IDPs return to camps in Iraq, Kurdistan Region | Rudaw.net

    Internally displaced people (IDPs) from across Iraq are returning to camps in Iraq and the Kurdistan Region amid a lack of services and security in their areas of origin.
    “We don’t live a good life. We are a family of seven and we can’t buy things. We don’t have a house and we can’t afford to rent. The security situation is not good. Even healthcare is not good, and coronavirus has spread. But the situation is better in the camp,”

    https://www.rudaw.net/english/kurdistan/15022021

    #Covid-19#Irak#camp#guerre#Santé#réfugiés#déplacés#migration#KRG

  • Les pénuries de médicaments s’aggravent au Liban
    https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2021/02/13/les-penuries-de-medicaments-s-aggravent-au-liban_6069844_3210.html

    Aller d’une pharmacie à une autre, s’entendre dire qu’antibiotiques ou sérums médicaux sont indisponibles, poursuivre avec opiniâtreté et inquiétude : Habib Battah passe souvent des journées entières avant de trouver les remèdes pour son père en fin de vie, soigné à domicile faute de place dans les hôpitaux, saturés par les malades du Covid-19. Au Liban, avec l’aggravation de la crise financière, les pénuries chroniques de médicaments se multiplient. « C’est comme chercher une aiguille dans une botte de foin. C’est très angoissant, très chronophage aussi. Mais je n’ai pas d’alternative. On est contraints de s’adapter », dit le jeune quadragénaire, journaliste indépendant et fondateur du site Beirut Report.
    Dans une pharmacie située dans la banlieue est de Beyrouth, une cliente est invitée à revenir une semaine plus tard pour son médicament. « Ne pas pouvoir répondre aux besoins détruit la relation de confiance, se désole Joanna Francis, la pharmacienne. Que peut-on répondre à un parent qui demande “comment vais-je nourrir mon bébé ?”, parce qu’il n’y a pas de lait infantile disponible ? » Sur les étagères, seules quelques rares boîtes de lait sont disposées.
    Se procurer des médicaments, dont plus de 80 % sont importés, est devenu un casse-tête pour de nombreux Libanais. Même le sacro-saint Panadol, un antidouleur très utilisé, est difficile à trouver. Apparues à l’automne 2020, un an après l’éclatement de la crise financière, les pénuries s’aggravent. Face à l’effondrement des réserves en devises de la Banque centrale, ses subventions sur les produits de première nécessité comme les médicaments sont menacées à court terme. Les quantités distribuées aux pharmacies sont rationnées. Un marché noir s’est mis en place. Un cercle vicieux s’est en outre installé. Des fournisseurs ou des pharmacies sont accusés de cacher leurs stocks dans l’optique de réaliser de juteuses marges une fois les subventions levées. Des clients paniqués ont acheté en quantité, accentuant la pression sur le secteur pharmaceutique. Un trafic de contrebande s’est instauré, dont l’échelle est inconnue. « Mais le problème principal est d’ordre financier », assure une source au ministère de la santé.
    Cherchant à anticiper le scénario noir d’une fin ou d’une révision des subventions sans amortisseur, qui frapperait les plus pauvres, un comité a planché sur une rationalisation du système. Mais ses recommandations sont dans les tiroirs du Parlement. « Si les subventions prennent fin brutalement, ce sera un désastre », prédit le docteur Firas Abiad, qui dirige l’hôpital public Rafic-Hariri, à Beyrouth. Bien que celui-ci reçoive des donations internationales, notamment pour la lutte contre le Covid-19 – qui a fait plus de 3 800 morts dans le pays –, il est confronté aux pénuries intermittentes : « Quand un manque apparaît, on le colmate, puis un autre surgit. Il est très difficile de prévoir les pénuries. » Pour poursuivre leur traitement, des Libanais s’appuient sur la solidarité, leurs relations ou les réseaux sociaux. Shaden Fakih, jeune comédienne de stand-up, a ainsi rendu publiques ses difficultés d’approvisionnement sur son compte Instagram. Cela, et des boîtes rapportées d’Europe par un ami, lui a permis de sécuriser pour un temps les médicaments dont elle a besoin, souffrant d’une maladie auto-immune ainsi que de troubles obsessionnels compulsifs. « Trouver les anticoagulants est une priorité absolue. Mais je sais ce que signifie une crise d’angoisse, et j’ai besoin de l’autre médicament aussi. Je me sens toutefois privilégiée, j’appartiens à la classe moyenne, et je suis entourée. »
    D’autres se tournent vers le secteur associatif, qui doit répondre à des besoins grandissants : la société se paupérise à toute vitesse. « Le nombre de nos bénéficiaires a doublé, dit Malak Khiami, pharmacienne à l’ONG Amel, dédiée à la santé. Parmi eux, certains viennent dans nos centres faute de trouver des médicaments ailleurs. Nous avons sécurisé des stocks jusqu’à l’été, en mettant l’accent sur les maladies chroniques et la pédiatrie. Et nous sommes très attentifs à ce que nous prescrivons. »
    Le docteur Jamal Al-Husseini (à gauche) tend une ordonnance à son assistant dans sa clinique, dans le camp de Chatila, Beyrouth, le 9 février 2021.En périphérie de Beyrouth, dans le camp de Chatila, lieu historique des réfugiés palestiniens, où les Syriens sont devenus les plus nombreux, les visages sont fatigués. Pour ceux qui sont aux marges de la société, la crise économique est un rouleau compresseur. Imane, Syrienne, a compté : il ne reste plus que quelques comprimés du traitement de son fils épileptique de 13 ans. « Après, je n’ose imaginer ce qui se passera, dit-elle. Pourvu qu’un médecin puisse trouver un substitut ! » Elle aussi fait le tour des pharmacies, y compris loin du camp aux ruelles étroites.
    Article réservé à nos abonnés Lire aussi Le Liban précipité dans l’abîme
    Des médicaments venus de Syrie, moins coûteux, y sont devenus plus nombreux. Ils parviennent au Liban hors du circuit officiel. « Si leur nombre augmente, et pas seulement dans les camps, c’est faute d’alternative », déplore le docteur palestinien Jamal Al-Husseini, en plaçant sous oxygène un malade du coronavirus. Ces bouteilles proviennent de dons de la diaspora palestinienne. « Jusqu’à présent, on arrive encore à soigner les gens. Mais cela va devenir de plus en plus difficile », redoute-t-il.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#liban#syrie#refugie#camp#chatila#palestien#sante#crise#medicament#circulationthérapeutique#diaspora

  • Office of Displaced Designers

    Office of Displaced Designers (ODD) is a design focused creative integration organisation. We use design to bring diverse people together from the displaced and host community to share skills, undertake research and co-create a more equitable and inclusive society. Our activities focus on the built environment, protection issues and cultural understanding.

    http://www.displaceddesigners.org
    #Lesbos #camps_de_réfugiés #solidarité #humanitarian_design #réfugiés #Grèce #asile #migrations #inclusion #architecture

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Ethiopia announces the shut down of UNHCR run #Hitsats & #Shimelba refugee camps. It cites as pretext, the camps’ proximity to Eritrea causing a safety risk. Satellite imagery revealed the camps, which sheltered ~25k Eritreans, were razed to the ground throughout January.

    https://twitter.com/ZekuZelalem/status/1359117586978508802

    #Ethiopie #réfugiés_érythréens #fermeture #camps #camps_de_réfugiés #réfugiés #asile #migrations #destruction

    ping @karine4 @isskein

    –—

    Sur le destruction des camps de réfugiés de Hitsas et Shimelba (nouvelle d’il y a 1 mois) :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/893937

    Et sur les annonces de fermeture des camps en avril 2020 par cause de covid :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/847443

  • Covid-19: Virus ’spiralling out of control’ in Syria’s Idlib, warns charity | Middle East Eye

    Covid-19 is “spiralling out of control” in Syria as hospitals in the country’s northwest run out of oxygen and beds for critically ill patients, a charity has warned.
    Since the pandemic began, Syria has recorded at least 40,000 coronavirus cases, with more than half of reported cases in the country’s northwest, the last major stronghold for armed opposition to the government.

    The pandemic has been compounded further in Idlib, with limited hospitals and medical facilities either damaged or destroyed by Syrian government bombardment.
    Amjad Yamin, from Save the Children’s Syria Response team, said he believed the overcrowded camps and lack of access to water had allowed the virus to spread faster in northwest Syria in comparison to other parts of the country.

    “The reason why the numbers are increasing is because there is no way of containing it in northwest Syria,” Yamin told Middle East Eye.
    “And when you live under 10 years of conflict, people are more worried about the ongoing fighting than the virus and say that they need to escape the fighting.”

    #Covid-19#Syrie#Pandémie#Santé#camp#Idlib#migrant#guerre#réfugiés#migration

    https://www.middleeasteye.net/news/coronavirus-idlib-spiralling-out-control-warns-charity

  • À #Calais, l’absurde #confiscation des #tentes des migrants

    À Calais, l’#expulsion tous les deux jours des terrains occupés par les exilés se double d’une confiscation de leurs #effets_personnels. Tentes, duvets, documents... sont, en théorie, stockés et peuvent être récupérés. Dans les faits, huit à dix tonnes d’affaires finissent chaque mois à la poubelle.

    Calais (Pas-de-Calais), reportage

    9 heures du matin, par 2 °C. Janvier à Calais. En bord d’un terrain à l’est de la ville, Matin [1] et ses amis frissonnent, le visage enfoncé jusqu’au nez dans leur col, les poings roulés dans les manches étirées. Ils sont jeunes, certains mineurs, originaires de plusieurs provinces afghanes, et viennent de se faire expulser du terrain de sable et de boue qu’ils occupent en bordure d’une voie ferrée. Ils ont une question, qu’ils répètent en boucle aux journalistes : « Why ? » — pourquoi ? Car ces opérations, menées toutes les 48 heures dans sept endroits différents de la ville, sont suivies de peu d’effets, tant en termes de mise à l’abri que d’accompagnement social, notamment en ce qui concerne les mineurs isolés. Il faut juste, à intervalles réguliers, faire le vide sur place — « éviter les points de fixation », dit l’État. « Tout est rendu difficile », peste Matin, regard dans ses pieds. « Ils arrivent, nous disent simplement go ! go ! Et on n’a pas intérêt à rester discuter. »

    Pour éviter les installations de #campements, plusieurs leviers existent. La mairie de Calais a ainsi lancé une série de #déboisements le long des routes et dans les zones de promenade, où les exilés ont l’habitude de camper. Autre moyen de pression : l’expulsion régulière des terrains occupés, avec saisie des effets personnels laissés sur place. En 2020, Human Rights Observers (HRO) a comptabilisé 967 d’expulsions.

    Les jeunes sont remontés : ce matin, l’opération s’est déroulée sans interprète. Impossible de palabrer avec les forces de l’ordre pour réclamer l’essentiel, impossible de passer le cordon des gendarmes pour aller récupérer leurs affaires. Tentes, couchages... autant d’équipements pourtant capitaux en hiver. De toute façon, tout ce qu’ils n’auront pas pu traîner en vitesse dans la bâche à leurs pieds sera soit jeté, soit emporté. [2] Il leur faut donc vider les lieux, puis négocier, réclamer leurs biens. Une routine à laquelle se plient, de mauvais gré, migrants et associations qui les accompagnent. Après le passage des uniformes, des silhouettes en veste bleue s’activent : ce sont les nettoyeurs d’#APC, société privée sous contrat, qui récupère les objets susceptibles de faire l’objet d’une réclamation. Le convoi se termine immanquablement par un camion chargé de tentes, duvets, tapis de sol, vêtements, téléphones, documents ou argent.

    528 tentes et #bâches ont été prises rien que sur le mois de décembre 2020

    Destination poubelle ? Jusqu’à récemment — janvier 2018 — c’était encore le cas. En colère, les associations avaient même porté une plainte [3], classée sans suite. Depuis, l’État a mis en place un processus spécifique à Calais. Outre les nettoyeurs d’APC, un acteur de l’économie solidaire a été sollicité pour récupérer et mettre à disposition les affaires emportées. Elle aussi située dans l’est de la ville, la #Ressourcerie_du-Calaisis, gérée par #Face_Valo, une association d’insertion, fait office de #dépôt depuis trois ans. Un accord non lucratif, comme le précise un encadrant technique du magasin qui souhaite rester anonyme : « Nous sommes simplement défrayés à la quantité d’objets qui passe par le stockage ici, au poids. Nous tenons des registres. »

    Les quantités en question : plusieurs tonnes par mois, dont des centaines de tentes, cruciales en hiver. Selon Human Rights Observers, qui documente l’action des pouvoirs publics à Calais, 528 tentes et bâches ont été prises rien que sur le mois de décembre 2020.

    « On court toujours après ! Tout ce que l’on retire d’ici est soit abîmé, soit trempé »

    C’est à la ressourcerie que les jeunes Afghans se regroupent en fin de matinée, comme toutes les 48 heures. Leur terrain est à proximité. Ils sont les seuls à être venus attendre en petit groupe l’arrivée du convoi du jour. « Ceux des autres camps plus éloignés, comme #Fort-Nieulay par exemple, ne viennent presque jamais, malgré le fait que nous les informions du dispositif lors de nos maraudes », déplore Pénélope, coordinatrice pour HRO. Le manque de temps peut expliquer ce désintérêt : l’accord prévoit un accès aux affaires deux heures durant, tous les jours ouvrés, de 10 h à midi. Des horaires qui coïncident avec la fin des expulsions matinales d’une part, et les distributions de nourriture et d’eau de l’association la Vie Active de l’autre. « Il faut donc faire un choix entre sauter un repas ou perdre sa tente », selon Pénélope.

    Le taux de casse et de pertes explique aussi le peu d’intérêt des migrants pour ce système. Le jour de notre reportage, le camion d’APC, arrivé non à 10 h mais à 11 h 20, a déchargé des tentes disloquées, brisées, alourdies de matériel. Pour certaines, elles ont déjà fait ce voyage quatre ou cinq fois. Une tutelle supplémentaire : ce sont les bénévoles de #HRO, et non les migrants, qui doivent remettre la liste des objets réclamés, suivant ce qu’ils ont pu observer. C’est Isabella qui en était chargée ce matin-là. Problème : comme les journalistes, HRO est maintenu en dehors des cordons de police, et ne peut donc pas correctement observer ce qui a été pris — en plus de noter les atteintes aux droits humains. « On fait le décompte comme on peut, selon ce que nous rapportent les expulsés, et on compare avec ce qui est déchargé », dit-elle à Reporterre, appuyée sur la porte du camion d’APC pour annoter son tableau. Les nettoyeurs, eux, font des va-et-vient dans le conteneur.

    Charge aux migrants, autorisés à entrer en groupe de trois dans l’édicule en tôle blanche, de faire le tri. « On n’a pas l’impression que ces affaires sont à nous, on court toujours après ! Tout ce que l’on retire d’ici est soit abîmé, soit trempé », soupirait Hamar [4], sorti en trombe — midi sonnait — avec une tente sur le dos, le masque sur le nez et des gants en plastique empruntés. Vu le gel nocturne, récupérer des affaires sèches est un enjeu de survie. Matin, lui, était à la recherche de son téléphone : un coup d’œil dans le containeur lui a été accordé, juste avant la fermeture. Peine perdue.

    « Neuf fois sur dix, aller réclamer un papier perdu en ressourcerie se solde par un échec »

    Avec ses moyens, HRO travaille à comptabiliser le différentiel affaires prises / affaires restituées en état. « Pour le moment, nous n’avons à disposition que des chiffres concernant une minorité des cas : les personnes qui se sont présentées à la ressourcerie », explique Pénélope. Des chiffres évocateurs : sur l’année écoulée, 52 % des personnes venues réclamer leurs affaires ont déclaré à HRO les avoir récupérées en état satisfaisant et en totalité. Un taux qui s’effondre à un inquiétant 27 % quand il s’agit d’objets de valeur : médicaments, smartphones, argent liquide et documents. « On est proche de mettre en place un stockage bien plus adapté », répond l’encadrant de la ressourcerie. Le magasin plancherait sur un local où les biens seraient présentés catégorisés, à l’abri des intempéries. Quant aux objets de valeur au taux de perte si importants, les documents notamment, « quand ils sont retrouvés, nous avons déjà pour consigne stricte de les réserver à part et de les mettre à disposition ».

    Margot Sifre, juriste de la Cabane juridique, une structure d’accompagnement des migrants, recueille les doléances de ceux qui ont perdu un papier : « Neuf fois sur dix, aller réclamer un papier perdu en ressourcerie se solde par un échec. Au lieu de compter dessus, les déclarations de perte et demandes de récépissés se systématisent, simplement pour ne pas être en défaut trop longtemps face aux autorités. »

    Contrairement à ce qui est encore en pratique dans la commune de Grande-Synthe, où les affaires enlevées finissent directement à la benne, le dispositif calaisien a le mérite de poser, sur le papier, la question de la propriété de ces biens. Dans les faits, les affaires restent très majoritairement jetées et le conteneur vidé environ tous les dix jours. Selon le magasin, ce sont huit à dix tonnes d’affaires non réclamées qui finissent chaque mois emportées par les camions-poubelles. Direction un site d’enfouissement, à trente kilomètres à vol d’oiseau.

    https://reporterre.net/A-Calais-l-absurde-confiscation-des-tentes-des-migrants
    #migrations #asile #réfugiés #harcèlement #frontières

    ping @karine4 @isskein

    • La France une « démocratie défaillante » : la faute au covid, mais pas seulement
      https://www.franceinter.fr/emissions/geopolitique/geopolitique-04-fevrier-2021

      Les conclusions sont de deux ordres :

      1. d’abord que les citoyens devront faire preuve de vigilance pour retrouver tous leurs droits et toutes leurs libertés une fois la pandémie surmontée. Cela n’est pas gagné partout.
      2. Mais surtout, tout ceci montre à quel point la démocratie reste un acquis fragile, l’après-élections américaines l’a montré ; mais aussi le fait que plusieurs pays ont régressé ; et qu’il n’y a que 8,4% de la population mondiale dans la catégorie « démocratie à part entière ». C’est peu, c’est inquiétant.

    • Le nouveau bras d’honneur du Conseil constitutionnel à l’Etat de droit
      https://blogs.mediapart.fr/paul-cassia/blog/050221/le-nouveau-bras-d-honneur-du-conseil-constitutionnel-l-etat-de-droit

      La prolongation automatique des détentions provisoires organisée par le gouvernement lors du premier état d’urgence sanitaire était inconstitutionnelle. Dix mois plus tard, par une décision du 29 janvier 2021, le Conseil constitutionnel a neutralisé les effets de cette inconstitutionnalité...

