• Quand le #Militantisme déconne : injonctions, pureté militante, attaques… (6/8)
    https://framablog.org/2021/08/13/quand-le-militantisme-deconne-injonctions-purete-militante-attaques-6-8

    La question compliquée et parfois houleuse du #militantisme nous intéresse depuis longtemps à Framasoft, aussi avons-nous demandé à #Viciss de Hacking Social, de s’atteler à la tâche. Voici déjà le sixième épisode [si vous avez raté les épisodes précédents] de … Lire la suite­­

    #Claviers_invités #Contributopia #Désinformation #Internet_et_société #Libr'en_Vrac #Causes #infiltrés #Information #Net #notoriété #surmenage #suspicion

  • The power of private philanthropy in international development

    In 1959, the Ford and Rockefeller Foundations pledged seven million US$ to establish the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) at Los Baños in the Philippines. They planted technologies originating in the US into the Philippines landscape, along with new institutions, infrastructures, and attitudes. Yet this intervention was far from unique, nor was it spectacular relative to other philanthropic ‘missions’ from the 20th century.

    How did philanthropic foundations come to wield such influence over how we think about and do development, despite being so far removed from the poor and their poverty in the Global South?

    In a recent paper published in the journal Economy and Society, we suggest that metaphors – bridge, leapfrog, platform, satellite, interdigitate – are useful for thinking about the machinations of philanthropic foundations. In the Philippines, for example, the Ford and Rockefeller foundations were trying to bridge what they saw as a developmental lag. In endowing new scientific institutions such as IRRI that juxtaposed spaces of modernity and underdevelopment, they saw themselves bringing so-called third world countries into present–day modernity from elsewhere by leapfrogging historical time. In so doing, they purposively bypassed actors that might otherwise have been central: such as post–colonial governments, trade unions, and peasantry, along with their respective interests and demands, while providing platforms for other – preferred – ideas, institutions, and interests to dominate.

    We offer examples, below, from three developmental epochs.

    Scientific development (1940s – 70s)

    From the 1920s, the ‘big three’ US foundations (Ford, Rockefeller, Carnegie) moved away from traditional notions of charity towards a more systematic approach to grant-making that involved diagnosing and attacking the ‘root causes’ of poverty. These foundations went on to prescribe the transfer of models of science and development that had evolved within a US context – but were nevertheless considered universally applicable – to solve problems in diverse and distant lands. In public health, for example, ‘success against hookworm in the United States helped inspire the belief that such programs could be replicated in other parts of the world, and were indeed expanded to include malaria and yellow fever, among others’. Similarly, the Tennessee Valley Authority’s model of river–basin integrated regional development was replicated in India, Laos, Vietnam, Egypt, Lebanon, Tanzania, and Brazil.

    The chosen strategy of institutional replication can be understood as the development of satellites––as new scientific institutions invested with a distinct local/regional identity remained, nonetheless, within the orbit of the ‘metropolis’. US foundations’ preference for satellite creation was exemplified by the ‘Green Revolution’—an ambitious programme of agricultural modernization in South and Southeast Asia spearheaded by the Rockefeller and Ford Foundations and implemented through international institutions for whom IRRI was the template.

    Such large-scale funding was justified as essential in the fight against communism.

    The Green Revolution offered a technocratic solution to the problem of food shortage in South and Southeast Asia—the frontier of the Cold War. Meanwhile, for developmentalist regimes that, in the Philippines as elsewhere, had superseded post-independence socialist governments, these programmes provided a welcome diversion from redistributive politics. In this context, institutions like IRRI and their ‘miracle seeds’ were showcased as investments in and symbols of modernity and development. Meanwhile, an increasingly transnational agribusiness sector expanded into new markets for seeds, agrichemicals, machinery, and, ultimately, land.

    The turn to partnerships (1970s – 2000s)

    By the 1970s, the era of large–scale investment in technical assistance to developing country governments and public bureaucracies was coming to an end. The Ford Foundation led the way in pioneering a new approach through its population programmes in South Asia. This new ‘partnership’ mode of intervention was a more arms-length form of satellite creation which emphasised the value of local experience. Rather than obstacles to progress, local communities were reimagined as ‘potential reservoirs of entrepreneurship’ that could be mobilized for economic development.

    In Bangladesh, for example, the Ford Foundation partnered with NGOs such as the Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC) and Concerned Women for Family Planning (CWFP) to mainstream ‘economic empowerment’ programmes that co-opted local NGOs into service provision to citizens-as-consumers. This approach was epitomised by the rise of microfinance, which merged women’s empowerment with hard-headed pragmatism that saw women as reliable borrowers and opened up new areas of social life to marketization.

    By the late-1990s private sector actors had begun to overshadow civil society organizations in the constitution of development partnerships, where state intervention was necessary to support the market if it was to deliver desirable outcomes. Foundations’ efforts were redirected towards brokering increasingly complex public-private partnerships (PPPs). This mode of philanthropy was exemplified by the Rockefeller Foundation’s role in establishing product development partnerships as the institutional blueprint for global vaccine development. Through a combination of interdigitating (embedding itself in the partnership) and platforming (ensuring its preferred model became the global standard), it enabled the Foundation to continue to wield ‘influence in the health sphere, despite its relative decline in assets’.

    Philanthrocapitalism (2000s – present)

    In the lead up to the 2015 UN Conference at which the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were agreed, a consensus formed that private development financing was both desirable and necessary if the ‘trillions’ needed to close the ‘financing gap’ were to be found. For DAC donor countries, the privatization of aid was a way to maintain commitments while implementing economic austerity at home in the wake of the global finance crisis. Philanthrocapitalism emerged to transform philanthropic giving into a ‘profit–oriented investment process’, as grant-making gave way to impact investing.

    The idea of impact investing was hardly new, however. The term had been coined as far back as 2007 at a meeting hosted by the Rockefeller Foundation at its Bellagio Centre. Since then, the mainstreaming of impact investing has occurred in stages, beginning with the aforementioned normalisation of PPPs along with their close relative, blended finance. These strategies served as transit platforms for the formation of networks shaped by financial logics. The final step came with the shift from blended finance as a strategy to impact investing ‘as an asset class’.

    A foundation that embodies the 21st c. transition to philanthrocapitalism is the Omidyar Network, created by eBay founder Pierre Omidyar in 2004. The Network is structured both as a non–profit organization and for–profit venture that ‘invests in entities with a broad social mission’. It has successfully interdigitated with ODA agencies to further align development financing with the financial sector. In 2013, for example, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) launched Global Development Innovation Ventures (GDIV), ‘a global investment platform, with Omidyar Network as a founding member’.

    Conclusion

    US foundations have achieved their power by forging development technoscapes centred in purportedly scale–neutral technologies and techniques – from vaccines to ‘miracle seeds’ to management’s ‘one best way’. They have become increasingly sophisticated in their development of ideational and institutional platforms from which to influence, not only how their assets are deployed, but how, when and where public funds are channelled and towards what ends. This is accompanied by strategies for creating dense, interdigitate connections between key actors and imaginaries of the respective epoch. In the process, foundations have been able to influence debates about development financing itself; presenting its own ‘success stories’ as evidence for preferred financing mechanisms, allocating respective roles of public and private sector actors, and representing the most cost–effective way to resource development.

    Whether US foundations maintain their hegemony or are eclipsed by models of elite philanthropy in East Asia and Latin America, remains to be seen. Indications are that emerging philanthropists in these regions may be well placed to leapfrog over transitioning philanthropic sectors in Western countries by ‘aligning their philanthropic giving with the new financialized paradigm’ from the outset.

    Using ‘simple’ metaphors, we have explored their potential and power to map, analyse, theorize, and interpret philanthropic organizations’ disproportionate influence in development. These provide us with a conceptual language that connects with earlier and emergent critiques of philanthropy working both within and somehow above the ‘field’ of development. Use of metaphors in this way is revealing not just of developmental inclusions but also its exclusions: ideascast aside, routes not pursued, and actors excluded.

    https://developingeconomics.org/2021/05/10/the-power-of-private-philanthropy-in-international-development

    #philanthropie #philanthrocapitalisme #développement #coopération_au_développement #aide_au_développement #privatisation #influence #Ford #Rockefeller #Carnegie #soft_power #charité #root_causes #causes_profondes #pauvreté #science #tranfert #technologie #ressources_pédagogiques #réplique #modernisation #fondations #guerre_froide #green_revolution #révolution_verte #développementalisme #modernité #industrie_agro-alimentaire #partnerships #micro-finance #entrepreneuriat #entreprenariat #partenariat_public-privé (#PPP) #privatisation_de_l'aide #histoire #Omidyar_Network #Pierre_Omidyar

  • The big wall


    https://thebigwall.org/en

    An ActionAid investigation into how Italy tried to stop migration from Africa, using EU funds, and how much money it spent.

    There are satellites, drones, ships, cooperation projects, police posts, repatriation flights, training centers. They are the bricks of an invisible but tangible and often violent wall. Erected starting in 2015 onwards, thanks to over one billion euros of public money. With one goal: to eliminate those movements by sea, from North Africa to Italy, which in 2015 caused an outcry over a “refugee crisis”. Here we tell you about the (fragile) foundations and the (dramatic) impacts of this project. Which must be changed, urgently.

    –---

    Ready, Set, Go

    Imagine a board game, Risk style. The board is a huge geographical map, which descends south from Italy, including the Mediterranean Sea and North Africa and almost reaching the equator, in Cameroon, South Sudan, Rwanda. Places we know little about and read rarely about.

    Each player distributes activity cards and objects between countries and along borders. In Ethiopia there is a camera crew shooting TV series called ‘Miraj’ [mirage], which recounts the misadventures of naive youth who rely on shady characters to reach Europe. There is military equipment, distributed almost everywhere: off-road vehicles for the Tunisian border police, ambulances and tank trucks for the army in Niger, patrol boats for Libya, surveillance drones taking off from Sicily.

    There is technology: satellite systems on ships in the Mediterranean, software for recording fingerprints in Egypt, laptops for the Nigerian police. And still: coming and going of flights between Libya and Nigeria, Guinea, Gambia. Maritime coordination centers, police posts in the middle of the Sahara, job orientation offices in Tunisia or Ethiopia, clinics in Uganda, facilities for minors in Eritrea, and refugee camps in Sudan.

    Hold your breath for a moment longer, because we still haven’t mentioned the training courses. And there are many: to produce yogurt in Ivory Coast, open a farm in Senegal or a beauty salon in Nigeria, to learn about the rights of refugees, or how to use a radar station.

    Crazed pawns, overlapping cards and unclear rules. Except for one: from these African countries, more than 25 of them, not one person should make it to Italy. There is only one exception allowed: leaving with a visa. Embassy officials, however, have precise instructions: anyone who doesn’t have something to return to should not be accepted. Relationships, family, and friends don’t count, but only incomes, properties, businesses, and titles do.

    For a young professional, a worker, a student, an activist, anyone looking for safety, future and adventure beyond the borders of the continent, for people like me writing and perhaps like you reading, the only allies become the facilitators, those who Europe calls traffickers and who, from friends, can turn into worst enemies.

    We called it The Big Wall. It could be one of those strategy games that keeps going throughout the night, for fans of geopolitics, conflicts, finance. But this is real life, and it’s the result of years of investments, experiments, documents and meetings. At first disorderly, sporadic, then systematized and increased since 2015, when United Nations agencies, echoed by the international media, sounded an alarm: there is a migrant crisis happening and Europe must intervene. Immediately.

    Italy was at the forefront, and all those agreements, projects, and programs from previous years suddenly converged and multiplied, becoming bricks of a wall that, from an increasingly militarized Mediterranean, moved south, to the travelers’ countries of origin.

    The basic idea, which bounced around chancelleries and European institutions, was to use multiple tools: development cooperation, support for security forces, on-site protection of refugees, repatriation, information campaigns on the risks of irregular migration. This, in the language of Brussels, was a “comprehensive approach”.

    We talked to some of the protagonists of this story — those who built the wall, who tried to jump it, and who would like to demolish it — and we looked through thousands of pages of reports, minutes, resolutions, decrees, calls for tenders, contracts, newspaper articles, research, to understand how much money Italy has spent, where, and what impacts it has had. Months of work to discover not only that this wall has dramatic consequences, but that the European – and Italian – approach to international migration stems from erroneous premises, from an emergency stance that has disastrous results for everyone, including European citizens.
    Libya: the tip of the iceberg

    It was the start of the 2017/2018 academic year and Omer Shatz, professor of international law, offered his Sciences Po students the opportunity to work alongside him on the preparation of a dossier. For the students of the faculty, this was nothing new. In the classrooms of the austere building on the Rive Gauche of Paris, which European and African heads of state have passed though, not least Emmanuel Macron, it’s normal to work on real life materials: peace agreements in Colombia, trials against dictators and foreign fighters. Those who walk on those marble floors already know that they will be able to speak with confidence in circles that matter, in politics as well as diplomacy.

    Shatz, who as a criminal lawyer in Israel is familiar with abuses and rights violations, launched his students a new challenge: to bring Europe to the International Criminal Court for the first time. “Since it was created, the court has only condemned African citizens – dictators, militia leaders – but showing European responsibility was urgent,” he explains.

    One year after first proposing the plan, Shatz sent an envelope to the Court’s headquarters, in the Dutch town of The Hague. With his colleague Juan Branco and eight of his students he recounted, in 245 pages, cases of “widespread and systematic attack against the civilian population”, linked to “crimes against humanity consciously committed by European actors, in the central Mediterranean and in Libya, in line with Italian and European Union policies”.

    The civilian population to which they refer comprises migrants and refugees, swallowed by the waves or intercepted in the central Mediterranean and brought back to shore by Libyan assets, to be placed in a seemingly endless cycle of detention. Among them are the 13.000 dead recorded since 2015, in the stretch of sea between North Africa and Italy, out of 523.000 people who survived the crossing, but also the many African and Asian citizens, who are rarely counted, who were tortured in Libya and died in any of the dozens of detention centers for foreigners, often run by militias.

    “At first we thought that the EU and Italy were outsourcing dirty work to Libya to block people, which in jargon is called ‘aiding and abetting’ in the commission of a crime, then we realized that the Europeans were actually the conductors of these operations, while the Libyans performed”, says Shatz, who, at the end of 2020, was preparing a second document for the International Criminal Court to include more names, those of the “anonymous officials of the European and Italian bureaucracy who participated in this criminal enterprise”, which was centered around the “reinvention of the Libyan Coast Guard, conceived by Italian actors”.

    Identifying heads of department, office directors, and institution executives in democratic countries as alleged criminals might seem excessive. For Shatz, however, “this is the first time, after the Nuremberg trials, after Eichmann, that Europe has committed crimes of this magnitude, outside of an armed conflict”. The court, which routinely rejects at least 95 percent of the cases presented, did not do so with Shatz and his students’ case. “Encouraging news, but that does not mean that the start of proceedings is around the corner”, explains the lawyer.

    At the basis of the alleged crimes, he continues, are “regulations, memoranda of understanding, maritime cooperation, detention centers, patrols and drones” created and financed by the European Union and Italy. Here Shatz is speaking about the Memorandum of Understanding between Italy and Libya to “reduce the flow of illegal migrants”, as the text of the document states. An objective to be achieved through training and support for the two maritime patrol forces of the very fragile Libyan national unity government, by “adapting” the existing detention centers, and supporting local development initiatives.

    Signed in Rome on February 2, 2017 and in force until 2023, the text is grafted onto the Treaty of Friendship, Partnership and Cooperation signed by Silvio Berlusconi and Muammar Gaddafi in 2008, but is tied to a specific budget: that of the so-called Africa Fund, established in 2016 as the “Fund for extraordinary interventions to relaunch dialogue and cooperation with African countries of priority importance for migration routes” and extended in 2020 — as the Migration Fund — to non-African countries too.

    310 million euros were allocated in total between the end of 2016 and November 2020, and 252 of those were disbursed, according to our reconstruction.

    A multiplication of tools and funds that, explains Mario Giro, “was born after the summit between the European Union and African leaders in Malta, in November 2015”. According to the former undersecretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, from 2013, and Deputy Minister for Foreign Affairs between 2016 and 2018, that summit in Malta “sanctioned the triumph of a European obsession, that of reducing migration from Africa at all costs: in exchange of this containment, there was a willingness to spend, invest”. For Giro, the one in Malta was an “attempt to come together, but not a real partnership”.

    Libya, where more than 90 percent of those attempting to cross the central Mediterranean departed from in those years, was the heart of a project in which Italian funds and interests support and integrate with programs by the European Union and other member states. It was an all-European dialogue, from which powerful Africans — political leaders but also policemen, militiamen, and the traffickers themselves — tried to obtain something: legitimacy, funds, equipment.

