city:minneapolis

  • Facebook Is Censoring Harm Reduction Posts That Could Save Opioid Users’ Lives
    https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/qv75ap/facebook-is-censoring-harm-reduction-posts-that-could-save-opioid-users-lives

    As Facebook rolls out its campaign with the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids to “Stop Opioid Silence” and other initiatives to fight the overdose crisis, some stalwart advocates in the field are seeing unwelcome changes. In the past few months, accounts have been disabled, groups have disappeared, posts containing certain content—particularly related to fentanyl—have been removed, and one social media manager reports being banned for life from advertising on Facebook.

    In its efforts to stop opioid sales on the site, Facebook appears to be blocking people who warn users about poisonous batches of drugs or who supply materials used to test for fentanyls and other contaminants. Just as 1990s web security filters mistook breast cancer research centers for porn sites, today’s internet still seems to have trouble distinguishing between drug dealers and groups trying to reduce the death toll from the overdose crisis. VICE reviewed screenshots and emails to corroborate the claims made in this story.

    Facebook seems to be especially focused on fentanyl. Claire Zagorski, a wound care paramedic at the Austin Harm Reduction Coalition in Texas, said she informally surveyed other harm reduction groups about their experiences. About half a dozen reported problems with reduced distribution of posts or outright rejection—especially if they were trying to report a specific, local instance of fentanyl-tainted drugs. Two of the organizations affected were a harm reduction group called Shot in the Dark in Phoenix, Arizona, and Southside Harm Reduction Services in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

    “I think it’s important to remember that they’re not being like, ‘Hooray drugs!’" Zagorski said. "They’re saying, ‘Be warned that this contaminated supply could be lethal.’”

    Devin Reaves, executive director and co-founder of the Pennsylvania Harm Reduction Coalition, who hasn’t personally had posts blocked, said: “Facebook wants to address the opioid crisis, but when harm reductionists try to inform their communities about what’s dangerous, their posts are being blocked.”

    Why then is Facebook cracking down?

    When reached for comment, a Facebook spokesperson said the company is investigating these incidents. After VICE contacted Facebook, the company restored posts from Southside Harm Reduction and Shot in the Dark, as well as Louise Vincent’s ability to post her email address, which apparently triggered a spam filter unrelated to opioids.

    Facebook also told VICE that Marcom was blocked from posting ads due not to fentanyl test strips, but due to posts related to kratom, an herb used by some as a substitute for opioids. Facebook has decided that kratom is a “non-medical drug” and is removing posts and groups related to it—even though its use is considered to be a form of harm reduction.

    Marcom said he hadn’t posted any kratom-related ads since 2018 and added, “It’s extremely frustrating that they have chosen to ban a proven safe plant medicine, as Facebook used to be a space where tens of thousands went daily for help getting off of opiates and other pharmaceuticals.”

    #Facebook #Opioides #Liberté_expression #Régulation

  • The woman fighting back against India’s rape culture

    When a man tried to rape #Usha_Vishwakarma she decided to fight back by setting up self-defence classes for women and girls.

    At first, people accused her of being a sex worker. But now she runs an award-winning organisation and has won the community’s respect.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-asia-48474708/the-woman-fighting-back-against-india-s-rape-culture
    #Inde #résistance #femmes #culture_du_viol

    • In China, a Viral Video Sets Off a Challenge to Rape Culture

      The images were meant to exonerate #Richard_Liu, the e-commerce mogul. They have also helped fuel a nascent #NoPerfectVictim movement.

      Richard Liu, the Chinese e-commerce billionaire, walked into an apartment building around 10 p.m., a young woman on his arm and his assistant in tow. Leaving the assistant behind, the young woman took Mr. Liu to an elevator. Then, she showed him into her apartment.

      His entrance was captured by the apartment building’s surveillance cameras and wound up on the Chinese internet. Titled “Proof of a Gold Digger Trap?,” the heavily edited video aimed to show that the young woman was inviting him up for sex — and that he was therefore innocent of her rape allegations against him.

      For many people in China, it worked. Online public opinion quickly dismissed her allegations. In a country where discussion of rape has been muted and the #MeToo movement has been held back by cultural mores and government censorship, that could have been the end of the story.

      But some in China have pushed back. Using hashtags like #NoPerfectVictim, they are questioning widely held ideas about rape culture and consent.

      The video has become part of that debate, which some feminism scholars believe is a first for the country. The government has clamped down on discussion of gender issues like the #MeToo movement because of its distrust of independent social movements. Officials banned the #MeToo hashtag last year. In 2015, they seized gender rights activists known as the Feminist Five. Some online petitions supporting Mr. Liu’s accuser were deleted.

      But on Weibo, the popular Chinese social media service, the #NoPerfectVictim hashtag has drawn more than 17 million page views, with over 22,000 posts and comments. Dozens at least have shared their stories of sexual assault.

      “Nobody should ask an individual to be perfect,” wrote Zhou Xiaoxuan, who has become the face of China’s #MeToo movement after she sued a famous TV anchor on allegations that he sexually assaulted her in 2014 when she was an intern. “But the public is asking this of the victims of sexual assault, who happen to be in the least favorable position to prove their tragedies.” Her lawsuit is pending.

      The allegations against Mr. Liu, the founder and chairman of the online retailer JD.com, riveted China. He was arrested last year in Minneapolis after the young woman accused him of raping her after a business dinner. The prosecutors in Minnesota declined to charge Mr. Liu. The woman, Liu Jingyao, a 21-year-old student at the University of Minnesota, sued Mr. Liu and is seeking damages of more than $50,000. (Liu is a common surname in China.)

      Debate about the incident has raged online in China. When the “Gold Digger” video emerged, it shifted sentiment toward Mr. Liu.
      Editors’ Picks
      Preparing My Family for Life Without Me
      Naomi Wolf’s Career of Blunders Continues in ‘Outrages’
      The Man Who Told America the Truth About D-Day

      Mr. Liu’s attorney in Beijing, who shared the video on Weibo under her verified account, said that according to her client the video was authentic.

      “The surveillance video speaks for itself, as does the prosecutor’s decision not to bring charges against our client,” Jill Brisbois, Mr. Liu’s attorney in the United States, said in a statement. “We believe in his innocence, which is firmly supported by all of the evidence, and we will continue to vigorously defend his reputation in court.”

      The video is silent, but subtitles make the point so nobody will miss it. “The woman showed Richard Liu into the elevator,” says one. “The woman pushed the floor button voluntarily,” says another. “Once again,” says a third, “the woman gestured an invitation.”

      Still, the video does not show the most crucial moment, which is what happened between Mr. Liu and Ms. Liu after the apartment door closed.

      “The full video depicts a young woman unable to locate her own apartment and a billionaire instructing her to take his arm to steady her gait,” said Wil Florin, Ms. Liu’s attorney, who accused Mr. Liu’s representatives of releasing the video. “The release of an incomplete video and the forceful silencing of Jingyao’s many social media supporters will not stop a Minnesota civil jury from hearing the truth.”

      JD.com declined to comment on the origin of the video.

      In the eyes of many, it contradicted the narrative in Ms. Liu’s lawsuit of an innocent, helpless victim. In my WeChat groups, men and women alike said the video confirmed their suspicions that Ms. Liu was asking for sex and was only after Mr. Liu’s money. A young woman from a good family would never socialize on a business occasion like that, some men said. A businesswoman asked why Ms. Liu didn’t say no to drinks.

      At first, I saw the video as a setback for China’s #MeToo movement, which was already facing insurmountable obstacles from a deeply misogynistic society, internet censors and a patriarchal government. Already, my “no means no” arguments with acquaintances had been met with groans.
      Subscribe to With Interest

      Catch up and prep for the week ahead with this newsletter of the most important business insights, delivered Sundays.

      The rare people of prominence who spoke in support of Ms. Liu were getting vicious criticism. Zhao Hejuan, chief executive of the technology media company TMTPost, had to disable comments on her Weibo account after she received death threats. She had criticized Mr. Liu, a married man with a young daughter, for not living up to the expectations of a public figure.

      Then I came across a seven-minute video titled “I’m also a victim of sexual assault,” in which four women and a man spoke to the camera about their stories. The video, produced by organizers of the hashtag #HereForUs, tried to clearly define sexual assault to viewers, explaining that it can take place between people who know each other and under complex circumstances.

      The man was molested by an older boy in his childhood. One of the women was raped by a classmate when she was sick in bed. One was assaulted by a powerful man at work but did not dare speak out because she thought nobody would believe her. One was raped after consuming too much alcohol on a date.

      “Slut-shaming doesn’t come from others,” she said in the video. “I’ll be the first one to slut-shame myself.”

      One woman with a red cross tattooed on her throat said an older boy in her neighborhood had assaulted her when she was 10. When she ran home, her parents scolded her for being late after school.

      “My childhood ended then and there,” she said in the video. “I haven’t died because I toughed it out all these years.”

      The video has been viewed nearly 700,000 times on Weibo. But creators of the video still have a hard time speaking out further, reflecting the obstacles faced by feminists in China.

      It was produced by a group of people who started the #HereForUs hashtag in China as a way to support victims of sexual harassment and assault. They were excited when I reached out to interview them. One of them postponed her visit to her parents for the interview.

      Then the day before our meeting, they messaged me that they no longer wanted to be interviewed. They worried that their appearance in The New York Times could anger the Chinese government and get their hashtag censored. I got a similar response from the organizer of the #NoPerfectVictim hashtag. Another woman begged me not to connect her name to the Chinese government for fear of losing her job.

      Their reluctance is understandable. They believe their hashtags have brought women together and given them the courage to share their stories. Some victims say that simply telling someone about their experiences is therapeutic, making the hashtags too valuable to be lost, the organizers said.

      “The world is full of things that hurt women,” said Liang Xiaowen, a 27-year-old lawyer now living in New York City. She wrote online that she had been molested by a family acquaintance when she was 11 and had lived with shame and guilt ever since. “I want to expand the boundaries of safe space by sharing my story.”

      A decentralized, behind-the-scenes approach is essential if the #MeToo movement is to grow in China, said Lü Pin, founding editor of Feminist Voices, an advocacy platform for women’s rights in China.

      “It’s amazing that they created such a phenomenon under such difficult circumstances,” Ms. Lü said.

      https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/05/business/china-richard-liu-rape-video-metoo.html
      #Chine #vidéo

  • J.S. Ondara raconte son rêve folk américain à l’Espace Django vendredi
    https://www.rue89strasbourg.com/js-ondara-folk-americain-espace-django-vendredi-152387

    La notion de rêve américain prend tout son sens quand on découvre J.S. Ondara. Jeune songwriter kenyan maintenant installé à Minneapolis, il affole la presse musicale, qui y voit la relève de Bob Dylan ou de Neil Young. À vérifier vendredi soir sur la scène de l’Espace Django. (lire l’article complet : J.S. Ondara raconte son rêve folk américain à l’Espace Django vendredi)

  • #Ghost_Towns | Buildings | Architectural Review

    https://www.architectural-review.com/today/ghost-towns/8634793.article

    Though criticised by many, China’s unoccupied new settlements could have a viable future

    Earlier this year a historic landmark was reached, but with little fanfare. The fact that the people of China are now predominantly urban, was largely ignored by the Western media. By contrast, considerable attention focused on China’s new ‘ghost towns’ or kong cheng − cities such as Ordos in the Gobi desert and Zhengzhou New District in Henan Province which are still being built but are largely unoccupied.

    By some estimates, the number of vacant homes in Chinese cities is currently around 64 million: space to accommodate, perhaps, two thirds of the current US population. However, unlike the abandoned cities of rust-belt America or the shrinking cities of Europe, China’s ghost cities seem never to have been occupied in the first place. So to what extent are these deserted places symbolic of the problems of rapid Chinese urbanisation? And what is revealed by the Western discourse about them?

    Characterised by its gargantuan central Genghis Khan Plaza and vast boulevards creating open vistas to the hills of Inner Mongolia, Ordos New Town is a modern frontier city. It is located within a mineral rich region that until recently enjoyed an estimated annual economic growth rate of 40 per cent, and boasts the second highest per-capita income in China, behind only the financial capital, Shanghai.

    Having decided that the existing urban centre of 1.5 million people was too crowded, it was anticipated that the planned cultural districts and satellite developments of Ordos New Town would by now accommodate half a million people rather than the 30,000 that reputedly live there.

    Reports suggest that high profile architectural interventions such as the Ai Weiwei masterplan for 100 villas by 100 architects from 27 different countries have been shelved, although a few of the commissions struggle on.

    It seems that expectations of raising both the region’s profile (at least in ways intended) and the aesthetic esteem of its new residents have failed to materialise. Instead, attention is focused on the vacant buildings and empty concrete shells within a cityscape devoid of traffic and largely empty of people.

    Estimates suggest there’s another dozen Chinese cities with similar ghost town annexes. In the southern city of Kunming, for example, the 40-square-mile area of Chenggong is characterised by similar deserted roads, high-rises and government offices. Even in the rapidly growing metropolitan region of Shanghai, themed model towns such as Anting German Town and Thames Town have few inhabitants. In the Pearl River Delta, the New South China Mall is the world’s largest. Twice the size of the Mall of America in Minneapolis, it is another infamous example of a gui gouwu zhongxin or ‘ghost mall’.

    Located within a dynamic populated region (40 million people live within 60 miles of the new Mall), it has been used in the American documentary Utopia, Part 3 to depict a modern wasteland. With only around 10 of the 2,300 retail spaces occupied, there is an unsettling emptiness here. The sense that this is a building detached from economic and social reality is accentuated by broken display dummies, slowly gliding empty escalators, and gondolas navigating sewage-infested canals. The message is that in this ‘empty temple to consumerism’ − as described by some critics − we find an inherent truth about China’s vapid future.

    Anting German Town Shanghai

    The main square of Anting German Town outside Shanghai. One of the nine satellite European cities built around the city, it has failed to establish any sense of community. The Volkswagen factory is down the road

    Pursued through the imagery of the ghost town, the commentary on stalled elements of Chinese modernity recalls the recent fascination with what has been termed ‘ruin porn’ − apocalyptic photographs of decayed industrial structures in cities such as Detroit, as in the collection The Ruins of Detroit by Yves Marchand and Romain Meffe. These too dramatise the urban landscapes but seldom seem interested in enquiring about the origins and processes underlying them.

    In his popular work Collapse, Jared Diamond fantasised that one day in the future, tourists would stare at the ‘rusting hulks of New York’s skyscrapers’ explaining that human arrogance − overreaching ourselves − is at the root of why societies fail. In Requiem for Detroit, filmmaker Julian Temple too argues that to avoid the fate of the lost cities of the Maya, we must recognise the ‘man-made contagion’ in the ‘rusting hulks of abandoned car plants’. (It seems that even using a different metaphor is deemed to be too hubristic.)

    In terms of the discussion about Chinese ghost cities, many impugn these places as a commentary on the folly of China’s development and its speed of modernisation. Take the Guardian’s former Asia correspondent, Jonathan Watts, who has argued that individuals and civilisations bring about their own annihilation by ‘losing touch with their roots or over-consuming’. Initial signs of success often prove to be the origin of later failures, he argues. In his view, strength is nothing more than potential weakness, and the moral of the tale is that by hitting a tipping point, civilisations will fall much more quickly than they rise.

    In fact, China’s headlong rush to development means that its cities embody many extremes. For example, the city of Changsha in Hunan Province recently announced that in the space of just seven months it would build an 838 metre skyscraper creating the world’s tallest tower. Understandably, doubts exist over whether this can be achieved − the current tallest, the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, took six years to build. Yet such is the outlook of a country with so much dynamic ambition, that even the seemingly impossible is not to be considered off-limits. At the other end of the scale, it was recently revealed that 30 million Chinese continue to live in caves − a reflection of under-development (not an energy efficient lifestyle choice).

    In the West, a risk averse outlook means that caution is the watchword. Not only is the idea of building new cities a distant memory, but data from the US and UK betrays that geographical mobility is reducing as people elect to stay in declining towns rather than seek new opportunities elsewhere. By contrast, China is a country on the move − quite literally. In fact the landmark 50 per cent urbanisation rate was achieved some years ago, driven by a ‘floating population’ of perhaps 200 million people, whose legal status as villagers disguises the fact they have already moved to live and work in cities.

    If cramming five to a room in the existing Anting town means easy access to jobs then why move to Anting German Town, accessible via only a single road, and surrounded by industrial districts and wasteland? But it is also clear that China is building for expansion. The notion of ‘predict and provide’ is so alien to Western planners these days, that they are appalled when particular Chinese authorities announce that they will build a new town with three-lane highways before people move there. How absurd, we say. Look, the roads are empty and unused. But in this debate, it is we who have lost our sense of the audacious.

    When assessing the ghost cities phenomenon, it seems likely that in a country growing at the breakneck speed of China, some mistakes will be made. When bureaucratic targets and technical plans inscribed in protocols and legislation are to the fore, then not all outcomes of investment programmes such as a recent $200 billion infrastructure project will work out. And yes, ghost cities do reflect some worrying economic trends, with rising house prices and the speculative stockpiling of units so that many apartments are owned but not occupied.

    But these problems need to be kept firmly in perspective. The reality is that meaningful development requires risk-taking. The ghost cities today may well prove to be viable in the longer term, as ongoing urbanisation leads to better integration with existing regions, and because by the very virtue of their creation, such areas create new opportunities that alter the existing dynamics.

    #chine #urban_matter #villes_fantômes #architecture

  • Cheap Words | The New Yorker
    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/02/17/cheap-words

    Amazon is a global superstore, like Walmart. It’s also a hardware manufacturer, like Apple, and a utility, like Con Edison, and a video distributor, like Netflix, and a book publisher, like Random House, and a production studio, like Paramount, and a literary magazine, like The Paris Review, and a grocery deliverer, like FreshDirect, and someday it might be a package service, like U.P.S. Its founder and chief executive, Jeff Bezos, also owns a major newspaper, the Washington Post. All these streams and tributaries make Amazon something radically new in the history of American business.

    Recently, Amazon even started creating its own “content”—publishing books. The results have been decidedly mixed. A monopoly is dangerous because it concentrates so much economic power, but in the book business the prospect of a single owner of both the means of production and the modes of distribution is especially worrisome: it would give Amazon more control over the exchange of ideas than any company in U.S. history. Even in the iPhone age, books remain central to American intellectual life, and perhaps to democracy. And so the big question is not just whether Amazon is bad for the book industry; it’s whether Amazon is bad for books.

    According to Marcus, Amazon executives considered publishing people “antediluvian losers with rotary phones and inventory systems designed in 1968 and warehouses full of crap.” Publishers kept no data on customers, making their bets on books a matter of instinct rather than metrics. They were full of inefficiences, starting with overpriced Manhattan offices. There was “a general feeling that the New York publishing business was just this cloistered, Gilded Age antique just barely getting by in a sort of Colonial Williamsburg of commerce, but when Amazon waded into this they would show publishing how it was done.”

    During the 1999 holiday season, Amazon tried publishing books, leasing the rights to a defunct imprint called Weathervane and putting out a few titles. “These were not incipient best-sellers,” Marcus writes. “They were creatures from the black lagoon of the remainder table”—Christmas recipes and the like, selected with no apparent thought. Employees with publishing experience, like Fried, were not consulted. Weathervane fell into an oblivion so complete that there’s no trace of it on the Internet. (Representatives at the company today claim never to have heard of it.) Nobody at Amazon seemed to absorb any lessons from the failure. A decade later, the company would try again.

