company:crispr

  • Une nouvelle technique d’édition génétique pour corriger les mutations inattendues (Futurascience)
    https://www.crashdebug.fr/sciencess/16135-une-nouvelle-technique-d-edition-genetique-pour-corriger-les-mutati

    Une nouvelle technique d’édition génétique évitant d’avoir à « couper » l’ADN, vient d’être mise au point. Elle corrige ainsi un défaut majeur des méthodes utilisées jusqu’à présent : l’apparition de mutations non désirées dans le génome.

    Cette nouvelle technologie « fonctionne plus comme une colle moléculaire que comme des ciseaux moléculaires », le surnom de la technique actuelle, résume dans un communiqué de presse l’université de Columbia (New York), dont est issue l’équipe de recherche.

    Développé depuis 2012 et maintenant utilisé dans des milliers de laboratoires de recherche du monde entier, l’outil Crispr-Cas9 a révolutionné l’édition génétique. Il permet de modifier de façon précise, rapide et à moindre coût une partie du génome, comme on corrigerait une faute (...)

    #En_vedette #Actualités_scientifiques #Sciences

  • Russian biologist plans more CRISPR-edited babies
    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01770-x

    Je n’ai pas réussi à extraire une simple partie de ce texte, tant l’ensemble me semble complètement hors-jeu. Je partage l’avis de l’auteur de l’article : la folie et l’hubris scientifiques se serrent la main dans le dos de l’humanité. Choisir de surcroit des femmes en difficulté (HIV positive) est bien dans la lignée machiste d’une science qui impose plus qu’elle ne propose.

    La guerre internationale à la réputation, la course à « être le premier » (ici le masculin s’impose), la science sans conscience ne peuvent que provoquer ce genre de dérives. Il faudra réfléchir à une « slow science » et à un réel partage des découvertes, qui permettrait de prendre le temps du recul, et qui pourrait associer la société civile (ici au sens de celle qui n’est pas engagée dans la guerre des sciences).

    The proposal follows a Chinese scientist who claimed to have created twins from edited embryos last year.
    David Cyranoski

    Denis Rebrikov

    Molecular biologist Denis Rebrikov is planning controversial gene-editing experiments in HIV-positive women.

    A Russian scientist says he is planning to produce gene-edited babies, an act that would make him only the second person known to have done this. It would also fly in the face of the scientific consensus that such experiments should be banned until an international ethical framework has agreed on the circumstances and safety measures that would justify them.

    Molecular biologist Denis Rebrikov has told Nature he is considering implanting gene-edited embryos into women, possibly before the end of the year if he can get approval by then. Chinese scientist He Jiankui prompted an international outcry when he announced last November that he had made the world’s first gene-edited babies — twin girls.

    The experiment will target the same gene, called CCR5, that He did, but Rebrikov claims his technique will offer greater benefits, pose fewer risks and be more ethically justifiable and acceptable to the public. Rebrikov plans to disable the gene, which encodes a protein that allows HIV to enter cells, in embryos that will be implanted into HIV-positive mothers, reducing the risk of them passing on the virus to the baby in utero. By contrast, He modified the gene in embryos created from fathers with HIV, which many geneticists said provided little clinical benefit because the risk of a father passing on HIV to his children is minimal.

    Rebrikov heads a genome-editing laboratory at Russia’s largest fertility clinic, the Kulakov National Medical Research Center for Obstetrics, Gynecology and Perinatology in Moscow and is a researcher at the Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University, also in Moscow.

    According to Rebrikov he already has an agreement with an HIV centre in the city to recruit women infected with HIV who want to take part in the experiment.

    But scientists and bioethicists contacted by Nature are troubled by Rebrikov’s plans.

    “The technology is not ready,” says Jennifer Doudna, a University of California Berkeley molecular biologist who pioneered the CRISPR-Cas9 genome-editing system that Rebrikov plans to use. “It is not surprising, but it is very disappointing and unsettling.”

    Alta Charo, a researcher in bioethics and law at the University of Wisconsin-Madison says Rebrikov’s plans are not an ethical use of the technology. “It is irresponsible to proceed with this protocol at this time,” adds Charo, who sits on a World Health Organization committee that is formulating ethical governance policies for human genome editing.
    Rules and regulations

    Implanting gene-edited embryos is banned in many countries. Russia has a law that prohibits genetic engineering in most circumstances, but it is unclear whether or how the rules would be enforced in relation to gene editing in an embryo. And Russia’s regulations on assisted reproduction do not explicitly refer to gene editing, according to a 2017 analysis of such regulations in a range of countries. (The law in China is also ambiguous: in 2003, the health ministry banned genetically modifying human embryos for reproduction but the ban carried no penalties and He’s legal status was and still is not clear).

    Rebrikov expects the health ministry to clarify the rules on the clinical use of gene-editing of embryos in the next nine months. Rebrikov says he feels a sense of urgency to help women with HIV, and is tempted to proceed with his experiments even before Russia hashes out regulations.

    To reduce the chance he would be punished for the experiments, Rebrikov plans to first seek approval from three government agencies, including the health ministry. That could take anywhere from one month to two years, he says.

    Konstantin Severinov, a molecular geneticist who recently helped the government design a funding program for gene-editing research, says such approvals might be difficult. Russia’s powerful Orthodox church opposes gene editing, says Severinov, who splits his time between Rutgers University in Piscataway, New Jersey, and the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology near Moscow.

    Before any scientist attempts to implant gene-edited embryos into women there needs to be a transparent, open debate about the scientific feasibility and ethical permissibility, says geneticist George Daley at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts, who also heard about Rebrikov’s plans from Nature.

    One reason that gene-edited embryos have created a huge global debate is that, if allowed to grow into babies, the edits can be passed on to future generations — a far-reaching intervention known as altering the germ line. Researchers agree that the technology might, one day, help to eliminate genetic diseases such as sickle-cell anaemia and cystic fibrosis, but much more testing is needed before it is used in the alteration of human beings.

    In the wake of He’s announcement, many scientists renewed calls for an international moratorium on germline editing. Although that has yet to happen, the World Health Organization, the US National Academy of Sciences, the UK’s Royal Society and other prominent organizations have all discussed how to stop unethical and dangerous uses — often defined as ones that pose unnecessary or excessive risk — of genome editing in humans.
    HIV-positive mothers

    Although He was widely criticized for conducting his experiments using sperm from HIV-positive fathers, his argument was that he just wanted to protect people against ever getting the infection. But scientists and ethicists countered that there are other ways to decrease the risk of infection, such as contraceptives. There are also reasonable alternatives, such as drugs, for preventing maternal transmission of HIV, says Charo.

