company:general

  • Les « dark patterns », ces procédés qui permettent aux sites d’e-commerce d’orienter vos achats
    https://www.lalibre.be/economie/digital/les-dark-patterns-ces-procedes-qui-permettent-aux-sites-d-e-commerce-d-orien

    L’e-commerce belge a généré près de 7 milliards d’euros de chiffre d’affaires en 2018, soit 20% de plus que l’année précédente. Pour pousser les internautes à la consommation, certains sites en ligne ont recours aux « dark patterns », des astuces de designs d’interface « douteux » qui orientent, voire trompent, les utilisateurs. « 3 personnes regardent aussi cette offre », « Marie a économisé 10€ en achetant ce jean », « Il vous manque 32€ pour profiter de la livraison gratuite »... Vous les voyez souvent sur les (...)

    #Amazon #Airbnb #algorithme #manipulation #[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données_(RGPD)[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation_(GDPR)[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation_(GDPR) #marketing (...)

    ##[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données__RGPD_[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_ ##profiling

  • La CNIL veut autoriser les sites Internet à nous tracer sans notre consentement
    https://www.laquadrature.net/2019/06/28/la-cnil-veut-autoriser-les-sites-internet-a-nous-tracer-sans-notre-con

    Hier, Mme Marie-Laure Denis, présidente de la CNIL, a expliqué en commission de l’Assemblée nationale que la CNIL prendrait le 4 juillet une décision injustifiable (voir la vidéo de 00:59:50 à 01:01:30). Aujourd’hui, la CNIL vient de préciser cette décision : au mépris total du droit européen, elle souhaite attendre juillet 2020 pour commencer à sanctionner les sites internet qui déposent des cookies sans respecter les nouvelles conditions du RGPD pour obtenir notre consentement. Ces nouvelles (...)

    #Google #[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données_(RGPD)[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation_(GDPR)[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation_(GDPR) #terms #profiling #LaQuadratureduNet #CNIL (...)

    ##[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données__RGPD_[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_ ##NOYB

  • Beyond the Hype of Lab-Grown Diamonds
    https://earther.gizmodo.com/beyond-the-hype-of-lab-grown-diamonds-1834890351

    Billions of years ago when the world was still young, treasure began forming deep underground. As the edges of Earth’s tectonic plates plunged down into the upper mantle, bits of carbon, some likely hailing from long-dead life forms were melted and compressed into rigid lattices. Over millions of years, those lattices grew into the most durable, dazzling gems the planet had ever cooked up. And every so often, for reasons scientists still don’t fully understand, an eruption would send a stash of these stones rocketing to the surface inside a bubbly magma known as kimberlite.

    There, the diamonds would remain, nestled in the kimberlite volcanoes that delivered them from their fiery home, until humans evolved, learned of their existence, and began to dig them up.

    The epic origin of Earth’s diamonds has helped fuel a powerful marketing mythology around them: that they are objects of otherworldly strength and beauty; fitting symbols of eternal love. But while “diamonds are forever” may be the catchiest advertising slogan ever to bear some geologic truth, the supply of these stones in the Earth’s crust, in places we can readily reach them, is far from everlasting. And the scars we’ve inflicted on the land and ourselves in order to mine diamonds has cast a shadow that still lingers over the industry.

    Some diamond seekers, however, say we don’t need to scour the Earth any longer, because science now offers an alternative: diamonds grown in labs. These gems aren’t simulants or synthetic substitutes; they are optically, chemically, and physically identical to their Earth-mined counterparts. They’re also cheaper, and in theory, limitless. The arrival of lab-grown diamonds has rocked the jewelry world to its core and prompted fierce pushback from diamond miners. Claims abound on both sides.

    Growers often say that their diamonds are sustainable and ethical; miners and their industry allies counter that only gems plucked from the Earth can be considered “real” or “precious.” Some of these assertions are subjective, others are supported only by sparse, self-reported, or industry-backed data. But that’s not stopping everyone from making them.

    This is a fight over image, and when it comes to diamonds, image is everything.
    A variety of cut, polished Ada Diamonds created in a lab, including smaller melee stones and large center stones. 22.94 carats total. (2.60 ct. pear, 2.01 ct. asscher, 2.23 ct. cushion, 3.01 ct. radiant, 1.74 ct. princess, 2.11 ct. emerald, 3.11 ct. heart, 3.00 ct. oval, 3.13 ct. round.)
    Image: Sam Cannon (Earther)
    Same, but different

    The dream of lab-grown diamond dates back over a century. In 1911, science fiction author H.G. Wells described what would essentially become one of the key methods for making diamond—recreating the conditions inside Earth’s mantle on its surface—in his short story The Diamond Maker. As the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) notes, there were a handful of dubious attempts to create diamonds in labs in the late 19th and early 20th century, but the first commercial diamond production wouldn’t emerge until the mid-1950s, when scientists with General Electric worked out a method for creating small, brown stones. Others, including De Beers, soon developed their own methods for synthesizing the gems, and use of the lab-created diamond in industrial applications, from cutting tools to high power electronics, took off.

    According to the GIA’s James Shigley, the first experimental production of gem-quality diamond occurred in 1970. Yet by the early 2000s, gem-quality stones were still small, and often tinted yellow with impurities. It was only in the last five or so years that methods for growing diamonds advanced to the point that producers began churning out large, colorless stones consistently. That’s when the jewelry sector began to take a real interest.

    Today, that sector is taking off. The International Grown Diamond Association (IGDA), a trade group formed in 2016 by a dozen lab diamond growers and sellers, now has about 50 members, according to IGDA secretary general Dick Garard. When the IGDA first formed, lab-grown diamonds were estimated to represent about 1 percent of a $14 billion rough diamond market. This year, industry analyst Paul Zimnisky estimates they account for 2-3 percent of the market.

    He expects that share will only continue to grow as factories in China that already produce millions of carats a year for industrial purposes start to see an opportunity in jewelry.
    “I have a real problem with people claiming one is ethical and another is not.”

    “This year some [factories] will come up from 100,000 gem-quality diamonds to one to two million,” Zimnisky said. “They already have the infrastructure and equipment in place” and are in the process of upgrading it. (About 150 million carats of diamonds were mined last year, according to a global analysis of the industry conducted by Bain & Company.)

    Production ramp-up aside, 2018 saw some other major developments across the industry. In the summer, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) reversed decades of guidance when it expanded the definition of a diamond to include those created in labs and dropped ‘synthetic’ as a recommended descriptor for lab-grown stones. The decision came on the heels of the world’s top diamond producer, De Beers, announcing the launch of its own lab-grown diamond line, Lightbox, after having once vowed never to sell man-made stones as jewelry.