    Around this time, a group called the “personalization team,” or P13N, started to replace editorial suggestions for readers with algorithms that used customers’ history to make recommendations for future purchases. At Amazon, “personalization” meant data analytics and statistical probability. Author interviews became less frequent, and in-house essays were subsumed by customer reviews, which cost the company nothing. Tim Appelo, the entertainment editor at the time, said, “You could be the Platonic ideal of the reviewer, and you would not beat even those rather crude early algorithms.” Amazon’s departments competed with one another almost as fiercely as they did with other companies. According to Brad Stone, a trash-talking sign was hung on a wall in the P13N office: “people forget that john henry died in the end.” Machines defeated human beings.

    In December, 1999, at the height of the dot-com mania, Time named Bezos its Person of the Year. “Amazon isn’t about technology or even commerce,” the breathless cover article announced. “Amazon is, like every other site on the Web, a content play.” Yet this was the moment, Marcus said, when “content” people were “on the way out.” Although the writers and the editors made the site more interesting, and easier to navigate, they didn’t bring more customers.

    The fact that Amazon once devoted significant space on its site to editorial judgments—to thinking and writing—would be an obscure footnote if not for certain turns in the company’s more recent history. According to one insider, around 2008—when the company was selling far more than books, and was making twenty billion dollars a year in revenue, more than the combined sales of all other American bookstores—Amazon began thinking of content as central to its business. Authors started to be considered among the company’s most important customers. By then, Amazon had lost much of the market in selling music and videos to Apple and Netflix, and its relations with publishers were deteriorating. These difficulties offended Bezos’s ideal of “seamless” commerce. “The company despises friction in the marketplace,” the Amazon insider said. “It’s easier for us to sell books and make books happen if we do it our way and not deal with others. It’s a tech-industry thing: ‘We think we can do it better.’ ” If you could control the content, you controlled everything.

    Many publishers had come to regard Amazon as a heavy in khakis and oxford shirts. In its drive for profitability, Amazon did not raise retail prices; it simply squeezed its suppliers harder, much as Walmart had done with manufacturers. Amazon demanded ever-larger co-op fees and better shipping terms; publishers knew that they would stop being favored by the site’s recommendation algorithms if they didn’t comply. Eventually, they all did. (Few customers realize that the results generated by Amazon’s search engine are partly determined by promotional fees.)

    In late 2007, at a press conference in New York, Bezos unveiled the Kindle, a simple, lightweight device that—in a crucial improvement over previous e-readers—could store as many as two hundred books, downloaded from Amazon’s 3G network. Bezos announced that the price of best-sellers and new titles would be nine-ninety-nine, regardless of length or quality—a figure that Bezos, inspired by Apple’s sale of songs on iTunes for ninety-nine cents, basically pulled out of thin air. Amazon had carefully concealed the number from publishers. “We didn’t want to let that cat out of the bag,” Steele said.

    The price was below wholesale in some cases, and so low that it represented a serious threat to the market in twenty-six-dollar hardcovers. Bookstores that depended on hardcover sales—from Barnes & Noble and Borders (which liquidated its business in 2011) to Rainy Day Books in Kansas City—glimpsed their possible doom. If reading went entirely digital, what purpose would they serve? The next year, 2008, which brought the financial crisis, was disastrous for bookstores and publishers alike, with widespread layoffs.

    By 2010, Amazon controlled ninety per cent of the market in digital books—a dominance that almost no company, in any industry, could claim. Its prohibitively low prices warded off competition.

    Publishers looked around for a competitor to Amazon, and they found one in Apple, which was getting ready to introduce the iPad, and the iBooks Store. Apple wanted a deal with each of the Big Six houses (Hachette, HarperCollins, Macmillan, Penguin, Random House, and Simon & Schuster) that would allow the publishers to set the retail price of titles on iBooks, with Apple taking a thirty-per-cent commission on each sale. This was known as the “agency model,” and, in some ways, it offered the publishers a worse deal than selling wholesale to Amazon. But it gave publishers control over pricing and a way to challenge Amazon’s grip on the market. Apple’s terms included the provision that it could match the price of any rival, which induced the publishers to impose the agency model on all digital retailers, including Amazon.

    Five of the Big Six went along with Apple. (Random House was the holdout.) Most of the executives let Amazon know of the change by phone or e-mail, but John Sargent flew out to Seattle to meet with four Amazon executives, including Russ Grandinetti, the vice-president of Kindle content. In an e-mail to a friend, Sargent wrote, “Am on my way out to Seattle to get my ass kicked by Amazon.”

    Sargent’s gesture didn’t seem to matter much to the Amazon executives, who were used to imposing their own terms. Seated at a table in a small conference room, Sargent said that Macmillan wanted to switch to the agency model for e-books, and that if Amazon refused Macmillan would withhold digital editions until seven months after print publication. The discussion was angry and brief. After twenty minutes, Grandinetti escorted Sargent out of the building. The next day, Amazon removed the buy buttons from Macmillan’s print and digital titles on its site, only to restore them a week later, under heavy criticism. Amazon unwillingly accepted the agency model, and within a couple of months e-books were selling for as much as fourteen dollars and ninety-nine cents.

    Amazon filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission. In April, 2012, the Justice Department sued Apple and the five publishers for conspiring to raise prices and restrain competition. Eventually, all the publishers settled with the government. (Macmillan was the last, after Sargent learned that potential damages could far exceed the equity value of the company.) Macmillan was obliged to pay twenty million dollars, and Penguin seventy-five million—enormous sums in a business that has always struggled to maintain respectable profit margins.

    Apple fought the charges, and the case went to trial last June. Grandinetti, Sargent, and others testified in the federal courthouse in lower Manhattan. As proof of collusion, the government presented evidence of e-mails, phone calls, and dinners among the Big Six publishers during their negotiations with Apple. Sargent and other executives acknowledged that they wanted higher prices for e-books, but they argued that the evidence showed them only to be competitors in an incestuous business, not conspirators. On July 10th, Judge Denise Cote ruled in the government’s favor.

    Apple, facing up to eight hundred and forty million dollars in damages, has appealed. As Apple and the publishers see it, the ruling ignored the context of the case: when the key events occurred, Amazon effectively had a monopoly in digital books and was selling them so cheaply that it resembled predatory pricing—a barrier to entry for potential competitors. Since then, Amazon’s share of the e-book market has dropped, levelling off at about sixty-five per cent, with the rest going largely to Apple and to Barnes & Noble, which sells the Nook e-reader. In other words, before the feds stepped in, the agency model introduced competition to the market. But the court’s decision reflected a trend in legal thinking among liberals and conservatives alike, going back to the seventies, that looks at antitrust cases from the perspective of consumers, not producers: what matters is lowering prices, even if that goal comes at the expense of competition.

    With Amazon’s patented 1-Click shopping, which already knows your address and credit-card information, there’s just you and the buy button; transactions are as quick and thoughtless as scratching an itch. “It’s sort of a masturbatory culture,” the marketing executive said. If you pay seventy-nine dollars annually to become an Amazon Prime member, a box with the Amazon smile appears at your door two days after you click, with free shipping. Amazon’s next frontier is same-day delivery: first in certain American cities, then throughout the U.S., then the world. In December, the company patented “anticipatory shipping,” which will use your shopping data to put items that you don’t yet know you want to buy, but will soon enough, on a truck or in a warehouse near you.

    Amazon employs or subcontracts tens of thousands of warehouse workers, with seasonal variation, often building its fulfillment centers in areas with high unemployment and low wages. Accounts from inside the centers describe the work of picking, boxing, and shipping books and dog food and beard trimmers as a high-tech version of the dehumanized factory floor satirized in Chaplin’s “Modern Times.” Pickers holding computerized handsets are perpetually timed and measured as they fast-walk up to eleven miles per shift around a million-square-foot warehouse, expected to collect orders in as little as thirty-three seconds. After watching footage taken by an undercover BBC reporter, a stress expert said, “The evidence shows increased risk of mental illness and physical illness.” The company says that its warehouse jobs are “similar to jobs in many other industries.”

    When I spoke with Grandinetti, he expressed sympathy for publishers faced with upheaval. “The move to people reading digitally and buying books digitally is the single biggest change that any of us in the book business will experience in our time,” he said. “Because the change is particularly big in size, and because we happen to be a leader in making it, a lot of that fear gets projected onto us.” Bezos also argues that Amazon’s role is simply to usher in inevitable change. After giving “60 Minutes” a first glimpse of Amazon drone delivery, Bezos told Charlie Rose, “Amazon is not happening to bookselling. The future is happening to bookselling.”

    In Grandinetti’s view, the Kindle “has helped the book business make a more orderly transition to a mixed print and digital world than perhaps any other medium.” Compared with people who work in music, movies, and newspapers, he said, authors are well positioned to thrive. The old print world of scarcity—with a limited number of publishers and editors selecting which manuscripts to publish, and a limited number of bookstores selecting which titles to carry—is yielding to a world of digital abundance. Grandinetti told me that, in these new circumstances, a publisher’s job “is to build a megaphone.”

    After the Kindle came out, the company established Amazon Publishing, which is now a profitable empire of digital works: in addition to Kindle Singles, it has mystery, thriller, romance, and Christian lines; it publishes translations and reprints; it has a self-service fan-fiction platform; and it offers an extremely popular self-publishing platform. Authors become Amazon partners, earning up to seventy per cent in royalties, as opposed to the fifteen per cent that authors typically make on hardcovers. Bezos touts the biggest successes, such as Theresa Ragan, whose self-published thrillers and romances have been downloaded hundreds of thousands of times. But one survey found that half of all self-published authors make less than five hundred dollars a year.

    Every year, Fine distributes grants of twenty-five thousand dollars, on average, to dozens of hard-up literary organizations. Beneficiaries include the pen American Center, the Loft Literary Center, in Minneapolis, and the magazine Poets & Writers. “For Amazon, it’s the cost of doing business, like criminal penalties for banks,” the arts manager said, suggesting that the money keeps potential critics quiet. Like liberal Democrats taking Wall Street campaign contributions, the nonprofits don’t advertise the grants. When the Best Translated Book Award received money from Amazon, Dennis Johnson, of Melville House, which had received the prize that year, announced that his firm would no longer compete for it. “Every translator in America wrote me saying I was a son of a bitch,” Johnson said. A few nonprofit heads privately told him, “I wanted to speak out, but I might have taken four thousand dollars from them, too.” A year later, at the Associated Writing Programs conference, Fine shook Johnson’s hand, saying, “I just wanted to thank you—that was the best publicity we could have had.” (Fine denies this.)

    By producing its own original work, Amazon can sell more devices and sign up more Prime members—a major source of revenue. While the company was building the Kindle, it started a digital store for streaming music and videos, and, around the same time it launched Amazon Publishing, it created Amazon Studios.

    The division pursued an unusual way of producing television series, using its strength in data collection. Amazon invited writers to submit scripts on its Web site—“an open platform for content creators,” as Bill Carr, the vice-president for digital music and video, put it. Five thousand scripts poured in, and Amazon chose to develop fourteen into pilots. Last spring, Amazon put the pilots on its site, where customers could review them and answer a detailed questionnaire. (“Please rate the following aspects of this show: The humor, the characters . . . ”) More than a million customers watched. Engineers also developed software, called Amazon Storyteller, which scriptwriters can use to create a “storyboard animatic”—a cartoon rendition of a script’s plot—allowing pilots to be visualized without the expense of filming. The difficulty, according to Carr, is to “get the right feedback and the right data, and, of the many, many data points that I can collect from customers, which ones can tell you, ‘This is the one’?”

    Bezos applying his “take no prisoners” pragmatism to the Post: “There are conflicts of interest with Amazon’s many contracts with the government, and he’s got so many policy issues going, like sales tax.” One ex-employee who worked closely with Bezos warned, “At Amazon, drawing a distinction between content people and business people is a foreign concept.”

    Perhaps buying the Post was meant to be a good civic deed. Bezos has a family foundation, but he has hardly involved himself in philanthropy. In 2010, Charlie Rose asked him what he thought of Bill Gates’s challenge to other billionaires to give away most of their wealth. Bezos didn’t answer. Instead, he launched into a monologue on the virtue of markets in solving social problems, and somehow ended up touting the Kindle.

    Bezos bought a newspaper for much the same reason that he has invested money in a project for commercial space travel: the intellectual challenge. With the Post, the challenge is to turn around a money-losing enterprise in a damaged industry, and perhaps to show a way for newspapers to thrive again.

    Lately, digital titles have levelled off at about thirty per cent of book sales. Whatever the temporary fluctuations in publishers’ profits, the long-term outlook is discouraging. This is partly because Americans don’t read as many books as they used to—they are too busy doing other things with their devices—but also because of the relentless downward pressure on prices that Amazon enforces. The digital market is awash with millions of barely edited titles, most of it dreck, while readers are being conditioned to think that books are worth as little as a sandwich. “Amazon has successfully fostered the idea that a book is a thing of minimal value,” Johnson said. “It’s a widget.”

    There are two ways to think about this. Amazon believes that its approach encourages ever more people to tell their stories to ever more people, and turns writers into entrepreneurs; the price per unit might be cheap, but the higher number of units sold, and the accompanying royalties, will make authors wealthier. Jane Friedman, of Open Road, is unfazed by the prospect that Amazon might destroy the old model of publishing. “They are practicing the American Dream—competition is good!” she told me. Publishers, meanwhile, “have been banks for authors. Advances have been very high.” In Friedman’s view, selling digital books at low prices will democratize reading: “What do you want as an author—to sell books to as few people as possible for as much as possible, or for as little as possible to as many readers as possible?”

    The answer seems self-evident, but there is a more skeptical view. Several editors, agents, and authors told me that the money for serious fiction and nonfiction has eroded dramatically in recent years; advances on mid-list titles—books that are expected to sell modestly but whose quality gives them a strong chance of enduring—have declined by a quarter.

    #Amazon

  • Des vidéos rares de Prince vont être postées sur youtube par la chaîne officielle. Voici les trois premières :

    Endorphinmachine
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09vNPhIk4QU

    Dolphin
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tfSA0mS8jEY

    Rock And Roll Is Alive ! (and It Lives In Minneapolis)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAxbwQNa15Q

    ELO#353 - Prince en vidéo
    Dror, #Entre_Les_Oreilles, le 26 décembre 2018
    http://entrelesoreilles.blogspot.com/2018/12/elo353-prince-en-video.html

    #Musique #Prince #Funk

  • As homeless camp grows, #Minneapolis leaders search for a solution

    A large homeless camp has formed outside Minneapolis inhabited mostly by Native Americans. The city has responded by tending to people within the camp and planning a temporary shelter site rather than displacing them.

    When a disturbed woman pulled a knife on Denise Deer earlier this month, she quickly herded her children into their tent. A nearby man stepped in and the woman was arrested, and within minutes, 8-year-old Shilo and 4-year-old Koda were back outside sitting on a sidewalk, playing with a train set and gobbling treats delivered by volunteers.

    The sprawling homeless encampment just south of downtown Minneapolis isn’t where Ms. Deer wanted her family of six to be, but with nowhere else to go after her mother-in-law wouldn’t take them in, she sighed: “It’s a place.”

    City leaders have been reluctant to break up what’s believed to be the largest homeless camp ever seen in Minneapolis, where the forbidding climate has typically discouraged large encampments seen elsewhere. But two deaths in recent weeks and concern about disease, drugs, and the coming winter have ratcheted up pressure for a solution.

    “Housing is a right,” Mayor Jacob Frey said. “We’re going to continue working as hard as we can to make sure the people in our city are guaranteed that right.”

    As many as 300 people have congregated in the camp that took root this summer beside an urban freeway. When The Associated Press visited earlier this month, colorful tents and a few teepees were lined up in rows, sometimes inches apart and three tents deep. Bicycles, coolers, or small toys were near some tents, and some people had strung up laundry to air out.

    Most of the residents are Native American. The encampment – called the “Wall of Forgotten Natives” because it sits against a highway sound wall – is in a part of the city with a large concentration of American Indians and organizations that help them. Some have noted the tents stand on what was once Dakota land.

    “They came to an area, a geography that has long been identified as a part of the Native community. A lot of the camp residents feel at home, they feel safer,” said Robert Lilligren, vice chairman of the Metropolitan Urban Indian Directors.

    The encampment illuminates some problems that face American Indians in Minneapolis. They make up 1.1 percent of Hennepin County’s residents, but 16 percent of unsheltered homeless people, according to an April count. It’s also a community being hit harder by opioids – with Native Americans five times more likely to die from an overdose than whites, according to state health department data.

    One end of the camp appeared to be geared toward families, while adults – some of whom were visibly high – were on the other end. In the middle, a group called Natives Against Heroin was operating a tent where volunteers handed out bottles of water, food, and clothing. The group also gives addicts clean needles and sharps containers, and volunteers carry naloxone to treat overdoses.

    “People are respectful,” said group founder James Cross. “But sometimes an addict will be coming off a high.... We have to deescalate. Not hurt them, just escort them off. And say ’Hey, this is a family setting. This is a community. We’ve got kids, elders. We’ve got to make it safe.’”

    With dozens of people living within inches of each other, health officials also fear an outbreak of infectious diseases like hepatitis A. Medical professionals have started administering vaccines. In recent weeks, one woman died when she didn’t have an asthma inhaler, and one man died from a drug overdose.

    For now, service agencies have set up areas for camp residents to get medical care, antibiotics, hygiene kits, or other supplies. There’s a station advertising free HIV testing, a place to apply for housing, and temporary showers. Portable restrooms and hand-sanitizing stations have also been put up.

    But city officials know that’s not sustainable, especially as winter approaches. At an emergency meeting on Sept. 26, the City Council approved a plan to use land that’s primarily owned by the Red Lake Nation as the site for a “navigation center,” which will include temporary shelters and services.

    Because buildings need to be demolished, that site might not be ready until early December, concerning at least one council member. But Sam Strong of the Red Lake Nation said it’s possible the process could be expedited. Once camp residents are safe for the winter, finding more stable, long-term housing will be the goal. Several families have already been moved to shelters.

    Bear La Ronge Jr. moved to the encampment after he got full custody of his three kids and realized they couldn’t live along the railroad tracks where he’d been staying. Over several weeks, he watched the tent city grow, and wishes the drug users would be removed.

    “This place is so incorporated with drugs, needles laying everywhere,” Mr. La Ronge said. He pointed to a cardboard box outside his tent that contained toys. “I wake up every morning and look in my toy box and there’s five open needles in there because people walk by and just drop their needles in my kids’ toys. So I need to go somewhere else.”

    Angela Brown has been homeless for years. She moved to the tent city with her 4-month-old daughter, Raylynn, when it seemed to be her last option.

    “I’d rather be getting a house. I don’t like being dirty, waking up sweaty,” Ms. Brown said as she cradled her daughter.