    Rebrikov agrees, and so plans to implant embryos only into a subset of HIV-positive mothers who do not respond to standard anti-HIV drugs. Their risk of transmitting the infection to the child is higher. If editing successfully disables the CCR5 gene, that risk would be greatly reduced, Rebrikov says. “This is a clinical situation which calls for this type of therapy,” he says.

    Most scientists say there is no justification for editing the CCR5 gene in embryos, even so, because the risks don’t outweigh the benefits. Even if the therapy goes as planned, and both copies of the CCR5 gene in cells are disabled, there is still a chance that such babies could become infected with HIV. The cell-surface protein encoded by CCR5 is thought to be the gateway for some 90% of HIV infections, but getting rid of it won’t affect other routes of HIV infection. There are still many unknowns about the safety of gene editing in embryos, says Gaetan Burgio at the Australian National University in Canberra. And what are the benefits of editing this gene, he asks. “I don’t see them.”
    Hitting the target

    There are also concerns about the safety of gene editing in embryos more generally. Rebrikov claims that his experiment — which, like He’s, will use the CRISPR-Cas9 genome-editing tool — will be safe.

    One big concern with He’s experiment — and with gene-editing in embryos more generally — is that CRISPR-Cas9 can cause unintended ‘off-target’ mutations away from the target gene, and that these could be dangerous if they, for instance, switched off a tumour-suppressor gene. But Rebrikov says that he is developing a technique that can ensure that there are no ‘off-target’ mutations; he plans to post preliminary findings online within a month, possibly on bioRxiv or in a peer-reviewed journal.

    Scientists contacted by Nature were sceptical that such assurances could be made about off-target mutations, or about another known challenge of using CRISPR-Cas 9 — so-called ‘on-target mutations’, in which the correct gene is edited, but not in the way intended.

    Rebrikov writes, in a paper published last year in the Bulletin of the RSMU, of which he is the editor in chief, that his technique disables both copies of the CCR5 gene (by deleting a section of 32 bases) more than 50% of the time. He says publishing in this journal was not a conflict of interest because reviewers and editors are blinded to a paper’s authors.

    But Doudna is sceptical of those results. “The data I have seen say it’s not that easy to control the way the DNA repair works.” Burgio, too, thinks that the edits probably led to other deletions or insertions that are difficult to detect, as is often the case with gene editing.

    Misplaced edits could mean that the gene isn’t properly disabled, and so the cell is still accessible to HIV, or that the mutated gene could function in a completely different and unpredictable way. “It can be a real mess,” says Burgio.

    What’s more, the unmutated CCR5 has many functions that are not yet well understood, but which offer some benefits, say scientists critical of Rebrikov’s plans. For instance, it seems to offer some protection against major complications following infection by the West Nile virus or influenza. “We know a lot about its [CCR5’s] role in HIV entry [to cells], but we don’t know much about its other effects,” says Burgio. A study published last week also suggested that people without a working copy of CCR5 might have a shortened lifespan.

    Rebrikov understands that if he proceeds with his experiment before Russia’s updated regulations are in place, he might be considered a second He Jiankui. But he says he would only do so if he’s sure of the safety of the procedure. “I think I’m crazy enough to do it,” he says.

    Nature 570, 145-146 (2019)
    doi: 10.1038/d41586-019-01770-x

  • Giant viruses have weaponised CRISPR against their bacterial hosts | New Scientist
    https://www.newscientist.com/article/2197422-giant-viruses-have-weaponised-crispr-against-their-bacterial-h

    Surprisingly, many of the giant phages also have CRISPR systems. CRISPR proteins have become famous for their use in genome editing, but they were first evolved by bacteria as a kind of immune system that targeted and destroyed the DNA of invading phages.

  • WHO Forms Human Gene-Editing Committee To Establish Guidelines : Shots - Health News : NPR
    https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/02/14/694710663/will+examine%20the%20scientific,%20ethical,%20social%20and%20legal%20challenges

    Voici le topo :
    – des « scientifiques » voyous manipulent génétiquement des embryons humains
    – la « communauté » scientifique crie au non respect de règles éthiques (et signale qu’il est « un peu tôt » pour se servir de la technique CRISPR qu’on maîtrise encore mal)
    – donc on crée une commission à l’OMS pour « encadrer l’usage futur »
    – donc, c’est comme si c’était déjà en cours, qu’il n’y avait ni interdiction, ni moratoire, juste le besoin de règles
    – et comme les règles vont prendre du temps, les autres « scientifiques » voyous vont « pratiquer » car il faut bien « expérimenter » pour définir l’éthique, n’est-ce pas ?

    En ne se prononçant jamais pour des interdictions ou des moratoires, les instances internationales laissent les entreprises/savants fous définir les règles. On retrouve le même processus en géoengineering, sur les manipulations génétiques des plantes alimentaires, sur les plantes phosphorescentes, sur la biologie de synthèse... Ce n’est au fond que la validation par les instances publiques multilatérales des fameuses « conférences d’Asilomar » dont le but était de laisser les entreprises d’un secteur définir les règles éthiques et environnementales qui s’appliqueront à ce secteur. C’est Facebook qui définit l’éthique des médias sociaux et les Sackler celle de la pharmacie des antidouleur.

    Bienvenue dans le monde de demain.

    The World Health Organization Thursday announced the formation of an international committee aimed at establishing uniform guidelines for editing human DNA in ways that can be passed down to future generations.

    The 18-member committee “will examine the scientific, ethical, social and legal challenges associated with human genome editing,” according to the WHO announcement.

    “The aim will be to advise and make recommendations on appropriate governance mechanisms for human genome editing,” the WHO says.

    The committee’s formation was prompted by the disclosure last year by Chinese scientist He Jiankui that he had created the world’s first gene-edited babies, twin girls.

    That sparked international outrage. Scientists, bioethicists and advocates condemned the experiment as unethical and irresponsible.

    But many scientists think it may be ethical someday to use the powerful new gene-editing technique known as CRISPR to edit the DNA in human embryos to prevent genetic disorders.

    Nevertheless, most scientists say it’s far too early to try to create babies that way since it’s unclear how well CRISPR works to edit DNA in a human embryo and whether it’s safe.

