• Résultats pas très probants, mais au moins là bas on peut faire le calcul :

    Quelle diversité chez les nouveaux professeurs d’université ?
    Mélissa Guillemette, Québec Science, le 23 juillet 2020
    https://www.quebecscience.qc.ca/societe/diversite-professeurs-universite

    Québec Science s’est penché particulièrement sur le sort des minorités visibles (c’est-à-dire les personnes, autres que les Autochtones, qui n’ont pas la peau blanche) et des Autochtones. En 2019, les universités avaient parmi leurs employés 6% de minorités visibles, alors que l’objectif moyen était de 12,5%, et elles comptaient 0,3% d’employés autochtones, plutôt que le 0,5% visé en moyenne, selon le dernier rapport triennal de la CDPDJ. Ces statistiques comprennent tous les types d’emplois.

    Alors que les universités parlent de diversité, « moi, je parle plutôt de décolonisation », dit Catherine Richardson, de Concordia. À l’hiver dernier, tous les cours de la majeure et de la mineure en études des peuples autochtones étaient donnés par des enseignants autochtones (incluant des chargés de cours), « une victoire ».

    #Universités #Québec #Racisme #Discriminations #Autochtones #minorités_visibles

  • Nigerians returned from Europe face stigma and growing hardship

    ‘There’s no job here, and even my family is ashamed to see me, coming back empty-handed with two kids.’

    The EU is doubling down on reducing migration from Africa, funding both voluntary return programmes for those stranded along migration routes before they reach Europe while also doing its best to increase the number of rejected asylum seekers it is deporting.

    The two approaches serve the same purpose for Brussels, but the amount of support provided by the EU and international aid groups for people to get back on their feet is radically different depending on whether they are voluntary returnees or deportees.

    For now, the coronavirus pandemic has slowed voluntary return programmes and significantly reduced the number of people being deported from EU countries, such as Germany. Once travel restrictions are lifted, however, the EU will likely resume its focus on both policies.

    The EU has made Nigeria one of five priority countries in Africa in its efforts to reduce the flow of migrants and asylum seekers. This has involved pouring hundreds of millions of euros into projects in Nigeria to address the “root causes” of migration and funding a “voluntary return” programme run by the UN’s migration agency, IOM.

    Since its launch in 2017, more than 80,000 people, including 16,800 Nigerians, have been repatriated to 23 African countries after getting stuck or having a change of heart while travelling along often-dangerous migration routes connecting sub-Saharan Africa to North Africa.

    Many of the Nigerians who have opted for IOM-facilitated repatriation were stuck in detention centres or exploitative labour situations in Libya. Over the same time period, around 8,400 Nigerians have been deported from Europe, according to official figures.

    Back in their home country, little distinction is made between voluntary returnees and deportees. Both are often socially stigmatised and rejected by their communities. Having a family member reach Europe and be able to send remittances back home is often a vital lifeline for people living in impoverished communities. Returning – regardless of how it happens – is seen as failure.

    In addition to stigmatisation, returnees face daily economic struggles, a situation that has only become worse with the coronavirus pandemic’s impact on Nigeria’s already struggling economy.

    Despite facing common challenges, deportees are largely left to their own devices, while voluntary returnees have access to an EU-funded support system that includes a small three-months salary, training opportunities, controversial “empowerment” and personal development sessions, and funds to help them start businesses – even if these programmes often don’t necessarily end up being effective.
    ‘It’s a well-oiled mechanism’

    Many of the voluntary returnee and deportation flights land in Lagos, Nigeria’s biggest city and main hub for international travel. On a hot and humid day in February, before countries imposed curfews and sealed their borders due to coronavirus, two of these flights arrived within several hours of each other at the city’s hulking airport.

    First, a group of about 45 people in winter clothes walked through the back gate of the cargo airport looking out of place and disoriented. Deportees told TNH they had been taken into immigration custody by German police the day before and forced onto a flight in Frankfurt. Officials from the Nigerian Immigration Service, the country’s border police, said they are usually told to prepare to receive deportees after the planes have already left from Europe.

    Out in the parking lot, a woman fainted under the hot sun. When she recovered, she said she was pregnant and didn’t know where she would sleep that night. A man began shouting angrily about how he had been treated in Europe, where he had lived for 16 years. Police officers soon arrived to disperse the deportees. Without money or phones, many didn’t know where to go or what to do.

    Several hours later, a plane carrying 116 voluntary returnees from Libya touched down at the airport’s commercial terminal. In a huge hangar, dozens of officials guided the returnees through an efficient, well-organised process.

    The voluntary returnees queued patiently to be screened by police, state health officials, and IOM personnel who diligently filled out forms. Officials from Nigeria’s anti-people trafficking agency also screened the female returnees to determine if they had fallen victim to an illegal network that has entrapped tens of thousands of Nigerian women in situations of forced sex work in Europe and in transit countries such as Libya and Niger.

    “It’s a well-oiled mechanism. Each agency knows its role,” Alexander Oturu, a programme manager at Nigeria’s National Commission for Refugees, Migrants & Internally Displaced Persons, which oversees the reception of returnees, told The New Humanitarian.

    Voluntary returnees are put up in a hotel for one night and then helped to travel back to their home regions or temporarily hosted in government shelters, and later they have access to IOM’s reintegration programming.

    Initially, there wasn’t enough funding for the programmes. But now almost 10,000 of the around 16,600 returnees have been able to access this support, out of which about 4,500 have set up small businesses – mostly shops and repair services – according to IOM programme coordinator Abrham Tamrat Desta.

    The main goal is to “address the push factors, so that upon returning, these people don’t face the same situation they fled from”, Desta said. “This is crucial, as our data show that 97 percent of returnees left for economic reasons.”
    COVID-19 making things worse

    Six hours drive south of Lagos is Benin City, the capital of Edo State.

    An overwhelming number of the people who set out for Europe come from this region. It is also where the majority of European migration-related funding ends up materialising, in the form of job creation programmes, awareness raising campaigns about the risks of irregular migration, and efforts to dismantle powerful trafficking networks.

    Progress* is one of the beneficiaries. When TNH met her she was full of smiles, but at 26 years old, she has already been through a lot. After being trafficked at 17 and forced into sex work in Libya, she had a child whose father later died in a shipwreck trying to reach Europe. Progress returned to Nigeria, but couldn’t escape the debt her traffickers expected her to pay. Seeing little choice, she left her child with her sister and returned to Libya.

    Multiple attempts to escape spiralling violence in the country ended in failure. Once, she was pulled out of the water by Libyan fishermen after nearly drowning. Almost 200 other people died in that wreck. On two other occasions, the boat she was in was intercepted and she was dragged back to shore by the EU-supported Libyan Coast Guard.

    After the second attempt, she registered for the IOM voluntary return programme. “I was hoping to get back home immediately, but Libyans put me in prison and obliged me to pay to be released and take the flight,” she said.

    Back in Benin City, she took part in a business training programme run by IOM. She couldn’t provide the paperwork needed to launch her business and finally found support from Pathfinders Justice Initiative – one of the many local NGOs that has benefited from EU funding in recent years.

    She eventually opened a hairdressing boutique, but coronavirus containment measures forced her to close up just as she was starting to build a regular clientele. Unable to provide for her son, now seven years old, she has been forced to send him back to live with her sister.

    Progress isn’t the only returnee struggling due to the impact of the pandemic. Mobility restrictions and the shuttering of non-essential activities – due to remain until early August at least – have “exacerbated returnees’ existing psychosocial vulnerabilities”, an IOM spokesperson said.

    The Edo State Task Force to Combat Human Trafficking, set up by the local government to coordinate prosecutions and welfare initiatives, is trying to ease the difficulties people are facing by distributing food items. As of early June, the task force said it had reached 1,000 of the more than 5,000 people who have returned to the state since 2017.
    ‘Sent here to die’

    Jennifer, 39, lives in an unfinished two-storey building also in Benin City. When TNH visited, her three-year-old son, Prince, stood paralysed and crying, and her six-year-old son, Emmanuel, ran and hid on the appartment’s small balcony. “It’s the German police,” Jennifer said. “The kids are afraid of white men now.”

    Jennifer, who preferred that only her first name is published, left Edo State in 1999. Like many others, she was lied to by traffickers, who tell young Nigerian women they will send them to Europe to get an education or find employment but who end up forcing them into sex work and debt bondage.

    It took a decade of being moved around Europe by trafficking rings before Jennifer was able to pay off her debt. She got a residency permit and settled down in Italy for a period of time. In 2016, jobless and looking to get away from an unstable relationship, she moved to Germany and applied for asylum.

    Her application was not accepted, but deportation proceedings against her were put on hold. That is until June 2019, when 15 policemen showed up at her apartment. “They told me I had five minutes to check on my things and took away my phone,” Jennifer said.

    The next day she was on a flight to Nigeria with Prince and Emmanuel. When they landed, “the Nigerian Immigration Service threw us out of the gate of the airport in Lagos, 20 years after my departure”. she said.

    Nine months after being deported, Jennifer is surviving on small donations coming from volunteers in Germany. It’s the only aid she has received. “There’s no job here, and even my family is ashamed to see me, coming back empty-handed with two kids,” she said.

    Jennifer, like other deportees TNH spoke to, was aware of the support system in place for people who return through IOM, but felt completely excluded from it. The deportation and lack of support has taken a heavy psychological toll, and Jennifer said she has contemplated suicide. “I was sent here to die,” she said.
    ‘The vicious circle of trafficking’

    Without a solid economic foundation, there’s always a risk that people will once again fall victim to traffickers or see no other choice but to leave on their own again in search of opportunity.

    “When support is absent or slow to materialise – and this has happened also for Libyan returnees – women have been pushed again in the hands of traffickers,” said Ruth Evon Odahosa, from the Pathfinders Justice Initiative.

    IOM said its mandate does not include deportees, and various Nigerian government agencies expressed frustration to TNH about the lack of European interest in the topic. “These deportations are implemented inhumanely,” said Margaret Ngozi Ukegbu, a zonal director for the National Commission for Refugees, Migrants and Internally Displaced Persons.

    The German development agency, GIZ, which runs several migration-related programmes in Nigeria, said their programming does not distinguish between returnees and deportees, but the agency would not disclose figures on how many deportees had benefited from its services.

    Despite the amount of money being spent by the EU, voluntary returnees often struggle to get back on their feet. They have psychological needs stemming from their journeys that go unmet, and the businesses started with IOM seed money frequently aren’t sustainable in the long term.

    “It’s crucial that, upon returning home, migrants can get access to skills acquisition programmes, regardless of the way they returned, so that they can make a new start and avoid falling back in the vicious circle of trafficking,” Maria Grazie Giammarinaro, the former UN’s special rapporteur on trafficking in persons, told TNH.

    * Name changed at request of interviewee.

    https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/news-feature/2020/07/28/Nigeria-migrants-return-Europe

    #stigmatisation #renvois #expulsions #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Nigeria #réfugiés_nigérians #réintegration #retour_volontaire #IOM #OIM #chiffres #statistiques #trafic_d'êtres_humains

    ping @_kg_ @rhoumour @isskein @karine4

  • Global Trends #2019 – rifugiati e richiedenti asilo: la situazione nell’Unione Europea

    Sono 20 milioni i rifugiati nel mondo nel 2019. L’Unione europea accoglie circa 2 milioni e 700 mila persone, che corrisponde al 13% di tutti coloro che sono accolti negli altri paesi e continenti.

    Secondo l’ultima edizione dei Global Trends (https://www.unhcr.it/news/comunicati-stampa/l1-per-cento-della-popolazione-mondiale-e-in-fuga-secondo-il-rapporto-annuale-) dell’Unhcr vi sono paesi come la Turchia, il Pakistan e l’Uganda che “da soli” riconoscono lo status di rifugiato rispettivamente a 3 milioni e mezzo, 1 milione e 491 mila, 1 milione e 359 mila persone, pari al 31% di tutti coloro che sono accolti negli altri paesi.

    La media Ue (Regno Unito compreso) è di 5 rifugiati ogni 1000 abitanti. In Italia la media è di 3 ogni 1000 abitanti.
    La sfida europea alla solidarietà

    I dati forniti da Unhcr in merito alla situazione dei rifugiati e dei richiedenti asilo nell’Unione europea consentono alcune riflessioni.

    La prima è la sostanziale continuità circa la presenza di rifugiati nei paesi dell’Unione europea: ben lontani dall’emergenza, la presenza di rifugiati nei paesi della Ue è stabile, con un incremento complessivo, rispetto al 2018, pari al 4%.

    La seconda riflessione chiama in causa l’Italia che, tra i paesi europei, è tra i paesi al di sotto della media europea con la presenza di 3 rifugiati ogni 1.000 abitanti.

    La terza riflessione concerne i paesi di provenienza dei rifugiati presenti negli stati europei al 31 dicembre 2019, e le scelte politiche conseguenti tra i paesi cosiddetti di frontiera e quelli di arrivo. Se alcuni paesi come l’Italia, la Grecia, Malta e la Spagna, in quanto paesi di approdo, sono coinvolti per primi nella gestione degli arrivi via mare, vi sono altri stati come la Francia e la Germania che concedono protezione a persone provenienti da una molteplicità di paesi. A questo proposito, colpisce il dato sulla Francia che accoglie rifugiati di 44 nazionalità.

    Queste riflessioni chiamano in causa proprio il ruolo dell’Unione europea e la necessità di policy condivise tra gli stati su una questione che coinvolge tutti i paesi, specifica, e costante. Peraltro alcuni paesi come i Paesi Bassi e la Francia, nel 2019, si sono distinti per la naturalizzazione dei rifugiati: oltre 12mila nei Paesi Bassi e 3mila in Francia.

    “A volte serve una crisi come quella da Covid19 per ricordarci che abbiamo bisogno di essere uniti. In un momento dove il mondo vive un periodo di grande vulnerabilità la nostra forza è la solidarietà: nessuno è al sicuro se non lo siamo tutti. Ognuno di noi può fare la differenza e contribuire a trovare delle soluzioni per andare avanti”, ha dichiarato la Rappresentante per l’Italia, la Santa Sede e San Marino, Chiara Cardoletti, il 20 giugno scorso, in occasione della celebrazione della Giornata Mondiale del Rifugiato.

    A questo proposito, bisogna ricordare che il Portogallo, ha scelto, nella fase di emergenza sanitaria di Covid 19, allo scopo di garantire l’assistenza sanitaria durante la pandemia, di concedere a immigrati e richiedenti asilo con permesso di soggiorno ‘pendente’ l’assistenza sanitaria e l’accesso ai servizi pubblici.

    Sul versante opposto, l’Ungheria ha inasprito ulteriormente le politiche di chiusura, utilizzando le misure di blocco per eseguire respingimenti su larga scala dai campi cittadini e dai centri che ospitano i richiedenti asilo.

    Una questione cruciale, la protezione sociale e sanitaria, che si sovrappone a un altro dato emerso dal Global Trends 2019. La portavoce di Unchr Italia, Carlotta Sami, in occasione della presentazione dei dati, ci ha ricordato che “la possibilità per Unhcr di organizzare i rientri a casa, che negli anni novanta corrispondeva ad una media di 1 milione e mezzo di persone all’anno, è crollata a 385 mila”e ha ricordato “che solo il 5% dei rifugiati ha potuto usufruire di una soluzione stabile come il reinsediamento”.

    Difficoltà a ritornare a casa e necessità di protezione sociale in fasi delicate come quelle della emergenza sanitaria sono due questioni sulle quali l’Unione europea è chiamata a intervenire.

    Nell’ormai lontano 1994, Alexander Langer, nel discorso pronunciato in occasione delle elezioni europee, invocò la necessità di una priorità politica nel trattare alcune questioni: “Finora l’Europa comunitaria si è preoccupata molto delle aziende, delle merci, dei capitali, dei tassi di inflazione. Ora si tratta di varare un corpo comune di leggi di cittadinanza e di democrazia europea, a garanzia di eguali diritti e uguale protezione in tutta l’Unione, a garanzia dell’apertura agli altri. La difesa e la promozione dei diritti umani all’interno e all’esterno dell’Unione deve diventare una priorità politica oltre che morale”.

    In un contesto come quello attuale, gli stati dell’Unione europea – su una questione cruciale come quella migratoria – dovrebbero raccogliere la sfida di trovare un accordo comune che riesca a superare interessi divergenti.

    https://www.cartadiroma.org/osservatorio/factchecking/global-trends-2019-rifugiati-e-richiedenti-asilo-la-situazione-nellunione-europea/amp/?__twitter_impression=true
    #statistiques #chiffres #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Europe #UE #EU #visualisation

    ping @karine4 @reka @isskein

  • What happens to migrants forcibly returned to Libya?

    ‘These are people going missing by the hundreds.’

    The killing last week of three young men after they were intercepted at sea by the EU-funded Libyan Coast Guard has thrown the spotlight on the fate of tens of thousands of migrants and asylum seekers returned to Libya to face detention, abuse and torture by traffickers, or worse.

    The three Sudanese nationals aged between 15 and 18 were shot dead on 28 July, reportedly by members of a militia linked to the Coast Guard as they tried to avoid being detained. They are among more than 6,200 men, women, and children intercepted on the central Mediterranean and returned to Libya this year. Since 2017, that figure is around 40,000.

    Over the last three months, The New Humanitarian has spoken to migrants and Libyan officials, as well as to UN agencies and other aid groups and actors involved, to piece together what is happening to the returnees after they are brought back to shore.

    It has long been difficult to track the whereabouts of migrants and asylum seekers after they are returned to Libya, and for years there have been reports of people going missing or disappearing into unofficial detention centres after disembarking.

    But the UN’s migration agency, IOM, told TNH there has been an uptick in people vanishing off its radar since around December, and it suspects that at least some returnees are being taken to so-called “data-collection and investigation facilities” under the direct control of the Ministry of Interior for the Government of National Accord.

    The GNA, the internationally recognised authority in Libya, is based in the capital, Tripoli, and has been fighting eastern forces commanded by general Khalifa Haftar for 16 months in a series of battles that has developed into a regional proxy war.

    Unlike official detention centres run by the GNA’s Directorate for Combating Illegal Migration (DCIM) – also under the Ministry of the Interior – and its affiliated militias, neither IOM nor the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR, has access to these data-collection facilities, which are intended for the investigation of smugglers and not for detaining migrants.

    “We have been told that migrants are no longer in these [data-collection] facilities and we wonder if they have been transferred,” Safa Msehli, spokesperson for IOM in Libya, told TNH.

    “These are people going missing by the hundreds. We have also been told – and are hearing reports from community leaders – that people are going missing,” she said. “We feel the worst has happened, and that these locations [data-collection facilities] are being used to smuggle or traffic people.”

    According to IOM, more than half of the over 6,200 people returned to Libya this year – which includes at least 264 women and 202 children – remain unaccounted for after being loaded onto buses and driven away from the disembarkation points on the coast.

    Msehli said some people had been released after they are returned, but that their number was “200 maximum”, and that if others had simply escaped she would have expected them to show up at community centres run by IOM and its local partners – which most haven’t.

    Masoud Abdal Samad, a commander in the Libyan Coast Guard, denied all accusations of trafficking to TNH, even though the UN has sanctioned individuals in the Coast Guard for their involvement in people smuggling and trafficking. He also said he didn’t know where asylum seekers and migrants end up after they are returned to shore. “It’s not my responsibility. It’s DCIM that determines where the migrants go,” he said.

    Neither the head of the DCIM, Al Mabrouk Abdel-Hafez, nor the media officer for the interior ministry, Mohammad Abu Abdallah, responded to requests for comment from TNH. But the Libyan government recently told the Wall Street Journal that all asylum seekers and migrants returned by the Coast Guard are taken to official detention centres.
    ‘I can’t tell you where we take them’

    TNH spoke to four migrants – three of whom were returned by the Libyan Coast Guard and placed in detention, one of them twice. All described a system whereby returned migrants and asylum seekers are being routinely extorted and passed between different militias.

    Contacted via WhatsApp, Yasser, who only gave his first name for fear of retribution for exposing the abuse he suffered, recounted his ordeal in a series of conversations between May and June.

    The final stage of his journey to start a new life in Europe began on a warm September morning in 2019 when he squeezed onto a rubber dinghy along with 120 other people in al-Garabulli, a coastal town near Tripoli. The year before, the 33-year-old Sudanese asylum seeker had escaped from conflict in his village in the Nuba Mountains to search for safety and opportunity.

    By nightfall, those on board the small boat spotted a reconnaissance aircraft, likely dispatched as part of an EU or Italian aerial surveillance mission. It appears the aircraft alerted the Libyan Coast Guard, which soon arrived to drag them onto their boat and back to war-torn Libya.

    Later that day, as the boat approached the port, Yasser overheard a uniformed member of the Coast Guard speaking on the phone. The man said he had around 100 migrants and was willing to sell each one for 500 Libyan dinars ($83).

    “Militias buy and sell us to make a profit in this country,” Yasser told TNH months later, after he escaped. “In their eyes, refugees are just an investment.”

    When Yasser stepped off the Coast Guard boat in Tripoli’s port, he saw dozens of people he presumed were aid workers tending to the injured. He tried to tell them that he and the others were going to be sold to a militia, but the scene was frantic and he said they didn’t listen.

    “Militias buy and sell us to make a profit in this country. In their eyes, refugees are just an investment.”

    Yasser couldn’t recall which organisation the aid workers were from. Whoever was there, they watched Libyan authorities herd Yasser and the other migrants onto a handful of buses and drive them away.

    IOM, or UNHCR, or one of their local partners are usually present at disembarkation points when migrants are returned to shore. The two UN agencies, which receive significant EU funding for their operations in Libya and have been criticised for participating in the system of interception and detention, say they tend to the injured and register asylum seekers. They also said they count the number of people returned from sea and jot down their nationalities and gender.

    But both agencies told TNH they are unable to track where people go next because Libyan authorities do not keep an official database of asylum seekers and migrants intercepted at sea or held in detention centres.

