city:atlanta

  • Not exercising worse than smoking, diabetes and heart disease study...
    https://diasp.eu/p/7891268

    Not exercising worse than smoking, diabetes and heart disease study finds

    Being unfit should be treated as a disease that has a prescription, called exercise, the study’s author said. Article word count: 764

    HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=18264436 Posted by nikolasavic (karma: 503) Post stats: Points: 97 - Comments: 48 - 2018-10-20T17:45:05Z

    #HackerNews #and #diabetes #disease #exercising #finds #heart #not #smoking #study #than #worse

    Article content:

    [1]High intensity workouts can help you live to 100

     Fitness leads to longer life, researchers found, with no limit to the benefit of aerobic exercise  Comparing those with a sedentary lifestyle to the top exercise performers, the risk of premature death was 500% higher.

    Atlanta, Georgia (CNN)Weʼve (...)


  • The mad, twisted tale of the electric scooter craze
    https://www.cnet.com/news/the-mad-tale-of-the-electric-scooter-craze-with-bird-lime-and-spin-in-san-fran

    Dara Kerr/CNET

    For weeks, I’d been seeing trashed electric scooters on the streets of San Francisco. So I asked a group of friends if any of them had seen people vandalizing the dockless vehicles since they were scattered across the city a couple of months ago.

    The answer was an emphatic “yes.”

    One friend saw a guy walking down the street kicking over every scooter he came across. Another saw a rider pull up to a curb as the handlebars and headset became fully detached. My friend figures someone had messed with the screws or cabling so the scooter would come apart on purpose.

    A scroll through Reddit, Instagram and Twitter showed me photos of scooters — owned by Bird, Lime and Spin — smeared in feces, hanging from trees, hefted into trashcans and tossed into the San Francisco Bay.

    It’s no wonder Lime scooters’ alarm isn’t just a loud beep, but a narc-like battle cry that literally says, “Unlock me to ride, or I’ll call the police.”

    San Francisco’s scooter phenomenon has taken on many names: Scootergeddon, Scooterpocalypse and Scooter Wars. It all started when the three companies spread hundreds of their dockless, rentable e-scooters across city the same week at the end of March — without any warning to local residents or lawmakers.

    Almost instantly, first-time riders began zooming down sidewalks at 15 mph, swerving between pedestrians and ringing the small bells attached to the handlebars. And they left the vehicles wherever they felt like it: scooters cluttered walkways and storefronts, jammed up bike lanes, and blocked bike racks and wheelchair accesses.

    The three companies all say they’re solving a “last-mile” transportation problem, giving commuters an easy and convenient way to zip around the city while helping ease road congestion and smog. They call it the latest in a long line of disruptive businesses that aim to change the way we live.

    The scooters have definitely changed how some people live.

    I learned the Wild West looks friendly compared to scooter land. In San Francisco’s world of these motorized vehicles, there’s backstabbing, tweaker chop shops and intent to harm.

    “The angry people, they were angry,” says Michael Ghadieh, who owns electric bicycle shop, SF Wheels, and has repaired hundreds of the scooters. “People cut cables, flatten tires, they were thrown in the Bay. Someone was out there physically damaging these things.”

    Yikes! Clipped brakes

    SF Wheels is located on a quaint street in a quintessential San Francisco neighborhood. Called Cole Valley, the area is lined with Victorian homes, upscale cafes and views of the city’s famous Mount Sutro. SF Wheels sells and rents electric bicycles for $20 per hour, mostly to tourists who want to see Golden Gate Park on two wheels.

    In March, one of the scooter companies called Ghadieh to tell him they were about to launch in the city and were looking for people to help with repairs. Ghadieh said he was game. He wouldn’t disclose the name of the company because of agreements he signed.

    Now he admits he didn’t quite know what he was getting into.

    Days after the scooter startups dropped their vehicles on an unsuspecting San Francisco, SF Wheels became so crammed with broken scooters that it was hard to walk through the small, tidy shop. Scooters lined the sidewalk outside, filled the doorway and crowded the mechanic’s workspace. The backyard had a heap of scooters nearly six-feet tall, Ghadieh told me.

    His bike techs were so busy that Ghadieh had to hire three more mechanics. SF Wheels was fixing 75 to 100 scooters per day. Ghadieh didn’t say how much the shop was making per scooter fix.

    “The repairs were fast and easy on some and longer on others,” Ghadieh said. “It’d depend on whether it was wear-and-tear or whether it was physically damaged by someone out there, some madman.”

    Some of the scooters, which cost around $500 off the shelf, came in completely vandalized — everything from chopped wires for the controller (aka the brain) to detached handlebars to bent forks. Several even showed up with clipped brake cables.

    I asked Ghadieh if the scooters still work without brakes.

    “It will work, yes,” he said. “It will go forward, but you just cannot stop. Whoever is causing that is making the situation dangerous for some riders.”

    Especially in a city with lots of hills.

    Ghadieh said his crew worked diligently for about six weeks, repairing an estimated 1,000 scooters. But then, about three weeks ago, work dried up. Ghadieh had to lay off the mechanics he’d hired and his shop is back to focusing on electric bicycles.

    “Now, there’s literally nothing,” he said. “There’s a change of face with the company. I’m not exactly sure what happened. … They decided to do it differently.”

    The likely change? The electric scooter company probably decided to outsource repairs to gig workers, rather than rely on agreements with shops.

    That’s gig as in freelancers looking to pick up part-time work, like Uber and Lyft drivers. And like Nick Abouzeid. By day, Abouzeid works in marketing for the startup AngelList. A few weeks ago, he got an email from Bird inviting him to be a scooter mechanic. The message told Abouzeid he could earn $20 for each scooter repair, once he’d completed an online training. He signed up, took the classes and is ready to start.

    “These scooters aren’t complicated. They’re cheap scooters from China,” Abouzeid said. “The repairs are anything from adjusting a brake to fixing a flat tire to adding stickers that have fallen off a Bird.”

    Bird declined to comment specifically on its maintenance program, but its spokesman Kenneth Baer did say, “Bird has a network of trained chargers and mechanics who operate as independent contractors.”

    All of Lime’s mechanics, on the other hand, are part of the company’s operations and maintenance team that repairs the scooters and ensures they’re safe for riders. Spin uses a mix of gig workers and contract mechanics, like what Ghadieh was doing.
    Gaming the system

    Electric scooters are, well, electric. That means they need to be plugged into an outlet for four to five hours before they can transport people, who rent them for $1 plus 15 cents for every minute of riding time.

    Bird, Spin and Lime all partially rely on gig workers to keep their fleets juiced up.

    Each company has a different app that shows scooters with low or dead batteries. Anyone with a driver’s license and car can sign up for the app and become a charger. These drivers roam the streets, picking up scooters and taking them home to be charged.
    img-7477

    “It creates this amazing kind of gig economy,” Bird CEO Travis VanderZanden, who is a former Uber and Lyft executive, told me in April. “It’s kind of like a game of Pokemon Go for them, where they go around and try to find and gobble up as many Birds as they can.”

    Theoretically, all scooters are supposed to be off city streets by nightfall when it’s illegal to ride them. That’s when the chargers are unleashed. To get paid, they have to get the vehicles back out on the street in specified locations before 7 a.m. the next day. Bird supplies the charging cables — only three at a time, but those who’ve been in the business longer can get more cables.

    “I don’t know the fascination with all of these companies using gig workers to charge and repair,” said Harry Campbell, who runs a popular gig worker blog called The Rideshare Guy. “But they’re all in, they’re all doing it.”

    One of the reasons some companies use gig workers is to avoid costs like extra labor, gasoline and electricity. Bird, Spin and Lime have managed to convince investors they’re onto something. Between the three of them they’ve raised $255 million in funding. Bird is rumored to be raising another $150 million from one of Silicon Valley’s top venture capital firms, Sequoia, which could put the company’s value at $1 billion. That’s a lot for an electric scooter disruptor.

    Lime pays $12 to charge each scooter and Spin pays $5; both companies also deploy their own operations teams for charging. Bird has a somewhat different system. It pays anywhere from $5 to $25 to charge its scooters, depending on the city and the location of the dead scooter. The harder the vehicle is to find and the longer it’s been off the radar, the higher the “bounty.”

    Abouzeid, who’s moonlighted as a Bird charger for the past two months, said he’s only found a $25 scooter once.

    “With the $25 ones, they’re like, ’Hey, we think it’s in this location, it’s got 0 percent battery, good luck,’” he said.

    But some chargers have devised a way to game the system. They call it hoarding.

    “They’ll literally go around picking up Birds and putting them in the back of their car,” Campbell said. “And then they wait until the bounties on them go up and up and up.”

    Bird has gotten wise to these tactics. It sent an email to all chargers last week warning them that if it sniffs out this kind of activity, those hoarders will be barred from the app.

    “We feel like this is a big step forward in fixing some of the most painful issues we’ve been hearing,” Bird wrote in the email, which was seen by CNET.

    Tweaker chop shops

    Hoarding and vandalism aren’t the only problems for electric scooter companies. There’s also theft. While the vehicles have GPS tracking, once the battery fully dies they go off the app’s map.

    “Every homeless person has like three scooters now,” Ghadieh said. “They take the brains out, the logos off and they literally hotwire it.”
    img-1134

    I’ve seen scooters stashed at tent cities around San Francisco. Photos of people extracting the batteries have been posted on Twitter and Reddit. Rumor has it the batteries have a resale price of about $50 on the street, but there doesn’t appear to be a huge market for them on eBay or Craigslist, according to my quick survey.

    Bird, Lime and Spin all said trashed and stolen scooters aren’t as big a problem as you’d think. When the companies launch in a new city, they said they tend to see higher theft and vandalism rates but then that calms down.

    “We have received a few reports of theft and vandalism, but that’s the nature of the business,” said Spin co-founder and President Euwyn Poon. “When you have a product that’s available for public consumption, you account for that.”

    Dockless, rentable scooters are now taking over cities across the US — from Denver to Atlanta to Washington, DC. Bird’s scooters are available in at least 10 cities with Scottsdale, Arizona, being the site of its most recent launch.

    Meanwhile, in San Francisco, regulators have been working to get rules in place to make sure riders drive safely and the companies abide by the law.

    New regulations to limit the number of scooters are set to go into effect in the city on June 4. To comply, scooter companies have to clear the streets of all their vehicles while the authorities process their permits. That’s expected to take about a month.

    And just like that, scooters will go out the way they came in — appearing and disappearing from one day to the next — leaving in their wake the chargers, mechanics, vandals and people hotwiring the things to get a free ride around town.

    #USA #transport #disruption #SDF


  • Petits coups de tonnerre dans le #podcast étatsunien ces derniers jours. D’abord, un gros fournisseur de podcasts, lié à Slate, annonce qu’il abandonne le podcast pour devenir exclusivement... un fournisseur de #publicités pour podcasts. Les managers préfèrent le « contenu marketing » au « contenu éditorial » :
    https://hotpodnews.com/breaking-shake-ups-at-panoply-and-slate

    #Panoply appears to be out of the content business. Several sources in the company inform me that, earlier this afternoon, the company internally announced that it will no longer be developing new podcasts and that it will be letting go of its entire editorial staff. I’m told that the layoffs are effective starting the end of the month.

    The company also announced that it will now shift its operational focus to the #Megaphone targeted #marketing platform — that is, Panoply’s podcast hosting, analytics, and monetization technology, which it acquired in the summer of 2015 and, more recently, forged a partnership with Nielsen to build a marketplace for targeted podcast ads.