      ... Il y a donc eu, durant le premier état d’urgence sanitaire, non seulement 67 millions de personnes assignées à domicile 23h/24 pendant 55 jours d’affilée sous peine de 135 euros d’amende voire d’un emprisonnement en cas de triple récidive dans le mois, mais encore un nombre indéterminé d’individus présumés innocents placés en détention provisoire et qui auront fait l’objet, sur la base d’un acte pris par le Conseil des ministres, d’une détention arbitraire après que cette détention provisoire aura été automatiquement prolongée.

      Dix mois plus tard, le 2 février 2021, le président de la République française n’a pas hésité à faire la leçon à son homologue russe à propos de la condamnation (par une juridiction !) à près de trois ans de prison, sur un prétexte fallacieux, du courageux opposant Alexeï Navalny : « le respect des droits humains comme celui de la liberté démocratique ne sont pas négociables ». Ils le sont pourtant en France, ainsi que le montrent les décisions rendues le 29 janvier 2021 par le Conseil constitutionnel et le 3 février 2021 par le Conseil d’Etat.

      Sauf à se résigner à vivre dans une « démocratie (de plus en plus) défaillante », les contrepouvoirs à l’exécutif sont à inventer, spécialement en cette époque d’états d’urgence permanents.

  • Un nombre choquant de morts, mais aussi des luttes grandissantes sur place

    2020 a été une année difficile pour des populations du monde entier. Les voyageur.euses des routes de #Méditerranée_occidentale et de l’Atlantique n’y ont pas fait exception. Iels ont fait face à de nombreux nouveaux défis cette année, et nous avons été témoins de faits sans précédents. Au Maroc et en #Espagne, non seulement la crise du coronavirus a servi d’énième prétexte au harcèlement, à l’intimidation et à la maltraitance de migrant.es, mais les itinéraires de voyage ont aussi beaucoup changé. Un grand nombre de personnes partent à présent d’Algérie pour atteindre l’Espagne continentale (ou même la #Sardaigne). C’est pourquoi nous avons commencé à inclure une section Algérie (voir 2.6) dans ces rapports. Deuxièmement, le nombre de traversées vers les #Canaries a explosé, particulièrement ces trois derniers mois. Tout comme en 2006 – lors de la dénommée « #crise_des_cayucos », lorsque plus de 30 000 personnes sont arrivées aux Canaries – des bateaux partent du Sahara occidental, mais aussi du Sénégal et de Mauritanie. Pour cette raison, nous avons renommé notre section sur les îles Canaries « route de l’Atlantique » (voir 2.1).

    Le nombre d’arrivées sur les #îles_Canaries est presqu’aussi élevé qu’en 2006. Avec plus de 40 000 arrivées en 2020, le trajet en bateau vers l’Espagne est devenu l’itinéraire le plus fréquenté des voyages vers l’Europe. Il inclut, en même temps, l’itinéraire le plus mortel : la route de l’Atlantique, en direction des îles Canaries.

    Ces faits sont terrifiants. A lui seul, le nombre de personnes mortes et de personnes disparues nous laisse sans voix. Nous dressons, tous les trois mois, une liste des mort.es et des disparu.es (voir section 4). Pour ce rapport, cette liste est devenue terriblement longue. Nous sommes solidaires des proches des défunt.es ainsi que des survivant.es de ce calvaire. A travers ce rapport, nous souhaitons mettre en avant leurs luttes. Nous éprouvons un profond respect et une profonde gratitude à l’égard de celles et ceux qui continuent de se battre, sur place, pour la dignité humaine et la liberté de circulation pour tous.tes.

    Beaucoup d’exemples de ces luttes sont inspirants : à terre, aux frontières, en mer et dans les centres de rétention.

    En Espagne, le gouvernement fait tout son possible pour freiner la migration (voir section 3). Ne pouvant empêcher la mobilité des personnes, la seule chose que ce gouvernement ait accompli c’est son échec spectaculaire à fournir des logements décents aux personnes nouvellement arrivées. Néanmoins, beaucoup d’Espagnol.es luttent pour les droits et la dignité des migrant.es. Nous avons été très inspiré.es par la #CommemorAction organisée par des habitant.es d’Órzola, après la mort de 8 voyageur.euses sur les plages rocheuses du nord de #Lanzarote. Ce ne sont pas les seul.es. : les citoyen.nes de Lanzarote ont publié un manifeste réclamant un traitement décent pour quiconque arriverait sur l’île, qu’il s’agisse de touristes ou de voyageur.euses en bateaux. Nous relayons leur affirmation : il est important de ne pas se laisser contaminer par le « virus de la haine ».

    Nous saluons également les réseaux de #solidarité qui soutiennent les personnes arrivées sur les autres îles : par exemple le réseau à l’initiative de la marche du 18 décembre en #Grande_Canarie, « #Papeles_para_todas » (papiers pour tous.tes).

    Des #résistances apparaissent également dans les centres de rétention (#CIE : centros de internamiento de extranjeros, centres de détention pour étrangers, équivalents des CRA, centres de rétention administrative en France). En octobre, une #manifestation a eu lieu sur le toit du bâtiment du CIE d’#Aluche (Madrid), ainsi qu’une #grève_de_la_faim organisée par les personnes qui y étaient détenues, après que le centre de #rétention a rouvert ses portes en septembre.

    Enfin, nous souhaitons mettre en lumière la lutte courageuse de la CGT, le syndicat des travailleur.euses de la #Salvamento_Maritimo, dont les membres se battent depuis longtemps pour plus d’effectif et de meilleures conditions de travail pour les gardes-côtes, à travers leur campagne « #MásManosMásVidas » (« Plus de mains, plus de vies »). La CGT a fait la critique répétée de ce gouvernement qui injecte des fonds dans le contrôle migratoire sans pour autant subvenir aux besoins financiers des gardes-côtes, ce qui éviterait l’épuisement de leurs équipes et leur permettrait de faire leur travail comme il se doit.

    Au Maroc, plusieurs militant.es ont dénoncé les violations de droits humains du gouvernement marocain, critiquant des pratiques discriminatoires d’#expulsions et de #déportations, mais dénonçant aussi la #stigmatisation que de nombreuses personnes noires doivent endurer au sein du Royaume. Lors du sit-in organisé par l’AMDH Nador le 10 décembre dernier, des militant.es rassemblé.es sur la place « Tahrir » de Nador ont exigé plus de liberté d’expression, la libération des prisonnier.es politiques et le respect des droits humains. Ils y ont également exprimé le harcèlement infligé actuellement à des personnes migrant.es.

    De la même manière, dans un communiqué conjoint, doublé d’une lettre au Ministère de l’Intérieur, plusieurs associations (Euromed Droits, l’AMDH, Caminando Fronteras, Alarm Phone, le Conseil des Migrants) se sont prononcées contre la négligence des autorités marocaines en matière de #sauvetage_maritime.

    Les voyageur.euses marocain.es ont également élevé la voix contre l’état déplorable des droits humains dans leur pays (voir le témoignage section 2.1) mais aussi contre les conditions désastreuses auxquelles iels font face à leur arrivée en Espagne, dont le manque de services de première nécessité dans le #camp portuaire d’#Arguineguín est un bon exemple.

    Au #Sénégal, les gens se sont organisées après les #naufrages horrifiants qui ont eu lieu en très grand nombre dans la seconde moitié du mois d’octobre. Le gouvernement sénégalais a refusé de reconnaître le nombre élevé de morts (#Alarm_Phone estime jusqu’à 400 le nombre de personnes mortes ou disparues entre le 24 et le 31 octobre, voir section 4). Lorsque des militant.es et des jeunes ont cherché à organiser une manifestation, les autorités ont interdit une telle action. Pourtant, trois semaines plus tard, un #rassemblement placé sous le slogan « #Dafa_doy » (Y en a assez !) a été organisé à Dakar. Des militant.es et des proches se sont réuni.es en #mémoire des mort.es. Durant cette période, au Sénégal, de nombreuses personnes ont été actives sur Twitter, ont tenté d’organiser des #hommages et se sont exprimées sur la mauvaise gestion du gouvernement sénégalais ainsi que sur les morts inqualifiables et inutiles.

    https://alarmphone.org/fr/2021/01/29/un-nombre-choquant-de-morts-mais-aussi-des-luttes-grandissantes-sur-plac
    #décès #morts #mourir_aux_frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Méditerranée #mourir_en_mer #route_Atlantique #Atlantique #Ceuta #Melilla #Gibraltar #détroit_de_Gibraltar #Nador #Oujda #Algérie #Maroc #marche_silencieuse

    ping @karine4 @_kg_
    #résistance #luttes #Sénégal

    • Liste naufrages et disparus (septembre 2020-décembre 2020) (partie 4 du même rapport)

      Le 30 septembre, un mineur marocain a été retrouvé mort dans un bateau dérivant devant la côte de la péninsule espagnole, près d’Alcaidesa. Apparemment, il est mort d’hypothermie.

      Le 1er octobre, un cadavre a été récupéré en mer dans le détroit de Gibraltar.

      Le 2 octobre, 53 voyageur.euse.s, dont 23 femmes et 6 enfants, ont été porté.e.s disparu.e.s en mer. Le bateau était parti de Dakhla en direction des îles Canaries. L’AP n’a pas pu trouver d’informations sur leur localisation. (Source : AP).

      Le 2 octobre, un corps a été retrouvé sur un bateau transportant 33 voyageur.euse.s au sud de Gran Canaria. Cinq autres passager.e.s étaient dans un état critique.

      Le 2 octobre, comme l’a rapporté la militante des droits de l’homme Helena Maleno, d’un autre bateau avec 49 voyageur.euse.s sur la route de l’Atlantique, 7 ont dû être transférés à l’hôpital dans un état critique. Deux personnes sont mortes plus tard à l’hôpital.

      Le 6 octobre, un corps a été récupéré au large d’Es Caragol, à Majorque, en Espagne.

      Le 6 octobre, un corps a été rejeté sur la plage de Guédiawaye, au Sénégal.

      Le 9 octobre, Alarm Phone a continué à rechercher en vain un bateau transportant 20 voyageur.euse.s en provenance de Laayoune. Iels sont toujours porté.e.s disparu.e.s. (Source : AP).

      Le 10 octobre, un corps a été retrouvé par les forces algériennes sur un bateau qui avait initialement transporté 8 voyageur.euse.s en provenance d’Oran, en Algérie. Deux autres sont toujours portés disparus, 5 des voyageur.euse.s ont été sauvé.e.s.

      Le 12 octobre, 2 corps de ressortissant.e.s marocain.e.s ont été récupérés en mer au large de Carthagène.

      Le 16 octobre, 5 survivant.e.s d’une odyssée de 10 jours en mer ont signalé que 12 de leurs compagnons de voyage étaient porté.e.s disparu.e.s en mer. Le bateau a finalement été secouru au large de la province de Chlef, en Algérie.

      Le 20 octobre, un voyageur est mort sur un bateau avec 11 passager.e.s qui avait débarqué de Mauritanie en direction des îles Canaries. (Source : Helena Maleno).

      Le 21 octobre, la Guardia Civil a ramassé le corps d’un jeune ressortissant marocain en combinaison de plongée sur une plage centrale de Ceuta.

      Le 21 octobre, Salvamento Maritimo a secouru 10 voyageur ;.euse.s dans une embarcation en route vers les îles Canaries, l’un d’entre eux est mort avant le sauvetage.

      Le 23 octobre, le moteur d’un bateau de Mbour/Sénégal a explosé. Il y avait environ 200 passager.e.s à bord. Seul.e.s 51 d’entre elleux ont pu être sauvé.e.s.

      Le 23 octobre, un corps a été rejeté par la mer dans la municipalité de Sidi Lakhdar, à 72 km à l’est de l’État de Mostaganem, en Algérie.

      Le 24 octobre, un jeune homme en combinaison de plongée a été retrouvé mort sur la plage de La Peña.

      Le 25 octobre, un bateau parti de Soumbédioun/Sénégal avec environ 80 personnes à bord est entré en collision avec un patrouilleur sénégalais. Seul.e.s 39 voyageur.euse.s ont été sauvé.e.s.

      Le 25 octobre, un bateau avec 57 passager.e.s a chaviré au large de Dakhla/ Sahara occidental. Une personne s’est noyée. Les secours sont arrivés assez rapidement pour sauver les autres voyageur.euse.s.

      Le 25 octobre, Salvamento Marítimo a sauvé trois personnes et a récupéré un corps dans un kayak dans le détroit de Gibraltar.

      Le 26 octobre, 12 ressortissant.e.s marocain.e.s se sont noyé.e.s au cours de leur périlleux voyage vers les îles Canaries.

      Le 29 octobre, nous avons appris une tragédie dans laquelle probablement plus de 50 personnes ont été portées disparues en mer. Le bateau avait quitté le Sénégal deux semaines auparavant. 27 survivant.e.s ont été sauvé.e.s au large du nord de la Mauritanie.

      Le 30 octobre, un autre grand naufrage s’est produit au large du Sénégal. Un bateau transportant 300 passager.e.s qui se dirigeait vers les Canaries a fait naufrage au large de Saint-Louis. Seules 150 personnes ont survécu. Environ 150 personnes se sont noyées, mais l’information n’est pas confirmée.

      Le 31 octobre, une personne est morte sur un bateau en provenance du Sénégal et à destination de Tenerifa. Le bateau avait pris le départ avec 81 passager.e.s.

      Le 2 novembre, 68 personnes ont atteint les îles Canaries en toute sécurité, tandis qu’un de leurs camarades a perdu la vie en mer.

      Le 3 novembre, Helena Maleno a signalé qu’un bateau qui avait quitté le Sénégal avait chaviré. Seul.e.s 27 voyageur.euse.s ont été sauvé.e.s sur la plage de Mame Khaar. 92 se seraient noyé.e.s.

      Début novembre, quatre Marocain.e.s qui tentaient d’accéder au port de Nador afin de traverser vers Melilla par un canal d’égout se sont noyé.e.s.

      Le 4 novembre, un groupe de 71 voyageur.euse.s en provenance du Sénégal a atteint Tenerifa. Un de leurs camarades est mort pendant le voyage.

      Le 7 novembre, 159 personnes atteignent El Hierro. Une personne est morte parmi eux.

      Le 11 novembre, un corps est retrouvé au large de Soumbédioune, au Sénégal.

      Le 13 novembre, 13 voyageur.euse.s de Boumerdes/Algérie se sont noyé.e.s alors qu’iels tentaient de rejoindre l’Espagne à bord d’une embarcation pneumatique.

      Le 14 novembre, après 10 jours de mer, un bateau de Nouakchott est arrivé à Boujdour. Douze personnes sont décédées au cours du voyage. Les 51 autres passager.e.s ont été emmené.e.s dans un centre de détention. (Source : AP Maroc)

      Le 16 novembre, le moteur d’un bateau a explosé au large du Cap-Vert. Le bateau était parti avec 150 passager.e.s du Sénégal et se dirigeait vers les îles Canaries. 60 à 80 personnes ont été portées disparues lors de la tragédie.

      Le 19 novembre, 10 personnes ont été secourues alors qu’elles se rendaient aux îles Canaries, l’une d’entre elles étant décédée avant son arrivée.

      Le 22 novembre, trois corps de jeunes ressortissant.e.s marocain.e.s ont été récupérés au large de Dakhla.

      Le 24 novembre, huit voyageur.euse.s sont mort.e.s et 28 ont survécu, alors qu’iels tentaient de rejoindre la côte de Lanzarote.

      Le 24 novembre, un homme mort a été retrouvé sur un bateau qui a été secouru par Salvamento Maritimo au sud de Gran Canaria. Le bateau avait initialement transporté 52 personnes.

      Le 25 novembre, 27 personnes sont portées disparues en mer. Elles étaient parties de Dakhla, parmi lesquelles 8 femmes et un enfant. Alarm Phone n’a pas pu trouver d’informations sur leur sort (Source : AP).

      Le 26 novembre, deux femmes et deux bébés ont été retrouvés mort.e.s dans un bateau avec 50 personnes originaires de pays subsahariens. Iels ont été emmenés par la Marine Royale au port de Nador.

      Le 27 novembre, un jeune ressortissant marocain est mort dans un canal d’eau de pluie en tentant de traverser le port de Nador pour se rendre à Mellila .

      Le 28 novembre, un.e ressortissant.e marocain.e a été retrouvé.e mort.e dans un bateau transportant 31 passager.e.s en provenance de Sidi Ifni (Maroc), qui a été intercepté par la Marine royale marocaine.

      Le 2 décembre, deux corps ont été retrouvés sur une plage au nord de Melilla.

      Le 6 décembre, 13 personnes se sont retrouvées au large de Tan-Tan/Maroc. Deux corps ont été retrouvés et deux personnes ont survécu. Les 9 autres personnes sont toujours portées disparues.

      Le 11 décembre, quatre corps de “Harraga” algérien.ne.s d’Oran ont été repêchés dans la mer, tandis que sept autres sont toujours porté.e.s disparu.e.s.

      Le 15 décembre, deux corps ont été retrouvés par la marine marocaine au large de Boujdour.

      Le 18 décembre, sept personnes se sont probablement noyées, bien que leurs camarades aient réussi à atteindre la côte d’Almería par leurs propres moyens.

      Le 23 décembre, 62 personnes ont fait naufrage au large de Laayoune. Seules 43 à 45 personnes ont survécu, 17 ou 18 sont portées disparues. Une personne est morte à l’hôpital. (Source : AP)

      Le 24 décembre, 39 voyageur.euse.s ont été secouru.e.s au large de Grenade. Un des trois passagers qui ont dû être hospitalisés est décédé le lendemain à l’hôpital.

      https://alarmphone.org/fr/2021/01/29/un-nombre-choquant-de-morts-mais-aussi-des-luttes-grandissantes-sur-place/#naufrages

  • Le #nouveau_camp de #Lesbos, #Grèce, #Kara_Tepe, et la présumée #contamination au #plomb du terrain où il est construit (construction : #septembre_2020)

    #déchets #toxicité #pollution #armée #zone_militaire #plomb #santé #migrations #asile #réfugiés #camps_de_réfugiés #Lesbos #Grèce #îles_grecques #Moria_2.0

    –---

    voir le fil de discussion sur Kara Tepe ici, auquel j’ai ajouté la question du plomb :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/875903

    ping @isskein @karine4

    • Refugee camp on toxic land, potentially life threatening for small children!