    Fragmented and torn apart by a decade-long conflict, Libya was however not alone. In October 2015, just before the handshakes and the usual photographs at the Malta meeting, the European Commission established an Emergency Trust Fund to “address the root causes of migration in Africa”.

    To do so, as Dutch researcher Thomas Spijkerboer will reconstruct years later, the EU executive declared a state of emergency in the 26 African countries that benefit from the Fund, thus justifying the choice to circumvent European competition rules in favor of direct award procedures. However “it’s implausible – Spijkerboeker will go on to argue – that there is a crisis in all 26 African countries where the Trust Fund operates through the duration of the Trust Fund”, now extended until the end of 2021.

    However, the imperative, as an advisor to the Budget Commission of the European Parliament explains, was to act immediately: “not within a few weeks, but days, hours“.

    Faced with a Libya still ineffective at stopping flows to the north, it was in fact necessary to intervene further south, traveling backwards along the routes that converge from dozens of African countries and go towards Tripolitania. And — like dominoes in reverse — raising borders and convincing, or forcing, potential travelers to stop in their countries of origin or in others along the way, before they arrived on the shores of the Mediterranean.

    For the first time since decolonization, human mobility in Africa became the keystone of Italian policies on the continent, so much so that analysts began speaking of migration diplomacy. Factors such as the number of migrants leaving from a given country and the number of border posts or repatriations all became part of the political game, on the same level as profits from oil extraction, promises of investment, arms sales, or trade agreements.

    Comprising projects, funds, and programs, this migration diplomacy comes at a cost. For the period between January 2015 and November 2020, we tracked down 317 funding lines managed by Italy with its own funds and partially co-financed by the European Union. A total of 1.337 billion euros, spent over five years and destined to eight different items of expenditure. Here Libya is in first place, but it is not alone.

    A long story, in short

    For simplicity’s sake, we can say that it all started in the hot summer of 2002, with an almost surrealist lightning war over a barren rock on the edge of the Mediterranean: the Isla de Persejil, the island of parsley. A little island in the Strait of Gibraltar, disputed for decades between Morocco and Spain, which had its ephemeral moment of glory when in July of that year the Moroccan monarchy sent six soldiers, some tents and a flag. Jose-Maria Aznar’s government quickly responded with a reconquista to the sound of fighter-bombers, frigates, and helicopters.

    Peace was signed only a few weeks later and the island went back to being a land of shepherds and military patrols. Which from then on, however, were joint ones.

    “There was talk of combating drug trafficking and illegal fishing, but the reality was different: these were the first anti-immigration operations co-managed by Spanish and Moroccan soldiers”, explains Sebastian Cobarrubias, professor of geography at the University of Zaragoza. The model, he says, was the one of Franco-Spanish counter-terrorism operations in the Basque Country, exported from the Pyrenees to the sea border.

    A process of externalization of Spanish and European migration policy was born following those events in 2002, and culminating years later with the crisis de los cayucos, the pirogue crisis: the arrival of tens of thousands of people – 31,000 in 2006 alone – in the Canary Islands, following extremely dangerous crossings from Senegal, Mauritania and Morocco.

    In close dialogue with the European Commission, which saw the Spanish border as the most porous one of the fragile Schengen area, the government of José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero reacted quickly. “Within a few months, cooperation and repatriation agreements were signed with nine African countries,” says Cobarrubias, who fought for years, with little success, to obtain the texts of the agreements.

    The events of the late 2000s look terribly similar to what Italy will try to implement a decade later with its Mediterranean neighbors, Libya first of all. So much so that in 2016 it was the Spanish Minister of the Interior himself, Jorge Fernández Díaz, who recalled that “the Spanish one is a European management model, reproducible in other contexts”. A vision confirmed by the European Commission officials with whom we spoke.

    At the heart of the Spanish strategy, which over a few short years led to a drastic decrease of arrivals by sea, was the opening of new diplomatic offices in Africa, the launch of local development projects, and above all the support given to the security forces of partner countries.

    Cobarrubias recounts at least four characteristic elements of the Madrid approach: the construction of new patrol forces “such as the Mauritanian Coast Guard, which did not exist and was created by Spain thanks to European funds, with the support of the newly created Frontex agency”; direct and indirect support for detention centers, such as the infamous ‘Guantanamito’, or little Guantanamo, denounced by civil society organizations in Mauritania; the real-time collection of border data and information, carried out by the SIVE satellite system, a prototype of Eurosur, an incredibly expensive intelligence center on the EU’s external borders launched in 2013, based on drones, satellites, airplanes, and sensors; and finally, the strategy of working backwards along migration routes, to seal borders, from the sea to the Sahara desert, and investing locally with development and governance programs, which Spain did during the two phases of the so-called Plan Africa, between 2006 and 2012.

    Replace “Spain” with “Italy”, and “Mauritania” with “Libya”, and you’ll have an idea of what happened years later, in an attempt to seal another European border.

    The main legacy of the Spanish model, according to the Italian sociologist Lorenzo Gabrielli, however, is the negative conditionality, which is the fact of conditioning the disbursement of these loans – for security forces, ministries, trade agreements – at the level of the African partners’ cooperation in the management of migration, constantly threatening to reduce investments if there are not enough repatriations being carried out, or if controls and pushbacks fail. An idea that is reminiscent both of the enlargement process of the European Union, with all the access restrictions placed on candidate countries, and of the Schengen Treaty, the attempt to break down internal European borders, which, as a consequence, created the need to protect a new common border, the external one.
    La externalización europea del control migratorio: ¿La acción española como modelo? Read more

    At the end of 2015, when almost 150,000 people had reached the Italian coast and over 850,000 had crossed Turkey and the Balkans to enter the European Union, the story of the maritime migration to Spain had almost faded from memory.

    But something remained of it: a management model. Based, once again, on an idea of crisis.

    “We tried to apply it to post-Gaddafi Libya – explains Stefano Manservisi, who over the past decade has chaired two key departments for migration policies in the EU Commission, Home Affairs and Development Cooperation – but in 2013 we soon realized that things had blown up, that that there was no government to talk to: the whole strategy had to be reformulated”.

    Going backwards, through routes and processes

    The six-month presidency of the European Council, in 2014, was the perfect opportunity for Italy.

    In November of that year, Matteo Renzi’s government hosted a conference in Rome to launch the Khartoum Process, the brand new initiative for the migration route between the EU and the Horn of Africa, modeled on the Rabat Process, born in 2006, at the apex of the crisis de los cayucos, after pressure from Spain. It’s a regional cooperation platform between EU countries and nine African countries, based on the exchange of information and coordination between governments, to manage migration.
    Il processo di Khartoum: l’Italia e l’Europa contro le migrazioni Read more

    Warning: if you start to find terms such as ‘process’ and ‘coordination platform’ nebulous, don’t worry. The backbone of European policies is made of these structures: meetings, committees, negotiating tables with unattractive names, whose roles elude most of us. It’s a tendency towards the multiplication of dialogue and decision spaces, that the migration policies of recent years have, if possible, accentuated, in the name of flexibility, of being ready for any eventuality. Of continuous crisis.

    Let’s go back to that inter-ministerial meeting in Rome that gave life to the Khartoum Process and in which Libya, where the civil war had resumed violently a few months earlier, was not present.

    Italy thus began looking beyond Libya, to the so-called countries of origin and transit. Such as Ethiopia, a historic beneficiary of Italian development cooperation, and Sudan. Indeed, both nations host refugees from Eritrea and Somalia, two of the main countries of origin of those who cross the central Mediterranean between 2013 and 2015. Improving their living conditions was urgent, to prevent them from traveling again, from dreaming of Europe. In Niger, on the other hand, which is an access corridor to Libya for those traveling from countries such as Nigeria, Gambia, Senegal, and Mali, Italy co-financed a study for a new law against migrant smuggling, then adopted in 2015, which became the cornerstone of a radical attempt to reduce movement across the Sahara desert, which you will read about later.

    A year later, with the Malta summit and the birth of the EU Trust Fund for Africa, Italy was therefore ready to act. With a 123 million euro contribution, allocated from 2017 through the Africa Fund and the Migration Fund, Italy became the second donor country, and one of the most active in trying to manage those over 4 billion euros allocated for five years. [If you are curious about the financing mechanisms of the Trust Fund, read here: https://thebigwall.org/en/trust-fund/].

    Through the Italian Agency for Development Cooperation (AICS), born in 2014 as an operational branch of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Italy immediately made itself available to manage European Fund projects, and one idea seemed to be the driving one: using classic development programs, but implemented in record time, to offer on-site alternatives to young people eager to leave, while improving access to basic services.

    Local development, therefore, became the intervention to address the so-called root causes of migration. For the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the newborn AICS, it seemed a winning approach. Unsurprisingly, the first project approved through the Trust Fund for Africa was managed by the Italian agency in Ethiopia.

    “Stemming irregular migration in Northern and Central Ethiopia” received 19.8 million euros in funding, a rare sum for local development interventions. The goal was to create job opportunities and open career guidance centers for young people in four Ethiopian regions. Or at least that’s how it seemed. In the first place, among the objectives listed in the project sheet, there is in fact another one: to reduce irregular migration.

    In the logical matrix of the project, which insiders know is the presentation – through data, indicators and figures – of the expected results, there is no indicator that appears next to the “reduction of irregular migration” objective. There is no way, it’s implicitly admitted, to verify that that goal has been achieved. That the young person trained to start a micro-enterprise in the Wollo area, for example, is one less migrant.

    Bizarre, not to mention wrong. But indicative of the problems of an approach of which, an official of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs explains to us, “Italy had made itself the spokesperson in Europe”.

    “The mantra was that more development would stop migration, and at a certain point that worked for everyone: for AICS, which justified its funds in the face of political landscape that was scared by the issue of landings, and for many NGOs, which immediately understood that migrations were the parsley to be sprinkled on the funding requests that were presented”, explains the official, who, like so many in this story, prefers to remain anonymous.

    This idea of the root causes was reproduced, as in an echo chamber, “without programmatic documents, without guidelines, but on the wave of a vague idea of political consensus around the goal of containing migration”, he adds. This makes it almost impossible to talk about, so much so that a proposal for new guidelines on immigration and development, drawn up during 2020 by AICS, was set aside for months.

    Indeed, if someone were to say, as evidenced by scholars such as Michael Clemens, that development can also increase migration, and that migration itself is a source of development, the whole ‘root causes’ idea would collapse and the already tight cooperation budgets would risk being cut, in the name of the same absolute imperative as always: reducing arrivals to Italy and Europe.

    Maintaining a vague, costly and unverifiable approach is equally damaging.

    Bram Frouws, director of the Mixed Migration Center, a think-tank that studies international mobility, points out, for example, how the ‘root cause’ approach arises from a vision of migration as a problem to be eradicated rather than managed, and that paradoxically, the definition of these deep causes always remains superficial. In fact, there is never talk of how international fishing agreements damage local communities, nor of land grabbing by speculators, major construction work, or corruption and arms sales. There is only talk of generic economic vulnerability, of a country’s lack of stability. An almost abstract phenomenon, in which European actors are exempt from any responsibility.

    There is another problem: in the name of the fight against irregular migration, interventions have shifted from poorer and truly vulnerable countries and populations to regions with ‘high migratory rates’, a term repeated in dozens of project descriptions funded over the past few years, distorting one of the cardinal principles of development aid, codified in regulations and agreements: that of responding to the most urgent needs of a given population, and of not imposing external priorities, even more so if it is countries considered richer are the ones doing it.

    The Nigerien experiment

    While Ethiopia and Sudan absorb the most substantial share of funds destined to tackle the root causes of migration — respectively 47 and 32 million euros out of a total expenditure of 195 million euros — Niger, which for years has been contending for the podium of least developed country on the planet with Central African Republic according to the United Nations Human Development Index — benefits from just over 10 million euros.

    Here in fact it’s more urgent, for Italy and the EU, to intervene on border control rather than root causes, to stop the flow of people that cross the country until they arrive in Agadez, to then disappear in the Sahara and emerge, days later — if all goes well — in southern Libya. In 2016, the International Organization for Migration counted nearly 300,000 people passing through a single checkpoint along the road to Libya. The figure bounced between the offices of the European Commission, and from there to the Farnesina, the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs: faced with an uncontrollable Libya, intervening in Niger became a priority.

    Italy did it in great style, even before opening an embassy in the country, in February 2017: with a contribution to the state budget of Niger of 50 million euros, part of the Africa Fund, included as part of a maxi-program managed by the EU in the country and paid out in several installments.

    While the project documents list a number of conditions for the continuation of the funding, including increased monitoring along the routes to Libya and the adoption of regulations and strategies for border control, some local and European officials with whom we have spoken think that the assessments were made with one eye closed: the important thing was in fact to provide those funds to be spent in a country that for Italy, until then, had been synonymous only with tourism in the Sahara dunes and development in rural areas.

    Having become a priority in the New Partnership Framework on Migration, yet another EU operational program, launched in 2016, Niger seemed thus exempt from controls on the management of funds to which beneficiaries of European funds are normally subject to.

    “Our control mechanisms, the Court of Auditors, the Parliament and the anti-corruption Authority, do not work, and yet the European partners have injected millions of euros into state coffers, without imposing transparency mechanisms”, reports then Ali Idrissa Nani , president of the Réseau des Organizations pour la Transparence et l’Analyse du Budget (ROTAB), a network of associations that seeks to monitor state spending in Niger.

    “It leaves me embittered, but for some years we we’ve had the impression that civil liberties, human rights, and participation are no longer a European priority“, continues Nani, who —- at the end of 2020 — has just filed a complaint with the Court of Niamey, to ask the Prosecutor to open an investigation into the possible disappearance of at least 120 million euros in funds from the Ministry of Defense, a Pandora’s box uncovered by local and international journalists.

    For Nani, who like other Nigerien activists spent most of 2018 in prison for encouraging demonstrations against high living costs, this explosion of European and Italian cooperation didn’t do the country any good, and in fact favoured authoritarian tendencies, and limited even more the independence of the judiciary.

    For their part, the Nigerien rulers have more than others seized the opportunity offered by European donors to obtain legitimacy and support. Right after the Valletta summit, they were the first to present an action plan to reduce migration to Libya, which they abruptly implemented in mid-2016, applying the anti-trafficking law whose preliminary study was financed by Italy, with the aim of emptying the city of #Agadez of migrants from other countries.

    The transport of people to the Libyan border, an activity that until that point happened in the light of day and was sanctioned at least informally by the local authorities, thus became illegal from one day to the next. Hundreds of drivers, intermediaries, and facilitators were arrested, and an entire economy crashed

    But did the movement of people really decrease? Almost impossible to tell. The only data available are those of the International Organization for Migration, which continues to record the number of transits at certain police posts. But drivers and foreign travelers no longer pass through them, fearing they will be arrested or stopped. Routes and journeys, as always happens, are remodeled, only to reappear elsewhere. Over the border with Chad, or in Algeria, or in a risky zigzagging of small tracks, to avoid patrols.

    For Hamidou Manou Nabara, a Nigerien sociologist and researcher, the problems with this type of cooperation are manifold.

    On the one hand, it restricted the free movement guaranteed within the Economic Community of West African States, a sort of ‘Schengen area’ between 15 countries in the region, making half of Niger, from Agadez to the north, a no-go areas for foreign citizens, even though they still had the right to move throughout the national territory.

    Finally, those traveling north were made even more vulnerable. “The control of borders and migratory movements was justified on humanitarian grounds, to contrast human trafficking, but in reality very few victims of trafficking were ever identified: the center of this cooperation is repression”, explains Nabara.

    Increasing controls, through military and police operations, actually exposes travelers to greater violations of human rights, both by state agents and passeurs, making the Sahara crossings longer and riskier.

    The fight against human trafficking, a slogan repeated by European and African leaders and a central expenditure item of the Italian intervention between Africa and the Mediterranean — 142 million euros in five years —- actually risks having the opposite effect. Because a trafiicker’s bread and butter, in addition to people’s desire to travel, is closed borders and denied visas.

    A reinvented frontier

    Galvanized by the activism of the European Commission after the launch of the Trust Fund but under pressure internally, faced with a discourse on migration that seemed to invade every public space — from the front pages of newspapers to television talk-shows — and unable to agree on how to manage migration within the Schengen area, European rulers thus found an agreement outside the continent: to add more bricks to that wall that must reduce movements through the Mediterranean.