    “I would say shock,” Lightbox Chief Marketing Officer Sally Morrison told Earther when asked how the jewelry world responded to the company’s launch.

    While the majority of lab-grown diamonds on the market today are what’s known as melee (less than 0.18 carats), the tech for producing the biggest, most dazzling diamonds continues to improve. In 2016, lab-grown diamond company MiaDonna announced its partners had grown a 6.28 carat gem-quality diamond, claimed to be the largest created in the U.S. to that point. In 2017, a lab in Augsburg University, Germany that grows diamonds for industrial and scientific research applications produced what is thought to be the largest lab-grown diamond ever—a 155 carat behemoth that stretches nearly 4 inches across. Not gem quality, perhaps, but still impressive.

    “If you compare it with the Queen’s diamond, hers is four times heavier, it’s clearer” physicist Matthias Schreck, who leads the group that grew that beast of a jewel, told me. “But in area, our diamond is bigger. We were very proud of this.”

    Diamonds can be created in one of two ways: Similar to how they form inside the Earth, or similar to how scientists speculate they might form in outer space.

    The older, Earth-inspired method is known as “high temperature high pressure” (HPHT), and that’s exactly what it sounds like. A carbon source, like graphite, is placed in a giant, mechanical press where, in the presence of a catalyst, it’s subjected to temperatures of around 1,600 degrees Celsius and pressures of 5-6 Gigapascals in order to form diamond. (If you’re curious what that sort of pressure feels like, the GIA describes it as similar to the force exerted if you tried to balance a commercial jet on your fingertip.)

    The newer method, called chemical vapor deposition (CVD), is more akin to how diamonds might form in interstellar gas clouds (for which we have indirect, spectroscopic evidence, according to Shigley). A hydrocarbon gas, like methane, is pumped into a low-pressure reactor vessel alongside hydrogen. While maintaining near-vacuum conditions, the gases are heated very hot—typically 3,000 to 4,000 degrees Celsius, according to Lightbox CEO Steve Coe—causing carbon atoms to break free of their molecular bonds. Under the right conditions, those liberated bits of carbon will settle out onto a substrate—typically a flat, square plate of a synthetic diamond produced with the HPHT method—forming layer upon layer of diamond.

    “It’s like snow falling on a table on your back porch,” Jason Payne, the founder and CEO of lab-grown diamond jewelry company Ada Diamonds, told me.

    Scientists have been forging gem-quality diamonds with HPHT for longer, but today, CVD has become the method of choice for those selling larger bridal stones. That’s in part because it’s easier to control impurities and make diamonds with very high clarity, according to Coe. Still, each method has its advantages—Payne said that HPHT is faster and the diamonds typically have better color (which is to say, less of it)—and some companies, like Ada, purchase stones grown in both ways.

    However they’re made, lab-grown diamonds have the same exceptional hardness, stiffness, and thermal conductivity as their Earth-mined counterparts. Cut, they can dazzle with the same brilliance and fire—a technical term to describe how well the diamond scatters light like a prism. The GIA even grades them according to the same 4Cs—cut, clarity, color, and carat—that gemologists use to assess diamonds formed in the Earth, although it uses a slightly different terminology to report the color and clarity grades for lab-grown stones.

    They’re so similar, in fact, that lab-grown diamond entering the larger diamond supply without any disclosures has become a major concern across the jewelry industry, particularly when it comes to melee stones from Asia. It’s something major retailers are now investing thousands of dollars in sophisticated detection equipment to suss out by searching for minute differences in, say, their crystal shape or for impurities like nitrogen (much less common in lab-grown diamond, according to Shigley).

    Those differences may be a lifeline for retailers hoping to weed out lab-grown diamonds, but for companies focused on them, they can become another selling point. The lack of nitrogen in diamonds produced with the CVD method, for instance, gives them an exceptional chemical purity that allows them to be classified as type IIa; a rare and coveted breed that accounts for just 2 percent of those found in nature. Meanwhile, the ability to control everything about the growth process allows companies like Lightbox to adjust the formula and produce incredibly rare blue and pink diamonds as part of their standard product line. (In fact, these colored gemstones have made up over half of the company’s sales since launch, according to Coe.)

    And while lab-grown diamonds boast the same sparkle as their Earthly counterparts, they do so at a significant discount. Zimnisky said that today, your typical one carat, medium quality diamond grown in a lab will sell for about $3,600, compared with $6,100 for its Earth-mined counterpart—a discount of about 40 percent. Two years ago, that discount was only 18 percent. And while the price drop has “slightly tapered off” as Zimnisky put it, he expects it will fall further thanks in part to the aforementioned ramp up in Chinese production, as well as technological improvements. (The market is also shifting in response to Lightbox, which De Beers is using to position lab-grown diamonds as mass produced items for fashion jewelry, and which is selling its stones, ungraded, at the controversial low price of $800 per carat—a discount of nearly 90 percent.)

    Zimnisky said that if the price falls too fast, it could devalue lab-grown diamonds in the eyes of consumers. But for now, at least, paying less seems to be a selling point. A 2018 consumer research survey by MVI Marketing found that most of those polled would choose a larger lab-grown diamond over a smaller mined diamond of the same price.

    “The thing [consumers] seem most compelled by is the ability to trade up in size and quality at the same price,” Garard of IGDA said.

    Still, for buyers and sellers alike, price is only part of the story. Many in the lab-grown diamond world market their product as an ethical or eco-friendly alternative to mined diamonds.

    But those sales pitches aren’t without controversy.
    A variety of lab-grown diamond products arrayed on a desk at Ada Diamonds showroom in Manhattan. The stone in the upper left gets its blue color from boron. Diamonds tinted yellow (top center) usually get their color from small amounts of nitrogen.
    Photo: Sam Cannon (Earther)
    Dazzling promises

    As Anna-Mieke Anderson tells it, she didn’t enter the diamond world to become a corporate tycoon. She did it to try and fix a mistake.

    In 1999, Anderson purchased herself a diamond. Some years later, in 2005, her father asked her where it came from. Nonplussed, she told him it came from the jewelry store. But that wasn’t what he was asking: He wanted to know where it really came from.

    “I actually had no idea,” Anderson told Earther. “That led me to do a mountain of research.”