      The new “temporary” camp in Kara Tepe, Lesvos, is as we all know built partially on an old military firing range. For the government this already restricted area was perfect, it was already fenced in. As all military areas there is a lot of restrictions, the most important ones are the restrictions of movement and the restrictions on taking pictures.
      The camp area has been criticized by many, because it’s just not suited to house people, in flimsy tents when the winter is approaching. It’s at the sea, without any protection from heavy winds that usually pounds this area. The area also floods frequently, the tents are built straight on the ground, there is no drainage system. When it’s really starts to rain, and it will, there will be mud everywhere, outside and inside the tents. And if that wasn’t enough, it’s a high possibility, that the very land the camp is built on is toxic.
      As previously mentioned, it’s an old military firing range, that has been used by the military for decades. We can assume that the military has used a variety of weapons, that over the years, have packed the ground with hazardous materials. The main concern is the possibility of lead contamination. The presence of lead and lead dust is well documented on such sites as are the extreme danger to health if lead is absorbed by children. Children younger than 6 years are especially vulnerable to lead poisoning, which can severely affect mental and physical development. At very high levels, lead poisoning can be fatal.
      As we all know, UNHCR are assisting the Greek authorities in resettling displaced families, many of them children, on this new site. They have a special responsibility, due to their involvement, to assure that the area used is suitable and safe to live on. UNHCR have rehoused displaced families on highly toxic land in the past, and should have learned by their previous mistakes.
      Following the war in Kosovo in 1999, UNHCR rehoused displaced families on highly toxic land. This is also well documented, particularly so on a website that followed the situation over a number of years. www.toxicwastekills.com
      It resulted in childrens’ blood lead levels higher than instruments could measure. There is no level of lead so low that children’s health will not be damaged. Very young children often absorb it through licking lead paint etc as they find it pleasant. This is also well documented. Pregnant women can transfer absorbed lead to foetuses through the placenta. It attacks all organs of the body but also causes irreversible brain damage. Now UNHCR is helping to place men, women and children on an old military firing range near Kara Tepe on Lesvos. This could be yet another deadly mistake in the making.
      Due to the fact that it took only 5 days to put up this camp, after the fire in Moria, it’s highly unlikely that any proper survey has been taken. This new site requires urgent toxicity checking by independent experts to reveal whether lead is present on the new site, which could indicate an evacuation might be necessary to protect the lives of vulnerable children. The concern has already been addressed by email to Astrid Castelein, head of the UNHCR sub office on Lesvos, and the main UNHCR office in Greece, so far without any reply.
      Some areas in the camp has been leveled out by bulldozers, in other areas soil from the leveled areas has been reused as landfill. By doing so, things that has been buried in the ground for decades has resurfaced, possibly making the situation even worse. Residents in the camp have found remains of ammunition casings and grenades around the tents, and military personnel have been observed using metal detectors in the outskirts of the camp. To see small children who have fled war, play with used ammunition in a European refugee camp, should raise some questions.
      If this isn’t enough, a proposal to create a new “reception and identification centre” structure with a capacity of 2,500 people, and a planned 500 employees overall, in the area of the former shooting range of Kamenos Dasos (Camlik) in central Lesvos seems to have been passed, as the majority of Mytilene municipal authority confirmed. These areas would never have been approved to build houses, schools or kindergartens, but seems to be more than good enough for these children..
      https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/lead-poisoning/symptoms-causes/syc-20354717

      https://www.facebook.com/AegeanBoatReport

    • Greece : Migrant Camp Lead Contamination

      Inadequate Government Response; Lack of Transparency Put Health at Risk

      The Greek government should release test results and other vital information about lead contamination in a migrant camp on Lesbos island to protect the health of residents and workers, Human Rights Watch said today.

      After testing soil samples in November, the government confirmed publicly on January 23, 2021 the presence of dangerous levels of lead in the soil in the administrative area of the Lesbos camp. It says that samples from residential areas showed lead levels below relevant standards but did not release the locations where samples were collected or the actual test results. The government has yet to indicate that it will take the necessary steps to adequately assess and mitigate the risk, including comprehensive testing and measures to remove people from areas that could be contaminated.

      “The Greek government knowingly built a migrant camp on a firing range and then turned a blind eye to the potential health risks for residents and workers there,” said Belkis Wille, senior crisis and conflict researcher at Human Rights Watch. “After weeks of prodding, it took soil samples to test for lead contamination while denying that a risk of lead exposure existed. It did not make the results public for over seven weeks, and has yet to allow independent experts to analyze them or vow to take the necessary steps to protect residents and workers and inform them about the potential health risks.”

      Human Rights Watch published a report in December documenting that thousands of asylum seekers, aid workers, and United Nations, Greek, and European Union employees may be at risk of lead poisoning in the Lesbos camp. Greek authorities built the new camp, Mavrovouni (also known as new Kara Tepe), on a repurposed military firing range. It now houses 6,500 people. According to a government announcement on January 23, one out of 12 soil samples taken in November came back on December 8 with lead levels that “exceeded the acceptable limit.” The announcement also mentions some steps to mitigate the risk.

      Human Rights Watch has requested the Greek government and the European Commission, which financially supports the camp and with which the government shared the results, to release the testing plan and the test results, which should include such information as the levels of lead for each sample, the sample depths and exact locations, a complete history of the site with location specifity, the expertise of those conducting the testing, the sampling methodology, and information on chain of custody. To date, neither the Greek government nor the European Commission has made this information available.

      This lack of transparency means that it is impossible to assess the adequacy of the testing, evaluate what the results represent, or recommend specific strategies to address the identified risks. As a result, it is impossible to determine whether the measures laid out in the January 23 statement, such as adding new soil, gravel, and a cement base in some areas, are adequate to protect people who live and work in the camp.

      In early September, large fires broke out inside the Moria camp, the Reception and Identification Center on Lesbos, which was housing 12,767 migrants, mostly women and children. Within days, the authorities constructed Mavrovouni and said they would construct a new permanent camp. Young children and women of reproductive age are most at risk for negative effects from lead exposure.

      In a meeting with Human Rights Watch on January 20, Minister for Migration and Asylum Notis Mitarachi said that he hoped that the residents of Mavrovouni would not spend another winter there, but did not specify when the new camp would be ready. Construction has yet to begin.

      Mavrovouni functioned as a military firing range from 1926 to mid-2020. Firing ranges are well recognized as sites with lead contamination because of bullets, shot, and casings that contain lead and end up in the ground. Lead in the soil from bullet residue can readily become airborne, especially under dry and windy conditions, which are often present on Lesbos. Lead is highly toxic when ingested or inhaled, particularly to children and anyone who is pregnant or lactating. The World Health Organization (WHO) maintains that there is no known safe level of blood lead concentration. Lead degrades very slowly, so sites can remain dangerous for decades.

      After multiple representations by Human Rights Watch to various Greek authorities, the European Commission, the UN refugee agency, UNHCR, and the WHO, the Greek government and the EU Commission commissioned the Hellenic Authority of Geology and Mineral Exploration to take 12 soil samples on November 24. According to the government, 11 soil samples showed lead levels “below the acceptable limits for lead in soil,” based on Dutch standards.

      The 12th sample, taken from what authorities described as an “administrative area” on the Mavrovouni hill, “at the end of the firing range,” showed elevated levels of lead above acceptable limits, but authorities did not reveal the concentration of lead in the soil. Mitarachi told Human Rights Watch that the area that showed lead levels above acceptable limits was fenced off, but residents and two aid workers said there were no fences inside the camp in that area or signs warning of a contaminated area. At least five aid organizations have offices in that area. An aid worker said residents, sometimes as many as 200 and including children, line up there for support and information. Younger children risk ingesting lead as they play or sit on contaminated ground.

      Human Rights Watch was unable to determine whether the government shared any information with humanitarian agencies about the testing results, but calls with agencies including UNHCR and the WHO indicated that they were not aware of them prior to the January 23 release. A staff member from one aid organization there said that at least one aid worker in the camp is currently pregnant, and 118 camp residents are pregnant, based on November government data.

      An environmental expert whom Human Rights Watch consulted said that, given the potential size of the affected area and the likelihood that elevated levels are the result of historic activity, the fact that one out of 12 samples in an area came back positive should trigger further testing.

      International law obligates countries to respect, protect, and fulfill the right to the highest attainable standard of health. The UN special rapporteur on human rights and the environment’s Framework Principles on Human Rights and the Environment, which interpret the right to a healthy environment, emphasize the need for “public access to environmental information by collecting and disseminating information and by providing affordable, effective and timely access to information to any person upon request.” The Aarhus Convention, to which Greece is a party, provides a right to receive environmental information held by public authorities.

      Greek authorities should immediately release the results and testing plan to the public, and take measures to mitigate the risk to the health of camp residents and workers, Human Rights Watch said. The authorities should ensure that residents and workers are informed about the results and measures to protect their health in languages they can understand. The authorities should also urgently undertake further testing and allow independent experts to comment on investigative work plans, audit the soil testing process, and collect split samples (a sample that is separated into at least two parts so that testing can be carried out at two or more seperate laboraties in order to confirm results) or carry out independent testing.

      The European Commission, which financially supports Greece to manage the camp and has staff stationed there, EU agencies, Frontex, and the European Asylum Support office, as well as United Nations agencies, UNHCR, UNICEF, the IOM and the WHO, should urge Greek authorities to make the detailed results and testing plan public, and push authorities to find alternative and safe housing solutions for those affected, including the option of moving them to the mainland. The European Commission, which was given the results and testing plan by the Greek government, should also make public the detailed information it received on the results and the methodology of the testing, to allow independent experts to comment on the risk to residents and workers in the camps.

      “Greece and its EU partners have a duty to make sure that people who live and work in the Mavrovouni camp are safe,” Wille said. “That requires transparency about the risks as well as urgent steps to mitigate them.”

      Additional Information

      In its January 23 statement and in its meeting with Human Rights Watch on January 20, the Greek government made several inaccurate claims regarding remediation and protection of residents. In its statement, the government claimed that after soil samples were taken on November 24, “while awaiting the results” it removed the tents directly on the firing range strip. But satellite imagery and residents’ and workers’ statements indicate that no tents were removed until between December 11 and 16, after the test results were received.

      Satellite imagery and aid organization mapping of the camp shows that by January 10, 79 tents remained on the firing range, with 58 more at the base of the hill. The residents in those tents may be at increased risk of coming into contact with contaminated soil, particularly when it rains. In addition, after some tents were removed, three migrants and two aid workers told Human Rights Watch that residents have been using the area for football and other recreation. Authorities have not fenced off the area or notified residents of the health risks.

      Since the site was tested, major construction work and heavy rains in the area mean that potentially contaminated soil from the hill and firing range area may have moved to other parts of the camp, which warrants further testing.

      Human Rights Watch received information from multiple sources that on January 18, the International Organization for Migration (IOM), which runs two assistance programs in the camp, suspended its operations at its tent on the hill. In response to a Human Rights Watch query, IOM’s Chief of Mission in Greece confirmed that, “Following the announcements regarding lead detection outside the accommodation areas and while waiting for more information from the authorities, IOM staff has been advised to remain inside the residential area.”

      In an aid briefing on January 19, the sources said it was revealed that the decision was made because of elevated levels of lead found in the “blue zone” of the camp, an area that includes the firing range and the base of the hill where the IOM Helios tent is located, as well as other aid tents including that of Médecins du Monde (MdM), and the International Rescue Committee (IRC). IOM staff have yet to return to the camp, but aid workers still in the camp said there is still no fencing or signage around that area. According to the camp residents and two aid workers, and 24 photos and videos taken from inside Mavrovouni by the DunyaCollective, a media collective, since December, authorities have been moving large quantities of soil, including removing some from the hill behind the IOM Helios tent.

      On January 23, Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors without Borders or MSF) issued a statement raising its concerns at the lack of appropriate government and EU action in the face of the testing results. On January 26, a group of 20 nongovernmental groups issued a joint statement calling on the Greek authorities to immediately evacuate camp residents and transfer them to appropriate structures on the mainland and elsewhere, such as hotel units.

      Aerial footage from January 14 shows tents still present in the part of the camp built on the former firing range at that date starting at around 02:00.

      https://www.hrw.org/news/2021/01/27/greece-migrant-camp-lead-contamination

    • Greece: Lead Poisoning Concerns in New Migrant Camp

      Thousands of asylum seekers, aid workers, United Nations, and Greek and European Union employees may be at risk of lead poisoning in a new migrant camp that Greek authorities have built on a repurposed military firing range on the island of Lesbos, Human Rights Watch said today.

      Firing ranges are commonly contaminated with lead from munitions, nevertheless the authorities did not conduct comprehensive lead testing or soil remediation before moving migrants to the site in September 2020. Evidence collected by migrants moved to the site also indicated that authorities have also failed to clear all unexploded mortar projectiles and live small arms ammunition, which could injure or kill if disturbed or handled.

      “Putting thousands of migrant adults and children, along with aid workers, on top of a former firing range without taking the necessary steps to guarantee they would not be exposed to toxic lead is unconscionable,” said Belkis Wille, senior crisis and conflict researcher at Human Rights Watch. “The Greek authorities should promptly conduct a comprehensive site assessment of soil lead levels and release the results.”

      In November and early December, Human Rights Watch interviewed four people living in the camp, two aid workers, one Greek migration ministry employee working in the camp, and four medical and environmental experts, and reviewed academic research on the risk of soil lead contamination at shooting ranges and medical research on the health risks of lead poisoning. Human Rights Watch did not have access to conduct on-site research, but analyzed photos and videos of the site and satellite imagery to confirm the firing range location.

      The Asylum and Migration Ministry began major construction work at the end of November at the site, called Mavrovouni camp, that could disturb any lead contaminated soil, further exposing residents and workers. The work to improve access to electricity and water and reduce the risk of flooding began despite warnings from Human Rights Watch of the potential of increased risk of lead poisoning.

      In early September, large fires broke out inside the Moria camp, the Reception and Identification Center on Lesbos that was housing 12,767 migrants, mostly women and child migrants. Within days, authorities constructed Mavrovouni (also known as new Kara Tepe) as a temporary camp and told people that they would begin construction of a new permanent camp for use by June 2021. According to the media, Migration and Asylum Minister Notis Mitarachi, has recently indicated the new camp will only be ready by Autumn 2021. Currently 7,517 people, mostly from Afghanistan and Syria, are staying at Mavrovouni, which started functioning as a military firing range in 1926 and was in use until the camp was constructed in September 2020, Mitarachi said.

      In response to letters from Human Rights Watch, Migration and Asylum Minister Notis Mitarachi stated in a November 19 letter that the camp had “no lead contamination,” but provided no evidence for the basis of that assertion. He said the government has agreed to conduct soil testing with the European Commission within one month, but has not revealed the nature of the testing, the areas to be tested, or the methodology. A Hellenic army representative called Human Rights Watch on December 1, stating his intention to respond to a letter received on November 4 from Human Rights Watch, raising urgent concerns. But no response has been received. On December 6, General Secretary for Asylum Seekers’ Reception Manos Logothetis, called Human Rights Watch to dispute the risk of lead contamination at the camp. He confirmed that no soil testing for lead had taken place prior to moving people to the camp, but said that authorities are awaiting the results of soil testing conducted recently in collaboration with the Institute of Geology and Mineral Exploration (IGME).

      “No one just shows up without a plan,” Dr. Gordon Binkhorst, vice president of global programs at Pure Earth, told Human Rights Watch. “Sharing of a well-founded work plan beforehand is key to transparency and ensuring confidence in the findings.” Greek authorities should allow independent experts to comment on investigative work plans, audit the soil testing process and collect split samples for independent testing.

      “The authorities should share documentation of work completed and a comprehensive site investigation work plan based on a review of the site history, contaminants of concern, a conceptual site model of how such contaminants are released to and migrated in the environment, and a comprehensive testing plan that evaluates the degree and extent of contamination in the environment, and potential exposure routes,” Dr. Binkhorst said.

      Firing ranges are well-recognized as sites with lead contamination because of bullets, shot, and casings that contain lead and end up in the ground. Lead in the soil from bullet residue can readily become airborne, especially under dry and windy conditions, which often exist on Lesbos. Lead is a heavy metal that is highly toxic to humans when ingested or inhaled, particularly by children and during pregnancy. It degrades very slowly, so sites can remain dangerous for decades.

      The World Health Organization maintains that there is no known safe level of lead exposure. Elevated levels can impair the body’s neurological, biological, and cognitive functions, leading to learning barriers or disabilities; behavioral problems; impaired growth; anemia; brain, liver, kidney, nerve, and stomach damage; coma and convulsions; and even death. Lead also increases the risk of miscarriage and can be transmitted through both the placenta and breast milk.

      Small children and women of reproductive age are at particular risk. According to Greek authorities, on November 19, 2,552 out of 7,517 people in the camp were children, 997 of them under age 5, and 1,668 were women – 118 of whom have said they are five or more months pregnant.Camp residents shared 17 photographs of items they said they had found in the ground around their tents, including an intact 60mm mortar projectile and a tail fin assembly for another 60mm mortar projectile, cartridge casings for rifle bullets, fired 12-gauge shotgun cartridges, and live pistol, rifle, machine gun, and shotgun ammunition. Intact munitions, such as 60mm mortar projectiles and small arms ammunition, pose an immediate explosive hazard and should be removed urgently from the area.

      “We try to stop our children from going to play up the hill because we know there might be bullets and other things the army didn’t clear that could be dangerous,” one camp resident said. Munitions containing lead can be extremely dangerous when swallowed by children or contaminate the soil, a medical expert told Human Rights Watch.

      The authorities should conduct a thorough and transparent assessment of lead levels in the soil and dust, as well as other possible pathways to exposure, and make the results publicly available. Any work that might increase exposure should be paused until after the soil has been tested or until people have been removed from the camp and housed in adequate facilities, Human Rights Watch said. If lead is present in the soil, authorities should provide free blood testing and treatment for camp residents, aid workers, police, and others who might have been exposed, prioritizing young children and women of reproductive age, and immediately move exposed residents to a safe location and remediate the contaminated areas.

      “The Greek government could be putting at risk families with young children, aid workers, and its own employees because it’s determined to hold asylum seekers on the island,” Wille said. “If this is where the government is trying to force asylum seekers to live on Lesbos, then all the more reason to transfer people to the mainland.”

      Tents on a Firing Range

      The Mavrovouni site sits on a large plot of military-owned land, some of which was used as a military firing range since 1926. The Asylum and Migration Ministry said that it covered the site with “new levels of soil” before the camp was opened.

      Human Rights Watch reviewed satellite imagery from before and after construction began on the camp on September 11, 2020. Imagery from before shows a firing range on part of the site next to Mavrovouni Hill. By September 28, more than 200 tents had been set up directly on the former firing range itself, with more tents on adjacent areas.

      Satellite imagery from June, before Moria camp was destroyed by fire, shows some basic clearance of vegetation cover within a rectangular strip that included the firing range, as well as a small section at the base of Mavrovouni Hill. From the imagery, it is impossible to determine the depth of the soil removal and whether the remediation of lead impacted soil was completed in accordance with prevailing standards and guidelines, or if it was just a superficial scraping of topsoil.