    She said she did laundry at the camp and took showers, and living there was OK. But she was worried about her daughter, especially with winter coming.

    https://www.csmonitor.com/USA/2018/0927/As-homeless-camp-grows-Minneapolis-leaders-search-for-a-solution?cmpid=TW
    #peuples_autochtones #camps #USA #Etats-Unis #SDF #sans-abri #logement #hébergement

    • Belle sélection américaine pour une si petite liste, mais ce sont les seuls que je n’arrive pas à écouter :

      Atlanta
      Future Mask Off
      Migos Bad and boujee
      Outkast Elevator (Me & You)
      Russ Do It Myself
      Boston
      Guru Lifesaver
      Breaux Bridge
      Buckshot Lefonque Music Evolution
      Brentwood
      EPMD Da Joint
      Chicago
      Saba LIFE
      Dallas
      #Erykah_Badu The Healer
      Detroit
      Clear Soul Forces Get no better
      Eminem The Real Slim Shady
      La Nouvelle-Orléans
      $uicideboy$ ft. Pouya South Side Suicide
      Mystikal Boucin’ Back Lexington
      CunninLynguists Lynguistics
      Los Angeles
      Cypress Hill Hits from the bong
      Dilated Peoples Trade Money
      Dr. Dre The next episode ft. Snoop Dogg
      Gavlyn We On
      Jonwayne These Words are Everything
      Jurassic 5 Quality Control
      Kendrick Lamar Humble
      N.W.A Straight outta Compton
      Snoop Dogg Who Am I (What’s my name) ?
      The Pharcyde Drop
      Miami
      Pouya Get Buck
      Minneapolis
      Atmosphere Painting
      New-York
      A tribe called quest Jazz (We’ve Got) Buggin’ Out
      Big L Put it on
      Jeru the Damaja Me or the Papes
      Mobb Deep Shook Ones Pt. II
      Notorious B.I.G Juicy
      The Underachievers Gold Soul Theory
      Wu-Tang Clan Da Mistery of Chessboxin’
      Newark
      Lords of the Underground Chief Rocka
      Pacewon Children sing
      Petersburg
      Das EFX They want EFX
      Philadelphie
      Doap Nixon Everything’s Changing
      Jedi Mind Tricks Design in Malice
      Pittsburgh
      Mac Miller Nikes on my feet
      Richmond
      Mad Skilzz Move Ya Body
      Sacramento
      Blackalicious Deception
      San Diego
      Surreal & the Sounds Providers Place to be
      San Francisco
      Kero One Fly Fly Away
      Seattle
      Boom Bap Project Who’s that ?
      Brothers From Another Day Drink
      SOL This Shit
      Stone Mountain
      Childish Gambino Redbone
      Washington DC
      Oddisee Own Appeal

      Limité mais permet des découvertes.

      Mark Mushiva - The Art of Dying (#Namibie)
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZZrp4TMAgQ

      Tehn Diamond - Happy (#Zimbabwe)
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T5tjMAy5ySM

      #rap

    • « Global Hip-Hop » : 23 nouveaux morceaux ajoutés dans la base grâce à vos propositions ! Deux nouveaux pays (Mongolie et Madagascar) et 11 nouvelles villes, de Mississauga à Versailles en passant par Molfetta, Safi, Oulan-Bator ou Tananarive ?

  • Des victimes de prêtres américains obtiennent un accord de 210 millions de dollars Belga - 1 Juin 2018 - RTBF
    https://www.rtbf.be/info/societe/detail_des-victimes-de-pretres-americains-obtiennent-un-accord-de-210-millions-

    Un archidiocèse de l’Eglise catholique de l’Etat américain du Minnesota a conclu jeudi un accord à hauteur de 210 millions de dollars avec des centaines de victimes d’abus de membres du clergé, résolvant un conflit vieux de plusieurs années.

    L’archidiocèse de Saint-Paul et Minneapolis - qui a été placé en 2015 sous la protection de la loi sur les faillites - a indiqué que l’accord devrait répondre à toutes les plaintes, conclure le processus de #faillite et permettre la création d’un fonds financier spécial pour 450 victimes.

    « Les rescapés des abus peuvent s’attendre à des paiements dès que le tribunal approuvera le plan », a déclaré l’archevêque Bernard Hebda.

    « Je suis reconnaissant pour toutes les victimes rescapées qui se sont courageusement présentées », a-t-il déclaré lors d’une conférence de presse. « Je reconnais que les abus vous ont tellement volé (...). L’Eglise vous a laissé tomber, je suis vraiment désolé. »

    Les victimes ont accueilli l’accord avec soulagement, mais ont souligné que leurs cicatrices émotionnelles restent intactes.

    Cet accord a été possible grâce à une loi du Minnesota adoptée en 2013, qui permet de poursuivre des agresseurs présumés dans des cas auparavant prescrits. L’accord met fin à l’un des plus longs processus de prise en charge des abus liés à l’Eglise catholique aux Etats-Unis.

    En 2012, des experts ont évoqué au Vatican le chiffre de 100.000 mineurs victimes d’abus de milliers de membres du clergé aux Etats-Unis, certains cas remontant à 1950.

     #religion #pédophilie #culture_du_viol #catholicisme #église #eglise #justice #vatican #viol #prêtres #viols #histoire #usa #faillite #enfants

  • De #Frontex à Frontex. À propos de la “continuité” entre l’#université logistique et les processus de #militarisation

    S’est tenu à l’Université de Grenoble, les jeudi 22 et vendredi 23 mars 2018, un colloque organisé par deux laboratoires de recherche en droit [1], intitulé « De Frontex à Frontex [2] ». Étaient invité.e.s à participer des universitaires, essentiellement travaillant depuis le champ des sciences juridiques, une représentante associative (la CIMADE), mais aussi des membres de l’agence Frontex, du projet Euromed Police IV et de diverses institutions européennes, dont Hervé-Yves Caniard, chef des affaires juridiques de l’agence Frontex et Michel Quillé, chef du projet Euromed Police IV.

    Quelques temps avant la tenue du colloque, des collectifs et associations [3], travaillant notamment à une transformation des conditions politiques contemporaines de l’exil, avaient publié un tract qui portait sur les actions de Frontex aux frontières de l’Europe et qui mettait en cause le mode d’organisation du colloque (notamment l’absence de personnes exilées ou de collectifs directement concernés par les actions de Frontex, les conditions d’invitation de membres de Frontex et Euromed Police ou encore les modes de financement de l’université). Le tract appelait également à un rassemblement devant le bâtiment du colloque [4].

    Le rassemblement s’est donc tenu le 22 mars 2018 à 15h, comme annoncé dans le tract. Puis, vers 16h, des manifestant.e.s se sont introduit.e.s dans la salle du colloque au moment de la pause, ont tagué « Frontex tue » sur un mur, clamé des slogans anti-Frontex. Après quelques minutes passées au fond de la salle, les manifestant.e.s ont été sévèrement et sans sommation frappé.e.s par les forces de l’ordre. Quatre personnes ont dû être transportées à l’hôpital [5]. Le colloque a repris son cours quelques temps après, « comme si de rien n’était » selon plusieurs témoins, et s’est poursuivi le lendemain, sans autres interventions de contestations.

    Au choc des violences policières, se sont ajoutées des questions : comment la situation d’un colloque universitaire a-t-elle pu donner lieu à l’usage de la force ? Plus simplement encore, comment en est-on arrivé là ?

    Pour tenter de répondre, nous proposons de déplier quelques-unes des nombreuses logiques à l’œuvre à l’occasion de ce colloque. Travailler à élaborer une pensée s’entend ici en tant que modalité d’action : il en va de notre responsabilité universitaire et politique d’essayer de comprendre comment une telle situation a pu avoir lieu et ce qu’elle dit des modes de subjectivation à l’œuvre dans l’université contemporaine. Nous proposons de montrer que ces logiques sont essentiellement logistiques, qu’elles sont associées à des processus inhérents de sécurisation et de militarisation, et qu’elles relient, d’un point de vue pratique et théorique, l’institution universitaire à l’institution de surveillance des frontières qu’est Frontex.


    Une démarche logistique silencieuse

    Chercheur.e.s travaillant depuis la géographie sociale et les area studies [6], nous sommes particulièrement attentifs au rôle que joue l’espace dans la formation des subjectivités et des identités sociales. L’espace n’est jamais un simple décor, il ne disparaît pas non plus complètement sous les effets de sa réduction temporelle par la logistique. L’espace n’est pas un donné, il s’élabore depuis des relations qui contribuent à lui donner du sens. Ainsi, nous avons été particulièrement attentifs au choix du lieu où fut organisé le colloque « De Frontex à Frontex ». Nous aurions pu nous attendre à ce que la faculté de droit de l’Université de Grenoble, organisatrice, l’accueille. Mais il en fut autrement : le colloque fut organisé dans le bâtiment très récent appelé « IMAG » (Institut de Mathématiques Appliquées de Grenoble) sur le campus grenoblois. Nouveau centre de recherche inauguré en 2016, il abrite six laboratoires de recherche, spécialisés dans les « logiciels et systèmes intelligents ».

    L’IMAG est un exemple de « zone de transfert de connaissances laboratoires-industries [7] », dont le modèle a été expérimenté dans les universités états-uniennes à partir des années 1980 et qui, depuis, s’est largement mondialisé. Ces « zones » se caractérisent par deux fonctions majeures : 1) faciliter et accélérer les transferts de technologies des laboratoires de recherche vers les industries ; 2) monétiser la recherche. Ces deux caractéristiques relèvent d’une même logique implicite de gouvernementalité logistique.

    Par « gouvernementalité logistique », nous entendons un mode de rationalisation qui vise à gérer toute différence spatiale et temporelle de la manière la plus ’efficace’ possible. L’efficacité, dans ce contexte, se réduit à la seule valeur produite dans les circuits d’extraction, de transfert et d’accumulation des capitaux. En tant que mode de gestion des chaînes d’approvisionnement, la logistique comprend une série de technologies, en particulier des réseaux d’infrastructures techniques et des technologies informatiques. Ces réseaux servent à gérer des flux de biens, d’informations, de populations. La logistique peut, plus largement, être comprise comme un « dispositif », c’est-à-dire un ensemble de relations entre des éléments hétérogènes, comportant des réseaux techniques, comme nous l’avons vu, mais aussi des discours, des institutions...qui les produisent et les utilisent pour légitimer des choix politiques. Dans le contexte logistique, les choix dotés d’un fort caractère politique sont présentés comme des « nécessités » techniques indiscutables, destinées à maximiser des formes d’organisations toujours plus « efficaces » et « rationnelles ».

    La gouvernementalité logistique a opéré à de nombreux niveaux de l’organisation du colloque grenoblois. (a) D’abord le colloque s’est tenu au cœur d’une zone logistique de transfert hyper-sécurisé de connaissances, où celles-ci circulent entre des laboratoires scientifiques et des industries, dont certaines sont des industries militaires d’armement [8]. (b) Le choix de réunir le colloque dans ce bâtiment n’a fait l’objet d’aucun commentaire explicite, tandis que les co-organisateurs du colloque dépolitisaient le colloque, en se défendant de « parler de la politique de l’Union Européenne [9] », tout en présentant l’Agence comme un « nouvel acteur dans la lutte contre l’immigration illégale [10] », reprenant les termes politiques d’une langue médiatique et spectacularisée. Cette dépolitisation relève d’un autre plan de la gouvernementalité logistique, où les choix politiques sont dissimulés sous l’impératif d’une nécessité, qui prend très souvent les atours de compétences techniques ou technologiques. (c) Enfin, Frontex peut être décrite comme un outil de gouvernementalité logistique : outil de surveillance militaire, l’agence est spécialisée dans la gestion de « flux » transfrontaliers. L’agence vise à produire un maximum de choix dits « nécessaires » : la « nécessité » par exemple de « sécuriser » les frontières face à une dite « crise migratoire », présentée comme inéluctable et pour laquelle Frontex ne prend aucune responsabilité politique.

    Ainsi, ce colloque mettait en abyme plusieurs niveaux de gouvernementalité logistique, en invitant les représentants d’une institution logistique militarisée, au cœur d’une zone universitaire logistique de transfert de connaissances, tout en passant sous silence les dimensions politiques et sociales de Frontex et de ce choix d’organisation.

    A partir de ces premières analyses, nous allons tenter de montrer au fil du texte :

    (1)-comment la gouvernementalité logistique s’articule de manière inhérente à des logiques de sécurisation et de militarisation (des relations sociales, des modes de production des connaissances, des modes de gestion des populations) ;

    (2)-comment la notion de « continuité », produite par la rationalité logistique, sert à comprendre le fonctionnement de l’agence Frontex, entendue à la fois comme outil pratique de gestion des populations et comme cadre conceptuel théorique ;

    (3)-comment les choix politiques, opérés au nom de la logistique, sont toujours présentés comme des choix « nécessaires », ce qui limite très fortement les possibilités d’en débattre. Autrement dit, comment la rationalité logistique neutralise les dissentiments politiques.
    Rationalité logistique, sécurisation et militarisation

    --Sécurisation, militarisation des relations sociales et des modes de production des connaissances au sein de l’université logistique

    La gouvernementalité ou rationalité logistique a des conséquences majeures sur les modes de production des relations sociales, mais aussi sur les modes de production des connaissances. Les conséquences sociales de la rationalité logistique devraient être la priorité des analyses des chercheur.e.s en sciences sociales, tant elles sont préoccupantes, avant même l’étude des conséquences sur les modes de production du savoir, bien que tous ces éléments soient liés. C’est ce que Brian Holmes expliquait en 2007 dans une analyse particulièrement convaincante des processus de corporatisation, militarisation et précarisation de la force de travail dans le Triangle de la Recherche en Caroline du Nord aux Etats-Unis [11]. L’auteur montrait combien les activités de transfert et de monétisation des connaissances, caractéristiques des « zones de transfert de connaissances laboratoires-industries », avaient contribué à créer des identités sociales inédites. En plus du « professeur qui se transforme en petit entrepreneur et l’université en grosse entreprise », comme le notait Brian Holmes, s’ajoute désormais un tout nouveau type de relation sociale, dont la nature est très fondamentalement logistique. Dans son ouvrage The Deadly Life of Logistics paru en 2014 [12], Deborah Cowen précisait la nature de ces nouvelles relations logistiques : dans le contexte de la rationalité logistique, les relations entre acteurs sociaux dépendent de plus en plus de logiques inhérentes de sécurisation. Autrement dit, les relations sociales, quand elles sont corsetées par le paradigme logistique, sont aussi nécessairement prises dans l’impératif de « sécurité ». Les travailleurs, les manageurs, les autorités régulatrices étatiques conçoivent leurs relations et situations de travail à partir de la figure centrale de la « chaîne d’approvisionnement ». Ils évaluent leurs activités à l’aune des notions de « risques » -et d’« avantages »-, selon le modèle du transfert de biens, de populations, d’informations (risques de perte ou de gain de valeur dans le transfert, en fonction notamment de la rapidité, de la fluidité, de la surveillance en temps réel de ce transfert). Ainsi, il n’est pas surprenant que des experts universitaires, dont la fonction principale est devenue de faciliter les transferts et la monétisation des connaissances, développent des pratiques qui relèvent implicitement de logiques de sécurisation. Sécuriser, dans le contexte de l’université logistique, veut dire principalement renforcer les droits de propriété intellectuelle, réguler de manière stricte l’accès aux connaissances et les conditions des débats scientifiques (« fluidifier » les échanges, éviter tout « conflit »), autant de pratiques nécessaires pour acquérir une certaine reconnaissance institutionnelle.

    L’IMAG est un exemple particulièrement intéressant de cette nouvelle « entreprise logistique de la connaissance », décrite par Brian Holmes, et qui se substitue progressivement à l’ancien modèle national de l’université. Quelles sont les logiques à l’œuvre dans l’élaboration de cette entreprise logistique de la connaissance ? (1) En premier lieu, et en ordre d’importance, la logistique s’accompagne d’une sécurisation et d’une militarisation de la connaissance. Le processus de militarisation est très clair dans le cas de l’IMAG qui entretient des partenariats avec l’industrie de l’armement, mais il peut être aussi plus indirect. Des recherches portant sur les systèmes embarqués et leurs usages civils, menées par certains laboratoires de l’IMAG et financées par des fonds étatiques, ont en fait également des applications militaires. (2) La seconde logique à l’œuvre est celle d’une disqualification de l’approche politique des objectifs et des conflits sociaux, au profit d’une approche fondée sur les notions de surveillance et de sécurité. A la pointe de la technologie, le bâtiment de l’IMAG est un smart building dont la conception architecturale et le design relèvent de logiques de surveillance. En choisissant de se réunir à l’IMAG, les organisateurs du colloque ont implicitement fait le choix d’un espace qui détermine les relations sociales par la sécurité et la logistique. Ce choix n’a jamais été rendu explicite, au profit de ce qui est réellement mis en valeur : le fait de pouvoir transférer les connaissances vers les industries et de les monétiser, peu importe les moyens utilisés pour les financer et les mettre en circulation.

    Le colloque « De Frontex à Frontex », organisé à l’Université de Grenoble, était ainsi -implicitement- du côté d’un renforcement des synergies entre la corporatisation et la militarisation de la recherche. On pourrait également avancer que la neutralisation de toute dimension politique au sein du colloque (réduite à des enjeux essentiellement juridiques dans les discours des organisateurs [13]) relève d’une même gouvernementalité logistique : il s’agit de supprimer tout « obstacle » potentiel, tout ralentissement « inutile » à la fluidité des transferts de connaissances et aux échanges d’« experts ». Dépolitiser les problèmes posés revient à limiter les risques de conflits et à « fluidifier » encore d’avantage les échanges. On commence ici à comprendre pourquoi le conflit qui s’est invité dans la salle du colloque à Grenoble fut si sévèrement réprimé.

    Les organisateurs expliquèrent eux-mêmes le jour du colloque à un journaliste du Dauphiné Libéré, qu’il n’était pas question de « parler de la politique migratoire de l’Union Européenne ». On pourrait arguer que le terme de « politique » figurait pourtant dans le texte de présentation du colloque. Ainsi, dans ce texte les co-organisateurs proposaient « de réfléchir sur la réalité de l’articulation entre le développement des moyens opérationnels de l’Union et la définition des objectifs de sa politique migratoire [14] ». Mais s’il s’agissait de s’interroger sur la cohérence entre les prérogatives de Frontex et la politique migratoire Union Européenne, les fondements normatifs, ainsi que les conséquences pratiques de cette politique, n’ont pas été appelés à être discutés. La seule mention qui amenait à s’interroger sur ces questions fut la suivante : « Enfin, dans un troisième temps, il faudra s’efforcer d’apprécier certains enjeux de l’émergence de ce service européen des garde-côtes et garde-frontières, notamment ceux concernant la notion de frontière ainsi que le respect des valeurs fondant l’Union, au premier rang desquelles la garantie effective des droits fondamentaux [15] ». Si la garantie effective des droits fondamentaux était bel et bien mentionnée, le texte n’abordait à aucun moment les milliers de morts aux frontières de l’Union Européenne. Débattre de politique, risquer le conflit, comme autant de freins au bon déroulement de transferts de connaissances, est rendu impossible (censuré, neutralisé ou réprimé) dans le contexte de la gouvernementalité logistique. Pendant le colloque, les représentants de l’agence Frontex et d’Euromed Police ont très peu parlé explicitement de politique, mais ont, par contre, souvent déploré, le manque de moyens de leurs institutions, en raison notamment de l’austérité, manière de faire appel implicitement à de nouveaux transferts de fonds, de connaissances, de biens ou encore de flux financiers. C’est oublier -ou ne pas dire- combien l’austérité, appliquée aux politiques sociales, épargne les secteurs de la militarisation et de la sécurisation, en particulier dans le domaine du gouvernement des populations et des frontières.

    Sécurisation et militarisation du gouvernement des populations

    Ainsi, les discussions pendant le colloque n’ont pas porté sur le contexte politique et social plus général de l’Union Européenne et de la France, pour se concentrer sur un défaut de moyens de l’agence Frontex. Rappelons que le colloque a eu lieu alors que le gouvernement d’Emmanuel Macron poursuivait la « refonte » du système des retraites, des services publics, du travail, des aides sociales. Le premier jour du colloque, soit le jeudi 22 mars 2018, avait été déposé un appel à la grève nationale par les syndicats de tous les secteurs du service public. Si l’essentiel des services publics sont soumis à la loi d’airain de l’austérité, d’autres secteurs voient au contraire leurs moyens considérablement augmenter, comme en témoignent les hausses très significatives des budgets annuels de la défense prévus jusqu’en 2025 en France [16]. La loi de programmation militaire 2019-2025, dont le projet a été présenté le 8 février 2018 par le gouvernement Macron, marque une remontée de la puissance financière de l’armée, inédite depuis la fin de la Guerre froide. « Jusqu’en 2022, le budget augmentera de 1,7 milliard d’euros par an, puis de 3 milliards d’euros en 2023, portant le budget des Armées à 39,6 milliards d’euros par an en moyenne, hors pensions, entre 2019 et 2023. Au total, les ressources des armées augmentent de près d’un quart (+23 %) entre 2019 et 2025 [17] ». La réforme de Frontex en 2016 s’inscrit dans la continuité de ces hausses budgétaires.