    Between 2015 and 2016, Italian, Dutch, German, French and European Union ministers, presidents and senior officials travel relentlessly between countries considered priorities for migration, and increasingly for security, and invite their colleagues to the European capitals. A coming and going of flights to Niger, Mali, Burkina Faso, Nigeria, Ethiopia, Sudan, Tunisia, Senegal, Chad, Guinea, to make agreements, negotiate.

    “Niamey had become a crossroads for European diplomats”, remembers Ali Idrissa Nani, “but few understood the reasons”.

    However, unlike the border with Turkey, where the agreement signed with the EU at the beginning of 2016 in no time reduced the arrival of Syrian, Afghan, and Iraqi citizens in Greece, the continent’s other ‘hot’ border, promises of speed and effectiveness by the Trust Fund for Africa did not seem to materialize. Departures from Libya, in particular, remained constant. And in the meantime, in the upcoming election in a divided Italy, the issue of migration seemed to be tipping the balance, capable of shifting votes and alliances.

    It is at that point that the Italian Ministry of the Interior, newly led by Marco Minniti, put its foot on the accelerator. The Viminale, the Italian Ministry of the Interior, became the orchestrator of a new intervention plan, refined between Rome and Brussels, with German support, which went back to focusing everything on Libya and on that stretch of sea that separates it from Italy.

    “In those months the phones were hot, everyone was looking for Marco“, says an official of the Interior Ministry, who admits that “the Ministry of the Interior had snatched the Libyan dossier from Foreign Affairs, but only because up until then the Foreign Ministry hadn’t obtained anything” .

    Minniti’s first move was the signing of the new Memorandum with Libya, which gave way to a tripartite plan.

    At the top of the agenda was the creation of a maritime interception device for boats departing from the Libyan coast, through the reconstruction of the Coast Guard and the General Administration for Coastal Security (GACS), the two patrol forces belonging to the Ministry of Defense and that of the Interior, and the establishment of a rescue coordination center, prerequisites for Libya to declare to the International Maritime Organization that it had a Search and Rescue Area, so that the Italian Coast Guard could ask Libyan colleagues to intervene if there were boats in trouble.

    Accompanying this work in Libya is a jungle of Italian and EU missions, surveillance systems and military operations — from the European Frontex, Eunavfor Med and Eubam Libya, to the Italian military mission “Safe Waters” — equipped with drones, planes, patrol boats, whose task is to monitor the Libyan Sea, which is increasingly emptied by the European humanitarian ships that started operating in 2014 (whose maneuvering spaces are in the meantime reduced to the bone due to various strategies) to support Libyan interception operations.

    The second point of the ‘Minniti agenda’ was to progressively empty Libya of migrants and refugees, so that an escape by sea would become increasingly difficult. Between 2017 and 2020, the Libyan assets, which are in large part composed of patrol boats donated by Italy, intercepted and returned to shore about 56,000 people according to data released by UN agencies. The Italian-European plan envisages two solutions: for economic migrants, the return to the country of origin; for refugees, the possibility of obtaining protection.

    There is one part of this plan that worked better, at least in terms of European wishes: repatriation, presented as ‘assisted voluntary return’. This vision was propelled by images, released in October 2017 by CNN as part of a report on the abuse of foreigners in Libya, of what appears to be a slave auction. The images reopened the unhealed wounds of the slave trade through Atlantic and Sahara, and helped the creation of a Joint Initiative between the International Organization for Migration, the European Union, and the African Union, aimed at returning and reintegrating people in the countries of origin.

    Part of the Italian funding for IOM was injected into this complex system of repatriation by air, from Tripoli to more than 20 countries, which has contributed to the repatriation of 87,000 people over three years. 33,000 from Libya, and 37,000 from Niger.

    A similar program for refugees, which envisages transit through other African countries (Niger and Rwanda gave their availability) and from there resettlement to Europe or North America, recorded much lower numbers: 3,300 evacuations between the end of 2017 and the end of 2020. For the 47,000 people registered as refugees in Libya, leaving the country without returning to their home country, to the starting point, is almost impossible.

    Finally, there is a third, lesser-known point of the Italian plan: even in Libya, Italy wants to intervene on the root causes of migration, or rather on the economies linked to the transit and smuggling of migrants. The scheme is simple: support basic services and local authorities in migrant transit areas, in exchange for this transit being controlled and reduced. The transit of people brings with it the circulation of currency, a more valuable asset than usual in a country at war, and this above all in the south of Libya, in the immense Saharan region of Fezzan, the gateway to the country, bordering Algeria, Niger, and Chad and almost inaccessible to international humanitarian agencies.

    A game in which intelligence plays central role (as also revealed by the journalist Lorenzo D’Agostino on Foreign Policy), as indeed it did in another negotiation and exchange of money: those 5 million euros destined — according to various journalistic reconstructions — to a Sabratha militia, the Anas Al-Dabbashi Brigade, to stop departures from the coastal city.

    A year later, its leader, Ahmed Al-Dabbashi, will be sanctioned by the UN Security Council, as leader for criminal activities related to human trafficking.

    The one built in record time by the ministry led by Marco Minniti is therefore a complicated and expensive puzzle. To finance it, there are above all the Trust Fund for Africa of the EU, and the Italian Africa Fund, initially headed only by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and unpacked among several ministries for the occasion, but also the Internal Security Fund of the EU, which funds military equipment for all Italian security forces, as well as funds and activities from the Ministry of Defense.

    A significant part of those 666 million euros dedicated to border control, but also of funds to support governance and fight traffickers, converges and enters this plan: a machine that was built too quickly, among whose wheels human rights and Libya’s peace process are sacrificed.

    “We were looking for an immediate result and we lost sight of the big picture, sacrificing peace on the altar of the fight against migration, when Libya was in pieces, in the hands of militias who were holding us hostage”. This is how former Deputy Minister Mario Giro describes the troubled handling of the Libyan dossier.

    For Marwa Mohamed, a Libyan activist, all these funds and interventions were “provided without any real clause of respect for human rights, and have fragmented the country even more, because they were intercepted by the militias, which are the same ones that manage both the smuggling of migrants that detention centers, such as that of Abd el-Rahman al-Milad, known as ‘al-Bija’ ”.

    Projects aimed at Libyan municipalities, included in the interventions on the root causes of migration — such as the whole detention system, invigorated by the introduction of people intercepted at sea (and ‘improved’ through millions of euros of Italian funds) — offer legitimacy, when they do not finance it directly, to the ramified and violent system of local powers that the German political scientist Wolfram Lacher defines as the ‘Tripoli militia cartel‘. [for more details on the many Italian funds in Libya, read here].
    Fondi italiani in Libia Read more

    “Bringing migrants back to shore, perpetuating a detention system, does not only mean subjecting people to new abuses, but also enriching the militias, fueling the conflict”, continues Mohamed, who is now based in London, where she is a spokesman of the Libyan Lawyers for Justice organization.

    The last few years of Italian cooperation, she argues, have been “a sequence of lost opportunities”. And to those who tell you — Italian and European officials especially — that reforming justice, putting an end to that absolute impunity that strengthens the militias, is too difficult, Mohamed replies without hesitation: “to sign the Memorandum of Understanding, the authorities contacted the militias close to the Tripoli government one by one and in the meantime built a non-existent structure from scratch, the Libyan Coast Guard: and you’re telling me that you can’t put the judicial system back on its feet and protect refugees? ”

    The only thing that mattered, however, in that summer of 2017, were the numbers. Which, for the first time since 2013, were falling again, and quickly. In the month of August there were 80 percent fewer landings than the year before. And so it would be for the following months and years.

    “Since then, we have continued to allocate, renewing programs and projects, without asking for any guarantee in exchange for the treatment of migrants”, explains Matteo De Bellis, researcher at Amnesty International, remembering that the Italian promise to modify the Memorandum of Understanding, introducing clauses of protection, has been on stop since the controversial renewal of the document, in February 2020.

    Repatriations, evacuations, promises

    We are 1500 kilometers of road, and sand, south of Tripoli. Here Salah* spends his days escaping a merciless sun. The last three years of the life of the thirty-year-old Sudanese have not offered much else and now, like many fellow sufferers, he does not hide his fatigue.

    We are in a camp 15 kilometers from Agadez, in Niger, in the middle of the Sahara desert, where Salah lives with a thousand people, mostly Sudanese from the Darfur region, the epicenter of one of the most dramatic and lethal conflicts of recent decades.

    Like almost all the inhabitants of this temporary Saharan settlement, managed by the UN High Commissioner for Refugees and — at the end of 2020 — undergoing rehabilitation also thanks to Italian funds, he passed through Libya and since 2017, after three years of interceptions at sea and detention, he’s been desperately searching for a way out, for a future.

    Salah fled Darfur in 2016, after receiving threats from pro-government armed militias, and reached Tripoli after a series of vicissitudes and violence. In late spring 2017, he sailed from nearby Zawiya with 115 other people. They were intercepted, brought back to shore and imprisoned in a detention center, formally headed by the government but in fact controlled by the Al-Nasr militia, linked to the trafficker Al-Bija.

    “They beat us everywhere, for days, raped some women in front of us, and asked everyone to call families to get money sent,” Salah recalls. Months later, after paying some money and escaping, he crossed the Sahara again, up to Agadez. UNHCR had just opened a facility and from there, as rumour had it, you could ask to be resettled to Europe.

    Faced with sealed maritime borders, and after experiencing torture and abuse, that faint hope set in motion almost two thousand people, who, hoping to reach Italy, found themselves on the edges of the Sahara, along what many, by virtue of investments and negotiations, had started to call the ‘new European frontier’.

    Three years later, a little over a thousand people remain of that initial group. Only a few dozen of them had access to resettlement, while many returned to Libya, and to all of its abuses.

    Something similar is also happening in Tunisia, where since 2017, the number of migrants and refugees entering the country has increased. They are fleeing by land and sometimes by sea from Libya, going to crowd UN structures. Then, faced with a lack of real prospects, they return to Libya.

    For Romdhane Ben Amor, spokesman for the Tunisian Federation for Economic and Social Rights, “in Tunisia European partners have financed a non-reception: overcrowded centers in unworthy conditions, which have become recruitment areas for traffickers, because in fact there are two options offered there: go home or try to get back to the sea “.

    In short, even the interventions for the protection of migrants and refugees must be read in a broader context, of a contraction of mobility and human rights. “The refugee management itself has submitted to the goal of containment, which is the true original sin of the Italian and European strategy,” admits a UNHCR official.

    This dogma of containment, at any cost, affects everyone — people who travel, humanitarian actors, civil society, local governments — by distorting priorities, diverting funds, and undermining future relationships and prospects. The same ones that European officials call partnerships and which in the case of Africa, as reiterated in 2020 by President Ursula Von Der Leyen, should be “between equals”.

    Let’s take another example: the Egypt of President Abdel Fetah Al-Sisi. Since 2016, it has been increasingly isolated on the international level, also due to violent internal repression, which Italy knows something about. Among the thousands of people who have been disappeared or killed in recent years, is researcher Giulio Regeni, whose body was thrown on the side of a road north of Cairo in February 2016.

    Around the time of the murder, in which the complicity and cover-ups by the Egyptian security forces were immediately evident, the Italian Ministry of the Interior restarted its dialogue with the country. “It’s absurd, but Italy started to support Egypt in negotiations with the European Union,” explains lawyer Muhammed Al-Kashef, a member of the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Right and now a refugee in Germany.

    By inserting itself on an already existing cooperation project that saw italy, for example, finance the use of fingerprint-recording software used by the Egyptian police, the Italian Ministry of the Interior was able to create a police academy in Cairo, inaugurated in 2018 with European funds, to train the border guards of over 20 African countries. Italy also backed Egyptian requests within the Khartoum Process and, on a different front, sells weapons and conducts joint naval exercises.

    “Rome could have played a role in Egypt, supporting the democratic process after the 2011 revolution, but it preferred to fall into the migration trap, fearing a wave of migration that would never happen,” says Al-Kashef.

    With one result: “they have helped transform Egypt into a country that kills dreams, and often dreamers too, and from which all young people today want to escape”. Much more so than in 2015 or that hopeful 2011.

    Cracks in the wall, and how to widen them

    If you have read this far, following personal stories and routes of people and funds, you will have understood one thing, above all: that the beating heart of this strategy, set up by Italy with the participation of the European Union and vice versa, is the reduction of migrations across the Mediterranean. The wall, in fact.

    Now try to add other European countries to this picture. Since 2015 many have fully adopted — or returned to — this process of ‘externalization’ of migration policies. Spain, where the Canary Islands route reopened in 2019, demonstrating the fragility of the model you read about above; France, with its strategic network in the former colonies, the so-called Françafrique. And then Germany, Belgium, Holland, United Kingdom, Austria.

    Complicated, isn’t it? This great wall’s bricks and builders keep multiplying. Even more strategies, meetings, committees, funds and documents. And often, the same lack of transparency, which makes reconstructing these loans – understanding which cement, sand, and lime mixture was used, i.e. who really benefited from the expense, what equipment was provided, how the results were monitored – a long process, when it’s not impossible.

    The Pact on Migration and Asylum of the European Union, presented in September 2020, seems to confirm this: cooperation with third countries and relaunching repatriations are at its core.

    Even the European Union budget for the seven-year period 2021-2027, approved in December 2020, continues to focus on this expenditure, for example by earmarking for migration projects 10 percent of the new Neighborhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument, equipped with 70 billion euros, but also diverting a large part of the Immigration and Asylum Fund (8.7 billion) towards support for repatriation, and foreseeing 12.1 billion euros for border control.

    While now, with the new US presidency, some have called into question the future of the wall on the border with Mexico, perhaps the most famous of the anti-migrant barriers in the world, the wall built in the Mediterranean and further south, up to the equator, has seemingly never been so strong.

    But economists, sociologists, human rights defenders, analysts and travelers all demonstrate the problems with this model. “It’s a completely flawed approach, and there are no quick fixes to change it,” says David Kipp, a researcher at the German Institute for International Affairs, a government-funded think-tank.

    For Kipp, however, we must begin to deflate this migration bubble, and go back to addressing migration as a human phenomenon, to be understood and managed. “I dream of the moment when this issue will be normalized, and will become something boring,” he admits timidly.

    To do this, cracks must be opened in the wall and in a model that seems solid but really isn’t, that has undesirable effects, violates human rights, and isolates Europe and Italy.

    Anna Knoll, researcher at the European Center for Development Policy Management, explains for example that European policies have tried to limit movements even within Africa, while the future of the continent is the freedom of movement of goods and people, and “for Europe, it is an excellent time to support this, also given the pressure from other international players, China first of all”.

    For Sabelo Mbokazi, who heads the Labor and Migration department of the Social Affairs Commission of the African Union (AU), there is one issue on which the two continental blocs have divergent positions: legal entry channels. “For the EU, they are something residual, we have a much broader vision,” he explains. And this will be one of the themes of the next EU-AU summit, which was postponed several times in 2020.

    It’s a completely flawed approach, and there are no quick fixes to change it
    David Kipp - researcher at the German Institute for International Affairs

    Indeed, the issue of legal access channels to the Italian and European territory is one of the most important, and so far almost imperceptible, cracks in this Big Wall. In the last five years, Italy has spent just 15 million euros on it, 1.1 percent of the total expenditure dedicated to external dimensions of migration.

    The European Union hasn’t done any better. “Legal migration, which was one of the pillars of the strategy born in Valletta in 2015, has remained a dead letter, but if we limit ourselves to closing the borders, we will not go far”, says Stefano Manservisi, who as a senior official of the EU Commission worked on all the migration dossiers during those years.

    Yet we all know that a trafficker’s worst enemy are passport stamps, visas, and airline tickets.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=HmR96ySikkY

    Helen Dempster, who’s an economist at the Center for Global Development, spends her days studying how to do this: how to open legal channels of entry, and how to get states to think about it. And there is an effective example: we must not end up like Japan.

    “For decades, Japan has had very restrictive migration policies, it hasn’t allowed anyone in”, explains Dempster, “but in recent years it has realized that, with its aging population, it soon won’t have enough people to do basic jobs, pay taxes, and finance pensions”. And so, in April 2019, the Asian country began accepting work visa applications, hoping to attract 500,000 foreign workers.

    In Europe, however, “the hysteria surrounding migration in 2015 and 2016 stopped all debate“. Slowly, things are starting to move again. On the other hand, several European states, Italy and Germany especially, have one thing in common with Japan: an increasingly aging population.

    “All European labor ministries know that they must act quickly, but there are two preconceptions: that it is difficult to develop adequate projects, and that public opinion is against it.” For Dempster, who helped design an access program to the Belgian IT sector for Moroccan workers, these are false problems. “If we want to look at it from the point of view of the security of the receiving countries, bringing a person with a passport allows us to have a lot more information about who they are, which we do not have if we force them to arrive by sea”, she explains.