    News footage – and testimonies from migrants and aid workers – shows white buses with DCIM logos frequently pick up those disembarking. TNH also identified a private bus company that DCIM contracts for transportation. The company, called Essahim, imported 130 vehicles from China before beginning operations in September 2019.

    On its Facebook page, Essahim only advertises its shuttle bus services to Misrata airport, in northwest Libya. But a high-level employee, who asked TNH not to disclose his name for fear of reprisal from Libyan authorities, confirmed that the company picks up asylum seekers and migrants from disembarkation points on the shore.

    He said all of Essahim’s buses are equipped with a GPS tracking system to ensure drivers don’t deviate from their route. He also emphasised that the company takes people to “legitimate centres”, but he refused to disclose the locations.

    “You have to ask the government,” he told TNH. “I can’t tell you where we take them. It’s one of the conditions in the contract.”

    Off the radar

    Since Libya’s 2011 revolution, state security forces – such as the Coast Guard and interior ministry units – have mostly consisted of a collection of militias vying for legitimacy and access to sources of revenue.

    Migrant detention centres have been particularly lucrative to control, and even the official ones can be run by whichever local militia or armed group holds sway at a particular time. Those detained are not granted rights or legal processes, and there have been numerous reports of horrific abuse, and deaths from treatable diseases like tuberculosis.

    Facts regarding the number of different detention centres and who controls them are sketchy, especially as they often close and re-open or come under new management, and as territory can change hands between the GNA and forces aligned with Haftar. Both sides have a variety of militias fighting alongside them, and there are splits within the alliances.

    But IOM’s Msehli told TNH that as of 1 August that there are 11 official detention centres run by DCIM, and that she was aware of returned migrants also being taken to what she believes are four different data-collection and investigation facilities – three in Tripoli and one in Zuwara, a coastal city about 100 kilometres west of the capital. The government has not disclosed how many data-collection centres there are or where they are located.

    Beyond the official facilities, there are also numerous makeshift compounds used by smugglers and militias – especially in the south and in the former Muammar Gaddafi stronghold of Bani Walid – for which there is no data, according to a report by the Global Initiative Against Transnational Organised Crime (GI).

    Yasser told TNH he had no idea if he was in an official DCIM-run detention centre or an unofficial site after he was pulled off the bus that took him to a makeshift prison from the port of Tripoli. Unless UN agencies show up, it is hard for detainees to tell the difference. Conditions are dismal and abuses occur in both locations: In unofficial facilities the extortion of detainees is systematic, while in official centres it tends to be carried out by individual staff members, according to the GI report.

    Between Yasser’s description and information from an aid group that gained access to the facility – but declined to be identified for fear of jeopardising its work – TNH believes Yasser was taken to an informal centre in Tripoli called Shaaria Zawiya, outside the reach of UN agencies. Msehli said IOM believes it is a data-collection and investigation facility.

    During the time Yasser was there, the facility was under the control of a militia commander with a brutal reputation, according to a high-level source from the aid group. The commander was eventually replaced in late 2019, but not before trying to extort hundreds of people, including Yasser.

    Several nights after he arrived at the centre, everyone being held there was ordered to pay a 3,000 Libyan dinar ransom – about $500 on the Libyan black market. The militia separated detainees by nationality and tossed each group a cell phone. They gave one to the Eritreans, one to the Somalis, and one to the Sudanese. The detainees were told to call their families and beg, Yasser recalled.

    Those who couldn’t pay languished in the centre until they were sold for a lower sum to another militia, which would try to extort them for a smaller ransom to earn a profit. This is a widely reported trend all across Libya: Militias sell migrants they can’t extort to make space for new hostages.

    Yasser’s friends and family were too poor to pay for his release, yet he clung to hope that he would somehow escape. He watched as the militia commander beat and intimidated other asylum seekers and migrants in the centre, but he was too scared to intervene. As the weeks passed, he started to believe nobody would find him.

    Then, one day, he saw a couple of aid workers. They came to document the situation and treat the wounded. “The migrants who spoke English whispered for help, but [the aid workers] just kept silent and nodded,” Yasser said.

    The aid workers were from the same NGO that identified the data-collection facility to TNH. The aid group said it suspects that Libyan authorities are taking migrants to two other locations in Tripoli after disembarkation: a data-collection and investigation facility in a neighbourhood called Hay al-Andulus, and an abandoned tobacco factory in another Tripoli suburb. “I know the factory exists, but I have no idea how many people are inside,” the source said, adding that the aid group had been unable to negotiate access to either location.

    “We were treated like animals.”

    Msehli confirmed that IOM believes migrants have been taken to both compounds, neither of which are under DCIM control. She added that more migrants are ending up in another unofficial location in Tripoli.

    After languishing for two months, until November, in Shaaria Zawiya, Yasser said he was sold to a militia manning what he thinks was an official detention centre. He assumed the location was official because uniformed UNHCR employees frequently showed up with aid. When UNHCR wasn’t there, the militia still demanded ransoms from the people inside.

    “We were treated like animals,” Yasser said. “But at least when UNHCR visited, the militia fed us more food than usual.”

    Tariq Argaz, the spokesperson for UNHCR in Libya, defended the agency’s aid provision to official facilities like this one, saying: “We are against the detention of refugees, but we have a humanitarian imperative to assist refugees wherever they are, even if it is a detention centre.”

    Growing pressure on EU to change tack

    The surge in disappearances raises further concerns about criminality and human rights abuses occurring within a system of interception and detention by Libyan authorities that the EU and EU member states have funded and supported since 2017.

    The aim of the support is to crack down on smuggling networks, reduce the number of asylum seekers and migrants arriving in Europe, and improve detention conditions in Libya, but critics say it has resulted in tens of thousands of people being returned to indefinite detention and abuse in Libya. There is even less oversight now that asylum seekers and migrants are ending up in data-collection and investigation facilities, beyond the reach of UN agencies.

    The escalating conflict in Libya and the coronavirus crisis have made the humanitarian situation for asylum seekers and migrants in the country “worse than ever”, according to IOM. At the same time, Italy and Malta have further turned their backs on rescuing people at sea. Italy has impounded NGO search and rescue ships, while both countries have repeatedly failed to respond, or responded slowly, to distress calls, and Malta even hired a private fishing vessel to return people rescued at sea to Libya.

    “We believe that people shouldn’t be returned to Libya,” Msehli told TNH. “This is due to the lack of any protection mechanism that the Libyan state takes or is able to take.”

    There are currently estimated to be at least 625,000 migrants in Libya and 47,859 registered asylum seekers and refugees. Of this number, around 1,760 migrants – including 760 registered asylum seekers and refugees – are in the DCIM-run detention centres, according to data from IOM and UNHCR, although IOM’s data only covers eight out of the 11 DCIM facilities.

    The number of detainees in unofficial centres and makeshift compounds is unknown but, based on those unaccounted for and the reported experiences of migrants, could be many times higher. A recent estimate from Liam Kelly, director of the Danish Refugee Council in Libya, suggests as many as 80,000 people have been in them at some point in recent years.

    There remains no clear explanation why some people intercepted attempting the sea journey appear to be being taken to data-collection and investigation facilities, while others end up in official centres. But researchers believe migrants are typically taken to facilities that have space to house new detainees, or other militias may strike a deal to purchase a new group to extort them.

    In a leaked report from last year, the EU acknowledged that the GNA “has not taken steps to improve the situation in the centres”, and that “the government’s reluctance to address the problems raises questions of its own involvement”.

    The UN, human rights groups, researchers, journalists and TNH have noted that there is little distinction between criminal groups, militias, and other entities involved in EU-supported migration control activities under the GNA.

    A report released last week by UNHCR and the Mixed Migration Centre (MMC) at the Danish Refugee Council said that migrants being smuggled and trafficked to the Mediterranean coast had identified the primary perpetrators of abuses as state officials and law enforcement.

    Pressure on the EU over its proximity to abuses resulting from the interception and detention of asylum seekers and migrants in Libya is mounting. International human rights lawyers have filed lawsuits to the International Criminal Court (ICC), the UN human rights committee, and the European Court of Human Rights to attempt to hold the EU accountable.

    Peter Stano, the EU Commission’s official spokesperson for External Affairs, told TNH that the EU doesn’t consider Libya a safe country, but that its priority has always been to stop irregular migration to keep migrants from risking their lives, while protecting the most vulnerable.

    “We have repeated again and again, together with our international partners in the UN and African Union, that arbitrary detention of migrants and refugees in Libya must end, including to Libyan authorities,” he said. “The situation in these centres is unacceptable, and arbitrary detention of migrants and refugees upon disembarkation must stop.”

    For Yasser, it took a war for him to have the opportunity to escape from detention. In January this year, the facility he was in came under heavy fire during a battle in the war for Tripoli. Dozens of migrants, including Yasser, made a run for it.

    He is now living in a crowded house with other Sudanese asylum seekers in the coastal town of Zawiya, and says that returning to the poverty and instability in Sudan is out of the question. With his sights set on Europe, he still intends to cross the Mediterranean, but he’s afraid of being intercepted by the Libyan Coast Guard, trafficked, and extorted all over again.

    “It’s a business,” said Yasser. “Militias pay for your head and then they force you to pay for your freedom.”

    https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/news-feature/2020/08/05/missing-migrants-Libya-forced-returns-Mediterranean

    #chronologie #timeline #time-line #migrations #asile #réfugiés #chiffres #statistiques #pull-back #pull-backs #push-backs #refoulements #disparitions #torture #décès #morts #gardes-côtes_libyens #détention #centres_de_détention #milices

    ping @isskein

    • The legal battle to hold the EU to account for Libya migrant abuses

      ‘It’s a well known fact that we’re all struggling here, as human rights practitioners.’

      More than 6,500 asylum seekers and migrants have been intercepted at sea and returned to Libya by the Libyan Coast Guard so far this year. Since the EU and Italy began training, funding, equipping, and providing operational assistance to the Libyan Coast Guard in 2017, that number stands at around 40,000 people.

      Critics say European support for these interceptions and returns is one of the most glaring examples of the trade-off being made between upholding human rights – a fundamental EU value – and the EU’s determination to reduce migration to the continent.

      Those intercepted at sea and returned to Libya by the Libyan Coast Guard – predominantly asylum seekers and migrants from East and West Africa – face indefinite detention, extortion, torture, sexual exploitation, and forced labour.

      This year alone, thousands have disappeared beyond the reach of UN agencies after being disembarked. Migration detention in Libya functions as a business that generates revenue for armed groups, some of whom have also pressed asylum seekers and migrants into military activities – a practice that is likely a war crime, according to Human Rights Watch.

      All of this has been well documented and widely known for years, even as the EU and Italy have stepped up their support for the Libyan Coast Guard. Yet despite their key role in empowering the Coast Guard to return people to Libya, international human rights lawyers have struggled to hold the EU and Italy to account. Boxed in by the limitations of international law, lawyers have had to find increasingly innovative legal strategies to try to establish European complicity in the abuses taking place.

      As the EU looks to expand its cooperation with third countries, the outcome of these legal efforts could have broader implications on whether the EU and its member states can be held accountable for the human rights impacts of their external migration policies.

      “Under international law there are rules… prohibiting states to assist other states in the commission of human rights violations,” Matteo de Bellis, Amnesty International’s migration researcher, told The New Humanitarian. “However, those international rules do not have a specific court where you can litigate them, where individuals can have access to remedy.”

      In fact, human rights advocates and lawyers argue that EU and Italian support for the Libyan Coast Guard is designed specifically to avoid legal responsibility.

      “For a European court to have jurisdiction over a particular policy, a European actor must be in control... of a person directly,” said Itamar Mann, an international human rights lawyer. “When a non-European agent takes that control, it’s far from clear that [a] European court has jurisdiction. So there is a kind of accountability gap under international human rights law.”
      ‘The EU is not blameless’

      When Italy signed a Memorandum of Understanding in February 2017 with Libya’s internationally recognised Government of National Accord (GNA) “to ensure the reduction of illegal migratory flows”, the agreement carried echoes of an earlier era.

      In 2008, former Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi signed a friendship treaty with Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi that, among other things, committed the two countries to working together to curb irregular migration.

      The following year, Italian patrol boats began intercepting asylum seekers and migrants at sea and returning them to Libya. In 2012, the European Court of Human Rights, an international court based in Strasbourg, France – which all EU member states are party to – ruled that the practice violated multiple articles of the European Convention on Human Rights.

      The decision, in what is known as the Hirsi case, was based on the idea that Italy had established “extraterritorial jurisdiction” over asylum seekers and migrants when it took them under their control at sea and had violated the principle of non-refoulement – a core element of international refugee law – by forcing them back to a country where they faced human rights abuses.

      Many states that have signed the 1951 refugee convention have integrated the principle of non-refoulement into their domestic law, binding them to protect asylum seekers once they enter a nation’s territory. But there are divergent interpretations of how it applies to state actors in international waters.

      By the time of the Hirsi decision, the practice had already ended and Gaddafi had been toppled from power. The chaos that followed the Libyan uprising in 2011 paved the way for a new era of irregular migration. The number of people crossing the central Meditteranean jumped from an average of tens of thousands per year throughout the late 1990s and 2000s to more than 150,000 per year in 2014, 2015, and 2016.

      Reducing these numbers became a main priority for Italy and the EU, and they kept the lessons of the Hirsi case in mind as they set about designing their policies, according to de Bellis.

      Instead of using European vessels, the EU and Italy focused on “enabling the Libyan authorities to do the dirty job of intercepting people at sea and returning them to Libya”, he said. “By doing so, they would argue that they have not breached international European law because they have never assumed control, and therefore exercised jurisdiction, over the people who have then been subjected to human rights violations [in Libya].”

      The number of people crossing the central Mediterranean has dropped precipitously in recent years as EU policies have hardened, and tens of thousands of people – including those returned by the Coast Guard – are estimated to have passed through formal and informal migration detention centres in Libya, some of them getting stuck for years and many falling victim to extortion and abuse.

      “There is always going to be a debate about, is the EU responsible… [because] it’s really Libya who has done the abuses,” said Carla Ferstman, a human rights law professor at the University of Essex in England. “[But] the EU is not blameless because it can’t pretend that it didn’t know the consequences of what it was going to do.”

      The challenge for human rights lawyers is how to legally establish that blame.
      The accountability gap

      Since 2017, the EU has given more than 91 million euros (about $107 million) to support border management projects in Libya. Much of that money has gone to Italy, which implements the projects and has provided its own funding and at least six patrol boats to the Libyan Coast Guard.

      One objective of the EU’s funding is to improve the human rights and humanitarian situation in official detention centres. But according to a leaked EU document from 2019, this is something the Libyan government had not been taking steps to do, “raising the question of its own involvement”, according to the document.

      The main goal of the funding is to strengthen the capacity of Libyan authorities to control the country’s borders and intercept asylum seekers and migrants at sea. This aspect of the policy has been effective, according to a September 2019 report by the UN secretary-general.

      “All our action is based on international and European law,” an EU spokesperson told the Guardian newspaper in June. “The European Union dialogue with Libyan authorities focuses on the respect for human rights of migrants and refugees.”

      The EU has legal obligations to ensure that its actions do not violate human rights in both its internal and external policy, according to Ferstman. But when it comes to actions taken outside of Europe, “routes for those affected to complain when their rights are being violated are very, very weak,” she said.

      The EU and its member states are also increasingly relying on informal agreements, such as the Memorandum of Understanding with Libya, in their external migration cooperation.

      “Once the EU makes formal agreements with third states… [it] is more tightly bound to a lot of human rights and refugee commitments,” Raphael Bossong, a researcher at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs (SWP) in Berlin, told TNH. “Hence, we see a shift toward less binding or purely informal arrangements.”

      Lawyers and researchers told TNH that the absence of formal agreements, and the combination of EU funding and member state implementation, undermines the standing of the EU Parliament and the Court of Justice, the bloc’s supreme court, to act as watchdogs.

      Efforts to challenge Italy’s role in cooperating with Libya in Italian courts have also so far been unsuccessful.

      “It’s a well known fact that we’re all struggling here, as human rights practitioners… to grapple with the very limited, minimalistic tools we have to address the problem at hand,” said Valentina Azarova, a lawyer and researcher affiliated with the Global Legal Action Network (GLAN), a nonprofit organisation that pursues international human rights litigation.

      Uncharted territory

      With no clear path forward, human rights lawyers have ventured into uncharted territory to try to subject EU and Italian cooperation with Libya to legal scrutiny.

      Lawyers called last year for the International Criminal Court to investigate the EU for its alleged complicity in thousands of deaths in the Mediterranean, and legal organisations have filed two separate complaints with the UN Human Rights Committee, which has a quasi-judicial function.

      In November last year, GLAN also submitted a case, called S.S. and others v. Italy, to the European Court of Human Rights that aims to build on the Hirsi decision. The case argues that – through its financial, material, and operational support – Italy assumes “contactless control” over people intercepted by Libyan Coast Guard and therefore establishes jurisdiction over them.

      “Jurisdiction is not only a matter of direct, effective control over bodies,” Mann, who is part of GLAN, said of the case’s argument. “It’s also a matter of substantive control that can be wielded in many different ways.”

      GLAN, along with two Italian legal organisations, also filed a complaint in April to the European Court of Auditors, which is tasked with checking to see if the EU’s budget is implemented correctly and that funds are spent legally.

      The GLAN complaint alleges that funding border management activities in Libya makes the EU and its member states complicit in the human rights abuses taking place there, and is also a misuse of money intended for development purposes – both of which fall afoul of EU budgetary guidelines.

      The complaint asks for the EU funding to be made conditional on the improvement of the situation for asylum seekers and migrants in the country, and for it to be suspended until certain criteria are met, including the release of all refugees and migrants from arbitrary detention, the creation of an asylum system that complies with international standards, and the establishment of an independent, transparent mechanism to monitor and hold state and non-state actors accountable for human rights violations against refugees and migrants.

      The Court of Auditors is not an actual courtroom or a traditional venue for addressing human rights abuses. It is composed of financial experts who conduct an annual audit of the EU budget. The complaint is meant to encourage them to take a specific look at EU funding to Libya, but they aren’t obligated to do so.

      “To use the EU Court of Auditors to get some kind of human rights accountability is an odd thing to do,” said Ferstman, who is not involved in the complaint. “It speaks to the [accountability] gap and the absence of clear approaches.”

      “[Still], it is the institution where this matter needs to be adjudicated, so to speak,” Azarova, who came up with the strategy, added. “They are the experts on questions of EU budget law.”

      Closing the gap?

      If successful, the Court of Auditors complaint could change how EU funding for Libya operates and set a precedent requiring a substantive accounting of how money is being spent and whether it ends up contributing to human rights violations in other EU third-country arrangements, according to Mann. “It will be a blow to the general externalisation pattern,” he said.

      Ferstman cautioned, however, that its impact – at least legally – might not be so concrete. “[The Court of Auditors] can recommend everything that GLAN has put forward, but it will be a recommendation,” she said. “It will not be an order.”

      Instead, the complaint’s more significant impact might be political. “It could put a lot of important arsenal in the hands of the MEPs [Members of the European Parliament] who want to push forward changes,” Ferstman said.

      A European Court of Human Rights decision in favour of the plaintiffs in S.S. and others v Italy could be more decisive. “It would go a long way towards addressing that [accountability] gap, because individuals will be able to challenge European states that encourage and assist other countries to commit human rights violations,” de Bellis said.

      If any or all of the various legal challenges that are currently underway are successful, Bossong, from SWP, doesn’t expect them to put an end to external migration cooperation entirely. “Many [external] cooperations would continue,” he said. “[But] policy-makers and administrators would have to think harder: Where is the line? Where do we cross the line?”

      The Court of Auditors will likely decide whether to review EU funding for border management activities in Libya next year, but the European Court of Human Rights moves slowly, with proceedings generally taking around five years, according to Mann.

      Human rights advocates and lawyers worry that by the time the current legal challenges are concluded, the situation in the Mediterranean will again have evolved. Already, since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, states such as Malta and Greece have shifted from empowering third countries to intercept people at sea to carrying out pushbacks directly.

      “What is happening now, particularly in the Aegean, is much more alarming than the facts that generated the Hirsi case in terms of the violence of the actual pushbacks,” Mann said.

      Human rights lawyers are already planning to begin issuing challenges to the new practices. As they do, they are acutely aware of the limitations of the tools available to them. Or, as Azarova put it: “We’re dealing with symptoms. We’re not addressing the pathology.”

      https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/analysis/2020/08/10/Libya-migrant-abuses-EU-legal-battle

      #justice

  • Crispations entre la #Tunisie et l’#Italie sur la question migratoire

    La reprise des flux de départs de migrants tunisiens irréguliers vers la péninsule italienne provoque un regain de #tensions entre Tunis et Rome.

    La relation se crispe à nouveau entre la Tunisie et l’Italie sur le dossier migratoire. Plus de 4 000 Tunisiens ont atteint les côtes italiennes durant le mois de juillet, bien au-delà du précédent pic d’arrivées qui avait culminé à 2 700 en octobre 2017. Alarmé, Rome a dépêché à Tunis le 27 juillet sa ministre de l’intérieur, Luciana Lamorgese. Le 30 juillet, l’ambassadeur tunisien à Rome était convoqué. Le lendemain, Luigi Di Maio, ministre des affaires étrangères, faisait monter la pression d’un cran en brandissant des menaces. Sans réponse tunisienne adaptée, a-t-il mis en garde, l’aide italienne pourrait être suspendue, évoquant une première enveloppe de 6,5 millions d’euros.

    Une telle poussée de fièvre italo-tunisienne sur le dossier migratoire n’est pas inédite. En juin 2018, l’ambassadeur italien à Tunis avait été convoqué par le ministère des affaires étrangères à la suite de propos désobligeants de Matteo Salvini, à l’époque vice premier ministre et ministre de l’intérieur, dénonçant l’« envoi » par la Tunisie de « repris de justice » en Italie.