    Du coup les productrices et producteurs de Panoply ancienne version sont dans l’incertitude totale, leurs vivres (publicitaires) coupées du jour au lendemain. Les réactions d’auditrices et auditeurs sont édifiantes :
    https://twitter.com/hpsacredtext/status/1040002097423560704

    I am truly sorry to hear this! It’s so freaky that this is happening to 120 podcasts at the same time. I recently made a donation but will seriously consider a second one! For now, sending love and gratitude.

    –-

    You should definitely start a patreon page.

    –-

    Any chance another network will pick you up?

    –-

    OMG I can’t live without hp sacred text anymore it’s literally my will to live I wish i could help financially but I’ll try anyways, lots of love ❤️😭, also panoply is one of the best podcast networks, this is sad :(

    Et par ailleurs, comme le résume un journaliste du Wall Street Journal (https://twitter.com/BenMullin/status/1040224009831567360), le 2e plus gros producteur de podcasts aux États-Unis (en nombre d’écoutes) a cette semaine racheté le 5e plus gros producteur de podcasts. La sympathique décentralisation des débuts a vécu son heure de gloire, place à la concentration.
    http://www.niemanlab.org/2018/09/podcast-shakeup-panoply-iheartmedia-stuff-and-malcolm-gladwell-are-all-ma

    With barely enough time to digest all that news, here comes more news! The Wall Street Journal reports that radio giant #iHeartMedia — f.k.a. Clear Channel — is buying Stuff Media, producer of popular podcasts like How Stuff Works and Atlanta Monster , for $55 million.

    “Podcast is to talk what streaming is to music,” said [iHeartMedia CEO Bob] Pittman in an interview. “It’s very critical to us and very strategic.”

    As part of the agreement, Stuff Media CEO Conal Byrne will join iHeart and lead its entire podcast division…

    Last month, public-radio companies PRX and PRI agreed to merge in a bid to capitalize on podcasts.

    Réaction du collectif Bello, qui assure une veille sur le podcast US depuis 2 ans :
    https://bellocollective.com/bello-69-rumblings-a5ac86b7be02

    For us, the members and writers of the Collective, the news felt like a tough break because we liked the content Panoply made — a lot. They had proven to have a good eye for talent by acquiring and distributing shows like Switched on Pop , Imaginary Worlds , and Flash Forward , and were making some pretty exciting strides with original content too (see: LifeAfter and the upcoming Passenger List ). Now they’re leaving all of that behind to be come an ad tech company — to create veritable banner ads for podcasts? It just feels wrong.

    There was a time when podcasting was deeply associated with public radio (where stories are created and distributed as an act of public service). The sting of Panoply’s demise — at least as a creator of content — is a reminder that podcasting is more a business than ever before. We don’t believe there is a podcast “bubble,” but we do foresee that the changes needed to make this content sustainable in a large-scale way are likely going to make us very uncomfortable.

    Not to be ignored here: Many of the people who made these great shows at Panpoly are left wondering what is next. If you are in a position to hire, seek them out. If you’re a listener and a fan, go discover how you can support their work moving forward.

    Voilà pourquoi considérer le podcast comme "une fête" qu’il ne faut pas critiquer (https://seenthis.net/messages/721978#message722569) risque de virer très vite à la sale déconvenue : un beau matin, on découvrira le paysage entièrement recomposé à la sauce libérale. Ça ressemblera à tout ce qu’on critiquait dans les médias de masse à l’ancienne, ceux-là mêmes qu’on prétendait « disrupter », et on ouvrira de grands yeux étonnés. C’est maintenant, en plein dans la « fête », qu’il s’agit de dissocier la démocratisation de la production et de la diffusion sonores (éminemment souhaitable) et leur libéralisation (nocive) : ce sont deux choses très distinctes, et à maintenir très distinctes. Maintenant, c’est-à-dire avant que les outils collectifs, indépendants ou de service public aient été dépecés au nom de la « créativité » et de l’"innovation".

    #création_sonore



  • The NSA’s Hidden Spy Hubs in Eight U.S. Cities
    https://theintercept.com/2018/06/25/att-internet-nsa-spy-hubs

    The NSA considers AT&T to be one of its most trusted partners and has lauded the company’s “extreme willingness to help.” It is a collaboration that dates back decades. Little known, however, is that its scope is not restricted to AT&T’s customers. According to the NSA’s documents, it values AT&T not only because it “has access to information that transits the nation,” but also because it maintains unique relationships with other phone and internet providers. The NSA exploits these relationships for surveillance purposes, commandeering AT&T’s massive infrastructure and using it as a platform to covertly tap into communications processed by other companies.

    It is an efficient point to conduct internet surveillance, Klein said, “because the peering links, by the nature of the connections, are liable to carry everybody’s traffic at one point or another during the day, or the week, or the year.”

    Christopher Augustine, a spokesperson for the NSA, said in a statement that the agency could “neither confirm nor deny its role in alleged classified intelligence activities.” Augustine declined to answer questions about the AT&T facilities, but said that the NSA “conducts its foreign signals intelligence mission under the legal authorities established by Congress and is bound by both policy and law to protect U.S. persons’ privacy and civil liberties.”

    Jim Greer, an AT&T spokesperson, said that AT&T was “required by law to provide information to government and law enforcement entities by complying with court orders, subpoenas, lawful discovery requests, and other legal requirements.” He added that the company provides “voluntary assistance to law enforcement when a person’s life is in danger and in other immediate, emergency situations. In all cases, we ensure that requests for assistance are valid and that we act in compliance with the law.”

    Dave Schaeffer, CEO of Cogent Communications, told The Intercept that he had no knowledge of the surveillance at the eight AT&T buildings, but said he believed “the core premise that the NSA or some other agency would like to look at traffic … at an AT&T facility.” He said he suspected that the surveillance is likely carried out on “a limited basis,” due to technical and cost constraints. If the NSA were trying to “ubiquitously monitor” data passing across AT&T’s networks, Schaeffer added, he would be “extremely concerned.”

    An estimated 99 percent of the world’s intercontinental internet traffic is transported through hundreds of giant fiber optic cables hidden beneath the world’s oceans. A large portion of the data and communications that pass across the cables is routed at one point through the U.S., partly because of the country’s location – situated between Europe, the Middle East, and Asia – and partly because of the pre-eminence of American internet companies, which provide services to people globally.

    The NSA calls this predicament “home field advantage” – a kind of geographic good fortune. “A target’s phone call, email, or chat will take the cheapest path, not the physically most direct path,” one agency document explains. “Your target’s communications could easily be flowing into and through the U.S.”

    Once the internet traffic arrives on U.S. soil, it is processed by American companies. And that is why, for the NSA, AT&T is so indispensable. The company claims it has one of the world’s most powerful networks, the largest of its kind in the U.S. AT&T routinely handles masses of emails, phone calls, and internet chats. As of March 2018, some 197 petabytes of data – the equivalent of more than 49 trillion pages of text, or 60 billion average-sized mp3 files – traveled across its networks every business day.

    The NSA documents, which come from the trove provided to The Intercept by the whistleblower Edward Snowden, describe AT&T as having been “aggressively involved” in aiding the agency’s surveillance programs. One example of this appears to have taken place at the eight facilities under a classified initiative called SAGUARO.

    In October 2011, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which approves the surveillance operations carried out under Section 702 of FISA, found that there were “technological limitations” with the agency’s internet eavesdropping equipment. It was “generally incapable of distinguishing” between some kinds of data, the court stated. As a consequence, Judge John D. Bates ruled, the NSA had been intercepting the communications of “non-target United States persons and persons in the United States,” violating Fourth Amendment protections against unreasonable searches and seizures. The ruling, which was declassified in August 2013, concluded that the agency had acquired some 13 million “internet transactions” during one six-month period, and had unlawfully gathered “tens of thousands of wholly domestic communications” each year.

    The root of the issue was that the NSA’s technology was not only targeting communications sent to and from specific surveillance targets. Instead, the agency was sweeping up people’s emails if they had merely mentioned particular information about surveillance targets.

    A top-secret NSA memo about the court’s ruling, which has not been disclosed before, explained that the agency was collecting people’s messages en masse if a single one were found to contain a “selector” – like an email address or phone number – that featured on a target list.

    Information provided by a second former AT&T employee adds to the evidence linking the Atlanta building to NSA surveillance. Mark Klein, a former AT&T technician, alleged in 2006 that the company had allowed the NSA to install surveillance equipment in some of its network hubs. An AT&T facility in Atlanta was one of the spy sites, according to documents Klein presented in a court case over the alleged spying. The Atlanta facility was equipped with “splitter” equipment, which was used to make copies of internet traffic as AT&T’s networks processed it. The copied data would then be diverted to “SG3” equipment – a reference to “Study Group 3” – which was a code name AT&T used for activities related to NSA surveillance, according to evidence in the Klein case.

    #Surveillance #USA #NSA #AT&T


    • Belle sélection américaine pour une si petite liste, mais ce sont les seuls que je n’arrive pas à écouter :

      Atlanta
      Future Mask Off
      Migos Bad and boujee
      Outkast Elevator (Me & You)
      Russ Do It Myself
      Boston
      Guru Lifesaver
      Breaux Bridge
      Buckshot Lefonque Music Evolution
      Brentwood
      EPMD Da Joint
      Chicago
      Saba LIFE
      Dallas
      #Erykah_Badu The Healer
      Detroit
      Clear Soul Forces Get no better
      Eminem The Real Slim Shady
      La Nouvelle-Orléans
      $uicideboy$ ft. Pouya South Side Suicide
      Mystikal Boucin’ Back Lexington
      CunninLynguists Lynguistics
      Los Angeles
      Cypress Hill Hits from the bong
      Dilated Peoples Trade Money
      Dr. Dre The next episode ft. Snoop Dogg
      Gavlyn We On
      Jonwayne These Words are Everything
      Jurassic 5 Quality Control
      Kendrick Lamar Humble
      N.W.A Straight outta Compton
      Snoop Dogg Who Am I (What’s my name) ?
      The Pharcyde Drop
      Miami
      Pouya Get Buck
      Minneapolis
      Atmosphere Painting
      New-York
      A tribe called quest Jazz (We’ve Got) Buggin’ Out
      Big L Put it on
      Jeru the Damaja Me or the Papes
      Mobb Deep Shook Ones Pt. II
      Notorious B.I.G Juicy
      The Underachievers Gold Soul Theory
      Wu-Tang Clan Da Mistery of Chessboxin’
      Newark
      Lords of the Underground Chief Rocka
      Pacewon Children sing
      Petersburg
      Das EFX They want EFX
      Philadelphie
      Doap Nixon Everything’s Changing
      Jedi Mind Tricks Design in Malice
      Pittsburgh
      Mac Miller Nikes on my feet
      Richmond
      Mad Skilzz Move Ya Body
      Sacramento
      Blackalicious Deception
      San Diego
      Surreal & the Sounds Providers Place to be
      San Francisco
      Kero One Fly Fly Away
      Seattle
      Boom Bap Project Who’s that ?
      Brothers From Another Day Drink
      SOL This Shit
      Stone Mountain
      Childish Gambino Redbone
      Washington DC
      Oddisee Own Appeal

      Limité mais permet des découvertes.

