• ‘Living in this constant nightmare of insecurity and uncertainty’

    DURING the first week of 2021, Katrin Glatz-Brubakk treated a refugee who had tried to drown himself.

    His arms, already covered with scars, were sliced open with fresh cuts.

    He told her: “I can’t live in this camp any more. I’m tired of being afraid all the time, I don’t want to live any more.”

    He is 11 years old. Glatz-Brubakk, a child psychologist at Doctors Without Borders’ (MSF) mental health clinic in Lesbos, tells me he is the third child she’s seen for suicidal thoughts and attempts so far this year.

    At the time we spoke, it was only two weeks into the new year.

    The boy is one of thousands of children living in the new Mavrovouni (also known as Kara Tepe) refugee camp on the Greek island, built after a fire destroyed the former Moria camp in September.

    MSF has warned of a mental health “emergency” among children at the site, where 7,100 refugees are enduring the coldest months of the year in flimsy tents without heating or running water.

    Situated by the coast on a former military firing range, the new site, dubbed Moria 2.0, is completely exposed to the elements with tents repeatedly collapsing and flooding.

    This week winds of up to 100km/h battered the camp and temperatures dropped to zero. Due to lockdown measures residents can only leave once a week, meaning there is no escape, not even temporarily, from life in the camp.
    Camp conditions causing children to break down, not their past traumas

    It is these appalling conditions which are causing children to break down to the point where some are even losing the will to live, Glatz-Brubakk tells me.

    While the 11-year-old boy she treated earlier this year had suffered traumas in his past, the psychologist says he was a resilient child and had been managing well for a long time.

    “But he has been there in Moria now for one year and three months and now he is acutely suicidal.”

    This is also the case for the majority of children who come to the clinic.

    “On our referral form, when children are referred to us we have a question: ‘When did this problem start?’ and approximately 90 per cent of cases it says when they came to Moria.”

    Glatz-Brubakk tells me she’s seen children who are severely depressed, have stopped talking and playing and others who are self-harming.

    Last year MSF noted 50 cases of suicidal thoughts and attempts among children on the island, the youngest of whom was an eight-year-old girl who tried to hang herself.

    It’s difficult to imagine children so young even thinking about taking their lives.

    But in the camp, where there are no activities, no school, where tents collapse in the night, and storms remind children of the war they fled from, more and more little ones are being driven into despair.

    “It is living in this constant nightmare of insecurity and uncertainty that is causing children to break down,” Glatz-Brubakk says.

    “They don’t think it’s going to get better. ‘I haven’t slept for too long, I’ve been worrying every minute of every day for the last year or two’ — when you get to that point of exhaustion, falling asleep and never waking up again is more tempting than being alive.”

    Children play in the mud in the Moria 2 camp [Pic: Mare Liberum]

    Mental health crisis worsening

    While there has always been a mental health crisis on the island, Glatz-Brubakk says the problem has worsened since the fire reduced Moria to ashes five months ago.

    The blaze “retraumatised” many of the children and triggered a spike in mental health emergencies in the clinic.

    But the main difference, she notes, is that many people have now lost any remnant of hope they may have been clinging to.

    Following the fire, the European Union pledged there would be “no more Morias,” and many refugees believed they would finally be moved off the island.

    But it quickly transpired that this was not going to be the case.

    While a total of 5,000 people, including all the unaccompanied minors, have been transferred from Lesbos — according to the Greek government — more than 7,000 remain in Moria 2.0, where conditions have been described as worse than the previous camp.

    “They’ve lost hope that they will ever be treated with dignity, that they will ever have their human rights, that they will be able to have a normal life,” Glatz-Brubakk says.

    “Living in a mud hole as they are now takes away all your feeling of being human, really.”

    Yasser, an 18-year-old refugee from Afghanistan and Moria 2.0 resident, tells me he’s also seen the heavy toll on adults’ mental health.

    “In this camp they are not the same people as they were in the previous camp,” he says. “They changed. They have a different feeling when you look in their eyes.”

    [Pic: Mare Liberum]

    No improvements to Moria 2.0

    The feelings of abandonment, uncertainty and despair have also been exacerbated by failures to make improvements to the camp, which is run by the Greek government.

    It’s been five months since the new camp was built yet there is still no running water or mains electricity.

    Instead bottled water is trucked in and generators provide energy for around 12 hours a day.

    Residents and grassroots NGOs have taken it upon themselves to dig trenches to mitigate the risk of flooding, and shore up their tents to protect them from collapse. But parts of the camp still flood.

    “When it rains even for one or two hours it comes like a lake,” says Yasser, who lives in a tent with his four younger siblings and parents.

    Humidity inside the tents also leaves clothes and blankets perpetually damp with no opportunity to get them dry again.

    Despite temperatures dropping to zero this week, residents of the camp still have no form of heating, except blankets and sleeping bags.

    The camp management have not only been unforgivably slow to improve the camp, but have also frustrated NGOs’ attempts to make changes.

    Sonia Nandzik, co-founder of ReFOCUS Media Labs, an organisation which teaches asylum-seekers to become citizen journalists, tells me that plans by NGOs to provide low-energy heated blankets for residents back in December were rejected.

    Camp management decided small heaters would be a better option. “But they are still not there,” Nandzik tells me.

    “Now they are afraid that the power fuses will not take it and there will be a fire. So there is very little planning, this is a big problem,” she says.

    UNHCR says it has purchased 950 heaters, which will be distributed once the electricity network at the site has been upgraded. But this all feels too little, too late.

    Other initiatives suggested by NGOs like building tents for activities and schools have also been rejected.

    The Greek government, which officially runs the camp, has repeatedly insisted that conditions there are far better than Moria.

    Just this week Greek migration ministry secretary Manos Logothetis claimed that “no-one is in danger from the weather in the temporary camp.”

    While the government claims the site is temporary, which may explain why it has little will to improve it, the 7,100 people stuck there — of whom 33 per cent are children — have no idea how long they will be kept in Moria 2.0 and must suffer the failures and delays of ministers in the meantime.

    “I would say it’s becoming normal,” Yasser says, when asked if he expected to be in the “temporary” camp five months after the fire.

    “I know that it’s not good to feel these situations as normal but for me it’s just getting normal because it’s something I see every day.”

    Yasser is one of Nandzik’s citizen journalism students. Over the past few months, she says she’s seen the mental health of her students who live in the camp worsen.

    “They are starting to get more and more depressed, that sometimes they do not show up for classes for several days,” she says, referring to the ReFOCUS’s media skills lessons which now take place online.

    One of her students recently stopped eating and sleeping because of depression.

    Nandzik took him to an NGO providing psychosocial support, but they had to reject his case.

    With only a few mental health actors on the island, most only have capacity to take the most extreme cases, she says.

    “So we managed to find a psychologist for him that speaks Farsi but in LA because we were seriously worried about him that if we didn’t act now it is going to go to those more severe cases.”

    [Pic: Mare Liberum]

    No escape or respite

    What makes matters far worse is that asylum-seekers have no escape or respite from the camp. Residents can only leave the camp for a period of four hours once per week, and only for a limited number of reasons.

    A heavy police presence enforces the strict lockdown, supposedly implemented to stop the spread of Covid-19.

    While the officers have significantly reduced the horrific violence that often broke out in Moria camp, their presence adds to the feeling of imprisonment for residents.

    “The Moria was a hell but since people have moved into this new camp, the control of the place has increased so if you have a walk, it feels like I have entered a prison,” Nazanin Furoghi, a 27-year-old Afghan refugee, tells me.

    “It wouldn’t be exaggerating if I say that I feel I am walking in a dead area. There is no joy, no hope — at least for me it is like this. Even if before I enter the camp I am happy, after I am feeling so sad.”

    Furoghi was moved out of the former Moria camp with her family to a flat in the nearby town of Mytilene earlier last year. She now works in the new camp as a cultural mediator.