      Human Rights Watch was unable to determine what soil removal activities took place between June and September, when the camp opened, or of other activities to decontaminate the ground or where soil removed was disposed of. Given the speed of camp construction, it is very unlikely that authorities could have carried out remediation of lead-impacted soil before setting up the tents. Greek authorities have indicated that new soil was placed prior to construction of the camp, with no location indicated.

      Satellite imagery analysis, combined with a review of photos and videos of the firing range that were posted online in the spring, shows that the military was shooting from the southwest toward targets in the northeast, at the foot of Mavrovouni Hill. This suggests that soil on the hillside might also be contaminated by lead.

      Imagery recorded between September 14 and 16, shows at least 300 tents just south of the hill without any prior signs of soil clearance, with another at least 170 added in the following days. Imagery from late November shows further ground preparation southeast of the hill, and the construction of four large structures.

      Medical and environmental experts interviewed said it was risky to conduct further work in the camp without first conducting soil samples. “Disturbing this area will mobilize the lead in the soil and make it more vulnerable to dispersion from periodic rainfall, flooding, and wind erosion,” said Jack Caravanos, professor of global environmental health at New York University. Dr. Caravanos has visited and assessed dozens of lead-contaminated sites throughout the world and expressed dismay over how this site was chosen without proper environmental investigation.

      A European Commission official who is involved in migration policy with Greece said that the Greek Defense Ministry claimed that “no pieces of lead were observed on the ground” during construction or other work. Because lead dust is usually not visible, this claim raises concerns about the seriousness of the Greek government’s assessment.

      A source close to the police said that the government had considered turning the firing range into a camp site as early as 2015. At the time, authorities rejected the proposal for several reasons, the source said, including because it had been a firing range. It is unclear why the government ignored these concerns in 2020. A migration ministry employee working on the camp who spoke on the condition of anonymity said that in September, before Mavrovouni was selected, the government met with a few larger nongovernmental organizations, and discussed at least two or three alternative locations.

      Lead Contamination

      In his letter to Human Rights Watch, Minister Mitarachi said that the range had only been used for “small arms (straight trajectory), commonly only bullets, and not for other types of ammunition.” This ammunition, he said, “according to the Greek Army, contains no lead.” He added that the army had searched the camp for munitions prior to opening, and again 20 days later, and “reported no findings.”In contrast to these claims, bullets used for rifles, pistols, and machine guns as well as shot used by shotguns usually contain lead, which is used in bullets for its density and penetrating ability. Research at firing ranges has found that the discharge of lead dust from shooting results in soil contamination. Research has shown that elevated blood lead levels are commonly found in users of these sites, even among those who use them for limited amounts of time for recreational purposes.

      The large amount of fired small arms casings and cartridges found at the camp indicates an equally large number of bullets and shot might be buried beneath the ground where they landed. Other areas near the firing range may have been affected, including from relocation of soil associated with the construction of the camp or historic clearing of soils and munitions from the firing range. Thus, it is likely that any soil contamination extends beyond the firing range. Greek authorities provided no documentation for their claim that all the munitions used at the firing range were lead-free. This claim is highly questionable, given that lead-free bullets are expensive and very rare, particularly prior to the 1980s. Some bullets have an external metal-alloy coating that may make them appear to be lead-free, but the coating disintegrates relatively quickly when the bullet enters the soil, and the lead core becomes exposed. In addition, the photographic evidence from camp residents does not appear to support this contention.

      Camp residents shared with Human Rights Watch five photographs, one dated September 20, and two videos of the Hellenic Army’s Land Mine Clearance Squad carrying out clearance activities without any protective equipment and disregarding distancing between them and camp residents needed for safe ammunition clearance activities.

      The migration ministry employee working in the camp who spoke on the condition of anonymity said she remembered clearance operations taking place around that date: “There were soldiers who had this machine to detect metal walking amongst us. They were so close that we had to pick up our feet from the ground so they could check right under us.” A government employee’s union made a formal complaint about general working conditions at the camp, including their concerns around these clearance activities.

      In addition to camp residents, anyone working inside the camp could also face potential lead exposure from spending time in the camp if the soil is contaminated. Residents, aid workers, and the migration ministry employee said that these include staff from the Hellenic police, Hellenic army, municipality, First Reception Service, Asylum Service, National Public Health Organization (EODY), European Commission, European Asylum Support Office (EASO), European Border and Coast Guard Agency (Frontex), Europol, IOM, UNHCR, UNICEF, World Health Organization, Red Cross, and at least eight other medical and aid groups.

      Risks of Lead Poisoning for At-risk Groups

      Symptoms of lead poisoning are often not diagnosed as such but its adverse health effects can be irreversible. The severity of symptoms increases with prolonged exposure. Globally, lead exposure is estimated to account for up to one million deaths annually, with the highest burden in low- and middle-income countries. Poor and disadvantaged populations are more vulnerable because undernourishment increases the amount of ingested lead the body absorbs.

      Children are especially at risk because they absorb four to five times as much lead as adults, and their brains and bodies are still developing. In addition, small children often put their hands in their mouths or play on the ground, which increases their likelihood of ingesting or inhaling lead in dust and dirt. Exposure during pregnancy can result in stillbirth, miscarriage, and low birth weight, and can negatively affect fetal brain development. At least 118 pregnant women and 2,552 children are at the site, according to government data.

      Mohammed Hafida, a camp resident with three young children whose wife is pregnant, said that when they first moved to the camp it was particularly dusty. “When cars drove past the tents there was dust everywhere,” he said. “That only went away once the rain set in two weeks later. But the camp is on a hill, and so when it rained for several hours, many of the tents collapsed. This isn’t a camp, it’s a hell.”

      People living in the camp said that for the first few weeks, they had been sleeping on blankets and mattresses on the dusty ground, but more recently aid workers had added flooring to the tents. Even as rainfall increased, residents reported that dust would still enter the tents including in the cooking areas. Camp residents said they have to clean dust out of their tents multiple times a day because cars are driving on adjacent gravel roads. Children often play in the dusty area by the roads. A medical expert said that small children at the camp are at very serious risk for as long as they are exposed to dust that could be contaminated.

      Camp authorities did not inform residents that there could be a risk of lead exposure at the site. Medical and environmental experts said that given the known risks of lead exposure at firing ranges, comprehensive soil testing should have been carried out before even considering it as a possible location for the camp. They warned of specific risks of lead poisoning for small children who are most at risk. “Remediation can be very difficult,” said Caravanos, the NYU professor of global environmental health. “I can’t imagine that you could make it safe without removing everyone if lead was found in the soil.”

      On November 17, Human Rights Watch was notified about significant planned construction work, which the Asylum and Migration Ministry confirmed in a letter dated November 19. On November 26, Human Rights Watch sent a letter with detailed findings to the Greek Ministries of Asylum and Migration and Defense, which it also shared with EU officials and representatives from UNHCR, the United Nations refugee agency, and the World Health Organization, saying that these actions risk further exposing residents and construction workers to any potentially lead-contaminated dust and soil. Despite these warnings, on November 30, residents of the camp informed researchers that large construction was underway, including on top of Mavrovouni hill.

      The authorities should have been aware of the amount of dust construction causes at the site. During the construction of the camp in September, the migration ministry employee said, workers had been moving around lots of soil to make room for the camp structure and “There was a lot of dust everywhere for days. I kept finding dust and even little pebbles in my ears at that time.”

      Unsatisfactory Clearance Operation

      Three people interviewed in November said that the authorities forced them to move to the camp after the fires in Moria camp by threatening that the government would stop their asylum claims if they refused. All three have found and provided Human Rights Watch with photographs of munition remnants since moving to Mavrovouni in September. They all said that after moving to the site, they saw the Greek military conduct clearance operations without protective gear, and they shared videos of those operations with Human Rights Watch.

      In the videos and photographs, the camp tents and migrants are clearly visible, confirming that some clearance activities took place after people were already living there. A Syrian man whose wife is nine-months pregnant with their first child said that, after they had moved into the camp, he saw the military find and remove at least one cartridge casing. Another camp resident said that since arriving, he has found many bullets on the ground but the “authorities haven’t told us what to do if we find them, or other kinds of munitions.”

      Access to Health Care

      Two medical staff from a team providing health care in Mavrovouni camp said on November 10 that, since arriving at the camp in October, they had not heard anything about possible lead exposure. Both said that the camp had “decent” health care services considering that it was a temporary camp, but that the laboratory inside the camp does not have the capacity to perform blood tests for lead levels. Both said that because of the nature of the symptoms of lead poisoning, which are also symptoms of other illnesses, it would be extremely difficult to diagnose potential cases without blood tests.

      Both medical staff and a doctor who had worked previously at the camp said it was very difficult for camp residents to visit the hospital due to movement restrictions related to Covid-19.

      Parallels to Kosovo Incident

      This is not the first time that people living in a camp are put at risk of lead poisoning. For more than a decade following the end of the war in Kosovo in 1999, about 600 Roma, Ashkali, and Balkan Egyptian minority members lived in camps for displaced people operated by the UN. The camps sat on land contaminated by lead from a nearby industrial mine. In 2016, a United Nations human rights advisory panel found that the UN mission in Kosovo (the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo, UNMIK) had violated the affected people’s rights to life and health. Human Rights Watch documented that camp residents experienced lasting health impacts and are still awaiting compensation and health and educational support for themselves and their families, seven years after the last camp was closed in 2013.

      International Legal Obligations

      International law obligates states to respect, protect, and fulfill the right to the highest attainable standard of health. The United Nations Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, which monitors governments’ compliance with the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, in its General Comment 14 on the right to health, has interpreted the covenant to include:

      [T]he requirement to […] the prevention and reduction of the population’s exposure to harmful substances such as radiation and harmful chemicals or other detrimental environmental conditions that directly or indirectly impact upon human health.

      The right to health encompasses the right to healthy natural environments. The right to a healthy environment, which is also enshrined in the Greek constitution, involves the obligation to “prevent threats to health from unsafe and toxic water conditions.”

      The United Nations special rapporteur on human rights and the environment’s Framework Principles on Human Rights and the Environment, which interpret the right to a healthy environment, emphasize the need for “public access to environmental information by collecting and disseminating information and by providing affordable, effective and timely access to information to any person upon request.” The Committee on the Rights of the Child, the treaty body that monitors compliance with the Convention on the Rights of the Child to which Greece is a party, when describing the right of the child to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health, calls on states to take appropriate measures “to combat disease and malnutrition … taking into consideration the dangers and risks of environmental pollution.”

      Responsibilities of the Greek Parliament and European Union

      Members of the Greek parliament should pay attention to the concerns that there may be lead contamination at Mavrovouni camp and assess the Greek government’s compliance with its obligations under national, European, and international law to realize the rights to health and healthy environment. They could hold a hearing or establish an inquiry to establish which government employees were involved in approving the site, the extent to which they knew or should have known about the risk of lead contamination, why they decided to move people to the site without first conducting comprehensive soil testing, and why, despite multiple concerns about lead contamination raised after the camp was opened, the authorities greenlighted construction work without first conducting comprehensive soil testing. They should take appropriate action to ensure accountability if merited.

      The European Commission, which financially supports Greece to manage the camp and has staff stationed there, as well as EU agencies, Frontex, and EASO, should urge Greek authorities to comprehensively test for lead and make the testing plan and results public.

      Human Rights Watch and other nongovernmental groups have long warned European leaders about the dire conditions in island camps, also known as hotspots. These have been exacerbated by Greek authorities’ containment policy, which has blocked transfers to the mainland. For years, residents were crammed into overcrowded, inadequate tents, with limited access to food, water, sanitation, and health care, including during the pandemic and despite the risk of Covid-19. The EU and Greece should fundamentally reconsider their hotspot approach on the Greek Islands and end policies that lead to the containment of thousands of migrants and asylum seekers in unsuitable, and in this case potentially hazardous, facilities.

      https://www.hrw.org/news/2020/12/08/greece-lead-poisoning-concerns-new-migrant-camp

      #pollution #contamination #plomb #Saturnisme #HRW #rapport

    • HRW calls for transparency over lead contamination at Lesvos migrant camp

      Greek authorities should release test results and other vital information about lead contamination at the Kara Tepe migrant camp on the eastern Aegean island of Lesvos to protect the health of residents and workers, Human Rights Watch (HRW) said on Wednesday.

      After testing soil samples in November, authorities earlier this month confirmed dangerous levels of lead in the soil in the administrative area of the facility, also known as Mavrovouni, which was built on a repurposed military firing range. They said that samples from residential areas showed lead levels below relevant standards but did not release the locations where samples were collected or the actual test results, the New York-based organization said.

      HRW said that officials have yet to indicate that they will take the necessary steps to adequately assess and mitigate the risk, including comprehensive testing and measures to remove people from areas that could be contaminated.

      “The Greek government knowingly built a migrant camp on a firing range and then turned a blind eye to the potential health risks for residents and workers there,” said Belkis Wille, senior crisis and conflict researcher at HRW.

      “After weeks of prodding, it took soil samples to test for lead contamination while denying that a risk of lead exposure existed. It did not make the results public for over seven weeks, and has yet to allow independent experts to analyze them or vow to take the necessary steps to protect residents and workers and inform them about the potential health risks,” she said.

      According to a report published by HRW in December, thousands of asylum seekers, aid workers, and United Nations, Greek, and European Union employees may be at risk of lead poisoning.

      The Kara Tepe facility currently houses 6,500 people.

      “Greece and its EU partners have a duty to make sure that people who live and work in the Mavrovouni camp are safe,” Wille said.

      “That requires transparency about the risks as well as urgent steps to mitigate them,” she said.

      https://www.ekathimerini.com/261695/article/ekathimerini/news/hrw-calls-for-transparency-over-lead-contamination-at-lesvos-migrant-c

  • Vaccination contre le Covid-19 : une faille béante dans le secret médical, Antton Rouget
    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/270121/vaccination-contre-le-covid-19-une-faille-beante-dans-le-secret-medical

    Par manque d’anticipation, l’assurance-maladie n’a eu qu’un mois et demi pour développer le système informatique de suivi de la campagne de vaccination. Selon nos informations, celui-ci souffre de plusieurs failles : il permet à un médecin d’accéder à tous les dossiers des Français tandis que la procédure de signalement des effets indésirables a été mise en œuvre a minima.

    C’est un nouveau raté de taille dans la gestion de la crise sanitaire. Le système d’information (SI-Vaccin Covid) mis en place par la Caisse nationale d’assurance-maladie (Cnam) pour le suivi de la campagne de vaccination en France présente d’importantes brèches et insuffisances, selon les éléments réunis par Mediapart.

    Ces loupés sont la conséquence d’une mise en route tardive du système après plusieurs mois d’inertie des autorités, malgré les mises en garde de spécialistes de vaccination depuis le printemps dernier. À l’époque, alors que les labos s’engageaient à toute vitesse dans la course aux vaccins, les professionnels alertaient sur les enjeux liés à l’anticipation d’une campagne de vaccination d’envergure.

    Il a pourtant fallu attendre l’automne 2020 pour que le projet de SI soit mis en route au ministère de la santé. Et encore : il a continué à prendre du retard en étant ballotté pendant des semaines de décision en contre-décision. 

    Ces problèmes ont eu une incidence importante sur le déroulé des opérations. D’un point de vue de la sécurité des données, d’abord, puisque le SI-Vaccin Covid qui tourne depuis le 4 janvier s’apparente à une véritable passoire.

    Concrètement, le système permet le suivi de la campagne de vaccination en enregistrant toutes les consultations, les numéros de lots utilisés, les dates et lieux des injections, le nom du praticien, etc. Pour ce faire, les vaccinateurs doivent s’identifier sur le portail de la Cnam avec leur carte de professionnel de santé (CPS ou e-CPS) pour enregistrer chaque acte, pour lequel ils sont ensuite remboursés.

    Mais, une fois à l’intérieur du système, ils peuvent aussi accéder au dossier de n’importe quel patient sans autorisation particulière, ainsi que nous avons pu le vérifier. Pour cela, il leur suffit de renseigner le numéro de Sécurité sociale de la personne concernée, un numéro que l’on peut reconstituer facilement à partir des données d’état civil. Des applications accessibles à tous permettent même de générer ces numéros automatiquement.

    Dès lors, un professionnel de santé peut consulter la fiche d’un proche, d’un voisin ou même d’une personnalité publique, et accéder à ses données de vaccination sans être son médecin traitant ni recueillir son consentement.

    Interrogés sur cette situation, les services de la Cnam ont nié toute « faille » dans le système en estimant qu’« il appartient au médecin de procéder à une recherche ou à un enregistrement uniquement et exclusivement pour ses patients ». « Il s’agit là des règles courantes relatives à l’exercice professionnel de médecins qui sont soumis au secret médical et dont l’encadrement de la profession est très strict. Estimer que cela relève d’une faille de sécurité consisterait donc à considérer que, par nature, les médecins ne respectent pas leurs obligations, ni la déontologie à laquelle ils sont réglementairement soumis », ajoute la Cnam, qui rappelle que les accès sont tracés.

    Dans son avis du 10 décembre sur le SI-Vaccin Covid, alors en projet, la Commission nationale de l’informatique et des libertés (Cnil) avait estimé nécessaire de rappeler que les données traitées dans le cadre du système seraient protégées par le secret médical. À cet égard, la commission insistait sur le fait que « seules les personnes habilitées et soumises au secret professionnel doivent pouvoir accéder aux données du SI “Vaccin Covid”, dans les strictes limites de leur besoin d’en connaître pour l’exercice de leurs missions ». En clair, la Cnil réclamait un cloisonnement strict des données accessibles par les professionnels de santé.

    « Il appartient donc au responsable de traitement de définir pour chaque destinataire des profils fonctionnels strictement limités aux besoins d’en connaître pour l’exercice des missions des personnes habilitées », ajoutait d’ailleurs la Cnil, en réclamant que soient prises des mesures « dès que possible » afin que les personnes habilitées ne « puissent accéder aux différentes données relatives aux personnes concernées que lorsqu’elles en ont effectivement besoin ».

    Alors que ce cloisonnement technique au « besoin d’en connaître » n’est aujourd’hui pas assuré, la Cnil précise à Mediapart que ses contrôles « seront conduits dans les prochaines semaines » et qu’ils se « poursuivront tout au long de la période d’utilisation des fichiers, jusqu’à la fin de leur mise en œuvre et la suppression des données qu’ils contiennent ». « Dans ce cadre, prévient la commission, la sécurité des données, notamment les profils d’habilitation et permissions d’accès, fera l’objet d’une vigilance particulière. »

    De l’aveu de plusieurs sources, ce dysfonctionnement est la conséquence du calendrier extrêmement serré pour la mise en œuvre du système. Pour le déployer dans une version « dégradée » (a minima) en janvier, les équipes de la Cnam ont charbonné pendant tout le mois de décembre. Mais le retard était impossible à combler. « On ne peut pas sérieusement monter un système de cette importance, avec tous les audits nécessaires, en quelques semaines », gronde un expert.