      Mark Mushiva - The Art of Dying (#Namibie)
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZZrp4TMAgQ

      Tehn Diamond - Happy (#Zimbabwe)
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T5tjMAy5ySM

      #rap

    • « Global Hip-Hop » : 23 nouveaux morceaux ajoutés dans la base grâce à vos propositions ! Deux nouveaux pays (Mongolie et Madagascar) et 11 nouvelles villes, de Mississauga à Versailles en passant par Molfetta, Safi, Oulan-Bator ou Tananarive 🌍



  • The #sec’s Guiding Hand
    https://hackernoon.com/the-secs-guiding-hand-8c23f95849b8?source=rss----3a8144eabfe3---4

    Today the SEC spoke at a town hall called #investing In America in Atlanta, Georgia. While the event was not crypto-specific, cryptocurrencies and ICOs loomed in the background. Indeed, blockchain and ICOs came up in one of the first questions at the Q & A at the end of the panel.In regards to ICOsBlockchain as architectureIn response to an inaudible question, one in which we can posit that the audience member asked about the SEC’s views on ICOs and the emerging crypto space, SEC Chairman Jay Clayton said, “I think we can all agree on [the promise of blockchain]. At the fore of my mind is that blockchain greatly reduces transactions costs, including costs of verification.”He goes on to describe how blockchain was adopted for the act of fundraising, but that “much of what I have seen in (...)

    #financial-regulation #crowdfunding #bitcoin


  • WHERE KILLINGS GO UNSOLVED
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2018/investigations/where-murders-go-unsolved/?noredirect=on
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZavZUdbo6Mo

    The Washington Post has identified the places in dozens of American cities where murder is common but arrests are rare. These pockets of impunity were identified by obtaining and analyzing up to a decade of homicide arrest data from 50 of the nation’s largest cities. The analysis of 52,000 criminal homicides goes beyond what is known nationally about the unsolved cases, revealing block by block where police fail to catch killers.

    The overall homicide arrest rate in the 50 cities is 49 percent, but in these areas of impunity, police make arrests less than 33 percent of the time. Despite a nationwide drop in violence to historic lows, 34 of the 50 cities have a lower homicide arrest rate now than a decade ago.

    Some cities, such as Baltimore and Chicago, solve so few homicides that vast areas stretching for miles experience hundreds of homicides with virtually no arrests. In other places, such as Atlanta, police manage to make arrests in a majority of homicides — even those that occur in the city’s most violent areas.

    Police blame the failure to solve homicides in these places on insufficient resources and poor relationships with residents, especially in areas that grapple with drug and gang activity where potential witnesses fear retaliation. But families of those killed, and even some officers, say the fault rests with apathetic police departments. All agree that the unsolved killings perpetuate cycles of violence in low-arrest areas.

    Detectives said they cannot solve homicides without community cooperation, which makes it almost impossible to close cases in areas where residents already distrust police. As a result, distrust deepens and killers remain on the street with no deterrent.

    “If these cases go unsolved, it has the potential to send the message to our community that we don’t care,” said Oakland police Capt. Roland Holmgren, who leads the department’s criminal investigation division. That city has two zones where unsolved homicides are clustered.

    MURDER WITH IMPUNITY
    Out of 52,179 homicides in 50 cities over the past decade,
    51 percent did not result in
    an arrest.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2018/investigations/unsolved-homicide-database



  • Maternités américaines : « Si Tanesia avait été blanche, elle serait encore en vie » - Libération
    http://www.liberation.fr/planete/2018/02/04/maternites-americaines-si-tanesia-avait-ete-blanche-elle-serait-encore-en

    Aux Etats-Unis, et plus encore à New York, les femmes noires sont davantage touchées par la mortalité maternelle. La famille Walker a perdu sa fille en novembre des suites d’un accouchement. Depuis, elle tente de comprendre, entre désarroi et colère.

    « La nuit, je fais des cauchemars. Je rêve que ma sœur est morte. Et quand je me réveille, je réalise qu’elle l’est vraiment. » Assis sur le canapé de l’appartement familial, Dwayne Walker peine à appréhender sa nouvelle réalité. Celle d’une vie sans Tanesia. Sa complice, l’aînée de la fratrie. A ses côtés, leur mère, Marcia, visage hagard plongé dans ses mains, répète d’une voix lasse : « On ne sait pas, on ne sait pas, on ne sait pas… Cela fait deux mois que Tanesia est morte, et on ne sait toujours pas pourquoi. » Elle tripote nerveusement des photos de sa fille, étalées sur la table basse. Sur chaque cliché, un même sourire éclatant. Ultimes vestiges d’un bonheur révolu, d’une vie écourtée brutalement.

    Fin novembre, à peine vingt heures après son accouchement, la jeune femme de 31 ans est morte dans un hôpital de Brooklyn. Et si les résultats de l’autopsie se font attendre, les Walker sont convaincus d’une chose : « Si Tanesia avait été blanche, elle serait encore en vie. » Ils n’ont probablement pas tort. Car loin d’être un cas isolé, le décès de Tanesia Walker illustre une tendance alarmante aux Etats-Unis, seul pays développé où la mortalité maternelle, des femmes noires en particulier, progresse. Faute de statistiques fiables, Washington n’a pas publié de taux officiel depuis une décennie. Mais travaux universitaires et estimations internationales pointent un même constat : dans la première puissance mondiale, les mères meurent beaucoup plus souvent que dans les autres pays riches. Au sein de l’OCDE, seul le Mexique fait pire. Selon l’organisation, le taux de mortalité américain s’élevait en 2014 à 24 décès pour 100 000 naissances. Environ trois fois plus qu’en France, quatre fois plus qu’au Canada et sept à huit fois plus qu’au Japon, aux Pays-Bas ou en Norvège.

    Comme Tanesia Walker, entre 700 et 900 femmes meurent chaque année aux Etats-Unis de complications liées à la grossesse ou à l’accouchement. 50 000 autres souffrent de sévères complications, qui entraînent parfois des séquelles à vie. Pour expliquer ce fléau, les experts avancent plusieurs facteurs, à la fois médicaux et sociaux : forte prévalence de l’obésité et des maladies cardiovasculaires, difficultés d’accès au système de santé, absence de congé maternité obligatoire, taux élevé de césariennes. En 2015, dans les hôpitaux américains, une femme sur trois a ainsi donné naissance par césarienne, contre une sur cinq en France. Avec, fatalement, un risque accru de complications postopératoires.

    Les faiblesses du système médical américain ne sont pas une révélation. Sur une pléthore d’indicateurs, les Etats-Unis sont à la traîne (lire page 9). Mais au-delà des comparaisons internationales, peu flatteuses, c’est l’ampleur du fossé racial qui choque le plus. D’après le Centre pour le contrôle des maladies, « le risque de mortalité dû à la grossesse est trois à quatre fois plus élevé chez les femmes noires que chez les blanches. »

    Fossé racial

    New York fait encore pire. Métropole parmi les plus inégalitaires au monde, la ville occupe une place unique dans ce débat sur la mortalité maternelle. On y trouve à la fois des recherches de pointe sur le sujet, un volontarisme politique inédit et l’une des illustrations les plus criantes de ce saisissant fossé racial. En 2015 et 2016, la municipalité a mené deux études approfondies pour mesurer l’ampleur du problème. De précédents rapports laissaient présager de mauvais résultats, qui se sont révélés pires encore : le taux de mortalité des mères noires à New York est douze fois supérieur à celui des blanches. Et contrairement à certaines idées reçues, obésité, diabète et pauvreté (qui touchent plus fortement la communauté noire) ne suffisent pas - loin de là - à expliquer de telles disparités. Une femme noire de poids normal présente encore deux fois plus de risques de complication qu’une femme blanche obèse.

    « Ma sœur était en excellente santé, dit Dwayne Walker. Elle était sportive, ne buvait pas, ne fumait pas. » Adolescente, avant que la famille quitte les Caraïbes pour New York, Tanesia portait le maillot de l’équipe jamaïcaine d’athlétisme. Etudiante brillante, diplômée en justice criminelle à Manhattan, elle a d’abord été cadre dans une banque. Avant d’entamer, poussée par sa passion du voyage, une carrière d’hôtesse de l’air chez American Airlines, où elle était soumise à des tests médicaux réguliers. « Sa grossesse s’est déroulée sans le moindre problème », assure son frère. Le jour de l’accouchement, c’est lui qui l’a conduite à l’hôpital. Sans imaginer un instant qu’il ne la reverrait jamais vivante.

    Le 27 novembre, vers midi, Tanesia Walker, déjà maman de Tafari, 1 an et demi, donne naissance par césarienne à un second garçon, Tyre. Ses parents lui rendent visitent peu après. Marcia raconte : « Elle souriait, le bébé endormi sur sa poitrine. » En fin d’après-midi, toutefois, elle dit se sentir faible, se demande s’il n’y a pas des complications. « Elle avait perdu du sang pendant l’opération. Sa peau avait un teint verdâtre », assure son père, Junior Walker. « C’est à cause de l’éclairage », aurait balayé une infirmière. Les proches quittent l’hôpital en début de soirée. Vers 2 heures du matin, Tanesia envoie un texto à son fiancé, se plaignant de douleurs abdominales.

    « Peu après 4 heures, l’hôpital nous a appelés pour dire que son état était critique », poursuit Junior. Il se précipite sur place avec sa femme. « C’était la panique, médecins et infirmières s’activaient autour de son lit. Sa chemise de nuit était maculée de sang », dit-il en montrant une photo prise avec son téléphone portable. Vers 6 h 45, le décès est prononcé. Dwayne, qui travaille de nuit, arrive peu après. Sa douleur se mêle à la colère : « J’ai supplié l’équipe médicale de me dire ce qui s’était passé. Personne n’avait l’air de savoir. » Un médecin évoque la piste d’une embolie pulmonaire, une pathologie très souvent évitable mais responsable de près de 20 % des morts maternelles à New York.

    Comme après chaque décès postopératoire, une autopsie a été réalisée par les services médico-légaux de New York. Deux mois plus tard, les résultats n’ont toujours pas été publiés. Un délai qui indigne la famille. « On nous laisse avec nos doutes et nos spéculations », soupire Dwayne. Dans les jours ayant suivi le décès de Tanesia, son père affirme avoir été sollicité plusieurs fois par l’hôpital, malgré ses refus répétés, pour un éventuel don d’organes. « Voulaient-ils cacher quelque chose ? » s’interroge-t-il. Contacté par Libération, l’hôpital public Suny Downstate, géré par l’Etat de New York, se refuse à tout commentaire, invoquant la « confidentialité des patients ».

    « Ville ségréguée »

    Et si Tanesia Walker avait tout simplement accouché… dans le mauvais hôpital ? Le rapport publié en 2016 par la ville a en effet révélé des disparités géographiques criantes en matière de santé maternelle. D’un quartier à l’autre, le risque varie du simple au triple. Le centre de Brooklyn, à très forte population noire, affiche les taux de complication les plus élevés. C’est là que vivent les Walker, à l’extrémité est de Crown Heights, une zone encore épargnée par la vague de gentrification qui recouvre rapidement la ville depuis quinze ans. Le site d’investigation ProPublica, spécialisé dans les sujets d’intérêt public, a publié récemment une longue enquête sur ce dossier. On y apprend notamment que l’hôpital « Suny Downstate, où 90 % des femmes qui donnent naissance sont noires, a l’un des taux de complication d’hémorragie les plus élevés » de tout l’Etat.

    « Les inégalités raciales sont ancrées dans l’histoire de ce pays, admet sans détour le Dr Deborah Kaplan, responsable de la santé maternelle, infantile et reproductive à la municipalité de New York. Les quartiers où vit en particulier la communauté noire ont souffert d’un désinvestissement public ciblé. Cela a contribué à rendre notre ville très ségréguée. » Les hôpitaux sont un marqueur majeur de cette ghettoïsation : moins bien financés et équipés, moins attractifs pour le personnel de santé, les établissements dont la majorité des patients sont noirs affichent les pires statistiques.