    Face au regain de tension, Kais Saïed, le chef de l’Etat tunisien, a tenté d’apaiser les esprits. Il s’est rendu dimanche 2 août à Sfax (centre) et à Mahdia, deux principaux points de départ à 140 km vers l’île de Lampedusa. Au programme : passage en revue des garde-côtes, visite de trois escadrilles offertes par l’Italie. Entouré d’uniformes, le président tunisien a cherché à rassurer les pays voisins en mettant en scène un Etat veillant sur ses frontières.

    Eliminer les motifs de départs

    Il a aussi adressé un message d’une autre nature. Dans un modeste bureau de la garde nationale maritime, il a en effet évoqué la responsabilité « collective » des deux côtés de la Méditerranée, imputant le phénomène migratoire – entre autres raisons – à « l’inégale répartition des richesses dans le monde ». « Au lieu d’investir davantage dans les forces côtières pour éradiquer ce fléau, a-t-il précisé, il faut éliminer les motifs originels qui poussent ces candidats à se jeter à la mer ». Il a ajouté que la Tunisie portait sa part de #responsabilité. « La question est essentiellement tuniso-tunisienne » car le pays a « échoué à résoudre les problèmes économiques », a-t-il expliqué. Les projets sont nombreux mais ils sont, à ses yeux, entravés par « les blocages politiques et administratifs ».

    De telles pesanteurs n’ont guère été arrangées par la crise politique dans laquelle la Tunisie est plongée depuis des semaines. Le gouvernement d’Elyes Fakhfakh a dû démissionner fin juillet à peine cinq mois après sa prise de fonction. Le parti islamoconservateur Ennahda, dominant au sein de la coalition gouvernementale, a tiré profit d’accusations de « conflit d’intérêts » visant M. Fakhfakh pour le pousser vers la sortie. Son ministre de l’intérieur, Hichem Mechichi, a été choisi par le chef de l’Etat pour constituer le prochain gouvernement.

    Dans ces conditions, le soupçon que les autorités tunisiennes auraient pu sciemment fermer les yeux sur la nouvelle vague de départs n’est guère pris au sérieux par certains observateurs. « Ce n’est absolument pas le cas », assure Romdhane Ben Amor, le chargé de la communication du Forum tunisien des droits économiques et sociaux (FTDES), une des organisations les plus dynamiques de la société civile tunisienne. « En juillet dernier, il y a eu près de 250 interceptions de la garde maritime, précise M. Ben Amor. C’est un record aussi. Les sécuritaires sont épuisés. »

    « Plus il y a de départs de passeurs et de migrants, moins il y a de risque de se faire intercepter, ajoute-t-il. C’est une logique, non une stratégie coordonnée. » Depuis la récente acquisition de trois vedettes et de radars par les autorités tunisiennes, les passeurs se sont adaptés. Les petits bateaux en Plexiglas et en bois ont remplacé les bateaux usuels d’une dizaine de mètres – de type chalutiers – chargés d’une centaine de personnes à bord, aisément détectables.
    « Expression d’une colère »

    « L’immigration irrégulière est un mouvement de #protestation et l’expression d’une #colère », analyse M. Ben Amor. La pression psychologique due à la crise politique et l’incertitude économique, notamment avec − 7 % de croissance attendue pour 2020, ont sûrement pesé dans ces décisions de départ. « Ce n’est pas nécessairement le manque de ressources mais plutôt le souhait d’amélioration de qualité de vie » qui motive les candidats à la traversée. Autre facteur de poids : le beau temps que connaît actuellement la Méditerranée.

    Le discours de Kais Saïed suscite toutefois les réserves de M. Ben Amor, qui qualifie de « formelles » ses considérations humanitaires. En fait, le président « s’adresse aux Européens et non aux Tunisiens », relève le porte-parole du FTDES. Et cette volonté de rassurer les Européens le place dans une position en décalage avec les « élans de souverainisme » appelant à une relation « d’égal à égal avec l’Union européenne [UE] » qui avaient marqué sa campagne électorale de l’automne 2019, note M. Ben Amor. La Tunisie sera-t-elle en mesure de résister à la pression croissante de l’UE en matière de réadmissions de ses ressortissants en situation irrégulière ? « Les flux illégaux doivent cesser et nous comptons sur la coopération des autorités tunisiennes, y compris en matière de retour », a récemment enjoint Oliver Varhelyi, le commissaire européen au voisinage et à l’élargissement.

    « L’UE clame qu’elle soutient la démocratie tunisienne, en réalité, elle l’étouffe », dénonce M. Ben Amor. L’économie est le point faible de la Tunisie, « pourtant elle veut imposer des traités injustes et se limiter à l’immigration régulière ». Et pour cause, « ça ne sert que ses intérêts de drainer les ingénieurs et les médecins tunisiens ». Selon lui, la Tunisie est aussi victime de la détérioration de la situation en Libye où les pays européens sont des acteurs du conflit.

    Pour peser encore plus dans le rapport de forces, l’Italie a décidé d’affréter un ferry pour mettre en quarantaine quelque 700 migrants par peur du Covid-19 dont la Tunisie a été largement épargnée. Selon M. Ben Amor, ce bateau pourrait se transformer en prison et prendre le large à n’importe quel moment pour une expulsion en masse.

    https://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2020/08/08/crispations-entre-la-tunisie-et-l-italie-sur-la-question-migratoire_6048468_
    #migrations #migrants_tunisiens #statistiques #chiffres

    ping @_kg_

  • Rapport 2019 sur les #incidents_racistes recensés par les #centres_de_conseil

    La plupart des incidents racistes recensés par les centres de conseil en 2019 sont survenus dans l’#espace_public et sur le #lieu_de_travail, le plus souvent sous la forme d’#inégalités_de_traitement ou d’#insultes. Pour ce qui est des motifs de #discrimination, la #xénophobie vient en tête, suivie par le #racisme_anti-Noirs et l’#hostilité à l’égard des personnes musulmanes. Le rapport révèle aussi une augmentation des incidents relevant de l’#extrémisme_de_droite.

    La plupart des #discriminations signalées en 2019 se sont produites dans l’espace public (62 cas). Les incidents sur le lieu de travail arrivent en deuxième position (50 cas), en diminution par rapport à 2018. Les cas de #discrimination_raciale étaient aussi très fréquents dans le #voisinage, dans le domaine de la #formation et dans les contacts avec l’#administration et la #police.

    Pour ce qui est des motifs de discrimination, la xénophobie en général arrive en tête (145 cas), suivie par le racisme anti-Noirs (132 incidents) et l’hostilité à l’égard des personnes musulmanes (55 cas). Enfin, le rapport fait état d’une augmentation significative des cas relevant de l’extrémisme de droite (36 cas). À cet égard, il mentionne notamment l’exemple d’un centre de conseil confronté dans une commune à différents incidents extrémistes commis par des élèves : diffusion de symboles d’extrême droite, gestes comme le #salut_hitlérien et même #agressions_verbales et physiques d’un jeune Noir. Le centre de conseil est intervenu en prenant différentes mesures. Grâce à ce travail de sensibilisation, il a réussi à calmer la situation.

    En 2019, les centres de conseil ont également traité différents cas de #profilage_racial (23 cas). Ainsi, une femme a notamment dénoncé un incident survenu à l’#aéroport alors qu’elle revenait d’un voyage professionnel : à la suite d’un contrôle effectué par la #police_aéroportuaire et les #gardes-frontières, cette femme a été la seule passagère à être prise à part. Alors même que tous ses documents étaient en ordre et sans aucune explication supplémentaire, elle a été emmenée dans une pièce séparée où elle a subi un interrogatoire musclé. Sa valise a également été fouillée et elle a dû se déshabiller. Le rapport revient plus en détail sur cet exemple – parmi d’autres – en lien avec un entretien avec la coordinatrice du Centre d’écoute contre le racisme de Genève.

    Au total, le rapport 2019 dénombre 352 cas de discrimination raciale recensés dans toute la Suisse par les 22 centres de conseil membres du réseau. Cette publication n’a pas la prétention de recenser et d’analyser la totalité des cas de #discrimination_raciale. Elle vise plutôt à donner un aperçu des expériences vécues par les victimes de racisme et à mettre en lumière la qualité et la diversité du travail des centres de conseil. Ceux-ci fournissent en effet des informations générales et des conseils juridiques, offrent un soutien psychosocial aux victimes et apportent une précieuse contribution à la résolution des conflits.

    https://www.admin.ch/gov/fr/accueil/documentation/communiques.msg-id-78901.html

    –—

    Pour télécharger le rapport :


    http://network-racism.ch/cms/upload/200421_Rassismusbericht_19_F.pdf

    #rapport #racisme #Suisse #statistiques #chiffres #2019
    #islamophobie #extrême_droite

    ping @cede

  • Budget européen pour la migration : plus de contrôles aux frontières, moins de respect pour les droits humains

    Le 17 juillet 2020, le Conseil européen examinera le #cadre_financier_pluriannuel (#CFP) pour la période #2021-2027. À cette occasion, les dirigeants de l’UE discuteront des aspects tant internes qu’externes du budget alloué aux migrations et à l’#asile.

    En l’état actuel, la #Commission_européenne propose une #enveloppe_budgétaire totale de 40,62 milliards d’euros pour les programmes portant sur la migration et l’asile, répartis comme suit : 31,12 milliards d’euros pour la dimension interne et environ 10 milliards d’euros pour la dimension externe. Il s’agit d’une augmentation de 441% en valeur monétaire par rapport à la proposition faite en 2014 pour le budget 2014-2020 et d’une augmentation de 78% par rapport à la révision budgétaire de 2015 pour ce même budget.

    Une réalité déguisée

    Est-ce une bonne nouvelle qui permettra d’assurer dignement le bien-être de milliers de migrant.e.s et de réfugié.e.s actuellement abandonné.e.s à la rue ou bloqué.e.s dans des centres d’accueil surpeuplés de certains pays européens ? En réalité, cette augmentation est principalement destinée à renforcer l’#approche_sécuritaire : dans la proposition actuelle, environ 75% du budget de l’UE consacré à la migration et à l’asile serait alloué aux #retours, à la #gestion_des_frontières et à l’#externalisation des contrôles. Ceci s’effectue au détriment des programmes d’asile et d’#intégration dans les États membres ; programmes qui se voient attribuer 25% du budget global.

    Le budget 2014 ne comprenait pas de dimension extérieure. Cette variable n’a été introduite qu’en 2015 avec la création du #Fonds_fiduciaire_de_l’UE_pour_l’Afrique (4,7 milliards d’euros) et une enveloppe financière destinée à soutenir la mise en œuvre de la #déclaration_UE-Turquie de mars 2016 (6 milliards d’euros), qui a été tant décriée. Ces deux lignes budgétaires s’inscrivent dans la dangereuse logique de #conditionnalité entre migration et #développement : l’#aide_au_développement est liée à l’acceptation, par les pays tiers concernés, de #contrôles_migratoires ou d’autres tâches liées aux migrations. En outre, au moins 10% du budget prévu pour l’Instrument de voisinage, de développement et de coopération internationale (#NDICI) est réservé pour des projets de gestion des migrations dans les pays d’origine et de transit. Ces projets ont rarement un rapport avec les activités de développement.

    Au-delà des chiffres, des violations des #droits_humains

    L’augmentation inquiétante de la dimension sécuritaire du budget de l’UE correspond, sur le terrain, à une hausse des violations des #droits_fondamentaux. Par exemple, plus les fonds alloués aux « #gardes-côtes_libyens » sont importants, plus on observe de #refoulements sur la route de la Méditerranée centrale. Depuis 2014, le nombre de refoulements vers la #Libye s’élève à 62 474 personnes, soit plus de 60 000 personnes qui ont tenté d’échapper à des violences bien documentées en Libye et qui ont mis leur vie en danger mais ont été ramenées dans des centres de détention indignes, indirectement financés par l’UE.

    En #Turquie, autre partenaire à long terme de l’UE en matière d’externalisation des contrôles, les autorités n’hésitent pas à jouer avec la vie des migrant.e.s et des réfugié.e.s, en ouvrant et en fermant les frontières, pour négocier le versement de fonds, comme en témoigne l’exemple récent à la frontière gréco-turque.

    Un budget opaque

    « EuroMed Droits s’inquiète de l’#opacité des allocations de fonds dans le budget courant et demande à l’Union européenne de garantir des mécanismes de responsabilité et de transparence sur l’utilisation des fonds, en particulier lorsqu’il s’agit de pays où la corruption est endémique et qui violent régulièrement les droits des personnes migrantes et réfugiées, mais aussi les droits de leurs propres citoyen.ne.s », a déclaré Wadih Al-Asmar, président d’EuroMed Droits.

    « Alors que les dirigeants européens se réunissent à Bruxelles pour discuter du prochain cadre financier pluriannuel, EuroMed Droits demande qu’une approche plus humaine et basée sur les droits soit adoptée envers les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s, afin que les appels à l’empathie et à l’action résolue de la Présidente de la Commission européenne, Ursula von der Leyen ne restent pas lettre morte ».

    https://euromedrights.org/fr/publication/budget-europeen-pour-la-migration-plus-de-controles-aux-frontieres-mo


    https://twitter.com/EuroMedRights/status/1283759540740096001

    #budget #migrations #EU #UE #Union_européenne #frontières #Fonds_fiduciaire_pour_l’Afrique #Fonds_fiduciaire #sécurité #réfugiés #accord_UE-Turquie #chiffres #infographie #renvois #expulsions #Neighbourhood_Development_and_International_Cooperation_Instrument

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur la #conditionnalité_de_l'aide_au_développement :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733358#message768701

    Et à la métaliste sur l’externalisation des contrôles frontaliers :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765319

    ping @karine4 @rhoumour @reka @_kg_

  • *La Marine teste l’utilisation de NETS pour piéger les migrants dans la Manche alors que des nombres record traversent illégalement*

    - Des navires militaires ont travaillé avec la UK Border Force pour essayer des tactiques en mai et juin
    - Priti Patel a révélé le stratagème en accusant Paris de la crise actuelle
    – Plus de 2 750 personnes auraient atteint le Royaume-Uni outre-Manche cette année

    La #Royal_Navy a testé l’utilisation de filets pour arrêter les migrants dans la Manche, a révélé hier #Priti_Patel.

    Des navires militaires ont travaillé avec la #UK_Border_Force en mai et juin, essayant des #tactiques pour se déployer contre de petits bateaux traversant la France.

    La ministre de l’Intérieur a fait la divulgation alors qu’elle reprochait à Paris de ne pas avoir maîtrisé la crise des migrants.

    Plus de 2 750 clandestins auraient atteint le Royaume-Uni de l’autre côté de la Manche cette année, dont 90 non encore confirmés qui ont atterri à Douvres hier.

    Ce chiffre se compare à seulement 1 850 au cours de l’année dernière. Dimanche, il y a eu un record de 180, entassés à bord de 15 dériveurs.

    Plus de 2 750 clandestins auraient atteint le Royaume-Uni de l’autre côté de la Manche cette année, dont 90 non encore confirmés qui ont atterri à #Douvres hier

    Les #chiffres montent en flèche malgré la promesse de Miss Patel, faite en octobre, qu’elle aurait pratiquement éliminé les passages de la Manche maintenant.

    Hier, elle a déclaré qu’elle s’efforçait de persuader les Français de « montrer leur volonté » et de permettre le retour des arrivées.

    Mlle Patel a affirmé que les #lois_maritimes_internationales autorisaient le Royaume-Uni à empêcher les bateaux de migrants d’atteindre le sol britannique, mais que Paris interprétait les règles différemment.

    « Je pense qu’il pourrait y avoir des mesures d’application plus strictes du côté français », a déclaré hier Mme Patel aux députés.

    « Je cherche à apporter des changements. Nous avons un problème majeur, majeur avec ces petits bateaux. Nous cherchons fondamentalement à changer les modes de travail en France.

    « J’ai eu des discussions très, très – je pense qu’il est juste de dire – difficiles avec mon homologue français, même en ce qui concerne les #interceptions en mer, car actuellement les autorités françaises n’interceptent pas les bateaux.

    « Et j’entends par là même des bateaux qui ne sont qu’à 250 mètres environ des côtes françaises.

    « Une grande partie de cela est régie par le #droit_maritime et les interprétations des autorités françaises de ce qu’elles peuvent et ne peuvent pas faire. »

    Elle a confirmé que les #navires_de_patrouille français n’interviendront pour arrêter les bateaux de migrants que s’ils sont en train de couler – et non pour empêcher les traversées illégales.

    Au sujet de la participation de la Marine, Mlle Patel a déclaré à la commission des affaires intérieures de la Chambre des communes : « Nous avons mené une série d’#exercices_dans_l’eau en mer impliquant une gamme d’#actifs_maritimes, y compris militaires.

    La ministre de l’Intérieur, photographiée hier, a fait la divulgation alors qu’elle reprochait à Paris de ne pas avoir maîtrisé la crise des migrants

    « Nous pouvons renforcer #Border_Force et montrer comment nous pouvons prendre des bateaux en toute sécurité et les renvoyer en France.

    « C’est effectivement le dialogue que nous entamons actuellement avec les Français pour savoir comment ils peuvent travailler avec nous et montrer leur volonté. Parce que cela ne sert à rien de leur pays.

    Tim Loughton, un député conservateur du comité, a demandé au ministre de l’Intérieur : « Pouvez-vous confirmer que vous pensez que les Français ont le pouvoir – qu’ils prétendent ne pas avoir – d’intercepter des bateaux en mer ? »

    Elle a répondu : ‘Absolument raison. Et c’est ce que nous nous efforçons de réaliser jusqu’au partage des #conseils_juridiques en matière de droit maritime. À travers la pandémie où le temps a été favorable, nous avons vu une augmentation des chiffres et nous devons mettre un terme à cette route.

    « Nous voulons rompre cette route, nous voulons rendre cela #non_viable. La seule façon d’y parvenir est d’intercepter et de renvoyer les bateaux en France. »

    Le ministre français de l’Intérieur, Gerald Darmanin, qui a été nommé il y a seulement dix jours, se rendra à Douvres le mois prochain pour voir l’impact des bateaux de migrants sur la communauté locale.

    « Le ministre de l’Intérieur est de plus en plus frustré par la partie française, mais nous avons de nouveaux espoirs que le nouveau ministre de l’Intérieur voudra régler ce problème », a déclaré une source de Whitehall.

    Hier, neuf passagers clandestins érythréens ont été découverts à l’arrière d’un camion lors d’un service Welcome Break sur la M40. La police a été appelée après que des témoins ont vu des mouvements à l’arrière du camion stationné dans l’Oxfordshire.

    https://www.fr24news.com/fr/a/2020/07/la-marine-teste-lutilisation-de-nets-pour-pieger-les-migrants-dans-la-manc
    #frontières #militarisation_des_frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #armée #NETS #Manche #La_Manche #France #UK #Angleterre #pull-back #pull-backs

    #via @FilippoFurri

  • Plastic for recycling from Europe ends up in Asia’s waters
    https://www.europeanscientist.com/en/environment/plastic-for-recycling-from-europe-ends-up-in-asian-waters

    The researchers from the National University of Ireland Galway and the University of Limerick in Ireland used trade data and waste management data from destination countries to determine the various fates – from successful conversion into recycled resins or ending up as landfill, incineration, or ocean debris – of all plastic recycling exported from Europe.

    They discovered that a massive 46 per cent of European separated plastic waste is exported outside the country of origin. While China was previously the single biggest importer of plastics for recycling, the country closed its doors in 2017. Since then, Southeast Asian nations with poor waste management practices have shouldered the burden.

    According to the authors, a large share of this waste is rejected from recycling streams and significantly contributes to ocean littering. For 2017, they estimated that up to 180,000 tonnes – that is, around 7 per cent, of all exported European polyethene – may have ended up in the oceans.

    #déchets_plastiques #pollution #Asie_du_Sud-Est

    • Recycling of European plastic is a pathway for plastic debris in the ocean

      Polyethylene (#PE) is one of the most common types of plastic. Whilst an increasing share of post-consumer plastic waste from Europe is collected for recycling, 46% of separated PE waste is exported outside of the source country (including intra-EU trade). The fate of this exported European plastic is not well known. This study integrated data on PE waste flows in 2017 from UN Comtrade, an open repository providing detailed international trade data, with best available information on waste management in destination countries, to model the fate of PE exported for recycling from Europe (EU-28, Norway and Switzerland) into: recycled high-density PE (#HDPE) and low-density PE (#LDPE) resins, “landfill”, incineration and ocean debris. Data uncertainty was reflected in three scenarios representing high, low and average recovery efficiency factors in material recovery facilities and reprocessing facilities, and different ocean debris fate factors. The fates of exported PE were then linked back to the individual European countries of export. Our study estimated that 83,187 Mg (tonnes) (range: 32,115–180,558 Mg), or 3% (1–7%) of exported European PE in 2017 ended up in the ocean, indicating an important and hitherto undocumented pathway of plastic debris entering the oceans. The countries with the greatest percentage of exported PE ending up as recycled HDPE or LDPE were Luxembourg and Switzerland (90% recycled for all scenarios), whilst the country with the lowest share of exported PE being recycled was the United Kingdom (59–80%, average 69% recycled). The results showed strong, significant positive relationships between the percentage of PE exported out of Europe and the percentage of exports which potentially end up as ocean debris. Export countries may not be the ultimate countries of origin owing to complex intra-EU trade in PE waste. Although somewhat uncertain, these mass flows provide pertinent new evidence on the efficacy and risks of current plastic waste management practices pertinent to emerging regulations around trade in plastic waste, and to the development of a more circular economy.

      https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412020318481?via%3Dihub

      #eau #plastique #ocean_littering #statistiques #chiffres #polyéthylène #recyclage #Luxembourg #Suisse #UK #Angleterre #économie_circulaire

      ping @albertocampiphoto @marty @daphne

  • EU: Damning draft report on the implementation of the Return Directive

    Tineke Strik, the Green MEP responsible for overseeing the passage through the European Parliament of the ’recast Return Directive’, which governs certain common procedures regarding the detention and expulsion of non-EU nationals, has prepared a report on the implementation of the original 2008 Return Directive. It criticises the Commission’s emphasis, since 2017, on punitive enforcement measures, at the expense of alternatives that have not been fully explored or implemented by the Commission or the member states, despite the 2008 legislation providing for them.