    De fait, difficile de blâmer les équipes au cœur du projet. Le problème se situe bien en amont, tout en haut de la chaîne de décision, prenant sa source dans un défaut d’anticipation comparable à celui sur les commandes de masques ou sur la campagne de dépistage.

    La réunion de « lancement et d’organisation du projet » ne s’est tenue au ministère des solidarités et de la santé que le 17 novembre, moins d’un mois et demi avant le lancement de la campagne de vaccination, selon des documents internes consultés par Mediapart.

    À l’ordre du jour : une présentation globale du périmètre du système informatique, un macro-planning et l’organisation de la gouvernance d’un projet qui rassemble plusieurs acteurs. Sont en effet associées à l’initiative la Cnam, la délégation ministérielle du numérique en santé (DNS), mais aussi Santé publique France (SPF, pour les aspects logistiques), l’Agence nationale de sécurité du médicament (ANSM, pour le suivi des effets indésirables), l’Agence nationale de la sécurité des systèmes d’information (Anssi, pour la partie sécurité) ou encore la Haute Autorité de santé (HAS, pour les recommandations vaccinales). Autant d’acteurs que d’enjeux à maîtriser et coordonner.

    Les équipes du ministère de la santé n’ont pas caché, lors de cette réunion du 17 novembre, la réalité « des risques opérationnels principalement liés aux délais de mises en œuvre techniques et juridiques » du dispositif. À cette difficulté s’ajoute alors le « fort besoin d’intégration entre plusieurs SI », en particulier celui que développait au même moment Santé publique France (SPF) pour la distribution des doses de vaccin.

    Pour essayer de tenir les délais, plusieurs points quotidiens sont ensuite organisés, en fin de journée, pour le pilotage du projet et la coordination opérationnelle. Il faut faire vite, car l’État est déjà en retard sur tous ces objectifs, même les moins ambitieux.


    Exemple de fiche patient (anonymisée) consultable par n’importe quel praticien. © Document Mediapart

    En octobre, la DNS est déjà consciente que les délais seront difficiles à tenir alors qu’elle table à l’époque sur un lancement du système au 15 janvier seulement (le SI sera finalement ouvert le 4 janvier).

    Le ministère de la santé envisage à cette période de s’appuyer sur l’expertise de prestataires privés, sélectionnés sans publicité ni mise en concurrence, au motif de l’urgence impérieuse. Un directeur de projet est recruté en toute hâte. Problème : aussi bon soit-il sur les aspects numériques, il ne connaît rien à la vaccination et aux enjeux qui lui sont propres, puisqu’il vient d’un groupe hôtelier. L’homme travaille pendant quelques semaines, avec une adresse Gmail fournie par Google (et non une adresse officielle), avant de quitter ses fonctions.

    Au cours de ce même mois d’octobre, tout reste à faire : la DNS en est encore à préciser qu’il faut « prendre contact avec nos homologues européens pour benchmark, et étudier la possibilité d’une action conjointe ». Il convient d’« inscrire le sujet SI » à l’agenda du groupe de contacts mis en place par une inspectrice des finances au sein de la « Task Force Vaccination » que vient de créer le premier ministre Jean Castex, demande-t-on alors au ministère de la santé.

    L’entreprise américaine de conseil Accenture des deux côtés du marché

    Pour trouver un prestataire capable de porter le SI français, la DNS auditionne dans le même temps trois candidats, qui se sont volontairement manifestés auprès d’elle. S’affrontent sans le savoir le laboratoire américain Baxter, la multinationale du conseil informatique Accenture et une solution française MesVaccins, portée par la PME Syadem, basée à Bordeaux.

    La proposition de Baxter est rapidement écartée : sa solution paraît « peu adaptable » aux besoins français, sans compter les dégâts que provoquerait dans l’opinion le fait de confier la gestion de données médicales à une entreprise de l’industrie pharmaceutique…

    La candidature d’Accenture pose aussi question : la délégation ministérielle au numérique en santé (DNS) reconnaît que l’entreprise est bien implantée dans les SI, même s’il y a des « développements à effectuer pour adaptation aux besoins de la France ». Mais il y a surtout un « sujet » sur la protection des données personnelles. Accenture travaille par exemple en partenariat avec Microsoft, à qui le ministre de la santé Olivier Véran veut justement retirer l’hébergement des données du Health Data Hub pour les confier à une entreprise européenne.


    Atouts et inconvénients d’Accenture, selon le ministère de la santé. © Document Mediapart

    Reste l’offre MesVaccins qui présente des atouts, selon la DNS : il s’agit d’une « entreprise experte des SI de vaccination » qui est « proche des acteurs publics », avec une « équipe motivée et réactive », et des « données hébergées en France » et non commercialisées.

    Créé en 2009, MesVaccins est un carnet de vaccination électronique (CVE) permettant à chaque patient de gérer gratuitement ses vaccinations. Le dispositif intègre aussi un « système expert » d’aide à la décision vaccinale prenant en compte les caractéristiques individuelles et l’historique vaccinal de chaque personne pour l’aider à évaluer le bénéfice/risque.

    En août 2019, l’Agence nationale de sécurité du médicament (ANSM) a aussi recommandé son système de pharmacovigilance renforcée (détection proactive des effets indésirables) dans le cadre du déploiement du vaccin contre le virus Ebola. Des discussions pour intégrer MesVaccins au dossier médical partagé (DMP) mis à disposition du public par la Cnam sont également en cours depuis plusieurs années.

    Au mois d’octobre 2020, le ministère de la santé a malgré tout un doute concernant la taille de Syadem, l’entreprise qui développe cette solution : la PME est une « petite structure » ; sa « capacité de montée en charge » sur un projet aussi stratégique que le SI-Vac reste donc « à investiguer », estime la DNS.

    Pour s’assurer que la PME a bien les reins suffisamment solides, le ministère décide, le 3 novembre, d’auditer l’entreprise. Elle confie curieusement cette tâche à… Accenture, qui passe ainsi subitement de candidat au marché à assistant à maîtrise d’ouvrage (AMO) du même marché.

    Interrogée sur le périmètre exact de son contrat avec le ministère de la santé, la firme américaine n’a pas souhaité répondre « pour des raisons de confidentialité ». Le 21 janvier, le ministère de la santé avait simplement signifié, sans plus de détails, à France Info qu’il « a été fait appel au cabinet Accenture pour le lancement, l’enrichissement et l’accompagnement de la mise en œuvre du SI vaccination ».

    Sollicitée par Mediapart depuis le 12 janvier, la direction générale de la santé (DGS) nous a finalement répondu, juste après la publication de cet article pour nous préciser sa relation contractuelle avec Accenture. Dans le cadre d’un contrat cadre de 2018 à 2022 (permet à chaque ministère, de ne pas avoir à remettre en concurrence les titulaires sélectionnés initialement), le ministère a commandé une première mission d’« étude stratégique autour du lancement du SI Vaccination », dont l’assistance « aux choix structurants » et à la « mise en œuvre de la phase initiale » pour un montant de 388 500 euros TTC.

    Ce contrat a été notifié le 20 novembre 2020, pour une date de fin au 8 janvier 2021 La date de signature de la mission est étonnante, puisqu’elle est postérieure au début de l’audit mené par Accenture auprès de MesVaccins, ce qui signifie donc que le cabinet a travaillé pendant plusieurs semaines pour le ministère sans contrat...

    Pendant deux semaines, le géant américain a passé au peigne fin les capacités de la PME bordelaise. Tous les voyants sont au vert. Et le 17 novembre, Accenture présente deux options au ministère de la santé.

    Un premier scénario dans lequel MesVaccins vient en renfort de l’État et apporte des « services spécifiques » à la campagne de vaccination (questionnaire pré-vaccinal, détermination de l’éligibilité vaccinale et des contre-indications vaccinales, aide à la décision vaccinale, gestion d’éventuelles interférences entre différents vaccins, etc.). La partie « pharmacovigilance renforcée » et l’analyse des données restent du domaine exclusif de l’État. Dans le second scénario, MesVaccins devient un acteur central de la chaîne de vaccination, même si les dossiers patients, le suivi vaccinal et les certificats de vaccination sont encore gérés par l’État.

    Les équipes du ministère n’ont pas le temps de se prononcer sur ces deux options qu’au même moment, à un échelon supérieur, tout le travail préparatoire est balayé d’un revers de main. La « Task Force Vaccination » qui fonctionne sous l’autorité du premier ministre vient de changer brutalement de cap : plus question de faire appel à un prestataire spécialisé, il faut maintenant que le SI soit développé par les développeurs de la Cnam en interne.

    Quels sont les motifs de ce revirement, et pourquoi n’a-t-il pas été anticipé ? Matignon ne nous a pas répondu.

    La Cnam invoque pour sa part des raisons techniques en indiquant qu’au terme d’un « sourcing » qui aurait été réalisé à « l’été 2020 », aucune « solution n’était en mesure d’apporter les garanties suffisantes ». Dans ce cas-là, pourquoi le ministère de la santé a-t-il organisé des consultations avec plusieurs candidats en octobre, puis demandé à Accenture d’auditer MesVaccins, et qu’a-t-il été fait des conclusions favorables du rapport d’audit ? Relancée sur ce point, la Cnam admet juste que les « échanges se sont poursuivis à l’automne » avec des prestataires, sans en dire plus.

    Le cabinet Accenture est pour sa part revenu dans la boucle avec une mission d’« enrichissement et accompagnement à la mise en œuvre du SI Vaccination », signée le 23 décembre 2020, et qui court jusqu’au 26 mars 2021, pour un montant de 594 540 euros, selon les chiffres communiqués par la DGS.

    « Quand il est sous pression, l’État craint toujours de faire appel à une PME. Il y a toujours quelqu’un qui dit : “Mais attendez, est-ce qu’ils sont vraiment fiables ?” Si ça ne marche pas, on nous tombera dessus en disant : “Pourquoi vous avez pris ces zozos ?” Par sécurité, l’État se tourne donc automatiquement vers de gros acteurs », interprète un entrepreneur du numérique, qui fut notamment mobilisé sur l’application StopCovid.

    Début 2020, les PME spécialisées dans l’import-export de masques depuis la Chine avaient vécu la même déconvenue. Malgré leur connaissance du marché et leur réactivité, elles avaient été ignorées par l’État, lequel avait préféré faire appel à des grandes entreprises, qui pour certaines ne connaissaient rien aux dispositifs médicaux.
    Les revirements entre le ministère de la santé et la Task Force ont en tout cas fait perdre de précieuses semaines, et suscité l’incompréhension de plusieurs parties prenantes. « Après avoir mobilisé 100 % de nos équipes pendant six semaines et répondu à toutes les attentes, on n’a plus eu de nouvelles du jour au lendemain », déplore Jean-Louis Koeck, le fondateur de MesVaccins.

    Des alertes depuis le printemps

    « Nous avions entre les mains une solution disponible, dont l’intégration au dossier médical partagé de l’assurance-maladie est en cours, mais on a préféré repartir de zéro », s’étonne un ancien responsable SI Santé, qui note que Nicolas Revel, le puissant directeur de cabinet Jean Castex, connaît d’autant mieux le sujet qu’il a dirigé la Cnam de 2014 à juillet 2020.

    Le gouvernement a-t-il simplement craint de confier une partie, même minime, de l’expertise à un acteur privé ? « Mais, dans ce cas-là, pourquoi l’État refuse-t-il un partenariat avec une PME comme MesVaccins alors qu’il ouvre grand les portes à Doctolib pour la prise de rendez-vous ? », interroge un autre spécialiste.

    Le médecin Marcel Garrigou-Grandchamp, de la cellule juridique de la Fédération des médecins de France (FMF), abonde : « L’argument de ne pas voir entrer le privé ne tient avec le contre-exemple Doctolib. » Lui « pense que d’autres acteurs privés plus gros que MesVaccins veulent lui barrer la route en attendant d’imposer leur solution, c’est bien dommage ».

    « On a la chance d’avoir en France un système très précurseur, toutes les associations de médecins qui l’utilisent en sont très contentes », précise l’épidémiologiste Yves Buisson. Le président du groupe Covid-19 à l’Académie de médecine insiste notamment sur les performances du « système expert » de MesVaccins, qui traduit les recommandations scientifiques pour le grand public, et est d’ailleurs utilisé par l’agence Santé publique France.

    Le professeur Buisson loue aussi son « système de pharmacovigilance très poussé » (avec des relances des patients pour retracer les effets indésirables). « Au lieu de cela, on a préféré bricoler un truc incomplet en quelques semaines. Je ne comprends pas. Comme si on n’avait rien d’autre de mieux à faire… », cingle Yves Buisson.

    Lors de la réunion de travail avec la Cnam le 17 novembre, les agents du ministère de la santé ont expliqué à quel point le calendrier pour la mise en place du nouveau SI était « extrêmement contraint ».

    La première version du système devait ainsi comporter « les fonctionnalités minimales nécessaires au démarrage avec deux vaccins simultanés et ciblant quelques millions de personnes », seulement. La version ne comprend par exemple qu’une redirection vers le site de signalement des effets indésirables (pour relais à l’ANSM, qui coordonne la pharmacovigilance) alors que ce sujet avait été identifié comme un enjeu important par la DNS dans l’architecture du système.

    La plateforme SI-Vac sera progressivement « enrichie » au fil des semaines en fonction des « enseignements tirés de la fonction minimale », a-t-il été convenu le 17 novembre. Le déploiement de la version « complète » du système, qui « devra pouvoir gérer des campagnes de vaccination à l’échelle de la population française et l’intégralité des vaccins mis sur le marché », étant alors programmé à « horizon printemps 2021 ».

    Du côté du Syndicat de la médecine générale (SMG), on déplore que la question des données ait été « totalement écartée » de la discussion par les autorités. « Cela ne m’étonne pas du tout qu’on en soit là », avec la possibilité pour un praticien de consulter tous les dossiers dans le SI-Vac, fait part l’une des représentantes du SMG, Mathilde Boursier, en déplorant « une grande opacité autour de tout ce qui entoure les données en santé ». La praticienne défend une approche de santé publique, une médecine préventive et l’innovation en santé, mais estime que cela « ne doit pas se faire au détriment de la sécurité des données personnelles ».

    Proche d’Emmanuel Macron, le directeur de cabinet de Jean Castex, Nicolas Revel a dirigé la CNAM de 2014 à 2020. © Assurance maladie
    Le 17 décembre, dans une tribune publiée dans Libération, l’ancien directeur général de la santé (DGS) William Dab, Alain-Michel Ceretti, président de l’association de patients « Le Lien », ou encore Didier Seyler, membre du Comité d’orientation et de dialogue avec la société de Santé publique France, ont tiré la sonnette d’alarme en indiquant qu’il « serait incompréhensible » à leurs yeux qu’un effort ne soit pas engagé par l’État « pour améliorer la pharmacovigilance portant sur ces nouveaux vaccins ».

    Co-signataire de cette tribune, Pierre-Jean Ternamian, président de l’Union régionale des professionnels de santé de la région Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, ne décolère pas. « J’ai martelé à toutes les réunions depuis le printemps, à l’échelon régional comme au niveau national, l’impérieuse nécessité de se préparer à la vaccination. On n’avait pas de nouvelles, on se disait : “Ils vont nous faire n’importe quoi”, et d’un coup on a vu surgir “SI-Vac”… Là on s’est dit qu’ils étaient en train d’inventer l’eau chaude, en pensant reproduire en deux mois dix ans d’expertise », peste ce médecin radiologue, qui a promu MesVaccins dans sa région et a même contribué à son développement.

    Pierre-Jean Ternamian avait écrit sur le sujet à Jean Castex avant l’explosion de la seconde vague, le 17 août 2020. Le chef de cabinet du premier ministre lui a répondu un mois et demi plus tard, dans un courrier daté du 1er octobre 2020, en renvoyant vers le conseiller technique pour la santé du cabinet, qui « ne manquera pas de vous contacter prochainement par téléphone ». « Je n’ai jamais eu de nouvelles », constate M. Ternamian.

    D’autres professionnels avaient aussi prévenu les autorités, dès le printemps, sur la nécessité d’anticiper la question du système d’information liée à la campagne de vaccination. « Mi-avril, nous avons écrit à nos interlocuteurs de la DNS pour évoquer les enjeux de la mise en place d’une future campagne de vaccination contre le Covid-19 », explique Jean-Louis Koeck de MesVaccins. Début mai 2020, une réunion a été organisée avec plusieurs membres de la Délégation ministérielle du numérique en santé (DNS), sans suite jusqu’au mois d’octobre.

    Le 9 juillet 2020, au creux de l’été, les membres du Conseil scientifique, du Care et du Comité Vaccin Covid-19, les trois groupes formés par Emmanuel Macron pour le conseiller dans ses décisions, ont rendu un avis important sur la question. « De nombreuses inconnues persistent sur le plan scientifique, mais il est indispensable d’avancer vers l’élaboration d’une stratégie vaccinale afin d’anticiper des questions aussi fondamentales que “qui vacciner et comment ?” dès qu’un vaccin sera disponible », prévenaient-ils alors, en indiquant que « l’occasion de diffuser/généraliser la mise en place d’un carnet électronique de vaccination doit être envisagée ». Lancée en plein remaniement ministériel, cette recommandation est restée lettre morte.

    #vaccin #Accenture #secret_médical #dossier_médical (très partageable) #campagne_vaccinale #attardés

  • Journeys of hope: what will migration routes into Europe look like in 2021? | Global development | The Guardian
    https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2021/jan/14/journeys-of-hope-what-will-migration-routes-into-europe-look-like-in-20
    https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/702b605b8c2f99aab20674bcf266d02354d1d707/120_0_3429_2057/master/3429.jpg?width=1200&height=630&quality=85&auto=format&fit=crop&overlay-ali

    “The onset of the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020 has decreased migration flows along the western Balkan route,” says Nicola Bay, DRC country director for Bosnia. Last year, 15,053 people arrived in BiH, compared with 29,196 in 2019. “But in the absence of real solutions the humanitarian situation for those entering BiH remains unacceptable and undignified.”In December, a fire destroyed a migrant camp in Bosnia, which had been built to contain the spread of Covid-19 among the migrant population. The same day the International Organization for Migration declared the effective closure of the facility. The destruction of the camp, which was strongly criticised by rights groups as inadequate due to its lack of basic resources, has left thousands of asylum seekers stranded in snow-covered forests and subzero temperatures. When countries in the region begin to ease Covid-19 restrictions this year, Bay says it is highly likely there will be a surge of arrivals to BiH, which remains the main transit point for those wanting to reach Europe – a scenario for which the EU and the region remain unprepared.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#ue#balkans#sante#humanitaire#oim#camp#transit#restrictionsanitaire#vulnerabilite

  • L’ASGI demande à la #Cour_des_comptes italienne l’ouverture d’une #enquête sur l’utilisation des #fonds_publics dans les #centres_de_détention en Libye

    L’ASGI a déposé une #plainte auprès de la Cour des comptes à Rome, soulignant plusieurs profils critiques liés aux activités menées par certaines ONG italiennes en Libye avec des fonds de l’#Agence_italienne_pour_la_coopération_au_développement (AICS).