    Pour tenter de réduire ce fossé racial « choquant », explique le Dr Kaplan, les autorités de santé veulent agir en priorité dans les zones les plus affectées. Les défis ne manquent pas : mieux informer les jeunes Afro-Américaines sur les risques encourus ; améliorer leur suivi médical avant, pendant et après la grossesse ; mieux former et sensibiliser le personnel soignant. Un comité d’une trentaine d’experts, inédit aux Etats-Unis, vient en outre d’être mis sur pied. Objectif de ces travaux, entamés mi-janvier : étudier en détail chaque cas de mortalité maternelle à New York pour en tirer le maximum d’enseignements.

    Biais raciste

    Parmi les autres initiatives lancées par la ville : un partenariat avec des « doulas », ces femmes chargées d’accompagner, soutenir et informer les mères à tous les stades de leur maternité. C’est le combat de Chanel Porchia. Cette mère de six enfants a créé il y a dix ans à Brooklyn le collectif Ancient Song Doula Services, qui propose notamment un service de doula gratuit ou à prix modique. « Que ce soit lors des rendez-vous médicaux ou dans la salle d’accouchement, on remarque que lorsqu’une doula est présente, il y a un changement dans la manière dont les femmes sont traitées, explique-t-elle. La façon dont les soignants parlent aux patientes, la qualité des soins, tout cela peut changer par notre simple présence. »

    Pour Chanel Porchia, le biais raciste de certains soignants ne fait pas l’ombre d’un doute : « Un client blanc et riche bénéficiera toujours d’une oreille plus attentive. Envers les femmes noires, il y a un comportement très condescendant, une manière de leur dire "vous ne savez pas de quoi vous parlez" et de ne pas être à leur écoute. » Tout en berçant son dernier-né dans son bureau aux murs de briques rouges, elle raconte avoir recueilli des témoignages de femmes « menacées de signalement aux services sociaux pour avoir tenté de refuser une césarienne ». Car, au-delà du #racisme latent, Chanel Porchia dénonce un « système de santé cassé », tourné vers le profit et la productivité : « Aux Etats-Unis, nous manquons de sensibilité culturelle, de compassion pour les femmes qui donnent naissance, car tout est géré comme une entreprise. L’objectif est de libérer les places au plus vite. »

    Signe d’une prise de conscience, le collectif Black Mamas Matter (« les mamans noires comptent ») a vu le jour en juin 2015. Porté par plusieurs associations et ONG, il ambitionne de sensibiliser un maximum d’acteurs, des futures mères aux professionnels de santé en passant par les élus au Congrès. Le collectif milite notamment pour un meilleur suivi médical, tout au long de la vie, et pas uniquement au cours de la grossesse. Aux Etats-Unis, près de la moitié des naissances se font sous Medicaid, l’assurance publique réservée aux plus modestes. « De nombreuses femmes, noires notamment, deviennent éligibles à Medicaid à partir du moment où elles tombent enceintes », explique Elizabeth Dawes Gay, présidente du comité directeur de Black Mamas Matter. Dans la plupart des Etats, dont New York, cette assurance prend fin six semaines après l’accouchement. « Six semaines, c’est déjà très peu, ajoute Elizabeth Dawes Gay, mais même au cours de cette période, l’attention se porte surtout sur l’enfant. Les soins post-partum dans notre pays sont quasi inexistants. »

    Autre obstacle majeur au suivi médical : l’absence de congé maternité obligatoire. Lentement, les choses évoluent. Au 1er janvier, l’Etat de New York a ainsi mis en place un congé maternité de huit semaines. Mais seule la moitié du salaire est prise en charge. Pour les femmes aux faibles revenus, impossible dans ces conditions de joindre les deux bouts. Beaucoup reprennent le travail trop tôt. « Si vous retournez travailler deux semaines après avoir accouché, quand trouvez-vous le temps de prendre soin de votre santé ? » interroge Elizabeth Dawes Gay.

    « Usure » physique

    Pour cette activiste basée à Atlanta, éviter les interruptions de couverture maladie s’avère d’autant plus crucial que les femmes noires sont par définition plus à risque. Conséquence d’un racisme latent subi depuis le plus jeune âge. « Le racisme intrinsèque à notre société représente une source chronique de stress, souligne Elizabeth Dawes Gay. La crainte des violences policières, les discriminations au travail ou au logement, la ségrégation : tout cela s’accumule pour fragiliser la santé des femmes noires. »

    Le racisme engendrerait donc une détérioration physique, biologique ? La thèse n’a rien de farfelu. Depuis des années, Arline Geronimus, chercheuse à l’université du Michigan, s’intéresse au sujet. L’une de ses études, sur les marqueurs de chromosomes du vieillissement, a livré une conclusion stupéfiante : l’organisme d’une femme noire de 50 ans paraît en moyenne sept ans et demi plus vieux que celui d’une femme blanche du même âge. Cette « usure » physique devrait conduire, selon elle, à une prise en charge médicale adaptée, en particulier en cas de grossesse. En clair : une femme noire de 30 ans devrait être considérée comme étant autant à risque qu’une femme blanche de plus de 35 ans.

    « Une femme ne devrait pas mourir parce qu’elle veut donner la vie. Pas aux Etats-Unis. Il faut que les gens soient informés », dit Dwayne Walker, le frère de Tanesia. Dès que les résultats de l’autopsie seront connus, la famille prévoit de porter plainte contre l’hôpital. Comme souvent ici, le contentieux se réglera sans doute par un gros chèque. De quoi prendre soin, matériellement, de Tafari et de Tyre. Courts cheveux bouclés, bouille malicieuse, l’aîné sort de sa chambre en courant et se précipite dans les bras de sa grand-mère, Marcia. A la vue de la photo de sa mère, il éclate en sanglots. « Tanesia était si aimante, si proche de lui. Depuis sa mort, il pleure beaucoup, refuse de manger. On ne sait pas quoi faire, se désole Dwayne. Ma mission est désormais de m’occuper d’eux. Nous allons leur donner autant d’amour que possible, ajoute Marcia. Mais rien ne remplacera jamais l’amour maternel. »
    Frédéric Autran

    À mettre en lien avec ce magistral article en anglais où la gravité de la non prise en compte de la douleur des femmes noires par le personnel soignant est très bien expliqué :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/650756

    #maternité #accouchement #hôpital #santé #discriminations #femmes_noires #états_unis


  • “Women Are Teachable”: This 1940s Booklet to Assist Male Bosses in Supervising Their New Female Employees ~ vintage everyday
    http://www.vintag.es/2018/01/women-are-teachable-1940s-guide.html

    In a re-discovered 1940s guide for how male bosses should treat female employees, men were amusingly told that “women are teachable.” The guide shows just how much the work place has changed since World War II.

    By 1944, over half of American adult women were employed outside the home, making invaluable contributions to the war effort. As women went about their duties, supervisors often worried about effectively assimilating them into the workforce. This publication from the Radio Corporation of America (RCA) awkwardly attempted to assist supervisors with managing their new female employees.

    But many of America’s supervisors had never had to deal with women in the workplace and many felt women not only belonged in the home, but were simply unable to learn how to work in a man’s world. So, RCA thought this guide would be helpful in order to keep America on its war footing.

    The implications in the text are somewhat amusing in that it seems to have been assumed that men were tougher of spirit, could take criticism better, didn’t take things personally, and perhaps were easier to keep working in unclean and unsafe working conditions.

    After all, many of these lines of advice seem like a good way to treat any employee; as opposed to just women!

    Following the image of each page of the booklet with the text below (please click on the images to view them larger):

    WHEN YOU SUPERVISE A WOMAN

    Make clear her part in the process or product on which she works.
    Allow for her lack of familiarity with machine processes.
    See that her working set-up is comfortable, safe and convenient.
    Start her right by kindly and careful supervision.
    Avoid horseplay or “kidding”; she may resent it.
    Suggest rather than reprimand.
    When she does a good job, tell her so.
    Listen to and aid her in her work problems.

    WOMEN ARE PATIENT

    WHEN YOU PUT A WOMAN TO WORK

    Have a job breakdown for her job.
    Consider her education, work experience and temperament in assigning her to that job.
    Have the necessary equipment, tools and supplies ready for her.
    Try out her capacity for and familiarity with the work.
    Assign her to a shift in accordance with health, home obligations and transportation arrangements.
    Place her in a group of workers with similar backgrounds and interests.
    Inform her fully on health and safety rules, company policies, company objectives.
    Be sure she knows the location of rest-rooms, lunch facilities, dispensaries.
    Don’t change her shift too often and never without notice.

    WOMEN ARE CAREFUL

    WHENEVER YOU EMPLOY A WOMAN

    Limit her hours to 8 a day, and 48 a week, if possible.
    Arrange brief rest periods in the middle of each shift.
    Try to make nourishing foods available during lunch periods.
    Try to provide a clean place to eat lunch, away from her workplace.
    Make cool and pure drinking water accessible.
    See that the toilet and restrooms are clean and adequate.
    Watch work hazards – moving machinery; dust and fumes; improper lifting; careless housekeeping.
    Provide properly adjusted work seats; good ventilation and lighting.
    Recommend proper clothing for each job; safe, comfortable shoes; try to provide lockers and a place to change work clothes.
    Relieve a monotonous job with rest periods. If possible, use music during fatigue periods.

    WOMEN ARE COOPERATIVE

    FINALLY–CALL ON A TRAINED WOMAN COUNSELOR IN YOUR PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT

    To find out what women workers think and want.
    To discover personal causes of poor work, absenteeism, turnover.
    To assist women workers in solving personal difficulties.
    To interpret women’s attitudes and actions.
    To assist in adjusting women to their jobs.

    (Citation: Records of the War Manpower Commission, via National Archives at Atlanta and The Federalist Papers)


  • Ce soir j’ai décidé d’être 7 fois en contravention avec la loi (américaine)

    « In a country like United-States, where medecine is mainly a science-based practice, where the ethnic diversity is definitly an evidence-based reality for the nation, it is clear that any vulnerable people such as elderly, transgender, pregnant women (including fetus) and generaly speaking the poorest part of the population have entitlement to medical aid. »

    –—

    CDC banned words: How the CDC used ‘vulnerable,’ “transgender” and other newly banned words in past documents — Quartz
    https://qz.com/1158898/cdc-banned-words-how-the-cdc-used-vulnerable-transgender-and-other-newly-banned-

    The Centers for Disease Control is the main public health institute in the United States. It is committed to helping Americans in a way that is science-based—er, oops, I can’t say that now.

    That’s because the Trump administration has barred the CDC from using a list of words it apparently doesn’t want “in any official documents being prepared for next year’s budget,” according to reporting from the Washington Post. Here is the list of words that are now banned:

    vulnerable
    entitlement
    diversity
    transgender
    fetus
    evidence-based
    science-based

    –----

    CDC banned from using 7 words, including “science-based” - Vox
    https://www.vox.com/2017/12/16/16784498/cdc-seven-words-science-transgender-fetus

    The Trump administration has reportedly banned officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from using these seven words in budget documents — a move that some are calling downright Orwellian:

    –---

    CDC gets list of forbidden words: Fetus, transgender, diversity - The Washington Post
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/cdc-gets-list-of-forbidden-words-fetus-transgender-diversity/2017/12/15/f503837a-e1cf-11e7-89e8-edec16379010_story.html

    The Trump administration is prohibiting officials at the nation’s top public health agency from using a list of seven words or phrases — including “fetus” and “transgender” — in official documents being prepared for next year’s budget.

