company:apple inc.

  • Apple Face-Recognition Blamed by N.Y. Teen for False Arrest
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-04-22/apple-face-recognition-blamed-by-new-york-teen-for-false-arrest

    A New York student sued Apple Inc. for $1 billion, claiming the company’s facial-recognition software falsely linked him to a series of thefts from Apple stores. Ousmane Bah, 18, said he was arrested at his home in New York in November and charged with stealing from an Apple store. The arrest warrant included a photo that didn’t resemble Bah, he said in a lawsuit filed Monday. One of the thefts he was charged with, in Boston, took place on the day in June he was attending his senior prom in (...)

    #Apple #CCTV #biométrie #facial #vidéo-surveillance #surveillance

  • Women Once Ruled Computers. When Did the Valley Become Brotopia? - Bloomberg
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2018-02-01/women-once-ruled-computers-when-did-the-valley-become-brotopia

    Lena Söderberg started out as just another Playboy centerfold. The 21-year-old Swedish model left her native Stockholm for Chicago because, as she would later say, she’d been swept up in “America fever.” In November 1972, Playboy returned her enthusiasm by featuring her under the name Lenna Sjööblom, in its signature spread. If Söderberg had followed the path of her predecessors, her image would have been briefly famous before gathering dust under the beds of teenage boys. But that particular photo of Lena would not fade into obscurity. Instead, her face would become as famous and recognizable as Mona Lisa’s—at least to everyone studying computer science.

    In engineering circles, some refer to Lena as “the first lady of the internet.” Others see her as the industry’s original sin, the first step in Silicon Valley’s exclusion of women. Both views stem from an event that took place in 1973 at a University of Southern California computer lab, where a team of researchers was trying to turn physical photographs into digital bits. Their work would serve as a precursor to the JPEG, a widely used compression standard that allows large image files to be efficiently transferred between devices. The USC team needed to test their algorithms on suitable photos, and their search for the ideal test photo led them to Lena.
    0718P_FEATURE_BROTOPIA_01
    Lena

    According to William Pratt, the lab’s co-founder, the group chose Lena’s portrait from a copy of Playboy that a student had brought into the lab. Pratt, now 80, tells me he saw nothing out of the ordinary about having a soft porn magazine in a university computer lab in 1973. “I said, ‘There are some pretty nice-looking pictures in there,’ ” he says. “And the grad students picked the one that was in the centerfold.” Lena’s spread, which featured the model wearing boots, a boa, a feathered hat, and nothing else, was attractive from a technical perspective because the photo included, according to Pratt, “lots of high-frequency detail that is difficult to code.”

    Over the course of several years, Pratt’s team amassed a library of digital images; not all of them, of course, were from Playboy. The data set also included photos of a brightly colored mandrill, a rainbow of bell peppers, and several photos, all titled “Girl,” of fully clothed women. But the Lena photo was the one that researchers most frequently used. Over the next 45 years, her face and bare shoulder would serve as a benchmark for image-processing quality for the teams working on Apple Inc.’s iPhone camera, Google Images, and pretty much every other tech product having anything to do with photos. To this day, some engineers joke that if you want your image compression algorithm to make the grade, it had better perform well on Lena.

    “We didn’t even think about those things at all when we were doing this,” Pratt says. “It was not sexist.” After all, he continues, no one could have been offended because there were no women in the classroom at the time. And thus began a half-century’s worth of buck-passing in which powerful men in the tech industry defended or ignored the exclusion of women on the grounds that they were already excluded .

    Based on data they had gathered from the same sample of mostly male programmers, Cannon and Perry decided that happy software engineers shared one striking characteristic: They “don’t like people.” In their final report they concluded that programmers “dislike activities involving close personal interaction; they are generally more interested in things than in people.” There’s little evidence to suggest that antisocial people are more adept at math or computers. Unfortunately, there’s a wealth of evidence to suggest that if you set out to hire antisocial nerds, you’ll wind up hiring a lot more men than women.