    Furoghi explains to me that when she was living in Moria, she would go out with friends, attend classes and teach at a school for refugee children at a nearby community centre from morning until the evening.

    Families would often bring food to the olive groves outside the camp and have picnics.

    Those rare moments can make all the difference, they can make you feel human.

    “But people here, they don’t have any kind of activities inside the camp,” she explains.“There is not any free environment around the camp, it’s just the sea and the beach and it’s very windy and it’s not even possible to have a simple walk.”

    Parents she speaks to tell her that their children have become increasingly aggressive and depressed. With little else to do and no safe place to play, kids have taken to chasing cars and trucks through the camp.

    Their dangerous new game is testament to children’s resilience, their ability to play against all odds. But Nazanin finds the sight incredibly sad.

    “This is not the way children should have to play or have fun,” she says, adding that the unhygienic conditions in the camp also mean the kids often catch skin diseases.

    The mud also has other hidden dangers. Following tests, the government confirmed last month that there are dangerous levels of lead contamination in the soil, due to residue from bullets from when the site was used as a shooting range. Children and pregnant women are the most at risk from the negative impacts of lead exposure.

    [Pic: Mare Liberum]

    The cruelty of containment

    Asylum-seekers living in camps on the Aegean islands have been put under varying degrees of lockdown since the outbreak in March.

    Recent research has shown the devastating impact of these restrictions on mental health. A report by the International Rescue Committee, published in December, found that self-harm among people living in camps on Chios, Lesbos and Samos increased by 66 per cent following restrictions in March.

    One in three were also said to have contemplated suicide. The deteriorating mental health crisis on the islands is also rooted in the EU and Greek government’s failed “hot-spot” policies, the report found.

    Asylum-seekers who arrive on the Aegean islands face months if not years waiting for their cases to be processed.

    Passing this time in squalid conditions wears down people’s hopes, leading to despair and the development of psychiatric problems.

    “Most people entered the camp as a healthy person, but after a year-and-a-half people have turned into a patient with lots of mental health problems and suicidal attempts,” Foroghi says.

    “So people have come here getting one thing, but they have lost many things.”

    [Pic: Mare Liberum]

    Long-term impacts

    Traumatised children are not only unable to heal in such conditions, but are also unable to develop the key skills they need in adult life, Glatz-Brubakk says.

    This is because living in a state of constant fear and uncertainty puts a child’s brain into “alert mode.”

    “If they stay long enough in this alert mode their development of the normal functions of the brain like planning, structure, regulating feeling, going into healthy relationships will be impaired — and the more trauma and the longer they are in these unsafe conditions, the bigger the impact,” she says.

    Yasser tells me if he could speak to the Prime Minister of Greece, his message would be a warning of the scars the camp has inflicted on them.

    “You can keep them in the camp and be happy on moving them out but the things that won’t change are what happened to them,” he says.

    “What will become their personality, especially children, who got impacted by the camp so much? What doesn’t change is what I felt, what I experienced there.”

    Glatz-Brubakk estimates that the majority of the 2,300 children in the camp need professional mental health support.

    But MSF can only treat 300 patients a year. And even with support, living in conditions that create ongoing trauma means they cannot start healing.

    [Pic: Mare Liberum]

    Calls to evacuate the camps

    This is why human rights groups and NGOs have stressed that the immediate evacuation of the island is the only solution. In a letter to the Greek ombudsman this week, Legal Centre Lesvos argues that the conditions at the temporary site “reach the level of inhuman and degrading treatment,” and amount to “an attack on “vulnerable’ migrants’ non-derogable right to life.”

    Oxfam and the Greek Council for Refugees have called for the European Union to share responsibility for refugees and take in individuals stranded on the islands.

    But there seems to be little will on behalf of the Greek government or the EU to transfer people out of the camp, which ministers claimed would only be in use up until Easter.

    For now at least it seems those with the power to implement change are happy to continue with the failed hot-spot policy despite the devastating impact on asylum-seekers.

    “At days I truly despair because I see the suffering of the kids, and when you once held hands with an eight, nine, 10-year-old child who doesn’t want to live you never forget that,” Glatz-Brubakk tells me.

    “And it’s a choice to keep children in these horrible conditions and that makes it a lot worse than working in a place hit by a natural catastrophe or things you can’t control. It’s painful to see that the children are paying the consequences of that political choice.”

    #Greece #Kara_Tepe #Mavrovouni #Moria #mental_health #children #suicide #trauma #camp #refugee #MSF

    https://thecivilfleet.wordpress.com/2021/02/21/living-in-this-constant-nightmare-of-insecurity-and-uncerta

  • Mental health ’emergency’ among child refugees in Greece
    Katy Fallon

    Concerns mount for children who have witnessed violence, a devastating camp fire, and other horrors in Greece.

    Names marked with an asterisk* have been changed to protect identities.

    Lesbos, Greece – Laleh*, an eight-year-old Afghan girl, is one of the thousands of children who live in the new, temporary camp on Lesbos, which was established in the wake of a devastating fire that destroyed the notorious Moria camp last September.

    She is among several children who are currently being treated at a mental health clinic on Lesbos, which is run by Doctors Without Borders (Medecins Sans Frontieres, or MSF), an organisation which has warned of a mental health “emergency” in the Greek island camps.

    Last year in Moria, a camp known for its poor living conditions, Laleh witnessed a violent fight as she was waiting in a queue for food with her father.

    Her mother Hawa*, 29, said that afterwards, Laleh started having panic attacks and became increasingly withdrawn and uncommunicative.

    The child was since hospitalised because she stopped eating. These days, she finds most activities challenging.

    The family now resides in the new camp in Mavrovouni, a dusty patch of earth where everyone lives in tents. The site is strictly monitored and most residents are only allowed to leave once a week.

    “During the day, she just lies down and closes her eyes,” said Hawa.

    A drawing by a child in Lesbos of the perilous sea journey to Europe undertaken by many migrants and refugees [Courtesy: MSF]

    At night, Laleh wears a nappy because she does not always say if she needs to go to the toilet.

    Something as simple as climbing steps can be difficult and feel overwhelming for her.

    “Before she was always drawing and painting,” Hawa said. “She was very hopeful, she wanted to be a doctor in the future.

    “It’s really hard for me as a mother. Laleh never had this problem before. When it started I was so worried and sad, I didn’t know how to manage,” she said. “She doesn’t really speak, she’s very quiet.”

    The fire which reduced Moria to ashes traumatised the family further.

    “Laleh had a psychogenic [non-epileptic] seizure and she fell down, everyone was shouting and running, it was a very difficult time.”

    A drawing by a child in Lesbos depicting the fire which raced through the Moira refugee camp in September [Courtesy: MSF]

    Laleh has had trouble sleeping and so Hawa lies with her and tells her stories, massaging her head in the hope it will soothe her.

    The family has seen some improvement in Laleh’s condition since she started attending MSF’s clinic, but she is still very withdrawn.

    Hawa said the securitised nature of the camp also has an effect on the children who live there.

    It is yet unclear whether the camp is being policed because of the pandemic and fears that the refugees may contract or spread the coronavirus, or as part of an increasingly securitised approach towards camps on the Greek islands.

    “Most of the children are afraid of the police because there are so many police around, it’s very difficult to go out of the camp and the children believe it’s a prison and that they can’t get out,” she said.

    Hawa herself said she views the camp as a “prison”, adding: “I hope that we leave this camp, this is my only hope for now.”

    Refugees and migrants wait to be transferred to camps on the mainland after their arrival on a passenger ferry from the island of Lesbos at the port of Lavrio, Greece, in September 2020 [File: Costas Baltas/Reuters]

    In 2020, child psychologists at MSF noted 50 cases of children with suicidal ideation and suicide attempts.