    Agence européenne pour la gestion de la coopération opérationnelle aux frontières extérieures créée en 2004, et devenue Agence de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes en 2016, Frontex déploie des « équipements techniques […] (tels que des avions et des bateaux) et de personnel spécialement formé [18] » pour contrôler, surveiller, repousser les mouvements des personnes en exil. « Frontex coordonne des opérations maritimes (par exemple, en Grèce, en Italie et en Espagne), mais aussi des opérations aux frontières extérieures terrestres, notamment en Bulgarie, en Roumanie, en Pologne et en Slovaquie. Elle est également présente dans de nombreux aéroports internationaux dans toute l’Europe [19] ». Le colloque devait interroger la réforme très récente de l’Agence en 2016 [20], qui en plus d’une augmentation de ses moyens financiers et matériels, entérinait des pouvoirs étendus, en particulier le pouvoir d’intervenir aux frontières des Etats membres de l’Union Européenne sans la nécessité de leur accord, organiser elle-même des expulsions de personnes, collecter des données personnelles auprès des personnes inquiétées et les transmettre à Europol.

    Cette réforme de l’agence Frontex montre combien l’intégration européenne se fait désormais en priorité depuis les secteurs de la finance et de la sécurité militaire. La création d’une armée européenne répondant à une doctrine militaire commune, la création de mécanismes fiscaux communs, ou encore le renforcement et l’élargissement des prérogatives de Frontex, sont tous des choix institutionnels qui ont des implications politiques majeures. Dans ce contexte, débattre de la réforme juridique de Frontex, en excluant l’analyse des choix politiques qui préside à cette forme, peut être considéré comme une forme grave d’atteinte au processus démocratique.

    Après avoir vu combien la gouvernementalité logistique produit des logiques de sécurisation et de militarisation, circulant depuis l’université logistique jusqu’à Frontex, nous pouvons désormais tenter de comprendre comment la gouvernementalité logistique produit un type spécifique de cadre théorique, résumé dans la notion de « continuité ». Cette notion est centrale pour comprendre les modes de fonctionnement et les implications politiques de Frontex.
    La « continuité » : Frontex comme cartographie politique et concept théorique

    Deux occurrences de la notion de « continuité » apparaissent dans la Revue Stratégique de Défense et de Sécurité Nationale de la France, parue en 2017 :

    [Les attentats] du 13 novembre [2015], exécutés par des commandos équipés et entraînés, marquent une rupture dans la nature même de [la] menace [terroriste] et justifient la continuité entre les notions de sécurité et de défense.
    [...]
    La continuité entre sécurité intérieure et défense contre les menaces extérieures accroît leur complémentarité. Les liens sont ainsi devenus plus étroits entre l’intervention, la protection et la prévention, à l’extérieur et à l’intérieur du territoire national, tandis que la complémentarité entre la dissuasion et l’ensemble des autres fonctions s’est renforcée.

    La réforme de l’agence Frontex correspond pleinement à l’esprit des orientations définies par la Revue Stratégique de Défense et de Sécurité Nationale. Il s’agit de créer une agence dont les missions sont légitimées par l’impératif de « continuité entre sécurité intérieure et défense contre les menaces extérieures ». Les périmètres et les modalités d’intervention de Frontex sont ainsi tout autant « intérieurs » (au sein des Etats membres de l’Union Européenne), qu’extérieurs (aux frontières et au sein des Etats non-membres), tandis que la « lutte contre l’immigration illégale » (intérieure et extérieure) est présentée comme un des moyens de lutte contre le « terrorisme » et la « criminalité organisée ».

    Des frontières « intérieures » et « extérieures » en « continuité »

    Ainsi, la « continuité » désigne un rapport linéaire et intrinsèque entre la sécurité nationale intérieure et la défense extérieure. Ce lien transforme les fonctions frontalières, qui ne servent plus à séparer un intérieur d’un extérieur, désormais en « continuité ». Les frontières dites « extérieures » sont désormais également « intérieures », à la manière d’un ruban de Moebius. A été largement montré combien les frontières deviennent « épaisses [21] », « zonales [22] », « mobiles [23] », « externalisées [24] », bien plus que linéaires et statiques. L’externalisation des frontières, c’est-à-dire l’extension de leurs fonctions de surveillance au-delà des limites des territoires nationaux classiques, s’ajoute à une indistinction plus radicale encore, qui rend indistincts « intérieur » et un « extérieur ». Selon les analyses de Matthew Longo, il s’agit d’un « système-frontière total » caractérisé par « la continuité entre des lignes [devenues des plus en plus épaisses] et des zones frontalières [qui ressemblent de plus en plus aux périphéries impériales] [25] » (souligné par les auteurs).

    La notion de « continuité » répond au problème politique posé par la mondialisation logistique contemporaine. La création de chaînes globales d’approvisionnement et de nouvelles formes de régulations au service de la souveraineté des entreprises, ont radicalement transformé les fonctions classiques des frontières nationales et la conception politique du territoire national. Pris dans la logistique mondialisée, celui-ci n’est plus imaginé comme un contenant fixe et protecteur, dont il est nécessaire de protéger les bords contre des ennemis extérieurs et au sein duquel des ennemis intérieurs [26] sont à combattre. Le territoire national est pensé en tant que forme « continue », une forme « intérieur-extérieur ». Du point de vue de la logistique, ni la disparition des frontières, ni leur renforcement en tant qu’éléments statiques, n’est souhaitable. C’est en devenant tout à la fois intérieures et extérieures, en créant notamment les possibilités d’une expansion du marché de la surveillance, qu’elles permettent d’optimiser l’efficacité de la chaîne logistique et maximiser les bénéfices qui en découlent.

    Une des conséquences les plus importantes et les plus médiatisées de la transformation contemporaine des frontières est celle des migrations : 65,6 millions de personnes étaient en exil (demandeur.se.s d’asile, réfugié.e.s, déplacé.e.s internes, apatrides) dans le monde en 2016 selon le HCR [27], contre 40 millions à la fin de la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Cette augmentation montre combien les frontières n’empêchent pas les mouvements. Au contraire, elles contribuent à les produire, pour notamment les intégrer à une économie très lucrative de la surveillance [28]. La dite « crise migratoire », largement produite par le régime frontalier contemporain, est un effet, parmi d’autres également très graves, de cette transformation des frontières. Évasion fiscale, produits financiers transnationaux, délocalisation industrielle, flux de déchets électroniques et toxiques, prolifération des armes, guerres transfrontalières (cyber-guerre, guerre financière, guerre de drones, frappes aériennes), etc., relèvent tous d’une multiplication accélérée des pratiques produites par la mondialisation contemporaine. Grâce au fonctionnement de l’économie de l’attention, qui caractérise le capitalisme de plateforme, tous ces processus, sont réduits dans le discours médiatisé, comme par magie, au « problème des migrants ». Tout fonctionne comme si les autres effets de cette transformation des frontières, par ailleurs pour certains facteurs de déplacements migratoires, n’existaient pas. S’il y avait une crise, elle serait celle du contrôle de l’attention par les technologies informatiques. Ainsi, la dite « crise migratoire » est plutôt le symptôme de la mise sous silence, de l’exclusion complète de la sphère publique de toutes les autres conséquences des transformations frontalières produites par le capitalisme logistique et militarisé contemporain.

    La réforme de l’agence Frontex en 2016 se situe clairement dans le contexte de cette politique de transformation des frontières et de mise en exergue d’une « crise migratoire », au service du marché de la surveillance, tandis que sont passés sous silence bien d’autres processus globaux à l’œuvre. Frontex, en favorisant des « coopérations internationales » militaires avec des Etats non-membres de l’Union Européenne, travaille à la création de frontières « en continu ». Ainsi les frontières de l’Union Européenne sont non seulement maritimes et terrestres aux « bords » des territoires, mais elles sont aussi rejouées dans le Sahara, au large des côtes atlantiques de l’Afrique de l’Ouest, jusqu’au Soudan [29] ou encore à l’intérieur des territoires européens (multiplication des centres de rétention pour étrangers notamment [30]). Le « projet Euromed Police IV », débuté en 2016 pour une période de quatre ans, financé par l’Union Européenne, dont le chef, Michel Quillé, était invité au colloque grenoblois, s’inscrit également dans le cadre de ces partenariats sécuritaires et logistiques internationaux : « le projet [...] a pour objectif général d’accroître la sécurité des citoyens dans l’aire euro-méditerranéenne en renforçant la coopération sur les questions de sécurité entre les pays partenaires du Sud de la Méditerranée [31] mais aussi entre ces pays et les pays membres de l’Union Européenne [32] ». La rhétorique de la « coopération internationale » cache une réalité toute différente, qui vise à redessiner les pratiques frontalières actuelles, dans le sens de la « continuité » intérieur-extérieur et de l’expansion d’une chaîne logistique sécuritaire.

    « Continuité » et « sécurité », des notions ambivalentes

    En tant qu’appareillage conceptuel, la notion de « continuité » entre espace domestique et espace extérieur, est particulièrement ambivalente. La « continuité » pourrait signifier la nécessité de créer de nouvelles formes de participation transnationale, de partage des ressources ou de solutions collectives. Autrement dit, la « continuité » pourrait être pensée du côté de l’émancipation et d’une critique en actes du capitalisme sécuritaire et militarisé. Mais la « continuité », dans le contexte politique contemporain, signifie bien plutôt coopérer d’un point de vue militaire, se construire à partir de la figure d’ennemis communs, définis comme à fois « chez nous » et « ailleurs ». Frontex, comme mode transnational de mise en relation, relève du choix politique d’une « continuité » militaire. Cette notion est tout à la fois descriptive et prescriptive. Elle désigne la transformation objective des frontières (désormais « épaisses », « zonales », « mobiles »), mais aussi toute une série de pratiques, d’institutions (comme Frontex), de discours, qui matérialisent cette condition métastable. Depuis un registre idéologique, la « continuité » suture le subjectif et l’objectif, la contingence et la nécessité, le politique et la logistique.

    La campagne publicitaire de recrutement pour l’armée de terre française, diffusée en 2016 et créée par l’agence de publicité parisienne Insign, illustre parfaitement la manière dont la notion de « continuité » opère, en particulier le slogan : « je veux repousser mes limites au-delà des frontières ». Le double-sens du terme « repousser », qui signifie autant faire reculer une attaque militaire, que dépasser une limite, est emblématique de toute l’ambivalence de l’idéologie de la « continuité ». Slogan phare de la campagne de recrutement de l’armée de terre, ’je veux repousser mes limites au-delà des frontières’ relève d’une conception néolibérale du sujet, fondée sur les présuppositions d’un individualisme extrême. Là où la militarisation des frontières et la généralisation d’un état de guerre coloniale engage tout un pays (sans pour autant que la distinction entre ennemi et ami soit claire), l’idée de frontière subit une transformation métonymique. Elle devient la priorité absolue de l’individu (selon l’individualisme comme principe sacré du néolibéralisme). La guerre n’est finalement qu’un moyen pour l’individu de se réaliser (tout obstacle relevant du côté de l’ » ennemi »). À la transgression des frontières par le triangle capital-militaire-sécuritaire, se substitue l’image fictive de limites individualisées.

    L’agence Frontex, en plus d’être un dispositif pratique, est aussi prise dans l’idéologie de la « continuité ». L’agence vise principalement à produire des sujets dont les pulsions individuelles se lient, de manière « continue », avec une chaîne logistico-militaire qui vise à « repousser » toute relation sociale et politique vers un espace de « sécurité » silencieux, neutralisé, voire mort. Objectif central des missions de Frontex, la « sécurité » est, tout comme la « continuité », loin d’être un concept clair et transparent. La sécurité dont il est question dans les opérations de Frontex est une modalité de gestion des populations, qui sert à légitimer des états d’exception. La sécurité dans ce cas est faussement celle des personnes. Il s’agit d’une toute autre sécurité, détachée de la question des personnes, qui concerne avant tout les flux de populations et de marchandises, destinée principalement à en garantir la monétisation. La sécurité n’est ainsi pas une fin en soi, en lien avec la liberté ou l’émancipation, mais une opération permettant la capitalisation des populations et des biens. Cette notion fonctionne car précisément elle sème le trouble entre « sécurité des personnes » et « sécurité des flux ». Le type de « sécurité » qui organise les missions de l’agence Frontex est logistique. Son but est de neutraliser les rapports sociaux, en rompant toutes possibilités de dialogues, pour gérer de manière asymétrique et fragmentaire, des flux, considérés à sens unique.

    Concept polyvalent et ambivalent, la « sécurité » devrait être redéfinie depuis un horizon social et servir avant tout les possibilités de créer des liens sociaux de solidarité et de mutualisation d’alternatives. Les partis traditionnels de gauche en Europe ont essayé pendant des décennies de re-socialiser la sécurité, défendant une « Europe sociale ». On peut retrouver dans les causes de l’échec des partis de Gauche en Europe les ferments du couple logistique-sécurité, toujours à l’œuvre aujourd’hui.

    Une des causes les plus signifiantes de cet échec, et ayant des répercussions majeures sur ce que nous décrivons au sujet de Frontex, tient dans l’imaginaire cartographique et historique de l’Europe sociale des partis traditionnels de Gauche. Au début des années 1990, des débats importants eurent lieu entre la Gauche et la Droite chrétienne au sujet de ce que devait être l’Union Européenne. Il en ressortit un certain nombre d’accords et de désaccords. La notion coloniale de « différence civilisationnelle » fit consensus, c’est-à-dire la définition de l’Europe en tant qu’aire civilisationnelle spécifique et différenciée. A partir de ce consensus commun, la Gauche s’écarta de la Droite, en essayant d’associer la notion de « différence civilisationnelle » à un ensemble de valeurs héritées des Lumières, notamment l’égalité et la liberté -sans, par ailleurs, faire trop d’effort pour critiquer l’esclavage ou encore les prédations territoriales, caractéristiques du siècle des Lumières. La transformation de l’universalisme des Lumières en trait de civilisation -autrement dit, concevoir que la philosophie politique universaliste est d’abord « européenne »- s’inscrit dans le registre de la différence coloniale, caractéristique du projet moderne. Le fait de répéter à l’envie que la Démocratie aurait une origine géographique et que ce serait Athènes s’inscrit dans ce projet moderne civilisateur colonial. L’égalité, la liberté, la démocratie s’élaborent depuis des mouvements sociaux, toujours renouvelés et qui visent à se déplacer vers l’autre, vers ce qui paraît étranger. Sans ce mouvement fondamental de déplacement, jamais achevé, qui découvre toujours de nouveaux points d’origine, aucune politique démocratique n’est possible. C’est précisément ce que les partis de Gauche et du Centre en Europe ont progressivement nié. La conception de l’égalité et de la liberté, comme attributs culturels ou civilisationnels, a rendu la Gauche aveugle. En considérant l’Europe, comme un territoire fixe, lieu d’un héritage culturel spécifique, la Gauche n’a pas su analyser les processus de mondialisation logistique et les transformations associées des frontières. Là où le territoire moderne trouvait sa légitimité dans la fixité de ses frontières, la logistique mondialisée a introduit des territorialités mobiles, caractérisées par une disparition progressive entre « intérieur » et « extérieur », au service de l’expansion des chaînes d’approvisionnement et des marchés. Frontex est une des institutions qui contribue au floutage des distinctions entre territoire intérieur et extérieur. Incapables de décoloniser leurs analyses de la frontière, tant d’un point de vue épistémologique, social qu’institutionnel, les partis de Gauche n’ont pas su réagir à l’émergence du cadre conceptuel de la « continuité » entre sécurité intérieure et guerre extérieure. Tant que la Gauche considérera que la frontière est/doit être l’enveloppe d’un territoire fixe, lieu d’une spécificité culturelle ou civilisationnelle, elle ne pourra pas interpréter et transformer l’idéologie de la « continuité », aujourd’hui dominée par la militarisation et la monétisation, vers une continuité sociale, au service des personnes et des relations sociales.

    Sans discours, ni débat public structuré sur ces transformations politiques, les explications se cantonnent à l’argument d’une nécessité logistique, ce qui renforce encore l’idéologie de la « continuité », au service de la surveillance et du capitalisme.

    C’est dans ce contexte que les « entreprises de la connaissance » remplacent désormais l’ancien modèle des universités nationales. Aucun discours public n’est parvenu à contrer la monétisation et la militarisation des connaissances. La continuité à l’œuvre ici est celle de la recherche universitaire et des applications sécuritaires et militaires, qui seraient les conditions de son financement. Le fait que l’université soit gouvernée à la manière d’une chaîne logistique, qu’elle serve des logiques et des intérêts de sécurisation et de militarisation, sont présentées dans les discours dominants comme des nécessités. Ce qui est valorisé, c’est la monétisation de la recherche et sa capacité à circuler, à la manière d’une marchandise capitalisée. La nécessité logistique remplace toute discussion sur les causes politiques de telles transformations. Aucun parti politique, a fortiori de Gauche, n’est capable d’ouvrir le débat sur les causes et les conséquences de la gouvernementalité logistique, qui s’est imposée comme le nouveau mode dominant d’une gouvernementalité militarisée, à la faveur du capitalisme mondialisé. Ces processus circulent entre des mondes a priori fragmentés et rarement mis en lien : l’université, Frontex, l’industrie de l’armement, la sécurité intérieure, la défense extérieure. L’absence de débat sur la légitimité politique de telles décisions est une énième caractéristique de la gouvernementalité logistique.
    Mise sous silence du politique par la rationalité logistique, neutralisation du dissentiment

    Les discours sécuritaires de l’agence Frontex et d’Euromed Police s’accompagnent d’une dissimulation de leurs positionnements politiques. Tout fonctionne depuis des « constats », des « diagnostics ». Ces constats « consensuels » ont été repris par les chercheur.e.s, organisateurs et soutiens du colloque sur Frontex. Les scientifiques, travaillant au sein de l’université logistique et se réunissant pour le colloque à l’IMAG, viennent renforcer les justifications logistiques des actions de Frontex et Euromed Police, en disqualifiant tout débat politique qui permettrait de les interroger.

    Le « constat » d’une « crise migratoire » vécue par l’Union Européenne, qui l’aurait « amené à renforcer les pouvoirs de son agence Frontex », est la première phrase du texte de cadrage du colloque :

    La crise migratoire que vit aujourd’hui l’Union européenne (UE) l’a amenée à renforcer les pouvoirs de son agence Frontex. La réforme adoptée en septembre 2016 ne se limite pas à la reconnaissance de nouvelles prérogatives au profit de Frontex mais consiste également à prévoir les modalités d’intervention d’un nouvel acteur dans la lutte contre l’immigration illégale au sein de l’UE : le corps européen des gardes-frontières et garde-côtes. Cette nouvelle instance a pour objet de permettre l’action en commun de Frontex et des autorités nationales en charge du contrôle des frontières de l’UE, ces deux acteurs ayant la responsabilité partagée de la gestion des frontières extérieures[6].