    Cannon and Perry’s work, as well as other personality tests that seem, in retrospect, designed to favor men over women, were used in large companies for decades, helping to create the pop culture trope of the male nerd and ensuring that computers wound up in the boys’ side of the toy aisle. They influenced not just the way companies hired programmers but also who was allowed to become a programmer in the first place.

    In 1984, Apple released its iconic Super Bowl commercial showing a heroic young woman taking a sledgehammer to a depressing and dystopian world. It was a grand statement of resistance and freedom. Her image is accompanied by a voice-over intoning, “And you’ll see why 1984 won’t be like 1984.” The creation of this mythical female heroine also coincided with an exodus of women from technology. In a sense, Apple’s vision was right: The technology industry would never be like 1984 again. That year was the high point for women earning degrees in computer science, which peaked at 37 percent. As the number of overall computer science degrees picked back up during the dot-com boom, far more men than women filled those coveted seats. The percentage of women in the field would dramatically decline for the next two and a half decades.

    Despite having hired and empowered some of the most accomplished women in the industry, Google hasn’t turned out to be all that different from its peers when it comes to measures of equality—which is to say, it’s not very good at all. In July 2017 the search engine disclosed that women accounted for just 31 percent of employees, 25 percent of leadership roles, and 20 percent of technical roles. That makes Google depressingly average among tech companies.

    Even so, exactly zero of the 13 Alphabet company heads are women. To top it off, representatives from several coding education and pipeline feeder groups have told me that Google’s efforts to improve diversity appear to be more about seeking good publicity than enacting change. One noted that Facebook has been successfully poaching Google’s female engineers because of an “increasingly chauvinistic environment.”

    Last year, the personality tests that helped push women out of the technology industry in the first place were given a sort of reboot by a young Google engineer named James Damore. In a memo that was first distributed among Google employees and later leaked to the press, Damore claimed that Google’s tepid diversity efforts were in fact an overreach. He argued that “biological” reasons, rather than bias, had caused men to be more likely to be hired and promoted at Google than women.

    #Féminisme #Informatique #Histoire_numérique

  • #Elsevier and the 25.2 Billion Dollar A Year Academic Publishing #Business

    Twenty years ago (December 18, 1995), Forbes predicted academic publisher Elsevier’s relevancy and life in the digital age to be short lived. In an article entitled “The internet’s first victim,” journalist John Hayes highlights the technological imperative coming toward the academic publisher’s profit margin with the growing internet culture and said, “Cost-cutting librarians and computer-literate professors are bypassing academic journals — bad news for Elsevier.” After publication of the article, investors seemed to heed Hayes’s rationale for Elsevier’s impeding demise. Elsevier stock fell 7% in two days to $26 a share.
    As the smoke settles twenty years later, one of the clear winners on this longitudinal timeline of innovation is the very firm that investors, journalists, and forecasters wrote off early as a casualty to digital evolution: Elsevier. Perhaps to the chagrin of many academics, the publisher has actually not been bruised nor battered. In fact, the publisher’s health is stronger than ever. As of 2015, the academic publishing market that Elsevier leads has an annual revenue of $25.2 billion. According to its 2013 financials Elsevier had a higher percentage of profit than Apple, Inc.


    https://medium.com/@jasonschmitt/can-t-disrupt-this-elsevier-and-the-25-2-billion-dollar-a-year-academic-publ
    #édition_scientifique #escroquerie #publications_scientifiques #science #recherche

  • Inside One of the World’s Most Secretive iPhone Factories
    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2016-04-24/inside-one-of-the-world-s-most-secretive-iphone-factories

    A few minutes past 9 a.m. at Pegatron Corp.’s vast factory on Shanghai’s outskirts, thousands of workers dressed in pink jackets are getting ready to make iPhones. The men and women stare into face scanners and swipe badges at security turnstiles to clock in. The strict ID checks are there to make sure they don’t work excessive overtime. The process takes less than two seconds. This is the realm in which the world’s most profitable smartphones are made, part of Apple Inc.’s closely guarded (...)

    #Apple #Pegatron #iPhone #travail #surveillance #China_Labor_Watch #reconnaissance_faciale (...)