    #Designer_babies #CRISPR #Manipulation_génétique #Ethique

  • Les animaux génétiquement modifiés : pas (...) - Inf’OGM
    https://www.infogm.org/6254-animaux-ogm-pas-vraiment-au-point

    Il existe des millions d’animaux transgéniques, créés en laboratoires à des fins de recherche : principalement des rats, mais aussi des lapins, des chèvres, des vaches, etc. Ils sont utilisés pour étudier les mécanismes génétiques, mimer des maladies humaines, tester ou synthétiser des molécules [1]. D’après le Daily Mail, en 2007, 3,2 millions d’expériences ont eu lieu sur des animaux transgéniques, une augmentation de 6 % par rapport à 2006. L’Inra en France, par exemple, a dès la fin des années 90, modifié génétiquement par transgenèse des animaux. Louis-Marie Houdebine, chercheur à l’Inra, a ainsi « créé » un lapin fluorescent qu’un artiste, Eduardo Kac, a ensuite médiatisé. Dans la même veine, un programme de recherche médicale de l’Inra utilisait des brebis transgéniques, elles aussi fluorescentes. Preuve qu’on ne maîtrise jamais totalement la sécurité de ces programmes de recherche, une agnelle transgénique a été vendue pour sa viande à un particulier, en 2014. L’Inra a dénoncé cet acte malveillant, reconnaissant un dysfonctionnement interne.

    Très peu d’animaux transgéniques autorisés à la commercialisation

    Les premières plantes transgéniques sont apparues sur le marché à la fin des années 90… et vingt ans après, ce sont toujours les quatre mêmes plantes qui dominent le marché (voir p.4-5). Un nombre faible qui montre que malgré les discours, les difficultés techniques et économiques restent des contraintes fortes. En ce qui concerne les animaux transgéniques, les difficultés sont encore plus conséquentes. La transgenèse animale est « très coûteuse et d’un maniement relativement délicat », confirme L.-M. Houdebine. Ainsi, sont autorisés commercialement un nombre très restreint d’animaux génétiquement modifiés.
    Des milliers de moustiques transgéniques lâchés au Brésil

    Le 10 avril 2014, le Brésil a autorisé la dissémination commerciale dans l’environnement du moustique Aedes aegypti transgénique (OX513A) de l’entreprise britannique Oxitec (liée à Syngenta). Au Brésil, la production a commencé : plusieurs usines ont déjà été construites. Celle de Juazeiro (état de Bahia) produit des milliers de moustiques transgéniques depuis 2011. Ce moustique transgénique stérile est censé permettre de lutter contre la dengue.
    Des essais en champs ont été réalisés par Oxitec dans les îles Caïmans, en Malaisie, au Panama et au Brésil. Les essais prévus en Floride (États-Unis) n’ont toujours pas eu lieu. Les prétendus « résultats probants » de ces essais n’ont toujours pas été publiés. Cependant, en se basant sur les données communiquées par Oxitec, les organisations de la société civile estiment qu’il faudrait plus de sept millions de moustiques GM stériles par semaine pour avoir une chance de supprimer une population sauvage de seulement 20 000 moustiques. Oxitec doit se frotter les mains devant un marché captif aussi prometteur.
    Autre faiblesse : 3 % d’entre eux ne seront pas stériles, reconnaît Oxitec et en présence d’un antibiotique très répandu, la tétracycline, le taux de survie monte à 15 % environ.
    Une efficacité à 100 % ne serait pas non plus la panacée… L’agence brésilienne précise qu’elle a « identifié la nécessité de surveiller les populations sauvages du moustique Aedes albopictus [le moustique tigre], un autre vecteur du virus de la dengue, en raison du risque que cette espèce occupe la niche écologique laissée par l’élimination de Aedes aegypti ». Et que connaissons-nous avec précision du rôle de Aedes aegypti dans la chaîne alimentaire ?
    Un saumon GM vendu au Canada

    Le saumon transgénique développé par AquaBounty Technologies a été modifié pour grandir quatre fois plus vite que sa version non transgénique. Après des péripéties judiciaires et réglementaires qui ont duré près de 20 ans, il a finalement été autorisé pour la consommation humaine aux États-Unis le 19 novembre 2015. Mais quelques mois plus tard, fin janvier 2016, les États-Unis suspendaient l’autorisation « jusqu’à ce que la FDA publie des lignes directrices en matière d’étiquetage pour informer les consommateurs finaux » [2]. Cette suspension peut paraître tout à fait surprenante. En effet, aux États-Unis, jusqu’à présent, aucun produit GM ne doit obligatoirement faire l’objet d’un étiquetage spécifique.
    Au Canada, la vente de ce saumon et la production d’œufs sont autorisées sur l’île du Prince Edward, mais pas l’élevage. Ces œufs sont envoyés au Panama, seul pays au monde qui a autorisé l’élevage de saumon transgénique. De même, l’autorisation étasunienne « ne permet pas que ce saumon soit conçu et élevé aux États-Unis », une restriction qui en dit long.
    En 2017, pour la première fois, ce saumon a été vendu, au Canada [3] : ces cinq tonnes de filets de saumon transgénique ont rapporté 53 300 dollars à l’entreprise. Il s’agit de la première commercialisation d’un animal transgénique destiné à l’alimentation humaine.
    Ce saumon pose de nombreux problèmes tant environnementaux que sanitaires. Premièrement, selon une étude publiée en 2002, l’hormone de croissance, produite par transgenèse, aboutit à plusieurs dégâts collatéraux. Ainsi, ces animaux ont une tendance supérieure aux autres à devenir diabétiques et les poissons d’AquaBounty devront probablement être vendus sous forme de filets ou dans des plats cuisinés du fait de leurs difformités. Ensuite, une étude de 2009 montrent que si des poissons transgéniques s’échappent, ils auront tendance à « coloniser » les saumons non transgéniques, ce qu’avaient déjà montré des chercheurs en 1999. Autre élément : les poissons transgéniques accumulent plus les toxines dans leur chair que les autres poissons.
    L’ensemble de ces risques a donné une image bien négative de ce saumon… Ainsi, de nombreuses collectivités territoriales dont les états de l’Alaska, de la Californie et une soixantaine d’entreprises agro-alimentaires - comme Subway, Whole Foods, Trader Joe’s ou Kroger ou encore CostCo, deuxième plus grand détaillant étasunien qui achète chaque semaine 272 tonnes de saumon - se mobilisent contre son autorisation.
    Nouveaux animaux GM bientôt autorisés ?

    Parmi les papys des AGM, évoquons le cochon transgénique (« Enviropig »). Ce projet date de 1995 et est mené par l’Université de Guelph, au Canada. Ce cochon est censé contenir moins de phosphore dans ses excréments. Abandonné en 2012, il est réapparu moins d’un an après sous un nouveau nom : « Cassie Line ». Officiellement, l’abandon était lié à la méfiance des consommateurs et des industriels. Mais en fait, l’article scientifique de 2012 publié par l’Université de Guelph parle d’un cochon GM dont la nouvelle lignée est plus stable génétiquement parlant… : ce serait donc plus pour des questions techniques que les premiers cochons auraient été euthanasiés.
    La recherche s’intéresse aussi de près aux insectes. Ces derniers sont actuellement testés en champs et pourraient être prochainement autorisés, tous mis au point par l’entreprise Oxitec pour être stériles. Ainsi, en 2011, aux États-Unis, était expérimenté en champs un papillon génétiquement modifié (Plutella xylostella, OX4319), un parasite important des choux, colzas et autres plantes de la famille des Brassicacées. Au Brésil, c’est la mouche méditerranéenne des fruits (Ceratitis capitata) transgénique de l’entreprise Oxitec qui était lâchée à titre expérimental… Enfin, en 2013 et en 2015, Oxitec faisait une demande pour disséminer en Espagne des milliers de mouches de l’olivier (Bactrocera oleae, OX3097D-Bol), essais refusés par les autorités catalanes.
    Et les animaux GM 2.0 ?