    That research eventually led Anderson to conclude that she had likely bought a diamond mined under horrific conditions. She couldn’t be sure, because the certificate of purchase included no place of origin. But around the time of her purchase, civil wars funded by diamond mining were raging across Angola, Sierra Leone, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Liberia, fueling “widespread devastation” as Global Witness put it in 2006. At the height of the diamond wars in the late ‘90s, the watchdog group estimates that as many as 15 percent of diamonds entering the market were conflict diamonds. Even those that weren’t actively fueling a war were often being mined in dirty, hazardous conditions; sometimes by children.

    “I couldn’t believe I’d bought into this,” Anderson said.

    To try and set things right, Anderson began sponsoring a boy living in a Liberian community impacted by the blood diamond trade. The experience was so eye-opening, she says, that she eventually felt compelled to sponsor more children. Selling conflict-free jewelry seemed like a fitting way to raise money to do so, but after a great deal more research, Anderson decided she couldn’t in good faith consider any diamond pulled from the Earth to be truly conflict-free in either the humanitarian or environmental sense. While diamond miners were, by the early 2000s, getting their gems certified “conflict free” according to the UN-backed Kimberley Process, the certification scheme’s definition of a conflict diamond—one sold by rebel groups to finance armed conflicts against governments—felt far too narrow.

    “That [conflict definition] eliminates anything to do with the environment, or eliminates a child mining it, or someone who was a slave, or beaten, or raped,” Anderson said.

    And so she started looking into science, and in 2007, launching MiaDonna as one of the world’s first lab-grown diamond jewelry companies. The business has been activism-oriented from the get-go, with at least five percent of its annual earnings—and more than 20 percent for the last three years—going into The Greener Diamond, Anderson’s charity foundation which has funded a wide range of projects, from training former child soldiers in Sierra Leone to grow food to sponsoring kids orphaned by the West African Ebola outbreak.

    MiaDonna isn’t the only company that positions itself as an ethical alternative to the traditional diamond industry. Brilliant Earth, which sells what it says are carefully-sourced mined and lab-created diamonds, also donates a small portion of its profits to supporting mining communities. Other lab-grown diamond companies market themselves as “ethical,” “conflict-free,” or “world positive.” Payne of Ada Diamonds sees, in lab-grown diamonds, not just shiny baubles, but a potential to improve medicine, clean up pollution, and advance society in countless other ways—and he thinks the growing interest in lab-grown diamond jewelry will help propel us toward that future.

    Others, however, say black-and-white characterizations when it comes to social impact of mined diamonds versus lab-grown stones are unfair. “I have a real problem with people claiming one is ethical and another is not,” Estelle Levin-Nally, founder and CEO of Levin Sources, which advocates for better governance in the mining sector, told Earther. “I think it’s always about your politics. And ethics are subjective.”

    Saleem Ali, an environmental researcher at the University of Delaware who serves on the board of the Diamonds and Development Initiative, agrees. He says the mining industry has, on the whole, worked hard to turn itself around since the height of the diamond wars and that governance is “much better today” than it used to be. Human rights watchdog Global Witness also says that “significant progress” has been made to curb the conflict diamond trade, although as Alice Harle, Senior Campaigner with Global Witness told Earther via email, diamonds do still fuel conflict, particularly in the Central African Republic and Zimbabwe.

    Most industry observers seems to agree that the Kimberley Process is outdated and inadequate, and that more work is needed to stamp out other abuses, including child labor and forced labor, in the artisanal and small-scale diamond mining sector. Today, large-scale mining operations don’t tend to see these kinds of problems, according to Julianne Kippenberg, associate director for children’s rights at Human Rights Watch, but she notes that there may be other community impacts surrounding land rights and forced resettlement.

    The flip side, Ali and Levin-Nally say, is that well-regulated mining operations can be an important source of economic development and livelihood. Ali cites Botswana and Russia as prime examples of places where large-scale mining operations have become “major contributors to the economy.” Dmitry Amelkin, head of strategic projects and analytics for Russian diamond mining giant Alrosa, echoed that sentiment in an email to Earther, noting that diamonds transformed Botswana “from one of the poorest [countries] in the world to a middle-income country” with revenues from mining representing almost a third of its GDP.

    In May, a report commissioned by the Diamond Producers Association (DPA), a trade organization representing the world’s largest diamond mining companies, estimated that worldwide, its members generate nearly $4 billion in direct revenue for employees and contractors, along with another $6.8 billion in benefits via “local procurement of goods and services.” DPA CEO Jean-Marc Lieberherr said this was a story diamond miners need to do a better job telling.

    “The industry has undergone such changes since the Blood Diamond movie,” he said, referring to the blockbuster 2006 film starring Leonardo DiCaprio that drew global attention to the problem of conflict diamonds. “And yet people’s’ perceptions haven’t evolved. I think the main reason is we have not had a voice, we haven’t communicated.”

    But conflict and human rights abuses aren’t the only issues that have plagued the diamond industry. There’s also the lasting environmental impact of the mining itself. In the case of large-scale commercial mines, this typically entails using heavy machinery and explosives to bore deep into those kimberlite tubes in search of precious stones.

    Some, like Maya Koplyova, a geologist at the University of British Columbia who studies diamonds and the rocks they’re found in, see this as far better than many other forms of mining. “The environmental footprint is the fThere’s also the question of just how representative the report’s energy consumption estimates for lab-grown diamonds are. While he wouldn’t offer a specific number, Coe said that De Beers’ Group diamond manufacturer Element Six—arguably the most advanced laboratory-grown diamond company in the world—has “substantially lower” per carat energy requirements than the headline figures found inside the new report. When asked why this was not included, Rick Lord, ESG analyst at Trucost, the S&P global group that conducted the analysis, said it chose to focus on energy estimates in the public record, but that after private consultation with Element Six it did not believe their data would “materially alter” the emissions estimates in the study.

    Finally, it’s important to consider the source of the carbon emissions. While the new report states that about 40 percent of the emissions associated with mining a diamond come from fossil fuel-powered vehicles and equipment, emissions associated with growing a diamond come mainly from electric power. Today, about 68 percent of lab-grown diamonds hail from China, Singapore, and India combined according to Zimnisky, where the power is drawn from largely fossil fuel-powered grids. But there is, at least, an opportunity to switch to renewables and drive that carbon footprint way down.
    “The reality is both mining and manufacturing consume energy and probably the best thing we could do is focus on reducing energy consumption.”

    And some companies do seem to be trying to do that. Anderson of MiaDonna says the company only sources its diamonds from facilities in the U.S., and that it’s increasingly trying to work with producers that use renewable energy. Lab-grown diamond company Diamond Foundry grows its stones inside plasma reactors running “as hot as the outer layer of the sun,” per its website, and while it wouldn’t offer any specific numbers, that presumably uses more energy than your typical operation running at lower temperatures. However, company spokesperson Ye-Hui Goldenson said its Washington State ‘megacarat factory’ was cited near a well-maintained hydropower source so that the diamonds could be produced with renewable energy. The company offsets other fossil fuel-driven parts of its operation by purchasing carbon credits.