    La plainte est basée sur le rapport « Profils critiques des activités des ONG italiennes dans les centres de détention en Libye avec des fonds de l’AICS » (https://sciabacaoruka.asgi.it/en/italian-ngos-activities-in-libyan-detention-centres), publié le 15 juillet 2020, dans lequel l’ASGI analyse une série de documents obtenus du ministère des affaires étrangères et de l’AICS suite à des demandes d’accès civique. La plainte porte à l’attention de la Cour des comptes de nombreux profils critiques dans la conception et la mise en œuvre des actions au sein des centres de détention en Libye, en partie déjà mis en évidence dans le rapport.

    La plainte affirme que dans certains centres, les ONG italiennes semblent avoir effectué des activités au profit de l’entretien des locaux de détention plutôt que des détenus, avec des activités visant à préserver leur solidité et leur efficacité. Par conséquent, ces interventions pourraient avoir contribué à renforcer la capacité du centre à accueillir, même à l’avenir, de nouveaux prisonniers dans des conditions désespérément inhumaines. En outre, bien que les centres libyens soient universellement reconnus comme des lieux de torture et de mortification de la dignité humaine, le gouvernement italien n’a pas conditionné la mise en œuvre de ces interventions à un engagement quelconque envers les autorités de Tripoli pour apporter une amélioration durable des conditions des étrangers y détenus.

    Dans la plainte l’ASGI souligne que la mise en œuvre d’interventions d’urgence en faveur de personnes détenues dans des conditions inhumaines sur ordre d’un gouvernement étranger ne semble pas relever de la promotion de la « coopération et du #développement » prévue par le statut de l’AICS.

    La plainte attire également l’attention de la Cour des comptes sur les doutes de l’ASGI quant à la destination réelle des biens et services fournis, compte tenue aussi de la décision du ministère des affaires étrangères d’interdire au personnel italien de se rendre en Libye. Le fait que la gestion de la plupart des centres de détention officiels soit menée par les milices, et l’approximation de la déclaration des dépenses encourues par certaines ONG dans leurs activités, ne semblent pas avoir conduit l’AICS à exercer un contrôle strict sur la dépense de fonds publics et sur ce qui est effectivement mis en œuvre par les partenaires libyens sur le terrain.

    Par cette plainte, l’ASGI demande donc à la Cour des comptes d’examiner si le comportement de l’AICS est conforme à ses objectifs statutaires et à ses obligations de veiller à la bonne utilisation des fonds publics, en déterminant les responsabilités éventuelles de l’Agence tant du point de vue d’un éventuel #préjudice_budgétaire que d’un éventuel préjudice à l’image du gouvernement italien.

    https://sciabacaoruka.asgi.it/fr/lasgi-demande-a-la-cour-des-comptes-italienne-louverture-dune-enq
    #justice #Italie #centres #camps #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés

  • Vers un #tournant_rural en #France ?

    En France, la seconde moitié du XXe siècle marque une accélération : c’est durant cette période que la population urbaine progresse le plus fortement pour devenir bien plus importante que la population rurale. À l’équilibre jusqu’à l’après-guerre, la part des urbains explose durant les « trente glorieuses » (1945-1973).

    Dans les analyses de l’occupation humaine du territoire national, l’#exode_rural – ce phénomène qui désigne l’abandon des campagnes au profit des centres urbains – a marqué l’histoire de France et de ses territoires. En témoigne nombre de récits et d’études, à l’image des travaux de Pierre Merlin dans les années 1970 et, plus proches de nous, ceux de Bertrand Hervieu.

    Ce long déclin des campagnes est documenté, pointé, par moment combattu. Mais depuis 1975, et surtout après 1990, des phénomènes migratoires nouveaux marquent un renversement. Le #rural redevient accueillant. La #périurbanisation, puis la #rurbanisation ont enclenché le processus.

    La période actuelle marquée par un contexte sanitaire inédit questionne encore plus largement. N’assisterait-on pas à un #renversement_spatial ? La crise en cours semble en tous cas accélérer le phénomène et faire émerger une « #transition_rurale ».

    Si cette hypothèse peut être débattue au niveau démographique, politique, économique et culturel, elle nous pousse surtout à faire émerger un nouveau référentiel d’analyse, non plus pensé depuis l’#urbanité, mais depuis la #ruralité.


    https://twitter.com/afpfr/status/1078546339133353989

    De l’exode rural…

    Dans la mythologie moderne française, l’exode rural a une place reconnue. Les #campagnes, qui accueillent jusque dans les années 1930 une majorité de Français, apparaissent comme le réservoir de main-d’œuvre dont l’industrie, majoritairement présente dans les villes a alors cruellement besoin. Il faut ainsi se rappeler qu’à cette époque, la pluriactivité est répandue et que les manufactures ne font pas toujours le plein à l’heure de l’embauche en période de travaux dans les champs.

    Il faudra attendre l’après-Seconde Guerre mondiale, alors que le mouvement se généralise, pour que la sociologie rurale s’en empare et prenne la mesure sociale des conséquences, jusqu’à proclamer, en 1967 avec #Henri_Mendras, « la #fin_des_paysans ».

    L’#urbanisation constitue le pendant de ce phénomène et structure depuis la géographie nationale. Dans ce contexte, la concentration des populations à l’œuvre avait déjà alerté, comme en témoigne le retentissement de l’ouvrage de Jean‑François Gravier Paris et le désert français (1947). Quelques années plus tard, une politique d’#aménagement_du_territoire redistributive sera impulsée ; elle propose une #délocalisation volontaire des emplois de l’#Ile-de-France vers la « #province », mais sans véritablement peser sur l’avenir des campagnes. Le temps était alors surtout aux métropoles d’équilibre et aux grands aménagements (ville nouvelle – TGV – création portuaire).

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JEC0rgDjpeE&feature=emb_logo

    Pour la France des campagnes, l’exode rural se traduisit par un déplacement massif de population, mais aussi, et surtout, par une perte d’#identité_culturelle et une remise en cause de ses fondements et de ses #valeurs.

    Le virage de la #modernité, avec sa recherche de rationalité, de productivité et d’efficacité, ne fut pas négocié de la même manière. Les campagnes reculées, où se pratique une agriculture peu mécanisable, subirent de plein fouet le « progrès » ; tandis que d’autres milieux agricoles du centre et de l’ouest de la France s’en tirèrent mieux. L’#exploitant_agricole remplace désormais le #paysan ; des industries de transformation, notamment agroalimentaires, émergent. Mais globalement, le rural quitta sa dominante agricole et avec elle ses spécificités. La campagne, c’était la ville en moins bien.

    Ce référentiel, subi par les populations « restantes », structurait la #vision_nationale et avec elle les logiques d’action de l’État. Cette histoire se poursuivit, comme en témoignent les politiques actuelles de soutien à la #métropolisation, heureusement questionnées par quelques-uns.

    … à l’exode urbain !

    Le recensement de 1975 marque un basculement. Pour la première fois, la population rurale se stabilise et des migrations de la ville vers ses #périphéries sont à l’œuvre.

    Le mouvement qualifié de « périurbanisation » puis de « rurbanisation » marquait une continuité, toujours relative et fixée par rapport à la ville. La « périurbanisation » exprimait les migrations en périphéries, un desserrement urbain. La « rurbanisation », la généralisation du mode de vie urbain, même loin d’elle. Le processus n’est pas homogène et il explique pour une grande part la #fragmentation contemporaine de l’#espace_rural en y conférant des fonctions résidentielles ou récréatives, sur fond d’emplois agricoles devenus minoritaires. Ainsi, la banlieue lyonnaise, l’arrière-pays vauclusien et la campagne picarde offrent différents visages de la ruralité contemporaine.

    Parallèlement, dans les territoires les plus délaissés (en Ardèche, dans l’Ariège, dans les Alpes-de-Haute-Provence par exemple), un « #retour_à_la_terre » s’opère. Si le grand public connaît ces nouveaux résidents sous l’appellation de « #néo-ruraux », des moments successifs peuvent être distingués.

    La chercheuse Catherine Rouvière s’intéressa à ce phénomène en Ardèche ; elle le décrypte en 5 moments.

    Les premiers, avec les « #hippies » (1969-1973), marquèrent culturellement le mouvement, mais peu l’espace, à l’inverse des « néo-ruraux proprement dits » (1975-1985) qui réussirent plus largement leur installation. Plus tard, les « #travailleurs_à_la_campagne » (1985-1995) furent les premiers à faire le choix d’exercer leur métier ailleurs qu’en ville. Enfin, les politiques néolibérales engagèrent dans ce mouvement les « personnes fragiles fuyant la ville » (1995-2005) et mirent en action les « #altermondialistes » (2005-2010). Le départ de la ville est donc ancien.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NcOiHbvsoA0&feature=emb_logo

    Jean‑Paul Guérin, voit déjà en 1983 dans ce phénomène d’exode urbain une opportunité pour les territoires déshérités de retrouver une élite. Ce qu’on qualifie aujourd’hui d’émigration massive avait ainsi été repéré depuis près de 30 ans, même si l’Insee l’a toujours méthodiquement minoré.

    Vers une transition rurale ?

    Présenter ainsi l’histoire contemporaine des migrations françaises de manière symétrique et binaire est pourtant trompeur.

    Tout comme l’exode rural est à nuancer, l’exode urbain engagé il y a des décennies mérite de l’être aussi. Les relations ville-campagne sont bien connues, la ruralité se décline dorénavant au pluriel et de nouveaux équilibres sont souvent recherchés. Malgré cela, la période actuelle nous oblige à poser un regard différent sur cette histoire géographique au long cours. La crise de la #Covid-19 marque une accélération des mouvements.

    Aujourd’hui, quelques auteurs s’interrogent et proposent des ajustements. En appelant à une Plouc Pride, une marche des fiertés des campagnes, Valérie Jousseaume nous invite ainsi collectivement à nous questionner sur la nouvelle place de la ruralité.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agAuOcgcOUQ&feature=emb_logo

    Et si, au fond, cette tendance témoignait d’un basculement, d’une transition, d’un tournant rural, démographique, mais aussi et surtout culturel ?

    La période rend en effet visible « des #exilés_de_l’urbain » qui s’inscrivent clairement dans un autre référentiel de valeurs, dans la continuité de ce qui fut appelé les migrations d’agrément. Celles-ci, repérées initialement en Amérique du Nord dans les années 1980 puis en France dans les années 2000, fonctionnent sur une logique de rapprochement des individus à leurs lieux de loisirs et non plus de travail.

    L’enjeu pour ces personnes consiste à renoncer à la ville et non plus de continuer à en dépendre. Dans la ruralité, de nombreux territoires conscients de ce changement tentent de s’affirmer, comme la Bretagne ou le Pays basque.

    Pourtant ils versent souvent, à l’image des métropoles, dans les politiques classiques de #compétitivité et d’#attractivité (#marketing_territorial, politique culturelle, territoire écologique, créatif, innovant visant à attirer entrepreneurs urbains et classes supérieures) et peu s’autorisent des politiques non conventionnelles. Ce phénomène mimétique nous semble d’autant plus risqué que dès 1978, Michel Marié et Jean Viard nous alertaient en affirmant que « les villes n’ont pas les concepts qu’il faut pour penser le monde rural ». Mais alors, comment penser depuis la ruralité ?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YOEyqkK2hTQ&feature=emb_logo

    Il s’agit d’ouvrir un autre référentiel qui pourrait à son tour servir à relire les dynamiques contemporaines. Le référentiel urbain moderne a construit un monde essentiellement social, prédictif et rangé. Ses formes spatiales correspondent à des zonages, des voies de circulation rapides et de l’empilement. Ici, l’#artificialité se conjugue avec la #densité.

    Le rural accueille, en coprésence, une diversité de réalités. Ainsi, la #naturalité se vit dans la #proximité. Ce phénomène n’est pas exclusif aux territoires peu denses, la naturalisation des villes est d’ailleurs largement engagée. Mais l’enjeu de l’intégration de nouveaux habitants dans le rural est d’autant plus fort, qu’en plus de toucher la vie des communautés locales, il se doit de concerner ici plus encore qu’ailleurs les milieux écologiques.

    Le trait n’est plus alors celui qui sépare (la #frontière), mais devient celui qui fait #lien (la #connexion). La carte, objet du géographe, doit aussi s’adapter à ce nouvel horizon. Et la période qui s’ouvre accélère tous ces questionnements !

    L’histoire de la civilisation humaine est née dans les campagnes, premiers lieux défrichés pour faire exister le monde. La ville n’est venue que plus tard. Son efficacité a par contre repoussé la limite jusqu’à dissoudre la campagne prise entre urbanité diffuse et espace naturel. Mais face aux changements en cours, à un nouvel âge de la #dispersion, la question qui se pose apparaît de plus en plus : pour quoi a-t-on encore besoin des villes ?

    https://theconversation.com/vers-un-tournant-rural-en-france-151490
    #villes #campagne #démographie #coronavirus #pandémie

  • #Damien_Carême dans « à l’air libre » sur la #politique_migratoire européenne et française
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KU1TpPLjRzI&feature=youtu.be

    –—

    Quelques citations :

    Damien Carême :

    « On est reparti [au parlement européen] sur les discussion sur le #pacte asile migration pour voir dans quelles conditions celui qui nous est proposé maintenant est pire que le précédent, parce qu’on nivelle par le bas les exigences. On l’appelait la directive #Dublin il y encore quelque temps, aujourd’hui moi je dis que c’est la #Directive_Budapest parce qu’on s’est aligné sur les désirs de #Orban vis-à-vis de la politique de migration, et c’est pas possible qu’on laisse faire cette politique-là. [Aujourd’hui] C’est laisser les camps en #Grèce, laisser les gens s’accumuler, laisser les pays de première entrée en Europe s’occuper de la demande d’asile et permettre maintenant aux Etats qui sont à l’extérieur (la Suède, la France, l’Allemagne ou ailleurs) organiser le retour, depuis la Grèce, depuis l’Italie, depuis l’Espagne en se lavant les mains. »

    –—

    Sur le manque chronique de #logement pour les exilés en France... et la demande de #réquisition de #logements_vacants de la part des associations...
    Question du journaliste : pourquoi les mairies, et notamment les mairies de gauche et écologistes ne le font pas ?

    Damien Carême :

    « C’est à eux qu’il faut poser la question, moi je ne le comprends pas, moi, je l’ai fait chez moi. Je ne souhaite pas faire des camps, c’est pas l’idée de faire des #camps partout, mais parce que j’avais pas d’école vide, j’avais pas d’ancien hôpital, d’ancienne caserne, de vieux bâtiments pour héberger ces personnes. Donc on peut accueillir ces personnes-là, je ne comprends pas pourquoi ils ne le font pas. Je milite en tant que président de l’association #ANVITA pour l’#accueil_inconditionnel »

    Journaliste : Qu’est-ce que vous diriez à #Anne_Hidalgo ?

    « On travaille ensemble... on ne peut pas laisser ces personnes là... il faut les rendre visibles. Il a raison #Yann_Manzi d’#Utopia_56 dans le reportage. Il ne faut surtout pas jouer la politique du gouvernement qui joue l’#invisibilité. Et le ras-le-bol des #bénévoles... moi je connais des bénévoles à Grande-Synthe, ça fait 20 ans qu’ils sont là pour aider des exilés qui arrivent sur le territoire... ils sont épuisés, et c’est l’#épuisement que joue le gouvernement. Il ne faut pas céder à cela et il faut en arriver de temps en temps à un #rapport_de_force pour faire en sorte qu’on ouvre [des bâtiments vides] pour que ces gens ne soient pas à la rue. »

    Journaliste : un mot pour qualifier la politique migratoire du gouvernement

    « C’est la #politique_du_refus. C’est une politique d’#extrême_droite. D’ailleurs l’extrême droite applaudit des 4 mains ce que fait aujourd’hui le gouvernement. »

    Sur la situation à #Briançon :
    Damien Carême :

    « C’est du #harcèlement organisé par l’Etat pour jouer l’épuisement sur les bénévoles mais aussi chez les exilés qui arrivent. Et on voit bien que ça ne sert à rien. Macron, à grand renfort de pub a annoncé qu’il doublait les forces de l’ordre à la frontière italienne pour éviter les entrées, y a jamais eu autant d’entrée à la #frontière franco-italienne... »

    Journaliste : "Il y a quasiment autant d’exilés que de policiers qui dorment dans les hôtels de la ville..."
    Damien Carême :

    « Mais bien sûr ! Le budget de #Frontex est passé de 50 millions à l’origine à 476 millions aujourd’hui, ça ne change rien. La seule chose que ça change, c’est qu’aujourd’hui, à Calais, pour passer de l’autre côté en Angleterre, il y a des gens qui prennent des #small_boats et il y a des gens qui meurent en traversant le détroit de la Manche. Et c’est ça qui est grave. Et c’est ça que font ces politiques ! Que le #trafic_d'êtres_humains est le troisième trafic international après les armes et la drogue, parce que le coût du passage a énormément augmenté. A Grande-Synthe en 2015, on me disait que c’était 800 euros le passage garanti, aujourd’hui c’est entre 10 et 14’000 euros. C’est toute l’#efficacité de cette politique-là. Donc changeons de politique : dépensons beaucoup moins d’argent à faire de la #répression [utilisons-le] en organisant l’accueil »

    Commentaire à partir de cette photo, prise à Grande-Synthe :


    Journaliste : Pourquoi ça se passe comment ça, sachant que c’est votre ancien adjoint, un socialiste, #Martial_Beyaert, qui est maire maintenant ?
    Damien Carême :

    "Il avait toujours été d’accord avec notre politique d’accueil. A partir du moment dans lequel il a assumé la responsabilité, il s’est réfugié derrière la volonté du préfet. Et aujourd’hui il dit qu’il est prêt à ouvrir le gymnase, « mais il faut que l’Etat soit d’accord pour le faire, et l’Etat n’est pas d’accord ». Mais l’Etat ne sera jamais d’accord, donc c’est du #cynisme de tenir ces propos aujourd’hui".

    Sur l’ANVITA :
    Damien Carême :

    « C’est un réseau de soutien, c’est un réseau de pression, il y a 44 communes, 3 régions et 2 départements. »

    Journaliste : c’est facile d’être solidaire en ce moment ?