    ##biométrie

  • Cash machine’ Apple creates poor societies
    http://goodelectronics.org/news-en/2018cash-machine2019-apple-creates-poor-societies

    Oct 27, 2015 Report and video on the financialisation of Apple

    On the same day as Apple Inc. is set to announce its financial results for the fourth quarter, the GoodElectronics Network and SOMO are publishing a critical paper on the company. The paper explains how Apple is short-changing societies by acting as a financial investor when handling its enormous company profits instead of reinvesting it into the real economy

    https://vimeo.com/143721806

  • Ne sachant pas quoi faire de son cash, #Apple le détruit… en donnant 14 milliards de dollars à ses actionnaires
    http://online.wsj.com/news/article_email/SB10001424052702303496804579367543198542118-lMyQjAxMTA0MDAwNjEwNDYyWj
    Apple Repurchases $14 Billion of Own Shares in 2 Weeks - WSJ.com

    Apple Inc. AAPL +0.58% has bought $14 billion of its own shares in the two weeks since reporting financial results that disappointed Wall Street, Chief Executive Tim Cook said in an interview.

    son gros actionnaire Carl Icahn propose d’en détruire encore plus :
    Icahn Ups Apple Stake to $3.6 Billion in Buyback Campaign - Bloomberg
    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-01-23/icahn-increases-apple-stake-by-500-million-to-3-6-billion.html

    “Given that the company has $130 billion of net cash and $40 billion of expected annual earnings, and the fact that it is hard to find a better time in history to borrow money, a $50 billion share repurchase over the course of fiscal year 2014 seems more than reasonable to us,” Icahn wrote in the letter, which was included in a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

    #destruction_de_valeur #capitalisme #silicon_valley #cash

    • C’est la première fois que j’entends que la distribution de bénéfice est une destruction monétaire. Que ce soit une manifestation de déséquilibre social légitimement taxable est un fait - mais de là à parler de destruction... La distribution de bénéfices marque la fin d’un cycle - la maturité d’un développement économique que peut éventuellement suivre sa sénescence, mais c’est justement en cela qu’elle est vitale : elle permet la redistribution du capital vers les activités en croissance.

    • Certes, la destruction de capital financier n’est pas forcément plus « destructrice » que la création monétaire n’est « créative ». Mais c’est bien du capital qui était censé en théorie être investi dans (c’est-à-dire donner les moyens de réaliser) une activité économique donnée.

      Ce qui est épatant, c’est que concrètement Apple dit à ses actionnaires « je ne sais plus comment grossir, quelles technologies ou sociétés acheter, quelles usines construire, quels talents employer. Toutes ces ressources que j’ai amassé, faites-en ce que vous voulez ». De ce point de vue elle détruit bien une capacité stratégique qu’elle avait accumulée.

    • discussion sur twitter avec @mr_piouf qui n’aime pas qu’on parle de « destruction » ; et comme on le verra, je me fais clouer le bec à la fin :

      Piouf> @thibnton Pas vraiment une destruction…

      tbn> @mr_piouf cf. le commentaire de @liotier / mais si le capital gagne ensuite des paradis fiscaux, on peut dire ça non ? cc @recifs

      Piouf> @thibnton @liotier @recifs Tout dépend à la place de qui on se place. Apple, les ex actionnaires, la société en général ?

      tbn> @mr_piouf @liotier @recifs la conversation continue… sur sinvice : )

      Piouf> @thibnton @liotier @recifs Scrogneugneu

      Fil> @mr_piouf @thibnton @liotier non

      Piouf> @recifs Ca c est de la réponse :) Si toucher un tel chèque est une perte pour moi actionnaire je me porte volontaire…

      Fil> @mr_piouf désolé, j’y peux rien, ça s’appelle comme ça ; même à l’OCDE

      Piouf> @recifs J’attend toujours la partie qui m’explique la destruction pour moi actionnaire qui vend mes parts.

      Piouf> @recifs ou la destruction pour Apple pour qui cela change la typologie de son actionnariat et ainsi les jeux de pouvoir en son sein.

      Fil> @mr_piouf j’ai touché un point sensible ? un tabou ? le rachat d’actions, si sont ensuite annulées, s’appelle "destruction de capital". point.