    See: DRAFT REPORT on the implementation of the Return Directive (2019/2208(INI)): https://www.statewatch.org/media/documents/news/2020/jun/ep-libe-returns-directive-implementation-draft-rep-9-6-20.pdf

    From the explanatory statement:

    “This Report, highlighting several gaps in the implementation of the Return Directive, is not intended to substitute the still overdue fully-fledged implementation assessment of the Commission. It calls on Member States to ensure compliance with the Return Directive and on the Commission to ensure timely and proper monitoring and support for its implementation, and to enforce compliance if necessary.

    (...)

    With a view to the dual objective of the Return Directive, notably promoting effective returns and ensuring that returns comply with fundamental rights and procedural safeguards, this Report shows that the Directive allows for and supports effective returns, but that most factors impeding effective return are absent in the current discourse, as the effectiveness is mainly stressed and understood as return rate.”

    Parliamentary procedure page: Implementation report on the Return Directive (European Parliament, link: https://oeil.secure.europarl.europa.eu/oeil/popups/ficheprocedure.do?reference=2019/2208(INI)&l=en)

    https://www.statewatch.org/news/2020/june/eu-damning-draft-report-on-the-implementation-of-the-return-directive
    #Directive_Retour #EU #Europe #Union_européenne #asile #migrations #réfugiés #renvois #expulsions #rétention #détention_administrative #évaluation #identification #efficacité #2008_Return_Directive #régimes_parallèles #retour_volontaire #déboutés #sans-papiers #permis_de_résidence #régularisation #proportionnalité #principe_de_proportionnalité #AVR_programmes #AVR #interdiction_d'entrée_sur_le_territoire #externalisation #Gambie #Bangladesh #Turquie #Ethiopie #Afghanistan #Guinée #Côte_d'Ivoire #droits_humains #Tineke_Strik #risque_de_fuite #fuite #accord #réadmission

    –—

    Quelques passages intéressants tirés du rapport:

    The study shows that Member States make use of the possibility offered in Article 2(2)(a) not to apply the Directive in “border cases”, by creating parallel regimes, where procedures falling outside the scope of the Directive offer less safeguards compared to the regular return procedure, for instance no voluntary return term, no suspensive effect of an appeal and less restrictions on the length of detention. This lower level of protection gives serious reasons for concern, as the fact that border situations may remain outside the scope of the Directive also enhances the risks of push backs and refoulement. (...) Your Rapporteur considers that it is key to ensure a proper assessment of the risk of refoulement prior to the issuance of a return decision. This already takes place in Sweden and France. Although unaccompanied minors are rarely returned, most Member States do not officially ban their return. Their being subject to a return procedure adds vulnerability to their situation, due to the lack of safeguards and legal certainty.

    (p.4)
    #frontières #zones_frontalières #push-backs #refoulement

    Sur les #statistiques et #chiffres de #Eurostat:

    According to Eurostat, Member States issued over 490.000 return decisions in 2019, of which 85% were issued by the ten Member States under the current study. These figures are less reliable then they seem, due to the divergent practices. In some Member States, migrants are issued with a return decision more than once, children are not issued a decision separately, and refusals at the border are excluded.

    Statistics on the percentage of departure being voluntary show significant varieties between the Member States: from 96% in Poland to 7% in Spain and Italy. Germany and the Netherlands have reported not being able to collect data of non-assisted voluntary returns, which is remarkable in the light of the information provided by other Member States. According to Frontex, almost half of the departures are voluntary.

    (p.5)

    As Article 7(4) is often applied in an automatic way, and as the voluntary departure period is often insufficient to organise the departure, many returnees are automatically subject to an entry ban. Due to the different interpretations of a risk of absconding, the scope of the mandatory imposition of an entry ban may vary considerably between the countries. The legislation and practice in Belgium, Bulgaria, France, the Netherlands and Sweden provides for an automatic entry ban if the term for voluntary departure was not granted or respected by the returnee and in other cases, the imposition is optional. In Germany, Spain, Italy, Poland and Bulgaria however, legislation or practice provides for an automatic imposition of entry bans in all cases, including cases in which the returnee has left during the voluntary departure period. Also in the Netherlands, migrants with a voluntary departure term can be issued with an entry ban before the term is expired. This raises questions on the purpose and effectiveness of imposing an entry ban, as it can have a discouraging effect if imposed at an early stage. Why leave the territory in time on a voluntary basis if that is not rewarded with the possibility to re-enter? This approach is also at odds with the administrative and non-punitive approach taken in the Directive.

    (p.6)

    National legislation transposing the definition of “risk of absconding” significantly differs, and while several Member States have long lists of criteria which justify finding a risk of absconding (Belgium has 11, France 8, Germany 7, The Netherlands 19), other Member States (Bulgaria, Greece, Poland) do not enumerate the criteria in an exhaustive manner. A broad legal basis for detention allows detention to be imposed in a systematic manner, while individual circumstances are marginally assessed. National practices highlighted in this context also confirm previous studies that most returns take place in the first few weeks and that longer detention hardly has an added value.

    (p.6)

    In its 2016 Communication on establishing a new Partnership Framework with third countries under the European Agenda on Migration, the Commission recognised that cooperation with third countries is essential in ensuring effective and sustainable returns. Since the adoption of this Communication, several informal arrangements have been concluded with third countries, including Gambia, Bangladesh, Turkey, Ethiopia, Afghanistan, Guinea and Ivory Coast. The Rapporteur regrets that such informal deals are concluded in the complete absence of duly parliamentary scrutiny and democratic and judicial oversight that according to the Treaties the conclusion of formal readmission agreements would warrant.

    (p.7)

    With the informalisation of cooperation with third countries in the field of migration, including with transit countries, also came an increased emphasis on conditionality in terms of return and readmission. The Rapporteur is concerned that funding earmarked for development cooperation is increasingly being redirected away from development and poverty eradication goals.

    (p.7)
    #développement #aide_au_développement #conditionnalité_de_l'aide

    ping @_kg_ @isskein @i_s_ @karine4 @rhoumour

  • The Fourth Overview of Housing Exclusion in Europe 2019

    Since 2015, FEANTSA and the Fondation Abbé Pierre have released a yearly Overview of Housing Exclusion in Europe. These annual reports look at the latest #Eurostat data (EU-SILC) and assess EU countries’ capacity to adequately house their populations.

    The 2020 deadline is approaching for the European Union’s cohesion policy, yet it’s objective – the fight against poverty and social exclusion by 2020 - remains unattainable. With this 4th report on homelessness and housing exclusion, FEANTSA and the Fondation Abbé Pierre ask: what is meant by "European cohesion” when another Europe, deprived of a home or even a shelter, is being left behind? This report explores the state of emergency housing in Europe, in order to attract the attention of all decision-making bodies in Europe on the overcrowding, precariousness and inadequacy our shelter systems are confronted with.

    https://www.feantsa.org/en/report/2019/04/01/the-fourth-overview-of-housing-exclusion-in-europe-2019?bcParent=27

    Pour télécharger le rapport en pdf :
    https://www.feantsa.org/download/rapport_europe_2019_def_web_06659524807198672857.pdf

    #rapport #SDF #sans-abri #sans-abrisme #Europe #FEANTSA #statistiques #chiffres #urgence #mal-logement #Fondation_Abbé_Pierre #2019 #hébergement_d'urgence #inconditionnalité #dortoirs

    ping @karine4 @isskein

    • A Foot In The Door: Experiences of the #Homelessness_Reduction_Act (2020)

      Key findings:

      - Two years into its implementation, the research has found the change in law has significantly expanded access to homelessness assistance particularly for single people.
      - The research findings suggest that this is one of the most substantial changes observed since the introduction of the HRA and that the change in legislation has had a noticeable impact on widening access to single homeless people.
      – Overwhelmingly people reported a more positive experience when first approaching Housing Options for assistance.
      – Seventy-five per cent of people reported they were treated with respect and were able to communicate confidentially with staff.
      - Despite the majority of participants reporting positive experiences there is still clear examples of people having poor assessments.
      – The intention and ambition of the HRA is being constrained by the housing market, welfare system and funding.
      – Whilst there has been a broadly positive experience of initial contact and engagement with Housing Options staff, the research has shown significant barriers and issues with the support on offer and people’s housing outcomes.
      - Overall only 39 per cent of respondents agreed when asked whether the local authority had helped them to resolve their housing issue.
      - A further 31 per cent of participants reported that they had either supported themselves or with the help of family or friends, and 30 per cent reported that their issue was still ongoing.
      - Overall 56 per cent of survey respondents reported a more positive housing situation when asked to compare their current position with the night before they presented at Housing Options.
      – The research found the most common form of intervention offered is information on accessing the private rented sector.
      – Lack of affordable housing both social and PRS means that local authorities are increasingly constrained in the realistic outcomes that they can achieve.

      Pour télécharger le rapport:
      https://www.crisis.org.uk/media/241742/a_foot_in_the_door_2020.pdf

      https://www.crisis.org.uk/ending-homelessness/homelessness-knowledge-hub/services-and-interventions/a-foot-in-the-door-experiences-of-the-homelessness-reduction-act-2020

      #UK #Angleterre

  • Migrants : les échecs d’un #programme_de_retour_volontaire financé par l’#UE

    Alors qu’il embarque sur un vol de la Libye vers le Nigeria à la fin 2018, James a déjà survécu à un naufrage en Méditerranée, traversé une demi-douzaine d’États africains, été la cible de coups de feu et passé deux ans à être maltraité et torturé dans les centres de détention libyens connus pour la brutalité qui y règne.

    En 2020, de retour dans sa ville de Benin City (Etat d’Edo au Nigéria), James se retrouve expulsé de sa maison après n’avoir pas pu payer son loyer. Il dort désormais à même le sol de son salon de coiffure.

    Sa famille et ses amis l’ont tous rejeté parce qu’il n’a pas réussi à rejoindre l’Europe.

    « Le fait que tu sois de retour n’est source de bonheur pour personne ici. Personne ne semble se soucier de toi [...]. Tu es revenu les #mains_vides », raconte-t-il à Euronews.

    James est l’un des quelque 81 000 migrants africains qui sont rentrés dans leur pays d’origine avec l’aide de l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) des Nations unies et le #soutien_financier de l’Union européenne, dans le cadre d’une initiative conjointe de 357 millions d’euros (https://migrationjointinitiative.org). Outre une place sur un vol au départ de la Libye ou de plusieurs autres pays de transit, les migrants se voient promettre de l’argent, un #soutien et des #conseils pour leur permettre de se réintégrer dans leur pays d’origine une fois rentrés chez eux.

    Mais une enquête d’Euronews menée dans sept pays africains a révélé des lacunes importantes dans ce programme, considéré comme la réponse phare de l’UE pour empêcher les migrants d’essayer de se rendre en Europe.

    Des dizaines de migrants ayant participé au programme ont déclaré à Euronews qu’une fois rentrés chez eux, ils ne recevaient aucune aide. Et ceux qui ont reçu une aide financière, comme James, ont déclaré qu’elle était insuffisante.

    Nombreux sont ceux qui envisagent de tenter à nouveau de se rendre en Europe dès que l’occasion se présente.

    « Je ne me sens pas à ma place ici », confie James. « Si l’occasion se présente, je quitte le pays ».

    Sur les 81 000 migrants qui ont été rapatriés depuis 2017, près de 33 000 ont été renvoyés de Libye par avion. Parmi eux, beaucoup ont été victimes de détention, d’abus et de violences de la part de passeurs, de milices et de bandes criminelles. Les conditions sont si mauvaises dans le pays d’Afrique du Nord que le programme est appelé « retour humanitaire volontaire » (VHR), plutôt que programme de « retour volontaire assisté » (AVR) comme ailleurs en Afrique.

    Après trois ans passés en Libye, Mohi, 24 ans, a accepté l’offre d’un vol de retour en 2019. Mais, une fois de retour dans son pays, son programme de réintégration ne s’est jamais concrétisé. « Rien ne nous a été fourni ; ils continuent à nous dire ’demain’ », raconte-t-il à Euronews depuis le nord du Darfour, au Soudan.

    Mohi n’est pas seul. Les propres statistiques de l’OIM sur les rapatriés au Soudan révèlent que seuls 766 personnes sur plus de 2 600 ont reçu un soutien économique. L’OIM attribue cette situation à des taux d’inflation élevés et à une pénurie de biens et d’argent sur place.

    Mais M. Kwaku Arhin-Sam, spécialiste des projets de développement et directeur de l’Institut d’évaluation Friedensau, estime de manière plus générale que la moitié des programmes de réintégration de l’OIM échouent.

    « La plupart des gens sont perdus au bout de quelques jours », explique-t-il.
    Deux tiers des migrants ne terminent pas les programmes de réintégration

    L’OIM elle-même revoit cette estimation à la baisse : l’agence des Nations unies a déclaré à Euronews que jusqu’à présent, seul un tiers des migrants qui ont commencé à bénéficier d’une aide à la réintégration sont allés au bout du processus. Un porte-parole a déclaré que l’initiative conjointe OIM/EU étant un processus volontaire, « les migrants peuvent décider de se désister à tout moment, ou de ne pas s’engager du tout ».

    Un porte-parole de l’OIM ajoute que la réintégration des migrants une fois qu’ils sont rentrés chez eux va bien au-delà du mandat de l’organisation, et « nécessite un leadership fort de la part des autorités nationales », ainsi que « des contributions actives à tous les niveaux de la société ».

    Entre mai 2017 et février 2019, l’OIM a aidé plus de 12 000 personnes à rentrer au Nigeria. Parmi elles, 9 000 étaient « joignables » lorsqu’elles sont rentrées chez elles, 5 000 ont reçu une formation professionnelle et 4 300 ont bénéficié d’une « aide à la réintégration ». Si l’on inclut l’accès aux services de conseil ou de santé, selon l’OIM Nigéria, un total de 7 000 sur 12 000 rapatriés – soit 58 % – ont reçu une aide à la réintégration.

    Mais le nombre de personnes classées comme ayant terminé le programme d’aide à la réintégration n’était que de 1 289. De plus, les recherches de Jill Alpes, experte en migration et chercheuse associée au Centre de recherche sur les frontières de Nimègue, ont révélé que des enquêtes visant à vérifier l’efficacité de ces programmes n’ont été menées qu’auprès de 136 rapatriés.

    Parallèlement, une étude de Harvard sur les Nigérians de retour de Libye (https://cdn1.sph.harvard.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/2464/2019/11/Harvard-FXB-Center-Returning-Home-FINAL.pdf) estime que 61,3 % des personnes interrogées ne travaillaient pas après leur retour, et que quelque 16,8 % supplémentaires ne travaillaient que pendant une courte période, pas assez longue pour générer une source de revenus stable. À leur retour, la grande majorité des rapatriés, 98,3 %, ne suivaient aucune forme d’enseignement régulier.

    La commissaire européenne aux affaires intérieures, Ylva Johansson, a admis à Euronews que « c’est un domaine dans lequel nous avons besoin d’améliorations ». Mme Johansson a déclaré qu’il était trop tôt pour dire quelles pourraient être ces améliorations, mais a maintenu que l’UE avait de bonnes relations avec l’OIM.

    Sandrine, Rachel et Berline, originaires du Cameroun, ont elles accepté de prendre un vol de l’OIM de Misrata, en Libye, à Yaoundé, la capitale camerounaise, en septembre 2018.

    En Libye, elles disent avoir subi des violences, des abus sexuels et avoir déjà risqué leur vie en tentant de traverser la Méditerranée. À cette occasion, elles ont été interceptées par les garde-côtes libyens et renvoyées en Libye.

    Une fois rentrées au Cameroun, Berline et Rachel disent n’avoir reçu ni argent ni soutien de l’OIM. Sandrine a reçu environ 900 000 fcfa (1 373,20 euros) pour payer l’éducation de ses enfants et lancer une petite entreprise – mais cela n’a pas duré longtemps.

    « Je vendais du poulet au bord de la route à Yaoundé, mais le projet ne s’est pas bien déroulé et je l’ai abandonné », confie-t-elle.

    Elle se souvient aussi d’avoir accouché dans un centre de détention de Tripoli avec des fusillades comme fond sonore.

    Toutes les trois ont affirmé qu’au moment de leur départ pour le Cameroun, elles n’avaient aucune idée de l’endroit où elles allaient dormir une fois arrivées et qu’elles n’avaient même pas d’argent pour appeler leur famille afin de les informer de leur retour.

    « Nous avons quitté le pays, et quand nous y sommes revenues, nous avons trouvé la même situation, parfois même pire. C’est pourquoi les gens décident de repartir », explique Berline.

    En novembre 2019, moins de la moitié des 3 514 migrants camerounais qui ont reçu une forme ou une autre de soutien de la part de l’OIM étaient considérés comme « véritablement intégrés » (https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/ENG_Press%20release%20COPIL_EUTF%20UE_IOM_Cameroon.pdf).

    Seydou, un rapatrié malien, a reçu de l’argent de l’OIM pour payer son loyer pendant trois mois et les factures médicales de sa femme malade. Il a également reçu une formation commerciale et un moto-taxi.

    Mais au Mali, il gagne environ 15 euros par jour, alors qu’en Algérie, où il travaillait illégalement, il avait été capable de renvoyer chez lui plus de 1 300 euros au total, ce qui a permis de financer la construction d’une maison pour son frère dans leur village.

    Il tente actuellement d’obtenir un visa qui lui permettrait de rejoindre un autre de ses frères en France.

    Seydou est cependant l’un des rares Maliens chanceux. Les recherches de Jill Alpes, publiées par Brot für die Welt et Medico (l’agence humanitaire des Églises protestantes en Allemagne), ont révélé que seuls 10 % des migrants retournés au Mali jusqu’en janvier 2019 avaient reçu un soutien quelconque de l’OIM.

    L’OIM, quant à elle, affirme que 14 879 Maliens ont entamé le processus de réintégration – mais ce chiffre ne révèle pas combien de personnes l’ont achevé.
    Les stigmates du retour

    Dans certains cas, l’argent que les migrants reçoivent est utilisé pour financer une nouvelle tentative pour rejoindre l’Europe.

    Dans un des cas, une douzaine de personnes qui avaient atteint l’Europe et avaient été renvoyées chez elles ont été découvertes parmi les survivants du naufrage d’un bateau en 2019 (https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/21407/mauritanian-coast-guard-intercepts-boat-carrying-around-190-migrants-i se dirigeait vers les îles Canaries. « Ils étaient revenus et ils avaient décidé de reprendre la route », a déclaré Laura Lungarotti, chef de la mission de l’OIM en Mauritanie.

    Safa Msehli, porte-parole de l’OIM, a déclaré à Euronews que l’organisation ne pouvait pas empêcher des personnes de tenter de repartir vers l’Europe une fois revenues.

    « C’est aux gens de décider s’ils veulent ou non émigrer et dans aucun de ses différents programmes, l’OIM ne prévoit pas d’empêcher les gens de repartir », a-t-elle expliqué.

    Qu’est-ce que l’OIM ?

    A partir de 2016, l’OIM s’est redéfinie comme agence des Nations unies pour les migrations, et en parallèle son budget a augmenté rapidement (https://governingbodies.iom.int/system/files/en/council/110/C-110-10%20-%20Director%20General%27s%20report%20to%20the%20110). Il est passé de 242,2 millions de dollars US (213 millions d’euros) en 1998 à plus de 2 milliards de dollars US (1,7 milliard d’euros) à l’automne 2019, soit une multiplication par huit. Bien qu’elle ne fasse pas partie des Nations unies, l’OIM est désormais une « organisation apparentée », avec un statut similaire à celui d’un prestataire privé.

    L’UE et ses États membres sont collectivement les principaux contributeurs au budget de l’OIM (https://governingbodies.iom.int/system/files/en/council/110/Statements/EU%20coordinated%20statement%20-%20Point%2013%20-%20final%20IOM), leurs dons représentant près de la moitié de son financement opérationnel.

    De son côté, l’OIM tient à mettre en évidence sur son site web les cas où son programme de retour volontaire a été couronné de succès, notamment celui de Khadeejah Shaeban, une rapatriée soudanaise revenue de Libye qui a pu monter un atelier de couture.

    –-
    Comment fonctionne le processus d’aide à la réintégration ?
    Les migrants embarquent dans un avion de l’OIM sur la base du volontariat et retournent dans leur pays ;
    Ils ont droit à des conseils avant et après le voyage ;
    Chaque « rapatrié » peut bénéficier de l’aide de bureaux locaux, en partenariat avec des ONG locales ;
    L’assistance à l’accueil après l’arrivée peut comprendre l’accueil à l’aéroport, l’hébergement pour la nuit, une allocation en espèces pour les besoins immédiats, une première assistance médicale, une aide pour le voyage suivant, une assistance matérielle ;
    Une fois arrivés, les migrants sont enregistrés et vont dans un centre d’hébergement temporaire où ils restent jusqu’à ce qu’ils puissent participer à des séances de conseil avec le personnel de l’OIM. Des entretiens individuels doivent aider les migrants à identifier leurs besoins. Les migrants en situation vulnérable reçoivent des conseils supplémentaires, adaptés à leur situation spécifique ;
    Cette assistance est généralement non monétaire et consiste en des cours de création d’entreprise, des formations professionnelles (de quelques jours à six mois/un an), des salons de l’emploi, des groupes de discussion ou des séances de conseil ; l’aide à la création de micro-entreprises. Toutefois, pour certains cas vulnérables, une assistance en espèces est fournie pour faire face aux dépenses quotidiennes et aux besoins médicaux ;
    Chaque module comprend des activités de suivi et d’évaluation afin de déterminer l’efficacité des programmes de réintégration.

    –-

    Des migrants d’#Afghanistan et du #Yémen ont été renvoyés dans ces pays dans le cadre de ce programme, ainsi que vers la Somalie, l’Érythrée et le Sud-Soudan, malgré le fait que les pays de l’UE découragent tout voyage dans ces régions.