    Les recherches actuelles de modification des animaux passent par l’utilisation de nouveaux outils de modification génétique, comme les Talen, ou Crispr/Cas9. En voici quelques exemples.
    Brice Whitelaw, du Roslin Institut, en Grande-Bretagne, a modifié des moutons et des bovins. Grâce aux protéines Talen, il a coupé la séquence génétique qui code pour la production de la myostatine qui freine le développement musculaire. Les animaux ainsi modifiés ont un système musculaire hypertrophié. Économiquement parlant, si cette délétion génétique arrive à produire des animaux viables, elle permettrait d’augmenter la masse musculaire de l’animal. En Chine, un des pays leaders dans le domaine, plusieurs équipes ont réussi, malgré des taux d’échecs importants, à désactiver certaines séquences génétiques en utilisant les technologies Talen ou Crispr/Cas9. Ainsi, l’une d’entre elles a mis au point des chiens de race Beagle plus musclés qui courent plus vite, et espère les vendre aux chasseurs... voire à l’armée ; une autre équipe propose un cochon nain qui reste vraiment nain, et espère le vendre comme animal de compagnie ; enfin, une troisième équipe travaille à réduire le taux de cholestérol chez le cochon, une innovation qui permettrait de limiter les maladies cardio-vasculaires…
    Éric Marois (CNRS / Inserm) estime que les deux outils Talen et Crispr/Cas9 « permettront d’obtenir très rapidement des mutations inactivant des gènes ciblés. Pour des manipulations génétiques plus complexes (remplacement d’un allèle par un autre, donnant par exemple une résistance à une maladie), ces outils permettront probablement d’accélérer les techniques déjà existantes développées chez la souris ».
    Au-delà des avantages techniques qui restent à démontrer, ces nouveaux OGM pourraient bien avoir un avantage considérable pour l’industrie : ne pas être considérés légalement com- me des OGM. Leur diffusion en serait facilitée car ils ne seraient plus soumis à autorisation, évaluation et étiquetage.
    Le forçage génétique

    Associé à une technique de transformation du vivant, le forçage génétique permet de propager une modification génétique plus vite que selon les lois classiques de Mendel sur l’hérédité, en quelques générations seulement. De nombreux laboratoires travaillent donc actuellement à forcer génétiquement des moustiques pour diffuser une stérilité rapidement. Objectif : éliminer les vecteurs pour éliminer les maladies. Mais avec quelles conséquences sur les équilibres écologiques ?
    Tous ces projets s’inscrivent dans une logique productiviste - des saumons plus gros, des cochons avec plus de muscle, etc. - ou mécaniste – éradiquer le vecteur pour combattre une maladie, sans comprendre la complexité d’un éco-système. C’est donc le risque de voir apparaître un autre vecteur qu’il faudra à son tour éliminer…
    Des AGM... juste pour le (...)
    Des AGM... juste pour le fun !
    GloFish

    Les premiers animaux transgéniques commercialisés étaient deux poissons d’ornement, destinés à des aquariums. Night Pearl®, conçu par l’Université de Taïwan, et GloFish®, conçu par l’Université de Singapour, ont été génétiquement modifiés avec un gène de fluorescence, issu respectivement d’une méduse et d’une anémone de mer. Ces poissons sont commercialisés à Taïwan, et aux États-Unis (sauf en Californie et au Michigan qui ont interdit les animaux transgéniques). GloFish est désormais une marque commerciale qui propose plusieurs espèces de poissons (poisson-zèbre, barbeau, tetra, etc.), disponibles dans plusieurs couleurs (orange, bleu, vert, rouge, violet, etc.).
    Interdits en Europe, quelques individus de ces poissons transgéniques ont été découverts dans plusieurs États membres – Allemagne, Irlande, Norvège, Pays-Bas, République Tchèque, Royaume-uni - de l’Union européenne entre 2006 et 2016.

  • Khrys’presso du lundi 3 décembre
    https://framablog.org/2018/12/03/khryspresso-du-lundi-3-decembre

    Comme chaque lundi, un coup d’œil dans le rétroviseur pour découvrir les informations que vous avez peut-être ratées la semaine dernière. Brave New World Un scientifique chinois a-t-il fait naître les premiers bébés CRISPR ? (theconversation.com) – voir aussi : La manipulation … Lire la suite­­

    #Claviers_invités #Internet_et_société #Libr'en_Vrac #Libre_Veille #DRM #espionnage #Facebook #GAFAM #Internet #Revue_de_web #Surveillance #veille #webrevue

  • Au-delà du code génétique : comment créer une cellule ?
    http://www.internetactu.net/2018/11/22/au-dela-du-code-genetique-comment-creer-une-cellule

    La création de cellules artificielles est la prochaine frontière de la #biologie_synthétique. Depuis pas mal d’années maintenant, on manipule l’ADN, on en crée même des versions dotées de nouvelles bases. Les adeptes des biobricks cherchent à normaliser et standardiser les opérations d’ingénierie génétique. CRISPR nous permet d’agir finement sur (...)

    #Articles #Recherches #biotechnologies

  • Bayer, dans l’enfer du mariage avec Monsanto

    Depuis la fusion effective des deux groupes, en juin, la valeur du nouvel ensemble ne cesse de fondre. Les investisseurs s’inquiètent du risque environnemental que constitue le glyphosate
    Cécile Boutelet
    page scq2

    Berlin correspondance - Ce jour-là, l’action Bayer a décroché, pour ne plus jamais se relever. Le 9 août 2018, Dewayne ­Johnson, un ancien jardinier en phase terminale de lymphome non hodgkinien, obtient gain de cause dans son procès contre Monsanto, qui ne l’a pas informé des risques qu’il courait en utilisant son produit phare, le Roundup. Le célèbre produit à base de glyphosate, l’herbicide le plus utilisé dans le monde, est pour la première fois rendu responsable d’un cancer par un tribunal, qui condamne Monsanto à verser au plaignant 289 millions de dollars (253 millions d’euros) : 39 au titre du préjudice moral et financier et 250 millions au titre des dommages. L’allemand Bayer, qui a racheté le semencier Monsanto au mois de juin 2018, accuse le coup : 10 milliards d’euros de valeur boursière s’évaporent en quelques heures. Le « risque Monsanto » correspond désormais à un chiffre, monstrueux. Et la descente aux enfers commence.