    Lightbox’s diamonds currently come from Element Six’s UK-based facilities. The company is, however, building a $94-million facility near Portland, Oregon, that’s expected to come online by 2020. Coe said he estimates about 45 percent of its power will come from renewable sources.

    “The reality is both mining and manufacturing consume energy and probably the best thing we could do is focus on reducing energy consumption,” Coe said. “That’s something we’re focused on in Lightbox.”

    In spite of that, Lightbox is somewhat notable among lab-grown diamond jewelry brands in that, in the words of Morrison, it is “not claiming this to be an eco-friendly product.”

    “While it is true that we don’t dig holes in the ground, the energy consumption is not insignificant,” Morrison told Earther. “And I think we felt very uncomfortable promoting on that.”
    Various diamonds created in a lab, as seen at the Ada Diamonds showroom in Manhattan.
    Photo: Sam Cannon (Earther)
    The real real

    The fight over how lab-grown diamonds can and should market themselves is still heating up.

    On March 26, the FTC sent letters to eight lab-grown and diamond simulant companies warning them against making unsubstantiated assertions about the environmental benefits of their products—its first real enforcement action after updating its jewelry guides last year. The letters, first obtained by JCK news director Rob Bates under a Freedom of Information Act request, also warned companies that their advertising could falsely imply the products are mined diamonds, illustrating that, even though the agency now says a lab-grown diamond is a diamond, the specific origin remains critically important. A letter to Diamond Foundry, for instance, notes that the company has at times advertised its stones as “above-ground real” without the qualification of “laboratory-made.” It’s easy to see how a consumer might miss the implication.

    But in a sense, that’s what all of this is: A fight over what’s real.
    “It’s a nuanced reality that we’re in. They are a type of diamond.”

    Another letter, sent to FTC attorney Reenah Kim by the nonprofit trade organization Jewelers Vigilance Committee on April 2, makes it clear that many in the industry still believe that’s a term that should be reserved exclusively for gems formed inside the Earth. The letter, obtained by Earther under FOIA, urges the agency to continue restricting the use of the terms “real,” “genuine,” “natural,” “precious,” and “semi-precious” to Earth-mined diamonds and gemstones. Even the use of such terms in conjunction with “laboratory grown,” the letter argues, “will create even more confusion in an already confused and evolving marketplace.”

    JVC President Tiffany Stevens told Earther that the letter was a response to a footnote in an explanatory document about the FTC’s recent jewelry guide changes, which suggested the agency was considering removing a clause about real, precious, natural and genuine only being acceptable modifiers for gems mined from the Earth.

    “We felt that given the current commercial environment, that we didn’t think it was a good time to take that next step,” Stevens told Earther. As Stevens put it, the changes the FTC recently made, including expanding the definition of diamond and tweaking the descriptors companies can use to label laboratory-grown diamonds as such, have already been “wildly misinterpreted” by some lab-grown diamond sellers that are no longer making the “necessary disclosures.”

    Asked whether the JVC thinks lab-grown diamonds are, in fact, real diamonds, Stevens demurred.

    “It’s a nuanced reality that we’re in,” she said. “They are a type of diamond.”

    Change is afoot in the diamond world. Mined diamond production may have already peaked, according to the 2018 Bain & Company report. Lab diamonds are here to stay, although where they’re going isn’t entirely clear. Zimnisky expects that in a few years—as Lightbox’s new facility comes online and mass production of lab diamonds continues to ramp up overseas—the price industry-wide will fall to about 80 percent less than a mined diamond. At that point, he wonders whether lab-grown diamonds will start to lose their sparkle.

    Payne isn’t too worried about a price slide, which he says is happening across the diamond industry and which he expects will be “linear, not exponential” on the lab-grown side. He points out that lab-grown diamond market is still limited by supply, and that the largest lab-grown gems remain quite rare. Payne and Zimnisky both see the lab-grown diamond market bifurcating into cheaper, mass-produced gems and premium-quality stones sold by those that can maintain a strong brand. A sense that they’re selling something authentic and, well, real.

    “So much has to do with consumer psychology,” Zimnisky said.

    Some will only ever see diamonds as authentic if they formed inside the Earth. They’re drawn, as Kathryn Money, vice president of strategy and merchandising at Brilliant Earth put it, to “the history and romanticism” of diamonds; to a feeling that’s sparked by holding a piece of our ancient world. To an essence more than a function.

    Others, like Anderson, see lab-grown diamonds as the natural (to use a loaded word) evolution of diamond. “We’re actually running out of [mined] diamonds,” she said. “There is an end in sight.” Payne agreed, describing what he sees as a “looming death spiral” for diamond mining.

    Mined diamonds will never go away. We’ve been digging them up since antiquity, and they never seem to lose their sparkle. But most major mines are being exhausted. And with technology making it easier to grow diamonds just as they are getting more difficult to extract from the Earth, the lab-grown diamond industry’s grandstanding about its future doesn’t feel entirely unreasonable.

    There’s a reason why, as Payne said, “the mining industry as a whole is still quite scared of this product.” ootprint of digging the hole in the ground and crushing [the rock],” Koplyova said, noting that there’s no need to add strong acids or heavy metals like arsenic (used in gold mining) to liberate the gems.

    Still, those holes can be enormous. The Mir Mine, a now-abandoned open pit mine in Eastern Siberia, is so large—reportedly stretching 3,900 feet across and 1,700 feet deep—that the Russian government has declared it a no-fly zone owing to the pit’s ability to create dangerous air currents. It’s visible from space.

    While companies will often rehabilitate other land to offset the impact of mines, kimberlite mining itself typically leaves “a permanent dent in the earth’s surface,” as a 2014 report by market research company Frost & Sullivan put it.

    “It’s a huge impact as far as I’m concerned,” said Kevin Krajick, senior editor for science news at Columbia University’s Earth Institute who wrote a book on the discovery of diamonds in far northern Canada. Krajick noted that in remote mines, like those of the far north, it’s not just the physical hole to consider, but all the development required to reach a previously-untouched area, including roads and airstrips, roaring jets and diesel-powered trucks.

    Diamonds grown in factories clearly have a smaller physical footprint. According to the Frost & Sullivan report, they also use less water and create less waste. It’s for these reasons that Ali thinks diamond mining “will never be able to compete” with lab-grown diamonds from an environmental perspective.