    Nous souhaitons ici citer, en contre-point, le premier paragraphe d’une lettre écrite quelques jours après les violences policières, par une personne ayant assisté au colloque. Dans ce paragraphe, l’auteur remet directement en cause la dissimulation d’un positionnement politique au nom d’un « constat réaliste et objectif » des « problèmes » auxquels Frontex devraient « s’attaquer » :

    Vous avez décidé d’organiser un colloque sur Frontex, à l’IMAG (Université de Grenoble Alpes), les 22 et 23 mars 2018. Revendiquant une approche juridique, vous affirmez que votre but n’était pas de débattre des politiques migratoires (article du Dauphiné Libéré, 23 mars 2018). C’est un choix. Il est contestable. Il est en effet tout à fait possible de traiter de questions juridiques sans évacuer l’analyse politique, en assumant un point de vue critique. Vous vous retranchez derrière l’argument qu’il n’était pas question de discuter des politiques migratoires. Or, vous présentez les choses avec les mots qu’utilise le pouvoir pour imposer sa vision et justifier ces politiques. Vous parlez de « crise migratoire », de « lutte contre l’immigration illégale », etc. C’est un choix. Il est contestable. Les mots ont un sens, ils véhiculent une façon de voir la réalité. Plutôt que de parler de « crise de l’accueil » et de « criminalisation des exilé.e.s » par le « bras armé de l’UE », vous préférez écrire que « la crise migratoire » a « amené » l’UE à « renforcer les pouvoirs de son agence, Frontex ». Et hop, le tour de magie est joué. Si Frontex doit se renforcer c’est à cause des migrant.e.s. S’il y a des enjeux migratoires, la seule réponse légitime, c’est la répression. Ce raisonnement implicite n’a rien à voir avec des questions juridiques. Il s’agit bien d’une vision politique. C’est la vôtre. Mais permettez-nous de la contester [33].

    « Diagnostiquer » une « crise migratoire » à laquelle il faut répondre, est présenté comme un « choix nécessaire », qui s’inscrit dans un discours sécuritaire mobilisé à deux échelles différentes : (1) « défendre » la « sécurité » des frontières européennes, contre une crise migratoire où les « migrants » sont les ennemis, à la fois extérieurs et intérieurs, et (2) défendre la sécurité de la salle de conférence et de l’université, contre les manifestant.e.s militant.e.s, qui seraient les ennemis du débat « scientifique » (et où le scientifique est pensé comme antonyme du « manifestant.e » et/ou « militant.e »). L’université logistique est ici complice de la disqualification du politique, pour légitimer la nécessité des actions de Frontex.

    Le texte de présentation du colloque invitait ainsi bien plus à partager la construction d’un consensus illusoire autour de concepts fondamentalement ambivalents (crise migratoire, protection, sécurité) qu’à débattre à partir des situations réelles, vécues par des milliers de personnes, souvent au prix de leur vie. Ce consensus est celui de l’existence d’un ’problème objectif de l’immigration » contre lequel l’agence Frontex a été « amené » à « lutter », selon la logique d’une « adhésion aveugle à l’ « objectivité » de la « nécessité historique [34] » et logistique. Or, il est utile de rappeler, avec Jacques Rancière, qu’« il n’y a pas en politique de nécessité objective ni de problèmes objectifs. On a les problèmes politiques qu’on choisit d’avoir, généralement parce qu’on a déjà les réponses. [35] ». Les gouvernements, mais on pourrait dire aussi les chercheur.e.s organisateurs ou soutiens de ce colloque, « ont pris pour politique de renoncer à toute politique autre que de gestion logistique des « conséquences ».

    Les violences policières pendant le colloque « De Frontex à Frontex », sont venues sévèrement réprimer le resurgissement du politique. La répression violente a pour pendant, dans certains cas, la censure. Ainsi, un colloque portant sur l’islamophobie à l’université de Lyon 2 avait été annulé par les autorités de l’université en novembre 2017. Sous la pression orchestrée par une concertation entre associations et presses de droite, les instances universitaires avaient alors justifié cette annulation au motif que « les conditions n’étaient pas réunies pour garantir la sérénité des échanges », autrement dit en raison d’un défaut de « sécurité [36] ». Encore une fois, la situation est surdéterminée par la logistique sécuritaire, qui disqualifie le politique et vise à « fluidifier », « pacifier », autrement dit « neutraliser » les échanges de connaissances, de biens, pour permettre notamment leur monétisation.

    On pourrait arguer que la manifestation ayant eu lieu à Grenoble, réprimée par des violences policières, puisse justifier la nécessité d’annuler des colloques, sur le motif de l’absence de sérénité des échanges. On pourrait également arguer que les manifestant.e.s grenoblois.e.s, se mobilisant contre le colloque sur Frontex, ont joué le rôle de censeurs (faire taire le colloque), censure par ailleurs attaquée dans la situation du colloque sur l’islamophobie.

    Or, renvoyer ces parties dos à dos est irrecevable :

    – d’abord parce que les positions politiques en jeu, entre les opposant.e.s au colloque portant sur l’islamophobie et les manifestant.e.s critiquant Frontex et les conditions du colloque grenoblois, sont profondément antagonistes, les uns nourrissant le racisme et la xénophobie, les autres travaillant à remettre en cause les principes racistes et xénophobes des politiques nationalistes à l’œuvre dans l’Union Européenne. Nous récusons l’idée qu’il y aurait une symétrie entre ces positionnements.

    – Ensuite, parce que les revendications des manifestant.e.s, parues dans un tract publié quelques jours avant le colloque, ne visait ni à son annulation pure et simple, ni à interdire un débat sur Frontex. Le tract, composé de quatre pages, titrait en couverture : « contre la présence à un colloque d’acteurs de la militarisation des frontières », et montrait aussi et surtout combien les conditions du débat étaient neutralisées, par la disqualification du politique.

    Les violences policières réprimant la contestation à Grenoble et l’annulation du colloque sur l’islamophobie, dans des contextes par ailleurs différents, nous semblent constituer les deux faces d’une même médaille : il s’est agi de neutraliser, réprimer ou d’empêcher tout dissentiment, par ailleurs condition nécessaire de l’expression démocratique. La liberté universitaire, invoquée par les organisateurs du colloque et certains intervenants, ne peut consister ni à réprimer par la violence la mésentente, ni à la censurer, mais à élaborer les conditions de possibilité de son expression, pour « supporter les divisions de la société. […] C’est […] le dissentiment qui rend une société vivable. Et la politique, si on ne la réduit pas à la gestion et à la police d’Etat, est précisément l’organisation de ce dissentiment » (Rancière).

    De quelle politique font preuve les universités qui autorisent la répression ou la mise sous silence de mésententes politiques ? Quelles conditions de débat permettent de « supporter les divisions de la société », plutôt que les réprimer ou les censurer ?

    La « liberté universitaire » au service de la mise sous silence du dissentiment

    Les organisateurs du colloque et leurs soutiens ont dénoncé l’appel à manifester, puis l’intrusion dans la salle du colloque, au nom de la liberté universitaire : « cet appel à manifester contre la tenue d’une manifestation scientifique ouverte et publique constitue en soi une atteinte intolérable aux libertés universitaires [37] ». Il est nécessaire de rappeler que le tract n’appelait pas à ce que le colloque n’ait pas lieu, mais plutôt à ce que les représentants de Frontex et d’Euromed Police ne soient pas invités à l’université, en particulier dans le cadre de ce colloque, élaboré depuis un argumentaire où la parole politique était neutralisée. En invitant ces représentants, en tant qu’experts, et en refusant des positionnements politiques clairs et explicites (quels qu’ils soient), quel type de débat pouvait avoir lieu ?

    Plus précisément, est reproché aux manifestant.e.s le fait de n’être pas resté.e.s dans le cadre de l’affrontement légitime, c’est-à-dire l’affrontement verbal, sur une scène autorisée et partagée, celle du colloque. La liberté universitaire est brandie comme un absolu, sans que ne soit prises en compte ses conditions de possibilité. L’inclusion/exclusion de personnes concernées par les problèmes analysés par les chercheur.e.s, ainsi que la définition de ce que signifie « expertise », sont des conditions auxquelles il semble important de porter attention. La notion d’expertise, par exemple, connaît de profonds et récents changements : alors qu’elle a longtemps servi à distinguer les chercheur.e.s, seul.e.s « expert.e.s », des « professionnel.le.s », les « professionnel.le.s » sont désormais de plus en plus reconnu.e.s comme « expert.e.s », y compris en pouvant prétendre à des reconnaissances universitaires institutionnelles telle la VAE (Validation des Acquis de l’Expérience [38]), allant jusqu’à l’équivalent d’un diplôme de doctorat. Là encore il s’agit d’une panoplie de nouvelles identités créées par la transition vers l’université logistique, et une équivalence de plus en plus institutionalisée entre l’ » expertise » et des formes de rémunération qui passent par les mécanismes d’un marché réglementé. Si des « professionnel.le.s » (non-chercheur.e.s) sont de plus en plus reconnu.e.s comme « expert.e.s » dans le champ académique, l’exclusion des personnes dotées d’autres formes de compétences (par exemple, celles qui travaillent de manière intensive à des questions sociales) est un geste porteur de conséquences extrêmement lourdes et pour la constitution des savoirs et pour la démarche démocratique.

    Pour comprendre comment la « liberté universitaire » opère, il est important de se demander quelles personnes sont qualifiées d’ « expertes », autrement dit quelles personnes sont considérées comme légitimes pour revendiquer l’exercice de la liberté universitaire ou, au contraire, l’opposer à des personnes et des fonctionnements jugés illégitimes. C’est précisément là où l’université logistique devient une machine de normalisation puissante qui exerce un pouvoir considérable sur la formation et la reconnaissance des identités sociales. A notre sens, la liberté universitaire ne peut être conçue comme une liberté à la négative, c’est-à-dire un principe servant à rester sourd à la participation des acteurs issu.e.s de la société civile non-universitaire (parmi les manifestant.e.s, on comptait par ailleurs de nombreux étudiant.e.s), des « expert.e.s » issu.e.s de domaines où elles ne sont pas reconnue.s comme tel.le.s.

    « Scientifique » vs. « militant ». Processus de disqualification du politique.

    Ainsi, dans le cas du colloque « De Frontex à Frontex », la scène légitime du débat ne garantissait pas le principe d’égalité entre celles et ceux qui auraient pu -et auraient dû- y prendre part. Les scientifiques ont été présentés à égalité avec les intervenants membres de Frontex et d’Euromed Police IV, invités en tant que « professionnels [39] », « praticiens [40] » ou encore « garants d’une expertise [41] ». Les experts « scientifiques » et les « professionnels » ont été définis en opposition à la figure de « militant.e.s » (dont certain.e.s étaient par ailleurs étudiant.e.s), puis aux manifestant.e.s, assimilé.e.s, après l’intrusion dans la salle du colloque, à des délinquant.e.s, dans une figure dépolitisée du « délinquant ». Si les co-organisateurs ont déploré, après le colloque, que des « contacts noués à l’initiative des organisateurs et de certains intervenants [42] » avec des organisations contestataires soient restés « sans succès », il est important de rappeler que ces contacts ont visé à opposer « colloque scientifique » et « colloque militant », c’est-à-dire un cadre antagoniste rendant le dialogue impossible. Là où le colloque censuré sur l’islamophobie entendait promouvoir l’« articulation entre le militantisme pour les droits humains et la réflexion universitaire [pour] montrer que les phénomènes qui préoccupent la société font écho à l’intérêt porté par l’université aux problématiques sociales, [ainsi que pour montrer qu’] il n’existe pas de cloisonnement hermétique entre ces deux mondes qui au contraire se complètent pour la construction d’une collectivité responsable et citoyenne [43] », les organisateurs du colloque grenoblois ont défendu la conception d’un colloque « scientifique », où le scientifique s’oppose à l’affirmation et la discussion de positions politiques - et ceci dans un contexte hautement politisé.

    Par ailleurs, la liberté universitaire ne peut pas servir de légitimation à l’usage de la force, pour réprimer des manifestant.e.s dont la parole a été disqualifiée et neutralisée avant même le colloque et par les cadres du colloque (dépolitisation, sécurisation). Le passage à l’acte de l’intrusion, pendant une des pauses de l’événement, a servi de moyen pour rappeler aux organisateurs et participant.e.s du colloque, les conditions de possibilité très problématiques à partir desquelles celui-ci avait été organisé, et notamment le processus préalable de neutralisation de la parole des acteurs fortement impliqués mais, de fait, exclus du champ concerné.

    Il ne suffit pas ainsi que des universitaires critiques des actions de Frontex aient été –effectivement- invité.e.s au colloque, en parallèle de « praticiens » de Frontex et Euromed Police, présentés comme des experts-gestionnaires, pour qu’un débat émerge. Encore aurait-il fallu que les termes du débat soient exposés, hors du « réalisme consensuel [44] » entre identités hautement normalisées et logistique qui caractérise le texte d’invitation. Débattre de Frontex, c’est d’abord lutter contre les « illusions du réalisme gestionnaire [45] » et logistique, mais aussi des illusions d’une analyse qui parviendrait à rester uniquement disciplinaire (ici la discipline juridique), pour affirmer que ses actions relèvent de choix politiques (et non seulement de nécessités logistiques et sécuritaires).

    Il est urgent que la liberté universitaire puisse servir des débats où les positionnements politiques soient explicitement exposés, ce qui permettrait l’expression précisément du dissentiment politique. Le dissentiment, plutôt qu’il soit neutralisé, censuré, réprimé, pourrait être entendu et valorisé (le dissentiment indique une orientation pour débattre précisément). La liberté universitaire serait celle aussi où les débats, partant d’un principe d’ » égalité des intelligences [46] », puissent s’ouvrir aux étudiant.e.s, à la société civile non-universitaire (société qui ne saurait pas s’identifier de manière directe et exhaustive avec le marché du travail réglementé), et aux personnes directement concernées par les problèmes étudiés. À la veille des changements historiques dans le marché de travail dûs aux technologies nouvelles, organiser le dissentiment revient ainsi à lutter contre le détournement de l’« expertise » à des fins autoritaires et contre la dépolitisation de l’espace universitaire au nom de la logistique sécuritaire. Il s’agit de rendre possible la confrontation de positions différentes au sein de bouleversements inédits sans perdre ni la démarche démocratique ni la constitution de nouveaux savoirs au service de la société toute entière.

    Pour ce faire, il est nécessaire de rompre avec l’idée de l’existence a priori d’une langue commune. La langue présupposée commune dans le cadre du colloque Frontex a été complètement naturalisée, comme nous l’avons montré notamment dans l’emploi consensuel de l’expression « crise migratoire ». Rendre possible le dissensus revient à dénaturaliser « la langue ». Dans le contexte de la « continuité » intérieur-extérieur et de la transformation des fonctions frontalières, il est important de rappeler que le processus démocratique et les pratiques du dissentiment ne peuvent plus s’appuyer sur l’existence d’une langue nationale standardisée, naturalisée, comme condition préalable. De nouvelles modalités d’adresse doivent être inventées. Il nous faudrait, donc, une politique de la différence linguistique qui prendrait son point de départ dans la traduction, comme opération linguistique première. Ainsi, il s’agit de renoncer à une langue unique et de renoncer à l’image de deux espaces opposés -un intérieur, un extérieur- à relier (de la même manière que la traduction n’est pas un pont qui relie deux bords opposés). Il est nécessaire de réoccuper la relation d’indistinction entre intérieur et extérieur, actuellement surdéterminé par le sécuritaire et le militaire, pour créer des liens de coopération, de partages de ressources, de mutualisation. Parler, c’est traduire, et traduire, ce n’est pas en premier lieu un transfert, mais la création de subjectivités. Le dissentiment n’est pas pré-déterminé, ni par une langue commune, ni par des sujets cohérents qui lui pré-existeraient (et qui tiendraient des positions déjà définies prêtes à s’affronter). Il est indéterminé. Il se négocie, se traduit, s’élabore dans des relations, à partir desquelles se créent des subjectivités. Le dissentiment s’élabore aussi avec soi-même. Ne pas (se) comprendre devient ce qui lie, ce qui crée la valeur de la relation, ce qui ouvre des potentialités.

    Le colloque « De Frontex à Frontex » a constitué un site privilégié à partir duquel observer les manières dont la gouvernementalité logistique opère, animée par des experts qui tentent de neutraliser et militariser les conflits sociaux, et qui exercent un strict contrôle sur les conditions d’accès à la parole publique. Nous avons tenté de montrer des effets de « continuité » entre gouvernementalité logistique et coloniale, en lien avec des logiques de sécurisation et de militarisation, tant dans le domaine de la production des connaissances à l’université que dans celui du gouvernement des populations. Tous ces éléments sont intrinsèquement liés. Il n’y a donc pas de frontière, mais bien une continuité, entre l’université logistique, la sécurité intérieure, l’agence Frontex et les guerres dites de défense extérieure. Les frontières étatiques elles-mêmes, ne séparent plus, mais créent les conditions d’une surveillance continue (presqu’en temps réel, à la manière des suivis de marchandises), au-delà de la distinction entre intérieur et extérieur.

    Les violences policières ayant eu lieu dans la salle du colloque « De Frontex à Frontex » nous amènent à penser que requalifier le dissentiment politique dans le contexte de la rationalité logistique est aujourd’hui dangereux ; faire entendre le dissentiment, le rendre possible, c’est s’exposer potentiellement ou réellement à la répression. Mais plutôt que d’avoir peur, nous choisissons de persister. Penser les conditions d’énonciation du dissentiment et continuer à tenter de l’organiser est une nécessité majeure.

    Jon Solomon, professeur, Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3, Sarah Mekdjian, maîtresse de conférences, Université Grenoble Alpes

    [1] Le CESICE : Centre d’Etudes sur la Sécurité Internationale et les Coopérations Européennes et le CRJ : Centre de Recherches Juridiques de Grenoble.

    [2] voir l’argumentaire du colloque ici : https://cesice.univ-grenoble-alpes.fr/actualites/2018-01-19/frontex-frontex-vers-l-emergence-d-service-europeen-garde

    [3] RUSF, Union départementale CNT 38, CLAGI, CISEM, CIIP, Collectif Hébergement Logement

    [4] Voir le tract ici : https://cric-grenoble.info/infos-locales/article/brisons-les-frontieres-a-bas-frontex-405

    [5] http://www.liberation.fr/france/2018/04/05/grenoble-un-batiment-de-la-fac-bloque_1641355

    [6] Les area studies, qui correspondent plus ou moins en français aux « études régionales », reposent sur la notion d’ « aire », telle que l’on trouve ce terme dans l’expression « aire de civilisation ». Comme le montre Jon Solomon, les « aires », constructions héritées de la modernité coloniale et impériale, se fondent sur la notion de « différence anthropologique », pour classer, hiérarchiser le savoir et la société. La géographie a participé et participe encore à la construction de cette taxinomie héritée de la modernité impériale et coloniale, en territorialisant ces « aires” dites « culturelles » ou de « civilisation ».