    “I never imagined it would be this bad,” said Katrin Glatz-Brubakk, a mental health supervisor for MSF on Lesbos.

    She told Al Jazeera they have seen children with severe depression, suicidal thoughts and that many have stopped playing.

    “As a child psychologist, I get very worried when children don’t play at all and we see a lot of that in the camp,” Glatz-Brubakk said.

    “Many of the children have experienced trauma but if they were moved to a [place with] safe and good [conditions] they would start healing from it. Now they get sicker and sicker because of the conditions they live in.

    “We are basically giving them skills to deal with a situation they should never be living in in the first place, it’s not treatment: it’s survival.”

    #Greece #mental_health #trauma #suicide #children #camps #Lesbos #MSF

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2021/2/11/children-dont-play-at-all-mental-health-crisis-stalks-lesbos

  • #Covid-Linked Syndrome in #Children Is Growing and Cases Are More Severe - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/16/health/covid-children-inflammatory-syndrome.html

    Fifteen-year-old Braden Wilson was frightened of Covid-19. He was careful to wear masks and only left his house, in Simi Valley, Calif., for things like orthodontist checkups and visits with his grandparents nearby.

    But somehow, the virus found Braden. It wreaked ruthless damage in the form of an inflammatory syndrome that, for unknown reasons, strikes some young people, usually several weeks after infection by the coronavirus.

    Doctors at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles put the teenager on a ventilator and a heart-lung bypass machine. But they could not stop his major organs from failing. On Jan. 5, “they officially said he was brain dead,” his mother, Amanda Wilson, recounted, sobbing. “My boy was gone.”

    Doctors across the country have been seeing a striking increase in the number of young people with the condition Braden had, which is called Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children or MIS-C. Even more worrisome, they say, is that more patients are now very sick than during the first wave of cases, which alarmed doctors and parents around the world last spring.

    “We’re now getting more of these MIS-C kids, but this time, it just seems that a higher percentage of them are really critically ill,” said Dr. Roberta DeBiasi, chief of infectious diseases at Children’s National Hospital in Washington, D.C. During the hospital’s first wave, about half the patients needed treatment in the intensive care unit, she said, but now 80 to 90 percent do.

  • #COVID-19 is not influenza - The Lancet Respiratory Medicine
    https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanres/article/PIIS2213-2600(20)30577-4/fulltext

    A surprising finding of the study by Piroth and colleagues4
    was that, among patients younger than 18 years, the rates of ICU admission were significantly higher for COVID-19 than influenza. The need for intensive care was highest in patients with COVID-19 who were younger than 5 years (14 [2·3%] of 613 for COVID-19 vs 65 [0·9%] of 6973 for influenza), but mortality in the COVID-19 group was not higher than for influenza. #Mortality was ten-times higher in #children aged 11–17 years with COVID-19 than in patients in the same age group with influenza (5 [1·1%] of 458 vs 1 [0·1%] of 804). These findings are supported by a study of 4784 children and adolescents with COVID-19 from Brazil7
    and a study of children and adolescents from Spain.8
    Clearly, COVID-19 is not an innocent infection in children and adolescents.

  • Rx3 : “Nous venons d’apprendre le déc…”
    https://masthead.social/@Rx3/105497165426379776

    Nous venons d’apprendre le décès d’Alexis Laiho, frontman emblématique de CHILDREN OF BODOM des suites d’une longue maladie.Compositeur talentueux, il aura marqué indéniablement la scène death mélo scandinave dans les années 2000. Il était l’une des figures les plus importantes du rayonnement du métal Finlandais grâce notamment à un jeu de guitare qui empruntait autant au power qu’au thrash, au black et au death.Nos pensées vont à sa famille et ses amis.G.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X5mwx_8v80s

    #realrebelradio #lavoixdurock #metal #rip #alexislaiho #childrenofbodom

  • #Lesbos : A #mental_health #crisis beneath the surface

    A mental health crisis among asylum seekers from the former #Moria camp on the Greek island of Lesbos is worsening. InfoMigrants has learned that in the new tent facility, even young #children are receiving psychiatric treatment and medication to deal with ongoing #trauma.

    In the new Lesbos tent camp, 17-year-old Nour from Syria says that when Moria went up in flames in September, she asked her mother to leave her there to die.

    Like a growing number of children and young people in the migrant camps, Nour is taking antidepressants.

    Long-term effects on children

    In the weeks following the destruction of the Moria camp, almost all of the unaccompanied minors – children traveling without a parent or guardian – were transferred off the island. But many children were also left on Lesbos, as well as the other hotspot islands.

    And according to Greg Kavarnos, a psychologist with the medical charity Doctors Without Borders (MSF) working with asylum seekers on Lesbos, children are among those most at risk of suffering long-term mental health effects.

    “Children are resilient and can bounce back, but they are also at a stage when they’re developing their character and their personality,” Kavarnos told InfoMigrants.

    “If they have to go through traumatic experiences at this age, these will then shape their personality or their character in the future, leading to long-term problems.”

    “We’re creating a generation of children that are going to be reliant on psychiatric medication for the rest of their lives.”

    Children in the camp are increasingly feeling a sense of resignation. Seeing their parents trapped and unable to make decisions or take action, they become hopeless, Kavarnos said.

    “If at eight years old a child has already resigned itself, what does that mean when this child becomes 12 or 16 years old? If at eight years old or 10 years old a child has to take psychiatric medication in order for the symptoms to be held at bay, what’s this going to mean later?”

    When a psychiatric problem arises as a result of trauma, if the trauma is not successfully dealt with, the psychiatric problem then becomes chronic, according to Kavarnos.

    “So, what are we doing? We’re creating a generation of children that are going to be reliant on psychiatric medication for the rest of their lives.”

    Karima, from Afghanistan, is also on antidepressants and has trouble sleeping. Most of her family, including her granddaughters, aged two and three, were in a boat from Turkey that sank in the Aegean. They were rescued and brought to Lesbos. For about two years, they lived in the Moria camp.

    Karima’s son; Rahullah tells us: “It was a very bad situation. ... People died, they drank, they killed each other. We didn’t sleep. So now we have mental problems, all of us, just because of Lesbos.”

    Rahullah’s sister F., the mother of the two little girls, became so unwell that she cut herself, says another of her brothers, a softly-spoken law graduate. F.’s husband was murdered in Afghanistan.

    Another young asylum seeker in the camp, Ahmad*, is 25. He travelled alone from Afghanistan to Greece. He says that he has twice attempted suicide, and if it hadn’t been for his friends, he would have gone through with it and succeeded in killing himself.

    Removal the only solution

    The International Rescue Committee, which provides mental health support to asylum seekers on Lesbos, tries to help migrants with counseling and medication. But according to IRC senior advocacy officer Martha Roussou, while some people do improve, “the only durable solution is to remove them from the traumatic space they are living in.”

    No matter how much medication or psychotherapy you give a person, “if they’re constantly being traumatized by their experiences, you’re always one step behind," said Greg Kavarnos.

    “I can’t do anything for the ongoing trauma, the threats of violence, the inability to access simple facilities. I can’t say to the person, ‘it’s okay, things will get better,’ because I don’t know if things will get better for them.”

    *Ahmad is an assumed name

    If you are suffering from serious emotional strain or suicidal thoughts, do not hesitate to seek professional help. You can find information on where to find such help, no matter where you live in the world, at this website: https://www.befrienders.org

    In Greece, a suicide-help line can be reached by telephone at this number: 1018. You can also find more information here: http://suicide-help.gr

    https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/28086/lesbos-a-mental-health-crisis-beneath-the-surface

  • Largest #COVID-19 contact tracing study to date finds #children key to spread, evidence of superspreaders
    https://www.princeton.edu/news/2020/09/30/largest-covid-19-contact-tracing-study-date-finds-children-key-spread-evi


    En résumé, le meilleur tremplin pour la #diffusion du #coronavirus, c’est plein d’#enfants tassés dans le même endroit…

    The researchers also reported, however, the first large-scale evidence that the implementation of a countrywide shutdown in India led to substantial reductions in coronavirus transmission.