    Policy analysts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta were told of the list of forbidden terms at a meeting Thursday with senior CDC officials who oversee the budget, according to an analyst who took part in the 90-minute briefing. The forbidden terms are “vulnerable,” “entitlement,” “diversity,” “transgender,” “fetus,” “evidence-based” and “science-based.”

    In some instances, the analysts were given alternative phrases. Instead of “science-based” or ­“evidence-based,” the suggested phrase is “CDC bases its recommendations on science in consideration with community standards and wishes,” the person said. In other cases, no replacement words were immediately offered.

    #trump #états-unis #cdc #mots #terminologie #vocabulaire


  • U.S. Black Mothers Die In Childbirth At Three Times The Rate Of White Mothers : NPR
    https://www.npr.org/2017/12/07/568948782/black-mothers-keep-dying-after-giving-birth-shalon-irvings-story-explains-why

    Black women are more likely to be uninsured outside of pregnancy, when Medicaid kicks in, and thus more likely to start prenatal care later and to lose coverage in the postpartum period. They are more likely to have chronic conditions such as obesity, diabetes and hypertension that make having a baby more dangerous. The hospitals where they give birth are often the products of historical #segregation, lower in quality than those where white mothers deliver, with significantly higher rates of life-threatening complications.

    Those problems are amplified by unconscious #biases that are embedded in the medical system, affecting quality of care in stark and subtle ways. In the more than 200 stories of #African-American mothers that ProPublica and NPR have collected over the past year, the feeling of being devalued and disrespected by medical providers was a constant theme.

    There was the new mother in Nebraska with a history of hypertension who couldn’t get her doctors to believe she was having a heart attack until she had another one. The young Florida mother-to-be whose breathing problems were blamed on obesity when in fact her lungs were filling with fluid and her heart was failing. The Arizona mother whose anesthesiologist assumed she smoked marijuana because of the way she did her hair. The Chicago-area businesswoman with a high-risk pregnancy who was so upset at her doctor’s attitude that she changed OB/GYNs in her seventh month, only to suffer a fatal postpartum stroke.
    Over and over, black women told of medical providers who equated being African-American with being poor, uneducated, noncompliant and unworthy. “Sometimes you just know in your bones when someone feels contempt for you based on your #race,” said one Brooklyn, N.Y., woman who took to bringing her white husband or in-laws to every prenatal visit. Hakima Payne, a mother of nine in Kansas City, Mo., who used to be a labor and delivery nurse and still attends births as a midwife-doula, has seen this cultural divide as both patient and caregiver. “The nursing culture is white, middle-class and female, so is largely built around that identity. Anything that doesn’t fit that #identity is suspect,” she said. Payne, who lectures on unconscious bias for professional organizations, recalled “the conversations that took place behind the nurse’s station that just made assumptions; a lot of victim-blaming — ’If those people would only do blah, blah, blah, things would be different.’”
    ...
    But it’s the discrimination that black women experience in the rest of their lives — the double whammy of race and gender — that may ultimately be the most significant factor in poor maternal outcomes.

    “It’s chronic stress that just happens all the time — there is never a period where there’s rest from it. It’s everywhere; it’s in the air; it’s just affecting everything,” said Fleda Mask Jackson, an Atlanta researcher who focuses on birth outcomes for middle-class black women.

    It’s a type of stress for which education and class provide no protection. “When you interview these doctors and lawyers and business executives, when you interview African-American college graduates, it’s not like their lives have been a walk in the park,” said Michael Lu, a longtime disparities researcher and former head of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the Health Resources and Services Administration, the main federal agency funding programs for mothers and infants. “It’s the experience of having to work harder than anybody else just to get equal pay and equal respect. It’s being followed around when you’re shopping at a nice store, or being stopped by the police when you’re driving in a nice neighborhood.”

    #racisme #États_Unis #maternité


  • Variole, une résurrection inquiétante
    http://www.lemonde.fr/sciences/article/2017/10/30/variole-une-resurrection-inquietante_5207923_1650684.html

    Un excellent papier par Yves Sciama

    C’est un important tournant pour la biologie synthétique et la sûreté biologique. » Pour le professeur Gregory Koblentz, spécialiste de biosécurité à l’université George-Mason, en Virginie, il n’y a aucun doute : la synthèse du virus éteint de la variole équine, à partir de segments d’ADN issus du commerce sur Internet et livrés par voie postale, doit valoir signal d’alarme. Quand bien même cette synthèse avait seulement pour objectif « d’améliorer l’actuel vaccin contre la variole humaine », selon le professeur David Evans, de l’université canadienne d’Edmonton, qui l’a coordonnée.
    La « recette » de la variole humaine

    Si cette expérience, révélée durant l’été et financée par le laboratoire Tonix Pharmaceuticals, a franchi une ligne jaune, selon de nombreux spécialistes, c’est qu’elle fournit, clés en main, rien moins que la « recette » de la synthèse de la variole humaine.

    Pourtant, la synthèse de la variole ressuscite brusquement un scénario de cauchemar : celui de son retour, par un accident de laboratoire ou l’acte malveillant d’un déséquilibré, de terroristes ou d’un Etat voyou.
    Contagieuse par voie respiratoire, la maladie fit au XXe siècle 300 millions de morts.

    Une épidémie de variole sèmerait un chaos et une panique inimaginables : contagieuse par voie respiratoire, la maladie (qui tue un malade sur trois) fit au XXe siècle 300 millions de morts – plus que toutes les guerres cumulées. Ses survivants sont de plus généralement défigurés par les centaines de vésicules dont la maladie recouvre le corps et les muqueuses.

    L’atmosphère de panique qui avait entouré la poignée de cas d’Ebola sortis d’Afrique – maladie a priori moins contagieuse que la variole – laisse imaginer le chaos que causerait une flambée de variole : les replis, les perturbations du système de transport, notamment aérien, les chocs économiques qui s’ensuivraient, etc. Des dizaines de rapports d’analystes documentent combien l’extrême interconnexion de notre monde fait d’une épidémie l’un des principaux risques globaux.

    J’avais défendu un moratoire sur la biologie de synthèse en 2009, dans le silence le plus assourdissant

    Mais la question de la variole n’est que la partie émergée du gigantesque iceberg qu’est devenue la biologie de synthèse, dont les fulgurants progrès commencent à révéler l’énorme potentiel d’usages malveillants. David Evans a indiqué qu’il n’avait fallu que six mois et 100 000 dollars à son thésard et à lui-même pour ressusciter la variole équine. Il n’en faudrait donc sans doute pas plus pour son homologue humaine. Or la ­variole appartient à la partie complexe du spectre des virus dangereux – la plupart sont bien plus simples à fabriquer (celui de la poliomyélite, par exemple, a été synthétisé dans les années 2000). Même la construction de génomes bactériens, porteurs de centaines de gènes, est maîtrisée depuis une décennie.

    Bien évidemment le marché de l’ADN est forcément éthique... selon la logique des Conférences d’Azilomar : ce sont ceux qui font qui décident des limites (on voit par exemple l’effet dans la crise actuelle des opiodes de cette « auto-régulation » des industries...)

    Cette industrie de la synthèse d’ADN se trouve être l’un des importants leviers d’action disponibles pour réguler, et reprendre un tant soit peu le contrôle des risques engendrés par les sciences du vivant. En particulier parce que c’est une industrie qui s’est dès ses débuts, spontanément, posé la question de la sûreté biologique. Et qui a mis en place des mesures de sécurité dès 2009.

    Des mesures, baptisées « Protocole Standard », dont il faut souligner qu’elles sont entièrement volontaires. Elles ne sont appliquées que par les entreprises du secteur adhérentes au Consortium international de synthèse génétique (IGSC), une association dont la fonction est « d’élever le ­niveau de sûreté biologique, pour garder cette ­industrie propre », résume Marcus Graf, res­pon­sable de l’activité biologie synthétique au sein de la société allemande Thermo Fisher Scientific. L’IGSC compte aujourd’hui onze membres, ­contre cinq en 2009, et représente environ 80 % du marché mondial de la synthèse d’ADN.

    Mais rien n’est simple : on peut être partisan de l’auto-régulaiton, mais vouloir que les règles sur les choses dangereuses soient fixées par d’autres (sans qu’on se demande comment seront financés les experts « indépendants », si ce n’est pas des contrats recherche/entreprise...).

    Secundo, la fameuse base de données des ­séquences suspectes, que l’industrie réactualise chaque année, devrait en fait être constamment tenue à jour, afin de suivre les progrès rapides de la biologie. Il faudrait affecter à ce travail des équipes entières de biologistes chevronnés, au fait des derniers développements de la littérature, capables d’anticiper sur les usages malveillants – et non pas laisser le soin de le faire à une industrie hyper-concurrentielle, obsédée par la nécessité de réduire ses coûts et ses délais de livraisons. « Cette base de données devrait être établie et tenue à jour par les Etats, et ce serait aussi leur rôle de consacrer une importante ­recherche publique à cette tâche », souligne ­Gregory Koblentz.

    Une intervention de l’Etat que, une fois n’est pas coutume, les industriels appellent de leurs vœux. « Nous serions très contents qu’une agence nous dise au niveau national ou au niveau international ce qui doit aller ou non dans notre base de données », confirme Todd Peterson. La chose n’a en effet rien de trivial – elle suppose d’identifier dans le génome d’un pathogène quelles sont les parties vraiment dangereuses, liées à la virulence, la contagiosité ou la résistance aux traitements, et quels sont les gènes bénins, partagés avec d’innombrables autres organismes, qui servent uniquement au fonctionnement de base de l’organisme – respirer, se diviser, percevoir, etc.

    Ce dont les industriels ne veulent pas, il est vrai, c’est d’un contrôle des commandes qui serait ­effectué directement par les agences étatiques (telles que l’ANSM en France). Ils estiment que dans ce cas, ceux d’entre eux qui auraient l’agence la moins diligente perdraient leurs marchés. « Nos clients veulent être livrés en 3 à 5 jours, deux semaines maximum – le screening ne doit pas prendre plus de quelques minutes », avertit Marcus Graf.

    Ce que cet excellent article dit un peu plus loin :

    Il n’en reste pas moins que, partout dans le monde, la plupart des obligations liées à la ­sûreté biologique reposent sur des listes d’organismes suspects… dont la variole équine ne fait nulle part partie – c’est d’ailleurs ce qui a permis à David Evans de commander sur Internet ses séquences. « Actuellement prédomine une concep­tion très étroite de la sûreté biologique, analyse Gregory Koblentz. Elle revient à dire que tout biologiste qui ne travaille pas sur la quinzaine d’organismes de la liste peut dormir tranquille et se dispenser de réfléchir à ces problèmes – la sûreté biologique est manifestement perçue avant tout comme un fardeau dont il faut affranchir le plus grand nombre. » Or, pour ce chercheur, il faut que l’ensemble de la communauté scientifique soit mobilisée par cette question, qu’elle soit supervisée par des comités de ­contrôle multiples, enseignée à l’université, etc.