    Let’s look at some figures to make it easier: in 2007, Italy made 340,000 entry visas available, half of them seasonal, for non-EU workers, as part of the Flows Decree, Italy’s main legal entry channel adopted annually by the government. Few people cried “invasion” back then. Ten years later, in 2017, those 119,000 people who reached Italy through the Mediterranean seemed a disproportionate number. In the same year, the quotas of the Flow decree were just 30,000.

    Perhaps these numbers aren’t comparable, and building legal entry programs is certainly long, expensive, and apparently impractical, if we think of the economic and social effects of the coronavirus pandemic in which we are immersed. For Dempster, however, “it is important to be ready, to launch pilot programs, to create infrastructures and relationships”. So that we don’t end up like Japan, “which has urgently launched an access program for workers, without really knowing how to manage them”.

    The Spanish case, as already mentioned, shows how a model born twenty years ago, and then adopted along all the borders between Europe and Africa, does not really work.

    As international mobility declined, aided by the pandemic, at least 41,000 people landed in Spain in 2020, almost all of them in the Canary Islands. Numbers that take us back to 2006 and remind us how, after all, this ‘outsourcing’ offers costly and ineffective solutions.

    It’s reminiscent of so-called planned obsolescence, the production model for which a technological object isn’t built to last, inducing the consumer to replace it after a few years. But continually renewing and re-financing these walls can be convenient for multinational security companies, shipyards, political speculators, authoritarian regimes, and international traffickers. Certainly not for citizens, who — from the Italian and European institutions — would expect better products. May they think of what the world will be like in 10, 30, 50 years, and avoid trampling human rights and canceling democratic processes in the name of a goal that — history seems to teach — is short-lived. The ideas are not lacking. [At this link you’ll find the recommendations developed by ActionAid: https://thebigwall.org/en/recommendations/].

    https://thebigwall.org/en
    #Italie #externalisation #complexe_militaro-industriel #migrations #frontières #business #Afrique #budget #Afrique_du_Nord #Libye #chiffres #Niger #Soudan #Ethiopie #Sénégal #root_causes #causes_profondes #contrôles_frontaliers #EU_Trust_Fund_for_Africa #Trust_Fund #propagande #campagne #dissuasion

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749
    Et plus précisément :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765328

    ping @isskein @karine4 @rhoumour @_kg_

  • #Réfugiés_climatiques : quand attiser la « peur du migrant » masque la réalité des phénomènes migratoires

    À chaque vague, Saint-Louis s’enfonce un peu plus sous l’océan, dont le niveau ne cesse de monter ; les eaux qui assuraient jadis les moyens de subsistance de cette ville du nord du Sénégal menacent désormais sa survie même. Les Nations Unies ont déclaré que Saint-Louis était la ville d’Afrique la plus en danger du fait de l’élévation du niveau de la mer : l’Atlantique engloutit jusqu’à deux mètres de côte chaque année. Plusieurs milliers d’habitants ont été contraints de se reloger à l’intérieur des terres suite aux tempêtes et à l’inondation de Doune Baba Dièye, un village de pêcheurs des environs. Pour les personnes qui habitent toujours sur place, la vie devient de plus en plus précaire.

    Des situations comme celles-là se répètent à mesure que la #crise_climatique s’aggrave. La migration et les #déplacements_de_population induits par le climat sont en hausse, de même que l’angoisse et la désinformation qui l’accompagne. Depuis quelques années, nous observons une multiplication des propos sensationnalistes et alarmistes dans les médias et chez les responsables politiques de l’hémisphère nord, qui affirment que le #changement_climatique entraîne directement et automatiquement une #migration_de_masse, et mettent en garde, en usant d’un #vocabulaire_déshumanisant, contre l’imminence des « #flots » ou des « #vagues » de millions, voire de milliards, de migrants ou de réfugiés climatiques au désespoir qui pourraient submerger l’Europe pour fuir un hémisphère sud devenu inhabitable.

    Les prédictions apocalyptiques retiennent peut-être l’attention de l’opinion, mais elles occultent la réalité complexe du terrain et alimentent une #xénophobie et un #racisme déjà profondément enracinés en Europe en jouant sur la #peur du migrant. Elles dressent en outre un tableau très inexact : ce que révèlent les études sur le changement climatique et la migration est très différent des discours alarmistes qui ont pris place.

    Les experts s’accordent à dire que le changement climatique se répercute sur la #mobilité. Cependant, la relation entre ces deux éléments n’est pas directe, comme elle est souvent décrite, mais complexe, résultant de #causes_multiples et propre à un contexte donné. Par ailleurs, les estimations relatives à l’impact du changement climatique sur la mobilité sont mises en doute par les incertitudes quant à la manière dont évolueront à l’avenir le climat, la capacité d’adaptation des pays et les politiques migratoires internationales.

    #Mythe et réalité

    Les prévisions de millions ou de milliards de personnes déplacées au cours des prochaines décennies laissent entendre que le déplacement et la migration induits par le climat se manifesteront dans un futur éloigné alors qu’il s’agit d’une réalité bien présente. À l’échelle mondiale, le nombre de personnes déplacées à l’intérieur de leur propre pays atteint des records : près de 25 millions de personnes ont dû quitter leur foyer en 2019 suite à des catastrophes soudaines. L’aggravation des #phénomènes_météorologiques_extrêmes, comme les #typhons, les #tempêtes et les #inondations, conjuguée aux changements qui s’opèrent plus lentement, tels que l’élévation du niveau de la mer, la dégradation des sols et les variations des précipitations, devrait accroître la mobilité due au climat.

    Traiter la « #migration_climatique » comme une catégorie de migration distincte implique à tort qu’il est possible de différencier le climat des autres facteurs. Or, les décisions de quitter un endroit résultent d’une multitude d’éléments qui sont profondément liés entre eux et qui interagissent de manière complexe. Pour les personnes qui vivent de l’agriculture de subsistance, les conditions environnementales et les résultats économiques ne font qu’un, étant donné que des changements de pluviométrie ou de température peuvent entraîner de graves conséquences économiques. Caroline Zickgraf, directrice adjointe de l’Observatoire Hugo, un centre de recherche basé à l’université de Liège, en Belgique, qui étudie comment l’environnement et le changement climatique agissent sur la migration explique :

    « Si l’on ne voit pas que tous ces facteurs différents sont imbriqués – facteurs sociaux, politiques, économiques, environnementaux et démographiques – on passe vraiment à côté de la situation générale »

    Une autre idée fausse persiste au sujet du changement climatique et de la mobilité des humains, consistant à croire que la plupart des individus qui se déplacent quittent leur pays. Depuis quelque temps, l’attention vis-à-vis des migrants porte largement sur les Africains qui cherchent à aller en Europe. Cette forme de migration internationale de longue distance représente l’image la plus répandue de la migration et, pourtant, les faits indiquent que ce n’est pas la plus fréquente, mais cette réalité est souvent inaudible.

    En Afrique de l’Ouest et centrale, la migration vers l’Afrique du Nord ou l’Europe représente seulement de 10 à 20 % des déplacements, alors que les 80 à 90 % restants s’effectuent à l’intérieur de la région. « Depuis plusieurs années, l’Europe attire de moins en moins les candidats à la migration, en raison des difficultés qu’ils rencontrent pour bénéficier des programmes de régularisation, trouver du travail et rester mobiles », souligne Aly Tandian, président de l’Observatoire sénégalais des migrations et professeur de sociologie associé à l’université Gaston Berger de Saint-Louis. Les pays africains constituent les destinations principales des migrants d’#Afrique_de_l’Ouest parce qu’il n’y a pas de contraintes de visa et qu’il est plus aisé de voyager sur la terre ferme, ce qui facilite la mobilité des personnes en quête d’opportunités, outre la familiarité que procure la proximité socioculturelle et linguistique de nombreux pays d’accueil, explique-t-il.

    Hind Aïssaoui Bennani, spécialiste de la migration, de l’environnement et du changement climatique auprès de l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations à Dakar, au Sénégal, affirme que l’ampleur de la #migration_économique est souvent mal reconnue, en dépit de son importance dans l’ensemble de la région. La plupart des migrants économiques partent pour trouver du travail dans le secteur des ressources naturelles, notamment l’agriculture, la pêche et l’exploitation minière. « L’#environnement est non seulement un élément moteur de la migration, qui oblige les personnes à se déplacer mais, en plus, il les attire », précise Mme Bennani. Elle ajoute toutefois que le changement climatique peut également entraîner l’#immobilité et piéger les individus qui ne peuvent pas partir par manque de ressources ou de capacités, c’est-à-dire généralement les plus vulnérables.

    Ce qui alimente la peur

    On ne peut pas savoir combien de personnes ont quitté leur région à cause du changement climatique et, d’après les experts,il est difficile, voire impossible, de prédire avec précision le nombre de citoyens qui devront se déplacer à l’avenir, du fait de la complexité inhérente à la migration et au changement climatique. « Il va y avoir toute une série de scénarios à partir des actions que nous menons en termes de politique et de climat, mais aussi par rapport à la réaction des gens qui, souvent, n’est pas linéaire. Cela ne se résume pas à dire ‘le changement climatique s’intensifie, donc la migration s’intensifie », indique Caroline Zickgraf.

    L’année dernière, un rapport (https://www.visionofhumanity.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/ETR_2020_web-1.pdf) réalisé par le think tank international Institute for Economics and Peace a révélé que les menaces écologiques contraindraient au déplacement 1,2 milliard de personnes d’ici à 2050. Ce chiffre s’est répandu comme une traînée de poudre et a été couvert par les principaux organes de presse à travers le monde, mais plusieurs experts reconnus dans le domaine de la migration récusent ce chiffre, parmi lesquels Caroline Zickgraf, qui estime qu’il n’est pas suffisamment scientifique et qu’il résulte d’une manipulation et d’une déformation des données. À titre de comparaison, un rapport de la Banque mondiale datant de 2018 qui s’appuyait sur des techniques de modélisation scientifiques prévoyait qu’il y aurait 140 millions de migrants climatiques internes d’ici à 2050 si aucune action urgente pour le climat n’était mise en place.

    L’idée selon laquelle « le changement climatique entraîne une migration de masse » est utilisée par la gauche pour alerter sur les conséquences humanitaires du changement climatique et pour galvaniser l’action en faveur du climat, alors qu’elle sert de point de ralliement à la droite et à l’extrême droite pour justifier la militarisation des frontières et les politiques de lutte contre l’immigration. Caroline Zickgraf note :

    « Mentionner la migration dans le but d’accélérer l’action pour le climat et d’attirer l’attention sur l’incidence du changement climatique pour les populations me semble tout à fait bien intentionnée. Mais malheureusement, très souvent, c’est la question de la sécurité qui prend le dessus. On attend une action pour le climat, et on se retrouve avec des politiques migratoires restrictives parce qu’on joue avec la peur des gens. »

    La peur n’incite pas les citoyens ni les gouvernements à agir davantage pour le climat mais a plutôt tendance à exacerber le racisme et la xénophobie et à contribuer à l’édification de la « forteresse Europe ». De surcroît, présenter la « migration climatique » comme un risque pour la sécurité justifie la mise en place de programmes de financement destinés à empêcher la migration en faisant en sorte que les candidats au départ restent chez eux, ce qui est contraire au droit humain fondamental de circuler librement. Alors que l’urgence climatique augmente, la « crise européenne des réfugiés » de 2015 est de plus en plus souvent invoquée pour prédire l’avenir. Caroline Zickgraf pense qu’en recourant à des tactiques qui alarment le public, ce ne sont pas les changements climatiques qui font peur, mais « l’Autre » – celui qui doit se déplacer à cause de ces changements.

    Un autre problème émane de la recherche sur la migration elle-même : quelles études, réalisées par quels chercheurs, sont reconnues et écoutées ? D’après Aly Tandian, étant donné qu’en Europe toutes les causes de la migration ne sont pas prises en considération, les analyses européennes se limitent à leur compréhension des questions migratoires sur le terrain en Afrique. « De plus, c’est souvent l’Europe qui est mandatée pour réaliser des études sur la migration, ce qui appauvrit en partie les résultats et les décisions politiques qui sont prises », observe-t-il.

    La mobilité, une #stratégie_d’adaptation

    La tendance actuelle à présenter la migration en provenance de l’hémisphère sud comme une anomalie, un problème à résoudre ou une menace à éviter ne tient pas compte du fait que la migration n’est pas un phénomène nouveau. Depuis la nuit des temps, la mobilité est une stratégie d’adaptation des humains pour faire face aux changements du climat ou de l’environnement. Et il ne s’agit pas toujours d’un moyen d’échapper à une crise. « La migration est une question de résilience et d’adaptation et, en Afrique de l’Ouest et centrale, la migration fait déjà partie de la solution », note Hind Aïssaoui Bennani.

    Dans certains endroits, nous devrons peut-être, et c’est souhaitable, faciliter la migration de manière préventive, dit Caroline Zickgraf, en veillant à ce que les gens migrent dans les meilleures conditions dans le contexte du changement climatique. « Ce que nous souhaitons vraiment, c’est donner le choix, et si nous considérons seulement la migration comme quelque chose de négatif, ou qui doit toujours être évité, nous ne voyons pas tous les intérêts qu’il peut y avoir à quitter une région vulnérable à l’impact du changement climatique. »

    Étant donné que le changement climatique pèse lourdement sur les fragilités et les inégalités existantes et qu’il frappera de façon disproportionnée les populations de l’hémisphère sud, alors qu’elles en sont le moins responsables, favoriser la mobilité n’est pas une simple stratégie d’adaptation, mais fait partie intégrante de la justice climatique.

    La mobilité peut permettre aux habitants de Saint-Louis et des innombrables lieux qui subissent déjà les effets du changement climatique, en termes de vies humaines et d’opportunités, d’être moins vulnérables et de vivre mieux – un rôle qui se révélera particulièrement essentiel dans un monde de plus en plus marqué par l’instabilité climatique.

    https://www.equaltimes.org/refugies-climatiques-quand-attiser?lang=fr
    #réfugiés #asile #migrations #réfugiés_environnementaux #adaptation

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Denying aid on the basis of EU migration objectives is wrong

    –-> extrait du communiqué de presse de CONCORD:

    The Development Committee of the European Parliament has been working on the report “Improving development effectiveness and efficiency of aid” since January 2020. However, shortly before the plenary vote on Wednesday, #Tomas_Tobé of the EPP group, suddenly added an amendment to allow the EU to refuse to give aid to partner countries that don’t comply with EU migration requirements.

    https://concordeurope.org/2020/11/27/denying-aid-on-the-basis-of-eu-migration-objectives-is-wrong

    –---

    Le rapport du Parlement européen (novembre 2020):

    REPORT on improving development effectiveness and the efficiency of aid (2019/2184(INI))

    E. whereas aid effectiveness depends on the way the principle of Policy Coherence for Development (PCD) is implemented; whereas more efforts are still needed to comply with PCD principles, especially in the field of EU migration, trade, climate and agriculture policies;
    3. Stresses that the EU should take the lead in using the principles of aid effectiveness and aid efficiency, in order to secure real impact and the achievement of the SDGs, while leaving no-one behind, in its partner countries; stresses, in this regard, the impact that EU use of development aid and FDI could have on tackling the root causes of migration and forced displacement;
    7. Calls on the EU to engage directly with and to build inclusive sustainable partnerships with countries of origin and transit of migration, based on the specific needs of each country and the individual circumstances of migrants;
    62. Notes with grave concern that the EU and Member States are currently attaching conditions to aid related to cooperation by developing countries on migration and border control efforts, which is clearly a donor concern in contradiction with key internationally agreed development effectiveness principles; recalls that aid must keep its purposes of eradicating poverty, reducing inequality, respecting and supporting human rights and meeting humanitarian needs, and must never be conditional on migration control;
    63. Reiterates that making aid allocation conditional on cooperation with the EU on migration or security issues is not compatible with agreed development effectiveness principles;

    EXPLANATORY STATEMENT

    As agreed in the #European_Consensus_on_Development, the #EU is committed to support the implementation of the #Sustainable_Development_Goals in our development partner countries by 2030. With this report, your rapporteur would like to stress the urgency that all EU development actors strategically use the existing tools on aid effectiveness and efficiency.

    Business is not as usual. The world is becoming more complex. Geopolitical rivalry for influence and resources as well as internal conflicts are escalating. The impact of climate change affects the most vulnerable. The world’s population is growing faster than gross national income, which increases the number of people living in poverty and unemployment. As of 2030, 30 million young Africans are expected to enter the job market per year. These challenges point at the urgency for development cooperation to have a real impact and contribute to peaceful sustainable development with livelihood security and opportunities.