    The researchers found that the chances of a person with coronavirus, regardless of their age, passing it on to a close contact ranged from 2.6% in the community to 9% in the household. The researchers found that children and young adults — who made up one-third of COVID cases — were especially key to transmitting the virus in the studied populations.

    “Kids are very efficient transmitters in this setting, which is something that hasn’t been firmly established in previous studies,” Laxminarayan said. “We found that reported cases and deaths have been more concentrated in younger cohorts than we expected based on observations in higher-income countries.”

    Children and young adults were much more likely to contract coronavirus from people their own age, the study found. Across all age groups, people had a greater chance of catching the coronavirus from someone their own age. The overall probability of catching coronavirus ranged from 4.7% for low-risk contacts up to 10.7% for high-risk contacts.

    #Mais_quelle_surprise

  • U.S. #Coronavirus Rates Are Rising Fast Among #Children - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/08/31/us/coronavirus-cases-children.html

    “Anyone who has been on the front lines of this pandemic in a children’s hospital can tell you we’ve taken care of lots of kids that are very sick,” Dr. O’Leary said. “Yes, it’s less severe in children than adults, but it’s not completely benign.”

    Since the beginning of the summer, every state in the country has had an increase in the number of young people who have tested positive for the coronavirus, as a share of all cases. In late May, about 5 percent of the nation’s cases were documented in minors. By Aug. 20, that number had risen to more than 9 percent.

  • [Drache Musicale] Mixtape #kids
    http://www.radiopanik.org/emissions/drache-musicale/mixtape-kids

    No simpleton kids music

    Volume 1.

    .

    .

    .

    .

    tracklist:

    Intro

    carl orff & gunild keetman - Cuckoo, Where Are You

    Noriko Kato - La Maman Des Poissons

    Kali - Tambou Dan Tche Nou

    Ivor Cutler - Little black buzzer

    Chassol -Sirine

    Isao Tomita - Owls’ Lullaby KIMBA / JUNGLE EMPEROR

    Weöres Sándor- Macska induló (Sebő Ferenc, Káldy Nóra)

    The Poppys - Le tourbillon du Pakistan

    François Hadji-Lazaro - Dans La Salle De La Cantine De La Rue Des Martines

    Dragibus – A monster song

    Delia Derbyshire – Mattachin

    Philippe - lili gribouille

    Riff Drache

    Dédé Saint Prix - Zizi-Pan

    Josette Césarin – Papiyon Volé

    O Karaiva - Xote das Meninas (Ela Só Quer)

    Kossua Ghyamphy - Ayo! Ayo!

    Chassol - Savana, Céline, Aya, Pt. 1

    Epo I Tai Tai E - folk song from the Maori people of New Zealand

    Nazaré Pereira - La (...)

    #enfants #contes #pas_de_cri #chorales #coucou #miaou #farandoles #debilos #children #pas_de_larmes #pas_niais #comptines #enfants,kids,contes,pas_de_cri,chorales,coucou,miaou,farandoles,debilos,children,pas_de_larmes,pas_niais,comptines
    http://www.radiopanik.org/media/sounds/drache-musicale/mixtape-kids_08985__1.mp3

  • Andrea #DWORKIN Heartbreak The Political Memoir of a Feminist Militant
    http://www.feministes-radicales.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/Andrea-DWORKIN-Heartbreak-The-Political-Memoir-of-a-Feminist-M

    Suffer the Little #Children

    In Amsterdam I knew a hippie man whose children from an early marriage were coming to stay with him. They were thir­teen and eleven, I think. The older girl had been incested by her stepfather. This came into the open because the older girl tried to kill herself. This she did at least in part valiantly because she saw the stepfather beginning to make moves on the younger girl in exactly the same way he had gradually forced himself on her. The stepfather had started to wash and shower with the younger girl. The mother, in despair, wrote the hippie man, who had abandoned all of them, for help. She wanted to mend the relationship with the second husband while keeping her children safe. The hippie man made clear to those of us who knew him that he considered his older daughter responsible for the sex; you know how girls flirt and all that. His woman friend made clear to him that he was wrong and also that she was not going to take care of the chil­dren. She wouldn’t have to, he said; he would be the nurturer. When the girls arrived in Amsterdam, one recently raped, exceptionally nervous and upset by temperament or contagion or molestation, the hippie man forgot his vows of responsibility, as he had always forgotten all the vows he had ever made, and let all the work, emotional and physical, devolve on his woman friend. She wasn’t having any and simply refused to take care of them. Eventually she left.

    One night I got a call from her: the hippie man had given each kid 100 guilders, set them loose, and told them to take care of themselves. He just could not be with them without fucking them, he told her (and them). In a noble and compas­sionate alternative gesture, he put them out on the streets. His woman friend made clear to me that this was a mess she was not going to clean up. I asked where they were.

    They had taken shelter in the frame of an abandoned build­ing, squatters without a room that had walls. They lived up toward the wooden frame for the ceiling. Their light came from burning candles. I found them and took them home with me, although “home” would be stretching it a bit. At that moment I lived in an emptied apartment, the one I had lived in with my husband, a batterer. I had married him after I left Benn­ington for the second time (the first was Crete, the second Amsterdam). After I had played hide-and-seek with the brute for a number of months, he decided I could live in the apart­ment he had cleaned out. By then I was grateful even if it meant that he knew where I was. A woman’s life is full of such trade-offs. So when the girls came with me, it wasn’t to safety or luxury or even just enough. The apartment, however, did have walls, and one does learn to be grateful.

    The older girl thought that she was probably pregnant. Her father, the hippie man, did light shows, many for rock bands; he had the habit of sending musicians into the older girl’s bed to have sex with her; the younger daughteslept next to the older girl, both on a mattress on the floor. They were wonder­ful and delightful girls, scared to death; each put up the best front she could: I’m not afraid, I don’t care, none of it hurts me.

    The first order of business, after getting them down from the wood rafters illuminated by the burning candles, was get­ting the older one a pregnancy test. If she was pregnant, she was going to have an abortion, I said. I’m not proud now of using my authority that way, but she was a child, a real child; anyway, for better or worse, I would have forced one on her. In Amsterdam the procedure was not so clandestine nor so stigmatized. It turned out that she wasn’t pregnant.

    One day she was suddenly very happy. One of the adult rockers sent into her bed by her father was going to Spain and he wanted to take her. This was proof that he loved her. I knew from the hippie father that he had paid the rocker to take the girl. Finally I was the adult and someone else was the child. I told her. I told her carefully and slowly and with love but I told her the truth, all of it, about the rotten father and the rotten rocker. Her mother now wanted her and her sister back. I sent them back. Nothing would ever be simple for me again. A strain of melancholy entered my life; it was the fusion of responsibility with loss in a world of bruised and bullied strangers.

    #liberation_sexuelle

  • Wie Europa geflüchtete Kinder einsperrt

    Zehntausende werden an den EU-Grenzen festgehalten: in Gefängnissen, die nicht so heißen dürfen. Kinder einzusperren, verstößt gegen internationale Abkommen.

    Unweit der Landebahn des Flughafens Schönefeld endet die Bundesrepublik. Ein Gitterzaun umgibt das Haus, das zwar in Brandenburg steht, sich aber rechtlich außerhalb Deutschlands befindet. Zwei Sicherheitskräfte bewachen die Räume, in denen dicht an dicht einfache Betten stehen. Wenn Familien ohne gültige Papiere die Ankunftshalle erreichen und um Asyl bitten, bringen die Grenzer sie hierher und halten sie so lange fest, bis die Behörden über ihren Antrag entscheiden.