    Bayer, ébranlé par la sanction, se défend. Il assure aux investisseurs que le procès sera cassé en appel, que la peine sera allégée et que le juge se rendra aux conclusions des « 800 études scientifiques » prouvant l’innocuité de la molécule. L’action reprend des couleurs. Mais lundi 22 octobre, le couperet tombe : la juge Suzanne Bolanos ne rouvrira pas le procès. Elle maintient le jugement mais allège la sanction financière, la ramenant au total à 78,5 millions de dollars. L’action s’effondre à nouveau, pour atteindre son plus bas niveau depuis cinq ans. Le 1er novembre, Dewayne Johnson a accepté dans le but d’éviter le poids d’un nouveau procès les dommages et intérêts réduits.

    Depuis le rachat de Monsanto, Bayer a perdu la somme gigantesque de 30 milliards d’euros de valeur boursière, alors que le groupe a opéré une augmentation de capital de 9 milliards d’euros pour boucler la fusion. Le « mariage du siècle » au sommet de l’agrochimie mondiale était-il une erreur ? Déjà condamné par les écologistes, voilà qu’il est aussi remis en cause par les marchés. Tout, dans cette alliance, est démesuré : le prix de la transaction (63 milliards de dollars) ; la taille du nouveau groupe, devenu le premier producteur de glyphosate du monde et le champion mondial de l’agrochimie ; la réputation de Monsanto, un nom si chargé négativement que Bayer a prévu de le faire disparaître. Mais c’est surtout l’ampleur du nouveau risque judiciaire qui affole les investisseurs : 7 800 procès sont actuellement intentés contre Monsanto aux Etats-Unis, soit plusieurs milliards de dollars de dommages et intérêts potentiels.

    « Ambiance désastreuse »

    « Les activités de Monsanto apportent des risques élevés en matière environnementale, sociale et de gouvernance », estime Ingo Speich, gestionnaire de fonds chez Union Investment. Bayer a-t-il suffisamment mesuré les risques ? Les actionnaires sont d’autant plus inquiets que les autres activités du groupe affichent des signes de faiblesse : le département des médicaments sans ordonnance a vu ses résultats reculer au dernier semestre. En pharmacie conventionnelle, plusieurs brevets Bayer arrivent bientôt à échéance, et les nouvelles molécules en cours d’homologation ne pourront pas compenser la perte de chiffre d’affaires.

    En interne, depuis le mois d’août, c’est le branle-bas de combat. « L’ambiance est désastreuse. Beaucoup avaient déjà eu du mal à avaler la décision de racheter Monsanto, vu l’image qu’ils en ont. Mais là, la situation n’est pas tenable à long terme. Si un hedge fund veut nous racheter, il peut le faire à bon compte », s’inquiète une source interne. Pour sauver la fusion, même les bijoux de famille sont examinés. Fin septembre, la presse allemande rapporte que Bayer étudie de près une cession de ses activités en santé animale, qui pourrait rapporter 6 à 7 milliards d’euros. Une information non confirmée par le groupe.

    Fin septembre, lors d’une réunion du personnel à Leverkusen, au siège de Bayer, Werner Baumann, patron du groupe, a évoqué la possibilité de se séparer de certaines parties de son département recherche en médicaments, l’un des coeurs traditionnels de Bayer. Les représentants des salariés sont alarmés.

    Surtout, Bayer veut sauver le soldat glyphosate. L’herbicide controversé est d’une importance cruciale pour le groupe. Il représentait un quart des ventes de Monsanto. Dans le groupe Bayer consolidé, il pèse 3 milliards d’euros de chiffre d’affaires. Alors Werner Baumann monte lui-même au créneau dans la presse. Dans le numéro du 23 septembre de Bild am Sonntag, version dominicale de Bild, le quotidien le plus lu d’Allemagne, il pose, souriant, dans un laboratoire du groupe. « Grâce au glyphosate, les gens mangent à leur faim », affirme-t-il, au risque de s’attirer les foudres des milieux écologistes.

    Volonté de dialogue

    La sortie pro-glyphosate du patron de Bayer surprend. Car, depuis début 2018, c’est un tout autre discours qui était mis en avant. Liam Condon, directeur du département Crop Science, a multiplié les interventions dans la presse et auprès d’associations environnementales pour expliquer la démarche du nouveau groupe. Il joue la carte du dialogue et de l’apaisement.

    Fin mars, dans le magazine Capital, une discussion est organisée avec le coprésident du parti écologiste allemand, Robert Habeck, sur la question de savoir comment nourrir la planète avec 10 milliards d’habitants en 2050. C’est la première fois qu’un tel débat est organisé dans le pays, symptomatique d’un double mouvement : la volonté de Bayer de trancher avec le passé de Monsanto, qui refusait systématiquement le débat avec ses contradicteurs, et la nouvelle orientation des Verts allemands, traditionnellement parti d’urbains très diplômés, qui ne veulent plus passer pour des ennemis de l’innovation. Les positions restent antagoniques, notamment sur la question des brevets sur les plantes, mais certains points d’entente sont identifiés. « Je ne veux pas revenir à une agriculture de carte postale avec trois cochons et deux poules », dit M. Habeck, aujourd’hui une des personnalités politiques les plus en vue d’Allemagne. « Le glyphosate n’est pas notre avenir », assure de son côté M. Condon.

    La question est brûlante : dans le contexte d’une augmentation de la population, d’un réchauffement du climat et d’une extinction des espèces, comment accroître la production agricole sans étendre les terres arables au détriment des espaces sauvages ? Comment adapter l’agriculture à la montée du niveau des mers ? Comment faire avec moins d’eau, moins d’engrais et moins de pesticides de synthèse ?

    Liam Condon est l’arme de Bayer dans ce débat sensible. Mi-juin, dans l’hebdomadaire FAS, il laisse entrevoir ce à quoi pourrait ressembler l’agriculture du futur selon Bayer : davantage de technique et moins de chimie. Même s’il continue de défendre le glyphosate comme un herbicide « sûr . « La grande solution qui va sauver le monde n’existe pas, explique-t-il. L’agriculture est trop variée. Mais il y aura une série de petits apports. »

    Il en nomme trois. Le premier est la technologie Crispr-Cas, ou « ciseau génétique » une technologie codécouverte en 2012 par la Française Emmanuelle Charpentier, qui permet de modifier l’ADN d’une plante plus rapidement qu’auparavant, sans avoir recours au matériel génétique d’une autre plante. Elle pourrait permettre de créer des organismes plus résistants à la sécheresse, capables de grandir dans l’eau salée, ou plus productifs, promettent les scientifiques, qui parlent de « révolution dans l’agriculture . La méthode divise actuellement les écologistes allemands et le thème est très controversé en Europe. Un arrêt de la Cour de justice européenne, rendu fin juillet, a ainsi mis un coup de frein au développement de la technologie sur les sols européens. Les plantes traitées avec la méthode Crispr-Cas sont considérées comme des OGM et devront être dûment étiquetées.