    En vertu du droit international relatif aux Droits de l’homme, le principe de « #non-refoulement » garantit que nul ne doit être renvoyé dans un pays où il risque d’être torturé, d’être soumis à des traitements cruels, inhumains ou dégradants ou de subir d’autres préjudices irréparables. Ce principe s’applique à tous les migrants, à tout moment et quel que soit leur statut migratoire.

    L’OIM fait valoir que des procédures sont en place pour informer les migrants pendant toutes les phases précédant leur départ, y compris pour ceux qui sont vulnérables, en leur expliquant le soutien que l’organisation peut leur apporter une fois arrivés au pays.

    Mais même lorsque les migrants atterrissent dans des pays qui ne sont pas en proie à des conflits de longue durée, comme le Nigeria, certains risquent d’être confrontés à des dangers et des menaces bien réelles.

    Les principes directeurs du Haut Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (HCR) sur la protection internationale considèrent que les femmes ou les mineurs victimes de trafic ont le droit de demander le statut de réfugié. Ces populations vulnérables risquent d’être persécutées à leur retour, y compris au Nigeria, voire même d’être à nouveau victime de traite.
    Forcer la main ?

    Le caractère volontaire contestable des opérations de retour s’étend également au Niger voisin, pays qui compte le plus grand nombre de migrants assistés par l’OIM et qui est présenté comme la nouvelle frontière méridionale de l’Europe.

    En 2015, le Niger s’est montré disposé à lutter contre la migration en échange d’un dédommagement de l’UE, mais des centaines de milliers de migrants continuent de suivre les routes à travers le désert en direction du nord pendant que le business du trafic d’êtres humains est florissant.

    Selon le Conseil européen sur les réfugiés et les exilés, une moyenne de 500 personnes sont expulsées d’Algérie vers le Niger chaque semaine, au mépris du droit international.

    La police algérienne détient, identifie et achemine les migrants vers ce qu’ils appellent le « #point zéro », situé à 15 km de la frontière avec le Niger. De là, les hommes, femmes et enfants sont contraints de marcher dans le désert pendant environ 25 km pour atteindre le campement le plus proche.

    « Ils arrivent à un campement frontalier géré par l’OIM (Assamaka) dans des conditions épouvantables, notamment des femmes enceintes souffrant d’hémorragies et en état de choc complet », a constaté Felipe González Morales, le rapporteur spécial des Nations unies, après sa visite en octobre 2018 (https://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=23698%26LangID).

    Jill Alpes, au Centre de recherche sur les frontières de Nimègue, estime que ces expulsions sont la raison principale pour laquelle les migrants acceptent d’être renvoyés du Niger. Souvent repérés lors d’opérations de recherche et de sauvetage de l’OIM dans le désert, ces migrants n’ont guère d’autre choix que d’accepter l’aide de l’organisation et l’offre de rapatriement qui s’ensuit.

    Dans ses travaux de recherche, Mme Alpes écrit que « seuls les migrants qui acceptent de rentrer au pays peuvent devenir bénéficiaire du travail humanitaire de l’OIM. Bien que des exceptions existent, l’OIM offre en principe le transport d’Assamakka à Arlit uniquement aux personnes expulsées qui acceptent de retourner dans leur pays d’origine ».

    Les opérations de l’IOM au Niger

    M. Morales, le rapporteur spécial des Nations unies, semble être d’accord (https://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=23698%26LangID). Il a constaté que « de nombreux migrants qui ont souscrit à l’aide au retour volontaire sont victimes de multiples violations des droits de l’Homme et ont besoin d’une protection fondée sur le droit international », et qu’ils ne devraient donc pas être renvoyés dans leur pays. « Cependant, très peu d’entre eux sont orientés vers une procédure de détermination du statut de réfugié ou d’asile, et les autres cas sont traités en vue de leur retour ».

    « Le fait que le Fonds fiduciaire de l’Union européenne apporte un soutien financier à l’OIM en grande partie pour sensibiliser les migrants et les renvoyer dans leur pays d’origine, même lorsque le caractère volontaire est souvent douteux, compromet son approche de la coopération au développement fondée sur les droits », indique le rapporteur spécial des Nations unies.
    Des contrôles insuffisants

    Loren Landau, professeur spécialiste des migrations et du développement au Département du développement international d’Oxford, affirme que le travail de l’OIM souffre en plus d’un manque de supervision indépendante.

    « Il y a très peu de recherches indépendantes et beaucoup de rapports. Mais ce sont tous des rapports écrits par l’OIM. Ils commandent eux-même leur propre évaluation , et ce, depuis des années », détaille le professeur.

    Dans le même temps, le Dr. Arhin-Sam, spécialiste lui de l’évaluation des programmes de développement, remet en question la responsabilité et la redevabilité de l’ensemble de la structure, arguant que les institutions et agences locales dépendent financièrement de l’OIM.

    « Cela a créé un haut niveau de dépendance pour les agences nationales qui doivent évaluer le travail des agences internationales comme l’OIM : elles ne peuvent pas être critiques envers l’OIM. Alors que font-elles ? Elles continuent à dire dans leurs rapports que l’OIM fonctionne bien. De cette façon, l’OIM peut ensuite se tourner vers l’UE et dire que tout va bien ».

    Selon M. Arhin-Sam, les ONG locales et les agences qui aident les rapatriés « sont dans une compétition très dangereuse entre elles » pour obtenir le plus de travail possible des agences des Nations unies et entrer dans leurs bonnes grâces.

    « Si l’OIM travaille avec une ONG locale, celle-ci ne peut plus travailler avec le HCR. Elle se considère alors chanceuse d’être financée par l’OIM et ne peuvent donc pas la critiquer », affirme-t-il.

    Par ailleurs, l’UE participe en tant qu’observateur aux organes de décision du HCR et de l’OIM, sans droit de vote, et tous les États membres de l’UE sont également membres de l’OIM.

    « Le principal bailleur de fonds de l’OIM est l’UE, et ils doivent se soumettre aux exigences de leur client. Cela rend le partenariat très suspect », souligne M. Arhin-Sam. « [Lorsque les fonctionnaires européens] viennent évaluer les projets, ils vérifient si tout ce qui est écrit dans le contrat a été fourni. Mais que cela corresponde à la volonté des gens et aux complexités de la réalité sur le terrain, c’est une autre histoire ».
    Une relation abusive

    « Les États africains ne sont pas nécessairement eux-mêmes favorables aux migrants », estime le professeur Landau. « L’UE a convaincu ces États avec des accords bilatéraux. S’ils s’opposent à l’UE, ils perdront l’aide internationale dont ils bénéficient aujourd’hui. Malgré le langage du partenariat, il est évident que la relation entre l’UE et les États africains ressemble à une relation abusive, dans laquelle un partenaire est dépendant de l’autre ».

    Les chercheurs soulignent que si les retours de Libye offrent une voie de sortie essentielle pour les migrants en situation d’extrême danger, la question de savoir pourquoi les gens sont allés en Libye en premier lieu n’est jamais abordée.

    Une étude réalisée par l’activiste humanitaire libyenne Amera Markous (https://www.cerahgeneve.ch/files/6115/7235/2489/Amera_Markous_-_MAS_Dissertation_2019.pdf) affirme que les migrants et les réfugiés sont dans l’impossibilité d’évaluer en connaissance de cause s’ils doivent retourner dans leur pays quand ils se trouvent dans une situation de détresse, comme par exemple dans un centre de détention libyen.

    « Comment faites-vous en sorte qu’ils partent parce qu’ils le veulent, ou simplement parce qu’ils sont désespérés et que l’OIM leur offre cette seule alternative ? » souligne la chercheuse.

    En plus des abus, le stress et le manque de soins médicaux peuvent influencer la décision des migrants de rentrer chez eux. Jean-Pierre Gauci, chercheur principal à l’Institut britannique de droit international et comparé, estime, lui, que ceux qui gèrent les centres de détention peuvent faire pression sur un migrant emprisonné pour qu’il s’inscrive au programme.

    « Il existe une situation de pouvoir, perçu ou réel, qui peut entraver le consentement effectif et véritablement libre », explique-t-il.

    En réponse, l’OIM affirme que le programme Retour Humanitaire Volontaire est bien volontaire, que les migrants peuvent changer d’avis avant d’embarquer et décider de rester sur place.

    « Il n’est pas rare que des migrants qui soient prêts à voyager, avec des billets d’avion et des documents de voyage, changent d’avis et restent en Libye », déclare un porte-parole de l’OIM.

    Mais M. Landau affirme que l’initiative UE-OIM n’a pas été conçue dans le but d’améliorer la vie des migrants.

    « L’objectif n’est pas de rendre les migrants heureux ou de les réintégrer réellement, mais de s’en débarrasser d’une manière qui soit acceptable pour les Européens », affirme le chercheur.

    « Si par ’fonctionner’, nous entendons se débarrasser de ces personnes, alors le projet fonctionne pour l’UE. C’est une bonne affaire. Il ne vise pas à résoudre les causes profondes des migrations, mais crée une excuse pour ce genre d’expulsions ».

    https://fr.euronews.com/2020/06/22/migrants-les-echecs-d-un-programme-de-retour-volontaire-finance-par-l-u
    #retour_volontaire #échec #campagne #dissuasion #migrations #asile #réfugiés #IOM #renvois #expulsions #efficacité #réintégration #EU #Union_européenne #Niger #Libye #retour_humanitaire_volontaire (#VHR) #retour_volontaire_assisté (#AVR) #statistiques #chiffres #aide_à_la_réintégration #Nigeria #réfugiés_nigérians #travail #Cameroun #migrerrance #stigmates #stigmatisation #Assamaka #choix #rapatriement #Fonds_fiduciaire_de_l'Union européenne #fonds_fiduciaire #coopération_au_développement #aide_au_développement #HCR #partenariat #pouvoir

    –---
    Ajouté à la métaliste migrations & développement (et plus précisément en lien avec la #conditionnalité_de_l'aide) :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733358#message768702

    ping @rhoumour @karine4 @isskein @_kg_

  • Enfants migrants enfermés : la grande #hypocrisie

    La France condamnée six fois depuis 2012

    En dépit de cette Convention, l’UE n’interdit pas la rétention des enfants. La directive « retour » de 2008 l’autorise comme « dernier ressort quand aucune autre #mesure_coercitive n’est possible pour mener à bien la procédure de #retour », nous précise le commissaire européen chargé de la migration. « L’Europe a toujours eu pour priorité la protection des enfants en migrations », explique Dimítris Avramópoulos. Seulement, la Commission européenne semble avoir un objectif plus important : garantir les expulsions. « Une interdiction absolue ne permettrait pas aux États membres d’assurer pleinement les procédures de retour, affirme le commissaire, car cela permettrait la fuite des personnes et donc l’annulation des expulsions. » De là à dire que la Commission propose de retenir les enfants pour mieux expulser les parents, il n’y a qu’un pas.

    Toutefois, rares sont les États de l’UE à assumer publiquement. Des enfants derrière les barreaux, c’est rarement bon pour l’image. L’immense majorité d’entre eux cachent la réalité derrière les noms fleuris qu’ils inventent pour désigner les prisons où sont enfermés des milliers de mineurs en Europe (seuls ou avec leurs parents). En #Norvège, comme l’a déjà raconté Mediapart, le gouvernement les a baptisées « #unité_familiale » ; en #Hongrie, ce sont les « #zones_de_transit » ; en #Italie, les « #hotspots » ; en #Grèce, « les #zones_sécurisées ». Autant d’euphémismes que de pays européens. Ces endroits privatifs de liberté n’ont parfois pas de nom, comme en #Allemagne où on les désigne comme « les #procédures_aéroports ». Une manière pour « les États de déguiser le fait qu’il s’agit de détention », juge Manfred Nowak.

    Certains d’entre eux frisent carrément le #déni. L’Allemagne considère par exemple qu’elle ne détient pas d’enfants. Et pourtant, comme Investigate Europe a pu le constater, il existe bien une zone fermée à l’#aéroport de #Berlin dont les murs sont bardés de dessins réalisés par les enfants demandeurs d’asile et/ou en phase d’expulsion. Étant donné que les familles sont libres de grimper dans un avion et de quitter le pays quand elles le souhaitent, il ne s’agit pas de détention, défend Berlin. Même logique pour le gouvernement hongrois qui enferme les mineurs dans les zones de transit à la frontière. Comme ils sont libres de repartir dans l’autre sens, on ne peut parler à proprement parler de #prison, répète l’exécutif dans ses prises de parole publiques.

    L’#invisibilisation ne s’arrête pas là. Le nombre d’enfants enfermés est l’un des rares phénomènes que l’UE ne chiffre pas. Il s’agit pourtant, d’après notre estimation, de plusieurs milliers de mineurs (au moins). Le phénomène serait même en augmentation en Europe « depuis que les États membres ont commencé à rétablir les contrôles aux frontières et à prendre des mesures plus dures, y compris dans des pays où la détention des enfants avait été totalement abandonnée au profit de méthodes alternatives », constate Tsvetomira Bidart, chargée des questions de migrations pour l’Unicef.

    En dépit de son insistance, même l’agence spécialisée des Nations unies n’est pas parvenue à se procurer des statistiques précises sur le nombre d’enfants enfermés dans l’UE. Et pour cause, précise Bidart, « la réglementation européenne n’impose pas de fournir ces statistiques ». Qui plus est, certains États membres procéderaient « à des détentions illégales d’enfants » et donc – logique – ne les comptabiliseraient pas. Quoi qu’il en soit, il existe un véritable chiffre noir et jusqu’à aujourd’hui, aucune volonté politique de sortir ces enfants de l’ombre où on les a placés. « Publier des statistiques de qualité, conclut l’experte, c’est la clef de la visibilité. »

    Le gouvernement français semble, lui, tenir des statistiques, seulement il rechigne à fournir ses chiffres à la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme (CEDH), comme nous l’a révélé la juriste responsable du suivi de la France auprès de la juridiction internationale. Chantal Gallant intervient une fois que le pays est condamné en s’assurant que les autorités prennent bien des mesures pour que les violations des droits humains ne se reproduisent pas. La France étant le pays de l’UE le plus condamné concernant les conditions de détention des mineurs migrants, elle a du pain sur la planche. Déjà six fois depuis 2012… Si l’on en croit la juriste, les dernières données fournies par la #France dateraient de 2016. Quatre ans. D’après elle, la Cour les a réclamées à plusieurs reprises, sans que ses interlocuteurs français – le ministère des affaires étrangères et la représentation française au Conseil de l’Europe – ne donnent suite.

    Chantal Gallant confesse toutefois « qu’elle a mis de côté le dossier » depuis août 2018, car ses interlocuteurs lui avaient certifié que la France allait limiter la rétention des mineurs en #CRA (ces centres où sont enfermés les sans-papiers en vue de leur expulsion) à 5 jours, au moment du débat sur la loi « asile et immigration » de Gérard Collomb. Cela n’a pas été fait, bien au contraire : le Parlement a décidé alors de doubler la durée de rétention maximale, y compris des familles avec enfants (il n’y a jamais de mineurs isolés), la faisant passer de 45 à 90 jours, son record historique. Une durée parmi les plus importantes d’Europe (l’Angleterre est à 24 heures, la Hongrie n’en a pas) et une violation probable de la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme. « Ce que je peux dire, c’est que la durée de 90 jours ne me semble pas en conformité avec la jurisprudence de la Cour, précise Chantal Gallant. Nous considérons qu’au-delà de 7 jours de rétention, le traumatisme créé chez l’enfant est difficile à réparer. »

    La situation est-elle en train de changer ? Le 3 juin, le député Florent Boudié (LREM) a été désigné rapporteur d’une proposition de loi sur le sujet, en gestation depuis deux ans, véritable arlésienne de l’Assemblée nationale. En janvier, l’assistante du parlementaire nous faisait encore part d’« un problème d’écriture sur cette question délicate »… Alors que de nombreux élus de la majorité poussaient pour plafonner la rétention des mineurs à 48 heures, la version déposée le 12 mai reste scotchée à cinq jours tout de même. Et son examen, envisagé un temps pour le 10 juin en commission des lois, n’est toujours pas inscrit à l’ordre du jour officiel. « La reprogrammation est prévue pour l’automne dans la “niche” LREM », promet désormais Florent Boudié.

    En l’état, elle ne vaudrait pas pour le département français de #Mayotte, visé par un régime dérogatoire « compte tenu du contexte de fortes tensions sociales, économiques et sanitaires ». Surtout, elle ne concerne que les centres de rétention et non les zones d’attente. Les enfants comme Aïcha, Ahmad et Mehdi pourront toujours être enfermés jusqu’à 20 jours consécutifs en violation des conventions internationales signées par la France.

    À l’heure où nous écrivions ces lignes (avant le confinement lié au Covid-19), les deux orphelins marocains avaient été confiés par le juge des enfants à l’Aide sociale à l’enfance. « Le jour où on nous a libérés, j’étais si content que j’ai failli partir en oubliant mes affaires ! », s’esclaffait Mehdi, assis à la terrasse du café. Comme la plupart des mineurs isolés âgés de plus de 15 ans, ils ont été placés dans un hôtel du centre de Marseille avec un carnet de Ticket-Restaurant en poche. La moitié des six mineurs sauvés du conteneur logés au même endroit, eux, ont disparu dans la nature, selon leurs avocates. Ont-ils fugué pour rejoindre des proches ? Ont-ils fait de mauvaises rencontres dans les rues de la Cité phocéenne ? Personne ne sait ni ne semble s’en préoccuper.

    Mehdi et Ahmad, eux, n’ont aucune intention de mettre les voiles. Les deux orphelins de Melilla n’ont qu’une hâte : reprendre le chemin de l’école, l’un pour devenir plombier, l’autre coiffeur. Ils ne sont qu’au début du chemin mais, pour l’heure, ils veulent croire que « la belle vie » commence enfin.

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/180620/enfants-migrants-enfermes-la-grande-hypocrisie?page_article=2
    #migrations #asile #réfugiés #enfants #enfance #détention_administration #rétention #emprisonnement #enfermement #Europe #retours #renvois #expulsions #euphémisme #mots #vocabulaire #terminologie #statistiques #chiffres #transparence

    ping @karine4 @isskein

  • Il Rapporto annuale 2020 del #Centro_Astalli

    Il Centro Astalli presenta il Rapporto annuale 2020: uno strumento per capire attraverso dati e statistiche quali sono le principali nazionalità degli oltre 20mila rifugiati e richiedenti asilo assistiti, di cui 11mila a Roma; quali le difficoltà che incontrano nel percorso per il riconoscimento della protezione e per l’accesso all’accoglienza o a percorsi di integrazione.

    Il quadro che ne emerge rivela quanto oggi sia alto il prezzo da pagare in termini di sicurezza sociale per non aver investito in protezione, accoglienza e integrazione dei migranti. E mostra come le politiche migratorie, restrittive, di chiusura – se non addirittura discriminatorie – che hanno caratterizzato l’ultimo anno, acuiscono precarietà di vita, esclusione e irregolarità, rendendo l’intera società più vulnerabile.

    Il Rapporto annuale 2020 descrive il Centro Astalli come una realtà che, grazie agli oltre 500 volontari che operano nelle sue 7 sedi territoriali (Roma, Catania, Palermo, Grumo Nevano-NA, Vicenza, Trento, Padova), si adegua e si adatta ai mutamenti sociali e legislativi di un Paese che fa fatica a dare la dovuta assistenza a chi, in fuga da guerre e persecuzioni, cerca di giungere in Italia.

    https://centroastalli.it/il-rapporto-annuale-2020-del-centro-astalli
    #Italie #asile #migrations #réfugiés #statistiques #chiffres #rapport #2019 #précarité #précarisation #protection_humanitaire #décret_salvini #decreto_salvini #accueil #femmes #marginalisation #Libye #externalisation #ceux_qui_n'arrivent_pas #arrivées #torture #santé_mentale #mauvais_traitements #traite_d'êtres_humains #permis_de_séjour #accès_aux_soins #siproimi #sprar #CAS #assistance_sociale #vulnérabilité #services_sociaux #intégration

    Synthèse du rapport :
    #pXXXLIEN2LIENXXX

    Rapport :


    https://centroastalli.it/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/astalli_RAPP_2020-completo-x-web.pdf

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Are women publishing less during the pandemic? Here’s what the data say

    Early analyses suggest that female academics are posting fewer preprints and starting fewer research projects than their male peers.
    Quarantined with a six-year-old child underfoot, Megan Frederickson wondered how academics were managing to write papers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Lockdowns implemented to stem coronavirus spread meant that, overnight, many households worldwide had become an intersection of work, school and home life. Conversations on Twitter seemed to confirm Frederickson’s suspicions about the consequences: female academics, taking up increased childcare responsibilities, were falling behind their male peers at work.

    But Frederickson, an ecologist at the University of Toronto, Canada, wanted to see what the data said. So, she looked at preprint servers to investigate whether women were posting fewer studies than they were before lockdowns began. The analysis — and several others — suggests that, across disciplines, women’s publishing rate has fallen relative to men’s amid the pandemic.

    The results are consistent with the literature on the division of childcare between men and women, says Molly King, a sociologist at Santa Clara University in California. Evidence suggests that male academics are more likely to have a partner who does not work outside the home; their female colleagues, especially those in the natural sciences, are more likely to have a partner who is also an academic. Even in those dual-academic households, the evidence shows that women perform more household labour than men do, she says. King suspects the same holds true for childcare.

    Preprint analysis

    In her analysis, Frederickson focused on the two preprint servers that she uses: the physical-sciences repository arXiv, and bioRxiv for the life sciences. To determine the gender of more than 73,000 author names on 36,529 preprints, she compared the names with those in the US Social Security Administration’s baby-name database, which registers the names and genders of children born in the United States.

    Frederickson looked at arXiv studies posted between 15 March and 15 April in 2019 and in 2020. The number of women who authored preprints grew by 2.7% from 2019 to 2020 — but the number of male authors increased by 6.4% over that period. The increase in male authorship of bioRxiv preprints also outstripped that of female authorship, although by a smaller margin (see ‘Preprint drop-off’). (The two servers are not directly comparable in Frederickson’s analysis because the program that she used pulled the names of only corresponding authors from bioRxiv, whereas all arXiv authors were included.)