    Despite good intentions, EU institutions and Member States are still mainly guided by their institutional or national goals and interests. By coordinating our efforts in a comprehensive manner and by using the aid effectiveness and efficiency tools we have at our disposal our financial commitment can have a strong impact and enable our partner countries to reach the Sustainable Development Goals.

    The EU, as the world’s biggest donor, as well as the strongest international actor promoting democracy and human rights, should take the lead. We need to implement the policy objectives in the EU Consensus on Development in a more strategic and targeted manner in each partner country, reinforcing and complementing the EU foreign policy goals and values. The commitments and principles on aid effectiveness and efficiency as well as international commitments towards financing needs are in place. The Union has a powerful toolbox of instruments and aid modalities.

    There are plenty of opportunities for the EU to move forward in a more comprehensive and coordinated manner:

    First, by using the ongoing programming exercise linked to NDICI as an opportunity to reinforce coordination. Joint programming needs to go hand in hand with joint implementation: the EU should collectively set strategic priorities and identify investment needs/gaps in the pre-programming phase and subsequently look at ways to optimise the range of modalities in the EU institutions’ toolbox, including grants, budget support and EIB loans, as well as financing from EU Member States.

    Second, continue to support sectors where projects have been successful and there is a high potential for future sustainability. Use a catalyst approach: choose sectors where a partner country has incentives to continue a project in the absence of funding.

    Third, using lessons learned from a common EU knowledge base in a strategic and results-oriented manner when defining prioritised sectors in a country.

    Fourth, review assessments of successful and failed projects where the possibilities for sustainability are high. For example, choose sectors that to date have been received budget support and where investment needs can be addressed through a combination of EIB loans/Member State financial institutions and expertise.

    Fifth, using EU and Member State headquarters/delegations’ extensive knowledge of successful and unsuccessful aid modalities in certain sectors on the ground. Continue to tailor EU aid modalities to the local context reflecting the needs and capacity in the country.

    Sixth, use the aid effectiveness and efficiency tools with the aim of improving transparency with our partner countries.

    We do not need to reinvent the wheel. Given the magnitude of the funding gap and limited progress towards achieving the SDGs, it is time to be strategic and take full advantage of the combined financial weight and knowledge of all EU institutions and EU Member States - and to use the unique aid effectiveness and efficiency tools at our disposal - to achieve real impact and progress.

    https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/A-9-2020-0212_EN.html

    –—

    L’#amendement de Tomas Tobé (modification de l’article 25.):
    25.Reiterates that in order for the EU’s development aid to contribute to long-term sustainable development and becompatible with agreed development effectiveness principles, aid allocation should be based on and promote the EU’s core values of the rule of law, human rights and democracy, and be aligned with its policy objectives, especially in relation to climate, trade, security and migration issues;

    Article dans le rapport:
    25.Reiterates that making aid allocation conditional on cooperation with the EU on migration issues is notcompatible with agreed development effectiveness principles;

    https://concordeurope.org/2020/11/27/denying-aid-on-the-basis-of-eu-migration-objectives-is-wrong
    https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/B-9-2019-0175-AM-001-002_EN.pdf

    –—

    Texte amendé
    https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/TA-9-2020-0323_EN.html
    –-> Texte adopté le 25.11.2020 par le parlement européen avec 331 votes pour 294 contre et 72 abstentions.

    https://www.europarl.europa.eu/news/en/press-room/20201120IPR92142/parliament-calls-for-better-use-of-the-eu-development-aid

    –-

    La chronologie de ce texte:

    On 29 October, the Committee on Development adopted an own-initiative report on “improving development effectiveness and efficiency of aid” presented by the Committee Chair, Tomas Tobé (EPP, Sweden). The vote was 23 in favour, 1 against and 0 abstentions: https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/TA-9-2020-0323_EN.html.

    According to the report, improving effectiveness and efficiency in development cooperation is vital to help partner countries to reach the Sustainable Development Goals and to realise the UN 2030 Agenda. Facing enormous development setbacks, limited resources and increasing needs in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, the report by the Development Committee calls for a new impetus to scale-up the effectiveness of European development assistance through better alignment and coordination with EU Member States, with other agencies, donors and with the priorities of aid recipient countries.

    On 25 November, the report was adopted by the plenary (331 in favour, 294 against, 72 abstentions): https://www.europarl.europa.eu/news/en/press-room/20201120IPR92142/parliament-calls-for-better-use-of-the-eu-development-aid

    https://www.europarl.europa.eu/committees/en/improving-development-effectiveness-and-/product-details/20200921CDT04141

    #SDGs #développement #pauvreté #chômage #coopération_au_développement #aide_au_développement #UE #Union_européenne #NDICI #Rapport_Tobé #conditionnalité_de_l'aide_au_développement #migrations #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #root_causes #causes_profondes

    ping @_kg_ @karine4 @isskein @rhoumour

    –—

    Ajouté dans la métaliste autour du lien développement et migrations:
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733358#message768701

    • Le #Parlement_européen vote pour conditionner son aide au développement au contrôle des migrations

      Le Parlement européen a adopté hier un rapport sur “l’#amélioration de l’#efficacité et de l’#efficience de l’aide au développement”, qui soutient la conditionnalité de l’aide au développement au contrôle des migrations.

      Cette position était soutenue par le gouvernement français dans une note adressée aux eurodéputés français.

      Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, directrice France de ONE, réagit : « Le Parlement européen a décidé de modifier soudainement son approche et de se mettre de surcroit en porte-à-faux du #traité_européen qui définit l’objectif et les valeurs de l’aide au développement européenne. Cela pourrait encore retarder les négociations autour de ce budget, et donc repousser sa mise en œuvre, en pleine urgence sanitaire et économique. »

      « Les études montrent justement que lier l’aide au développement aux #retours et #réadmissions des ressortissants étrangers dans leurs pays d’origine ne fonctionne pas, et peut même avoir des effets contre-productifs. L’UE doit tirer les leçons de ses erreurs passées en alignant sa politique migratoire sur les besoins de ses partenaires, pas sur des priorités politiques à court terme. »

      « On prévoit que 100 millions de personnes supplémentaires tomberont dans l’extrême pauvreté à cause de la pandémie, et que fait le Parlement européen ? Il tourne le dos aux populations les plus fragiles, qui souffriraient directement de cette décision. L’aide au développement doit, sans concessions, se concentrer sur des solutions pour lutter contre l’extrême #pauvreté, renforcer les systèmes de santé et créer des emplois décents. »

      https://www.one.org/fr/press/alerte-le-parlement-europeen-vote-pour-conditionner-son-aide-au-developpement-a

  • #EU #Development #Cooperation with #Sub-Saharan #Africa 2013-2018: Policies, funding, results

    How have EU overall development policies and the EU’s overall policies vis-à-vis Sub-Saharan Africa in particular evolved in the period 2013-2018 and what explains the developments that have taken place?2. How has EU development spending in Sub-Saharan Africa developed in the period 2013-2018 and what explains these developments?3.What is known of the results accomplished by EU development aid in Sub-Saharan Africa and what explains these accomplishments?

    This study analyses these questions on the basis of a comprehensive desk review of key EU policy documents, data on EU development cooperation as well as available evaluation material of the EU institutionson EU external assistance. While broad in coverage, the study pays particular attention to EU policies and development spending in specific areas that are priority themes for the Dutch government as communicated to the parliament.

    Authors: Alexei Jones, Niels Keijzer, Ina Friesen and Pauline Veron, study for the evaluation department (IOB) of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands, May 2020

    = https://ecdpm.org/publications/eu-development-cooperation-sub-saharan-africa-2013-2018-policies-funding-resu

  • L’impensé colonial de la #politique_migratoire italienne

    Les sorties du Mouvement Cinq Étoiles, au pouvoir en Italie, contre le #franc_CFA, ont tendu les relations entre Paris et Rome en début d’année. Mais cette polémique, en partie fondée, illustre aussi l’impensé colonial présent dans la politique italienne aujourd’hui – en particulier lors des débats sur l’accueil des migrants.

    Au moment de déchirer un billet de 10 000 francs CFA en direct sur un plateau télé, en janvier dernier (vidéo ci-dessous, à partir de 19 min 16 s), #Alessandro_Di_Battista savait sans doute que son geste franchirait les frontières de l’Italie. Revenu d’un long périple en Amérique latine, ce député, figure du Mouvement Cinq Étoiles (M5S), mettait en scène son retour dans l’arène politique, sur le plateau de l’émission « Quel temps fait-il ? ». Di Battista venait, avec ce geste, de lancer la campagne des européennes de mai.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X14lSpRSMMM&feature=emb_logo


    « La France, qui imprime, près de Lyon, cette monnaie encore utilisée dans 14 pays africains, […] malmène la souveraineté de ces pays et empêche leur légitime indépendance », lance-t-il. Di Battista cherchait à disputer l’espace politique occupé par Matteo Salvini, chef de la Ligue, en matière de fermeté migratoire : « Tant qu’on n’aura pas déchiré ce billet, qui est une menotte pour les peuples africains, on aura beau parler de ports ouverts ou fermés, les gens continueront à fuir et à mourir en mer. »

    Ce discours n’était pas totalement neuf au sein du M5S. Luigi Di Maio, alors ministre du travail, aujourd’hui ministre des affaires étrangères, avait développé à peu près le même argumentaire sur l’immigration, lors d’un meeting dans les Abruzzes, à l’est de Rome : « Il faut parler des causes. Si des gens partent de l’Afrique aujourd’hui, c’est parce que certains pays européens, la #France en tête, n’ont jamais cessé de coloniser l’Afrique. L’UE devrait sanctionner ces pays, comme la France, qui appauvrissent les États africains et poussent les populations au départ. La place des Africains est en Afrique, pas au fond de la Méditerranée. »

    À l’époque, cette rhétorique permettait au M5S de creuser sa différence avec la Ligue sur le dossier, alors que Matteo Salvini fermait les ports italiens aux bateaux de migrants. Mais cette stratégie a fait long feu, pour des raisons diplomatiques. Celle qui était alors ministre des affaires européennes à Paris, Nathalie Loiseau, a convoqué l’ambassadrice italienne en France pour dénoncer des « déclarations inacceptables et inutiles ». L’ambassadeur français à Rome a quant à lui été rappelé à Paris, une semaine plus tard – en réaction à une rencontre de dirigeants du M5S avec des « gilets jaunes » français.

    En Italie, cet épisode a laissé des traces, à l’instar d’un post publié sur Facebook, le 5 juillet dernier, par le sous-secrétaire aux affaires étrangères M5S Manlio Di Stefano. À l’issue d’une rencontre entre Giuseppe Conte, premier ministre italien, et Vladimir Poutine, il écrit : « L’Italie est capable et doit être le protagoniste d’une nouvelle ère de #multilatéralisme, sincère et concret. Nous le pouvons, car nous n’avons pas de #squelettes_dans_le_placard. Nous n’avons pas de #tradition_coloniale. Nous n’avons largué de bombes sur personne. Nous n’avons mis la corde au cou d’aucune économie. »

    Ces affirmations sont fausses. Non seulement l’Italie a mené plusieurs #guerres_coloniales, jusqu’à employer des #armes_chimiques – en #Éthiopie de 1935 à 1936, dans des circonstances longtemps restées secrètes –, mais elle a aussi été l’un des premiers pays à recourir aux bombardements, dans une guerre coloniale – la guerre italo-turque de 1911, menée en Libye. Dans la première moitié du XXe siècle, l’Italie fut à la tête d’un empire colonial qui englobait des territoires comme la Somalie, la Libye, certaines portions du Kenya ou encore l’Éthiopie.

    Cette sortie erronée du sous-secrétaire d’État italien a au moins un mérite : elle illustre à merveille l’impensé colonial présent dans la politique italienne contemporaine. C’est notamment ce qu’affirment plusieurs intellectuels engagés, à l’instar de l’écrivaine et universitaire romaine de 45 ans #Igiaba_Scego. Issue d’une famille somalienne, elle a placé la #question_coloniale au cœur de son activité littéraire (et notamment de son roman Adua). Dans une tribune publiée par Le Monde le 3 février, elle critique sans ménagement l’#hypocrisie de ceux qui parlent du « #colonialisme_des_autres ».

    À ses yeux, la polémique sur le franc CFA a soulevé la question de l’effacement de l’histoire coloniale en cours en Italie : « Au début, j’étais frappée par le fait de voir que personne n’avait la #mémoire du colonialisme. À l’#école, on n’en parlait pas. C’est ma génération tout entière, et pas seulement les Afro-descendants, qui a commencé à poser des questions », avance-t-elle à Mediapart.

    Elle explique ce phénomène par la manière dont s’est opéré le retour à la démocratie, après la Seconde Guerre mondiale : #fascisme et entreprise coloniale ont été associés, pour mieux être passés sous #silence par la suite. Sauf que tout refoulé finit par remonter à la surface, en particulier quand l’actualité le rappelle : « Aujourd’hui, le corps du migrant a remplacé le corps du sujet colonial dans les #imaginaires. » « Les migrations contemporaines rappellent l’urgence de connaître la période coloniale », estime Scego.

    Alors que le monde politique traditionnel italien évite ce sujet délicat, la question est sur la table depuis une dizaine d’années, du côté de la gauche radicale. Le mérite revient surtout à un groupe d’écrivains qui s’est formé au début des années 2000 sous le nom collectif de Wu Ming (qui signifie tout à la fois « cinq noms » et « sans nom » en mandarin).

    Sous un autre nom, emprunté à un footballeur anglais des années 1980, Luther Blissett, ils avaient déjà publié collectivement un texte, L’Œil de Carafa (Seuil, 2001). Ils animent aujourd’hui le blog d’actualité politico-culturelle Giap. « On parle tous les jours des migrants africains sans que personne se souvienne du rapport historique de l’Italie à des pays comme l’Érythrée, la Somalie, l’Éthiopie ou la Libye », avance Giovanni Cattabriga, 45 ans, alias Wu Ming 2, qui est notamment le co-auteur en 2013 de Timira, roman métisse, une tentative de « créoliser la résistance italienne » à Mussolini.

    Dans le sillage des travaux du grand historien critique du colonialisme italien Angelo Del Boca, les Wu Ming ont ouvert un chantier de contre-narration historique qui cible le racisme inhérent à la culture italienne (dont certains textes sont traduits en français aux éditions Métailié). Leur angle d’attaque : le mythe d’une Italie au visage bienveillant, avec une histoire coloniale qui ne serait que marginale. Tout au contraire, rappelle Cattabriga, « les fondements du colonialisme italien ont été posés très rapidement après l’unification du pays, en 1869, soit huit ans à peine après la création du premier royaume d’Italie, et avant l’annexion de Rome en 1870 ».

    La construction nationale et l’entreprise coloniale se sont développées en parallèle. « Une partie de l’identité italienne s’est définie à travers l’entreprise coloniale, dans le miroir de la propagande et du racisme que celle-ci véhiculait », insiste Cattabriga. Bref, si l’on se souvient de la formule du patriote Massimo D’Azeglio, ancien premier ministre du royaume de Sardaigne et acteur majeur de l’unification italienne qui avait déclaré en 1861 que « l’Italie est faite, il faut faire les Italiens », on pourrait ajouter que les Italiens ont aussi été « faits » grâce au colonialisme, malgré les non-dits de l’histoire officielle.
    « La gauche nous a abandonnés »

    Au terme de refoulé, Cattabriga préfère celui d’oubli : « D’un point de vue psychanalytique, le refoulé se base sur une honte, un sentiment de culpabilité non résolu. Il n’y a aucune trace de ce sentiment dans l’histoire politique italienne. » À en croire cet historien, l’oubli colonial italien deviendrait la pièce fondamentale d’une architecture victimaire qui sert à justifier une politique de clôture face aux étrangers.

    « Jouer les victimes, cela fait partie de la construction nationale. Notre hymne dit : “Noi fummo da sempre calpesti e derisi, perché siam divisi” [“Nous avons toujours été piétinés et bafoués, puisque nous sommes divisés” – ndlr]. Aujourd’hui, le discours dominant présente les Italiens comme des victimes des migrations pour lesquelles ils n’ont aucune responsabilité. Cette victimisation ne pourrait fonctionner si les souvenirs de la violence du colonialisme restaient vifs. »

    Un mécanisme identique serait à l’œuvre dans la polémique sur le franc CFA : « On stigmatise la politique néocoloniale française en soulignant son caractère militaire, à quoi on oppose un prétendu “style italien” basé sur la coopération et l’aide à l’Afrique. Mais on se garde bien de dire que l’Italie détient des intérêts néocoloniaux concurrents de ceux des Français », insiste Cattabriga.