    Damien Carême : « Oui c’est facile. En fait, tout repose sur l’#imaginaire, sur les #récits qu’on peut faire. Nous, ce qu’on a fait quand on était à Grande-Synthe, et c’est ce qui se passe dans plein de villes... quand on accueille réellement, quand on met en relation les populations accueillies et les populations accueillantes, tout se passe merveilleusement bien. »

    Carême parle de #Lyon comme prochaine ville qui intégrera le réseau... et il rapporte les mots de #Gérard_Collomb :
    Damien Carême :

    "Lyon c’est quand même symbolique, parce que Gérard Collomb... qui avait été, pour moi, le ministre de l’intérieur le plus cynique, lui aussi, puisqu’il m’avait dit quand je l’avais vu en entretien en septembre 2017, ouvert les guillemets : « On va leur faire passer l’envie de venir chez nous », fermées les guillemets. C’était les propos d’un ministre de l’intérieur sur la politique migratoire qui allait été mise en ville"

    L’ANVITA....

    « c’est mettre en réseau ces collectivités, c’est montrer qu’on peut faire, qu’on peut faire de l’accueil sans soulèvement de population... Et c’est bientôt créer un réseau européen, car il y a des réseaux comme ça en Allemagne, en Belgique, en Italie, et fédérer ces réseaux »

    Damien Carême :

    « Dans la #crise_écologique, dans la #crise_climatique qu’on vit, il y a la crise migratoire, enfin... c’est pas une #crise_migratoire, c’est structurel, c’est pas conjoncturel la migration : c’est depuis toujours et ça durera toujours. C’est quelque chose à intégrer. Et donc intégrons-le dans nos politiques publiques. C’est pas une calamité, c’est une #chance parfois d’avoir cet apport extérieur. Et toute l’histoire de l’humanité nous le raconte parfaitement »

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #interview #Calais #France #Grande-Synthe #camp_humanitaire #camps_de_réfugiés #accueil #rhétorique #appel_d'air #solidarité #mouvements_citoyens #associations #sauvetage #mer #secours_en_mer #Frontex #Fabrice_Leggeri #refus #harcèlement_policier #passeurs #militarisation_des_frontières #efficacité

    signalé par @olaf : https://seenthis.net/messages/898383

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Greece’s new confidentiality law aims to conceal grave violations against asylum seekers

    We strongly condemn Greece’s new law prohibiting NGOs’ first-hand account of abuses inside refugee camps, said the Euro-Mediterranean Human Rights Monitor in a statement today. The new confidentiality law is in essence an alarming measure to muzzle NGO workers and undermine their crucial role in highlighting the unbearable suffering asylum seekers are subjected to in infamous migrant camps.

    Earlier this week, the Greek government has enacted a law that prevents all workers, including volunteers and government civil servants, from publicly sharing any information related to the operations or residents of refugee camps in the country, also after they have stopped working there. This means that NGO workers won’t be allowed to publicly raise any concerns about potential violations against asylum seekers in those camps or the inhumane conditions they are forced to live through, such as overcrowding, inadequate infrastructure, scarce food and water supply, and appalling sanitary conditions.

    This is not the first attempt of the Greek government to restrict and criminalize solidarity and aid towards migrants. Since its victory at the elections in mid-2019, the right-wing New Democracy party has started pursuing a campaign against NGOs and civil society actors supporting refugees and asylum seekers, with some members also accusing NGOs of smuggling and trafficking people.

    In July 2020, the government declared (https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/25447/ngos-in-greece-told-to-register-or-cease-operations) that all NGOs working in refugee camps would have to register in order to continue to work and many had to cease their operations. On that occasion, 73 organizations released a statement (https://helprefugees.org/news/statement-greek-ngo-registration) to condemn the unnecessary and disproportional barriers imposed on their work, essential to cover the gaps in the provision of basic services, including legal and medical assistance, housing, informal education and human rights’ monitoring.

    It’s still uncertain how the new law will be implemented, but the mere fact of enacting it is already a clear sign of power and repressive control over asylum issues from the conservative government. The New Democracy party aims at showcasing its ability to curb migration flows within the country better than the previous left-wing Syriza government. Yet this control is done at the expense of refugees and asylum seekers’ human rights.

    Both in the Greek islands and on the mainland, the poor and unsanitary conditions in refugee camps have been extensively documented. Euro-Med Monitor has recently collected first-hand material and information from Greek camps, showing the appalling and inhumane conditions that migrants are forced to endure in such sites.

    “NGOs’ reporting from refugee camps offers timely eyewitness accounts of abuses, provides visibility to the struggles asylum seekers and refugees live daily and reminds political leaders both locally and globally that human rights’ violations will not go unnoticed” said Michela Pugliese, legal researcher at Euro-Med Monitor.

    Euro-Med Monitor calls on Greece to urgently retract this new law; to engage in constructive dialogue with humanitarian workers and volunteers operating in refugee camps; and to concretely support, rather than hinder, their essential work to protect and fulfil migrants and asylum seekers’ fundamental rights.

    https://euromedmonitor.org/en/article/4057/Greece%E2%80%99s-new-confidentiality-law-aims-to-conceal-grave-viola
    #censure #camps_de_réfugiés #asile #migrations #réfugiés #loi #Grèce #confidentialité #solidarité #associations #liberté_d'expression

  • IOM run camps in Bosnia: Structural violence is not an incident

    We demand transparency in the work of international organizations and an immediate switch to the practices of care and justice!

    Since 2018, when the first “temporary reception center” run by the IOM and financed by large from the EU, was established in Bosnia and Herzegovina, people placed in camps have been trying to draw the attention of the public. They have been united in saying that living conditions have been below any standards. At the same time, IOM representatives, as well as the EU, have been repeating that the centers have been built in accordance with the “European standards”. However, they have never told us what these standards are.

    At the moment, camp Blažuj near Sarajevo is the biggest concentration camp in BiH with over 3.200 people ‘housed’ inside. The conditions are precarious. No hot water, food is only basic, it is overcrowded, no heating, many people have scabies, every illness is treated with paracetamol and brufen (DRC responsibility). A similar precarious situation is in another camp near Sarajevo, Ušivak.

    People in Sarajevo are receiving everyday pleas for help from the people in the camps. They ask for food, clothes, hygiene supplies, even baby diapers. Tensions are high and occur in daily conflicts. Additionally, the part of the staff in centers is rude, unprofessional, abusive, and often disrespectful towards the people. Local police enter the camps, and the surrounding area, often using methods that should be scrutinized.

    Therefore, we must ask: Do mass, overcrowded camps represent the “European standard” of living? Is the absence of basic living conditions like hot water and heating, the absence of medical care and treatment, the absence of regular diet and widespread hunger, the absence of human care and compassion the “European standard”? Are mass camps soon becoming new mass graves, as a result of the European living standard in question?

    The atmosphere of tension culminated in Blažuj on the evening of January 20th, when a huge fight broke inside the camp. Another one. Each time it is bigger and bigger. IOM cannot negate this as we all saw the fire a few nights ago, which was the result of one such fight. Those who are running camp do not have the knowledge, or willingness, to deal with tensions, meaning to provide more psychological support than security, better conditions, and activities that would make people at least feel human. Instead of that, the IOM and others have decided to limit media access, and to monitor contacts ‘residents’ have with people outside of the camp and the media, often punishing those who are found to communicate with people outside and accused of sending true information about the conditions in the camp (that should be public anyway). Those who do that are often punished with retaliation, expulsion, or even detention inside the special area in the camps, but also in official detention centers in Bosnia, where with no trials or delivered sentences people are kept sometimes for months.

    In the end, the media, IOM, and authorities put the perpetual blame on people on the move, demonizing and criminalizing them in order to justify their own (wrong) doings and (mis)handlings.

    We ask for transparency in the work of international organizations, and an immediate switch to the practices of care and justice. People in Bosnia, but also many other countries in a similar situation, have been asking for this for decades, with little success, while witnessing what could be described as very problematic behaviour of the personnel and leaders of the international organizations (e.g. during the war, especially in so called “safe zones”, or after the war when the UN personnel was involved in human trafficking).

    - unlimited media access to the camps

    – freedom of speech for people inside the camps

    - utter protection from all kinds of violence

    – access to nutritive food, hot and drinking water, hygienic care, medical treatments, mental health support

    – end to the police, military, and security guards’ violence.

    No more structural violence.

    No more mass camps.

    No more (mass) graves.

    Transbalkan Solidarity

    https://transbalkanskasolidarnost.home.blog/iom-run-camps-in-bosnia-structural-violence-is-not-

    #violence_structurelle #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Bosnie #OIM #IOM #camps_de_réfugiés #Blažuj #Blazuj #Balkans #route_des_Balkans

    ping @isskein @karine4

    • Bosnia: Fight in migrant camp leaves three officials injured

      Two police officers and an IOM employee suffered minor injuries in clashes at the Blazuj migrant reception center near Sarajevo on Wednesday, police said. More than 3,000 migrants are currently housed at the former military barracks.

      Police were called late Wednesday night to intervene in a fight that had broken out between migrants at the center outside Bosnian capital Sarajevo.

      “During the intervention, migrants attacked police officers and damaged several police and International Organization for Migration (IOM) cars, as well as IOM offices,” police spokesperson Mirza Hadziabdic told the news agency AFP.

      Hadziabdic confirmed that two police officers and an IOM employee were slightly injured, and that the property damaged in the clash included computers and other equipment.

      According to a statement by the IOM, “a skirmish between two migrants … quickly escalated into a bigger fight.” It was not immediately clear if anyone was arrested, AP reports.

      In Bosnian media, the incident was described as a major clash. The news platform Klix.ba published images of smashed cars and reported that police brought in members of special units with dogs. According to Klix.ba, around 2,000 migrants clashed with police and threw stones.

      Klix.ba reported on Friday that six persons involved in the scuffles had received deportation orders from the foreigners’ office and local authorities in the Sarajevo Canton. One Iranian national reportedly also received an an entry ban of three years and is due to be deported.
      Tense situation for migrants in Bosnia

      Bosnia is a transit country for migrants, mainly from Asia, Africa and the Middle East, who travel along the Balkan route in hopes of reaching Western Europe. Many however remain stranded in Bosnia and fail to cross into EU member state Croatia — their attempts are thwarted by Croatian border police who are regularly accused of applying force to push migrants back into Bosnia.

      Bosnia has struggled to manage a growing number of migrant arrivals since 2018 and most recently, the EU called upon Bosnia to provide adequate housing for migrants who are stranded in the country and face harsh winter conditions.

      According to estimates from EU and IOM officials, there are currently between 8,000 and 9,000 migrants in Bosnia.

      Around 6,000 migrants are living in five centers run by the IOM.

      Roughly 900 migrants are living in heated tents at Lipa camp, which the Bosnian army set up after weeks of criticism from the international community over the conditions at the camp.

      Roughly 2,000 migrants are camping out in the woods and in abandoned buildings in northwestern Bosnia, and their situation is becoming increasingly dangerous.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/29826/bosnia-fight-in-migrant-camp-leaves-three-officials-injured

    • Twenty Police Cars damaged by Migrants in Blazuj

      In last night’s riots in the migrant center in Blazuj near Sarajevo, 20 vehicles of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Sarajevo Canton and several IOM vehicles were damaged. This information was confirmed for Klix.ba by the Minister of the Interior of Canton Sarajevo, Admir Katica.

      Two injured police officers and one International Organization for Migrations employee is the epilogue of the chaos that happened last night in the migrant camp in Blazuj. This information was confirmed for “Avaz” by Mirza Hadziabdic, spokesman for the Ministry of the Interior of the Sarajevo Canton, and added that 2,000 migrants took part in the riots.

      The situation calmed down last night at 10:50 p.m. The police are still on the spot, an investigation is being carried out, and no one has been detained so far – Hadziabdic added.

      Recall, the workers of the International Organization for Migration (IOM) tried to move to another camp a migrant who disturbed the order and who is the leader of one of the groups in this camp. Migrants tried to release him by force, after which there was a conflict.

      https://www.sarajevotimes.com/around-2000-migrants-participated-in-riots-in-blazuj

  • How the Pandemic Turned Refugees Into ‘Guinea Pigs’ for Surveillance Tech

    An interview with Dr. Petra Molnar, who spent 2020 investigating the use of drones, facial recognition, and lidar on refugees

    The coronavirus pandemic unleashed a new era in surveillance technology, and arguably no group has felt this more acutely than refugees. Even before the pandemic, refugees were subjected to contact tracing, drone and LIDAR tracking, and facial recognition en masse. Since the pandemic, it’s only gotten worse. For a microcosm of how bad the pandemic has been for refugees — both in terms of civil liberties and suffering under the virus — look no further than Greece.

    Greek refugee camps are among the largest in Europe, and they are overpopulated, with scarce access to water, food, and basic necessities, and under constant surveillance. Researchers say that many of the surveillance techniques and technologies — especially experimental, rudimentary, and low-cost ones — used to corral refugees around the world were often tested in these camps first.

    “Certain communities already marginalized, disenfranchised are being used as guinea pigs, but the concern is that all of these technologies will be rolled out against the broader population and normalized,” says Petra Molnar, Associate Director of the Refugee Law Lab, York University.

    Molnar traveled to the Greek refugee camps on Lesbos in 2020 as part of a fact-finding project with the advocacy group European Digital Rights (EDRi). She arrived right after the Moria camp — the largest in Europe at the time — burned down and forced the relocation of thousands of refugees. Since her visit, she has been concerned about the rise of authoritarian technology and how it might be used against the powerless.

    With the pandemic still raging and states more desperate than ever to contain it, it seemed a good time to discuss the uses and implications of surveillance in the refugee camps. Molnar, who is still in Greece and plans to continue visiting the camps once the nation’s second lockdown lifts, spoke to OneZero about the kinds of surveillance technology she saw deployed there, and what the future holds — particularly with the European Border and Coast Guard Agency, Molnar says, adding “that they’ve been using Greece as a testing ground for all sorts of aerial surveillance technology.”

    This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

    OneZero: What kinds of surveillance practices and technologies did you see in the camps?

    Petra Molnar: I went to Lesbos in September, right after the Moria camp burned down and thousands of people were displaced and sent to a new camp. We were essentially witnessing the birth of the Kara Tepes camp, a new containment center, and talked to the people about surveillance, and also how this particular tragedy was being used as a new excuse to bring more technology, more surveillance. The [Greek] government is… basically weaponizing Covid to use it as an excuse to lock the camps down and make it impossible to do any research.

    When you are in Lesbos, it is very clear that it is a testing ground, in the sense that the use of tech is quite rudimentary — we are not talking about thermal cameras, iris scans, anything like that, but there’s an increase in the appetite of the Greek government to explore the use of it, particularly when they try to control large groups of people and also large groups coming from the Aegean. It’s very early days for a lot of these technologies, but everything points to the fact that Greece is Europe’s testing ground.

    They are talking about bringing biometric control to the camps, but we know for example that the Hellenic Coast Guard has a drone that they have been using for self-promotion, propaganda, and they’ve now been using it to follow specific people as they are leaving and entering the camp. I’m not sure if the use of drones was restricted to following refugees once they left the camps, but with the lockdown, it was impossible to verify. [OneZero had access to a local source who confirmed that drones are also being used inside the camps to monitor refugees during lockdown.]

    Also, people can come and go to buy things at stores, but they have to sign in and out at the gate, and we don’t know how they are going to use such data and for what purposes.

    Surveillance has been used on refugees long before the pandemic — in what ways have refugees been treated as guinea pigs for the policies and technologies we’re seeing deployed more widely now? And what are some of the worst examples of authoritarian technologies being deployed against refugees in Europe?

    The most egregious examples that we’ve been seeing are that ill-fated pilot projects — A.I. lie detectors and risk scorings which were essentially trying to use facial recognition and facial expressions’ micro-targeting to determine whether a person was more likely than others to lie at the border. Luckily, that technology was debunked and also generated a lot of debate around the ethics and human rights implications of using something like that.

    Technologies such as voice printing have been used in Germany to try to track a person’s country of origin or their ethnicity, facial recognition made its way into the new Migration’s Pact, and Greece is thinking about automating the triage of refugees, so there’s an appetite at the EU level and globally to use this tech. I think 2021 will be very interesting as more resources are being diverted to these types of tech.

    We saw, right when the pandemic started, that migration data used for population modeling became kind of co-opted and used to try and model flows of Covid. And this is very problematic because they are assuming that the mobile population, people on the move, and refugees are more likely to be bringing in Covid and diseases — but the numbers don’t bear out. We are also seeing the gathering of vast amounts of data for all these databases that Europe is using or will be using for a variety of border enforcement and policing in general.

    The concern is that fear’s being weaponized around the pandemic and technologies such as mobile tracking and data collection are being used as ways to control people. It is also broader, it deals with a kind of discourse around migration, on limiting people’s rights to move. Our concern is that it’ll open the door to further, broader rollout of this kind of tech against the general population.

    What are some of the most invasive technologies you’ve seen? And are you worried these authoritarian technologies will continue to expand, and not just in refugee camps?

    In Greece, the most invasive technologies being used now would probably be drones and unpiloted surveillance technologies, because it’s a really easy way to dehumanize that kind of area where people are crossing, coming from Turkey, trying to claim asylum. There’s also the appetite to try facial recognition technology.

    It shows just how dangerous these technologies can be both because they facilitate pushbacks, border enforcement, and throwing people away, and it really plays into this kind of idea of instead of humane responses you’d hope to happen when you see a boat in distress in the Aegean or the Mediterranean, now entities are turning towards drones and the whole kind of surveillance apparatus. It highlights how the humanity in this process has been lost.

    And the normalization of it all. Now it is so normal to use drones — everything is about policing Europe’s shore, Greece being a shield, to normalize the use of invasive surveillance tech. A lot of us are worried with talks of expanding the scope of action, mandate, and powers of Frontex [the European Border and Coast Guard Agency] and its utter lack of accountability — it is crystal clear that entities like Frontex are going to do Europe’s dirty work.

    There’s a particular framing applied when governments and companies talk about migrants and refugees, often linking them to ISIS and using careless terms and phrases to discuss serious issues. Our concern is that this kind of use of technology is going to become more advanced and more efficient.

    What is happening with regard to contact tracing apps — have there been cases where the technology was forced on refugees?

    I’ve heard about the possibility of refugees being tracked through their phones, but I couldn’t confirm. I prefer not to interact with the state through my phone, but that’s a privilege I have, a choice I can make. If you’re living in a refugee camp your options are much more constrained. Often people in the camps feel they are compelled to give access to their phones, to give their phone numbers, etc. And then there are concerns that tracking is being done. It’s really hard to track the tracking; it is not clear what’s being done.

    Aside from contact tracing, there’s the concern with the Wi-Fi connection provided in the camps. There’s often just one connection or one specific place where Wi-Fi works and people need to be connected to their families, spouses, friends, or get access to information through their phones, sometimes their only lifeline. It’s a difficult situation because, on the one hand, people are worried about privacy and surveillance, but on the other, you want to call your family, your spouse, and you can only do that through Wi-Fi and people feel they need to be connected. They have to rely on what’s available, but there’s a concern that because it’s provided by the authorities, no one knows exactly what’s being collected and how they are being watched and surveilled.