    [7] Voir la description de l’IMAG sur son site internet : « Le bâtiment IMAG a pour stratégie de concentrer les moyens et les compétences pour créer une masse critique (800 enseignants-chercheurs, chercheurs et doctorants), augmenter les synergies et garantir à Grenoble une visibilité à l’échelle mondiale. L’activité recherche au sein de ce bâtiment permettra également d’amplifier fortement les coopérations entre les acteurs locaux qui prennent déjà place dans l’Institut Carnot grenoblois ’logiciels et systèmes intelligents’ et dans le pôle de compétitivité Minalogic pour atteindre le stade de la recherche intégrative. [...] Nous voulons construire un accélérateur d’innovations capable de faciliter le transfert des recherches en laboratoire vers l’industrie”, https://batiment.imag.fr

    [8] Le laboratoire Verimag indique ainsi sur son site internet travailler, par exemple, en partenariat avec l’entreprise MBDA, le leader mondial des missiles. Voir : http://www-verimag.imag.fr/MBDA.html?lang=en

    [9] « Quelques minutes avant l’incident, Romain Tinière, professeur de droit à l’Université et membre de l’organisation du colloque, faisait le point : « L’objet du colloque n’est pas sur la politique migratoire de l’Union européenne. On aborde Frontex sous la forme du droit. On parle de l’aspect juridique avec les personnes qui le connaissent, notamment avec Frontexit. Pour lui, le rassemblement extérieur portait atteinte à « la liberté d’expression » », Dauphiné Libéré du 23 mars 2018.

    [10] Texte de présentation du colloque, https://cesice.univ-grenoble-alpes.fr/actualites/2018-01-19/frontex-frontex-vers-l-emergence-d-service-europeen-garde

    [11] https://brianholmes.wordpress.com/2007/02/26/disconnecting-the-dots-of-the-research-triangle

    [12] Cowen Deborah, The Deadly Life of Logistics-Mapping Violence in Global Trade, Minneapolis, London, University of Minnesota Press, 2014.

    [13] « En tant que juristes, nous avons logiquement choisi une approche juridique et réunis les spécialistes qui nous paraissaient en mesure d’apporter des regards intéressants et différents sur les raisons de la réforme de cette agence, son fonctionnement et les conséquences de son action, incluant certains des collègues parmi les plus critiques en France sur l’action de Frontex » (lettre de « mise au point des organisateurs » du colloque, 27 mars 2018), disponible ici : https://lunti.am/Lettre-ouverte-aux-organisateurs-du-colloque-de-Frontex-a-Frontex.

    [14] Voir le texte de présentation du colloque, https://cesice.univ-grenoble-alpes.fr/actualites/2018-01-19/frontex-frontex-vers-l-emergence-d-service-europeen-garde

    [15] Ibid.

    [16] Lors de son discours aux armées le 13 juillet 2017, à l’Hôtel de Brienne, le président Emmanuel Macron a annoncé que le budget des Armées serait augmenté dès 2018 afin d’engager une évolution permettant d’atteindre l’objectif d’un effort de défense s’élevant à 2 % du PIB en 2025. « Dès 2018 nous entamerons (une hausse) » du budget des Armées de « 34,2 milliards d’euros », expliquait ainsi Emmanuel Macron.

    [17] https://www.defense.gouv.fr/content/download/523152/8769295/file/LPM%202019-2025%20-%20Synth%C3%A8se.pdf

    [18] Voir le texte de présentation de Frontex sur le site de l’agence : https://frontex.europa.eu/about-frontex/mission-tasks

    [19] Ibid.

    [20] « Le règlement adopté le 14 septembre 2016 « transforme celle qui [était] chargée de la « gestion intégrée des frontières extérieures de l’Union » en « Agence européenne de garde-côtes et de garde-frontières’. Cette mutation faite de continuités met en lumière la prédominance de la logique de surveillance sur la vocation opérationnelle de Frontex. [...]’. La réforme de Frontex a aussi consisté en de nouvelles dotations financières et matérielles pour la création d’un corps de gardes-frontières dédié : le budget de Frontex, de 238,69 millions d’euros pour 2016, est prévu pour atteindre 322,23 millions d’euros à l’horizon 2020. ’Cette montée en puissance est assortie d’un cofinancement par les États membres de l’espace Schengen établi à 77,4 millions d’euros sur la période 2017-2020’, auxquels il faut ajouter 87 millions d’euros pour la période 2017-2020 ajoutés par l’Union Européenne, répartis comme suit : - 67 millions d’euros pour financer la prestation de services d’aéronefs télépilotés (RPAS ou drones) aux fins de surveillance aérienne des frontières maritimes extérieures de l’Union ; - 14 millions d’euros dédiés à l’achat de données AIS par satellite. Ces données permettent notamment de suivre les navires. Elles pourront être transmises aux autorités nationales.

    [21] Longo Matthew, The Politics of Borders Sovereignty, Security, and the Citizen after 9/11”, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2017

    [22] Ibid.

    [23] Amilhat Szary, Giraut dir., Borderities and the Politics of Contemporary Mobile Borders, Palgrave McMillan, 2015

    [24] Voir : http://www.migreurop.org/article974.html

    [25] Longo Matthew, The Politics of Borders Sovereignty, Security, and the Citizen after 9/11”, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2017, p. 3

    [26] Voir sur la notion d’ennemi intérieur, l’ouvrage de Mathieu Rigouste, L’ennemi intérieur. La généalogie coloniale et militaire de l’ordre sécuritaire dans la France contemporaine, Paris, La Découverte, 2009.

    [27] Voir le rapport global 2016 du HCR –Haut Commissariat aux Réfugiés- : http://www.unhcr.org/the-global-report.html

    [28] Voir à ce sujet l’ouvrage de Claire Rodier, Xénophobie business, Paris, La Découverte, 2012.

    [29] Voir notamment : https://www.lacimade.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Externalisation-UE-Soudan.pdf

    [30] Voir notamment http://closethecamps.org ou encore http://www.migreurop.org/article2746.html

    [31] « Les pays partenaires du projet sont la République Algérienne Démocratique et Populaire, la République Arabe d’Egypte, Israël, le Royaume de Jordanie, le Liban, la Lybie, la République Arabe Syrienne, le Royaume du Maroc, l’Autorité Palestinienne et la République de Tunisie », https://www.euromed-police.eu/fr/presentation

    [32] https://www.euromed-police.eu/fr/presentation

    [33] Extrait de la « lettre ouverte aux organisateurs du colloque ‘De Frontex à Frontex’ » disponible ici : https://lundi.am/Lettre-ouverte-aux-organisateurs-du-colloque-de-Frontex-a-Frontex

    [34] Rancière Jacques, Moments politiques, Interventions 1977-2009, Paris, La Fabrique éditions.

    [35] Ibid.

    [36] Voir : https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/051017/un-colloque-universitaire-sur-l-islamophobie-annule-sous-la-pression?ongle

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/fr...

    [37] Voir la lettre de « mise au point des organisateurs » du colloque, diffusée le 27 mars 2018, et disponible ici : https://lundi.am/Lettre-ouverte-aux-organisateurs-du-colloque-de-Frontex-a-Frontex

    [38] Voir par exemple pour l’Université Grenoble Alpes : https://www.univ-grenoble-alpes.fr/fr/grandes-missions/formation/formation-continue-et-alternance/formations-diplomantes/validation-des-acquis-de-l-experience-vae--34003.kjsp

    [39] « Le colloque a été organisé « en mêlant des intervenants venant à la fois du milieu académique et du milieu professionnel pour essayer de croiser les analyses et avoir une vision la plus complète possible des enjeux de cette réforme sur l’Union » (texte de présentation du colloque).

    [40] « En tant que juristes, nous avons logiquement choisi une approche juridique et réunis les spécialistes qui nous paraissaient en mesure d’apporter des regards intéressants et différents sur les raisons de la réforme de cette agence, son fonctionnement et les conséquences de son action, incluant certains des collègues parmi les plus critiques en France sur l’action de Frontex. Pour ce faire, il nous a paru essentiel de ne pas nous cantonner à l’approche universitaire mais d’inclure également le regard de praticiens » (lettre de « mise au point des organisateurs » du colloque, 27 mars 2018, disponible ici : https://lundi.am/Lettre-ouverte-aux-organisateurs-du-colloque-de-Frontex-a-Frontex).

    [41] « Certaines personnes [ont été] invitées à apporter leur expertise sur le thème du colloque » (lettre de « mise au point des organisateurs » du colloque, 27 mars 2018, disponible ici https://lundi.am/Lettre-ouverte-aux-organisateurs-du-colloque-de-Frontex-a-Frontex).

    [42] Voir la lettre de « mise au point des organisateurs » du colloque, 27 mars 2018, disponible ici : https://lundi.am/Lettre-ouverte-aux-organisateurs-du-colloque-de-Frontex-a-Frontex

    [43] Voir : https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/051017/un-colloque-universitaire-sur-l-islamophobie-annule-sous-la-pression?ongle

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/fr...

    [44] Rancière Jacques, Moments politiques, Interventions 1977-2009, Paris, La Fabrique éditions.

    [45] Ibid.

    [46] Ibid.

    https://lundi.am/De-Frontex-a-Frontex-a-propos-de-la-continuite-entre-l-universite-logistique-e

    –-> Article co-écrit par ma collègue et amie #Sarah_Mekdjian

    #colloque #UGA #Université_Grenoble_Alpes #violences_policières #sécurisation #militarisation #complexe_militaro-industriel #surveillance_des_frontières #frontières #IMAG #Institut_de_Mathématiques_Appliquées_de_Grenoble #transferts_de_connaissance #transferts_technologiques #gouvernementalité_logistique #efficacité #logistique #industrie_de_l'armement #dépolitisation #De_Frontex_à_Frontex

  • Your Brain’s Music Circuit Has Been Discovered - Facts So Romantic
    http://nautil.us/blog/-your-brains-music-circuit-has-been-discovered

    The discovery that certain neurons have “music selectivity” stirs questions about the role of music in human life. Illustration by Len SmallBefore Josh McDermott was a neuroscientist, he was a club DJ in Boston and Minneapolis. He saw first-hand how music could unite people in sound, rhythm, and emotion. “One of the reasons it was so fun to DJ is that, by playing different pieces of music, you can transform the vibe in a roomful of people,” he says. With his club days behind him, McDermott now ventures into the effects of sound and music in his lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he is an assistant professor in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. In 2015, he and a post-doctoral colleague, Sam Norman-Haignere, and Nancy Kanwisher, a professor of cognitive (...)

  • #blockchain After the Gold Rush
    https://hackernoon.com/blockchain-after-the-gold-rush-e1c6d3044dae?source=rss----3a8144eabfe3--

    How Ethereum Smart Contracts Can Replace Central Banks!Minneapolis #fed President Neel Kashkari said a few weeks ago:If you live in any modern advanced economy I would stick with the dollar and leave bitcoin for the, you know, toy collectors.https://medium.com/media/b083d0da2ce2efb7441d4ab45ccb518d/hrefBut why do central bankers call us toy collectors? Why are they confident that we can never challenge their monopoly and sovereignty in the money market? Why can not cryptocurrencies compete with government-issued money? What is money that cryptocurrencies are not? Let’s see what the Deputy Governor of the Bank of Israel says about that:[A money] fulfills the functions ascribed to it in the economic literature — a unit of account, a mean of payment, and stability that enables it serve as a (...)

    #ethereum-smart-contracts #after-the-gold-rush #central-bank

  • What Happens When We Let Tech Care For Our Aging Parents | WIRED
    https://www.wired.com/story/digital-puppy-seniors-nursing-homes

    Arlyn Anderson grasped her father’s hand and presented him with the choice. “A nursing home would be safer, Dad,” she told him, relaying the doctors’ advice. “It’s risky to live here alone—”

    “No way,” Jim interjected. He frowned at his daughter, his brow furrowed under a lop of white hair. At 91, he wanted to remain in the woodsy Minnesota cottage he and his wife had built on the shore of Lake Minnetonka, where she had died in his arms just a year before. His pontoon—which he insisted he could still navigate just fine—bobbed out front.

    Arlyn had moved from California back to Minnesota two decades earlier to be near her aging parents. Now, in 2013, she was fiftysomething, working as a personal coach, and finding that her father’s decline was all-consuming.

    Her father—an inventor, pilot, sailor, and general Mr. Fix-It; “a genius,” Arlyn says—started experiencing bouts of paranoia in his mid-eighties, a sign of Alzheimer’s. The disease had progressed, often causing his thoughts to vanish mid-sentence. But Jim would rather risk living alone than be cloistered in an institution, he told Arlyn and her older sister, Layney. A nursing home certainly wasn’t what Arlyn wanted for him either. But the daily churn of diapers and cleanups, the carousel of in-home aides, and the compounding financial strain (she had already taken out a reverse mortgage on Jim’s cottage to pay the caretakers) forced her to consider the possibility.

    Jim, slouched in his recliner, was determined to stay at home. “No way,” he repeated to his daughter, defiant. Her eyes welled up and she hugged him. “OK, Dad.” Arlyn’s house was a 40-minute drive from the cottage, and for months she had been relying on a patchwork of technology to keep tabs on her dad. She set an open laptop on the counter so she could chat with him on Skype. She installed two cameras, one in his kitchen and another in his bedroom, so she could check whether the caregiver had arrived, or God forbid, if her dad had fallen. So when she read in the newspaper about a new digi­tal eldercare service called CareCoach a few weeks after broaching the subject of the nursing home, it piqued her interest. For about $200 a month, a human-powered avatar would be available to watch over a homebound person 24 hours a day; Arlyn paid that same amount for just nine hours of in-home help. She signed up immediately.

    More From the Magazine
    Mara Hvistendahl

    Inside China’s Vast New Experiment in Social Ranking
    Nathan Hill

    The Overwatch Videogame League Aims to Become the New NFL
    Brian Castner

    Exclusive: Tracing ISIS’ Weapons Supply Chain—Back to the US

    A Google Nexus tablet arrived in the mail a week later. When Arlyn plugged it in, an animated German shepherd appeared onscreen, standing at attention on a digitized lawn. The brown dog looked cutesy and cartoonish, with a bubblegum-pink tongue and round, blue eyes.

    She and Layney visited their dad later that week, tablet in hand. Following the instructions, Arlyn uploaded dozens of pictures to the service’s online portal: images of family members, Jim’s boat, and some of his inventions, like a computer terminal known as the Teleray and a seismic surveillance system used to detect footsteps during the Vietnam War. The setup complete, Arlyn clutched the tablet, summoning the nerve to introduce her dad to the dog. Her initial instinct that the service could be the perfect companion for a former technologist had splintered into needling doubts. Was she tricking him? Infantilizing him?

    Tired of her sister’s waffling, Layney finally snatched the tablet and presented it to their dad, who was sitting in his armchair. “Here, Dad, we got you this.” The dog blinked its saucer eyes and then, in Google’s female text-to-speech voice, started to talk. Before Alzheimer’s had taken hold, Jim would have wanted to know exactly how the service worked. But in recent months he’d come to believe that TV characters were interacting with him: A show’s villain had shot a gun at him, he said; Katie Couric was his friend. When faced with an onscreen character that actually was talking to him, Jim readily chatted back.

    Jim named his dog Pony. Arlyn perched the tablet upright on a table in Jim’s living room, where he could see it from the couch or his recliner. Within a week Jim and Pony had settled into a routine, exchanging pleasantries several times a day. Every 15 minutes or so Pony would wake up and look for Jim, calling his name if he was out of view. Sometimes Jim would “pet” the sleeping dog onscreen with his finger to rustle her awake. His touch would send an instantaneous alert to the human caretaker behind the avatar, prompting the CareCoach worker to launch the tablet’s audio and video stream. “How are you, Jim?” Pony would chirp. The dog reminded him which of his daughters or in-person caretakers would be visiting that day to do the tasks that an onscreen dog couldn’t: prepare meals, change Jim’s sheets, drive him to a senior center. “We’ll wait together,” Pony would say. Often she’d read poetry aloud, discuss the news, or watch TV with him. “You look handsome, Jim!” Pony remarked after watching him shave with his electric razor. “You look pretty,” he replied. Sometimes Pony would hold up a photo of Jim’s daughters or his inventions between her paws, prompting him to talk about his past. The dog complimented Jim’s red sweater and cheered him on when he struggled to buckle his watch in the morning. He reciprocated by petting the screen with his index finger, sending hearts floating up from the dog’s head. “I love you, Jim!” Pony told him a month after they first met—something CareCoach operators often tell the people they are monitoring. Jim turned to Arlyn and gloated, “She does! She thinks I’m real good!”

    About 1,500 miles south of Lake Minnetonka, in Monterrey, Mexico, Rodrigo Rochin opens his laptop in his home office and logs in to the CareCoach dashboard to make his rounds. He talks baseball with a New Jersey man watching the Yankees; chats with a woman in South Carolina who calls him Peanut (she places a cookie in front of her tablet for him to “eat”); and greets Jim, one of his regulars, who sips coffee while looking out over a lake.

    Rodrigo is 35 years old, the son of a surgeon. He’s a fan of the Spurs and the Cowboys, a former international business student, and a bit of an introvert, happy to retreat into his sparsely decorated home office each morning. He grew up crossing the border to attend school in McAllen, Texas, honing the English that he now uses to chat with elderly people in the United States. Rodrigo found CareCoach on an online freelancing platform and was hired in December 2012 as one of the company’s earliest contractors, role-playing 36 hours a week as one of the service’s avatars.

    After watching her dad interact with Pony, Arlyn’s reservations about outsourcing her father’s companionship vanished.

    In person, Rodrigo is soft-spoken, with wire spectacles and a beard. He lives with his wife and two basset hounds, Bob and Cleo, in Nuevo León’s capital city. But the people on the other side of the screen don’t know that. They don’t know his name—or, in the case of those like Jim who have dementia, that he even exists. It’s his job to be invisible. If Rodrigo’s clients ask where he’s from, he might say MIT (the CareCoach software was created by two graduates of the school), but if anyone asks where their pet actually is, he replies in character: “Here with you.”

    Rodrigo is one of a dozen CareCoach employees in Latin America and the Philippines. The contractors check on the service’s seniors through the tablet’s camera a few times an hour. (When they do, the dog or cat avatar they embody appears to wake up.) To talk, they type into the dashboard and their words are voiced robotically through the tablet, designed to give their charges the impression that they’re chatting with a friendly pet. Like all the CareCoach workers, Rodrigo keeps meticulous notes on the people he watches over so he can coordinate their care with other workers and deepen his relationship with them over time—this person likes to listen to Adele, this one prefers Elvis, this woman likes to hear Bible verses while she cooks. In one client’s file, he wrote a note explaining that the correct response to “See you later, alligator” is “After a while, crocodile.” These logs are all available to the customer’s social workers or adult children, wherever they may live. Arlyn started checking Pony’s log between visits with her dad several times a week. “Jim says I’m a really nice person,” reads one early entry made during the Minnesota winter. “I told Jim that he was my best friend. I am so happy.”

    After watching her dad interact with Pony, Arlyn’s reservations about outsourcing her father’s companionship vanished. Having Pony there eased her anxiety about leaving Jim alone, and the virtual dog’s small talk lightened the mood.

    Pony was not only assisting Jim’s human caretakers but also inadvertently keeping an eye on them. Months before, in broken sentences, Jim had complained to Arlyn that his in-home aide had called him a bastard. Arlyn, desperate for help and unsure of her father’s recollection, gave her a second chance. Three weeks after arriving in the house, Pony woke up to see the same caretaker, impatient. “Come on, Jim!” the aide yelled. “Hurry up!” Alarmed, Pony asked why she was screaming and checked to see if Jim was OK. The pet—actually, Rodrigo—later reported the aide’s behavior to CareCoach’s CEO, Victor Wang, who emailed Arlyn about the incident. (The caretaker knew there was a human watching her through the tablet, Arlyn says, but may not have known the extent of the person’s contact with Jim’s family behind the scenes.) Arlyn fired the short-tempered aide and started searching for a replacement. Pony watched as she and Jim conducted the interviews and approved of the person Arlyn hired. “I got to meet her,” the pet wrote. “She seems really nice.”

