company:fitbit

  • Opinion | Insurers Want to Know How Many Steps You Took Today - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/10/opinion/insurance-ai.html

    A smartphone app that measures when you brake and accelerate in your car. The algorithm that analyzes your social media accounts for risky behavior. The program that calculates your life expectancy using your Fitbit.

    This isn’t speculative fiction — these are real technologies being deployed by insurance companies right now. Last year, the life insurance company John Hancock began to offer its customers the option to wear a fitness tracker — a wearable device that can collect information about how active you are, how many calories you burn, and how much you sleep. The idea is that your Fitbit or Apple Watch can tell whether or not you’re living the good, healthy life — and if you are, your insurance premium will go down.

    #assurance #surveillance#santé

  • What you don’t know about your health data will make you sick
    https://www.fastcompany.com/90317471/what-you-dont-know-about-your-health-data-privacy-will-make-you-sick

    Chances are, at least one of you is being monitored by a third party like data analytics giant Optum, which is owned by UnitedHealth Group, Inc. Since 1993, it’s captured medical data—lab results, diagnoses, prescriptions, and more—from 150 million Americans. That’s almost half of the U.S. population.

    “They’re the ones that are tapping the data. They’re in there. I can’t remove them from my own health insurance contracts. So I’m stuck. It’s just part of the system,” says Joel Winston, an attorney who specializes in privacy and data protection law.

    Healthcare providers can legally sell their data to a now-dizzyingly vast spread of companies, who can use it to make decisions, from designing new drugs to pricing your insurance rates to developing highly targeted advertising.

    Yet not all health-related information is protected by privacy rules. Companies can now derive insights about your health from growing piles of so-called “alternative” data that fall outside of HIPAA. This data—what some researchers refer to as your “shadow health record”—can include credit scores, court documents, smartphone locations, sub-prime auto loans, search histories, app activity, and social media posts.

    Your health data can be deployed in alarming ways, privacy experts say. Insurance companies can raise your rate based on a photo on your Instagram feed. Digital advertisers can fold shadow health data into ads that target or discriminate against you. It can even seem invasive and predatory. One trend among personal injury lawyers, for example, is geo-targeted ads to patients’ phones in emergency rooms.

    Uniquely valuable health data is also increasingly the target of hackers, ransomware attacks, breaches, or what some patients call just plain shadiness, which has led to litigation and can ultimately further undermine trust in the healthcare system. A 2017 breach at a New York hospital leaked sensitive information about more than 7,000 patients, including addiction histories, medical diagnoses, and reports of sexual assault and domestic violence. Criminals can use that kind of data to commit identity and insurance fraud.

    “There’s a great deal of trust that’s placed in our interactions with doctors and healthcare institutions,” says Mary Madden, research lead at Data & Society, who studies consumer and health privacy. “The current process of seeking consent for data collection and use in many health settings is often treated as an administrative afterthought, rather than a meaningful exchange that makes patients feel empowered and informed.”

    Your health-related data are compiled into a specialty report akin to the consumer credit reports made famous—or infamous—by Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion. Insurers claim these reports are crucial to evaluating and pricing risk, and they can use this data to raise your rate, or to deny your application entirely. If your application is rejected—it’s called an “adverse event”—you are legally entitled to receive a copy of your specialty report and to potentially dispute an error.

    “Many people don’t understand that the data from a Fitbit or other health wearable or health device can actually be sold and is, in fact, today being sold. It is being sold for behavioral analytics, for advertising targeting. People don’t understand that is happening,” she told the committee. (After this story was published, a Fitbit spokesperson sent Fast Company a statement saying that the company does not “sell customer personal data, and we do not share customer personal information except in the limited circumstances described in our privacy policy.”)

    The demand for all this data is rising, as it has for years. The health data market was approximately $14.25 billion in 2017, according to BIS Research. The firm predicts that in just under seven years—by the end of 2025—the market will grow nearly five times bigger, to $68.75 billion.

    #Données_médicales #Etats_unis #Assurances

  • Let startups die.
    https://hackernoon.com/let-startups-die-183e7a338170?source=rss----3a8144eabfe3---4

    I can’t wait for startups to die.Sure, I’m writing this on my Microsoft Surface Book 2 from a lively cafe in Budapest while staying in an Airbnb and tracking my activity with my Fitbit Aria. So yeah, I like the products of startups. But I still want them to die a miserable death.I believe the peak of American greed and #capitalism has found its golden child in the #startup culture, especially as it is peddled by Y Combinator and their ilk. I daresay I need not explain what makes startup culture the quintessential embodiment of the failed American Dream. Shrink the corporate timeline down to a decade (ship it!), give the masses what they want (that elusive product-market fit), and sell at the peak (IPO FTW!). Unicorn hunters.Startups make me sick, and I don’t think I’m the only one. The (...)

    #entrepreneurship #art #let-startups-die

  • Fitness Tracker Data Highlights Sprawling U.S. Military Footprint in Africa
    https://theintercept.com/2018/01/29/strava-heat-map-fitness-tracker-us-military-base

    Out in the cocoa-colored wastes of north-central Niger, people have been running around in circles. Exactly who has been jogging or walking around this compound outside the town of Arlit is unclear. But there’s a good chance it has something to do with U.S. Africa Command’s “Analysis Office” there, the existence of which was disclosed in 2016 contracting documents. Not far away, people have been running round and round in a compound near the airfield in Agadez, Niger, where the U.S. military (...)