    Im vergangenen Jahr wurde laut Innenministerium neun Menschen die Einreise verweigert, darunter ein Kind, im Jahr 2018 waren es 13 Personen, darunter eine Mutter aus Armenien mit ihrer achtjährigen Tochter sowie ihrem zehnjährigen und ihrem zwölfjährigen Sohn, gibt die Zentrale Ausländerbehörde Brandenburg an. Mit Buntstiften haben sie Herzen und Blumen an die Wand eines Aufenthaltsraums gemalt. Die Zeichnungen blieben, die Familie wurde nach drei Wochen abgeschoben. Anwälte kritisieren diese Zustände als unzulässige Haft für Kinder.

    Neben Berlin-Schönefeld findet das sogenannte Flughafenverfahren in Düsseldorf, Hamburg, München und Frankfurt am Main statt. Auch dort müssen Menschen im Transitbereich bleiben, auch dort soll binnen zwei Tagen über ihren Asylantrag entschieden werden. Wird dem stattgegeben oder brauchen die Behörden mehr Zeit, dürfen die Menschen einreisen. Lehnen die Mitarbeiter des Bundesamts für Migration und Flüchtlinge (Bamf) den Antrag hingegen als „offensichtlich unbegründet“ ab, können die Menschen klagen. So werden aus diesen zwei Tagen leicht Wochen oder Monate, erklärt der Hannoveraner Anwalt Peter Fahlbusch, der seit Langem Menschen betreut, die sich im Flughafenverfahren befinden.
    Abgeschottet von der Öffentlichkeit: das Flughafenverfahren

    Mitte der 90er Jahre entschied das Bundesverfassungsgericht, dass es sich bei dem Festhalten von Menschen im Transit nicht um Freiheitsentziehung im Sinne des Grundgesetzes handelt. Pro-Asyl-Sprecher Bernd Mesovic hält das für irreführend: „Der Gesetzgeber sagt, auf dem Luftweg können die Betroffenen jederzeit das Land verlassen. Wir meinen, das ist eine haftähnliche Situation, und die ist für Kinder sehr belastend.“ Rechtsanwalt Fahlbusch beschreibt die Situation ebenfalls als bedrückend: „Kinder im Frankfurter Transitbereich mussten erleben, wie ein Mitgefangener versuchte, sich im Innenhof zu erhängen.“

    Das Flughafenverfahren findet abgeschottet von der Öffentlichkeit statt. Mitarbeiter der Caritas und Diakonie, die Menschen am Frankfurter Drehkreuz betreuen, sagen zunächst ein Gespräch zu, verweigern es dann aber doch.

    „Das örtliche Amtsgericht meint, die Unterkunft ist jugendgerecht. Nichts davon ist jugendgerecht“, sagt Anwalt Fahlbusch. „Minderjährige dort einzusperren, ist der Wahnsinn.“ In den vergangenen zehn Jahren hat es mehr als 6000 solcher Verfahren in Deutschland gegeben, jedes vierte betraf ein Kind.

    Während das Flughafenverfahren im Transitbereich von Flughäfen durchgeführt wird und sowohl Asylantrag als auch Rückführung umfasst, findet die Abschiebehaft auf deutschem Staatsgebiet statt. Hier werden Menschen eingesperrt, deren Asylantrag abgelehnt wurde und die in ihr Herkunftsland oder in den Staat, in dem sie zuerst Asyl beantragten, zurückgeführt werden.
    Viele Regierungen sammeln wenige Daten

    Fast überall in der EU wurden in den vergangenen Jahren mehrere Tausend Kinder in Haft oder haftähnlichen Zuständen festgehalten. Ob in Polen oder Portugal, in Ungarn oder Deutschland, in Italien oder Griechenland: Wenn Kinder allein oder in Begleitung Asyl brauchen und beantragen oder es ihnen nicht gewährt wird, dann sperren die Behörden sie ein oder halten sie in Lagern fest.

    Das Team von „Investigate Europe“ konnte in den vergangenen Monaten recherchieren, dass die Regierungen damit jedes Jahr vielfach die Kinderrechtskonvention der Vereinten Nationen brechen, in denen es heißt: „Festnahme, Freiheitsentziehung oder Freiheitsstrafe darf bei einem Kind im Einklang mit dem Gesetz nur als letztes Mittel“ verwendet werden.

    Um einen Überblick über das Problem zu bekommen, beauftragte der damalige UN-Generalsekretär Ban Ki Moon einen Bericht, für den eine Arbeitsgruppe um den österreichischen Soziologen Manfred Nowak mehrere Jahre forschte. Das fertige, 789 Seiten umfassende Werk mit dem Titel „UN Global Study on Children Deprived of Liberty“ wurde vergangenes Jahr präsentiert. Die Studie basiert auf lückenhaftem Zahlenmaterial, denn viele Regierungen sammeln nur unzureichende oder gar keine Daten.
    „Ausreisesammelstelle“ am Flughafen Schönefeld.Foto: picture alliance/dpa

    Wie viele Kinder exakt betroffen sind, lässt sich daher nicht verlässlich sagen. Allein in Frankreich waren im Jahr 2017 laut mehreren Nichtregierungsorganisationen mehr als 2500 Flüchtlingskinder in Haft. In Deutschland haben zwischen 2009 und 2019 nach Angaben der Bundesregierung fast 400 Kinder in Abschiebehaft gesessen. Dabei käme natürlich keine europäische Regierung auf die Idee, Kinder unter 14 Jahren der eigenen Nationalität einzusperren.

    Migrationshaft für Kinder sei ein politisch sehr sensibles Thema, sagt Nowak, dessen Arbeitsgruppe feststellte, dass Migrationshaft „nie eine letzte Maßnahme und nie im besten Interesse der Kinder“ sein könne. Fast alle Experten stimmen ihm zu. Nowak fordert, dass jede Form der Migrationshaft für Kinder verboten werden müsse.

    Bei der Namenswahl für die De-facto-Gefängnisse wählen die Behörden Begriffe wie Transitzone, Familieneinheit oder Safe Zone. Als Reporter von „Investigate Europe“ Zugang bekommen wollten, wurden ihre Anfragen in vielen Ländern abgelehnt.
    Minderjährig oder nicht?

    Überall auf der Welt fliehen Menschen vor Bürgerkriegen oder Hunger, viele von ihnen nach Europa. Nicht immer ist klar, ob die Menschen, die kommen, wirklich minderjährig sind oder nicht. Dann müssen sie sich häufig einer Altersprüfung unterziehen. Zum Beispiel Jallow B. aus Gambia. Seit mehr als einem Monat sitzt er in Gießen in Abschiebehaft. Am Telefon klingt seine Stimme hoffnungsvoll. Im Jahr 2018 hatte B. alleine Italien erreicht. Dahin wollen ihn die deutschen Behörden nun zurückbringen. Doch ist das nur möglich, wenn er volljährig ist. „Ich bin im Jahr 2002 geboren, aber niemand glaubt mir“, sagt B. am Telefon. Laut seiner Anwältin setzte das Bundesamt für Migration und Flüchtlinge nach einer Inaugenscheinnahme B.s Geburtsdatum auf den 31. Dezember 2000 fest.

    Während sich das Alter des Gambiers nicht zweifelsfrei klären lässt, musste in einem anderen Fall kürzlich ein Jugendlicher aus der Abschiebehaft im nordrhein-westfälischen Büren entlassen werden. Er konnte nachweisen, dass er noch nicht 18 Jahre alt war.