    Mais l’hubris des démiurges de la biologie de synthèse est si fort. Ce sont des prédicateurs (titre d’un article sur le sujet que j’ai commis il y a quelques années... et qui ne doit pas être encore en ligne)

    En réalité, il est frappant de constater à quel point la situation préoccupe peu la majorité des biologistes, partagés entre inquiétude que des profanes se mêlent de leur imposer des règles, et fatalisme technologique. Pour David Evans, par exemple, « dire qu’il est possible de mettre arbitrairement des limites à ce que la science peut ou ne peut pas faire, c’est tout simplement naïf. Le génie est sorti de la bouteille ». Et d’ajouter, un brin provoquant : « La biologie synthétique a même dépassé de beaucoup ce dont la plupart de ses critiques ont conscience… »

    Bon, j’aurais envie de citer tout le papier... il est très bon. Voici la conclusion, que je partage totalement :

    Il serait pourtant bon de faire mentir la règle, bien connue des spécialistes du risque industriel, selon laquelle on ne régule sérieusement les activités dangereuses qu’après qu’elles aient causé un accident emblématique. Car on frémit à l’idée de ce que pourrait être un « Titanic » de la biologie synthétique.

    –---------------
    Une affaire dans l’affaire : que faire des souches de variole existantes

    Doit-on détruire les échantillons de variole ? : le débat se poursuit

    Après l’éradication de la variole en 1980, il ne reste aujourd’hui que deux séries d’échantillons du virus sur la planète, l’une au Center for Disease Control (CDC) américain, à Atlanta, et l’autre au centre VECTOR russe à Novossibirsk – du moins en principe, car l’existence d’échantillons clandestins ne peut être exclue. Un débat enfiévré fait rage depuis les années 1990 entre partisans et adversaires de la destruction de ces deux échantillons, les premiers plaidant que l’éradication de la maladie justifie – et même impose – d’effacer le virus de la surface de la Terre, les seconds invoquant la nécessité de nouvelles recherches sur les vaccins et traitements. Bien qu’elle en ait beaucoup diminué l’enjeu, la possibilité d’une synthèse artificielle de la variole n’a pas éteint ce débat. Les « destructeurs » argumentent que, puisqu’il y a possibilité de reconstruire le virus en cas de besoin urgent, autant le détruire ; tandis que les « conservateurs » estiment qu’il n’y a plus de raison de se débarrasser du virus, car il peut plus que jamais se retrouver dans des mains malveillantes. Verdict à l’Assemblée mondiale de la santé, dans deux ans.


  • Variole, une résurrection inquiétante

    http://www.lemonde.fr/sciences/article/2017/10/30/variole-une-resurrection-inquietante_5207923_1650684.html

    La synthèse de la variole équine par des chercheurs canadiens a été un électrochoc   : les industriels de la génétique s’alarment eux-mêmes de détournements à des fins terroristes.

    C’est un important tournant pour la biologie synthétique et la sûreté biologique. » Pour le professeur Gregory Koblentz, spécialiste de biosécurité à l’université George-Mason, en Virginie, il n’y a aucun doute : la synthèse du virus éteint de la variole équine, à partir de segments d’ADN issus du commerce sur Internet et livrés par voie postale, doit valoir signal d’alarme. Quand bien même cette synthèse avait seulement pour objectif « d’améliorer l’actuel vaccin contre la variole humaine », selon le professeur David Evans, de l’université canadienne d’Edmonton, qui l’a coordonnée.

    La « recette » de la variole humaine

    Si cette expérience, révélée durant l’été et financée par le laboratoire Tonix Pharmaceuticals, a franchi une ligne jaune, selon de nombreux spécialistes, c’est qu’elle fournit, clés en main, rien moins que la « recette » de la synthèse de la variole humaine.

    Les différents virus de la variole, qui infectent divers mammifères et oiseaux, sont en effet très étroitement apparentés ; ce qui fonctionne avec l’un fonctionne en général avec l’autre. Or, leur complexité et leur grande taille (250 gènes contre 11 pour la grippe, par exemple) les rendaient jusqu’à présent difficiles à fabriquer artificiellement. Une difficulté que David Evans a réussi à contourner, ­notamment par la mise en œuvre astucieuse d’un « virus auxiliaire », le SFV, qui fournit à celui de la ­variole des protéines lui permettant de se multiplier. David Evans espérait que ce travail lui vaudrait une place dans Science ou Nature, les deux principales revues scientifiques. Mais elles ont décliné ; des pourparlers sont en cours pour le publier ailleurs.

    Scénario de cauchemar

    Pourtant, la synthèse de la variole ressuscite brusquement un scénario de cauchemar : celui de son retour, par un accident de laboratoire ou l’acte malveillant d’un déséquilibré, de terroristes ou d’un Etat voyou.

    Une épidémie de variole sèmerait un chaos et une panique inimaginables : contagieuse par voie respiratoire, la maladie (qui tue un malade sur trois) fit au XXe siècle 300 millions de morts – plus que toutes les guerres cumulées. Ses survivants sont de plus généralement défigurés par les centaines de vésicules dont la maladie recouvre le corps et les muqueuses.

    Ce scénario noir est, il est vrai, nimbé d’incerti­tudes. Nombre de spécialistes, comme Geoffrey Smith, qui préside le comité de l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS) chargé de réguler la ­recherche sur la variole, soulignent les « bons progrès » accomplis en termes de vaccin, de traitement, de kits de détection. Et expriment des doutes sur la possibilité qu’une épidémie d’une grande ampleur survienne. Mais d’autres avertissent qu’on ne peut se rassurer à bon compte. La maladie ayant disparu depuis quarante ans, il est difficile de savoir exactement ce que valent nos vaccins et traitements.

    De plus, la population mondiale est redevenue « naïve » envers le virus, donc plus vulnérable. Enfin, les vaccins et les traitements sont en quantité limitée et concentrés dans les pays riches, particulièrement aux Etats-Unis. S’en dessaisiraient-ils pour éteindre un foyer épidémique qui démarrerait ailleurs ?

    Doit-on détruire les échantillons de variole ? : le débat se poursuit

    Après l’éradication de la variole en 1980, il ne reste aujourd’hui que deux séries d’échantillons du virus sur la planète, l’une au Center for Disease Control (CDC) américain, à Atlanta, et l’autre au centre VECTOR russe à Novossibirsk – du moins en principe, car l’existence d’échantillons clandestins ne peut être exclue. Un débat enfiévré fait rage depuis les années 1990 entre partisans et adversaires de la destruction de ces deux échantillons, les premiers plaidant que l’éradication de la maladie justifie – et même impose – d’effacer le virus de la surface de la Terre, les seconds invoquant la nécessité de nouvelles recherches sur les vaccins et traitements. Bien qu’elle en ait beaucoup diminué l’enjeu, la possibilité d’une synthèse artificielle de la variole n’a pas éteint ce débat. Les « destructeurs » argumentent que, puisqu’il y a possibilité de reconstruire le virus en cas de besoin urgent, autant le détruire ; tandis que les « conservateurs » estiment qu’il n’y a plus de raison de se débarrasser du virus, car il peut plus que jamais se retrouver dans des mains malveillantes. Verdict à l’Assemblée mondiale de la santé, dans deux ans.

    L’atmosphère de panique qui avait entouré la poignée de cas d’Ebola sortis d’Afrique – maladie a priori moins contagieuse que la variole – laisse imaginer le chaos que causerait une flambée de variole : les replis, les perturbations du système de transport, notamment aérien, les chocs économiques qui s’ensuivraient, etc. Des dizaines de rapports d’analystes documentent combien l’extrême interconnexion de notre monde fait d’une épidémie l’un des principaux risques globaux.

    Mais la question de la variole n’est que la partie émergée du gigantesque iceberg qu’est devenue la biologie de synthèse, dont les fulgurants progrès commencent à révéler l’énorme potentiel d’usages malveillants. David Evans a indiqué qu’il n’avait fallu que six mois et 100 000 dollars à son thésard et à lui-même pour ressusciter la variole équine. Il n’en faudrait donc sans doute pas plus pour son homologue humaine. Or la ­variole appartient à la partie complexe du spectre des virus dangereux – la plupart sont bien plus simples à fabriquer (celui de la poliomyélite, par exemple, a été synthétisé dans les années 2000). Même la construction de génomes bactériens, porteurs de centaines de gènes, est maîtrisée depuis une décennie.

    Ce qui signifie que, par-delà la variole, la plupart des pathogènes les plus meurtriers, d’Ebola à la tuberculose multirésistante, pourraient être synthétisés ou manipulés pour accroître leur ­virulence. D’ailleurs, de multiples expériences ces dernières années ont relevé de cette recherche dangereuse, pudiquement désignée par l’expression « à double usage », car elle peut être à la fois utile ou nocive. C’est cependant la première fois qu’une entreprise privée conduit une telle expérience et non une équipe de recherche fondamentale – signe sans doute de la banalisation du « double usage ».

    Une industrie dont le chiffre d’affaires explose

    Cette synthèse de la variole équine a au moins permis de mettre en lumière un acteur méconnu, au cœur de cette affaire : l’industrie de la synthèse d’ADN. C’est désormais la norme, en biologie moléculaire, pour les laboratoires publics aussi bien que pour les multinationales pharmaceutiques, d’aller sur Internet, de commander une séquence génétique ou une liste de gènes. Et de recevoir par la poste, en quelques jours, son ADN conditionné dans le matériel biologique choisi, assemblés à partir de produits chimiques inertes.

    L’explosion en effectif et en chiffre d’affaires de l’industrie des sciences du ­vivant a dopé ce marché de la synthèse d’ADN, qui est sorti de terre en une décennie. Désormais, il pèse 1,3 milliard de dollars ; mais avec des taux de croissance de 10,5 %, il devrait atteindre 2,75 milliards en 2023.

    Cette industrie de la synthèse d’ADN se trouve être l’un des importants leviers d’action disponibles pour réguler, et reprendre un tant soit peu le contrôle des risques engendrés par les sciences du vivant. En particulier parce que c’est une industrie qui s’est dès ses débuts, spontanément, posé la question de la sûreté biologique. Et qui a mis en place des mesures de sécurité dès 2009.

    Des mesures, baptisées « Protocole Standard », dont il faut souligner qu’elles sont entièrement volontaires. Elles ne sont appliquées que par les entreprises du secteur adhérentes au Consortium international de synthèse génétique (IGSC), une association dont la fonction est « d’élever le ­niveau de sûreté biologique, pour garder cette ­industrie propre », résume Marcus Graf, res­pon­sable de l’activité biologie synthétique au sein de la société allemande Thermo Fisher Scientific. L’IGSC compte aujourd’hui onze membres, ­contre cinq en 2009, et représente environ 80 % du marché mondial de la synthèse d’ADN.

    Le « Protocole Standard » interdit de vendre de l’ADN à des particuliers, et impose de ne fournir que des institutions à la réalité et au sérieux ­vérifiés. Surtout, il met en œuvre une base de données de séquences génétiques « problématiques », conçue par l’IGSC, où l’on trouve les gènes de la plupart des microbes dangereux figurant sur les listes rouges édictées par les autorités de différents pays – par exemple celle des select agents aux Etats-Unis, ou des micro-organismes et toxines (MOT) en France. « Lorsqu’un de nos membres reçoit une commande, explique Todd Peterson, directeur pour la technologie de la ­société californienne Synthetic Genomics, et ­secrétaire actuel de l’IGSC, il doit d’abord vérifier les séquences demandées pour vérifier qu’aucune ne figure sur notre base de données. Si une ­séquence est suspecte, il prend contact avec le client et discute du problème. »

    Ces cas suspects, qui représentent à peine 0,67 % des commandes, proviennent en outre le plus souvent d’institutions ayant pignon sur rue, telles que l’Institut Pasteur ou l’Institut ­Robert Koch outre-Rhin. Celles-ci travaillent sur des agents pathogènes dangereux pour des ­raisons légitimes (vaccins, traitements, etc.) et dans des conditions de sécurité satisfaisantes, et un coup de fil suffit alors pour s’assurer que tout va bien. « Si nous décelons un problème, ­cependant, nous pouvons refuser la commande, et dans ce cas nous en avertissons les autres membres du consortium, voire les autorités », précise Todd Peterson, qui indique que ces incidents sont rarissimes.