    L’historien Michele Colucci, auteur d’une récente Histoire de l’immigration étrangère en Italie, est sur la même ligne. Pour lui, « l’idée selon laquelle l’Italie serait un pays d’immigration récente est pratique, parce qu’elle évite de reconnaître la réalité des migrations, un phénomène de longue date en Italie ». Prenons le cas des Érythréens qui fuient aujourd’hui un régime autoritaire. Selon les chiffres des Nations unies et du ministère italien de l’intérieur, ils représentaient environ 14 % des 23 000 débarqués en Italie en 2018, soit 3 300 personnes. Ils ne formaient l’année précédente que 6 % des 119 000 arrivés. De 2015 à 2016, ils constituaient la deuxième nationalité, derrière le Nigeria, où l’ENI, le géant italien du gaz et du pétrole, opère depuis 1962.

    « Les migrations de Somalie, d’Éthiopie et d’Érythrée vers l’Italie ont commencé pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Elles se sont intensifiées au moment de la décolonisation des années 1950 [la Somalie est placée sous tutelle italienne par l’ONU de 1950 à 1960, après la fin de l’occupation britannique – ndlr]. Cela suffit à faire de l’Italie une nation postcoloniale. » Même si elle refuse de le reconnaître.

    Les stéréotypes coloniaux ont la peau dure. Selon Giovanni Cattabriga, alias Wu Ming 2, « [ses collègues et lui ont] contribué à sensibiliser une partie de la gauche antiraciste, mais [il n’a] pas l’impression que, globalement, [ils soient] parvenus à freiner les manifestations de racisme » : « Je dirais tout au plus que nous avons donné aux antiracistes un outil d’analyse. »

    Igiaba Scego identifie un obstacle plus profond. « Le problème, affirme-t-elle, est qu’en Italie, les Afro-descendants ne font pas partie du milieu intellectuel. Nous sommes toujours considérés un phénomène bizarre : l’école, l’université, les rédactions des journaux sont des lieux totalement “blancs”. Sans parler de la classe politique, avec ses visages si pâles qu’ils semblent peints. »

    Ce constat sur la « blanchitude » des lieux de pouvoir italiens est une rengaine dans les milieux militants et antiracistes. L’activiste Filippo Miraglia, trait d’union entre les mondes politique et associatif, en est convaincu : « Malgré les plus de cinq millions de résidents étrangers présents depuis désormais 30 ans, nous souffrons de l’absence d’un rôle de premier plan de personnes d’origine étrangère dans la politique italienne, dans la revendication de droits. À mon avis, c’est l’une des raisons des défaites des vingt dernières années. »

    Miraglia, qui fut président du réseau ARCI (l’association de promotion sociale de la gauche antifasciste fondée en 1957, une des plus influentes dans les pays) entre 2014 et 2017 (il en est actuellement le chef du département immigration) et s’était présenté aux législatives de 2018 sur les listes de Libres et égaux (à gauche du Parti démocrate), accepte une part d’autocritique : « Dans les années 1990, les syndicats et les associations ont misé sur des cadres d’origine étrangère. Mais ce n’était que de la cooptation de personnes, sans véritable ancrage sur le terrain. Ces gens sont vite tombés dans l’oubli. Certains d’entre eux ont même connu le chômage, renforçant la frustration des communautés d’origine. »

    L’impasse des organisations antiracistes n’est pas sans rapport avec la crise plus globale des gauches dans le pays. C’est pourquoi, face à cette réalité, les solutions les plus intéressantes s’inventent sans doute en dehors des organisations traditionnelles. C’est le cas du mouvement des Italiens de deuxième génération, ou « G2 », qui réunit les enfants d’immigrés, la plupart nés en Italie, mais pour qui l’accès à la citoyenneté italienne reste compliqué.

    De 2005 à 2017, ces jeunes ont porté un mouvement social. Celui-ci exigeait une réforme de la loi sur la nationalité italienne qui aurait permis d’accorder ce statut à environ 800 000 enfants dans le pays. La loi visait à introduire un droit du sol, sous certaines conditions (entre autres, la présence d’un des parents sur le territoire depuis cinq ans ou encore l’obligation d’avoir accompli un cycle scolaire complet en Italie).

    Ce mouvement était parvenu à imposer le débat à la Chambre basse en 2017, sous le gouvernement de Matteo Renzi, mais il perdit le soutien du même Parti démocrate au Sénat. « La gauche a commis une grave erreur en rejetant cette loi, estime Igiaba Scego, qui s’était investie dans la campagne. Cette réforme était encore insuffisante, mais on se disait que c’était mieux que rien. La gauche nous a abandonnés, y compris celle qui n’est pas représentée au Parlement. Nous étions seuls à manifester : des immigrés et des enfants d’immigrés. Il y avait de rares associations, quelques intellectuels et un grand vide politique. À mon avis, c’est là que l’essor de Matteo Salvini [le chef de la Ligue, extrême droite – ndlr] a commencé. »

    Certains, tout de même, veulent rester optimistes, à l’instar de l’historien Michele Colucci qui signale dans son ouvrage le rôle croissant joué par les étrangers dans les luttes du travail, notamment dans les secteurs de l’agriculture : « Si la réforme de la nationalité a fait l’objet de discussions au sein du Parlement italien, c’est uniquement grâce à l’organisation d’un groupe de personnes de deuxième génération d’immigrés. Ce mouvement a évolué de manière indépendante des partis politiques et a fait émerger un nouvel agenda. C’est une leçon importante à retenir. »

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/241219/l-impense-colonial-de-la-politique-migratoire-italienne?onglet=full
    #colonialisme #Italie #impensé_colonial #colonisation #histoire #migrations #causes_profondes #push-factors #facteurs_push #Ethiopie #bombardements #guerre_coloniale #Libye #histoire #histoire_coloniale #empire_colonial #Somalie #Kenya #Wu_Ming #Luther_Blissett #littérature #Luther_Blissett #contre-récit #contre-narration #nationalisme #construction_nationale #identité #identité_italienne #racisme #oubli #refoulement #propagande #culpabilité #honte #oubli_colonial #victimes #victimisation #violence #néocolonialisme #stéréotypes_coloniaux #blanchitude #invisibilisation #G2 #naturalisation #nationalité #droit_du_sol #gauche #loi_sur_la_nationalité #livre

    –—
    Mouvement #seconde_generazioni (G2) :

    La Rete G2 - Seconde Generazioni nasce nel 2005. E’ un’organizzazione nazionale apartitica fondata da figli di immigrati e rifugiati nati e/o cresciuti in Italia. Chi fa parte della Rete G2 si autodefinisce come “figlio di immigrato” e non come “immigrato”: i nati in Italia non hanno compiuto alcuna migrazione; chi è nato all’estero, ma cresciuto in Italia, non è emigrato volontariamente, ma è stato portato qui da genitori o altri parenti. Oggi Rete G2 è un network di “cittadini del mondo”, originari di Asia, Africa, Europa e America Latina, che lavorano insieme su due punti fondamentali: i diritti negati alle seconde generazioni senza cittadinanza italiana e l’identità come incontro di più culture.

    https://www.secondegenerazioni.it

    ping @wizo @albertocampiphoto @karine4 @cede

  • Des trajectoires immobilisées : #protection et #criminalisation des migrations au #Niger

    Le 6 janvier dernier, un camp du Haut-Commissariat des Nations Unies pour les Réfugiés (HCR) situé à une quinzaine de kilomètres de la ville nigérienne d’Agadez est incendié. À partir d’une brève présentation des mobilités régionales, l’article revient sur les contraintes et les tentatives de blocage des trajectoires migratoires dans ce pays saharo-sahélien. Depuis 2015, les projets européens se multiplient afin de lutter contre « les causes profondes de la migration irrégulière ». La Belgique est un des contributeurs du Fonds fiduciaire d’urgence de l’Union européenne pour l’Afrique (FFUE) et l’agence #Enabel met en place des projets visant la #stabilisation des communautés au Niger

    http://www.liguedh.be/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Chronique_LDH_190_voies-sures-et-legales.pdf
    #immobilité #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Agadez #migrations #asile #réfugiés #root_causes #causes_profondes #Fonds_fiduciaire #mécanisme_de_transit_d’urgence #Fonds_fiduciaire_d’urgence_pour_l’Afrique #transit_d'urgence #OIM #temporaire #réinstallation #accueil_temporaire #Libye #IOM #expulsions_sud-sud #UE #EU #Union_européenne #mise_à_l'abri #évacuation #Italie #pays_de_transit #transit #mixed_migrations #migrations_mixtes #Convention_des_Nations_Unies_contre_la_criminalité_transnationale_organisée #fermeture_des_frontières #criminalisation #militarisation_des_frontières #France #Belgique #Espagne #passeurs #catégorisation #catégories #frontières #HCR #appel_d'air #incendie #trafic_illicite_de_migrants #trafiquants

    –----

    Sur l’incendie de janvier 2020, voir :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/816450

    ping @karine4 @isskein :
    Cette doctorante et membre de Migreurop, Alizée Dauchy, a réussi un super défi : résumé en 3 pages la situation dans laquelle se trouve le Niger...

    –---

    Pour @sinehebdo, un nouveau mot : l’#exodant
    –-> #vocabulaire #terminologie #mots

    Les origine de ce terme :

    Sur l’origine et l’emploi du terme « exodant » au Niger, voir Bernus (1999), Bonkano et Boubakar (1996), Boyer (2005a). Les termes #passagers, #rakab (de la racine arabe rakib désignant « ceux qui prennent un moyen de trans-port »), et #yan_tafia (« ceux qui partent » en haoussa) sont également utilisés.

    https://www.reseau-terra.eu/IMG/pdf/mts.pdf

  • Comment l’Europe contrôle ses frontières en #Tunisie ?

    Entre les multiples programmes de coopération, les accords bilatéraux, les #équipements fournis aux #gardes-côtes, les pays européens et l’Union européenne investissent des millions d’euros en Tunisie pour la migration. Sous couvert de coopération mutuelle et de “#promotion_de_la mobilité”, la priorité des programmes migratoires européens est avant tout l’externalisation des frontières. En clair.

    À la fois pays de transit et pays de départ, nœud dans la région méditerranéenne, la Tunisie est un partenaire privilégié de l’Europe dans le cadre de ses #politiques_migratoires. L’Union européenne ou les États qui la composent -Allemagne, France, Italie, Belgique, etc.- interviennent de multiples manières en Tunisie pour servir leurs intérêts de protéger leurs frontières et lutter contre l’immigration irrégulière.

    Depuis des années, de multiples accords pour réadmettre les Tunisien·nes expulsé·es d’Europe ou encore financer du matériel aux #gardes-côtes_tunisiens sont ainsi signés, notamment avec l’#Italie ou encore avec la #Belgique. En plus de ces #partenariats_bilatéraux, l’#Union_européenne utilise ses fonds dédiés à la migration pour financer de nombreux programmes en Tunisie dans le cadre du “#partenariat_pour_la_mobilité”. Dans les faits, ces programmes servent avant tout à empêcher les gens de partir et les pousser à rester chez eux.

    L’ensemble de ces programmes mis en place avec les États européens et l’UE sont nombreux et difficiles à retracer. Dans d’autres pays, notamment au Nigeria, des journalistes ont essayé de compiler l’ensemble de ces flux financiers européens pour la migration. Dans leur article, Ils et elle soulignent la difficulté, voire l’impossibilité de véritablement comprendre tous les fonds, programmes et acteurs de ces financements.

    “C’est profondément préoccupant”, écrivent Maite Vermeulen, Ajibola Amzat et Giacomo Zandonini. “Bien que l’Europe maintienne un semblant de transparence, il est pratiquement impossible dans les faits de tenir l’UE et ses États membres responsables de leurs dépenses pour la migration, et encore moins d’évaluer leur efficacité.”

    En Tunisie, où les investissements restent moins importants que dans d’autres pays de la région comme en Libye, il a été possible d’obtenir un résumé, fourni par la Délégation de l’Union européenne, des programmes financés par l’UE et liés à la migration. Depuis 2016, cela se traduit par l’investissement de près de 58 millions d’euros à travers trois différents fonds : le #FFU (#Fonds_Fiduciaire_d’Urgence) de la Valette, l’#AMIF (Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund) et l’Instrument européen de voisinage (enveloppe régionale).

    Mais il est à noter que ces informations ne prennent pas en compte les autres investissements d’#aide_au_développement ou de soutien à la #lutte_antiterroriste dont les programmes peuvent également concerner la migration. Depuis 2011, au niveau bilatéral, l’Union européenne a ainsi investi 2,5 billions d’euros en Tunisie, toutes thématiques confondues.

    L’écrasante majorité de ces financements de l’UE - 54 200 000 euros - proviennent du #Fond_fiduciaire_d'urgence_pour_l'Afrique. Lancé en 2015, lors du #sommet_de_la_Valette, ce FFU a été créé “en faveur de la stabilité et de la lutte contre les #causes_profondes de la migration irrégulière et du phénomène des personnes déplacées en Afrique” à hauteur de 2 milliards d’euros pour toute la région.

    Ce financement a été pointé du doigt par des associations de droits humains comme Oxfam qui souligne “qu’une partie considérable de ses fonds est investie dans des mesures de #sécurité et de #gestion_des_frontières.”

    “Ces résultats montrent que l’approche des bailleurs de fonds européens vis-à-vis de la gestion des migrations est bien plus axée sur des objectifs de #confinement et de #contrôle. Cette approche est loin de l’engagement qu’ils ont pris (...) de ‘promouvoir des canaux réguliers de migration et de mobilité au départ des pays d’Europe et d’Afrique et entre ceux-ci’ (...) ou de ‘Faciliter la migration et la mobilité de façon ordonnée, sans danger, régulière et responsable’”, détaille plus loin le rapport.

    Surveiller les frontières

    Parmi la vingtaine de projets financés par l’UE, la sécurité des frontières occupe une place prépondérante. Le “#Programme_de_gestion_des_frontières_au_Maghreb” (#BMP_Maghreb) est, de loin, le plus coûteux. Pour fournir de l’équipement et des formations aux gardes-côtes tunisiens, l’UE investit 20 millions d’euros, près d’un tiers du budget en question.

    Le projet BMP Maghreb a un objectif clairement défini : protéger, surveiller et contrôler les #frontières_maritimes dans le but de réduire l’immigration irrégulière. Par exemple, trois chambres d’opération ainsi qu’un système pilote de #surveillance_maritime (#ISmariS) ont été fournis à la garde nationale tunisienne. En collaboration avec le ministère de l’Intérieur et ses différents corps - garde nationale, douane, etc. -, ce programme est géré par l’#ICMPD (#Centre_international_pour_le_développement_des_politiques_migratoires).

    “Le BMP Maghreb est mis en place au #Maroc et en Tunisie. C’est essentiellement de l’acquisition de matériel : matériel informatique, de transmission demandé par l’Etat tunisien”, détaille Donya Smida de l’ICMPD. “On a fait d’abord une première analyse des besoins, qui est complétée ensuite par les autorités tunisiennes”.

    Cette fourniture de matériel s’ajoute à des #formations dispensées par des #experts_techniques, encore une fois coordonnées par l’ICMPD. Cette organisation internationale se présente comme spécialisée dans le “renforcement de capacités” dans le domaine de la politique migratoire, “loin des débat émotionnels et politisés”.

    "Cette posture est symptomatique d’un glissement sémantique plus général. Traiter la migration comme un sujet politique serait dangereux, alors on préfère la “gérer” comme un sujet purement technique. In fine, la ’gestionnaliser’ revient surtout à dépolitiser la question migratoire", commente #Camille_Cassarini, chercheur sur les migrations subsahariennes en Tunisie. “L’ICMPD, ce sont des ‘techniciens’ de la gestion des frontières. Ils dispensent des formations aux États grâce à un réseau d’experts avec un maître-mot : #neutralité politique et idéologique et #soutien_technique."

    En plus de ce programme, la Tunisie bénéficie d’autres fonds et reçoit aussi du matériel pour veiller à la sécurité des frontières. Certains s’inscrivent dans d’autres projets financés par l’UE, comme dans le cadre de la #lutte_antiterroriste.

    Il faut aussi ajouter à cela les équipements fournis individuellement par les pays européens dans le cadre de leurs #accords_bilatéraux. En ce qui concerne la protection des frontières, on peut citer l’exemple de l’Italie qui a fourni une douzaine de bateaux à la Tunisie en 2011. En 2017, l’Italie a également soutenu la Tunisie à travers un projet de modernisation de bateaux de patrouille fournis à la garde nationale tunisienne pour environ 12 millions d’euros.