    Im vergangenen Jahr nahmen Polizisten in Passau die 30-jährige hochschwangere Palästinenserin Samah C. fest. Die Behörden wollten sie, ihren Mann und ihren sechs Jahre alten Sohn nach Litauen abschieben, wo sie erstmals Asyl beantragt hatten. Um das zu verhindern, tauchte der Mann unter. Die Beamten trennten Samah C. und ihren Sohn Hahmudi, der in ein Kinderheim gebracht wurde. Auf Nachfrage teilte die Zentrale Ausländerbehörde Niederbayern damals mit: „Die Verantwortung für die vorübergehende Trennung von Eltern und Kind liegt ausschließlich bei den Eltern.“

    Nach zwei Wochen wurde die Mutter vorübergehend aus der Abschiebehaft entlassen. Mit ihrem Sohn und ihrem inzwischen fünf Monate alten Baby lebt sie in Passau. Doch zuletzt zitierte die „Passauer Neue Presse“ eine Beamtin der Zentralen Ausländerbehörde, die nahelegte, dass die Mutter und ihre Kinder bald abgeschoben werden sollen.
    Europa kritisiert die US-Einwanderungspolitik

    2018 dokumentierten US-Medien, wie entlang der mexikanischen Grenze Kinder unter der Anti-Einwanderungspolitik von Präsident Donald Trump litten. Der ließ die Minderjährigen von ihren Eltern trennen. Europäische Regierungen kritisierten die drastischen Zustände. „Wir haben nicht das gleiche Gesellschaftsmodell“, sagte ein Sprecher der französischen Regierung. „Wir teilen nicht die gleichen Werte.“ Auch der deutsche Regierungssprecher Steffen Seibert mahnte damals zur „Beachtung des Rechts“ und der „Beachtung der Würde jedes einzelnen Menschen“. Das müsste ebenso für die deutschen Behörden gelten. Doch auch hierzulande wird die Würde der Menschen nicht immer geachtet.

    Die Bundesregierung gibt an, dass im Jahr 2018 nur ein Minderjähriger in Abschiebehaft genommen wurde. Dabei handelte es sich um den 17-jährigen Afghanen K., den die Behörden als volljährig beurteilt hatten. Erst nachdem K.s Eltern Dokumente aus Afghanistan übermittelten, wurde er freigelassen. Im Jahr 2009 hatte die Bundesregierung noch 147 Fälle aufgelistet.

    2014 hatte der Europäische Gerichtshof die deutsche Haftpraxis verurteilt und die Bundesregierung aufgefordert, ihr System für die Abschiebung unerwünschter Migranten zu reformieren. Menschen in Abschiebehaft dürfen nicht länger gemeinsam mit Strafgefangenen untergebracht werden. Doch vor allem für minderjährige Geflüchtete gab es in Deutschland keine speziellen Hafteinrichtungen, deshalb „war ein Großteil der bisherigen Abschiebehaft Geschichte, vor allem für Minderjährige“, erklärt der Geschäftsführer des Hessischen Flüchtlingsrates, Timmo Scherenberg. In Hessen waren zuvor nach Bayern die zweitmeisten Jugendlichen festgehalten worden.
    Hinter Gittern und Stacheldraht. Geflüchtete Familien auf Lesbos.Foto: picture alliance/dpa

    Doch auch, wenn es sich nach offizieller Definition nicht um Haft handelt, kann das Kindeswohl bedroht sein. Im vergangenen Sommer stimmten im Bundestag die Abgeordneten dem Migrationspaket der Regierung zu. Seitdem können Familien bis zu sechs Monate in einer Erstaufnahmeeinrichtung bleiben. Die dürfen sie zwar tagsüber verlassen, doch meist befinden sich die Einrichtungen fern der Innenstädte mit ihrer Infrastruktur. Zudem leben Eltern und Kinder hier mit Menschen zusammen, deren Asylanträge abgelehnt wurden und die nun vor ihren Augen aus den Unterkünften abgeschoben werden.

    Ein solches Leben sei eine schlimme Belastung für Kinder, berichten Ärzte. „Wer nicht schon traumatisiert ist, wird hier traumatisiert“, sagt etwa die Psychiaterin Ute Merkel, die Menschen in der Dresdner Erstaufnahmeeinrichtung betreut. Merkel behandelte unter anderem ein elfjähriges Mädchen aus Eritrea, das in Dresden aufgehört habe zu sprechen. Auf der Flucht durch die Wüste sei der kleine Bruder des Mädchens verdurstet. Sie habe begonnen zu schweigen, um sich zu schützen, sagt Merkel. „Das Mädchen hat ihre traumatisierte Mutter nicht mehr ausgehalten, die mit einer Kinderleiche durch die Wüste gelaufen ist.“

    Eine Kollegin Merkels berichtet von dem Fall eines 16-jährigen Tschetschenen, dessen Vater von Milizen erschossen worden sei. Als er in der Erstaufnahmeeinrichtung, die eine „gefängnisähnliche Situation“ darstelle, Sicherheitsmitarbeiter in Trainingsanzügen gesehen habe, sei der Junge wieder mit dem konfrontiert worden, was ihn traumatisiert hatte.

    „Was Kinder brauchen, sind Schutz und Eltern, die sie vor der bösen Welt schützen“, sagt Merkel. Doch in den Erstaufnahmeeinrichtungen neuen Typs, den sogenannten Ankerzentren, würden die Kinder erleben, dass dies nicht möglich sei. „Es gibt keine Privatsphäre, alle müssen gemeinsam essen und duschen. Die Zimmer können nicht abgeschlossen werden.“
    Ankerzentren können sich nicht durchsetzen

    Nahe der Erstaufnahmeeinrichtung in Dresden befinden sich die Büros mehrerer Behörden, darunter das Bamf und die Zentrale Ausländerbehörde, gemeinsam bilden sie als Teil einer Testphase des Bundesinnenministeriums diese neue Form der Unterkunft, das Ankerzentrum. Auf die hatten sich CDU und SPD in ihrem Koalitionsvertrag geeinigt. In Ankerzentren arbeiten mehrere Behörden zusammen, so sollen Menschen in den Unterkünften ankommen, und wenn ihr Asylantrag abgelehnt wird, umgehend abgeschoben werden. Neben Sachsen beteiligen sich auch Bayern und das Saarland an dem Test, nach dem, so hatte es das Bundesinnenministerium gehofft, bundesweit Ankerzentren eröffnet werden sollen.

    Doch Recherchen von „Investigate Europe“ zeigen, dass dieser Plan offenbar scheitert. Lediglich Brandenburg und Mecklenburg-Vorpommern planen ähnliche Zentren. Alle anderen Bundesländer wollen keine solchen Einrichtungen eröffnen – auch aus humanitären Gründen. Aus dem Thüringer Innenministerium heißt es: „Die Landesregierung hält es für inhuman und nicht zielführend, geflüchtete Menschen zentral an einem Ort unterzubringen.“ Die Bremer Senatorin für Integration teilt mit, dass Erwachsene ohne Kinder und Familien weiterhin getrennt werden sollen. „Wichtiger Beweggrund ist das Interesse an der Sicherung des Kindeswohls in der Jugendhilfe.“ Im Klartext: Diese Bundesländer finden die Pläne des Bundesinnenministeriums unmenschlich und falsch.

    Sachsens neue Landesregierung will nun die Unterbringung etwas menschlicher regeln. Im Koalitionsvertrag vereinbarten CDU, Grüne und SPD im Dezember, dass Familien nur noch drei Monate in den Unterkünften bleiben sollten. Doch Kinder- und Jugendpsychiaterin Merkel hält diesen Schritt nicht für ausreichend. „Es ist nicht ratsam, dort Kinder auch nur für drei Monate unterzubringen.“ Denn es bleibe dabei, die Grundbedürfnisse für eine gesunde Entwicklung seien nicht erfüllt.
    Experten: Die Lage an den EU-Außengrenzen ist furchtbar

    In Deutschland ist die Situation besorgniserregend, an den Außengrenzen der Europäischen Union ist sie noch schlimmer.