    La deuxième technologie sur laquelle mise Bayer est l’agriculture numérique ou « digital farming », qui suppose par exemple l’utilisation de robots autonomes dans les champs qui repèrent les plantes nuisibles et les détruisent au laser. Ou celle de capteurs, capables de mesurer au plus près l’hygrométrie et la quantité d’intrants à utiliser. La troisième innovation repose sur une meilleure connaissance des micro-organismes ou microbes présents dans le sol et leur relation avec la croissance de la plante. Elle propose des solutions biologiques pour la fertilisation des sols ou la protection contre les maladies. Certaines préparations déjà sur le marché sont d’ailleurs utilisables en agriculture bio.

    Interrogées par le Monde, plusieurs sources des milieux écologistes conviennent, en off, que ces innovations sont « intéressantes » et qu’elles consacrent l’émergence d’une agriculture « post-chimie . Mais elles maintiennent leur condamnation de la concentration du secteur de l’agrotechnologie. Pour les actionnaires, ces nouvelles méthodes ne promettent cependant pas de profits à court terme. Or la Bourse est cruelle : elle mesure le risque environnemental, mais ne veut pas renoncer aux profits sûrs. Pour Bayer, le défi est double : il doit convaincre que son modèle d’agriculture du futur est aussi « durable » qu’il le prétend, et qu’il peut générer autant de profits que le glyphosate.

    Dans Le Monde Éco & Entreprise, samedi 3 novembre 2018 1478 mots, p. SCQ2

    #agriculture #monsanto #glyphosate

  • Bayer, dans l’enfer du mariage avec Monsanto
    https://www.lemonde.fr/economie/article/2018/11/02/bayer-dans-l-enfer-du-mariage-avec-monsanto_5377800_3234.html

    Depuis la fusion effective des deux groupes, en juin, la valeur du nouvel ensemble ne cesse de fondre. Les investisseurs s’inquiètent du risque environnemental que constitue le glyphosate.

    Ce jour-là, l’action Bayer a décroché, pour ne plus jamais se relever. Le 9 août 2018, Dewayne Johnson, un ancien jardinier en phase terminale de lymphome non hodgkinien, obtient gain de cause dans son procès contre Monsanto, qui ne l’a pas informé des risques qu’il courait en utilisant son produit phare, le Roundup. Le célèbre herbicide à base de glyphosate, le plus utilisé dans le monde, est pour la première fois rendu responsable d’un cancer par un tribunal, qui condamne Monsanto à verser au plaignant 289 millions de dollars (253 millions d’euros) : 39 au titre du préjudice moral et financier et 250 millions au titre des dommages.

    L’allemand Bayer, qui a racheté le semencier Monsanto au mois de juin, accuse le coup : 10 milliards d’euros de valeur boursière s’évaporent en quelques heures. Le « risque Monsanto » correspond désormais à un chiffre, monstrueux. Et la descente aux enfers commence.

    Bayer, ébranlé par la sanction, se défend. Il assure aux investisseurs que le procès sera cassé en appel, que la peine sera allégée et que le juge se rendra aux conclusions des « 800 études scientifiques » prouvant l’innocuité de la molécule. L’action reprend des couleurs. Mais lundi 22 octobre, le couperet tombe : la juge Suzanne Bolanos ne rouvrira pas le procès. Elle maintient le jugement mais allège la sanction financière, la ramenant au total à 78,5 millions de dollars. L’action s’effondre à nouveau, pour atteindre son plus bas niveau depuis cinq ans. Le 1er novembre, Dewayne Johnson a accepté – dans le but d’éviter le poids d’un nouveau procès – les dommages et intérêts réduits.

    Branle-bas de combat

    Depuis le rachat de Monsanto, Bayer a perdu la somme gigantesque de 30 milliards d’euros de valeur boursière, alors que le groupe a opéré une augmentation de capital de 9 milliards d’euros pour boucler la fusion. Le « mariage du siècle » au sommet de l’agrochimie mondiale était-il une erreur ? Déjà condamné par les écologistes, voilà qu’il est aussi remis en cause par les marchés.

    Tout, dans cette alliance, est démesuré : le prix de la transaction (63 milliards de dollars) ; la taille du nouveau groupe, devenu le premier producteur de glyphosate du monde et le champion mondial de l’agrochimie ; la réputation de Monsanto, un nom si chargé négativement que Bayer a prévu de le faire disparaître. Mais c’est surtout l’ampleur du nouveau risque judiciaire qui affole les investisseurs : 7 800 procès sont actuellement intentés contre Monsanto aux Etats-Unis, soit plusieurs milliards de dollars de dommages et intérêts potentiels.

    Dans le groupe Bayer consolidé, l’herbicide Roundup pèse 3 milliards d’euros de chiffre d’affaires.

    « Les activités de Monsanto apportent des risques élevés en matière environnementale, sociale et de gouvernance, » juge Ingo Speich, gestionnaire de fonds chez Union Investment. Bayer a-t-il suffisamment mesuré les risques ? Les actionnaires sont d’autant plus inquiets que les autres activités du groupe affichent des signes de faiblesse : le département des médicaments sans ordonnance a vu ses résultats reculer au dernier semestre. En pharmacie conventionnelle, plusieurs brevets Bayer arrivent bientôt à échéance, et les nouvelles molécules en cours d’homologation ne pourront pas compenser la perte de chiffre d’affaires.

    En interne, depuis le mois d’août, c’est le branle-bas de combat. « L’ambiance est désastreuse. Beaucoup avaient déjà eu du mal à avaler la décision de racheter Monsanto, vu l’image qu’ils en ont. Mais là, la situation n’est pas tenable à long terme. Si un hedge fund veut nous racheter, il peut le faire à bon compte », s’inquiète une source interne. Pour sauver la fusion, même les bijoux de famille sont examinés. Fin septembre, la presse allemande rapporte que Bayer étudie de près une cession de ses activités en santé animale, qui pourrait rapporter 6 à 7 milliards d’euros. Une information non confirmée par le groupe.

    Fin septembre, lors d’une réunion du personnel à Leverkusen, au siège de Bayer, Werner Baumann, patron du groupe, a évoqué la possibilité de se séparer de certaines parties de son département recherche en médicaments, un des cœurs traditionnels de Bayer. Les représentants des salariés sont alarmés.