    “The mining industry should not even by trying to do that,” he said.

    Of course, this is capitalism, so try to compete is exactly what the DPA is now doing. That same recent report that touted the mining industry’s economic benefits also asserts that mined diamonds have a carbon footprint three times lower than that of lab-grown diamonds, on average. The numbers behind that conclusion, however, don’t tell the full story.

    Growing diamonds does take considerable energy. The exact amount can vary greatly, however, depending on the specific nature of the growth process. These are details manufacturers are typically loathe to disclose, but Payne of Ada Diamonds says he estimates the most efficient players in the game today use about 250 kilowatt hour (kWh) of electricity per cut, polished carat of diamond; roughly what a U.S. household consumes in 9 days. Other estimates run higher. Citing unnamed sources, industry publication JCK Online reported that a modern HPHT run can use up to 700 kWh per carat, while CVD production can clock in north of 1,000 kWh per carat.

    Pulling these and several other public-record estimates, along with information on where in the world today’s lab diamonds are being grown and the energy mix powering the producer nations’ electric grids, the DPA-commissioned study estimated that your typical lab-grown diamond results in some 511 kg of carbon emissions per cut, polished carat. Using information provided by mining companies on fuel and electricity consumption, along with other greenhouse gas sources on the mine site, it found that the average mined carat was responsible for just 160 kg of carbon emissions.

    One limitation here is that the carbon footprint estimate for mining focused only on diamond production, not the years of work entailed in developing a mine. As Ali noted, developing a mine can take a lot of energy, particularly for those sited in remote locales where equipment needs to be hauled long distances by trucks or aircraft.

    There’s also the question of just how representative the report’s energy consumption estimates for lab-grown diamonds are. While he wouldn’t offer a specific number, Coe said that De Beers’ Group diamond manufacturer Element Six—arguably the most advanced laboratory-grown diamond company in the world—has “substantially lower” per carat energy requirements than the headline figures found inside the new report. When asked why this was not included, Rick Lord, ESG analyst at Trucost, the S&P global group that conducted the analysis, said it chose to focus on energy estimates in the public record, but that after private consultation with Element Six it did not believe their data would “materially alter” the emissions estimates in the study.

    Finally, it’s important to consider the source of the carbon emissions. While the new report states that about 40 percent of the emissions associated with mining a diamond come from fossil fuel-powered vehicles and equipment, emissions associated with growing a diamond come mainly from electric power. Today, about 68 percent of lab-grown diamonds hail from China, Singapore, and India combined according to Zimnisky, where the power is drawn from largely fossil fuel-powered grids. But there is, at least, an opportunity to switch to renewables and drive that carbon footprint way down.
    “The reality is both mining and manufacturing consume energy and probably the best thing we could do is focus on reducing energy consumption.”

    And some companies do seem to be trying to do that. Anderson of MiaDonna says the company only sources its diamonds from facilities in the U.S., and that it’s increasingly trying to work with producers that use renewable energy. Lab-grown diamond company Diamond Foundry grows its stones inside plasma reactors running “as hot as the outer layer of the sun,” per its website, and while it wouldn’t offer any specific numbers, that presumably uses more energy than your typical operation running at lower temperatures. However, company spokesperson Ye-Hui Goldenson said its Washington State ‘megacarat factory’ was cited near a well-maintained hydropower source so that the diamonds could be produced with renewable energy. The company offsets other fossil fuel-driven parts of its operation by purchasing carbon credits.

    Lightbox’s diamonds currently come from Element Six’s UK-based facilities. The company is, however, building a $94-million facility near Portland, Oregon, that’s expected to come online by 2020. Coe said he estimates about 45 percent of its power will come from renewable sources.

    “The reality is both mining and manufacturing consume energy and probably the best thing we could do is focus on reducing energy consumption,” Coe said. “That’s something we’re focused on in Lightbox.”

    In spite of that, Lightbox is somewhat notable among lab-grown diamond jewelry brands in that, in the words of Morrison, it is “not claiming this to be an eco-friendly product.”

    “While it is true that we don’t dig holes in the ground, the energy consumption is not insignificant,” Morrison told Earther. “And I think we felt very uncomfortable promoting on that.”
    Various diamonds created in a lab, as seen at the Ada Diamonds showroom in Manhattan.
    Photo: Sam Cannon (Earther)
    The real real

    The fight over how lab-grown diamonds can and should market themselves is still heating up.

    On March 26, the FTC sent letters to eight lab-grown and diamond simulant companies warning them against making unsubstantiated assertions about the environmental benefits of their products—its first real enforcement action after updating its jewelry guides last year. The letters, first obtained by JCK news director Rob Bates under a Freedom of Information Act request, also warned companies that their advertising could falsely imply the products are mined diamonds, illustrating that, even though the agency now says a lab-grown diamond is a diamond, the specific origin remains critically important. A letter to Diamond Foundry, for instance, notes that the company has at times advertised its stones as “above-ground real” without the qualification of “laboratory-made.” It’s easy to see how a consumer might miss the implication.

    But in a sense, that’s what all of this is: A fight over what’s real.
    “It’s a nuanced reality that we’re in. They are a type of diamond.”

    Another letter, sent to FTC attorney Reenah Kim by the nonprofit trade organization Jewelers Vigilance Committee on April 2, makes it clear that many in the industry still believe that’s a term that should be reserved exclusively for gems formed inside the Earth. The letter, obtained by Earther under FOIA, urges the agency to continue restricting the use of the terms “real,” “genuine,” “natural,” “precious,” and “semi-precious” to Earth-mined diamonds and gemstones. Even the use of such terms in conjunction with “laboratory grown,” the letter argues, “will create even more confusion in an already confused and evolving marketplace.”

    JVC President Tiffany Stevens told Earther that the letter was a response to a footnote in an explanatory document about the FTC’s recent jewelry guide changes, which suggested the agency was considering removing a clause about real, precious, natural and genuine only being acceptable modifiers for gems mined from the Earth.

    “We felt that given the current commercial environment, that we didn’t think it was a good time to take that next step,” Stevens told Earther. As Stevens put it, the changes the FTC recently made, including expanding the definition of diamond and tweaking the descriptors companies can use to label laboratory-grown diamonds as such, have already been “wildly misinterpreted” by some lab-grown diamond sellers that are no longer making the “necessary disclosures.”

    Asked whether the JVC thinks lab-grown diamonds are, in fact, real diamonds, Stevens demurred.

    “It’s a nuanced reality that we’re in,” she said. “They are a type of diamond.”