    L’#Allemagne est aussi un investisseur de plus en plus important, surtout en ce qui concerne les frontières terrestres. Entre 2015 et 2016, elle a contribué à la création d’un centre régional pour la garde nationale et la police des frontières. A la frontière tuniso-libyenne, elle fournit aussi des outils de surveillance électronique tels que des caméras thermiques, des paires de jumelles nocturnes, etc…

    L’opacité des #accords_bilatéraux

    De nombreux pays européens - Allemagne, Italie, #France, Belgique, #Autriche, etc. - coopèrent ainsi avec la Tunisie en concluant de nombreux accords sur la migration. Une grande partie de cette coopération concerne la #réadmission des expulsé·es tunisien·nes. Avec l’Italie, quatre accords ont ainsi été signés en ce sens entre 1998 et 2011. D’après le FTDES* (Forum tunisien des droits économiques et sociaux), c’est dans le cadre de ce dernier accord que la Tunisie accueillerait deux avions par semaine à l’aéroport d’Enfidha de Tunisien·nes expulsé·es depuis Palerme.

    “Ces accords jouent beaucoup sur le caractère réciproque mais dans les faits, il y a un rapport inégal et asymétrique. En termes de réadmission, il est évident que la majorité des #expulsions concernent les Tunisiens en Europe”, commente Jean-Pierre Cassarino, chercheur et spécialiste des systèmes de réadmission.

    En pratique, la Tunisie ne montre pas toujours une volonté politique d’appliquer les accords en question. Plusieurs pays européens se plaignent de la lenteur des procédures de réadmissions de l’Etat tunisien avec qui “les intérêts ne sont pas vraiment convergents”.

    Malgré cela, du côté tunisien, signer ces accords est un moyen de consolider des #alliances. “C’est un moyen d’apparaître comme un partenaire fiable et stable notamment dans la lutte contre l’extrémisme religieux, l’immigration irrégulière ou encore la protection extérieure des frontières européennes, devenus des thèmes prioritaires depuis environ la moitié des années 2000”, explique Jean-Pierre Cassarino.

    Toujours selon les chercheurs, depuis les années 90, ces accords bilatéraux seraient devenus de plus en plus informels pour éviter de longues ratifications au niveau bilatéral les rendant par conséquent, plus opaques.

    Le #soft_power : nouvel outil d’externalisation

    Tous ces exemples montrent à quel point la question de la protection des frontières et de la #lutte_contre_l’immigration_irrégulière sont au cœur des politiques européennes. Une étude de la direction générale des politiques externes du Parlement européen élaborée en 2016 souligne comment l’UE “a tendance à appuyer ses propres intérêts dans les accords, comme c’est le cas pour les sujets liés à l’immigration.” en Tunisie.

    Le rapport pointe du doigt la contradiction entre le discours de l’UE qui, depuis 2011, insiste sur sa volonté de soutenir la Tunisie dans sa #transition_démocratique, notamment dans le domaine migratoire, tandis qu’en pratique, elle reste focalisée sur le volet sécuritaire.

    “La coopération en matière de sécurité demeure fortement centrée sur le contrôle des flux de migration et la lutte contre le terrorisme” alors même que “la rhétorique de l’UE en matière de questions de sécurité (...) a évolué en un discours plus large sur l’importance de la consolidation de l’État de droit et de la garantie de la protection des droits et des libertés acquis grâce à la révolution.”, détaille le rapport.

    Mais même si ces projets ont moins de poids en termes financiers, l’UE met en place de nombreux programmes visant à “développer des initiatives socio-économiques au niveau local”, “ mobiliser la diaspora” ou encore “sensibiliser sur les risques liés à la migration irrégulière”. La priorité est de dissuader en amont les potentiel·les candidat·es à l’immigration irrégulière, au travers de l’appui institutionnel, des #campagnes de #sensibilisation...

    L’#appui_institutionnel, présenté comme une priorité par l’UE, constitue ainsi le deuxième domaine d’investissement avec près de 15% des fonds.

    Houda Ben Jeddou, responsable de la coopération internationale en matière de migration à la DGCIM du ministère des Affaires sociales, explique que le projet #ProgreSMigration, créé en 2016 avec un financement à hauteur de 12,8 millions d’euros, permet de mettre en place “ des ateliers de formations”, “des dispositifs d’aides au retour” ou encore “des enquêtes statistiques sur la migration en Tunisie”.

    Ce projet est en partenariat avec des acteurs étatiques tunisiens comme le ministère des Affaires Sociales, l’observatoire national des migrations (ONM) ou encore l’Institut national de statistiques (INS). L’un des volets prioritaires est de “soutenir la #Stratégie_nationale_migratoire_tunisienne”. Pour autant, ce type de projet ne constitue pas une priorité pour les autorités tunisiennes et cette stratégie n’a toujours pas vu le jour.

    Houda Ben Jeddou explique avoir déposé un projet à la présidence en 2018, attendant qu’elle soit validée. "Il n’y a pas de volonté politique de mettre ce dossier en priorité”, reconnaît-elle.

    Pour Camille Cassarini, ce blocage est assez révélateur de l’absence d’une politique cohérente en Tunisie. “Cela en dit long sur les stratégies de contournement que met en place l’État tunisien en refusant de faire avancer le sujet d’un point de vue politique. Malgré les investissements européens pour pousser la Tunisie à avoir une politique migratoire correspondant à ses standards, on voit que les agendas ne sont pas les mêmes à ce niveau”.

    Changer la vision des migrations

    Pour mettre en place tous ces programmes, en plus des partenariats étatiques avec la Tunisie, l’Europe travaille en étroite collaboration avec les organisations internationales telles que l’#OIM (Organisation internationale pour les migrations), l’ICMPD et le #UNHCR (Haut Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés), les agences de développement européennes implantées sur le territoire - #GiZ, #Expertise_France, #AfD - ainsi que la société civile tunisienne.

    Dans ses travaux, Camille Cassarini montre que les acteurs sécuritaires sont progressivement assistés par des acteurs humanitaires qui s’occupent de mener une politique gestionnaire de la migration, cohérente avec les stratégies sécuritaires. “Le rôle de ces organisations internationales, type OIM, ICMPD, etc., c’est principalement d’effectuer un transfert de normes et pratiques qui correspondent à des dispositifs de #contrôle_migratoire que les Etats européens ne peuvent pas mettre directement en oeuvre”, explique-t-il.

    Contactée à plusieurs reprises par Inkyfada, la Délégation de l’Union européenne en Tunisie a répondu en fournissant le document détaillant leurs projets dans le cadre de leur partenariat de mobilité avec la Tunisie. Elle n’a pas souhaité donner suite aux demandes d’entretiens.

    En finançant ces organisations, les Etats européens ont d’autant plus de poids dans leur orientation politique, affirme encore le chercheur en donnant l’exemple de l’OIM, une des principales organisations actives en Tunisie dans ce domaine. “De par leurs réseaux, ces organisations sont devenues des acteurs incontournables. En Tunisie, elles occupent un espace organisationnel qui n’est pas occupé par l’Etat tunisien. Ça arrange plus ou moins tout le monde : les Etats européens ont des acteurs qui véhiculent leur vision des migrations et l’État tunisien a un acteur qui s’en occupe à sa place”.

    “Dans notre langage académique, on les appelle des #acteurs_épistémologiques”, ajoute Jean-Pierre Cassarino. A travers leur langage et l’étendue de leur réseau, ces organisations arrivent à imposer une certaine vision de la gestion des migrations en Tunisie. “Il n’y a qu’à voir le #lexique de la migration publié sur le site de l’Observatoire national [tunisien] des migrations : c’est une copie de celui de l’OIM”, continue-t-il.

    Contactée également par Inkyfada, l’OIM n’a pas donné suite à nos demandes d’entretien.

    Camille Cassarini donne aussi l’exemple des “#retours_volontaires”. L’OIM ou encore l’Office français de l’immigration (OFII) affirment que ces programmes permettent “la réinsertion sociale et économique des migrants de retour de façon à garantir la #dignité des personnes”. “Dans la réalité, la plupart des retours sont très mal ou pas suivis. On les renvoie au pays sans ressource et on renforce par là leur #précarité_économique et leur #vulnérabilité", affirme-t-il. “Et tous ces mots-clés euphémisent la réalité d’une coopération et de programmes avant tout basé sur le contrôle migratoire”.

    Bien que l’OIM existe depuis près de 20 ans en Tunisie, Camille Cassarini explique que ce système s’est surtout mis en place après la Révolution, notamment avec la société civile. “La singularité de la Tunisie, c’est sa transition démocratique : l’UE a dû adapter sa politique migratoire à ce changement politique et cela est passé notamment par la promotion de la société civile”.

    Dans leur ouvrage à paraître “Externaliser la gouvernance migratoire à travers la société tunisienne : le cas de la Tunisie” [Externalising Migration Governance through Civil Society : Tunisia as a Case Study], Sabine Didi et Caterina Giusa expliquent comment les programmes européens et les #organisations_internationales ont été implantées à travers la #société_civile.

    “Dans le cas des projets liés à la migration, le rôle déterminant de la société civile apparaît au niveau micro, en tant qu’intermédiaire entre les organisations chargées de la mise en œuvre et les différents publics catégorisés et identifiés comme des ‘#migrants_de_retour’, ‘membres de la diaspora’, ou ‘candidats potentiels à la migration irrégulière’", explique Caterina Giusa dans cet ouvrage, “L’intérêt d’inclure et et de travailler avec la société civile est de ‘faire avaler la pilule’ [aux populations locales]”.

    “Pour résumer, tous ces projets ont pour but de faire en sorte que les acteurs tunisiens aient une grille de lecture du phénomène migratoire qui correspondent aux intérêts de l’Union européenne. Et concrètement, ce qui se dessine derrière cette vision “gestionnaire”, c’est surtout une #injonction_à_l’immobilité”, termine Camille Cassarini.

    https://inkyfada.com/fr/2020/03/20/financements-ue-tunisie-migration
    #externalisation #asile #migrations #frontières #Tunisie #EU #UE #Europe #contrôles_frontaliers #politique_de_voisinage #dissuasion #IOM #HCR #immobilité

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation des frontières :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765330

    Et celle sur la conditionnalité de l’aide au développement :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733358#message768701

    ping @karine4 @isskein @_kg_

  • #Livre-blanc - Prendre au sérieux la société de la #connaissance

    Ce Livre Blanc est le fruit de quatre années de rencontres, de séminaires préparatoires, de colloques, d’auditions, de focus groups. Plus de 1.500 personnes y ont contribué depuis 2012. Il est représentatif de ce que l’on nomme « la #société_de_la_connaissance_par_le_bas ». Il se justifie d’autant plus que la confiance de tous nos interlocuteurs dans l’apport des démarches scientifiques comme de la #formation_supérieure dans la construction de notre futur commun est avérée. Ce Livre Blanc est une contribution à l’analyse. Il propose des pistes d’amélioration des politiques publiques. Il vise à définir l’horizon d’actions pour les acteurs concernés : le législateur, l’exécutif, les acteurs de la société civile, les établissements d’enseignement supérieur et de recherche, et les collectivités

    https://inra-dam-front-resources-cdn.wedia-group.com/ressources/afile/397900-528c0-resource-livre-blanc-alliss-prendre-au-serieux-la-societe-de-la-connaissance.pdf
    #capacitation #savoir #université #innovation_élargie #recherche #société_civile

    –---

    Ce Livre Blanc a été envoyé par email dans une des listes militantes contre la réforme retraites et contre la LPPR, le 25.01.2020. Avec ce commentaire :

    Dans le cadre de l’#OPECST (Office parlementaire d’évaluation des choix scientifiques et technologiques a pour mission d’informer le Parlement), en mars 2017, cette association avait présenté son Livre Blanc « Prendre au sérieux la société de la connaissance »

    https://inra-dam-front-resources-cdn.wedia-group.com/ressources/afile/397900-528c0-resource-livre-blanc-alliss-prendre-au-serieux-la-societe-de-la-connaissance.pdf
    Livre blanc envoyé ensuite à tous les candidats à la présidentielle

    https://usbeketrica.com/article/le-tiers-etat-de-la-recherche-envoie-ses-doleances-aux-candidats

    L’idée est simple : les #associations seraient devenues un acteur incontournable de la recherche mais souffrent d’un manque de #reconnaissance, et surtout d’un manque de #moyens !

    Le SNCS-FSU avait réalisé une lecture critique de ce Livre Blanc de 2017, à laquelle j’avais participée, que je vous transmets ci-dessous (le secrétaire général du SNCS-FSU avait réussi à se faire inviter à l’ OPECST, pour soulever, depuis la salle - et non à la tribune - nos inquiétudes) :

    1/ Ce document intègre une vision limitée des acteurs qui produisent de la #recherche_publique, comme en témoigne la définition de "Recherche" p. 8 : "les chercheurs professionnels, aussi appelés les scientifiques" = or pour faire fonctionner l’appareil public de recherche, on a besoin d’entre un tiers et de la moitié d’Ingénieurs, Techniciens et Administratifs (#ITA), qui ici sont totalement négligés, voire considérés comme remplaçables par des citoyens bénévoles ou des doctorants salariés par ces associations.

    Il repose aussi sur une vision très stigmatisée de la recherche publique, avec des termes péjoratifs répétés de manière régulière comme "confinée en laboratoire", "approches académiques surplombantes", "la République des savants", "silos disciplinaires"...

    C’est à se demander s’ils veulent travailler avec des scientifiques...

    2/ Ce document repose à l’inverse sur une vision idéalisée des gentils citoyens, qui seraient animés d’un même but, faire progresser la recherche fondamentale, d’un souci du bien commun, liée à leur curiosité et à leur engagement, sur des « causes communes ».

    Or, si des « amateurs » éclairés peuvent participer à l’observation de faits naturels (les oiseaux, la flore, ou les patients à l’égard de leur maladie et traitement), ou éventuellement certains faits sociaux avec les personnes concernées (pauvreté comme ATD-QuartMonde, transport), ce n’est pas réplicable dans tous les domaines.

    Sur d’autres « #causes_communes » plus discutées (égalité femmes-hommes et LGBT, avortement, racisme et immigration, origine du monde, OGM…), des amateurs éclairés avec des valeurs politiques ou religieuses pourraient même s’investir « contre » le développement de la recherche publique fondamentale.

    Loin de l’angélisme de ce document, des associations peuvent aussi détournées de leur but original par des organisations marchandes (les multinationales adorent les fondations) pour faire du #lobbying et influencer sur les problématiques « importantes », ou privilégier leur pérennité à la #vérité_scientifique (notamment quand les emplois en dépendent).

    Surtout, la production de connaissances ne doit pas être orientée que sur des « causes », même louables, pour poursuivre sa propre logique de #découverte_scientifique, on est bien là sur une #recherche_orientée, même sur des buts nobles.

    3/ Ce document intègre un parti-pris totalement idéologique selon lequel seules les associations (donc le privé non lucratif) seraient mieux à même de jouer le rôle de #médiation entre recherche et sociétés, notamment les #collectivités_territoriales, que des structures publiques. Et ces associations seraient le « tiers-Etat » de la recherche, au sens surtout de « pas assez financée » et ayant besoin de #subventions_publiques.

    Or la plus-value des associations en matière de production de savoirs, par rapport à la fonction publique de recherche, reste à démontrer, car les associations sont des petites structures de moyen terme, moins pérennes, très dépendantes de leurs financeurs, qui peuvent difficilement porter des infrastructures de long terme comme des bases de données ou des appareillages coûteux, ou des bibliothèques spécialisées. Une association soutenue par une Région peut être fragilisée en cas de changement de majorité politique.

    Le document signale d’ailleurs lui-même cette fragilité :

    En 2015, les élections régionales ont mis un terme aux initiatives locales pour se concentrer sur le #transfert_technologique (p. 55) Dans les exemples développés, des associations, comme #TelaBonica, ont pris le relais d’activités de recherche désinvesties par la recherche publique. Ces "associations" reposent d’ailleurs sur de larges financements publics, comme TelaBonica :

    http://www.tela-botanica.org/page:partenaires_financiers?langue=fr

    D’autres exemples cités, comme les #FabLab, ne produisent pas de la recherche, même s’ils peuvent réaliser de l’#innovation et faire de la transmission des savoirs scientifiques.

    Nombre d’exemples cités auraient pu tout autant être développés dans des structures publiques de recherche, sous la forme de projets participatifs. Le passage concernant les collectivités territoriales est très problématique : pour l’instant, les universités et EPST, implantés dans toutes les régions, avaient construit des liens avec les collectivités territoriales, via des financements des structures publiques, de colloques ou de doctorants en #CIFRE ou post-docs financés. D’où sort l’idée, qui ne s’appuie sur aucun chiffre, que le lien entre recherche et collectivités territoriales est inexistant ? A part que dans certaines régions, les laboratoires publics et les universités ont été progressivement fragilisés et sous-financés !