    How do we fight this surveillance creep?

    That’s the hard question. I think one of the ways that we can fight some of this is knowledge. Knowing what is happening, sharing resources among different communities, having a broader understanding of the systemic way this is playing out, and using such knowledge generated by the community itself to push for regulation and governance when it comes to these particular uses of technologies.

    We call for a moratorium or abolition of all high-risk technology in and around the border because right now we don’t have a governance mechanism in place or integrated regional or international way to regulate these uses of tech.

    Meanwhile, we have in the EU a General Data Protection Law, a very strong tool to protect data and data sharing, but it doesn’t really touch on surveillance, automation, A.I., so the law is really far behind.

    One of the ways to fight A.I. is to make policymakers understand the real harm that these technologies have. We are talking about ways that discrimination and inequality are reinforced by this kind of tech, and how damaging they are to people.

    We are trying to highlight this systemic approach to see it as an interconnected system in which all of these technologies play a part in this increasingly draconian way that migration management is being done.

    https://onezero.medium.com/how-the-pandemic-turned-refugees-into-guinea-pigs-for-surveillance-t

    #réfugiés #cobaye #surveillance #technologie #pandémie #covid-19 #coroanvirus #LIDAR #drones #reconnaissance_faciale #Grèce #camps_de_réfugiés #Lesbos #Moria #European_Digital_Rights (#EDRi) #surveillance_aérienne #complexe_militaro-industriel #Kara_Tepes #weaponization #biométrie #IA #intelligence_artificielle #détecteurs_de_mensonges #empreinte_vocale #tri #catégorisation #donneés #base_de_données #contrôle #technologies_autoritaires #déshumanisation #normalisation #Frontex #wifi #internet #smartphone #frontières

    ping @isskein @karine4

    ping @etraces

  • Pourquoi #Bergame ? Le virus au bout du territoire

    La région de Bergame en Italie a été l’un des foyers les plus actifs du coronavirus en Europe. Marco Cremaschi remet en cause les lectures opposant de manière dualiste villes et campagnes et souligne la nécessité de repenser la gouvernance de ces territoires d’entre-deux.

    https://metropolitiques.eu/Pourquoi-Bergame-Le-virus-au-bout-du-territoire.html
    #Italie #coronavirus #covid-19 #ville #campagne #habitat #densité_résidentielle #géographie #aménagement_du_territoire

  • ’I’m certain that people have died here’ – German doctor talks about his experience treating migrants in Bosnia

    Aid workers are increasingly alarmed about the worsening situation of the some 1,500 migrants stuck in northwest Bosnia, hundreds of whom are staying in abandoned buildings and makeshift forest settlements with little access to aid. InfoMigrants spoke with German streetwork doctor Gerhard Trabert about his patients’ physical and mental health, a lack of cooperation at the expense of the migrants and what ought to happen next.

    Over the past 20 years, Gerhard Trabert has done no fewer than 34 medical aid missions abroad in countries and hotspots including Afghanistan, Syria, Ethiopia, Sri Lanka, Indonesia and Lesbos.

    In 1998, the German doctor and social worker founded the aid organization “Armut und Gesundheit in Deutschland” ("Poverty and Health in Germany"), whose medical streetwork approach is to seek out homeless people so they get access to health care. For his accomplishments and services, he received Germany’s Federal Cross of Merit in 2004 and was named professor of the year in 2020, among other awards.

    Trabert’s latest mission took him to northwest Bosnia and Herzegovina, where the living conditions of the some 1,500 migrants stranded in the Una-Sana canton are becoming increasingly miserable and dangerous. For months, they have been staying there without access to the most basic necessities.

    Despite not receiving an official permit to deliver medical care, Trabert and his team managed to treat some 170 people in Bihać, the administrative center of the Una-Sana canton, and several other hotspots in the region over the course of eight days.

    InfoMigrants spoke to the 64-year-old in mid-January, three days after he returned from his trip to Bosnia. The interview, which has been edited and condensed for clarity, was conducted by InfoMigrants’ Benjamin Bathke.

    ************************

    InfoMigrants: The experiences you had in Bosnia must still be very present. What is going through your mind now that you’re back in Germany?

    Gerhard Trabert: Seeing people living in ruins without access to food, water and medical care at freezing temperatures in shabby blankets and mattresses, who make open fire to somehow keep warm; seeing the migrant camp Lipa that’s still not functioning — all this makes (you) melancholic, sad and angry because these conditions shouldn’t, they mustn’t exist; and Europe is failing to act.

    It’s bizarre that only a ten-hour car drive away from my home, it almost feels like being almost in another world. It also feels bizarre how different and incommensurate priorities can be: While protective measures against COVID-19 are being discussed in Germany, none of these measures exist for migrants and refugees in Bosnia. People complain about not being able to go skiing this winter while migrants live in cold and damp huts full of snow and mud.

    All week long we had sub-zero temperatures. After spending three hours in one of the dwellings, we were chilled to the bone. Of course we were able to go where it’s warm afterwards, but the notion that these people are living in these conditions 24/7 is unfathomable. It’s hard to convey these things if you haven’t seen them with your own eyes or sensed it with your own body, if only temporarily.


    https://twitter.com/InfoMigrants/status/1351220558529224704

    Can you tell us why you decided to go to Bosnia and what your mission looked like, broadly speaking?

    It was a very spontaneous decision after watching all the media reports. We drove down there with two mobile clinics and had contact with our Bosnian partner organization SOS Bihać upfront. We tried to get a permit but decided we could no longer wait and must give it a try. Our vehicles are rolling consulting rooms equipped with an examination couch, medical equipment, medicine, dressing material, and so on. After waiting at the Croatian-Bosnian border for six hours, we were allowed to cross the border, but without our vehicles. A few hours later, we were told we couldn’t go anywhere because of the curfew in Bosnia, so they brought us to a nearby accommodation. The next day, it took another five hours to finally enter Bosnia with our vehicles and drive to Bihać.

    Our team of five consisted of two nurses, two social workers and myself in the role of a physician. We had brought high-quality, suitable material including sleeping bags usable for down to -15°C, sleeping pads, hygiene articles like diapers and toilet paper and warm underwear. We weren’t able to use our mobile clinics, especially in the first few days, because SOS Bihać told us police would come immediately if we show up at a hotspot with the vehicles. So we put as much as we could in our backpacks and walked to the hotspots.

    One of those hotspots you described on Facebook is the run-down four-story building in Bihać of what you say used to be an elderly care facility. What did you experience there?

    We saw more than 100 Pakistani and Afghan men staying there in the freezing cold, most of them between the ages of 20 and 40. We went from floor to floor, introduced ourselves and offered help. It was so dark we had to use flash lights and headlamps at all times. There was this biting smoke everywhere from the open fireplaces they used to keep somewhat warm and cook food.

    Around one in three people had some kind of injury that required medical attention. We treated lots of cases of scabies, which causes bacteria to enter the wound through itching. Fortunately, we had brought special salves and medication needed to treat scabies, which a local pharmacy didn’t have. Many people had respiratory diseases and problems with their digestive organs like gastritis due to the cold and their general living conditions. We also saw skin wounds and severe open wounds as well as typical stress disorders like high blood pressure. During our second visit, we changed the bandages.

    Experiencing people forced to live like this was very intense. Some people told us they had been staying in the building for over a year, one even said it’s been three years. They occasionally try to cross the border, get pushed back and return to the ruin.

    https://gw.infomigrants.net/media/resize/my_image_big/5a72f32860f584ddd9f1aa6e8c805ff8e535fd37.jpeg

    What do the surroundings of the ruin look like?

    It’s a hotspot in the middle of the city, next to a river. The distance to our apartment in Bihać, which has a population of around 50,000, was only 200 meters. During the day, people were out and about in the city for a while and received some food at kiosks. I saw some shovel snow, so perhaps they received some money in exchange. But a regular care concept for these people doesn’t exist. Drinking water, groceries, sanitary facilities — the migrants are more or less dependent on themselves.

    I also noticed protests by locals, but we were told those Bosnians weren’t against refugees and migrants per se but against illegal hotspots. They called for accommodating and providing for them instead of living in the middle of Bihać by the hundreds. But it seems that nobody on the Bosnian side feels responsible for providing for them.

    What about the NGOs — to what extent can they alleviate the suffering?

    My impression after a week on the ground is that there was no real cooperation, interconnectedness or communication between the NGOs. We even sensed some competition. It’s a scrap for power and competence, and many things happened in a very uncoordinated way.

    Regarding Bosnian authorities, there are conflicts between the Una-Sana canton and the capital Sarajevo. Overall, the different players didn’t look at who has which resources, who can take on which task, and so on. I perceived the situation as absolute bleak. And I do have to say that this imbroglio was wanted from the side of Bosnian authorities, which didn’t surprise me as I know it from my time on Lesbos, where the Greek, but also the EU authorities acted similarly: Signaling time and again to the people that they were not welcome there. So I assume chaos is part of the strategy.

    How does the group dynamics among the migrants staying in the hotspots look like? Are there hierarchies and tensions?

    From my experience on the ground in Bosnia, but also from missions in other countries, I must say that there is a hierarchy among the different nationalities. Syrians usually hold the top spot, followed by Afghans, Pakistani, Bangladeshi and northern African countries like Morocco. Why? Because Syrians have the best shot at receiving asylum. Migrants there know exactly how Europe reacts. This hierarchy sometimes manifests in violent confrontations — we treated stab wounds, for instance. Moroccans and Algerians told us they couldn’t go to groups from other countries without getting sent away. There are some mixed groups, including people from Afghanistan and Pakistan as well as Moroccans and Algerians.

    What can you tell us about people’s mental health?

    Please allow me to make a short scientific digression. There are three forms of traumatization, primary, secondary and tertiary. Primary and secondary cases occur when people suffer from violence directly or observe others becoming the victim of violence, respectively. My point is about the tertiary form of traumatization, or sequential traumatization. It means that a person with a primary or secondary trauma — and that includes all the 1,500 people in northwest Bosnia — who isn’t received with respect, who isn’t able to share their experiences with others, who isn’t listened to or shown empathy, also suffers from tertiary traumatization. The tragic thing about this third form is that it is graver than the first two because only then does the trauma become chronic; only then they have flashbacks, anxieties, sleep disorders, depressions, panic attacks and heightened risk of suicide. All this means that the way we treat those people leads to another, active traumatization. And you can feel it when you talk to talk to them.

    Speaking of suicides, you said in a recent interview that you “wouldn’t be surprised if people died here”. What made you arrive at this conclusion?

    We were told there were bears and wolves in the woods in the Una-Sana canton that have attacked and killed migrants in the past, as well as many wild dogs that have bitten many of them. We treated one person with a bite wound from a dog, which is extremely dangerous because of the certain kind of germs in that wound. If such a wound isn’t treated with antibiotics, his life is in danger. We gave him a special antibiotics. He also had a swollen, infected hand. I cannot imagine that nobody has died yet — and dies — in these conditions. The question is how deaths are dealt with, and I believe they are swept under the rug. If you look at the living conditions as well as the diseases and illnesses of these people with a bit of common sense, I’m certain that people have died.

    On your Facebook page, you also wrote about treating small children.

    In Bosanska Bojna, a small village north of Bihać directly on the border with Croatia, a contact who was shooting a film there had met 20 families who lived in ramshackle houses and ruins with their infants and toddlers. We were able to drive there with our mobile clinics because there were no controls. We treated infections, inflammations of the middle ear, which unless it is treated can lead to meningitis. It seemed that the children there were well cared for by and large, but it’s always difficult to tell because children being able to suppress many things fairly well means it’s not easy to see the scars and wounds on their souls.

    Many had stomach aches and nausea, which could stem from the hygienic conditions, but could also be an indicator for a psychosomatic component. Children can also get depression, but the symptoms are different from those in adults: Most of the time, children are very nervous or hyperactive. Oftentimes, this is interpreted as attention deficit disorder, when it is in fact a depression. One sees that time and again among migrant children: Being hyperactive or reclusive, which I also saw in Bosanska Bojna. Partly no talking and no eye contact, nothing. Symptoms like these are always signs for psychic traumatization.

    What did you hear about violent push backs at the hand of Croatian police?

    We have seen many wounds on arms and legs that might well have been caused by beatings. Many call trying to cross the borders “Game” — they go back time and again in the hope to eventually encounter Croatians who allow them into the country.

    Calling it “Game” — is that some kind of coping strategy or black humor?

    I think it speaks to an optimism bias that’s especially prevalent in situations of extreme stress like the one migrants in northwest Bosnia are in. They perceive and describe their situation much more positive than it objectively is. This also manifests in their language, so “Game” is a trivialization to suppress the brutality of the experience a bit. Optimism bias also applies to their general situation and their health conditions, otherwise they wouldn’t be able to act in their situation or survive. It’s astounding what the body and the psyche do in order to deal with such life-threatening situations.

    Why do so many people choose to live outside of the camp in Lipa?

    Lipa is located at 750 meters in an area hostile to life. It is surrounded by wood, and it’s cold and windy there. There is no infrastructure nearby. The village of Lipa is hours away by foot, and you have to use a dirt road for two kilometers to reach the camp. It’s obvious that the location of the camp emphasizes to the people: “You are not welcome here, and we kind of don’t care what happens to you.”

    That’s why people look for opportunities elsewhere like in Bihać, where they might get some kind of assistance or earn some money by working somewhere. So they use former factories, the ruins of the said elderly care facility or the so-called jungle camp in Velika Kladuša, where we also treated people. These hotspots are everywhere because there is no real care concept, like I said before. So people try to create a certain amount of ’free space’ for themselves they can shape more actively — notwithstanding all the other deprivations, because hardly anybody goes to those spaces and brings food and water.

    From your perspective, what needs to happen now to help migrants in northwestern Bosnia?

    My principal claim is to evacuate all of the people there and distribute them among EU member states. It’s possible, we can achieve it and it needs to happen. Their living conditions are not in keeping with human rights and are inhumane. We cannot wait for all of Europe to go along with this. There’s a shift to the right across Europe, toward nationalism and racism, which I also see in this debate. We have to take a stand, and German needs to lead the way.

    Right this moment we need to conceptually organize how medical care can be provided. This needs to happen immediately. The EU alongside Bosnia needs to show where money is invested in a transparent way. At Lipa, we need tents that protect people from all kinds of weather. We also need a hygiene concept and sanitary facilities. All of this is possible — the containers can be brought there and be installed quickly. Moreover, we need a real interconnectedness and cooperation between the different organizations, and ideally a UN organization like UNHCR at the helm that brings together all the different players and decides who does what and where. My impression is that the Bosnian authorities are overburdened and ill-suited, which has something to do with the old wounds and still existent power struggles and rivalries from the Bosnian war.

    Will you go back to Bosnia and Herzegovina in case you receive the permission from the Bosnian authorities to deliver medical aid?

    Yes, in that case we would go back there, at least with one mobile clinic. We would then deliver medical aid in cooperation with others and might leave the vehicle in Bosnia long-term, perhaps by lending it to a different NGO to use free of charge like we’re doing right now in Sicily with an Italian NGO.

    https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/29741/i-m-certain-that-people-have-died-here-german-doctor-talks-about-his-e
    #route_des_Balkans #Bosnie #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Balkans #santé_mentale #violence #Gerhard_Trabert #Lipa #hiver #froid #neige #Bihać #hotspot #hotspots #traumatisme #the_game #game #camp_de_réfugiés

  • Decade of conflict triggering ‘slow tsunami’ across Syria, Security Council hears | | UN News
    https://news.un.org/en/story/2021/01/1082592

    “Today, millions inside the country and the millions of refugees outside, are grappling with deep trauma, grinding poverty, personal insecurity, and lack of hope for the future”, Special Envoy Geir Pedersen said via video link.
    Ten years of death, displacement, destruction and destitution “on a massive scale”, have left millions of Syrians grappling with “deep trauma, grinding poverty, personal insecurity and lack of hope for the future”, he added.
    He cited the UN humanitarian office, OCHA, in saying that more than eight in 10 people are living in poverty, and the World Food Programme (WFP) has assessed that 9.3 million are food insecure. And with rising inflation and fuel shortages, he expects that the authorities will be unable to provide basic services and goods. The pandemic is also continuing to take its toll.
    “Syrians are suffering”, the UN official said, speaking out against economic sanctions that would worsen the plight of Syrians. “A torn society faces further unraveling of its social fabric, sowing the seeds for more suffering and even more instability”, he warned. Civilians continue to be killed in crossfire and IED attacks while facing dangers ranging “from instability, arbitrary detention and abduction, to criminality and the activities of UN-listed terrorist groups”, said the UN envoy. “The political process is not as yet delivering real changes in Syrian’s lives nor a real vision for the future”, he said, pointing to the need for confidence-building steps, such as unhindered humanitarian access; information on and access to detainees; and a nationwide ceasefire. He called for “more serious and cooperative international diplomacy” and urged States to build on common interests, including stability, counter-terrorism and preventing further conflict that “could unlock genuine progress and could chart a safe and secure path out of this crisis for all Syrians”. Mr. Pedersen flagged that, depending on COVID, the Syrian-led, Syrian-owned, UN-facilitated Constitutional Committee will convene in Geneva next week. “We need to ensure that the Committee begins to move from ‘preparing’ a constitutional reform to ‘drafting’ one, as it is mandated to do”, he spelled out.
    UN Humanitarian Coordinator Mark Lowcock, spoke of “historically high levels” of food prices and the “drastically” declining value of Syria’s currency that have together driven food insecurity. “As a result of decreased purchasing power, over 80 per cent of households report relying on negative coping mechanisms to afford food”, he told ambassadors. Also of grave concern is the continuing economic crisis that has created fuel shortages and power cuts during winter, and a rising dependency on child labor. Furthermore, harsh weather has sparked widespread flooding, forcing Syrians to “spend entire nights standing up in their tents due to rising flood waters”, the UN Humanitarian Coordinator said. As the COVID pandemic compounds the economic crisis, he said that amidst limited testing, “there are indications that Syria may be experiencing a renewed wave of infections”. Turning to desperate conditions at the notorious Al Hol refugee camp, the UN official stressed that security must be provided without endangering residents, violating their rights or restricting humanitarian access. He reminded that most of the 62,000 people there are younger than 12, and “growing up in unacceptable conditions”. Stressing the UN’s focus on life-saving humanitarian needs, Mr. Lowcock said the Organization was committed to assisting but required “adequate funding, improved access, and an end to the violence that has tormented Syrians for nearly a decade”.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#syrie#refugie#personnedeplacee#camp#sante#crise#vulnerabilite#sante