    Change is afoot in the diamond world. Mined diamond production may have already peaked, according to the 2018 Bain & Company report. Lab diamonds are here to stay, although where they’re going isn’t entirely clear. Zimnisky expects that in a few years—as Lightbox’s new facility comes online and mass production of lab diamonds continues to ramp up overseas—the price industry-wide will fall to about 80 percent less than a mined diamond. At that point, he wonders whether lab-grown diamonds will start to lose their sparkle.

    Payne isn’t too worried about a price slide, which he says is happening across the diamond industry and which he expects will be “linear, not exponential” on the lab-grown side. He points out that lab-grown diamond market is still limited by supply, and that the largest lab-grown gems remain quite rare. Payne and Zimnisky both see the lab-grown diamond market bifurcating into cheaper, mass-produced gems and premium-quality stones sold by those that can maintain a strong brand. A sense that they’re selling something authentic and, well, real.

    “So much has to do with consumer psychology,” Zimnisky said.

    Some will only ever see diamonds as authentic if they formed inside the Earth. They’re drawn, as Kathryn Money, vice president of strategy and merchandising at Brilliant Earth put it, to “the history and romanticism” of diamonds; to a feeling that’s sparked by holding a piece of our ancient world. To an essence more than a function.

    Others, like Anderson, see lab-grown diamonds as the natural (to use a loaded word) evolution of diamond. “We’re actually running out of [mined] diamonds,” she said. “There is an end in sight.” Payne agreed, describing what he sees as a “looming death spiral” for diamond mining.

    Mined diamonds will never go away. We’ve been digging them up since antiquity, and they never seem to lose their sparkle. But most major mines are being exhausted. And with technology making it easier to grow diamonds just as they are getting more difficult to extract from the Earth, the lab-grown diamond industry’s grandstanding about its future doesn’t feel entirely unreasonable.

    There’s a reason why, as Payne said, “the mining industry as a whole is still quite scared of this product.”

    #dimants #Afrique #technologie #capitalisme

  • Cigna Official Site | Global Health Service Company
    https://www.cigna.com

    At Cigna, we’re your partner in total health & well-being.

    Top 822 Reviews about Cigna Health Insurance
    https://www.consumeraffairs.com/insurance/cigna_health.html

    Karen of Maumelle, AR
    Verified Reviewer
    Original review: June 19, 2019

    Cigna plays God with your health. The company refuses to cover medical expenses for treatments other insurance companies have covered for years. Cigna does not consider how well your chronic conditions have been managed in the past, or what your doctor may order to monitor your condition. I’ve had rheumatoid arthritis for years, and under United and Blue Cross coverage was able to receive the treatments I need to manage my condition well. My husband has a severe case of myasthenia gravis that we have been able to manage with Blue Cross and United. Cigna does not care if people suffer; nor do the company’s doctors respect their highly reputable colleagues in the field of medicine. The doctors spend no time understanding your medical history; they simply follow standard black and white written protocols, without regard for patients’ well-being.

    Carl Icahn Cigna: Billionaire Slams Express Scripts Deal | Fortune
    http://fortune.com/2018/08/07/carl-icahn-cigna-express-scripts

    “Purchasing Express Scripts may well become one of the worst blunders in corporate history, ranking up there with the Time Warner/AOL fiasco and General Electric’s long-running string of value destruction,” wrote Icahn, citing one of the most heavily criticized mergers of the past few decades. Icahn reportedly has acquired a “sizable” stake in Cigna, according to the Wall Street Journal, but the precise extent of that stake is unclear.

    Icahn also mentioned the specter of Amazon entering the prescription drug business as a key reason why the Cigna-Express Scripts merger would amount to a “$60 billion folly,” adding that recent federal government actions scrutinizing the largely opaque benefits management industry are also a major red flag. PBMs have been accused of being one of the key reasons why prescription drug prices remain so high.

    “When Amazon starts to compete as we believe they will, with their 100 million Prime users and scale distribution system, they will have no trouble breaking into the so called ‘ecosystem.’ With lower prices, the beneficiary will be American consumer, not the owners of Express Scripts,” wrote Icahn in an underlined section of the letter. Icahn also disclosed that he has taken a short position on Express Scripts, expecting the stock to fall.

    Behind the Scenes, Health Insurers Use Cash and Gifts to Sway Which Benefits Employers Choose | HealthLeaders Media
    https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/behind-scenes-health-insurers-use-cash-and-gifts-sway-which-bene

    The insurance industry gives lucrative commissions and bonuses to independent brokers who advise employers. Critics call the payments a “classic conflict of interest” that drive up costs.

    #USA #assurance_maladie #capitalisme

  • Collecte de données : l’UFC-Que choisir lance une action de groupe contre Google
    https://www.lemonde.fr/pixels/article/2019/06/26/collecte-de-donnees-l-ufc-que-choisir-lance-une-action-de-groupe-contre-goog

    L’association de défense des consommateurs accuse Google de collecter et d’exploiter illégalement les données personnelles des utilisateurs du système d’exploitation Android. Nouvelle attaque contre Google. Mercredi 26 juin, l’UFC-Que choisir a annoncé le lancement d’une action de groupe contre l’entreprise américaine, qu’elle accuse de collecter et d’exploiter illégalement les données de ses utilisateurs. Selon l’association française de consommateurs, Google enfreint le nouveau règlement européen sur la (...)

    #Google #Android #[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données_(RGPD)[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation_(GDPR)[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation_(GDPR) #BigData #données #profiling (...)

    ##[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données__RGPD_[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_ ##UFC-QueChoisir

  • Le vrai visage de la reconnaissance faciale
    https://www.laquadrature.net/2019/06/21/le-vrai-visage-de-la-reconnaissance-faciale

    La Quadrature du Net est contre la reconnaissance faciale, d’accord : mais pourquoi ? Dès qu’on aborde le sujet en public, on voit se dessiner deux attitudes opposées. D’un côté, le solide bon sens qui ne voit pas pourquoi on se priverait de la possibilité d’identifier efficacement les criminels dans une foule, et pour qui tous les moyens sont bons, puisque la fin est juste. De l’autre côté, la peur réflexe devant cette technique de surveillance – souvent plus vive que devant d’autres techniques de (...)

    #Google #Microsoft #SenseTime #algorithme #SmartCity #CCTV #lunettes #Reporty #smartphone #biométrie #facial #vidéo-surveillance (...)