    Il faut donc que ce modèle, qui s’est développé à petite échelle et sous certaines conditions "bonnes", voire "idéales", notamment dans le champ de l’#éducation_populaire_scientifique ne soit pas étendu sans réflexion, sur les effets pervers encore non anticipés, surtout quand ils demandent que leur soient ouverts de nouveaux droits collectifs :

    – demande d’avoir des sièges dans les conseils scientifiques et instances scientifiques des EPST et universités (avec effet sur les problématiques légitimes ou pas, financées ou pas) : de quelles instances précisément ? et à quelle association précisément ?

    – demande de reconnaissance du travail scientifique "bénévole" de collecte de données (qui peut à terme justifier de ne pas remplacer des postes d’Ingénieurs et de techniciens dans les laboratoires publics et donc que le travail associatif se fasse en substitution du travail des fonctionnaires), qui serait validée par des seules "normes qualité" ; or le contrôle doit se faire par les pairs, dans la proximité, pour éviter toute dérive de données fausses, bidonnées et non vérifiables !

    – demande d’un budget de l’ESR de 110 M€ ciblé sur des associations à but scientifique, ce qui donne des emplois dérivés vers ces structures, avec 1.000 thèses en CIFRE, un programme ANR, une extension du Crédit Impôt Recherche aux associations, un service civique étudiant scientifique... Et puis quoi encore ?

    Ce Livre blanc n’a jamais été discuté largement avec la communauté scientifique et ses instances représentatives. On ne peut pas plaider pour des sciences participatives et citoyennes, sans demander l’avis aux scientifiques, ça ne marche pas que dans un sens !

    5/ Enfin, on peut se demander pourquoi la coordination du Libre Blanc de 2017 n’était portée que par certains acteurs de l’ESR, alors que #Alliss se présente comme une « plateforme de travail et de coopération » entre établissements d’enseignement supérieur et de recherche et acteurs de la société civile, associations, syndicats, entreprises.

    #RAP #PAR

  • C’est #Qwant qu’on va où ?
    https://framablog.org/2019/07/19/cest-qwant-quon-va-ou

    L’actualité récente de Qwant était mouvementée, mais il nous a semblé qu’au-delà des polémiques c’était le bon moment pour faire le point avec Qwant, ses projets et ses valeurs. Si comme moi vous étiez un peu distrait⋅e et en étiez … Lire la suite­­

    #Dégooglisons_Internet #Framasoft #G.A.F.A.M. #Internet_et_société #Interview #Libres_Logiciels #Libres_Services #Non_classé #Cartes #Causes #Dépôt #GitHub #Google #IA #Images #junior #Libre #Maps #Masq #musique #OpenSource #OpenStreetMaps #osm #POI #recherche

  • Planting 1.2 Trillion Trees Could Cancel Out a Decade of #CO2 Emissions, Scientists Find - Yale E360
    https://e360.yale.edu/digest/planting-1-2-trillion-trees-could-cancel-out-a-decade-of-co2-emissions-sc

    Tree planting is becoming an increasingly popular tool to combat climate change. The United Nations’ Trillion Tree Campaign has planted nearly 15 billion trees across the globe in recent years. And Australia has announced a plan to plant a billion more by 2050 as part of its effort to meet the country’s Paris Agreement climate targets.

    #climat #arbres #causes #effets

  • Morts aux frontières (de 1988 à 2011)
    –-> la carte n’a pas été mise à jour... c’est Filippo Furri qui me l’a signalée... je la mets ici pour archivage (inspiration peut-être ?) :


    #visualisation #décès #mourir_aux_frontières #Forteresse_europe

    On peut y voir aussi les #causes_du_décès pays par pays.

    Ici par exemple la Suisse :

    http://app.owni.fr/mortsauxfrontieres

    #frontières #migrations #asile #réfugiés

    ping @reka

    • Je l’avais déjà archivée en 2014 sur seenthis...
      https://seenthis.net/messages/234408
       :-)

      @reka y signalait déjà quelques problèmes...

      Cristina, cette carte et cet article posent des problèmes un peu ennuyeux.

      Nous connaissons bien ce projet qui a été mené par un copain (#Jean-Marc_Manach) au début de l’année 2011. Nous avions été avec @fil discuter avec lui et l’équipe d’#Owni en janvier 2011 si je me souviens bien, puisqu’ils nous avaient demandé la permission de reproduire quelques documents établis par Olivier Clochard pour Migreurop, et repris et édité par moi pour le Monde diplo en 2010.

      Je trouve que l’idée du mémorial est plutôt originale et intéressante, pour lutter contre l’oubli. Mais puisque la forme du mémorial est une carte interactive, il faudrait qu’elle soit régulièrement mise à jour, au moins deux fois par an quand United publie ses précieuses statistiques, et ce n’est pas le cas, et pour cause : Owni n’existe plus.

      Ça m’ennuie de voir publier en mars 2014 un article en référence à une initiative de 2011 basé sur des chiffres de 2010 (qui étaient même incomplets au moment où la carte a été faite). Je veux dire par là que Vivre ensemble peut tout à fait mentionner l’initiative qui est légitime et importante, mais il faudrait l’accompagner d’une note visible, d’un texte précisant la date et expliquant ce qui s’est passé depuis.

      Aujourd’hui, et selon les dernières statistiques de United (toujours des chiffres à minima d’ailleurs puisqu’ils ne référencent que les cas reconnus et documentés) on est passé à 17 300 morts.

      http://www.unitedagainstracism.org/campaigns/the-fatal-realities-of-fortress-europe

      C’est le chiffre qu’on retient, mais officieusement, on craint qu’il ne soit en réalité beaucoup plus élevé puisqu’on sait que beaucoup de migrants disparaissent sans laisser de trace, où sans que leur mort ne fasse l’objet d’une citation ou d’un article de presse qui est le matériau primaire avec lequel United travaille pour établir ses chiffres.

      Entre temps, il y a eu la révolution en Tunisie, en Libye et en Egypte (puis la Syrie un peu plus tard) ce qui a aussi considérablement changé le contexte, contribué à une très sensible augmentation des flux et donc des décès en mer et sur terre, sans qu’il soit aujourd’hui vraiment possible de les évaluer avec précision.

      Tous les chiffres de l’article de Vivre ensemble sont ceux de mi-2010 (ce qui est normal puisque c’est une reprise de l’article d’Owni). Mais il faudrait les compléter avec les derniers chiffres, à défaut de pouvoir mettre à jour la carte interactive.

      Sur la carte, ce qui est aussi très ennuyeux (je suppose que c’est un bug que les auteurs n’ont pas pu corriger), comme les données de 2010 étaient incomplètes et qu’il n’y avait pas de données pour 2011, le point des courbes revient à zéro, laissant penser que le phénomène diminue ou même disparait. Or, 2011 a été une des années la plus meurtrière (la cause, c’est conjointement le début des révoltes arabes en Afrique du Nord et renforcement des politiques anti-migrants). Ainsi, tous les graphiques produit interactivement sont faux dans la forme pour les trois dernières années, et donnent une impression visuelle qui fait comprendre au lecteur le contraire de ce qui s’est passé en réalité.

      Voilà, en espérant que ces remarques soient utiles et servent de base à une discussion avec les membres de Vivre ensemble pour compléter l’article publié en référence à la mention faite au Mémorial proposé par Jean-Marc et Owni en février 2011.

  • Durkheim’s types of suicide and social capital: a cross-national comparison of 53 countries.
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/issj.12111/full?hootPostID=d1c5d15899f9ee77d9e275cd04bf3d8e

    Abstract
    Emile Durkheim conceptualised four types of suicide depending on the level of regulation and integration of society. Many studies have been conducted using his types of suicide as a model. Recently, social capital has produced a wide range of studies examining the benefits that the concept has to social and economic outcomes in a community. Durkheim’s conceptualisation of egoistic, altruistic, and anomic suicide may be viewed as different forms of social capital. The current analysis examines Durkheim’s different types of suicide using a social capital model. The findings demonstrate that suicide increases in countries where the individual is too integrated into society (altruistic suicide) and decreases in countries where the individual does not feel part of society (egoistic suicide). The findings illustrate that social capital can increase or decrease suicide depending on the amount of social capital present in the country.

    • C’est quand même assez ahurissant qu’il n’y ait pas un mot sur la fiabilité et la comparabilité des données pour les 53 pays étudiés !

      La question se pose en général pour la fiabilité des #causes_de_décès mais avec encore plus d’acuité pour le #suicide.

      cf. p.ex. Eurostat

      Les causes de décès - Statistics Explained
      http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Causes_of_death_statistics/fr

      • dans la partie spécifique (c’est moi qui graisse) :

      Bien que le suicide ne soit pas une cause de décès majeure et que les données de certains États membres de l’Union puissent être faussées par une sous-déclaration, il est souvent considéré comme un indicateur important de problèmes, auxquels la société doit s’intéresser.

      • dans les remarques générales sur les sources

      La validité et la fiabilité des statistiques sur les causes de décès dépendent, dans une certaine mesure, de la qualité des données fournies par les médecins qui établissent les certificats. Plusieurs facteurs peuvent être à l’origine d’imprécisions, parmi lesquels :
      • les erreurs éventuelles lors de la délivrance du certificat de décès,
      • les problèmes liés au diagnostic médical,
      • la désignation de la cause principale du décès,
      • l’encodage de la cause du décès.

    • On ne peut que renvoyer à ce constat (de 2002) :

      The registration of causes of death : Problems of comparability | SpringerLink
      https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-94-017-3381-6_8

      Abstract
      Cause-of death statistics are usually available in tables which present for some items of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) annual numbers of deaths by age and sex. Most of the research on mortality by cause is based on these tables which are published by the National Statistical or Medical Institutes as well as by WHO. Very few studies take into account the previous steps of elaboration of cause-of-death statistics to evaluate the quality of the data production from the death of an individual to the addition of one more death in the specific cell of a table.

      Les deux premières pages du chapitre (de 20 pages) sont consultables sur ce site

      Meslé F. (2002) The registration of causes of death : Problems of comparability. In : Wunsch G., Mouchart M., Duchêne J. (eds) The Life Table. European Studies of Population, vol 11. Springer, Dordrecht

      https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-3381-6_8

  • To find the extremism behind the Egypt terror attack, start with anti-Sufi preachers | HA Hellyer | Opinion | The Guardian
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/nov/28/extremism-egypt-terror-attack-sufi-islam-extremist-ideology

    For decades, there have been figures trained in countries, particularly Saudi Arabia, who have preached that not only is Sufism not integral to Islam, but that it is a rejection of it. Those figures are not simply on a few fiery pulpits on the Arabian peninsula – they are much further afield, in Muslim majority communities as well as Muslim minority ones. That reality is not simply true of post-1979, despite what Riyadh may now claim – rather, it goes back much further than that, and any “counter-extremism” approach needs to recognise that.

    #causes #arabie_saoudite

  • The Ink Link | The Ink Link
    http://www.theinklink.org/fr/ink-link

    L’association The Ink Link est un réseau d’auteurs de bande dessinée engagés, souhaitant proposer leurs savoir-faire au service de causes qui leur tiennent à cœur.

    Nous pensons que le dessin, en plus d’être un outil de plaidoyer et de communication fort, peut aussi servir d’outil de dialogue communautaire.

    The Ink Link propose d’accompagner les associations et institutions à développer des documents illustrés spécialement adaptés au public ciblé. Pour cela, nous regroupons dans tous nos projets scénaristes, dessinateurs et experts avec une méthodologie adaptée.

    #bande_dessinée #auteurs #causes #associations #communication

  • Medical errors estimated to be third leading cause of U.S. deaths - Chicago Tribune
    http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/sc-medical-errors-health-0511-20160504-story.html

    Medical errors are the third leading cause of death in the United States, a new study contends.

    Johns Hopkins University researchers analyzed several years of U.S. data and concluded that more than 250,000 people died each year due to medical errors.

    If confirmed, that would make medical errors the third leading cause of death among Americans. Currently, respiratory disease, which kills about 150,000 people a year, is listed as the third leading cause of death by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    However, “incidence rates for deaths directly attributable to medical care gone awry haven’t been recognized in any standardized method for collecting national statistics,” said Dr. Martin Makary, a professor of surgery at Baltimore-based Hopkins.

    The CDC’s data collection method does not classify medical errors separately on a death certificate, according to the study authors, who called for changes to that criteria.

    The medical coding system was designed to maximize billing for physician services, not to collect national health statistics, as it is currently being used,” Makary explained in a university news release.

    #causes_de_décès #erreur_médicale
    #finalité_de_la_collecte

  • The Deceptive Debate Over What Causes Terrorism Against the West
    https://theintercept.com/2016/01/06/the-deceptive-debate-over-what-causes-terrorism-against-the-west

    One hears this all the time from self-defending jingoistic Westerners who insist that their tribe in no way plays any causal role in what it calls terrorist violence. They insist that those who posit a causal link between endless Western violence in the Muslim world and return violence aimed at the West are “infantilizing the terrorists and treating them like children” by suggesting that terrorists lack autonomy and the capacity for choice, and are forced by the West to engage in terrorism. They bizarrely claim — as McFadden did before being fired — that to recognize this causal link is to deny that terrorists have agency and to instead believe that their actions are controlled by the West. One hears this claim constantly.

    The claim is absurd: a total reversal of reality and a deliberate distortion of the argument. That some Muslims attack the West in retaliation for Western violence (and external imposition of tyranny) aimed at Muslims is so well-established that it’s barely debatable. Even the 2004 task force report commissioned by the Rumsfeld Pentagon on the causes of terrorism decisively concluded this was the case:

    Beyond such studies, those who have sought to bring violence to Western cities have made explicitly clear that they were doing so out of fury and a sense of helplessness over Western violence that continuously kills innocent Muslims. “The drone hits in Afghanistan and Iraq, they don’t see children, they don’t see anybody. They kill women, children, they kill everybody,” Faisal Shahzad, the attempted Times Square bomber, told his sentencing judge when she expressed bafflement over how he could try to kill innocent people. And then there’s just common sense about human nature: if you spend years bombing, invading, occupying, and imposing tyranny on other people, some of them will want to bring violence back to you.

    #terrorisme #causes #déni

  • Causes of Death | FlowingData
    http://flowingdata.com/2016/01/05/causes-of-death

    There are many ways to die. Cancer. Infection. Mental. External. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention classifies the ways into 113 causes, which are grouped into 20 categories. The CDC’s Underlying Cause of Death database provides estimates for the number of people who die due to each of the causes.

  • War & Peace Over Lunch
    http://www.aucegypt.edu/GAPP/CairoReview/Pages/articleDetails.aspx?aid=879

    I d[o] not agree with the primacy of a Saudi- and Iranian-led regional confrontation that has been heavily promoted by many people in the Saudi-led Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), and therefore by extension by most of the Arab and global media [...]

    A more complete explanation of the battered Arab region today must include accounting for several other mega-tends: the impact of the last twenty-fix years of non-stop American military attacks, threats and sanctions from Libya to Afghanistan; the radicalizing impact of sixty-seven years of non-stop Zionist colonization and militarism against Palestinians, Lebanese, Syrians and other Arabs; the hollowing out of Arab economic and governance systems by three generations of military-led, amateurish and corruption-riddled mismanaged governance that deprived citizens of their civic and political rights and pushed them to assert instead the primacy of their sectarian and tribal identities; and, the catalytic force of the 2003 Anglo-American led war on Iraq that opened the door for all these forces and others yet — like lack of water, jobs, and electricity that make normal daily life increasingly difficult — to combine into the current situation of widespread national polarization and violence.

    #Moyen-Orient #manipulation #médias #Etats-Unis #causes #effets

  • La foire aux « causes faciles »...

    Celebrating causes: Dies irae

    Every cause has its day, whether deserved or not

    http://www.economist.com/news/international/21567057-every-cause-has-its-day-whether-deserved-or-not-dies-irae

    World Toilet Day was on November 19th. World Television Day has just passed. International Civil Aviation Day is on December 7th and International Mountain Day comes four days later. (...)

    No means exist for purging the calendar of causes when their day is done. And the whims of UN decision-making mean that, though 264 days are free of an observance, others are overloaded. March 21st, for example, requires some contortions for the conscientious: they must simultaneously celebrate Nowruz, eliminate racial discrimination, care about Down’s syndrome and exalt poetry.

    Any takers for World Apathy Day?

    #causes_faciles #ONU #célébrations