    Kurz vor Weihnachten in Marseille unweit des Hafens, der Frankreich mit der Welt verbindet, erzählt der 16-jährige Ahmad*, wie er aus Nordafrika hierherkam. „Meine Eltern starben vor sechs Jahren. Meine Tante misshandelte mich. Sie ließ mich nicht schlafen, nicht essen. Ich musste weg.“ Versteckt an Bord eines Containerschiffes reiste er nach Marseille. Doch statt in Sicherheit kam er ins Gefängnis. Das heißt hier Wartezone. Ahmad, so erzählt er es, habe dort mehr als zwei Wochen bleiben müssen. „Das kam mir vor wie 15 Jahre. Ich wusste nicht mehr, welcher Wochentag war.“ Das Gebäude habe er nicht verlassen können. „Die Polizei sprach nicht mit mir, keiner kümmerte sich um mich.“ Dann sei er freigekommen: „Wenn du das Gefängnis verlässt, fühlt sich das an, als ob du endlich Licht siehst.“
    Griechische Inseln mit großen Flüchtlingslagern.Grafik: Fabian Bartel

    Wenige Tage später, Anfang Januar, beging der 17-jährige Iraner Reza* ein trauriges Jubiläum: Seit einem Jahr darf er die Transitzone in Röszke nahe der Grenze zu Serbien nicht in Richtung Ungarn verlassen. Zäune samt Stacheldraht umziehen das Containerdorf, an dessen Ein- und Ausgang bewaffnete Sicherheitskräfte patrouillieren. Sie wachen auch darüber, dass niemand in das Lager kommt. Reporter von „Investigate Europe“ sprachen Reza am Telefon. Der junge Iraner floh mit seinem Onkel über Serbien hierher, um Asyl zu beantragen. Warum sie flohen, will Reza nicht sagen, aus Angst um seine restliche Familie, die noch im Iran lebt. Ungarische Beamte trennten ihn und seinen Onkel, dieser bekam einen Schutzstatus zugesprochen, Rezas Asylantrag wurde kürzlich ein zweites Mal abgelehnt. „Es ist schwer für mich hier“, sagt der Teenager am Telefon. „Jeden Morgen wache ich auf und sehe dasselbe.“

    Nachts liege er wach, nur am Morgen könne er etwas dösen. Die Wachleute hätten ihn in einen Bereich für unbegleitete Minderjährige gesperrt, seit Monaten sei er dort der einzige Insasse. Jeden Tag dürfe er für wenige Stunden zu den Familien gehen, die in dem Lager leben. „Aber wenn ich zurückkomme, habe ich nichts zu tun. Dann denke ich wieder nach, und zu viel nachzudenken ist wie eine Bombe im Kopf.“
    Provisorische Unterkunft im Camp Moria.Foto: REUTERS

    Die Nichtregierungsorganisation Helsinki Commission schätzt, dass sich in den beiden ungarischen Transitlagern an der serbischen Grenze derzeit zwischen 300 und 360 Menschen aufhalten. Genau weiß das kaum jemand. Zugang haben nur wenige. Darunter ungarische Parlamentsabgeordnete wie Bernadett Szél. Sie sagt: „Es ist sehr schlimm für die Kinder da drin.“ Manche seien krank und bräuchten medizinische Hilfe, die sie nicht bekämen. „Es ist wie in einem Gefängnis.“

    Für ihre Praxis in den Transitlagern hat der Europäische Gerichtshof für Menschenrechte (EGMR) die ungarische Regierung wiederholt verurteilt. Allein seit November 2018 entschieden die EGMR-Richter in 17 Fällen, die ungarische Regierung habe Menschen unrechtmäßig hungern lassen, nachdem diese gegen die Ablehnung ihrer Asylbescheide geklagt hatten. Gewinnen die Kläger ihren Prozess vor dem EGMR, erhalten sie wieder Lebensmittel. Wer nicht klagt, muss weiter hungern.

    Auch im 1000 Kilometer südlich gelegenen Flüchtlingslager Moria müssen Minderjährige leiden. Im Winter klingt hier, auf der griechischen Insel Lesbos, aus den dicht gedrängten Zelten das Husten kleiner Kinder. Sie schlafen meist auf Matten, die vom Boden nur mit Paletten erhöht sind. Auch hier umziehen zweieinhalb Meter hohe Zäune das Lager. An die hat jemand große Plakate gehängt, die wohl den tristen Lageralltag aufhellen sollen. Auf einem davon stolziert ein Löwe, der vorgibt: „Ich bin stark.“ Doch so fühlt sich hier kaum jemand mehr. Die Neurologin Jules Montague, die für Ärzte ohne Grenzen auf der Insel arbeitete, berichtet von Fällen, in denen Kinder wie in Dresden nicht mehr sprechen und ihre Augen kaum öffnen.
    Das Camp fasst 2840 Menschen ausgelegt. Momentan leben dort 19000

    Die Kinder dürfen die griechischen Inseln nicht verlassen. Dabei sind dort die Lager längst überfüllt. Das Camp Moria ist für 2840 Menschen ausgelegt. Doch den Jahreswechsel erlebten dort rund 19 000 Menschen, jeder Dritte ein Kind. Für deren Sicherheit kann kaum garantiert werden.
    Grafik: Fabian Bartel

    In der sogenannten Safe Zone des Lagers, in der unbegleitete Minderjährige leben, erstach im vergangenen August laut UNHCR ein 15-jähriger Afghane einen Gleichaltrigen. Einen Monat später, im September, überrollte ein Lkw einen fünfjährigen Afghanen, berichteten Reuters und der griechische Rundfunk. Und Ärzte ohne Grenzen meldete, dass im November ein neun Monate altes Baby aus der Republik Kongo an den Folgen einer Dehydrierung starb.

    Die Zustände an den EU-Außengrenzen haben offenbar System. Im Jahr 2015 waren mehr als 1,2 Millionen Asylanträge in Europa gestellt worden, mehr als doppelt so viele wie noch im Jahr 2014. Um zu verhindern, dass weiter viele Menschen nach Europa fliehen, unterzeichnete die EU im März 2016 einen Pakt mit der Türkei. Der half in den folgenden Jahren allerdings vor allem den Staaten im Zentrum Europas. Hatten im März 2016 in Deutschland 58 000 Menschen ihren Asylerstantrag gestellt, waren es drei Jahre später nur noch 11 000. Im selben Zeitraum verdoppelte sich in Griechenland die Zahl der Asylerstanträge auf 5300. Für die zentraleuropäischen Staaten ergibt sich so eine komfortable Lage: Wo weniger Menschen ankommen, können diese besser behandelt werden. Für die Staaten an der Außengrenze gilt dies nicht.
    Experte: Zustände in den Flüchtlingslagern dienen der Abschreckung

    Nun übt der Vordenker des Türkei-Deals, der Migrationsforscher Gerald Knaus, offen Kritik an dem Pakt. Er sagte „Investigate Europe“: „Was auch immer die Motivation der EU und Griechenlands ist, sie betreiben eine Politik, die unmenschlich und illegal ist und trotzdem niemanden abschreckt.“ Der migrationspolitische Sprecher der Grünen im EU-Parlament, Erik Marquardt, sagt: „Wir stehen vor der Situation, dass die EU-Kommission und der Europarat von einer erfolgreichen Asylpolitik sprechen, wenn die Zahl der Menschen sinkt, die nach Europa fliehen. Dabei nimmt man dann Zustände wie auf den griechischen Inseln in Kauf, auf diese Weise will man bessere Statistiken erreichen.“

    So sei das Abkommen mit der Türkei längst nicht die einzige Maßnahme, um Flüchtlinge davon abzuhalten, nach Europa zu kommen, sagt Marquardt. „Die europäische Politik versucht, die Situation an den Außengrenzen so schlecht wie möglich zu gestalten, damit die Menschen lieber in Kriegsgebieten bleiben, als zu kommen.“ Alle Staaten Europas seien verantwortlich für die Situation an den Außengrenzen, weil sie diese finanzieren, sagt der frühere UN-Berichterstatter für Willkürliche Inhaftierung, Mads Andenæs und fügt hinzu: „In ein paar Jahren können Taten, die heute als politische Notwendigkeiten betrachtet werden, als willkürliche Haft und grobe Verletzung des Rechts und der Menschlichkeit beurteilt werden.“