    Pony—friend and guard dog—would stay.
    Grant Cornett

    Victor Wang grew up feeding his Tama­got­chis and coding choose-your-own-­adventure games in QBasic on the family PC. His parents moved from Taiwan to suburban Vancouver, British Columbia, when Wang was a year old, and his grandmother, whom he called Lao Lao in Mandarin, would frequently call from Taiwan. After her husband died, Lao Lao would often tell Wang’s mom that she was lonely, pleading with her daughter to come to Taiwan to live with her. As she grew older, she threatened suicide. When Wang was 11, his mother moved back home for two years to care for her. He thinks of that time as the honey-­sandwich years, the food his overwhelmed father packed him each day for lunch. Wang missed his mother, he says, but adds, “I was never raised to be particularly expressive of my emotions.”

    At 17, Wang left home to study mechanical engineering at the University of British Columbia. He joined the Canadian Army Reserve, serving as an engineer on a maintenance platoon while working on his undergraduate degree. But he scrapped his military future when, at 22, he was admitted to MIT’s master’s program in mechanical engineering. Wang wrote his dissertation on human-machine interaction, studying a robotic arm maneuvered by astronauts on the International Space Station. He was particularly intrigued by the prospect of harnessing tech to perform tasks from a distance: At an MIT entrepreneurship competition, he pitched the idea of training workers in India to remotely operate the buffers that sweep US factory floors.

    In 2011, when he was 24, his grandmother was diagnosed with Lewy body dementia, a disease that affects the areas of the brain associated with memory and movement. On Skype calls from his MIT apartment, Wang watched as his grandmother grew increasingly debilitated. After one call, a thought struck him: If he could tap remote labor to sweep far-off floors, why not use it to comfort Lao Lao and others like her?

    Wang started researching the looming caretaker shortage in the US—between 2010 and 2030, the population of those older than 80 is projected to rise 79 percent, but the number of family caregivers available is expected to increase just 1 percent.

    In 2012 Wang recruited his cofounder, a fellow MIT student working on her computer science doctorate named Shuo Deng, to build CareCoach’s technology. They agreed that AI speech technology was too rudimentary for an avatar capable of spontaneous conversation tailored to subtle mood and behavioral cues. For that, they would need humans.

    Older people like Jim often don’t speak clearly or linearly, and those with dementia can’t be expected to troubleshoot a machine that misunderstands. “When you match someone not fully coherent with a device that’s not fully coherent, it’s a recipe for disaster,” Wang says. Pony, on the other hand, was an expert at deciphering Jim’s needs. Once, Pony noticed that Jim was holding onto furniture for support, as if he were dizzy. The pet persuaded him to sit down, then called Arlyn. Deng figures it’ll take about 20 years for AI to be able to master that kind of personal interaction and recognition. That said, the CareCoach system is already deploying some automated abilities. Five years ago, when Jim was introduced to Pony, the offshore workers behind the camera had to type every response; today CareCoach’s software creates roughly one out of every five sentences the pet speaks. Wang aims to standardize care by having the software manage more of the patients’ regular reminders—prodding them to take their medicine, urging them to eat well and stay hydrated. CareCoach workers are part free­wheeling raconteurs, part human natural-­language processors, listening to and deciphering their charges’ speech patterns or nudging the person back on track if they veer off topic. The company recently began recording conversations to better train its software in senior speech recognition.

    CareCoach found its first customer in December 2012, and in 2014 Wang moved from Massachusetts to Silicon Valley, renting a tiny office space on a lusterless stretch of Millbrae near the San Francisco airport. Four employees congregate in one room with a view of the parking lot, while Wang and his wife, Brittany, a program manager he met at a gerontology conference, work in the foyer. Eight tablets with sleeping pets onscreen are lined up for testing before being shipped to their respective seniors. The avatars inhale and exhale, lending an eerie sense of life to their digital kennel.

    CareCoach conveys the perceptiveness and emotional intelligence of the humans powering it but masquerades as an animated app.

    Wang spends much of his time on the road, touting his product’s health benefits at medical conferences and in hospital executive suites. Onstage at a gerontology summit in San Francisco last summer, he deftly impersonated the strained, raspy voice of an elderly man talking to a CareCoach pet while Brittany stealthily cued the replies from her laptop in the audience. The company’s tablets are used by hospitals and health plans across Massachusetts, California, New York, South Carolina, Florida, and Washington state. Between corporate and individual customers, CareCoach’s avatars have interacted with hundreds of users in the US. “The goal,” Wang says, “is not to have a little family business that just breaks even.”

    The fastest growth would come through hospital units and health plans specializing in high-need and elderly patients, and he makes the argument that his avatars cut health care costs. (A private room in a nursing home can run more than $7,500 a month.) Preliminary research has been promising, though limited. In a study conducted by Pace University at a Manhattan housing project and a Queens hospital, CareCoach’s avatars were found to reduce subjects’ loneliness, delirium, and falls. A health provider in Massachusetts was able to replace a man’s 11 weekly in-home nurse visits with a CareCoach tablet, which diligently reminded him to take his medications. (The man told nurses that the pet’s nagging reminded him of having his wife back in the house. “It’s kind of like a complaint, but he loves it at the same time,” the project’s lead says.) Still, the feelings aren’t always so cordial: In the Pace University study, some aggravated seniors with dementia lashed out and hit the tablet. In response, the onscreen pet sheds tears and tries to calm the person.

    More troubling, perhaps, were the people who grew too fiercely attached to their digi­tal pets. At the conclusion of a University of Washington CareCoach pilot study, one woman became so distraught at the thought of parting with her avatar that she signed up for the service, paying the fee herself. (The company gave her a reduced rate.) A user in Massachusetts told her caretakers she’d cancel an upcoming vacation to Maine unless her digital cat could come along.

    We’re still in the infancy of understanding the complexities of aging humans’ relationship with technology. Sherry Turkle, a professor of social studies, science, and technology at MIT and a frequent critic of tech that replaces human communication, described interactions between elderly people and robotic babies, dogs, and seals in her 2011 book, Alone Together. She came to view roboticized eldercare as a cop-out, one that would ultimately degrade human connection. “This kind of app—in all of its slickness and all its ‘what could possibly be wrong with it?’ mentality—is making us forget what we really know about what makes older people feel sustained,” she says: caring, interpersonal relationships. The question is whether an attentive avatar makes a comparable substitute. Turkle sees it as a last resort. “The assumption is that it’s always cheaper and easier to build an app than to have a conversation,” she says. “We allow technologists to propose the unthinkable and convince us the unthinkable is actually the inevitable.”

    But for many families, providing long-term in-person care is simply unsustainable. The average family caregiver has a job outside the home and spends about 20 hours a week caring for a parent, according to AARP. Nearly two-thirds of such caregivers are women. Among eldercare experts, there’s a resignation that the demographics of an aging America will make technological solutions unavoidable. The number of those older than 65 with a disability is projected to rise from 11 million to 18 million from 2010 to 2030. Given the option, having a digital companion may be preferable to being alone. Early research shows that lonely and vulnerable elders like Jim seem content to communicate with robots. Joseph Coughlin, director of MIT’s AgeLab, is pragmatic. “I would always prefer the human touch over a robot,” he says. “But if there’s no human available, I would take high tech in lieu of high touch.”

    CareCoach is a disorienting amalgam of both. The service conveys the perceptiveness and emotional intelligence of the humans powering it but masquerades as an animated app. If a person is incapable of consenting to CareCoach’s monitoring, then someone must do so on their behalf. But the more disconcerting issue is how cognizant these seniors are of being watched over by strangers. Wang considers his product “a trade-off between utility and privacy.” His workers are trained to duck out during baths and clothing changes.

    Some CareCoach users insist on greater control. A woman in Washington state, for example, put a piece of tape over her CareCoach tablet’s camera to dictate when she could be viewed. Other customers like Jim, who are suffering from Alzheimer’s or other diseases, might not realize they are being watched. Once, when he was temporarily placed in a rehabilitation clinic after a fall, a nurse tending to him asked Arlyn what made the avatar work. “You mean there’s someone overseas looking at us?” she yelped, within earshot of Jim. (Arlyn isn’t sure whether her dad remembered the incident later.) By default, the app explains to patients that someone is surveilling them when it’s first introduced. But the family members of personal users, like Arlyn, can make their own call.

    Arlyn quickly stopped worrying about whether she was deceiving her dad. Telling Jim about the human on the other side of the screen “would have blown the whole charm of it,” she says. Her mother had Alzheimer’s as well, and Arlyn had learned how to navigate the disease: Make her mom feel safe; don’t confuse her with details she’d have trouble understanding. The same went for her dad. “Once they stop asking,” Arlyn says, “I don’t think they need to know anymore.” At the time, Youa Vang, one of Jim’s regular in-­person caretakers, didn’t comprehend the truth about Pony either. “I thought it was like Siri,” she said when told later that it was a human in Mexico who had watched Jim and typed in the words Pony spoke. She chuckled. “If I knew someone was there, I may have been a little more creeped out.”

    Even CareCoach users like Arlyn who are completely aware of the person on the other end of the dashboard tend to experience the avatar as something between human, pet, and machine—what some roboticists call a third ontological category. The care­takers seem to blur that line too: One day Pony told Jim that she dreamed she could turn into a real health aide, almost like Pinoc­chio wishing to be a real boy.

    Most of CareCoach’s 12 contractors reside in the Philippines, Venezuela, or Mexico. To undercut the cost of in-person help, Wang posts English-language ads on freelancing job sites where foreign workers advertise rates as low as $2 an hour. Though he won’t disclose his workers’ hourly wages, Wang claims the company bases its salaries on factors such as what a registered nurse would make in the CareCoach employee’s home country, their language proficiencies, and the cost of their internet connection.

    The growing network includes people like Jill Paragas, a CareCoach worker who lives in a subdivision on Luzon island in the Philippines. Paragas is 35 years old and a college graduate. She earns about the same being an avatar as she did in her former call center job, where she consoled Americans irate about credit card charges. (“They wanted to, like, burn the company down or kill me,” she says with a mirthful laugh.) She works nights to coincide with the US daytime, typing messages to seniors while her 6-year-old son sleeps nearby.

    Even when Jim grew stubborn or paranoid with his daughters, he always viewed Pony as a friend.

    Before hiring her, Wang interviewed Paragas via video, then vetted her with an international criminal background check. He gives all applicants a personality test for certain traits: openness, conscientiousness, extroversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism. As part of the CareCoach training program, Paragas earned certifications in delirium and dementia care from the Alzheimer’s Association, trained in US health care ethics and privacy, and learned strategies for counseling those with addictions. All this, Wang says, “so we don’t get anyone who’s, like, crazy.” CareCoach hires only about 1 percent of its applicants.

    Paragas understands that this is a complicated business. She’s befuddled by the absence of family members around her aging clients. “In my culture, we really love to take care of our parents,” she says. “That’s why I’m like, ‘She is already old, why is she alone?’ ” Paragas has no doubt that, for some people, she’s their most significant daily relationship. Some of her charges tell her that they couldn’t live without her. Even when Jim grew stubborn or paranoid with his daughters, he always viewed Pony as a friend. Arlyn quickly realized that she had gained a valuable ally.
    Related Galleries

    These Abandoned Theme Parks Are Guaranteed To Make You Nostalgic

    The Best WIRED Photo Stories of 2017

    Space Photos of the Week: When Billions of Worlds Collide
    1/7Jim Anderson and his wife, Dorothy, in the living room of their home in St. Louis Park, Minnesota in the ’70s. Their house was modeled after an early American Pennsylvania farmhouse.Courtesy Arlyn Anderson
    2/7Jim became a private pilot after returning home from World War II.Courtesy Arlyn Anderson
    6/7A tennis match between Jim and his middle daughter, Layney, on his 80th birthday. (The score was tied at 6-6, she recalls; her dad won the tiebreaker.)Courtesy Arlyn Anderson
    Related Galleries

    These Abandoned Theme Parks Are Guaranteed To Make You Nostalgic

    The Best WIRED Photo Stories of 2017

    Space Photos of the Week: When Billions of Worlds Collide
    1/7Jim Anderson and his wife, Dorothy, in the living room of their home in St. Louis Park, Minnesota in the ’70s. Their house was modeled after an early American Pennsylvania farmhouse.Courtesy Arlyn Anderson

    As time went on, the father, daughter, and family pet grew closer. When the snow finally melted, Arlyn carried the tablet to the picnic table on the patio so they could eat lunch overlooking the lake. Even as Jim’s speech became increasingly stunted, Pony could coax him to talk about his past, recounting fishing trips or how he built the house to face the sun so it would be warmer in winter. When Arlyn took her dad around the lake in her sailboat, Jim brought Pony along. (“I saw mostly sky,” Rodrigo recalls.)

    One day, while Jim and Arlyn were sitting on the cottage’s paisley couch, Pony held up a photograph of Jim’s wife, Dorothy, between her paws. It had been more than a year since his wife’s death, and Jim hardly mentioned her anymore; he struggled to form coherent sentences. That day, though, he gazed at the photo fondly. “I still love her,” he declared. Arlyn rubbed his shoulder, clasping her hand over her mouth to stifle tears. “I am getting emotional too,” Pony said. Then Jim leaned toward the picture of his deceased wife and petted her face with his finger, the same way he would to awaken a sleeping Pony.

    When Arlyn first signed up for the service, she hadn’t anticipated that she would end up loving—yes, loving, she says, in the sincerest sense of the word—the avatar as well. She taught Pony to say “Yeah, sure, you betcha” and “don’t-cha know” like a Minnesotan, which made her laugh even more than her dad. When Arlyn collapsed onto the couch after a long day of caretaking, Pony piped up from her perch on the table:

    “Arnie, how are you?”

    Alone, Arlyn petted the screen—the way Pony nuzzled her finger was weirdly therapeutic—and told the pet how hard it was to watch her dad lose his identity.

    “I’m here for you,” Pony said. “I love you, Arnie.”

    When she recalls her own attachment to the dog, Arlyn insists her connection wouldn’t have developed if Pony was simply high-functioning AI. “You could feel Pony’s heart,” she says. But she preferred to think of Pony as her father did—a friendly pet—rather than a person on the other end of a webcam. “Even though that person probably had a relationship to me,” she says, “I had a relationship with the avatar.”

    Still, she sometimes wonders about the person on the other side of the screen. She sits up straight and rests her hand over her heart. “This is completely vulnerable, but my thought is: Did Pony really care about me and my dad?” She tears up, then laughs ruefully at herself, knowing how weird it all sounds. “Did this really happen? Was it really a relationship, or were they just playing solitaire and typing cute things?” She sighs. “But it seemed like they cared.”

    When Jim turned 92 that August, as friends belted out “Happy Birthday” around the dinner table, Pony spoke the lyrics along with them. Jim blew out the single candle on his cake. “I wish you good health, Jim,” Pony said, “and many more birthdays to come.”

    In Monterrey, Mexico, when Rodrigo talks about his unusual job, his friends ask if he’s ever lost a client. His reply: Yes.

    In early March 2014, Jim fell and hit his head on his way to the bathroom. A caretaker sleeping over that night found him and called an ambulance, and Pony woke up when the paramedics arrived. The dog told them Jim’s date of birth and offered to call his daughters as they carried him out on a stretcher.

    Jim was checked into a hospital, then into the nursing home he’d so wanted to avoid. The Wi-Fi there was spotty, which made it difficult for Jim and Pony to connect. Nurses would often turn Jim’s tablet to face the wall. The CareCoach logs from those months chronicle a series of communication misfires. “I miss Jim a lot,” Pony wrote. “I hope he is doing good all the time.” One day, in a rare moment of connectivity, Pony suggested he and Jim go sailing that summer, just like the good old days. “That sounds good,” Jim said.
    Related Stories

    James Vlahos

    A Son’s Race to Give His Dying Father Artificial Immortality
    Alex Mar

    Are We Ready for Intimacy With Robots?
    Karen Wickre

    Surviving as an Old in the Tech World

    That July, in an email from Wang, Rodrigo learned that Jim had died in his sleep. Sitting before his laptop, Rodrigo bowed his head and recited a silent Lord’s Prayer for Jim, in Spanish. He prayed that his friend would be accepted into heaven. “I know it’s going to sound weird, but I had a certain friendship with him,” he says. “I felt like I actually met him. I feel like I’ve met them.” In the year and a half that he had known them, Arlyn and Jim talked to him regularly. Jim had taken Rodrigo on a sailboat ride. Rodrigo had read him poetry and learned about his rich past. They had celebrated birthdays and holidays together as family. As Pony, Rodrigo had said “Yeah, sure, you betcha” countless times.

    That day, for weeks afterward, and even now when a senior will do something that reminds him of Jim, Rodrigo says he feels a pang. “I still care about them,” he says. After her dad’s death, Arlyn emailed Victor Wang to say she wanted to honor the workers for their care. Wang forwarded her email to Rodrigo and the rest of Pony’s team. On July 29, 2014, Arlyn carried Pony to Jim’s funeral, placing the tablet facing forward on the pew beside her. She invited any workers behind Pony who wanted to attend to log in.

    A year later, Arlyn finally deleted the CareCoach service from the tablet—it felt like a kind of second burial. She still sighs, “Pony!” when the voice of her old friend gives her directions as she drives around Minneapolis, reincarnated in Google Maps.

    After saying his prayer for Jim, Rodrigo heaved a sigh and logged in to the CareCoach dashboard to make his rounds. He ducked into living rooms, kitchens, and hospital rooms around the United States—seeing if all was well, seeing if anybody needed to talk.

  • Une fuite de pétrole entraîne la fermeture temporaire de l’oléoduc #Keystone_XL
    http://www.lemonde.fr/planete/article/2017/11/17/une-fuite-de-petrole-entraine-la-fermeture-temporaire-de-l-oleoduc-keystone-

    L’opérateur canadien TransCanada a annoncé la fermeture provisoire de son oléoduc Keystone entre le Canada et les Etats-Unis en raison d’une fuite de pétrole détectée dans l’Etat américain du Dakota du Sud, dans une zone rurale située à près de 402 kilomètres à l’ouest de Minneapolis.

    Environ 5 000 barils de pétrole (environ 795 000 litres) se sont déversés à l’aube de l’oléoduc pour une raison encore inconnue, a précisé dans un communiqué TransCanada.

  • In Minneapolis, response to police shooting of white woman by Somali officer has been different - The Washington Post
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/in-minneapolis-response-to-police-shooting-of-white-woman-by-somali-officer-has-been-different/2017/08/01/e14aec18-7237-11e7-803f-a6c989606ac7_story.html

    MINNEAPOLIS — Kim Handy-Jones stands at the front of a meeting room in a working-class portion of southeast Minneapolis, large pieces of butcher paper labeled “Body Cams,” “Accountability” and “Training” hanging behind her. In the months since a police officer shot and killed her son in neighboring St. Paul, Handy-Jones has met here regularly with a dozen or so longtime Twin Cities advocates of police reform.

    But this meeting is different. This time, the room is full. Some of the nearly 80 people present have to stand.

    And this time, the majority is white.

    Handy-Jones, who is black, pauses and bows her head, displaying the intricacies of her braided updo. It’s as though she’s considering her words, what she can and what she must say.

    “I am so glad — truly, my heart is glad — to see this room so full,” she says softly, before building in a

  • Les #salaires et Wall Street
    http://www.wsws.org/fr/articles/2017/jul2017/pers-j18.shtml

    Malgré les conflits géopolitiques, la stagnation économique et les crises gouvernementales pays après pays, les marchés boursiers aux États-Unis et dans le monde continuent leur spectaculaire montée. Vendredi, alors que de nouvelles révélations dans la saga Trump-Russie intensifiaient la #crise à laquelle l’administration américaine profondément impopulaire fait face, Wall Street a marqué une autre journée triomphale. Les indices Dow Jones et S & P 500 ont fini sur de nouveaux records et le Nasdaq a enregistré sa meilleure semaine de l’année. Depuis sa crise post-2008 en mars 2009, le Dow a augmenté de 340 pour cent.