    ##[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données__RGPD_[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_ ##surveillance ##étudiants ##BigBrotherWatch ##LaQuadratureduNet

  • Vie privée des enfants : pourquoi YouTube fait l’objet d’une enquête fédérale aux États-Unis
    https://www.numerama.com/tech/527489-vie-privee-des-enfants-pourquoi-youtube-fait-lobjet-dune-enquete-fe

    YouTube fait l’objet d’une enquête du gouvernement américain à cause de la faible protection de ses jeunes utilisateurs mineurs. La plateforme devra régler le problème au plus vite. YouTube va devoir agir, et vite. Une enquête du gouvernement fédéral américain est sur le point d’aboutir à son sujet. Elle concerne la protection des mineurs sur la plateforme et surtout celle de leurs données personnelles qui serait insuffisante, a révélé le Washington Post mercredi 19 juin.

    YouTube aura-t-il une amende ? (...)

    #Google #YouTube #TikTok #BigData #publicité #[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données_(RGPD)[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation_(GDPR)[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation_(GDPR) #COPPA #enfants (...)

    ##publicité ##[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données__RGPD_[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_ ##FTC
    //c2.lestechnophiles.com/www.numerama.com/content/uploads/2019/03/youtube-enfants.jpg

  • China : Der größte Automobilmarkt der Welt bricht ein - WELT
    https://www.welt.de/wirtschaft/article195553245/China-Der-groesste-Automobilmarkt-der-Welt-bricht-ein.html

    30 ans après sa transformation capitaliste la Chine se trouve face à une récession de plus en plus ingérable.

    Seit zwölf Monaten fallen in China Autoproduktion und -absatz. Die Lager sind überfüllt, Händler versuchen verzweifelt, mit Rabattaktionen doch noch Fahrzeuge loszuwerden. Ein ausländischer Hersteller steht als großer Verlierer da.
    ...
    Vergangene Woche meldete das Statistische Amt als Hiobsbotschaft für die Industrieproduktion nur noch fünf Prozent Wachstum im Einzelmonat Mai. Es war der schwächste Zuwachs seit 2002. Schuld daran trug die im gleichen Monat um 21,5 Prozent im Vergleich zum Vorjahr eingebrochene Automobilherstellung.

    Sie war jahrelang Motor der Konjunktur und steuerte bis zu zehn Prozent zum Bruttoinlandsprodukt bei. Nach Angaben des Herstellerverbandes CAAM konnten im Mai noch 1,91 Millionen Neufahrzeuge an den Handel ausgeliefert werden. Das waren 16,4 Prozent weniger als im Mai des Vorjahres und 3,4 Prozent weniger als im Vormonat. Mit anderen Worten: Die Talfahrt beschleunigt sich immer weiter.
    ...
    Das Bild ist jedoch durchwachsen. Deutsche Hersteller und Marktführer wie VW, Mercedes oder BMW spürten den Gegenwind zwar ebenfalls, behaupteten sich aber, vor allem mit ihren Premiumfahrzeugen. Die vor einigen Jahren noch abgeschlagenen Japaner haben sogar zugelegt. Größter Verlierer ist – quasi als Kollateralschaden des Handelskrieges – der amerikanische Autobauer General Motors.

    #Chine #économie #crise #industrie_automobile

  • J’ai (enfin) découvert pourquoi des marques inconnues me ciblaient sur Facebook
    https://www.numerama.com/tech/508381-jai-enfin-decouvert-pourquoi-des-marques-inconnues-me-ciblaient-sur

    Dans une première enquête publiée en avril, nous avions tenté de comprendre d’où venaient les données servant au ciblage publicitaire sur Facebook. 4 mois après le début de cette vaste quête, nous avons enfin quelques réponses. Depuis le mois de février, je cherche à savoir quelle entreprise a récupéré mes données personnelles afin de faire du ciblage publicitaire sur Facebook. Dans un premier article publié le 25 avril — et que je vous invite à aller lire avant de poursuivre –, je vous racontais ce qui (...)

    #Facebook #publicité #BigData #marketing #[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données_(RGPD)[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation_(GDPR)[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation_(GDPR)

    ##publicité ##[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données__RGPD_[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_
    //c0.lestechnophiles.com/www.numerama.com/content/uploads/2019/06/facebook-donnees.jpg

  • L’idée selon laquelle le #petit_déjeuner est le #repas le plus important vient-elle d’un #lobby ?

    Que ce soit par nos parents ou les publicités, l’affirmation selon laquelle le petit-déjeuner est le repas le plus important de la journée est constamment répétée. Pourtant, encore aujourd’hui, les effets de ce repas sur la santé sont débattus.

    L’idée, très répandue, selon laquelle le petit-déjeuner est le repas le plus important de la journée apparaît la toute première fois au début du XXe siècle, sous la plume de Lenna F. Cooper, dans les pages d’un magazine de santé américain de l’époque nommé #Good_Health.

    « A bien des égards, le petit-déjeuner est le repas le plus important de la journée, car c’est le repas qui nous fait commencer la journée, écrit ainsi cette diététicienne dans les pages du mensuel publié en août 1917. Il ne devrait pas être consommé précipitamment, et toute la famille devrait y participer. Et surtout, il doit être composé d’aliments faciles à digérer, et équilibré de telle façon que les différents éléments qui le composent sont en bonnes proportions. Ça ne devrait pas être un repas lourd, il devrait contenir entre 500 et 700 calories ».

    Le journal dans lequel écrit Lenna F. Cooper n’est pas anodin. Good Health appartient à #John_Harvey_Kellogg, qui en est également le rédacteur en chef. Et Lenna F. Cooper est la protégée du Dr Kellogg.

    Une idée dans l’air du temps

    Cette idée ne sort pas de nulle part. Elle naît avec un changement des habitudes alimentaires au tournant du XXe siècle, alors que les pays occidentaux sont en pleine révolution industrielle, selon Alain Drouard, historien et sociologue de l’alimentation. C’est à cette période que naît le concept de petit-déjeuner tel qu’on le connaît aujourd’hui.

    « Avant cette période, dans les milieux ruraux, bien sûr les personnes avaient des prises alimentaires pour rompre le jeûne de la nuit, mais ce n’était pas ritualisé, explique le professeur Drouard. Les aliments qu’on associe maintenant au petit-déjeuner n’étaient pas encore répandus. »

    On consomme alors le matin ce qu’il restait dans le garde-manger ou les restes du dîner de la veille. Mais alors que de plus en plus de monde quitte la campagne et les champs pour se rendre en ville travailler dans des emplois sédentaires à l’usine ou dans des bureaux, beaucoup de travailleurs commencent à se plaindre d’indigestion. Leur régime est inadapté.

    « A cette même époque, un discours d’inspiration scientifique fleurit. Des médecins commencent à se lever contre l’industrialisation de l’alimentation, aux Etats-Unis comme en France, pour préconiser un retour à une alimentation riche en céréales, et généralement plus saine et naturelle », explique Alain Drouard.