    Dass Migrationshaft für Kinder unumgänglich sei, gibt EU-Migrationskommissar Dimitris Avramopoulos indirekt auch zu. So sagte er „Investigate Europe“ zwar, dass sich die EU-Mitgliedsstaaten um Haftalternativen kümmern sollten. Wo es diese aber noch nicht gebe, sei es notwendig, Kinder in Gewahrsam zu nehmen, „um die Verpflichtung zu erfüllen, alle notwendigen Maßnahmen zu ergreifen, eine Rückführung zu ermöglichen“.
    Geflüchtete Kinder auf Lesbos.Foto: Sebastian Wells/Ostkreuz

    An einem Herbsttag an der ungarisch-serbischen Grenze im Flüchtlingslager Röszke schlägt der zehnjährige Armin mit den Armen, als wolle er fliegen. Sein Vater, der iranische Regisseur Abouzar Soltani, filmt seinen Jungen dabei. Es wäre eine Szene voller Leichtigkeit, wäre da nicht der Stacheldraht, der hinter beiden in den Himmel ragt. „Ich wollte die Träume meines Sohnes wahr werden lassen“, sagt Soltani über die Aufnahmen später.

    Der Vater und sein zehnjähriger Sohn leben in dem eingezäunten Containerdorf, das sie nicht verlassen dürfen. Wie den 17-jährigen Iraner Reza hält die ungarische Regierung die beiden fest – und das inzwischen seit über einem Jahr. Kontaktleuten gelang es, Soltanis Aufnahmen aus dem Lager zu bringen. Sie zeigen auch, wie Armin im kargen Bett auf einer dünnen Matratze liegt, wie er Fische ans Fenster malt. Einfach wegfliegen, das ist für ihn nur ein Spiel.

    Für die Hilfsorganisation Ärzte ohne Grenzen betreut die Psychologin Danae Papadopoulou Kinder, die in Moria leben. „Das Camp ist nicht sicher für Kinder und die Situation wird immer schlimmer“, sagt sie. Viele Kinder könnten das Leben im Lager zwischen den dicht gedrängten Zelten, die Kälte und die Hoffnungslosigkeit nicht mehr ertragen. „Wir hatten zuletzt einige Notfälle, in denen Kinder und Heranwachsende versucht haben, sich aus Schock und Panik zu töten.“

    * Die vollständigen Namen sind der Redaktion bekannt.

    https://www.tagesspiegel.de/gesellschaft/ich-wusste-nicht-mehr-welcher-wochentag-war-wie-europa-gefluechtete-kinder-einsperrt/25406306.html

    #migration #asylum #children #minors #detention #Europe #Germany #BAMF #Berlin #Schönfeld #Düsseldorf #Hamburg #München #Frankfurt #deportation #trauma #traumatization #retraumatization #mental_health

    #Flughafenverahren (= term for detention procedure at German airports)

    German terms for child/minor/family airport detention zone : #Transitzone #Familieneinheit #Safe_Zone [sic]

    @cdb_77 , y a-t-il un fil sur la détation des personnen mineures ?

    • Children Deprived of Liberty - The United Nations Global Study

      Children deprived of liberty remain an invisible and forgotten group in society notwithstanding the increasing evidence of these children being in fact victims of further human rights violations. Countless children are placed in inhuman conditions and in adult facilities – in clear violation of their human rights - where they are at high risk of violence, rape and sexual assault, including acts of torture and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

      Children are being detained at a younger and younger age and held for longer periods of time. The personal cost to these children is immeasurable in terms of the destructive impact on their physical and mental development, and on their ability to lead healthy and constructive lives in society.

      The associated financial costs to governments can also have a negative impact on national budgets and can become a financial drain when their human rights obligations are not upheld with regard children deprived of liberty.

      To address this situation, in December 2014 the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) adopted its Child Rights Resolution (A/RES/69/157), inviting the United Nations Secretary-General (SG) to commission an in-depth global study on children deprived of liberty (§ 52.d). On 25 October 2016, the Secretary General welcomed the appointment of Professor Manfred Nowak as Independent Expert to lead the Study. By Resolution 72/245, the UNGA invited the Independent Expert to submit a final report on the Study during its seventy-fourth session in September 2019.

      Based on the over-all mandate established by the UNGA Resolution, the following core objectives of the Global Study have been identified:

      Assess the magnitude of the phenomenon of children being deprived of liberty, including the number of children deprived of liberty (disaggregated by age, gender and nationality), as well as the reasons invoked, the root-causes, type and length of deprivation of liberty and places of detention;

      Document promising practices and capture the view and experiences of children to inform the recommendations that the Global Study will present;

      Promote a change in stigmatizing attitudes and behaviour towards children at risk of being, or who are, deprived of liberty;

      Provide recommendations for law, policy and practice to safeguard the human rights of the children concerned, and significantly reduce the number of children deprived of liberty through effective non-custodial alternatives, guided by the international human rights framework.

      –-> Full study here:
      https://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/CRC/StudyChildrenDeprivedLiberty/Pages/Index.aspx

    • How Europe detains minor migrants

      Under international and European law, migrant children should be given protection and humanitarian assistance. Detention must only be used as a last resort. But how do European governments really treat this most vulnerable group? Our new investigation shows that migrant children are detained en masse, with seemingly little regard for their well-being.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_Tyey4aFEk&


      feature=youtu.be

  • Skid Row Downtown Los Angeles Christmas Day 2017
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e8fsfwo6R-Y


    Une balade dans les rues de L.A. avec des entretiens peu communs

    Downtown Los Angeles - by car
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E7HozzSGakA


    Une visite du même quartier qui montre davantage de rues avec leurs SDF.

    California Homeless Problem - by bike
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zvCGtxeknSg

    Why is liberal California the poverty capital of America ? - LA Times
    http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-jackson-california-poverty-20180114-story.html
    http://www.trbimg.com/img-5a5d2722/turbine/la-oe-jackson-california-poverty-20180114

    Hillary Clinton in Estonia - Trumpland (2016) Michael Moore
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7TjReC37TWI


    Enfin un discours de Michael Moore qui explique comment 20 millions d’américains sont morts des conséquences de la politique de santé dans son pays.

    #USA #pauvreté #santé #SDF #Californie #Los_Angeles

  • Photography Cambridge School of Art : Eaton Portrait Prize 2016 Winners announced
    http://photographycsa.blogspot.co.uk/2016/04/eaton-portrait-prize-2016-winners.html

    Eaton #Portrait Prize 2016 Winners announced 1st Place
    ‘Sterrin’ - Anna Kressler

    A girl is smiling in a refugee #camp in the #Dunkirk suburb of Grand-Synthe in France. According to the mayor Damien Lent ‘in late July [2015], there were sixty [refugees] in Grande-Synthe, then 180 in mid-August. And 2,400-2,500 today [Jan | Feb 2016]", including more than 200 #children like Sterrin, who live in the camp in squalid conditions. I don’t know what happened to Sterrin but I hope that despite this uncertain future she and her family will one day be able to reach their desired destination, #England.

    #photography #refugees

  • Comic book made by the Dutch for children that are being deported out of Europe. Narrative: Going back is better and great... Be sure to scroll through this sickening piece, full of astonishingly embarrassing tone-deaf clichés !

    Full book at https://publications.iom.int/system/files/pdf/ulyana_comic.pdf and some translations at https://twitter.com/SLevelt/status/720658489354403840


    #migrations #migrants #children #deportation #EU #Europe #Netherlands #Dutch #comics #BD