    Sauver le soldat glyphosate

    Surtout, Bayer veut sauver le soldat glyphosate. L’herbicide controversé est d’une importance cruciale pour le groupe. Il représentait un quart des ventes de Monsanto. Dans le groupe Bayer consolidé, il pèse 3 milliards d’euros de chiffre d’affaires. Alors Werner Baumann monte lui-même au créneau dans la presse. Dans le numéro du 23 septembre de Bild am Sonntag, version dominicale de Bild, le quotidien le plus lu d’Allemagne, il pose souriant dans un laboratoire du groupe. « Grâce au glyphosate, les gens mangent à leur faim », affirme-t-il, au risque de s’attirer les foudres des milieux écologistes.

    La sortie pro-glyphosate du patron de Bayer surprend. Car depuis début 2018, c’est un tout autre discours qui était mis en avant. Liam Condon, directeur du département Crop Science, a multiplié les interventions dans la presse et auprès d’associations environnementales pour expliquer la démarche du nouveau groupe. Il joue la carte du dialogue et de l’apaisement.

    Fin mars, dans le magazine Capital, une discussion est organisée avec le coprésident du parti écologiste allemand, Robert Habeck, sur la question de savoir comment nourrir la planète avec 10 milliards d’habitants en 2050. C’est la première fois qu’un tel débat est organisé dans le pays, symptomatique d’un double mouvement : la volonté de Bayer de trancher avec le passé de Monsanto, qui refusait systématiquement le débat avec ses contradicteurs, et la nouvelle orientation des Verts allemands, traditionnellement parti d’urbains très diplômés, qui ne veulent plus passer pour des ennemis de l’innovation.

    Les positions restent antagoniques, notamment sur la question des brevets sur les plantes, mais certains points d’entente sont identifiés. « Je ne veux pas revenir à une agriculture de carte postale avec trois cochons et deux poules, » dit M. Habeck, aujourd’hui une des personnalités politiques les plus en vue d’Allemagne. « Le glyphosate n’est pas notre avenir », assure de son côté M. Condon.

    La question est brûlante : dans le contexte d’une augmentation de la population, d’un réchauffement du climat et d’une extinction des espèces, comment augmenter la production agricole sans étendre les terres arables au détriment des espaces sauvages ? Comment adapter l’agriculture à la montée du niveau des mers ? Comment faire avec moins d’eau, moins d’engrais et moins de pesticides de synthèse ?

    Plus de technique, moins de chimie

    Liam Condon est l’arme de Bayer dans ce débat sensible. Mi-juin, dans l’hebdomadaire FAS, il laisse entrevoir à quoi pourrait ressembler l’agriculture du futur selon Bayer : davantage de technique et moins de chimie. Même s’il continue à défendre le glyphosate comme un herbicide « sûr ». « La grande solution qui va sauver le monde n’existe pas, explique-t-il. L’agriculture est trop variée. Mais il y aura une série de petits apports. »

    Il en nomme trois. Le premier est la technologie Crispr/Cas, ou « ciseau génétique » une technologie co-découverte en 2012 par la Française Emmanuelle Charpentier, qui permet de modifier l’ADN d’une plante de façon plus rapide qu’avant, sans avoir recours au matériel génétique d’une autre plante. Elle pourrait permettre de créer des organismes plus résistants à la sécheresse, capables de grandir dans l’eau salée, ou plus productifs, promettent les scientifiques, qui parlent de « révolution dans l’agriculture ». La méthode divise actuellement les écologistes allemands et le thème est très controversé en Europe. Un arrêt de la Cour de justice européenne, rendu fin juillet, a ainsi mis un coup de frein au développement de la technologie sur les sols européens. Les plantes traitées avec la méthode Crispr/Cas sont considérées comme des OGM et devront être dûment étiquetées.

    La deuxième technologie sur laquelle mise Bayer est l’agriculture numérique ou « digital farming », qui suppose par exemple l’utilisation de robots autonomes dans les champs qui repèrent les plantes nuisibles et les détruisent au laser. Ou celle de capteurs, capables de mesurer au plus près l’hygrométrie et la quantité d’intrants à utiliser. La troisième innovation repose sur une meilleure connaissance des micro-organismes ou microbes présents dans le sol et leur relation avec la croissance de la plante. Elle propose des solutions biologiques pour la fertilisation des sols ou la protection contre les maladies. Certaines préparations déjà sur le marché sont d’ailleurs utilisables en agriculture bio.

    Interrogées par le Monde, plusieurs sources des milieux écologistes conviennent, en off, que ces innovations sont « intéressantes » et qu’elles consacrent l’émergence d’une agriculture post-chimie. Mais elles maintiennent leur condamnation de la concentration du secteur de l’agrotechnologie. Pour les actionnaires, ces nouvelles méthodes ne promettent cependant pas de profits à court terme. Or la Bourse est cruelle : elle mesure le risque environnemental, mais ne veut pas renoncer aux profits sûrs. Pour Bayer, le défi est double : il doit convaincre que son modèle d’agriculture du futur est aussi « durable » qu’il le prétend, et qu’il peut générer autant de profits que le glyphosate.

  • UP Magazine - Les organismes génétiquement modifiés par CRISPR passeraient la barrière des espèces. Et c’est une très mauvaise nouvelle.
    http://www.up-magazine.info/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=8038:les-organismes-genet

    Le paludisme, le Zika, le chikungunya… sont des fléaux terribles. Causés par des moustiques que tous les pays touchés entendent éradiquer. Les chercheurs examinent depuis longtemps des solutions chimiques (insecticides), physiques (radiations), transgéniques… Rien ne semble assez efficace à côté d’une arme massue : le forçage génétique. Il s’agit d’une technique de manipulation génétique qui permet de booster la propagation d’une mutation dans une population.
    Une étude vient d’être publiée dans la revue Nature Biotech. Elle établit que cette technique, appliquée sur des populations de moustiques fonctionne parfaitement. Mais elle révèle aussi que la mutation génétique introduite artificiellement pourrait ne pas se contenter de cibler certaines espèces de moustiques. Elle pourrait passer la barrière des espèces et se propager à d’autres espaces animales, les menaçant d’une éradication définitive. Un danger majeur qui prouve, une fois de plus, les risques préoccupants que font courir certaines techniques de manipulations génétiques.

    Ce qu’il faut comprendre, c’est que les chercheurs ont ciblé un gène de détermination du sexe qui est hautement conservé dans le processus évolutionnaire naturel. Cela signifie que cette séquence ADN particulière est restée la même au fil du temps sur une échelle évolutionnaire et qu’elle n’a pas été modifiée par des mutations aléatoires. Une séquence hautement conservée implique un gène conservé et hautement protégé, où toute altération de cette séquence génétique entraînerait une forme de vie non viable. Le choix d’une séquence génétique hautement conservée, en particulier le gène " doublesex " de détermination du sexe, comme site cible du gene drive signifie qu’aucun allèle de résistance viable (variants génétiques) n’apparaît et ne se propage pour sauver la population en labo ou potentiellement la population sauvage.