    L’autre tendance économique persistante, en particulier aux États-Unis, est la stagnation et le déclin des salaires. Cela en dépit d’un supposé taux de chômage aux États-Unis de 4,4 pour cent, d’un niveau bas par rapport aux normes historiques et de ce que les médias qualifient d’une « solide » création d’emplois.

    Le rapport sur l’emploi des États-Unis pour juin, sorti la semaine dernière, a suscité, en dépit d’une croissance de la masse salariale supérieure à celle prévue, un malaise même dans certains milieux bourgeois, car les salaires n’ont augmenté que de 2,4 pour cent comparés à la même période de l’année précédente, bien en deçà du taux de 3 pour cent dans les mois précédant Le krach financier de 2008. Le New York Times a cité un haut dirigeant de Manpower North America, qui a déclaré : « Nous n’avons pas vu auparavant une chute du chômage avec les taux de participation bas et en même temps des salaires qui ne bougent pas. Cela vous dit que quelque chose ne va pas sur le marché du travail. »

    Selon le plus récent « Real Wage Index » (indice des salaires réels), publié plus tôt ce mois sur le site PayScale, cinq des 32 zones métropolitaines incluses dans l’indice ont enregistré des baisses de salaire au deuxième trimestre de cette année. Quatre des cinq étaient dans les régions du Midwest les plus touchées par des décennies de désindustrialisation : Detroit, Kansas City, Chicago et Minneapolis.

    En tenant compte de l’inflation, les salaires réels aux États-Unis ont, selon cet indice, reculé de 7,5 % depuis 2006. En termes réels, les salaires moyens aux États-Unis ont atteint leur pic il y a plus de 40 ans.

  • Lost Mothers
    An estimated 700 to 900 women in the U.S. died from pregnancy-related causes in 2016. We have identified 120 of them so far.

    https://www.propublica.org/article/lost-mothers-maternal-health-died-childbirth-pregnancy

    The U.S. has the highest rate of maternal mortality in the developed world. Yet these deaths of women from causes related to pregnancy or childbirth are almost invisible. When a new or expectant mother dies, her obituary rarely mentions the circumstances. Her identity is shrouded by medical institutions, regulators and state maternal mortality review committees. Her loved ones mourn her loss in private. The lessons to be learned from her death are often lost as well.

    “”"The inability, or unwillingness, of states and the federal government to track maternal deaths has been called “an international embarrassment.” To help fill this gap, ProPublica and NPR have spent the last few months searching social media and other sources for mothers who died, trying to understand what happened to them and why. So far, we’ve identified 120 pregnancy- and childbirth-related deaths for 2016 out of an estimated U.S. total of 700 to 900. Together these women form a picture of maternal mortality that is more racially, economically, geographically and medically diverse than many people might expect. Their ages ranged from 16 to 43; their causes of death, from hemorrhage to infection, complications of pre-existing medical conditions, and suicide. We were struck by how many perished in the postpartum period, by the number of heart-related deaths, by the contributing role sometimes played by severe depression and mood disorders — and by the many missed opportunities to save lives.

    ProPublica and NPR plan to expand our 2016 photo gallery as we find more women and hear from more families. If you know of someone who died, please tell us here. Meanwhile, we highlight 16 women with portraits of their lives and deaths. Their stories are a reminder of just how much is lost when a mother dies. Examined together, these private tragedies point to a much bigger public health problem, and underscore the potential repercussions for women and families as Republicans in Congress push to revamp the health care system and roll back Medicaid.

  • La financiarisation, le microcrédit et l’architecture changeante de l’accumulation du capital CADTM - Silvia Federici - 28 Juin 2017 _

    Comme le crash de Wall Street de 2008 l’a si dramatiquement démontré, l’espoir que la « financiarisation » puisse apporter une solution ou une alternative à la disparition des emplois et des salaires s’est avéré une illusion. La décision de renflouer les banques mais pas les débiteurs de la classe ouvrière a démontré que la dette est conçue pour être une norme de la vie des travailleurs, pas moins que dans la phase initiale de l’industrialisation, mais avec des conséquences plus dévastatrices du point de vue de la solidarité de classe. Ceci parce que le créditeur n’est plus le boutiquier local ou le voisin mais le banquier, et qu’en raison des taux d’intérêts élevés, la dette, comme un cancer, continue de s’accroître avec le temps. De surcroît, depuis les années 1980, toute une campagne idéologique a été orchestrée qui présente les emprunts comme destinés à subvenir à l’autoreproduction, comme une forme entrepreneuriat, passant sous silence la relation de classe et l’exploitation qu’ils impliquent. Si l’on en croit cette campagne, au lieu d’un combat capital-travail favorisé par la dette, nous avons des millions de micro-entrepreneurs qui investissent dans leur reproduction même s’ils ne possèdent que quelques centaines de dollars, supposément « libres » de prospérer ou d’échouer en fonction de leur labeur et de leur sagacité.

    Il ne s’agit pas seulement de présenter la « reproduction » comme un « auto-investissement ». Comme la machine à prêter de la dette devient le principal moyen de reproduction, une nouvelle relation de classe s’instaure, où les exploiteurs sont mieux cachés, plus dans l’ombre, et les mécanismes d’exploitation sont plus individualisés et culpabilisants. Au lieu de travail, d’exploitation et, par-dessus tout, de « patrons », si importants dans le monde de l’usine, les débiteurs se retrouvent maintenant non plus face à un employeur mais à une banque qu’ils affrontent seuls et non plus comme partie d’une entité collective et de relations de groupe, comme c’était le cas avec les travailleurs salariés. De cette façon, la résistance des travailleurs est affaiblie, les désastres économiques acquièrent une dimension moralisatrice et la fonction de la dette comme instrument d’extraction du travail est masquée, comme nous l’avons vu, sous l’illusion d’un auto-investissement.


    
Microfinance et #macrodette
    Jusqu’à présent, j’ai décrit à grands traits comment la création de la dette de la classe ouvrière a fonctionné aux États-Unis. Néanmoins, les fonctionnements de la machine prêt/dette sont plus visibles dans la politique du microcrédit ou de la microfinance. Ce programme très médiatisé lancé à la fin des années 1970 par l’économiste bangladeshi, Muhammad Yunus, avec la fondation de la Grameen Bank s’est depuis étendu à toutes les régions de la planète. Vanté comme moyen d’« alléger la pauvreté » dans le monde, la microfinance s’est en réalité avérée être un instrument à créer de la dette, impliquant un vaste réseau de gouvernements nationaux et locaux, d’organisations non gouvernementales (ONG) et de banques, à commencer par la Banque mondiale, servant surtout à capter le travail, les énergies et l’inventivité des « pauvres » |1|, surtout des femmes. Comme Maria Galindo de Mujeres Creando |2| l’a écrit au sujet de la Bolivie dans son prologue à La pobreza, un gran negocio, la microfinance, en tant que programme financier et politique, a eu pour but de récupérer et de détruire les stratégies de survie que les femmes pauvres avaient mises au point en réponse à la crise de l’emploi mâle provoquée par l’ajustement structurel des années 1980. Persuadant les femmes que même un petit prêt pouvait résoudre leurs problèmes économiques, il a intégré leurs activités informelles, faites d’échanges avec des femmes pauvres sans emploi comme elles, dans l’économie formelle, les obligeant à payer un montant hebdomadaire en remboursement de leur emprunt |3|. L’observation de Maria Galindo, que la microfinance est un mécanisme destiné à placer les femmes sous le contrôle de l’économie formelle, peut être généralisée à d’autres pays, de même que son argument selon lequel les prêts sont des pièges dont peu de femmes peuvent profiter ou se libérer.

    “La microfinance est un instrument à créer de la dette, impliquant un vaste réseau de gouvernements, d’ONG et de banques.”
    Il est significatif que les prêts concernant habituellement de très faibles sommes d’argent sont majoritairement donnés à des femmes et particulièrement à des groupes de femmes, bien que dans de nombreux cas, ce sont les maris ou les autres hommes de la famille qui les utilisent |4|.
    . . . . . . . . . . . .

    La suite : http://www.cadtm.org/La-financiarisation-le-microcredit

    |1| Je mets « pauvres » entre guillemets pour souligner la mystification implicite de ce concept. Il n’y a pas de pauvres, il y a des peuples et des populations qui ont été appauvris. Cela peut paraître une distinction mineure mais elle est nécessaire pour lutter contre la normalisation et la banalisation de l’appauvrissement sous-tendues pas le concept de « pauvres ».
    |2| Mujeres creando est l’organisation féministe autonome la plus importante de Bolivie. Basée à La Paz depuis 2002, elle a été partie prenante des luttes contre les dettes de la microfinance et a développé des recherches sur la microfinance, dont le livre d’où vient la citation. Sur ce sujet, voir : Maria Galindo “La Pobreza Un Gran Negocio.” In Mujer Pública 7. Revista de Discusión Feminista, 2012.
    |3| Ibid. p.8
    |4| C’est la situation décrite pour le Bangladesh par Lamia Karim qui a constaté dans son étude que « 95 % des emprunteuses donnent le montant de leurs prêts à leurs maris ou à d’autres emprunteurs hommes. Lamia Karim. Microfinance and Its Discontents, Women in Debt in Bangladesh. Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, 2011

    #dette #finance #microcrédit #microfinance #financiarisation #norme #banque #exploitation #Grameen_Bank #pauvreté #ONG #Banque mondiale #Femmes #émancipation

  • Jewish-American protester hurt by Israeli cops: I’m proud to be Jewish, but occupation is not Judaism
    Veteran activist Sarah Brammer-Shlay may need surgery for the broken upper arm she suffered when police dispersed demonstrators at the annual Jerusalem Day Flag March
    Allison Kaplan Sommer and Steven Silber 25.05.2017 16:04 Updated: 4:05 PM
    http://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium-1.791844
    http://www.haaretz.com/polopoly_fs/1.791857.1495707583!/image/607255258.JPG_gen/derivatives/headline_1200x630/607255258.JPG

    A young American Jew whose arm was broken by the police on Jerusalem Day Wednesday says this was the “most violently” she has ever been treated at a demonstration.

    Sarah Brammer-Shlay, a 25-year-old native of Minneapolis, said doctors at Hadassah University Hospital told her she had a fracture above her left elbow and faced a 50 percent chance of needing surgery.

    She and about 50 other people were protesting Wednesday at the annual Flag March, a high-profile event on Jerusalem Day, when Israel celebrates the capture of East Jerusalem during the 1967 Six-Day War.

    Brammer-Shlay told Haaretz that about 20 of the protesters were linking arms trying to block the Old City from the flag marchers, when the police started pushing them to the ground. Once on the ground, they linked arms again and the police started dragging them off, some being choked while they were dragged.

    She said the police then threw protesters on top of one another within a small area fenced off by metal barricades. The police then tried removing her from the caged-off area.

    “They pulled my left arm; I heard and felt my arm pop and I knew something horrible had happened,” she said. “I was screaming ‘my arm, my arm,’” she said, noting that she “was having trouble walking, my arm hurt so badly.”

    The police did not respond to a Haaretz request for comment.

    Brammer-Shlay, one of the founders of the Washington chapter of the anti-occupation group IfNotNow, was the coordinator of the IfNotNow protest at the AIPAC conference in Washington last March. She moved to Washington after graduating from the University of Minnesota Twin Cities in 2012.

    Brammer-Shlay has been involved in social activism in the United States and Jewish activism since college, mostly concerning domestic American issues.

    She says that at protests in the United States there’s a protocol; the police normally warn demonstrators about what they are going to do. On Wednesday, such warnings were rare, Brammer-Shlay said.

    “There was no sense of control by the police officers,” she said. “They looked so angry. You don’t need to break my arm to stop me from linking arms with somebody. It was apparent that they didn’t care.”

    Brammer-Shlay, who has also been a trip leader for the Center for Jewish Nonviolence, is currently studying Hebrew in Israel. In the fall she will start studying at rabbinical school to become a Reconstructionist rabbi.

    “They say Israel is here to protect Jews, and that’s not true,” she said. “It’s here to protect a system of occupation. When Jews push back against the system they are no longer protected. If this were a Palestinian protest, I’m sure the injuries would be worse than a broken arm.”

    As Brammer-Shlay put it, “I’m going to rabbinical school. I’m very proud to be Jewish and I’m devoted to the Jewish community. And I also know that the occupation is not Judaism .... But today I think the biggest crisis facing the American Jewish community is our support for the occupation.”

    According to Leanne Gale, the spokeswoman for the protest Wednesday, three organizations took part: IfNotNow, its Israeli counterpart All That’s Left, and Free Jerusalem, which describes itself as a solidarity group of Jewish Israelis working with Palestinian partners to combat the occupation in East Jerusalem.

    “To my knowledge, this is the first time local Jews and Diaspora Jews have put their bodies on the line to prevent the violence of the march of flags from imposing itself on the Palestinian residents of the Old City,” Gale said.

  • #Meghan_Murphy : La Bibliothèque des femmes de Vancouver ouvre ses portes dans un contexte de réaction antiféministe
    http://tradfem.wordpress.com/2017/02/12/la-bibliotheque-des-femmes-de-vancouver-ouvre-ses-portes-dans-un-

    La deuxième vague féministe a donné lieu à un authentique mouvement de création de librairies féministes. Des espaces, des maisons d’édition, des écrits et des événements dédiés aux femmes ont été dès les débuts considérés comme faisant partie intégrante du féminisme. Dans ce contexte, les librairies des femmes ont été valorisées non seulement comme moyens de rendre accessibles l’écriture et le travail des femmes, mais aussi comme lieux où des femmes pouvaient se réunir, rencontrer d’autres femmes et se politiser.

    À son apogée, ce mouvement a compté plus de 150 librairies de femmes en Amérique du Nord. La toute première d’entre elles – la Librairie Amazon de Minneapolis – a été inaugurée sur le porche d’entrée d’une commune en 1970, et en 1997, on comptait 175 de ces librairies, généralement animées par des bénévoles et des collectifs. Mais deux décennies plus tard, elles avaient presque toutes fermé leurs portes.

    À Vancouver, la maison Women in Print, active pendant 12 ans, a fermé en 2005 et la Librairie des femmes de Vancouver a mis fin à ses activités en 1996, après plus de 20 ans. Mais le besoin de ces librairies n’est pas disparu. En fait, il semble évident que ces espaces sont plus essentiels que jamais, car le mouvement féministe fait face à une hostilité croissante venant de la droite, de la gauche et des médias.

    La nouvelle Bibliothèque des femmes de Vancouver a ouvert ses portes vendredi soir le 3 février 2017 dans un petit local du quartier Eastside. Des femmes de tous âges et de milieux variés venues y célébrer l’évènement et socialiser ont été surprises de s’y heurter à des manifestants et manifestantes qui non seulement les ont harcelées verbalement, mais ont tenté de les empêcher physiquement d’entrer dans l’immeuble.

    Une féministe engagée du quartier, Jindi Mehat, m’a dit être arrivée vers 21 h au local de la bibliothèque, au 1670, rue Franklin. Il y avait des gens debout devant la porte ; une bannière les identifiait comme « Trans Communist Cadre », et la situation était tendue, dit-elle. Mehat et une amie sont entrées à l’intérieur, pour découvrir que les choses étaient « pire encore » dans la bibliothèque.

    Traduction : #Tradfem
    Version originale : http://www.feministcurrent.com/2017/02/07/vancouver-womens-library-opens-amid-anti-feminist-backlash

    Meghan Murphy, fondatrice et éditrice du site FeministCurent.com est écrivaine et journaliste indépendante. Diplômée de maîtrise au département d’Études sur le genre, la sexualité et les femmes de l’Université Simon Fraser en 2012, elle vit à Vancouver avec son chien. On peut la suivre sur Twitter à @MeghanEMurphy.
    #bibliothèque_féministe #Vancouver #trans

  • Etats-Unis : Clear propose la biométrie dans 22 aéroports
    http://www.businesstravel.fr/etats-unis-clear-propose-la-biometrie-dans-22-aeroports.html

    Les contrôles de sécurité accélérés sont un devenus un véritable Business aux Etats-Unis : le leader du marché Clear, espère compter 4 autres aéroports dans son offre dans les prochains mois selon Bloomberg… La société Clear a proposé dans on offre l’aéroport Kennedy International de New York en janvier 2017 et prévoit de proposer l’aéroport de LA Guardia, d’Atlanta Hartsfield Jackson, de Los Angeles International et de Minneapolis St Paul d’ici avril (...)

    #Clear #biométrie #iris #voyageurs #surveillance

    ##voyageurs

  • Une hôtesse de l’air n’a pas cru une passagère qui se présentait comme médecin parce qu’elle était noire | Slate.fr
    http://www.slate.fr/story/126302/docteur-noir-discrimination-avion-etats-unis

    Lorsqu’un passager a fait un malaise dans un vol allant de Detroit à Minneapolis, Tamika Cross, une jeune gynécologue-obstétricienne, a proposé d’aider. Mais, dans un post publié sur Facebook, Cross a expliqué que l’hôtesse de l’air a refusé son aide, ne semblant pas croire qu’elle était qualifiée. L’hôtesse a ensuite demandé à voir son certificat de médecine, et c’est un médecin blanc qui a fini par assister le patient (et demandé des conseils à Cross).

    Tamika Cross, qui effectue sa résidence dans un centre médical de Houston au Texas, accuse désormais le personnel de la compagnie aérienne Delta de discrimination. La compagnie a déclaré qu’une enquête était en cours, et que le personnel demandait en général à voir des documents prouvant les qualifications des docteurs. Selon Cross, l’hôtesse s’est ensuite excusée et lui a proposé des miles gratuits en guise de dédommagement.

    #racisme #discrimination #santé

    • En août 1988, j’ai fait un malaise dans un avion de retour d’Abidjan, les stewards se sont précipités pour m’aider, c’était assez spectaculaire, un type de ma corpulence qui fait une crise d’épilepsie dans un avion, c’est hyper désordre, j’ai entendu le fameux message, y a-t-il un docteur dans l’avion ? , il y en avait deux, un Français et un Ivoirien, le Français m’a à peine adressé la parole et s’est immédiatement désintéressé de moi dès qu’il a vu qu’il y avait un autre candidat pour me venir en aide et il est retourné en première, l’Ivoirien a fait le reste du voyage avec moi au fond de l’avion.

      Je dois beaucoup à ce médecin ivoirien pour m’avoir, à force de discussions ce jour-là, mis, des années plus tard, sur une piste très intéressante dans ma première psychanalyse : le retour traumatique de ma petite famille de Côte d’Ivoire en 1967 dans des conditions d’angoisse quant à la santé de mon père, j’avais deux ans et demi, et à vingt trois ans j’étais en train de revivre le traumatisme de ce voyage enfoui.

  • Facebook ‘glitch’ that deleted the Philando Castile shooting vid : It was the police – sources
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/07/08/castile_shooting_police_deletion

    Footage vanished on command, not by a tech gremlin The deadly shooting of 32-year-old Philando Castile by a cop during a routine traffic stop in Minnesota on Wednesday just got murkier. Multiple sources have told The Register that police removed video footage of Castile’s death from Facebook, potentially tampering with evidence. Castile, his girlfriend Diamond Reynolds, and her four-year-old daughter were pulled over by police in the Falcon Heights suburb of Minneapolis for a broken tail (...)

    #Facebook #censure