    “The differences are modest, but they’re there,” Frederickson says. She notes that the lockdowns so far have been relatively short compared with the usual research timeline, so the long-term implications for women’s careers are still unclear.

    The limitations of these types of name-based analysis are well-known. Using names to predict gender can exclude non-binary people, and can misgender others. They are more likely to exclude authors with non-Western names. And between disciplines, their utility can vary because of naming conventions — such as the use of initials instead of given names, as is common in astrophysics. Still, says Frederickson, over a large sample size, they can provide valuable insights into gender disparities in academia.
    Fresh projects

    Other researchers are finding similar trends. Cassidy Sugimoto, an information scientist at Indiana University Bloomington who studies gender disparities in research, conducted a separate analysis of author gender on nine popular preprint servers. Methodological differences meant that the two analyses are not directly comparable, but Frederickson’s work “converges with what we’re seeing”, says Sugimoto.

    Sugimoto points out that the preprints being published even now probably rely on labour that was performed many months ago. “The scientific publication process doesn’t lend itself to timely analyses,” she says. So her study also included databases that log registered reports, which indicate the initiation of new research projects.

    In 2 of the 3 registered-report repositories, covering more than 14,000 reports with authors whose genders could be matched, Sugimoto’s team found a decrease in the proportion of submissions by female principal investigators from March and April of 2019 to the same months in 2020, when lockdowns started. They also saw a declining proportion of women publishing on several preprint servers, including EarthArXiv and medRxiv. These differences were more pronounced when looking at first authors, who are usually early-career researchers, than at last authors, who are often the most senior faculty members on a study.

    “This is what’s the most worrying to me, because those consequences are long-term,” Sugimoto says. “The best predictor of a publication is a previous publication.”
    Early-career bias

    In economics, too, there are indications that the pandemic is disproportionately affecting younger researchers, says Noriko Amano-Patiño, an economist at the University of Cambridge, UK. Taken as a whole, there aren’t clear discrepancies in the overall number of working papers — a preprint-like publication format in economics — that have been submitted to three major repositories and invited commentaries submitted to a fourth site that publishes research-based policy analyses.

    She and her collaborators also examined who was working on pandemic-related research questions using a COVID-19-specific repository. Although women have consistently authored about 20% of working papers since 2015, they make up only 12% of the authors of new COVID-19-related research. Amano-Patiño suspects that, in addition to their childcare responsibilities, early- and mid-career researchers, especially women, might be more risk-averse and thus less likely to jump into a new field of research. “Mostly senior economists are taking their bite into these new areas,” says Amano-Patiño. “And junior women are the ones that seem to be missing out the most.”

    “Unfortunately, these findings are not surprising,” says Olga Shurchkov, an economist at Wellesley College in Massachusetts. Shurchkov came to similar conclusions in a separate analysis of economists’ productivity during the pandemic. And a preprint posted to arXiv on 13 May1 shows the same trends in pandemic-related medical literature (see ‘COVID-19 effect’). Compared with the proportion of women among authors of nearly 40,000 articles published in US medical journals in 2019, the proportion of female authors on COVID-19 papers has dropped by 16%.

    Academic responsibilities

    Increased childcare responsibility is one issue. In addition, women are more likely to take care of ailing relatives, says Rosario Rogel-Salazar, a sociologist at the Autonomous University of Mexico State in Toluca. These effects are probably exacerbated in the global south, she notes, because women there have more children on average than do their counterparts in the global north.

    And women face other barriers to productivity. Female faculty, on average, shoulder more teaching responsibilities, so the sudden shift to online teaching — and the curriculum adjustments that it requires — disproportionately affects women, King says. And because many institutions are shut owing to the pandemic, non-research university commitments — such as participation in hiring and curriculum committees — are probably taking up less time. These are often dominated by senior faculty members — more of whom are men. As a result, men could find themselves with more time to write papers while women experience the opposite.

    Because these effects will compound as lockdowns persist, universities and funders should take steps to mitigate gender disparities as quickly as possible, Shurchkov says. “They point to a problem that, if left unaddressed, can potentially have grave consequences for diversity in academia.”

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-01294-9

    #femmes #publications #coronavirus #confinement #inégalités #hommes #genre #recherche #projets_de_recherche #gender_gap

    • And because many institutions are shut owing to the pandemic, non-research university commitments — such as participation in hiring and curriculum committees — are probably taking up less time. These are often dominated by senior faculty members — more of whom are men. As a result, men could find themselves with more time to write papers while women experience the opposite

      Eh oui cest bien connu cest les vieux seniors qui écrivent les articles et pas les doctorants ou postdoc..

      "The differences are modest, but they’re there,” Frederickson says.

      Franchement les différences sont tellement minimes sur les chiffres quils montrent que je vois meme pas comment on peut les utiliser.. prendre des chiffres et leur faire dire ce qu on veut.
      Je suis convaincu que les femmes ont plus de charges ménagères que les hommes mais cet article ne le démontre absolument pas.

    • Pandemic lockdown holding back female academics, data show

      Unequal childcare burden blamed for fall in share of published research by women since schools shut, but funding bodies look to alleviate career impact

      Female academics have been hit particularly hard by coronavirus lockdowns, according to data that show that women’s publishing success dropped after the pandemic shut schools.

      The results are some of the first to show that lockdowns may be taking a toll on women’s career-critical publication records, building on other studies demonstrating that the pandemic has also set back female researchers at the preprint and journal submission stage.

      With lockdowns shutting schools the world over and forcing academics to look after children at home, it is feared that female scholars have borne a heavier childcare and housework burden than their male counterparts, prompting questions about how universities and funding bodies should respond.

      “Universities will need to account for the pandemic’s gendered effects on research when making decisions about hiring, tenure, promotion, merit pay and so on,” said Megan Frederickson, an associate professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Toronto, who has also found that the pandemic has skewed research along gender lines in a separate analysis.

      The latest data were compiled by Digital Science, a London-based company specialising in research analysis tools, using its Dimensions publication database to analyse more than 60,000 journals across all disciplines for Times Higher Education.

      The analysis shows that the proportion of accepted papers with a female first author dipped below the historical trend for submissions made in March, April and May.

      The decline in the share of papers by female first authors was particularly pronounced in April, when it fell by more than two percentage points to 31.2 per cent, and May, which saw a collapse of seven points to 26.8 per cent.

      A more granular week-by-week analysis shows that the number of female first-author acceptances started to slip in mid-March and has dropped more steeply since late April.

      School closures became mandatory in most countries around mid-March and are still fully or partially in place across most of the world.

      There are caveats to the study. Because of the time lag between submission of a paper to a journal and acceptance, much of the data are not yet in, particularly for May, meaning the picture is still a partial one.

      But at the same point last year, similarly incomplete data did not lead to female under-representation, Digital Science said, making the falls in female success less likely to be an artefact of data collection.

      In addition, following the lockdown, the proportion of published papers in medical and health sciences disciplines has shot up as researchers scramble to understand the novel coronavirus and disseminate their results.

      Women are better represented in these fields than they are in most others – representing 37.6 per cent of first authors over the past five years – meaning that, if anything, female publication success during the pandemic should have grown, not shrunk.

      Worries in the research community about the lockdowns’ impact on women have been growing since mid-April, when several journal editors observed that submissions had become far more male-skewed since the imposition of lockdowns. Several studies looking at preprints have confirmed this.

      This latest data from Digital Science, which has performed previous analyses on the gender split in research, reveal that the pandemic’s disproportionate toll on women is filtering through into published papers – the currency of academic careers.

      That conclusion is “certainly in line with what I’m seeing” from other results, said Molly King, an assistant professor of sociology at Santa Clara University in California, who has studied inequalities in academic publishing.

      The theory is that as lockdowns have increased domestic workloads – not just childcare, but homeschooling, shopping, cleaning and caring for elderly relatives – women have been landed with more tasks than men, and this has cut into their research time and exacerbated existing career hurdles.

      Professor King pointed to survey data from the American Association of University Professors showing that even in normal times, female scientists do twice as much cooking, cleaning and laundry as male scientists, amounting to an extra five hours a week. Even in dual academic couples, women do more. “My hypothesis is that it would be the same with childcare,” she said.

      One complementary explanation is that female academics, having only recently broken into some disciplines, are younger and so more likely to have small children. “So even if childcare duties are evenly spread within families with young children, there will be more men with older or adult children to skew the gender balance,” said Elizabeth Hannon, deputy editor of the British Journal for the Philosophy of Science and one of the first to notice that women were submitting fewer papers.

      This hypothesis is supported by a survey of about 4,500 principal investigators in the US and Europe in mid-April, which found that having a child under five was the biggest factor associated with a drop in research hours. Women were more likely than men to have young children, partly explaining why they reported a larger drop in research time, according to “Quantifying the immediate effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on scientists”, a preprint posted to arXiv.

      The question now is what universities can do to correct the blow to female productivity during the pandemic.

      Professor King said universities should “explicitly not require any teaching evaluations from this spring as part of hiring materials” and should perhaps “recalibrate expectations” for publishing records during lockdown.

      One difficulty, however, is that although female academics have been disadvantaged on average, this could hide all kinds of individual stories.

      “I think universities (and funding agencies) will probably need to ask researchers to self-report how the pandemic has affected their research and make decisions on a case-by-case basis, but such a system will likely be imperfect,” said Professor Frederickson.

      Meanwhile, some funding bodies have already begun working on a policy response.

      In the Netherlands, the Dutch Research Council is in discussion with several female researcher groups to assess the impact of lockdown and has relaxed its funding rules to allow affected academics a second shot at applying for grants next year if, for example, childcare overwhelmed them at home.

      A gender equality unit within Spain’s Ministry of Science and Innovation has also started looking into the pandemic’s impact on women’s research careers and has suggested that “compensatory measures” might be needed.

      https://www.timeshighereducation.com/news/pandemic-lockdown-holding-back-female-academics-data-show
      #statistiques #chiffres

  • During and After Crisis : Evros Border Monitoring Report

    #HumanRights360 documents the recent developments in the European land border of Evros as a result of the ongoing policy of externalization and militarization of border security of the EU member States. The report analyses the current state of play, in conjunction with the constant amendments of the Greek legislation amid the discussions pertaining to the reform of the Common European Asylum System (CEAS) and the Return Directive.

    https://www.humanrights360.org/during-and-after-crisis-evros-border-monitoring-report

    #rapport #Evros #migrations #réfugiés #Grèce #frontières #2019 #militarisation_des_frontières #loi_sur_l'asile #Kleidi #Serres #covid-19 #coronavirus #Turquie #push-backs #refoulements #refoulement #push-back #statistiques #passages #chiffres #frontière_terrestre #murs #barrières_frontalières #Kastanies #violence #Komotini #enfermement #détention #rétention_administrative #Thiva #Fylakio #transferts

    –------
    Pour télécharger le rapport


    https://www.humanrights360.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/During-After-Crisis-Evros.pdf

    ping @luciebacon

  • ’There is no absolute truth’: an infectious disease expert on #Covid-19, misinformation and ’bullshit’ | World news | The Guardian
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/28/there-is-no-absolute-truth-an-infectious-disease-expert-on-covid-19-mis

    We’re all used to verbal #bullshit. We’re all used to campaign promises and weasel words, and we’re pretty good at seeing through that because we’ve had a lot of practice. But as the world has become increasingly quantified and the currency of arguments has become statistics, facts and figures and models and such, we’re increasingly confronted, even in the popular press, with numerical and statistical arguments. And this area’s really ripe for bullshit, because people don’t feel qualified to question information that’s given to them in quantitative form.

    #manipulation #chiffres

    • Pour ma part, s’il y a un truc à retenir, c’est ça :

      The other big piece is understanding the notion of positive predictive value and the way false positive and false negative error rates influence the estimate. And that depends on the incidence of infection in the population.

      If you have a test that has a 3% error rate, and the incidence in the population is below 3%, then most of the positives that you get are going to be false positives. And so you’re not going to get a very tight estimate about how many people have it. This has been a real problem with the Santa Clara study. From my read of the paper, their data is actually consistent with nobody being infected. A New York City study on the other hand showed 21% seropositive, so even if there has a 3% error rate, the majority of those positives have to be true positives.

      Je sais, je me répète un peu, mais ça fait plaisir de le voir écrit noir sur blanc. Et ça ne vaut pas seulement pour la biologie : la détection de signaux faibles ne peut pas se faire avec des tests.

  • Mortalité : les graphiques utiles... et les autres - Par Loris Guémart | Arrêt sur images
    https://www.arretsurimages.net/articles/mortalite-les-graphiques-utiles-et-les-autres

    Les représentations visuelles du nombre de décès liés au Covid-19 se sont multipliées dans les médias du monde entier. Mais ils sont loin de tous transmettre une information utile, surtout à mesure que l’épidémie évolue. Comment et pourquoi les infographistes, en particulier anglo-saxons, de loin les plus influents, ont-ils choisi l’échelle logarithmique, laissé de côté le nombre de morts par habitants, ou fini par adopter la statistique des « morts en excès » ?

    " "Dans une interview du 14 avril, Burn-Murdoch explique : « Vers le 10 mars, un de nos journalistes voulait savoir où en étaient l’Espagne et le Royaume-Uni par rapport à l’Italie », note Burn-Murdoch. Le journaliste fait alors le choix déterminant d’une progression dite « logarithmique » (et non plus linéaire). Il crée deux courbes, du nombre de cas d’abord, du nombre de morts cumulé ensuite (qu’il transformera en avril en nombre de morts quotidiennes). Actualisées chaque jour sur une page placée en accès libre par ce média 100 % payant en temps normal, elles deviendront les infographies les plus citées au monde.

    https://medium.com/nightingale/how-john-burn-murdochs-influential-dataviz-helped-the-world-understand-coron
    https://www.ft.com/coronavirus-latest

    « Pour représenter une croissance , une échelle linéaire utilise une grande partie de l’espace disponible pour montrer la verticalité grandissante de la courbe », détaille Burn-Murdoch. Cela aboutit à « écraser » les pays dont l’épidémie est naissante dans un espace restreint, tout en rendant plus difficile les comparaisons, toutes les courbes exponentielles semblant similaires. Très remarqué, son choix a également été loué par le New York Times : « Sur une échelle linéaire, la courbe s’envole. Sur une échelle logarithmique, elle se transforme en une ligne droite, ce qui signifie que les déviations (soit une croissante encore plus forte, ou réduite, ndlr) deviennent beaucoup plus simples à déceler. »

    Les courbes de progression logarithmiques permettent de comprendre où en est chaque pays, relativement aux autres. Mais elles constituent des représentations peu efficaces pour apprécier en un clin d’œil le niveau d’accélération ou de décroissance d’un pays donné, malgré les affirmations du journaliste du Financial Times, notait début avril le responsable des données du groupe Veolia. Autre défaut : leur efficacité semble tout aussi limitée pour appréhender la réussite ou l’échec des politiques de santé de chaque État, hors des cas les plus flagrants, tel que le succès de la Corée du Sud. « Nous nous concentrons sur la trajectoire (…) et sur les nombres que vous entendez dans les médias », défendait le Financial Times le 30 mars. « Si nous choisissions d’aller vers un ratio du nombre de morts par habitant, vous perdriez un peu du côté viscéral, immédiat et évident. »

    The Economist diffuse en effet des comparaisons entre les données de surmortalité issues de sources fiables, comme la base de données européenne de décès EuroMOMO, et les bilans officiels dans de nombreux pays et régions, dont la France. Il est rapidement imité par le New York Times, le Financial Times et Mediapart, entre autres.

    Si les comparaisons internationales du nombre de morts, comme du nombre de morts par habitants, sont particulièrement défavorables au gouvernement français, le différentiel entre la surmortalité totale et les décès officiels du Covid-19 montre plutôt une transparence acceptable et de données relativement fiables… du moins depuis que la France s’est résolue à comptabiliser les morts des Ehpad.

    #mortalité #surmortalité #chiffres #statistiques
    cc @fil @simplicissimus

  • Asile : bilan en #France et en Europe pour #2019

    #Eurostat a publié le 3 mars 2020 des données relatives aux demandes d’asile, aux décisions prises et aux demandes en instance pour 2019. Cela complète des données publiées par le ministère de l’intérieur, l’#OFII et la #CNDA en janvier et permet de dresser une #cartographie de la demande d’asile en France et en Europe.
    Demandes d’asile en France : trois chiffres différents

    La particularité de la France est qu’elle ne comptabilise pas les demandes de la même manière que les autres pays européens et qu’il existe trois ou quatre données différentes.

    L’OFPRA comptabilise les demandes introduites auprès de lui, cela comprend les demandes des réinstallés qui sont,en pratique sinon en droit, exemptées d’enregistrement en GUDA, les réexamens et les demandes des « Dublinés » arrivés au terme de la procédure et qui peuvent introduire une demande OFPRA (les « requalifiés »)
    A partir de ces données, le ministère de l’intérieur transmet des donnés à Eurostat en retirant les demandes des réinstallés. Les données sont alors arrondies.
    L’OFII et le ministère de l’intérieur publient le nombre de demandes enregistrées dans les guichets unique des demandes d’asile ( GUDA) ainsi que le nombre de demandes enregistrées les années précédentes comme Dublinées qui à l’issue de la procédure, peuvent saisir l’OFPRA.

    En 2019, selon ces différentes sources, 119 915 (Eurostat), 123 530 (OFPRA), 143 040 (ministère de l’intérieur et OFII) premières demandes (mineurs compris) ont été enregistrées ou introduites soit une hausse de 10 à 11% des demandes par rapport à l’année précédente. S’ajoutent pour le chiffres du ministère de l’intérieur , 16 790 « requalifications » des années précédentes soit 171 420 demandes. Ce nombre est un nouveau record.

    Si on reprend les statistiques précédemment publiées, environ 135 000 personnes adultes ont été l’objet d’une procédure Dublin depuis 2016, environ 75 000 ont finalement accédé à la procédure OFPRA, près de 13 000 ont été transférées, un peu plus de 30 000 sont toujours dans cette procédure et près de 19 000 ont un destin indéterminé (une bonne part d’entre elles sont considérées en fuite)

    Selon le ministère de l’intérieur, un peu plus de 110 000 premières demandes adultes ont été enregistrées par les GUIDA. 39 630 étaient au départ « Dublinées » mais un peu plus de 9 000 ont vu leur demande « requalifiée en cours d’année. A la fin de l’année 51 360 demandes enregistrées en 2019 étaient en procédure normale et 37 770 en procédure accélérée (soit 26%). Si on ajoute à ce nombre, celui des requalifiés des années précédentes et les réexamens adultes, le nombre de demandes adultes est de 134 380 dont 31% sont en procédure accélérée et 25% Dublinées

    Nationalités de demandeurs d’asile

    L’Afghanistan est redevenu le premier pays de provenance des demandeurs d’asile avec selon Eurostat 10 140 demandes, principalement le fait d’adultes. Viennent ensuite deux pays considérés comme sûrs avec l’Albanie ( 9 235) et la Géorgie (8 280 demandes). La Guinée, le Bangladesh et la Côte d’Ivoire complètent le quintet de tête.

    Demandes d’asile des mineurs non accompagnés

    Le nombre de demandes des mineurs non-accompagnés est de 755 en 2019 contre 690 en 2018 soit une « hausse » de 9,4%. La première nationalité est l’Afghanistan avec 207 demandes suivi de la RDC, de la Guinée et du Burundi (vraisemblablement Mayotte).

    Réinstallations

    Le Gouvernement s’était engagé à accueillir 10 000 personnes réinstallées en 2018-2019. il a presque réalisé son objectif puisque 9 684 personnes sont arrivées dont 4 652 en 2019. La première nationalité est la Syrie avec plus de 6 600 personnes (en provenance de Turquie, du Liban et de Jordanie) , suivie de loin par le Soudan (1 372 en provenance principalement du Tchad) , l’Erythrée (474 en provenance du Niger et d’Égypte), la Centrafrique (464 en provenance du Tchad) et du Nigeria (261 en provenance du Niger)

    Décisions prises par l’OFPRA

    Selon le ministère de l’intérieur, l’OFPRA a pris près de 96 000 décisions hors mineurs accompagnants, dont 14 066 reconnaissances du statut de réfugié et 8 466 protections subsidiaires, soit un taux d’accord de 23.6% qui est en baisse par rapport à 2018.

    Les statistiques fournies par Eurostat sont nettement différentes puisque le nombre de décisions adultes est de 87 445 avec 9395 statuts de réfugiés et 8085 PS soit 20% d’accord. Cela s’explique par le fait que l’OFPRA comptabilise les statuts de réfugiés reconnus à des mineurs à titre personnel parmi les décisions « adultes » et par l’inclusion des personnes réinstallées (ce qui fait une différence non négligeable de 5 500 décisions).

    Comme pour les demandes d’asile, l’Afghanistan est la première nationalité à qui est octroyée une protection avec 4 660 décisions dont 4 235 protections subsidiaires (soit 60,3% d’accords). Malgré la baisse de la demande, le Soudan est la deuxième nationalité avec 1 915 protections (soit 59%). La Syrie arrive troisième avec 1 145 protections (sans compter les personnes réinstallées au nombre de 2 435 selon le HCR). A l’inverse, les trois pays comptabilisant le plus grand nombre de rejets sont l’Albanie (7 125, soit 6,1% d’accord), la Géorgie (7 080, soit 3,2% d’accord) et la Guinée ( 5 920, soit 10,1%).

    Quant aux décisions prises pour les mineurs, le taux d’accord est de 67% variant de 100% pour le Yemen, 95% pour le Burundi, 83% pour l’Afghanistan. En comptant les annulations CNDA le taux d’accord est de 82%.

    Une année exceptionnelle pour la CNDA

    La Cour nationale du droit d’asile qui a publié un rapport d’activité a quant à elle enregistré un peu plus de 59 000 recours dont 42% devaient être jugés en cinq semaines.