    Ce « Standard Protocol » est cependant loin de tout résoudre. Primo, 20 % du marché de l’ADN échappe tout de même au consortium. « Dans la situation actuelle, les sociétés qui font l’effort d’inspecter les séquences et d’appliquer nos règles de sécurité s’imposent un handicap concurrentiel, car cela coûte du temps et de l’argent », observe Marcus Graf. Or, avec la baisse rapide du prix de la synthèse génomique, « la concurrence s’est exacerbée et le secteur est devenu une industrie coupe-gorge, aux marges faibles », indique Gregory Koblenz. Le chercheur propose de rendre obligatoire, au moins pour toutes les institutions de recherche publiques, de se fournir auprès de membres du consortium, afin de compenser ce handicap. Une mesure que l’IGSC verrait d’un bon œil, « mais pour laquelle nous ne voulons pas faire de lobbying, explique Todd Peterson, pour ne pas être accusés de collusion. » La loi pourrait même rendre l’adhésion à l’IGSC obligatoire, ce qui reviendrait à imposer ses règles à tout nouvel entrant – mais la mesure supposerait une certaine concertation internationale, pour éviter la formation de « paradis réglementaires »…

    Intervention de l’Etat

    Secundo, la fameuse base de données des ­séquences suspectes, que l’industrie réactualise chaque année, devrait en fait être constamment tenue à jour, afin de suivre les progrès rapides de la biologie. Il faudrait affecter à ce travail des équipes entières de biologistes chevronnés, au fait des derniers développements de la littérature, capables d’anticiper sur les usages malveillants – et non pas laisser le soin de le faire à une industrie hyper-concurrentielle, obsédée par la nécessité de réduire ses coûts et ses délais de livraisons. « Cette base de données devrait être établie et tenue à jour par les Etats, et ce serait aussi leur rôle de consacrer une importante recherche publique à cette tâche », souligne ­Gregory Koblentz.

    Une intervention de l’Etat que, une fois n’est pas coutume, les industriels appellent de leurs vœux. « Nous serions très contents qu’une agence nous dise au niveau national ou au niveau international ce qui doit aller ou non dans notre base de données », confirme Todd Peterson. La chose n’a en effet rien de trivial – elle suppose d’identifier dans le génome d’un pathogène quelles sont les parties vraiment dangereuses, liées à la virulence, la contagiosité ou la résistance aux traitements, et quels sont les gènes bénins, partagés avec d’innombrables autres organismes, qui servent uniquement au fonctionnement de base de l’organisme – respirer, se diviser, percevoir, etc.

    Ce dont les industriels ne veulent pas, il est vrai, c’est d’un contrôle des commandes qui serait ­effectué directement par les agences étatiques (telles que l’ANSM en France). Ils estiment que dans ce cas, ceux d’entre eux qui auraient l’agence la moins diligente perdraient leurs marchés. « Nos clients veulent être livrés en 3 à 5 jours, deux semaines maximum – le screening ne doit pas prendre plus de quelques minutes », avertit Marcus Graf.

    Au fond, ce qu’il faudrait ici, c’est que les Etats cessent de considérer l’industrie de l’ADN comme un secteur anodin que l’on laisse entièrement s’autoréguler, mais qu’ils acceptent enfin de considérer qu‘il s’agit d’une industrie certes indispensable, mais porteuse de réels dangers. Et donc nécessitant une attention et un encadrement strict – ce dont les industriels eux-mêmes conviennent et qu’ils tentent de gérer, sans soutien public, depuis dix ans. « Il faudrait aller, ­résume Gregory Koblentz, vers un modèle semblable à l’industrie du transport aérien, où l’existence d’une concurrence acharnée n’empêche pas une réglementation sévère et des systèmes d’inspection rigoureux, visant à rendre l’accident quasiment impossible. »

    Failles du cadre réglementaire actuel

    Il existe un troisième problème, sans doute le plus difficile à résoudre, qui est illustré par la synthèse de la variole équine. Formellement, dans le cadre réglementaire actuel, le travail de David Evans n’a transgressé aucune règle. Certes, c’est en partie parce que la législation nord-américaine ne régule pas les modifications génétiques, contrairement à la situation européenne – en France, par exemple, il aurait fallu demander l’autorisation de faire l’expérience au Haut Conseil des biotechnologies.

    Il n’en reste pas moins que, partout dans le monde, la plupart des obligations liées à la ­sûreté biologique reposent sur des listes d’organismes suspects… dont la variole équine ne fait nulle part partie – c’est d’ailleurs ce qui a permis à David Evans de commander sur Internet ses séquences. « Actuellement prédomine une concep­tion très étroite de la sûreté biologique, analyse Gregory Koblentz. Elle revient à dire que tout biologiste qui ne travaille pas sur la quinzaine d’organismes de la liste peut dormir tranquille et se dispenser de réfléchir à ces problèmes – la sûreté biologique est manifestement perçue avant tout comme un fardeau dont il faut affranchir le plus grand nombre. » Or, pour ce chercheur, il faut que l’ensemble de la communauté scientifique soit mobilisée par cette question, qu’elle soit supervisée par des comités de ­contrôle multiples, enseignée à l’université, etc.

    Car le risque dépasse clairement les listes. D’abord parce que des organismes anodins – donc qui n’y figurent pas – peuvent être modifiés d’une manière qui les rend dangereux. Une grippe saisonnière ou une varicelle « augmentées », par exemple, créeraient une menace ­épidémique grave. Mais de plus, souligne Koblentz, « il n’y a pas que des organismes, il y a des savoir-faire qui peuvent être considérés comme à double usage ».

    Ainsi la manipulation des virus de la famille des poxviridae, celle des différentes varioles, confère comme on l’a vu des compétences ­poten­tiel­lement dangereuses. Or cette famille est de plus en plus utilisée. Ces virus de grande taille se révèlent en effet être de très bons « véhicules » pour transporter des molécules thé­rapeutiques à l’intérieur des cellules du corps, notamment pour soigner les cancers ou combattre le VIH. Il suffit pour cela d’intégrer la molécule désirée dans le virus, dont l’habileté à déjouer le système immunitaire est ainsi mise à profit pour emmener le médicament jusqu’à sa cible.

    « Le génie est sorti de la bouteille »

    Des dizaines d’essais cliniques reposant sur ces techniques sont actuellement en cours. « Or à mesure que la communauté des chercheurs possédant cette expertise grandit, note Koblentz, la probabilité d’un mésusage augmente. Ce n’est pas un problème que l’on peut ignorer, et il faut rediscuter des bénéfices et des risques. » Ici, la tension avec l’injonction à innover régnant dans toutes les institutions scientifiques saute aux yeux. « Ecoutez, combien de cas de variole avons-nous eu depuis trois ans, et combien de cas de cancer ? On ne parle pas assez des bénéfices potentiels de ces recherches », s’agace David Evans.

    En réalité, il est frappant de constater à quel point la situation préoccupe peu la majorité des biologistes, partagés entre inquiétude que des profanes se mêlent de leur imposer des règles, et fatalisme technologique. Pour David Evans, par exemple, « dire qu’il est possible de mettre arbitrairement des limites à ce que la science peut ou ne peut pas faire, c’est tout simplement naïf. Le génie est sorti de la bouteille ». Et d’ajouter, un brin provoquant : « La biologie synthétique a même dépassé de beaucoup ce dont la plupart de ses critiques ont conscience… »

    Côté politique, entre sentiment d’incompétence face aux questions scientifiques et peur de brider l’innovation, personne n’a envie de se saisir d’un problème aussi épineux. Lorsque Todd Peterson suggère aux agences de son pays qu’elles devraient s’impliquer davantage dans le « Protocole Standard », « tout le monde me dit que c’est une excellente idée, mais personne n’a envie de se mettre en avant, de définir un budget et de se battre pour l’obtenir. En tout cas, c’est mon impression personnelle ».

    Il serait pourtant bon de faire mentir la règle, bien connue des spécialistes du risque industriel, selon laquelle on ne régule sérieusement les activités dangereuses qu’après qu’elles aient causé un accident emblématique. Car on frémit à l’idée de ce que pourrait être un « Titanic » de la biologie synthétique.


  • Kaleb and Kordale: meet America’s new model family | Life and style | The Guardian

    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/oct/22/kaleb-and-kordale-america-new-model-same-sex-family

    Pas mal du tout.

    Kordale Lewis, Kaleb Anthony and their four children have taken social media by storm, creating an inspiring all American family. Aaron Hicklin visits them in Georgia

    Photograph: Raymond McCrea Jones for the Observer

    Aaron Hicklin

    Sunday 22 October 2017 09.00 BST

    Kordale Lewis has just returned from a late-night visit to the shops with his daughters, Desmiray, 11, and Maliyah, 10. Their large, grandly furnished home in the Atlanta suburbs is humming with anticipation of an imminent family trip to Paris. The girls have bought some accessories and Kaleb Anthony, Kordale’s partner, is taking an inventory.


  • Soupçonné d’être un « baron » de la drogue en ligne, un Breton de Plusquellec arrêté aux Etats-Unis
    LE MONDE | 29.09.2017 à 11h46 • Mis à jour le 01.10.2017 à 06h33 | Par Damien Leloup, Martin Untersinger et Morgane Tual
    http://www.lemonde.fr/pixels/article/2017/09/29/un-breton-de-plusquellec-soupconne-d-etre-un-baron-de-la-drogue-en-ligne-arr

    C’est à Plusquellec, petite commune costarmoricaine de 500 habitants, que résidait Gal Vallerius. Un décor inhabituel pour une histoire qui l’est tout autant : à la fin du mois d’août, ce Franco-Israélien de 35 ans a été arrêté à son arrivée à Atlanta, en Géorgie, alors qu’il se rendait à un concours international de barbe à Austin (Texas). La justice américaine le soupçonne d’avoir tenu « un rôle essentiel » dans un des plus grands supermarchés de la drogue en ligne, Dream Market.

    L’affaire a été révélée mardi 26 septembre par le Miami Herald, une semaine après le dépôt du dossier auprès d’un tribunal de Floride. Une enquête préliminaire a également été ouverte en France, le 1er septembre, par la direction interrégionale de la police judiciaire, a appris Le Monde auprès du parquet de Saint-Brieuc.

    « Notre point de départ est en soutien des enquêteurs américains », par l’intermédiaire « du magistrat de liaison Interpol des Pays-Bas », précise le parquet. L’homme était jusqu’ici « absolument passé à travers tous les radars judiciaires, il était totalement inconnu sur le territoire national ».


  • Saint Louis Cemetery
    La rentrée policière aux USA et en France
    Par Ferdinand Cazalis / Klaktualités

    http://jefklak.org/?p=4381

    Après les talents de la plume, les virtuoses du plomb. Maintenant que la rentrée littéraire a fait long feu, braquons les projecteurs sur une tout autre rentrée, policière celle-ci. À Saint-Louis (25 km de Ferguson – Missouri), l’officier Jason Stockley qui avait tué Anthony Lamar Smith en 2011 vient d’être relaxé par la Justice. Depuis, c’est l’émeute. À Atlanta (Géorgie), c’est Scout Schultz, président.e transgenre de l’organisation LGBT du campus de Georgia Tech qui s’est fait abattre par la police cette semaine. Depuis, c’est l’émeute. Et à Vigneux-sur-Seine (Essonne) le week-end dernier, un jeune homme a perdu un œil après un tir de la BAC. Depuis, c’est...