      Fil> @mr_piouf s’ils le font c’est qu’ils estiment que c’est dans leur intérêt :) personne ne dit le contraire

      Piouf> @recifs Ben non ça a rien de tabou. Certes mais destruction de capital ne veut pas dire destruction de cash ou destruction de X dollars :)

      Piouf> @recifs Forcément si on fait un amalgame entre des mots qui ne veulent pas dire la même chose… Facile de dire « Point. » <3

      Piouf> @recifs Sans compter que c est une réduction pas une destruction. La réduction apporte quelque chose qui n’est pas forcément financier.

      Fil> @mr_piouf oui ils en gardent sous le coude, ce n’est "que" 10% :)

      Piouf> @thibnton lien stp ?

      Piouf> @recifs Peut importe le % ça n’est pas une destruction. C’est un réduction de capital stratégique qui me semble tout à fait normale.

      Piouf> @recifs Voir salutaire, l’argent d’Apple qui dort dans des paradis fiscaux VS une chance qu’elle serve à quelque chose d’autre.

      tbn> @mr_piouf cf. le commentaire de @liotier / mais si le capital gagne ensuite des paradis fiscaux, on peut dire ça non ? cc @recifs

      Piouf> @thibnton @liotier @recifs Tout dépend à la place de qui on se place. Apple, les ex actionnaires, la société en général ?

      Fil> @mr_piouf @thibnton @liotier non

      Piouf> @recifs Ca c est de la réponse :) Si toucher un tel chèque est une perte pour moi actionnaire je me porte volontaire…

      Fil> @mr_piouf désolé, j’y peux rien, ça s’appelle comme ça ; même à l’OCDE

      Piouf> @recifs J’attend toujours la partie qui m’explique la destruction pour moi actionnaire qui vend mes parts.

      Fil> @mr_piouf j’ai touché un point sensible ? un tabou ? le rachat d’actions, si sont ensuite annulées, s’appelle "destruction de capital". point.

      Piouf> @recifs Ben non ça a rien de tabou. Certes mais destruction de capital ne veut pas dire destruction de cash ou destruction de X dollars :)

      Piouf> @recifs Forcément si on fait un amalgame entre des mots qui ne veulent pas dire la même chose… Facile de dire « Point. » <3

      Piouf> @recifs Sans compter que c est une réduction pas une destruction. La réduction apporte quelque chose qui n’est pas forcément financier.

      Fil> @mr_piouf oui ils en gardent sous le coude, ce n’est "que" 10% :)

      Piouf> @recifs Peut importe le % ça n’est pas une destruction. C’est un réduction de capital stratégique qui me semble tout à fait normale.

      Piouf> @recifs Voir salutaire, l’argent d’Apple qui dort dans des paradis fiscaux VS une chance qu’elle serve à quelque chose d’autre.

      Fil> @mr_piouf à consommer du crack

      Fil> @mr_piouf "normal" = comme ça que le capitalisme fonctionne, cf Marx ; là-dessus rien à redire ; mais du coup je comprends pas ta critique

      Piouf> @recifs Rachat sur le marché ouvert, c’est sur mes amis ayant tous des actions sont tous des fumeur de crack. Bref bon troll :)

      Fil> @mr_piouf tu demande du moralisme, je t’en donne :) Clairement c’est pas ça la question

      Piouf> @recifs Ma critique est que l’on parle de destruction là ou il n’y en a pas. Au contraire c un éloignement d’Apple de la financiarisation

      Fil> @mr_piouf on parle aussi de création là où il n’y en a pas :) c’est le langage de l’économie c tout

      Piouf> @recifs bref il n’y a aucune logique dans cette argumentation, elle ne sert donc à rien pour moi. Sincère bonne journée à toi

    • L’utopie capitalo-néolibérale correspond tout à fait à ce que décrit @liotier au début et piouf plus tard : avec l’argent « non périssable », rien ne se perd, rien ne se crée, tout se transforme.
      Le problème c’est que cette utopie implique que les investisseurs remplissent leur mission sociale : utiliser leur savoir faire d’analystes économico-financiers pour piloter au mieux les investissements réalisés dans l’économie « réelle » (le quasi-pléonasme est volontaire), ce qui permet en théorie une redistribution financière régulière vers les entrepreneurs, puis les productifs. En théorie.