    La principale nationalité qui a déposé des recours est l’Albanie suivie de la Géorgie de la Guinée,du Bangladesh et de l’ Afghanistan.

    La répartition régionale réserve quelques surprises avec un poids relatif de certaines régions plus important que celui des demandes d’asile (notamment pour la Bourgogne Franche Comté et l’Occitanie). Il s’agit de régions où les ressortissants de pays d’origine sûrs sont assez nombreux.

    Le nombre de demandes et de décisions sur l’aide juridictionnelle est assez logiquement à la hausse avec plus de 51 000 demandes. Le bureau d’aide juridictionnelle a pris un nombre équivalent de décisions, favorables pour 94% des cas (contre 96% en 2018 , ce qui montre l’impact de la disposition de la loi obligeant à formuler cette demande dans un délai de quinze jours).

    La CNDA a pris un nombre record de 66 464 décisions dont 44 171 après une audience collégiale ou de juge unique et plus de 22 000 ordonnances, soit 33.5% des décisions.

    Pour les décisions prises après une audience, le taux d’annulation est de 35% en collégiale, de 23% pour celles à juge unique.

    Le délai moyen constaté pour les premières est de 294 jours, de 120 jours pour les secondes. Le délai moyen constaté est de 218 jours donc on peut déduire que les ordonnances sont prises dans un délai de 169 jours

    Le « stock » de dossiers s’est réduit à 29 245 dossiers (soit environ 35 000 personnes, mineurs compris) contre 36 388 en 2018. En conséquence, le délai moyen prévisible est de 5 mois et 9 jours. Cette baisse contraste avec l’augmentation sensible à l’ofpra (58 000 dossiers adultes en novembre).

    En ce qui concerne les nationalités, le plus grand nombre de décisions ont été prises pour des demandes albanaises, géorgiennes, ivoiriennes, guinéennes et haïtiennes. la Guinée devient la première. nationalité pour le nombre de reconnaissances du statut devant le Soudan et la Syrie (principalement des requalifications) Mais ce sont les Afghans avec 1 729 protections dont 1 208 PS , à qui la CNDA accorde le plus de protections (75% d’annulation) . A l’inverse, le taux d’accord est de 3% pour la Géorgie et de 1% pour la Chine (vraisemblablement massivement par ordonnances)

    On peut estimer le nombre de décisions définitives. Le taux d’accord est alors de 35% contre 41% en 2019.

    A la fin de l’année 2019 environ 110 000 demandes étaient en cours d’instruction à l’OFPRA ou la CNDA avec un nombre très important de dossiers afghans et bangladais.

    Un dispositif d’accueil saturé ?

    En données brutes, selon l’OFII, le dispositif national d’accueil comptait 81 866 places stables fin 2019 . Parmi elles, 78 105 soit 95.4% étaient occupées. 73 468 personnes sont entrées dans un lieu contre 73 396 en 2018 dont 13 372 Afghans et 65 079 en sont sorties (contre 66 006 en 2018)

    Parmi les 71 805 places, 53 319 sont occupées par des demandeurs à l’OFPRA, 7 201 par des Dubliné·e·s (soit à peine 20% de cette catégorie), 12 306 par des réfugié·e·s et 5 279 par des débouté·e·s. Les personnes « en présence indue » représente 12.3% des places.

    Mais à regarder de plus près, ces chiffres semblent erronées. D’abord parce que le parc géré par l’OFII est en diminution (81 866 contre 93 000 en 2018) car il a été décidé d’exclure les places CAES et les hébergement non stables (hôtels). Mais le bât blesse encore plus lorsque l’on compare les données du ministère et celle de l’OFII : il manque ainsi plus de 2 360 places de CADA, 369 places de PRADHA et 600 places d’HUDA stables (les hôtels avoisinant 11 000 places)

    Dès lors, si on rapporte le nombre de personnes présentes à celui des places autorisées fourni par le ministère, le taux d’occupation dans les CADA est de 90% et même en deçà dans trois régions (AURA, Nouvelle Aquitaine, et Occitanie) et de 93% au total (soit 7 000 places vacantes ou non répertoriées à la fin de l’année). En clair, c’est la confirmation qu’il y a un sérieux problème d’attribution des places CADA (et des CPH) . Surtout la moitié des personnes qui demandent asile ne sont pas hébergées avec des grandes variations entre régions (71.5% en Ile-de-France et 12% en Bourgogne-Franche-Comté)

    La France au coude à coude avec l’Allemagne.

    Pour la première fois depuis 2012, la France a enregistré plus de premières demandes que l’Allemagne : 143 030 contre 142 450. C’était déjà le cas pour les premières demandes adultes depuis 2018 mais le nombre de mineurs était nettement plus important outre-Rhin. L’Espagne, qui est devenue le troisième pays d’accueil en Europe, compte plus de premières demandes adultes que l’Allemagne. En revanche, l’Allemagne reste en tête si on comptabilise les réexamens. Le nombre de demandes d’asile en Italie a diminué de moitié tandis que la Grèce connait une forte hausse avec 77 200 demandes.

    Quant aux décisions de première instance, l’Italie a « déstocké » massivement en prenant plus de 88 000 décisions adultes dépassant légèrement la France. L’Espagne a délivré des statuts humanitaires aux nombreux vénézuéliens qui ont demandé asile.

    Enfin la situation est contrastée en ce qui concerne les demandes d’asile en instance. L’Italie a diminué de moitié ce nombre, L’Allemagne l’a réduit de 40 000 tandis que l’Espagne et la Grèce ont dépassé les 100 000 demandes en instance. La France qui frôle les 80 000 dossiers en instance à l’OFPRA (donc sans compter les 50 000 Dublinés en cours d’instruction) a connu une forte hausse.

    https://www.lacimade.org/asile-bilan-de-lasile-en-france-et-en-europe2019
    #asile #statistiques #chiffres #visualisation (mais elle est tellement moche que ça fait mal aux yeux...) #Dublin #recours #demandes_d'asile #nationalité #MNA #mineurs_non_accompagnés #réinstallation #décisions #accueil #hébergement #taux_d'acceptation

    ping @reka @isskein @karine4

    • Dispositif d’#accueil des demandeurs d’asile : état des lieux 2020

      Etat des lieux des dispositifs d’accueil et d’hébergement dédiés aux personnes demanderesses d’asile et réfugiées.

      43 600 PLACES DE CADA
      Au 1er janvier 2020, le dispositif national d’accueil compte environ 43 600 places autorisées de centres d’accueil pour demandeurs d’asile (#CADA). Le parc est principalement situé en Ile- de-France, Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes et Grand Est. Cependant, ce sont les régions Pays de la Loire, Bretagne, Nouvelle Aquitaine et Occitanie qui ont connu le plus grand nombre de créations. Le principal opérateur est #ADOMA devant #COALLIA, #FTDA, #Forum_réfugiés-Cosi. A l’occasion des appels à création des dernières années , le groupe #SOS et #France_Horizon ont développé un réseau important.

      Selon le ministère de l’intérieur, le dispositif est destiné à accueillir des personnes dont la demande est en procédure normale et les plus vulnérables des personnes en procédure accélérée

      64 500 PLACES D’AUTRES LIEUX D’HÉBERGEMENT (APPELÉS GÉNÉRIQUEMENT #HUDA)
      Pour pallier le manque de places de CADA, un dispositif d’#hébergement_d’urgence_des_demandeurs_d’asile (HUDA) s’était développé au cours des décennie 2000 et 2010. Ce dispositif est géré régionalement. Il est très développé en Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes et dans le Grand Est et a intégré en 2019 les 6 000 places d’#ATSA qui naguère était géré par le ministère et l’#OFII central et la majorité des places dites CHUM qui existaient en Ile-de-France. Selon la circulaire du 31 décembre 2018, ce dispositif est destiné à accueillir des personnes en #procédure_accélérée ou Dublinées. 36% des places sont des nuitées d’hôtel notamment à Paris, à Lyon, à Marseille ou à Nice. Une information du ministère de l’intérieur du 27 décembre 2019 veut réduire cette part à 10% en ouvrant des structures stables.

      Mis en place pour orienter des personnes vivant dans le campement de la Lande à Calais et développé pour son démantèlement, le dispositif des centres d’accueil et d’orientation (#CAO) a compté selon le ministère de l’intérieur 10 000 places dont 2 000 ont été dédiés à des mineurs entre novembre 2016 et mars 2017. Ce dispositif a été rattaché budgétairement depuis 2017 aux crédits de la mission asile et immigration (BOP 303) et est géré depuis par l’OFII. Ces places sont intégrés dans le dispositif HUDA

      5 351 places ont été créées dans le cadre d’un programme d’accueil et d’hébergement des demandeurs d’asile (#PRAHDA). Lancé par appel d’offres en septembre 2016 remporté pour tous les lots par ADOMA, il consiste en grande partie en des places situées dans d’anciens #hôtels formule 1, rachetés au groupe #Accor. Ces places, gérées par l’OFII, accueillent pour moitié des personnes isolées, qui ont demandé l’asile ou qui souhaitent le faire et qui n’ont pas été enregistrées. Ce dispositif s’est spécialisé dans beaucoup de lieux dans l’hébergement avec #assignation_à_résidence des personnes Dublinées notamment ceux situés à proximité d’un #pôle_régional_Dublin. Cependant des personnes dont la demande est examinée à l’OFPRA ou à la CNDA y sont également logées.

      Dernier dispositif mis en place en 2017 mais destiné aux personnes qui souhaitent solliciter l’asile, les #centres_d’accueil_et_d’étude_de_situations (#CAES) comptent environ 3000 places. Leur particularité est un séjour très bref (en théorie un mois, deux mois en réalité) et d’avoir un accès direct aux #SPADA.

      L’ensemble des structures sont des lieux d’hébergement asile où l’accueil est conditionné à la poursuite d’une demande d’asile. Des arrêtés du ministre de l’intérieur en fixent le cahier des charges, le règlement intérieur et le contrat de séjour. L’OFII décide des entrées, des sorties et des transferts et les personnes qui y résident sont soumises à ces prescriptions, notamment à ne pas les quitter plus de sept jours sans autorisation ou peuvent y être assignées à résidence.

      Enfin, environ 1000 places de #DPAR sont destinées à l’assignation à résidence des déboutées du droit d’asile sur orientation des préfets et de l’OFII. Ces structures sont financées par une ligne budgétaire distincte des autres lieux.

      PLUS DE 8 700 PLACES DE #CPH POUR LES BÉNÉFICIAIRES DE PROTECTION INTERNATIONALE.
      Historiquement, première forme de lieu d’accueil lié à l’asile, le centre provisoires d’hébergement accueille des réfugié·e·s et des bénéficiaires de la protection subsidiaire. Limité pendant vingt ans à 1 083 places, le dispositif a connu un doublement avec la création de 1 000 places supplémentaires en 2017. 3 000 places supplémentaires ont été créées en 2018 et 2000 autres en 2019 soit 8 710 places.

      Pour accélérer les arrivées de personnes réinstallées, l’État a mis en place des centres de transit d’une capacité de 845 places au total.

      En tout le dispositif d’accueil dédié compte plus de 108 000 places. Selon l’OFII, il est occupé à 97% soit 87 000 personnes hébergées dont 75% ont une demande d’asile en cours d’examen.

      Cependant il reste en-deça des besoins d’hébergement car le nombre de demandeurs d’asile en cours d’instance bénéficiant des conditions d’accueil est de 152 923 en octobre 2019 contre 127 132 en mai 2018. Une partie des places (environ 25%) est occupée par des personnes qui ne sont pas encore ou plus demanderesses d’asile (demandes d’asile non enregistrées dans les CAES, bénéficiaires de la protection internationale ou déboutées). Malgré la création massive de places, le dispositif national d’accueil n’héberge que les deux cinquièmes des personnes. En conséquence, plus de 70 000 personnes perçoivent le montant additionnel de l’allocation pour demandeur d’asile de 7,40€ par jour pour se loger. Environ 20 000 autres sont dépourvues de ces conditions car ayant demandé l’asile plus de 90 jours après leur arrivée, ayant formulé une demande de réexamen ou sont considérés en fuite.

      https://www.lacimade.org/schemas-regionaux-daccueil-des-demandeurs-dasile-quel-etat-des-lieux

      #Dublinés

  • CoVid-19 dans les #pays_méditerranéens

    En collaboration avec les ingénieurs de la plateforme universitaire de données d’Aix-Marseille (PUD-AMU), l’Observatoire démographique vous propose ci-dessous des ressources #statistiques officielles concernant la situation de l’#épidémie. (Merci aux chercheurs qui nous ont fait des retours pour améliorer cette page : Hala Bayoumi, Eric Verdeil, Philippe Sierra).

    Pour chaque pays, nous donnons le lien vers la ou les sources officielles : #Albanie, #Algérie, #Bosnie-et-Herzégovine, #Bulgarie, #Chypre, #Croatie, #Egypte, #Espagne, #France, #Grèce, #Israël, #Italie, #Jordanie, #Kosovo, #Liban, #Libye, #Macédoine, #Malte, #Maroc, #Monténégro, #Palestine, #Portugal, #Serbie, #Slovénie, #Syrie, #Tunisie, #Turquie

    https://demomed.org/index.php/fr/ressources-en-ligne/coronavirus-situation
    #Méditerranée #comparaison #chiffres #graphiques #contamination #décès #coronavirus #visualisation

    ping @simplicissimus @reka

  • Institut Pasteur - Estimating the burden of SARS-CoV-2 in France
    https://hal-pasteur.archives-ouvertes.fr/pasteur-02548181

    Abstract : France has been heavily affected by the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic and went into lockdown on the 17th March 2020. Using models applied to hospital and death data, we estimate the impact of the lockdown and current population immunity.

    We find 2.6% of infected individuals are hospitalized and 0.53% die, ranging from 0.001% in those <20y to 8.3% in those >80y. Across all ages, men are more likely to be hospitalized, enter intensive care, and die than women.

    The lockdown reduced the reproductive number from 3.3 to 0.5 (84% reduction). By 11 May, when interventions are scheduled to be eased, we project 3.7 million (range: 2.3-6.7) people, 5.7% of the population, will have been infected. Population immunity appears insufficient to avoid a second wave if all control measures are released at the end of the lockdown

    article résumé ici :
    https://www.lemonde.fr/planete/article/2020/04/21/coronavirus-5-7-de-la-population-francaise-aura-ete-infectee-le-11-mai-selon

  • Coronavirus : l’#exode_mondial avant le #confinement

    Près de 4,5 milliards de personnes sont soumises à un confinement dans 110 pays. Cette situation inédite a été précédée d’une autre étape, aussi exceptionnelle.

    Les frontières ont fermé les unes après les autres, les avions sont restés cloués au sol. Du début février à mi-avril, quelque 4,5 milliards de personnes – soit plus de la moitié de l’humanité – ont été soumises à un confinement total dans 110 pays, et le monde s’est figé. Cette situation inédite a été précédée d’une autre étape, tout aussi exceptionnelle, lorsque des millions d’êtres humains à travers la planète ont cherché à regagner leur pays, par leurs propres moyens ou bien par le biais d’opérations de rapatriement.

    A l’intérieur des Etats, des millions de citadins, à New York, Paris, Milan, Madrid ou Istanbul, ont décidé de fuir les grandes métropoles dans l’espoir d’échapper à la contagion du Covid-19 et à la complexité du confinement. Des travailleurs saisonniers ou transfrontaliers, bloqués ou contraints de rebrousser chemin, n’ont pas eu ce choix. Des migrants ont été chassés.

    En Inde, dès l’annonce du confinement immédiat du pays, le 25 mars, des millions de travailleurs pauvres, privés de leurs revenus journaliers, sont partis à pied rejoindre leurs villages. Ces scènes dantesques ont rappelé à l’écrivaine indienne Arundhati Roy celles de la partition, en 1947, des Indes britanniques, qui a abouti à la naissance du Pakistan.

    A l’exception de l’Afrique subsaharienne, où peu de grands mouvements ont été constatés jusqu’à présent, la pandémie de Covid-19 a partout provoqué un exode massif que nul n’avait anticipé. Il existe des projections sur des déplacements de population liés aux conditions climatiques ; des bilans ont été dressés à la suite de catastrophes naturelles ; des cérémonies religieuses ou des fêtes traditionnelles sont l’occasion, en Chine, en Inde ou en Arabie saoudite, de migrations spectaculaires. Cependant, des mouvements simultanés d’une telle ampleur n’avaient jamais été encore observés. « C’est un moment historique » , remarque Catherine Wihtol de Wenden, directrice de recherche au CERI-Sciences Po et spécialiste des migrations internationales, qui se dit particulièrement inquiète quant au sort des migrants, « ceux qui fuient déjà une crise » .

    « Des Européens, interdits d’entrée dans des pays, ont expérimenté ce que c’est de ne pas être les bienvenus. Cela change les perspectives » (François Gemenne, spécialiste des migrations)

    « Il s’agit d’un mouvement mondial totalement inédit , abonde François Gemenne, spécialiste des migrations, professeur à Sciences Po Paris et à l’université de Liège, en Belgique. Autre élément nouveau, les flux habituels de migration ont été bouleversés. L’exode des ruraux a été remplacé par l’exode des citadins, celui des pays en voie de développement par celui des pays industrialisés. La Tunisie et la Mauritanie ont expulsé des Italiens ; des Européens, interdits d’entrée dans des pays, ont expérimenté ce que c’est de ne pas être les bienvenus. Cela change les perspectives. »

    Il est encore trop tôt pour se faire une idée exhaustive de ces mouvements et de leurs répercussions. Mais pour se forger une idée du phénomène, Le Monde a sollicité le réseau de ses correspondants à l’étranger. Sur la base d’éléments collectés entre le début février et le 8 avril (date du déconfinement progressif de la ville chinoise de Wuhan, point de départ de la pandémie), c’est un exode d’avant-confinement hors norme qui se dégage.

    Retour par ses propres moyens

    La crainte de l’isolement, le besoin de se rapprocher de la famille, ou la perte brutale de revenus ont poussé nombre de ressortissants basés à l’étranger à rentrer dans leur pays, le plus souvent par leurs propres moyens. Entre le 15 mars et le 7 avril, 143 000 Ukrainiens ont ainsi quitté la Pologne, selon les gardes-frontières polonais qui ont évoqué un « véritable exode, à une échelle encore jamais vue » . Ils étaient alors encore 11 000 à espérer un retour, selon l’ambassade ukrainienne à Varsovie.

    L’annonce, le 26 mars, de la fermeture des frontières par le président ukrainien, Volodymyr Zelensky, a précipité le mouvement. Sur une population estimée à plus de 1,2 million d’Ukrainiens résidant en Pologne avant la crise sanitaire, 12 % ont quitté le pays. Pour la plupart, il s’agit de travailleurs en situation légale : 90 % ont fui les difficultés économiques du secteur de l’hôtellerie et de la restauration après leur mise à l’arrêt.

    Plus de 200 000 Roumains ont eux aussi rejoint leur pays depuis le début de la pandémie, selon la police des frontières. Au point que les autorités de Bucarest ont appelé la diaspora à ne pas rentrer avant la fin de l’état d’urgence, prolongé jusqu’au 16 mai, par crainte d’un effet supplémentaire de contagion.

    Les effectifs des Danois et des Norvégiens enregistrés sur les listes consulaires à l’étranger ont fondu de moitié. Selon le ministère des affaires danois, ils n’étaient plus que 38 000 le 27 mars, contre 74 000 quelques jours auparavant. Des touristes, surtout, rentrés par leurs propres moyens, à l’instar des 234 000 Norvégiens encore à l’étranger le 12 mars, selon les données des opérateurs Telia et Telenor, qui n’étaient plus que 105 000 le 26 mars. De même, 25 000 à 35 000 Russes, bloqués par la fermeture des frontières, attendaient encore, le 3 avril, de pouvoir rentrer chez eux, en provenance notamment de Thaïlande.

    L’Australie pourrait faire face au plus grand déclin démographique de sa population depuis… 1788.

    Même phénomène en Australie, où plus de 280 000 citoyens et résidents permanents ont regagné l’île-continent depuis le 13 mars, sur 1 million vivant à l’étranger, soit 20 % d’entre eux, selon le ministère des affaires étrangères. Ces arrivées ne compensent pas les départs : 260 000 travailleurs temporaires, étudiants et touristes ont quitté le pays depuis le 1er février et 50 000 autres durant les deux premières semaines d’avril.

    A ce rythme, selon des projections sur l’année qui font état de 300 000 départs supplémentaires, l’Australie pourrait faire face au plus grand déclin démographique de sa population depuis… 1788, selon un expert cité par The Australian . Le 1er février, le premier ministre Scott Morrison avait prévenu que l’entrée du pays serait dorénavant refusée aux non-Australiens ayant voyagé en Chine. L’interdiction s’est ensuite étendue aux Iraniens, aux Sud-Coréens, aux Italiens, puis à l’ensemble de la planète à partir du 20 mars.

    Le gouvernement chilien a annoncé, le 2 avril, le retour de 30 000 de ses ressortissants depuis le 18 mars. En Chine, dans la semaine qui a précédé la quasi-fermeture du ciel chinois, le 29 mars, on comptait 25 000 arrivées quotidiennes. Un chiffre ramené à 3 000 la semaine suivante. En outre, 200 000 étudiants sur 1,6 million résidant à l’étranger sont revenus, selon le ministère de l’éducation (41 000 en provenance des Etats-Unis, 28 000 d’Australie, 22 000 du Royaume-Uni, 11 000 d’Allemagne et de France). Tous ont dû payer leur billet.

    Ces retours sont difficiles à quantifier au Venezuela, plongé dans une grave crise politique et économique depuis 2015 et qui a vu 4,3 millions de ses citoyens s’exiler. Mais des Vénézuéliens vivant dans une grande précarité au Pérou, en Equateur et en Colombie sont revenus – 2 153 recensés les 4 et 5 avril. Nicolas Maduro, président contesté, a ensuite annoncé l’arrivée de 5 800 réfugiés en provenance de Colombie.