    Il y a un hic
    Le problème est que cette séquence cible est si bien conservée dans la nature qu’on peut la trouver dans toutes les espèces d’anophèles analysées jusqu’à présent. Pour la professeure Ricarda Steinbrecher de l’Université d’Oxford, il s’agit d’un problème très préoccupant. Elle déclare en effet dans un courriel à la rédaction de UP’ Magazine : « une fois que le complexe de gènes (ou transgène de gènes) traverse l’une des autres espèces, il pourrait potentiellement traverser d’autres populations et espèces, réduire fortement voire éliminer ces populations, avec des conséquences écologiques et de biodiversité potentiellement graves ». Elle ajoute : « Lorsqu’on étudie les limites de reproduction entre les espèces d’anophèles, il y a un degré de fluidité qui montre que des croisements entre différentes espèces de moustiques se produisent. [Des études antérieures ont déjà] signalé un taux d’hybridation global de 0,1 % dans la nature. Ces résultats sont très alarmants lorsqu’on examine les conséquences potentielles de la dissémination de moustiques porteurs de gènes dans la nature, en particulier lorsque le site cible est si bien conservé que dans la présente étude. »

    Si le gene drive passe la barrière des espèces, on peut légitimement craindre qu’il ne se propage à des populations animales qui se nourrissent de moustiques comme par exemple les chauves-souris, ou à des organismes piqués par des moustiques génétiquement modifiés.
    Cette crainte n’échappe pas au professeur Esvett, l’un des auteurs de l’étude ; il confie en effet au site d’informations spécialisées GEN « si les scientifiques se trompent et que l’espèce cible se croise avec d’autres moustiques anophèles, le fait que la séquence cible doubleex est très conservée signifie qu’elle pourrait se propager à des espèces non ciblées »

    Pour Dorothée Browaeys qui vient de publier l’Urgence du vivant, plus préoccupante encore est la question de l’usage de cette technique gene-drive qui constitue un outil de "gestion des nuisibles".
    Car comment juger qu’une population est "indésirable", "gênante" ? Au regard de quel critère ? Elle tente une réponse : « Le terme nuisible, est appliqué par l’agrobusiness à tout ce qui minimise le rendement des récoltes, la productivité. Or il existe un foisonnement de prédateurs qui menacent les intérêts économiques. Et le gene drive pourrait être bien utile pour en finir avec ces « ravageurs » vus comme de stricts nuisibles, alors qu’ils peuvent être aussi des pollinisateurs ou des rouages utiles des écosystèmes ».

    #Génétique #Moustiques #Gene_drive #Danger #Ecologie

    • https://jefklak.org/forcer-les-genes-et-lafrique

      Les méthodes de prévention et de traitements comprenaient jusqu’à présent des moustiquaires à imprégnation durable, des pulvérisations et des médicaments antipaludiques. Mais aujourd’hui, quelques adeptes du progrès technique affirment pouvoir éliminer la maladie en amont, c’est-à-dire au sein même de l’ADN des moustiques vecteurs du paludisme. Si cela semble tout droit sorti d’un livre de science fiction, il s’agit bel et bien de l’objectif de Target Malaria, un consortium de recherches principalement financé (à hauteur de 92 millions de dollars) par la Fondation Bill et Melinda Gates et le projet Open Philanthropy dont les fonds proviennent en grande partie de Dustin Moskovitz, cofondateur de Facebook.

      Target Malaria postule qu’il existe un consensus selon lequel on aurait besoin de « nouveaux outils pour éliminer le paludisme ». Le « nouvel outil » en question est le forçage génétique, une technique pouvant modifier le code génétique de populations entières d’Anopheles coluzzii, d’Anopheles arabiensis et d’Anopheles gambiae, trois espèces de moustiques vecteurs du paludisme, et c’est sur cette dernière que travaille Target Malaria. Grâce au forçage, un gène modifié est assuré d’être transmis à la totalité de la génération suivante, il suffirait donc de ne relâcher qu’un nombre restreint d’insectes dotés de gènes modifiés pour propager les traits censés éradiquer l’ensemble de la population de diptères. Parmi les différentes stratégies étudiées par les responsables du projet, les deux principales consistent à créer des souches de moustiques femelles fertiles mais dont une grande partie de la descendance serait stérile, ou bien à développer une population de moustiques mâles incapables de transmettre leur chromosome X, et ne donnant ainsi naissance qu’à des mâles.

  • The Birth of CRISPR Inc | Science
    http://science.sciencemag.org/content/355/6326/680.full

    Just 5 years ago, the community of researchers studying CRISPR, the powerful new genome editing tool, was small. When the first inklings that CRISPR could become a big business emerged, leading scientists expected to work together. But the attempt at unity collapsed—with a good deal of noise and dust. As the science grew even more compelling and venture capital (VC) beckoned, the jockeying to start CRISPR companies became intense. The research community was rent apart by concerns about intellectual property, academic credit, Nobel Prize dreams, geography, media coverage, egos, personal profit, and loyalty. A billion dollars poured into what might be called CRISPR Inc. from VC firms, pharmaceutical companies, and public stock offerings. And the companies and the academic license holders faced each other down in a battle royale over patents.

    #crispr #recherche #brevets via @neoviral

  • Broad Institute prevails in heated dispute over CRISPR patents
    https://www.statnews.com/2017/02/15/crispr-patent-ruling

    The US patent office ruled on Wednesday that hotly disputed patents on the revolutionary genome-editing technology CRISPR-Cas9 belong to the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, dealing a blow to the University of California in its efforts to overturn those patents.

    In a one-sentence judgment by the Patent Trial and Appeal Board, the three judges decided that there is “no interference in fact.” In other words, key CRISPR patents awarded to the Broad beginning in 2014 are sufficiently different from patents applied for by UC that they can stand. (…)

    The ruling means that, in the eyes of the patent office, breakthrough work by UC biochemist Jennifer Doudna and her colleagues on CRISPR — an ancient bacterial immune system that they repurposed to easily and precisely edit DNA — was not so all-encompassing as to make later advances “obvious.” That is at odds with how much of the science world has viewed their work. Doudna and her chief collaborator, Emmanuelle Charpentier, won the $3 million Breakthrough Prize in the life sciences in 2015, the $500,000 Gruber Genetics Prize in 2015, and the $450,000 Japan Prize in 2017.

    #crispr-cas9 #brevets #recherche #génétique