      Dans les faits, et dans la théorie aussi d’ailleurs, mais ça ne dérange pas grand monde apparemment ce vice de forme, les investisseurs n’ont aucune mission sociale, ils n’ont aucune obligation ni responsabilité vis à vis de la bonne irrigation de l’économie réelle (seul le marché est responsable, tu parles..).
      Les investisseurs ont juste des privilèges, celui de faire ce qu’ils veulent pourvu qu’ils s’enrichissent (ou pas). Et dans les faits ils ne se privent pas d’exploiter ce privilège.
      Une technique pas trop risquée quand le troupeau des investisseurs tirent dans le même sens : il suffit d’entretenir une pénurie de liquidités, en stockant l’argent dans des chambres froides hermétiques (les paradis fiscaux) pour que la déperdition fiscale soit nulle, tandis que la pénurie aidant, la valeur du stock prend de la valeur, ou en tous cas n’en perd pas. On assèche petit à petit l’économie réelle.. Les investisseurs se sont enrichis, tout va très bien madame la marquise, ils ont d’opulents oasis au milieu du désert..
      Destruction, assèchement, ponction, délestage d’eau potable dans l’océan, peu importe les mots ou les images, le résultat est bien celui là... Certains laissent déborder leur piscine pendant que ceux qui pompent crèvent de soif..

    • Le cœur du problème n’est pas l’actionnaire (par nature amoral) mais l’Etat qui tolère les paradis fiscaux et n’impose pas de contreparties plus fortes au privilège de création monétaire dont bénéficient les banques. Le problème est donc politique - dans la législation qui n’exprime pas suffisamment les contraintes reflétant nos exigences de moralité et dans l’exécutif indifférent.

      La responsabilité sociale de l’actionnaire et donc celle de l’entreprise n’existent que sous la contrainte politique - les actionnaires sont sourds tant que la clameur des spoliés est insuffisante pour influer les acteurs du marché et donc la performance économique de l’entreprise. Seule la menace réglementaire se profilant à l’issue d’une campagne de culpabilisation efficace incite l’actionnaire à changer avant que la loi ne l’y contraigne en des termes plus rigoureux.

      Stigmatiser les comportements asociaux me parait difficile dans le cas du désinvestissement. Dans le domaine écologique, c’est simple : si le pollueur ne compense pas de manière adéquate ses externalités négatives, alors il est asocial - d’ailleurs l’Etat l’est aussi si il ne l’y contraint pas et ne l’encourage pas ainsi à changer son comportement. Mais dans le domaine de l’investissement ? Le cas des banques est moralement relativement simple : les contreparties doivent être à la hauteur du privilège de création monétaire. Le cas des investisseurs non bancaires est différent - on ne peut pas leur en vouloir de jouer leur rôle social d’optimisation de l’allocation financière.

      Si les investisseurs non bancaires choisissent de gonfler des bulles au lieu de contribuer à un développement économique socialement bénéfique, la responsabilité en revient à l’Etat qui n’exerce pas son pouvoir de modeler les comportements en diminuant l’attractivité des investissements asociaux. Dans ce domaine, l’élasticité de l’incitation fiscale permet une adaptation plus souple que des contraintes liberticides enclines aux dommages collatéraux - et elle prête moins le flanc à l’agitation anti-interventionniste.

      L’exercice du pouvoir fiscal n’en est pas moins un art complexe et plein de pièges - effets d’aubaine et niches inexpugnables sont courants... Mais prendre ce prétexte pour justifier l’inaction serait bien mal venu tant le pouvoir fiscal n’est plus exercé qu’à l’aune des clientèles électorales.