  • “We only shoot black people,” Georgia cop assures woman during traffic stop
    https://www.vox.com/identities/2017/8/31/16232880/georgia-police-cobb-county-video
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfXHoH-8pjk

    It was a mere traffic stop, but the driver was clearly nervous — telling the police officer that she was worried that if she moved her hands, she would be shot.

    Then the cop, Greg Abbott, tried to assure her: “But you’re not black. Remember, we only shoot black people. Yeah, we only kill black people, right?”

    The shocking words by the Cobb County, Georgia, police officer — caught on dash-cam video during a DUI stop — have led the department to open an internal investigation into the incident, which happened last year.

    Cobb County Police Chief Mike Register told WSB-TV in Atlanta, which obtained the video: “The statements was made by an individual, and they’re not indicative of the values and the facts that surround the Cobb County Police Department and this county in general.”


  • Pizza Workers Can’t ’Avoid Noid’—Held Hostage 5 Hours - latimes
    http://articles.latimes.com/1989-01-31/news/mn-1499_1_pizza-chain

    January 31, 1989|From Associated Press

    CHAMBLEE, Ga. — A man named Noid, apparently annoyed by Domino’s Pizza’s “Avoid the Noid” ads, held two Domino’s employees at gunpoint for more than five hours before they escaped and he surrendered after ordering and eating a pizza, authorities said today.

    Kenneth Lamar Noid, 22, told police he thinks Tom S. Monaghan, owner of the Detroit-based pizza chain and the Detroit Tigers baseball club, “comes in his apartment and looks around,” said Police Chief Reed Miller.

    Investigators believe Noid was “having an ongoing feud in his mind with Monaghan about the ’Noid’ commercials,” said detective Sgt. Mark Bender. “Apparently, he thinks they’re aimed at him.”

    How Domino’s Pizza Lost Its Mascot
    http://priceonomics.com/how-dominos-pizza-lost-its-mascot

    In 1960, Tom and James Monaghan borrowed $900 and bought a small, ailing pizza shop on the fringes of the Eastern Michigan University campus. Early on, business was horrible and James sold his half of the company to his brother for a used Volkswagen Beetle. Tom persisted and, by 1978, had expanded Domino’s Pizza into a 200-store enterprise worth $500 million.

    During this period of rapid growth, Domino’s Pizza set an industry precedent that would prove critical to their success: they guaranteed that if a customer didn’t receive his pizza within 30 minutes of placing the order, it’d be free. Domino’s executives hired an external marketing firm, Group 243, to promote this new promise. The result? The “Noid.”

    A troll-like creature, the Noid was outfitted in a skin-tight red onesie with rabbit-like ears and buck-teeth. Will Vinton, whose studio animated the creature, described it as a “physical manifestation of all the challenges inherent in getting a pizza delivered in 30 minutes or less.” Its name, a play on “annoyed,” was an indication of its nature: many considered the Noid to be one of the most obnoxious mascots of all time. Throughout the late 80s, Domino’s ran a series of commercials in which the Noid set about attempting to make life an utter hell for pizza consumers:

    The spots soon employed the slogan “Avoid the Noid,” and reminded customers that their company’s pizzas were “Noid-proof.” The campaign was a smash success. In 1989, a computer game, “Avoid the Noid,” was released to commemorate the red antagonist (the goal was to deliver a pizza with a half-hour whilst avoiding a lumbering swarm of Noids), plush toys were abound, and the character was a household name.

    Then, right at the height of his popularity, the Noid endured perhaps the worst mascot PR in history.

    On January 30, 1989, a man wielding a .357 magnum revolver stormed into a Domino’s in Atlanta, Georgia and took two employees hostage. For five hours, he engaged in a standoff with police, all the while ordering his hostages to make him pizzas. Before the police could negotiate with his demands ($100,000, a getaway car, and a copy of The Widow’s Son — a novel about Freemasons), the two employees escaped. In the ensuing chaos, the captor fired two gunshots into the establishment’s ceiling, was forcefully apprehended, and received charges of kidnapping, aggravated assault, and theft by extortion.

    The assailant, a 22-year-old named Kenneth Lamar Noid, was apparently upset about the chain’s new mascot. A police officer on the scene later revealed that Noid had “an ongoing feud in his mind with the owner of Domino’s Pizza about the Noid commercials,” and thought the advertisements had specifically made fun of him. A headline the following morning in the Boca Raton News sparked a talk show frenzy: “Domino’s Hostages Couldn’t Avoid the Noid This Time.”

    A subsequent court hearing found Noid innocent by reason of insanity; a paranoid schizophrenic, he was found to have “acute psychological problems,” was turned over to the Department of Human Resources, and ended up in Georgia’s Mental Health Institute, where he spent three months. Years later, in 1995, unable to shake the idea that the Domino’s ad campaign had intentionally targeted him, Noid committed suicide in his Florida apartment.

    Following the ordeal, Domino’s swiftly terminated the Noid campaign. For nearly twenty years, the annoying character lay in glorious respite, before briefly returning in 2011 (his 25th anniversary). This time though, he was merely part of a short-lived promotional marketing campaign: in Domino’s Facebook game, “The Noid’s Super Pizza Shootout.” As quickly as he came, the Noid returned to the void.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bri0SA7FTf4

    Play online Avoid The Noid !
    http://www.freegameempire.com/games/Avoid-The-Noid

    void the Noid (MS-DOS) - Complete Playthrough
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_PUdbm5-Uqs

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avoid_the_Noid_(video_game)

    https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=avoid+the+noid

    #jeux


  • R Kelly’s playing an Atlanta show later this month — but not if these activists can help it
    https://mic.com/articles/183826/r-kellys-playing-an-atlanta-show-later-this-month-but-not-if-these-activists-ca

    Atlanta activists Oronike Odeleye and Kenyette Barnes want R. Kelly “out of our heads.” That’s how Odeleye put it in a recent phone conversation; she said their goal is to make the controversial singer a “nonentity,” to do away with the idea that he’s “someone we should be playing at barbecues and our family reunions.” They’re starting by trying to cancel Kelly’s upcoming Atlanta concert, planned for Aug. 25.


  • À Paris, les « Arabes du coin » ferment le rideau
    https://www.vice.com/fr/article/evdwya/a-paris-les-arabes-du-coin-ferment-le-rideau
    Philippe Pilliot connaît bien la profession. Délégué général de la Fédération nationale de l’épicerie, il a rencontré de nombreux épiciers en novembre dernier. Arrondissement par arrondissement, banlieue par banlieue, dans le but de rameuter le plus d’indépendants possible pour faire bloc contre des projets de lois ou des arrêtés préfectoraux. « Je constate depuis quelque temps que beaucoup d’entre eux ont vendu leur fonds de commerce à des chaînes. » (...)
    Autrefois situées en périphérie, les chaînes de supermarchés visent aujourd’hui les centres-villes. Selon les chiffres de l’APUR (Atelier Parisien d’Urbanisme), en 2010, à Paris, quelque 830 petites supérettes labellisées ont ouvert leurs portes. Serge Papin, PDG de Système U, n’a pas surfé sur la vague. Il analyse donc la disparition progressive de l’épicier indépendant avec un certain recul : « Dans les années 1980, on était sur du développement horizontal. Vous aviez la banlieue pavillonnaire, son centre avec les petits indépendants, et, à l’extérieur, les pôles commerciaux, les magasins de périphérie. On invitait les gens à aller faire leurs courses en voiture. Les chaînes ne s’intéressaient pas aux milieux urbains. Mais depuis une quinzaine d’années, on est sur un mouvement centrifuge. Les gens veulent de la proximité, tout en voulant des prix compétitifs. » Souvent mieux agencées, plus propres, compétitives sur les prix et toujours à la recherche de nouveaux concepts, les chaînes sont plus que jamais une source d’inquiétude pour le petit commerçant.
    #urbanisme #villes #commerces #changement #gentrification #franchises

    • Il y a aussi un phénomène de gentrification très puissant toujours à l’œuvre : même dans les supérettes franchisées déjà présentes depuis longtemps dans les centres-métropoles, il y a un recentrage commercial vers les classes moyennes supérieures… en effet, les classes populaires ont pratiquement disparu des centres urbains et les classes moyennes inférieures peinent à s’y maintenir.
      Ainsi, Franprix qui a longtemps été une enseigne plutôt populaire finit sa mue qui vise concrètement à bouffer des parts de marché à Monoprix.

    • Ma belle-sœur vit dans une des banlieues classes moyennes d’Atlanta. Des endroits où on ne peut que se déplacer en voiture, où il n’existe plus de commerces du tout, en dehors de Target, WallMart et ce genre de gros trucs. Elle qui était plutôt junkfood en France, elle s’est retrouvée à traverser toute la zone urbaine pour trouver des légumes. Il semble qu’elle ait été sauvée par l’implantation d’un épicier coréen dans son quartier. Mais il parait que c’est de toute manière assez cher.
      La malbouffe est la règle, là-bas, les produits frais, l’exception réservée à une élite…

    • Le manque d’eau, de nourriture de qualité, d’air... les libéraux transcrivent le mot « manque » en « rareté » et donc en « opportunité ».

      Le même processus est à l’œuvre pour la musique ou les films, où les libéraux font le nécessaire pour détruire les moyens de distribution en abondance que permettent dans la théorie les technologies numériques, tout cela afin de créer une rareté artificielle.

      Le temps est sans doute venu de cesser de croire que les « qui nous gouvernent » et « qui écrivent les lois » œuvrent pour le bien commun. Surtout quand tout ce qu’ils décident ne fait qu’alimenter la rareté de tout ce qui est nécessaire à la vie.


  • Âgé de 13 ans, il meurt d’une balle tombée du ciel | Slate.fr
    http://www.slate.fr/story/148368/etats-unis-mort-jeune-garcon-balle-perdue

    D’après le site Forensic Outreach, cet incident est loin d’être isolé. Ces dernières années, plusieurs dizaines d’Américains seraient morts des suites de balles tirées dans le ciel et des centaines d’autres blessés, citant au passage les cas tragiques d’une femme d’une cinquantaine d’années à Atlanta, d’un garçon de 11 ans à Phoenix et d’un bébé de la Nouvelle-Orléans : « Si le tir n’est pas vertical, la balle gardera suffisamment de vitesse pour faire de lourds dégâts au moment de l’impact. » Noah Inman en a payé le prix.


  • The Pressures and Perks of Being a Thought Leader - Facts So Romantic
    http://nautil.us/blog/the-pressures-and-perks-of-being-a-thought-leader

    Barmy ideas can gain a foothold just because of the prominence of the person voicing them.Photograph by Tamaki Sono / FlickrThe first time I saw the term, I was mystified. “Hey, Dr S! We’re getting a few KOLs together to give us some advice about how to develop our new compound,” began the friendly e-mail from a pharmaceutical liaison, her return address reflecting her third employer in as many years. “Are you available to come to Atlanta next Saturday? We’ll give you an honorarium for your time.”KOL? What was that? Because “Google” had not yet become a verb, I pulled out my old college dictionary, but its sole suggestion seemed implausible: the Knights of Labor, a nineteenth century workingman’s organization. In response to my puzzled reply, the liaison patiently explained that KOL in this (...)