    Plus de 20 000 expatriés Libanais reviennent au compte-gouttes, entravés par la situation de leur pays au bord de la faillite. La situation des Palestiniens est particulière. Depuis mi-mars, la quasi-fermeture des passages entre la bande de Gaza et Israël interdit la sortie de 5 000 travailleurs et commerçants palestiniens. Tandis que 70 000 autres, travailleurs légaux et illégaux de Cisjordanie, sont aujourd’hui bloqués en Israël s’ils veulent conserver leur emploi.

    Opérations de rapatriements

    Agnès Thierry, une Française installée depuis quatre ans au Vietnam après plusieurs années passées à Hongkong, songeait déjà, avant la pandémie, à rentrer au pays. Elle a brusqué sa décision. « Là-bas, au Vietnam, les écoles sont fermées depuis janvier, les autorités ont bloqué très tôt les frontières, puis elles ont refusé l’entrée des étrangers, la situation est devenue de plus en plus dure » , raconte-t-elle.

    La difficulté de renouveler son visa tous les trois mois, comme elle le faisait jusqu’à présent, a convaincu cette designer spécialisée dans la céramique de monter, le 27 mars, à bord d’un avion Air France, spécialement affrété – à charge pour les passagers de régler des billets négociés. « Il y a eu deux avions la même semaine, ils étaient pleins à craquer » , témoigne Agnès Thierry. Comme elle, près de 150 000 Français – en majorité des touristes – ont ainsi bénéficié de vols spéciaux depuis le 17 mars.

    En Pologne, le gouvernement a organisé l’opération « Vol à la maison », présentée comme le plus grand plan de rapatriement depuis la seconde guerre mondiale

    Partout, des opérations de rapatriement d’ampleur ont été mises sur pied : 200 000 Allemands coincés à l’étranger ont pu regagner leur pays en l’espace de trois semaines jusqu’au 6 avril, selon le ministère des affaires étrangères (il en restait encore 40 000 en Nouvelle-Zélande, au Pérou et en Afrique) ; 60 000 Italiens ont été évacués par des vols spéciaux ; 9 303 Algériens, selon le ministère de l’intérieur ; 12 000 Brésiliens au 6 avril ; 7 965 Tunisiens à la même date ; 8 432 Mexicains entre le 23 mars et le 3 avril ; 15 000 Turcs, entre mi-mars et début avril ; 14 950 Argentins, entre le 18 et le 30 mars ; 2 400 Norvégiens au 1er avril… La liste est longue. Le 17 avril, la Commission européenne a, pour sa part, évalué à 500 000 le nombre d’Européens rapatriés avec son concours ; tandis que 98 900 autres restent encore bloqués à l’étranger.

    En Pologne, après la fermeture des frontières, le gouvernement a organisé, avec la compagnie aérienne nationale LOT, l’opération « Vol à la maison », présentée comme la plus grande opération de rapatriement depuis la seconde guerre mondiale. Entre le 15 mars et le 5 avril, 360 vols et 44 avions mobilisés ont permis de ramener 54 000 Polonais, principalement de Londres (21 000 personnes), de Chicago (3 100), de Bangkok (2 200) ou encore d’Edimbourg (2 000).

    Fin mars, 300 000 Britanniques attendaient de pouvoir être rapatriés, ce qui a valu pas mal de critiques au gouvernement de Boris Johnson pour sa lenteur. Le 6 avril, seuls 1 450 Britanniques étaient parvenus à quitter la Tunisie, l’Algérie ou le Pérou, selon des chiffres du Foreign Office. Au 10 avril, environ 5 000 autres étaient censés, à leur tour, avoir réussi à quitter l’Inde. De leur côté, 16 812 Marocains n’ont pas encore trouvé de solution pour rentrer chez eux.

    Dans ce paysage chamboulé, seule l’Argentine semble se distinguer. A rebours du mouvement général, 30 000 Argentins ont quitté le pays, le 13 mars, au lendemain d’une allocution du président annonçant le confinement et la fermeture des frontières le 16. Pour quelles destinations ? La question demeure.

    Le retour contraint des migrants

    La question des migrants est celle qui préoccupe le plus les experts. En Iran, qui figure parmi les premiers foyers de contamination, la situation du million de travailleurs afghans présents dans le pays s’est dégradée. Alors que la République islamique s’est enfoncée dans la crise sanitaire, nombre de ces migrants, qui constituent une main-d’œuvre peu qualifiée souvent victime de discriminations, sont rentrés chez eux. Leur nombre exact n’est pas connu, mais mi-mars l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) faisait état du retour de 140 000 Afghans en provenance d’Iran. Cet afflux, parmi le plus important mouvement transfrontalier causé par la pandémie, laisse craindre le pire dans un pays ravagé par près de vingt ans de guerre et de corruption.

    30 000 migrants éthiopiens qui tentaient de rejoindre l’Arabie saoudite se sont retrouvés piégés au Yémen

    L’Arabie saoudite, où les travailleurs étrangers constituent un tiers de la population (80 % dans le secteur privé), a renvoyé chez eux des milliers d’Ethiopiens, y compris certains suspectés d’être contaminés par le Covid-19, en affrétant jusqu’à deux vols quotidiens pour Addis-Abeba. Dans les dix premiers jours d’avril, 2 968 travailleurs éthiopiens ont ainsi été ramenés dans leur pays, selon le Financial Times . Des retours « coordonnés », affirment les officiels saoudiens, alors que l’Ethiopie a demandé l’arrêt de ces déportations durant la pandémie. Dans la même période, 30 000 migrants éthiopiens qui tentaient de rejoindre l’Arabie saoudite se sont retrouvés piégés au Yémen.

    Pour sa part, Ankara a mis un frein à sa politique délibérée de déplacements de migrants vers la frontière grecque, le 13 mars, où plus de 10 000 personnes campaient selon les estimations. Selon le ministère turc de l’intérieur, 5 800 d’entre eux, pour la plupart des Afghans et quelques Syriens, ont quitté cette zone en bus à destination de centres de confinements dans neuf provinces de Turquie.

    Le Mexique a reconduit aux frontières 8 528 Guatémaltèques entre fin janvier et mars, selon l’Institut guatémaltèque de la migration, et expulsé 15 101 Honduriens, d’après le bilan fourni au 8 mars par le ministère des affaires étrangères hondurien. Côté américain, Washington autorise, depuis le 20 mars, les expulsions express – en moins de deux heures – à la frontière mexicaine pour protéger du Covid-19 ses agents. Selon la presse mexicaine, près de 7 000 clandestins mexicains et centraméricains ont ainsi été renvoyés en deux semaines. Au 25 mars, en Thaïlande, ce sont près de 60 000 migrants originaires du Cambodge, du Laos ou de Myanmar, qui ont quitté le pays après la fermeture des commerces.

    La fuite hors des villes

    C’est un phénomène connu depuis le Moyen Age : les plus aisés, du moins ceux qui en ont les moyens, fuient les villes menacées et confinées lors des grandes pandémies. « Le phénomène “résidence secondaire” – ceux qui partent vite, loin, et qui reviennent tard – a été observé notamment lors de la grande peste de Marseille de 1720 » , rappelle Isabelle Seguy, de l’Institut national des études démographiques (Ined). Un véritable mur sanitaire avait alors été constitué du Vaucluse aux Alpes, avec guérites et soldats. « Il fallait des autorisations pour passer » , souligne la spécialiste.

    Trois cents ans plus tard, les réflexes perdurent. Une scène, en particulier, est restée dans la mémoire des Italiens, celle des trains de nuit pris d’assaut en gare de Milan dans la soirée du 7 mars. Un brouillon du premier décret de confinement de la Lombardie venait de circuler, provoquant le départ massif, en quelques heures, de jeunes travailleurs pressés de rentrer chez eux, dans le Sud. On estime à 100 000 leur nombre ce soir-là.

    En Turquie, bien avant le 3 avril, jour de l’annonce des restrictions d’entrée et de sortie dans les 30 plus grosses villes du pays, près de 3 millions de citadins sont partis pour leur village d’origine ou leur résidence secondaire. Plus de 1 million de Stambouliotes ont rejoint leur lieu de villégiature sur la côte égéenne. Entre la mi-mars et le début avril, 125 000 Turcs ont par exemple gagné la ville touristique de Bodrum.

    En France, le confinement décrété le 17 mars a engendré de vastes mouvements. Selon l’Institut national de la statistique et des études économiques (Insee), entre 1,6 et 1,7 million de personnes ont rejoint leur département de résidence. A contrario, Paris intra-muros a perdu 11 % de sa population. Sur la base de ses propres statistiques, l’opérateur Orange estime qu’entre le 13 et le 30 mars, 1,2 million de Franciliens ont quitté la région, soit 17 % de la population du Grand Paris, tandis que celle de l’île de Ré a augmenté de 30 %.

    A New York, ce fut aussi la ruée hors de la ville. Début mars, « Big Apple » s’est vidée de nombreux habitants, partis se réfugier dans leur villégiature des Hamptons, à l’extrémité chic de Long Island, à l’est de Manhattan, dans la vallée de l’Hudson, au nord, ou sur les rivages du Maine. Aucun chiffre n’a été rendu public, mais des indicateurs confirment la tendance : les quartiers résidentiels de Manhattan sont moins touchés que d’autres par l’épidémie. La collecte d’ordures y a baissé de 5 %, alors que celle des quartiers pauvres (Queens, Staten Island) a au contraire progressé de 10 %. Cet exode des plus favorisés a été suffisamment important pour que la Maison Blanche s’inquiète d’une propagation du virus à Long Island, moins bien dotée médicalement que New York.

    Autre indicateur, à Moscou cette fois. Le vendredi 27 mars au soir, avant le début du confinement annoncé pour le lundi suivant, 750 000 voitures ont quitté la capitale russe, soit une augmentation de 15 % par rapport à la normale.

    Le départ de dizaines de milliers de Madrilènes, le 13 mars, a suscité un flot de réactions dans la presse. Des villes et villages ont érigé des barrières pour empêcher leur arrivée

    En Espagne aussi. Le départ de dizaines de milliers de Madrilènes hors de la capitale, le 13 mars, à la veille du confinement du pays, a suscité un flot de réactions dans la presse sous des titres tels que « ¡ Que vienen los Madrilenos ! » (« Les Madrilènes arrivent ! »), photos d’embouteillages à l’appui. Cette situation a poussé des villes et villages à ériger des barrières pour empêcher leur arrivée. Dans la station balnéaire de Calafell (25 000 habitants), au sud de Barcelone, des blocs de béton ont été installés et des contrôles de police instaurés à l’approche des fêtes de Pâques.

    En Australie, des mesures similaires ont été prises pour limiter les déplacements des citoyens d’un Etat à l’autre. La Tasmanie, le Territoire du Nord, le Queensland, l’Australie-Méridionale et l’Australie-Occidentale ont, durant la seconde moitié de mars, mis en place des mesures de contrôles à leurs « frontières ».

    Que dire enfin des 5 millions d’habitants de Wuhan, partis juste avant la fermeture de leur ville, le 23 janvier ? Etait-ce pour éviter l’enfermement ou pour tenter, malgré tout, de faire un voyage qu’ils avaient projeté à l’occasion du Nouvel An lunaire ? C’est ici que tout a commencé et que le balancier des déplacements repartira en sens inverse. Ou pas.

    https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2020/04/17/covid-19-l-exode-mondial-avant-le-confinement_6036919_3210.html
    #exode #émigration #retour_au_pays #mobilité #coronavirus #covid-19 #cartographie #visualisation #chiffres #monde #migrations

  • Charles de Gaulle, une contagion qui vire au fiasco - Le Télégramme


    en une et pages 2 et 3
    (on notera qu’on ne connait toujours pas les résultats des 30% de tests en attente)

    Les questions que pose la contamination à bord du Charles-de-Gaulle - France - Le Télégramme
    https://www.letelegramme.fr/france/les-questions-que-pose-la-contamination-a-bord-du-charles-de-gaulle-16-

    En dix jours, le fleuron de la Marine nationale, dont les avions Rafale contribuent à la dissuasion nucléaire, a été mis hors de combat par le virus Covid-19. La séquence soulève de légitimes questions, en particulier des marins et de leurs familles.
    Solidarité coronavirus Bretagne

    Ce que l’on sait : retour sur la chronologie fatale
    Mercredi soir, la terrible nouvelle est tombée. Sur les 1 767 marins testés, 668 sont positifs. Ils appartiennent principalement au Charles-de-Gaulle, mais quelques-uns proviennent de la frégate de défense aérienne Chevalier Paul, qui le protège en permanence. Ce jeudi, une vingtaine étaient hospitalisés à Toulon, dont un major placé en réanimation et intubé. Et ce bilan médical est très évolutif…

    • Un marin du Charles-de-Gaulle : « C’est la télé qui nous a appris qu’il y avait 50 cas à bord ! » - France - Le Télégramme
      https://www.letelegramme.fr/france/un-marin-du-charles-de-gaulle-c-est-la-tele-qui-nous-a-appris-qu-il-y-a


      Notre témoin fait partie des plus de 1 000 marins du Charles-de-Gaulle réunis à Saint-Mandrier, dans la baie de Toulon.
      Photo EPA

      Nous avons joint un des marins bretons du Charles-de-Gaulle. Actuellement confiné près de Toulon, il raconte cette quarantaine stricte et livre le sentiment amer des marins, « les derniers au courant de ce qui se passe ».

      Comment se passe le confinement depuis que vous êtes à terre ?
      Nous sommes plus de 1 000 marins du Charles-de-Gaulle réunis à Saint-Mandrier, dans la baie de Toulon. Nous sommes dans des chambrées de deux ou quatre. Le temps nous semble long, encore plus depuis mercredi (15) car une nouvelle mesure s’applique à nous : nous ne pouvons même plus sortir au sein de cette base, pour des activités sportives, même à deux. Seuls ceux qui fument peuvent aller dehors le temps d’en griller une. En gros, on s’ennuie grave. On nettoie les communs, on mange, point.

      Vous êtes inquiets ?
      Non. Nous sommes jeunes, tous plutôt entraînés physiquement et nous sommes suivis en ce moment médicalement. Mais on sent quand même un certain flottement. Surtout en termes de communication : nous sommes les derniers au courant de ce qui se passe. Et cela dès le début, à bord du porte-avions. C’est la télévision qui nous a appris qu’il y avait 50 cas sur le Charles-de-Gaulle ! Une heure plus tard nous avions une diffusion à bord pour nous en informer… C’est encore la télévision qui nous prévient que la mission est écourtée de 10 jours et que nous rentrons ! Et encore hier, nous avons appris par les médias les 668 cas parmi nous.

      Vous respectez des consignes sanitaires actuellement ?
      Nous portons tous un masque. Nous allons à la cafétéria en nous tenant à une distance minimale. Nous avons été testés au grand coton-tige. Mais je n’ai toujours pas la moindre information, de résultat personnel, j’attends. Après, les cas positifs devraient rester dans leur chambrée, les autres rejoindre d’autres bâtiments. Mais s’ils deviennent à leur tour positifs dans quelques jours…

      chapeau au commandement pour la transparence…

    • Christophe Rogier : « La contamination du porte-avions signe l’échec de la prévention dans les armées » - L’épidémie de coronavirus - Le Télégramme
      https://www.letelegramme.fr/dossiers/lepidemie-de-coronavirus/christophe-rogier-la-contamination-du-porte-avions-signe-l-echec-de-la-


      DR

      Médecin général (2S), Christophe Rogier est chercheur en infectiologie. Il a travaillé avec les équipes du Pr Didier Raoult à Marseille et a dirigé l’Institut Pasteur de Madagascar. Entre 2018 et 2019, avant de rejoindre le civil, il a été l’adjoint « Expertise et stratégie Santé de Défense » du directeur central du Service de santé des armées.

      Notre porte-avions neutralisé en quelques jours par le Covid-19 : à qui la faute ?
      Les enquêtes officielles feront toute la lumière sur ce drame. De mon point de vue de médecin et d’expert en épidémiologie et en hygiène militaire, ce fiasco n’aurait jamais dû arriver. Il signe d’abord l’échec de la prévention dans nos armées. Elles ont perdu la culture de l’hygiène et de la prévention des risques médicaux. Avec de la méthode et des moyens, il était possible d’anticiper et d’empêcher la propagation du virus à bord.

      Que voulez-vous dire par « perte de culture » ?
      Le Service de santé des armées a oublié son histoire. Dès la fin du XVIIIe siècle, les médecins et officiers de marine ont conçu des règles d’hygiène qui leur ont permis de contrôler les épidémies qui ravageaient les équipages : scorbut, saturnisme et maladies infectieuses. L’enjeu était déjà d’appliquer des mesures trop souvent perçues comme coûteuses ou inutiles. Rien n’a changé. L’ère pasteurienne a fini par donner des bases scientifiques et améliorer la prévention. La science ne fait pas tout. Il faut aussi qu’elle soit mise en œuvre. Et cela repose sur la proximité et la confiance entre les commandants et leurs médecins. En Afghanistan, l’accent a été mis sur le sauvetage du blessé, avec une grande efficacité, mais on a oublié, entre-temps, la maxime : mieux vaut prévenir que guérir.

      Et depuis, rien n’aurait alerté nos armées sur l’importance de renouer avec cette expertise ?
      Des signaux avaient alerté sur les conséquences opérationnelles liées au manque d’hygiène et de prévention. En 2009, le porte-hélicoptères Jeanne-d’Arc a dû interrompre un exercice à cause de cas de grippe H1N1 à bord. Plus récemment, à Barkhane, au Sahel, des épidémies de diarrhée ont entravé la capacité opérationnelle de la force. Pour le Covid-19, dès le début février, le Service de santé des armées aurait pris la mesure du risque et n’aurait cessé de conseiller le commandement en adaptant ses recommandations au fur et à mesure de l’évolution des connaissances. Encore fallait-il être convaincant. Et certains chefs considèrent parfois que respecter les règles d’hygiène limite l’aguerrissement du soldat et entrave la manœuvre. Moi, je considère que l’hygiène et la prévention sont les conditions de la résilience de la force. Dans cette affaire du porte-avions, le Service de santé et le commandement sont dans le même « navire ». Il revient au premier d’éclairer l’autre, qui doit décider dans l’incertitude ; tout l’art militaire…

    • Florence Parly dément « une fausse rumeur » sur la gestion de la crise du Covid-19 sur le Charles de Gaulle
      https://france3-regions.francetvinfo.fr/provence-alpes-cote-d-azur/var/toulon/pres-700-marins-positifs-au-covid-19-que-s-est-il-passe

      A ce jour 2010 marins de Charles de Gaulle et de l’ensemble du groupe aéronaval ont été testés au Covid-19. 1081 se sont révélés positifs.

      « 545 d’entre eux présentent des symptômes. Tous sont sous surveillance médicale étroite »..,

  • #Voyageurs_internationaux ou immigrants, le virus ne fait pas la différence

    La relation entre #immigration et #épidémie peut s’envisager sous l’angle des inégalités d’accès au logement, aux soins, au matériel de protection, à l’information. Mais cela ne doit pas faire oublier que la #migration_internationale est peu de chose sur l’ensemble de la #mobilité_internationale.

    Selon l’Organisation mondiale du #tourisme, on comptait dans le monde en 2018 environ 1,4 milliard de franchissements de frontière par des non-résidents pour un séjour de moins de 12 mois, contre seulement 0,9 milliard en 2008. Soit une progression de 50 % en dix ans, malgré l’essor des communications à distance. Voyages touristiques surtout, mais aussi visites familiales, déplacements professionnels, travail saisonnier ou « détaché ». L’Europe en capte la moitié, la France 6,4 %.

    En 2018, en effet, la France a enregistré 89 millions d’entrées de non-résidents pour des séjours inférieurs à 12 mois. C’est le record mondial, devant l’Espagne (83 millions) et les États-Unis (80 millions). Cela correspond à 140 millions de nuitées, autant que les nuitées de résidents nationaux.

    Sur cette masse d’entrées, combien sont le fait d’immigrants venus s’installer en France pour au moins un an ? Environ 400 000 si l’on se limite à l’immigration issue des pays tiers :

    – 280 000 entrées légales (titres de séjour accordés en 2019) ;
    – une partie, difficile à déterminer, des 132 000 premiers demandeurs d’asile (enfants mineurs compris). Une partie seulement, car si 36 % environ obtiennent une protection, d’autres, déboutés il y a déjà plusieurs années, finissent par décrocher un titre de séjour pour motifs familiaux et se retrouvent donc dans la statistique des titres de séjour d’une année ultérieure. D’autres, enfin, repartent ;
    – une partie (sous des hypothèses analogues) des 40 000 demandes « sous statut Dublin », présentées aux « guichets uniques » de l’Office français de l’immigration et de l’intégration (Ofii) et des préfectures sans passer par l’Office français de protection des réfugiés et apatrides (Ofpra).

    S’ajoutent à cela les quelque 140 000 entrées annuelles de ressortissants des pays de l’Espace économique européen, non tenus de demander un titre de séjour (Insee Focus, n° 145, février 2019).

    Ces fourchettes sont larges mais seul importe ici l’ordre de grandeur : la migration non européenne représente moins de 0,5 % des 89 millions d’entrées annuelles en France, soit 1/200 des entrées. Européens inclus, les entrées de migrants représentent environ 0,6 % de la mobilité internationale vers la France, soit une entrée sur 170.

    Une fermeture prophylactique des frontières ciblée sur les seuls migrants (européens ou non), n’aurait donc aucun sens, vu leur part minime dans l’ensemble des entrées. Dans notre imaginaire, fermer les frontières, c’est d’abord les fermer aux migrants. Mais le covid-19 se moque de cette distinction ; il se propage d’un pays à l’autre via les voyageurs de toute sorte, sans se demander s’ils sont migrants.

    http://icmigrations.fr/2020/04/07/defacto-018-04

    #migrations #frontières #mobilité #franchissement_des_frontières #statistiques #chiffres #fermeture_des_frontières #coronavirus #covid-19 #François_Héran