      Reste le prétexte de la concurrence entre Etats - mais si la fiscalité Somalienne est si avantageuse, pourquoi ne pas proposer aux investisseurs se prétendant persécutés d’aller y investir ? Et si une industrie produit moins cher au prix de dommages planétaires, pourquoi ne pas taxer ses produits à l’entrée sur notre territoire ? Et si une autre société fait réellement mieux, moins cher et avec une qualité de vie nous paraissant attractive et compatible avec nos idéaux ? Alors c’est à nous de nous adapter... Mais la réduction de la pression fiscale n’est que l’un des leviers d’daptation, tout comme la réduction du prix n’est que l’un des moyens par lesquels les entreprises se font concurrence - et pas forcément le plus important... Mais les investisseurs adulant le moins-disant fiscal font souvent semblant de l’oublier.

    • Merci @liotier pour cette réponse intéressante, je réagis sur ce point là :

      Si les investisseurs non bancaires choisissent de gonfler des bulles au lieu de contribuer à un développement économique socialement bénéfique, la responsabilité en revient à l’Etat qui n’exerce pas son pouvoir de modeler les comportements en diminuant l’attractivité des investissements asociaux

      Justement je me bats contre cette idée : les investisseurs non bancaires sont des adultes comme les autres, des citoyens comme les autres. Il est temps qu’on admette que le niveau de responsabilité « civile » qu’on peut assumer est directement proportionnel au pouvoir physique que l’on détient sur l’activité sociale. Penser que le pouvoir financier ne peut être tenu pour responsable de rien, c’est vivre dans l’illusion que la responsabilité pourrait être assumée par un acteur imaginaire, qui de la main invisible du marché, qui de l’Etat...
      La main invisible n’a jamais rien assumé, quant à l’Etat, qui assume au final ? Les fonctionnaires censés être compétents à leur poste, les représentants élus, ou ceux qui les ont élus et confié leurs impôts ?
      Enfin l’Etat n’a que le pouvoir qu’on lui accorde, c’est à dire plus grand chose désormais, puisqu’il semble résigné à seulement « inciter » le pouvoir financier à pas s’éloigner trop délibérément de la décence et de l’intérêt général en vue de garantir l’ordre public.

      Je milite personnellement pour redéfinir clairement qui est responsable de quoi, en fonction de la mission sociale qu’il remplit. Et je me bats donc pour qu’on considère qu’investir n’est pas un privilège, mais une fonction sociale, comme celle consistant à fabriquer du pain ou soigner les gens. Cela doit être réglementé, et il faut en assumer les responsabilités....

    • La discussion a glissé vers le terrain moral, ce qui n’était pas mon propos — mais vous pouvez continuer ;-)

      Mais je veux revenir sur la destruction de capital. Si une armée vendait ses tanks, on me laisserait dire qu’elle a démantelé une partie de sa capacité d’action sur le terrain, qu’elle ne sait pas quoi faire de ces tanks, etc.

      Sans que ce soit « bien » ou « mal » (perso je trouverais ça plutôt « bien », sans doute…), ni « normal » ou « anormal », et sans préjuger de ce que l’État vendeur ferait de cet argent, ni de ce que l’acheteur ferait de ces tanks, on pourrait se mettre d’accord sur un constat objectif : cette capacité militaire, qui existait, a disparu.

      Alors comment expliquer que dire la même chose d’Apple semble relever du crime de lèse-majesté, d’une insulte aux actionnaires et d’un défi à la logique ?

    • Dans ton exemple, une partie de la capacité persiste sous forme d’augmentation du budget du vendeur - mais des intangibles tels que le savoir-faire qui allait avec l’exploitation du matériel sont perdus. Ca n’a rien à voir avec une question monétaire.

      Un rachat d’action est neutre en termes de masse monétaire, contrairement à un remboursement d’emprunt bancaire qui est une destruction monétaire : une banque est créatrice de monnaie par ses prêts alors qu’un prêteur non-bancaire ne l’est pas.

      Le signal transmis aux actionnaires est mitigé : d’un côté le rachat d’actions a pour effet l’augmentation de l’effet de levier - et donc l’augmentation de la rentabilité du capital restant... Mais d’un autre côté une diminution du capital et donc de la capacité d’endettement est traditionnellement un signe que la phase de croissance forte est considérée comme terminée - time to milk the brand !