    #GPS #géolocalisation #sport #Fitbit #Strava

  • U.S. soldiers are revealing sensitive and dangerous information by jogging - The Washington Post
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/a-map-showing-the-users-of-fitness-devices-lets-the-world-see-where-us-soldiers-are-and-what-they-are-doing/2018/01/28/86915662-0441-11e8-aa61-f3391373867e_story.html?hpid=hp_hp-top-table

    An interactive map posted on the Internet that shows the whereabouts of people who use fitness devices such as Fitbit also reveals highly sensitive information about the locations and activities of soldiers at U.S. military bases, in what appears to be a major security oversight.

    The Global Heat Map, published by the GPS tracking company Strava, uses satellite information to map the locations and movements of subscribers to the company’s fitness service over a two-year period, by illuminating areas of activity.

    Strava, the social network for athletes, has launched its global heatmap, a striking visualization of over one billion activities from Strava athletes across a wide variety of activities, both on land and in the sea. The activities logged covered nearly 17 billion miles. You can explore and search for your own area here
    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/the-running-blog/gallery/2017/nov/02/strava-a-global-heatmap-of-athletic-activity

    The map, released in November 2017, shows every single activity ever uploaded to Strava – more than 3 trillion individual GPS data points, according to the company. The app can be used on various devices including smartphones and fitness trackers like Fitbit to see popular running routes in major cities, or spot individuals in more remote areas who have unusual exercise patterns.

    However, over the weekend military analysts noticed that the map is also detailed enough that it potentially gives away extremely sensitive information about a subset of Strava users: military personnel on active service.

    Nathan Ruser, an analyst with the Institute for United Conflict Analysts, first noted the lapse. The heatmap “looks very pretty” he wrote, but is “not amazing for Op-Sec” – short for operational security. “US Bases are clearly identifiable and mappable.”

    “If soldiers use the app like normal people do, by turning it on tracking when they go to do exercise, it could be especially dangerous,” Ruser added, highlighting one particular track that “looks like it logs a regular jogging route.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jan/28/fitness-tracking-app-gives-away-location-of-secret-us-army-bases

    #applications #bases_militaires_us #cartographie #parcours #jogging

  • Big data meets Big Brother as #China moves to rate its citizens | Wired
    http://www.wired.co.uk/article/chinese-government-social-credit-score-privacy-invasion

    n June 14, 2014, the State Council of China published an ominous-sounding document called “Planning Outline for the Construction of a Social Credit System”. In the way of Chinese policy documents, it was a lengthy and rather dry affair, but it contained a radical idea. What if there was a national trust score that rated the kind of citizen you were?

    Imagine a world where many of your daily activities were constantly monitored and evaluated: what you buy at the shops and online; where you are at any given time; who your friends are and how you interact with them; how many hours you spend watching content or playing video games; and what bills and taxes you pay (or not). It’s not hard to picture, because most of that already happens, thanks to all those data-collecting behemoths like Google, Facebook and Instagram or health-tracking apps such as Fitbit. But now imagine a system where all these behaviours are rated as either positive or negative and distilled into a single number, according to rules set by the government. That would create your Citizen Score and it would tell everyone whether or not you were trustworthy. Plus, your rating would be publicly ranked against that of the entire population and used to determine your eligibility for a mortgage or a job, where your children can go to school - or even just your chances of getting a date.

    A futuristic vision of #Big_Brother out of #control? No, it’s already getting underway in China, where the government is developing the #Social_Credit_System (SCS) to rate the trustworthiness of its 1.3 billion citizens. The Chinese government is pitching the system as a desirable way to measure and enhance “trust” nationwide and to build a culture of “sincerity”. As the policy states, “It will forge a public opinion environment where keeping trust is glorious. It will strengthen sincerity in government affairs, commercial sincerity, social sincerity and the construction of judicial credibility.”

  • Claude Shannon, the Las Vegas Cheat - Issue 50: Emergence
    http://nautil.us/issue/50/emergence/claude-shannon-the-las-vegas-cheat

    Many of Claude Shannon’s off-the-clock creations were whimsical—a machine that made sarcastic remarks, for instance, or the Roman numeral calculator. Others created by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and father of information theory showed a flair for the dramatic and dazzling: the trumpet that spit flames or the machine that solved Rubik’s cubes. Still other devices he built anticipated real technological innovations by more than a generation. One in particular stands out, not just because it was so far ahead of its time, but because of just how close it came to landing Shannon in trouble with the law—and the mob. Long before the Apple Watch or the Fitbit, what was arguably the world’s first wearable computer was conceived by Ed Thorp, then a little-known graduate (...)

  • Inspector gadget : how smart devices are outsmarting criminals
    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/jun/23/smart-devices-solve-crime-murder-internet-of-things

    Fitbits, pacemakers, Amazon Echoes – all are tools of the modern detective’s trade in a world where our devices are always watching Richard Dabate told police a masked intruder assaulted him and killed his wife in their Connecticut home. His wife’s Fitbit told another story and Dabate was charged with the murder. James Bates said an acquaintance accidentally drowned in his hot tub in Arkansas. Detectives suspected foul play and obtained data from Bates’s Amazon Echo device. Bates was charged (...)

    #Echo #wearable #criminalité

    ##criminalité