    • Bien sûr - un rachat d’action handicape le développement de la société et il n’a normalement lieu qu’à l’initiative des actionnaires qui décident qu’il est temps d’engranger les bénéfices... C’est la seule motivation de Carl Icahn qui n’est donc pas bien populaire parmi ceux qui croient à la croissance d’AAPL.

      Ceci dit, l’entrée de Carl Icahn au capital a permis à des actionnaires qui ont fait un bout de chemin avec Apple d’être finalement rémunérés et de passer à autre chose... Sans de tels personnages achetant des titres à maturité et leur offrant donc une voie de sortie, ils n’auraient probablement pas soutenu la croissance d’Apple.

      La question n’est pas celle de l’avenir d’Apple - c’est de savoir si l’investissement privé est un mode efficient d’allocation des ressources financières.

    • Puis je suggerer « Une destruction potentiellement créatrice » . :-) j’ai bien aime par exemple le projet fotopedia (même si ça a l’air compliqué) créé par un ancien d’Apple . .Il est vrai que majoritairement le cash ira alimenter la spéculation qu’il faut combattre donc

    • Les suggestions de Wired sont ce qu’elles sont… la stratégie d’Apple, en ce moment, c’est apparemment plutôt la croissance interne – à la différence du modèle de Google, qui se nourrit de libre et des innovations des autres –. C’est pas totalement infondé d’un point de vue financier, et c’est pas non plus « détruire du cash ». On peut toujours rêver que, prises de folies, les entreprises géantes du web s’autodétruisent, mais il semblerait qu’elles aient à leur tête des gens encore pas totalement fous.

      Apple était jusqu’à récemment la plus grosse valeur de la bourse de New York, il semblerait qu’elle veuille le redevenir. Et ce que les financiers appellent « les fondamentaux » lui donnent plutôt raison – PER de 11, (onze ans de dividende pour rembourser l’achat de son action si je ne dis pas de bêtise, ce qui est plutôt bien), deux fois moins par exemple que pour Google…

      Après c’est peut-être que l’entreprise est en panne de stratégie, ou qu’elle est sujette à des crises de susceptibilité, mais c’est quand même rentrer dans des élucubrations compliquées.

      Tout ce qu’on sait, c’est que ce qu’elle prépare n’est pas pour notre bien.

      #bourse

    • Même The Economist prend peur :
      http://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21616950-companies-are-spending-record-amounts-buying-back-their-own-shar

      Buy-backs are not necessarily a bad idea. (gna gna gna…)
      But it could also be a source of trouble, for two main reasons.

      (...) both short-term investors and managers have incentives that could lead them to overdo buy-backs and neglect long-term investment projects.

      (...) They are borrowing heavily at home to pay for buy-backs while keeping cash abroad to avoid America’s high corporate tax rate.

      À noter que le contenu de cet article invalide quelque peu la réponse de @Mr_Piouf qui m’expliquait que ça permettait de faire sortir l’argent des paradis fiscaux ; et son titre (“Corporate cocaine”) réhabilite ma réponse “à consommer du crack” :-)

    • La trésorerie d’Apple dépasse les 200 milliards de dollars
      http://siliconvalley.blog.lemonde.fr/2015/07/23/la-tresorerie-dapple-depasse-les-200-milliards-de-dollars

      Portée par les ventes record d’iPhone, la trésorerie d’Apple vient de dépasser la barre symbolique des 200 milliards de dollars. Au 30 juin, elle s’élevait à 202,8 milliards (186 milliards d’euros). Avec cette somme, le groupe à la pomme pourrait, théoriquement, racheter Walt Disney, Coca-Cola, IBM ou encore AT&T sans avoir à emprunter le moindre centime. De fait, seulement douze sociétés américaines ont une capitalisation boursière plus élevée.

  • Apple Censors Drone War + Petition

    http://act.rootsaction.org/p/dia/action/public/?action_KEY=6750

    Apple Inc., which has received over $9 million in Pentagon contracts in recent years, has rejected from its App Store, and therefore from all iPhones, a simple informative application.

    Drones+ is an application that shows no depictions of the carnage of war and reveals no secret information. It simply adds a location to a map every time a drone strike is reported in the media and added to a database maintained by the U.K.’s Bureau of Investigative Journalism.

    #Apple #Drones+ #BIJ

  • Your iPhone Was Built, In Part, By 13 Year-Olds Working 16 Hours A Day For 70 Cents An Hour - Business Insider
    http://articles.businessinsider.com/2012-01-15/tech/30628970_1_iphones-ipads-apple

    We love our iPhones and iPads.

    We love the prices of our iPhones and iPads.

    We love the super-high profit margins of Apple, Inc., the maker of our iPhones and iPads.

    And that’s why it’s disconcerting to remember that the low prices of our iPhones and iPads — and the super-high profit margins of Apple — are only possible because our iPhones and iPads are made with labor practices that would be illegal in the United States.

  • Apple’s Voice Recognition Siri Doubles IPhone Data Volumes - Bloomberg
    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-01-06/apple-s-voice-recognition-siri-doubles-iphone-data-volumes.html

    Apple Inc. (AAPL)’s voice recognition software Siri has prompted users of the iPhone 4S to use almost twice as much data compared with the handset’s predecessor, placing greater pressure on operators, network firm Arieso said.

    “Voice is the ultimate human interface,” Arieso Chief Technology Officer Michael Flanagan said in an interview in London. “As you lower the barriers,” consumers will use their smartphones’ functions even more often, he said. Arieso, based in Atlanta, advises clients such as Vodafone Group Plc (VOD), Telefonica SA (TEF) and Nokia Siemens Networks Oy on how to manage wireless networks.

    Ça, c’est des fois que tu aies cru que ton réseau de téléphonie mobile était conçu pour transmettre correctement la voix sans que ton opérateur prétende que ça lui met la pression.

    • C’est certainement la voix qui prend le plus de place, en comparaison des autres requêtes automatisées. D’ailleurs, je ne vois pas pourquoi ces requêtes se feraient depuis le téléphone, lorsque le téléphone « ne sait pas » : autant que ce soit aux serveurs d’Apple d’acquérir ce savoir, et de renvoyer le résultat à l’utilisateur.

      Ceci étant, je ne vois pas en quoi la voix sur IP est une aberration. On transporte bien de l’IP sur une ligne fixe. Et même plusieurs lignes en VoIP sur une même ligne de téléphonie fixe. La téléphonie mobile est toujours numérique, aussi, quel que soit la bande passante, la couche IP ne me paraît pas si gourmande, en comparaison des données transmises par ailleurs, à savoir la voix. D’ailleurs, ne peut-on pas améliorer la compression de la voix, en étant sur IP, le tout avec une technologie propriétaire, contrairement aux standards du marché, nécessairement plus figés, du fait du besoin d’interopérabilité entre opérateurs ?

      Bref, oui, il y a une utilisation plus importante de trafic IP, mais je ne peux soupçonner les opérateurs de rendre l’usage IP coûteux dans l’unique but de conserver des marges importantes, sans qu’aucun élément rationnel n’explique des prix élevés. Je veux dire : en Afrique, où la téléphonie fixe ne s’est pas développée, on opte directement pour la téléphonie mobile, moins onéreuse à déployer. Pourquoi, par quel mauvais sort, le déploiement de la téléphonie coûterait-il plus cher en France ?

      Bref, disais-je...

  • Apple Adds Do-Not-Track Tool to New Browser - WSJ.com
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703551304576261272308358858.html

    Apple Inc. has added a do-not-track privacy tool to a test version of its latest Web browser for keeping customers’ online activities from being monitored by marketers.

    The tool is included within the latest test release of Lion, a version of Apple’s Mac OS X operating system that is currently available only to developers. The final version of the operating system is scheduled to be released to the public this summer. Mentions of the do-not-track feature in Apple’s Safari browser began to appear recently in online discussion forums and on Twitter.

    The move by the Cupertino, Calif., company leaves Google Inc. as the only major browser provider that hasn’t yet committed to supporting a do-no-track capability in its browser, called Chrome. Microsoft Corp. and Mozilla Corp. both offer do-not-track features in their latest browsers.

    #privacy