    Le docteur, inventeur et nutritionniste John H. Kellogg est très investi dans cette recherche du meilleur mode de vie possible, ce qu’il appelle « #biologic_living » (« mode de vie biologique »). Directeur du #sanatorium de #Battle_Creek dans le Michigan, il dispense aux personnes aisées des traitements allant de la #luminothérapie à l’#hydrothérapie, selon les principes de #santé (physique et morale) de l’#Eglise_adventiste_du_septième_jour. Il prescrit à ses patients des régimes à base d’aliments fades, faibles en gras et en viande. C’est dans ce contexte-là qu’en 1898, le docteur Kellogg invente les #cornflakes, les pétales à base de farine de maïs, à l’origine un moyen pour lui de combattre l’#indigestion.

    Son frère, #Will_Keith_Kellogg, voit le potentiel commercial dans les cornflakes et en 1907 il décide de la commercialiser pour le grand public. Les #céréales Kellogg’s sont nées. Et le petit-déjeuner, soutenu par les thèses de nutritionnistes comme Kellogg, prend son essor, alors même que les céréales de petit-déjeuner envahissent le marché.

    Il faut toutefois attendre 1968 pour que la #multinationale s’installe en France et y commercialise ses céréales.

    Cent ans après une idée qui persiste via la recherche

    Cent ans après l’affirmation de Lenna F. Cooper, l’idée selon laquelle le petit-déjeuner est le repas le plus important de la journée persiste. Elle est toujours très présente dans le milieu de la recherche en nutrition. De nombreuses études ont été menées depuis cette époque qui lient la prise régulière d’un petit-déjeuner à une bonne santé, à une perte de poids ou même à de plus faibles risques de problèmes cardiaques ou de diabète.

    Mais les méthodes utilisées dans ces recherches ne sont pas toujours très convaincantes. Une étude américaine de 2005 établit par exemple un lien entre le fait de manger un petit-déjeuner et le fait d’avoir un faible #indice_de_masse corporelle (#IMC). Mais il ne s’agit pas ici d’étudier les résultats provoqués par un changement d’habitudes alimentaires. L’étude compare simplement deux groupes aux habitudes différentes. Ce faisant, toutes les variables qui entrent en jeu pour déterminer si la cause du faible ICM est la prise régulière d’un petit-déjeuner, ne sont pas prises en compte. L’étude établit donc une corrélation, un lien entre ces deux facteurs, mais pas un véritable un lien de causalité. De nombreuses études utilisent des méthodes similaires.

    En janvier, une méta-analyse, c’est-à-dire une étude compilant les données de beaucoup d’autres études, a été publiée sur le sujet. Et les chercheurs concluent n’« avoir trouvé aucune preuve soutenant l’idée que la consommation d’un petit-déjeuner promeut la perte de poids. Cela pourrait même avoir l’effet inverse ».

    Tout cela ne veut pas dire que le petit-déjeuner est mauvais pour la santé. Plusieurs recherches ont par exemple prouvé que manger un petit-déjeuner était bénéfique dans le développement de l’enfant. Mais trop de variables entrent en jeu pour pouvoir affirmer que prendre un petit-déjeuner est effectivement une pratique essentielle à notre bonne santé. La définition même de ce qui constitue un petit-déjeuner varie grandement selon les études, car l’heure à laquelle ce repas est pris ou sa composition peut beaucoup changer entre les sujets observés.
    Beaucoup d’études… financées par les géants du secteur

    Il existe un autre problème. « Beaucoup, si ce n’est presque toutes, les études qui démontrent que les personnes qui mangent un petit-déjeuner sont en meilleure santé et maîtrisent mieux leur poids que ceux qui n’en mangent pas sont sponsorisées par Kellogg’s ou d’autres compagnies de céréales », explique la nutritionniste Marion Nestle sur son blog Food Politics.

    Par exemple, une étude française du Crédoc (Centre de recherche pour l’étude et l’observation des conditions de vie) citée en 2017 par Libération, qui soulignait le fait que « le petit-déjeuner est en perte de vitesse, sauf le week-end », était entièrement financée par Kellogg’s. Une revue systématique de 2013 sur les bienfaits du petit-déjeuner pour les enfants et les adolescents, financée par Kellogg’s, relevait que sur les quatorze études qu’ils analysaient, treize avaient été financées par des compagnies de céréales.

    Une autre méta-analyse a été lancée en 2018 par une équipe de recherche internationale, The International Breakfast Research Initiative (Ibri). Composée de chercheurs de plusieurs pays, l’équipe cherche à analyser les différents types de petits-déjeuners et leurs apports en nutriments grâce à des données récoltées dans tous les pays respectifs des chercheurs, dans le but de déterminer des recommandations nutritionnelles précises pour le plus grand nombre.

    Ce travail est financé par le groupe Cereal Partners Worldwide, une coentreprise spécialisée dans la distribution de céréales créée en 1991 par Nestlé et Général Mills, le sixième groupe alimentaire mondial qui commercialise entre autres 29 marques de céréales (qui finance d’ailleurs directement le versant canadien et américain de l’étude).

    Toutes ces recherches peuvent ultimement servir à la publicité de Kellogg, de Nestlé et d’autres marques. « Et quelle est la source principale d’information des Français en matière de nutrition ? C’est la publicité. Qui détient les budgets publicitaires les plus importants ? Les groupes alimentaires. Il y a encore quelques années, ça dépassait le milliard d’euros », remarque Alain Drouard.

    En résumé : L’idée selon laquelle le petit-déjeuner est le repas le plus important de la journée est effectivement liée à l’industrie des produits de petits-déjeuners, et notamment des céréales. Si depuis le développement de cette idée de nombreuses recherches ont été menées pour prouver cette affirmation, beaucoup de ces études montrent moins une véritable cause entre la prise régulière d’un petit-déjeuner et une bonne santé, que des liens, parfois contradictoires. Et une grande part de ces recherches sont sponsorisées par de grands groupes agroalimentaires comme #Kellogg's ou #Nestlé.

    https://www.liberation.fr/checknews/2019/06/09/l-idee-selon-laquelle-le-petit-dejeuner-est-le-repas-le-plus-important-vi
    #alimentation #idée_reçue #imaginaire

    • Intéressant... Je ne connais que l’Europe où on a un petit déj spécial, pas composé contre les autres repas. En Malaisie, par exemple, le petit déj est souvent du riz au wok, manière d’accommoder les restes de la veille. Ou alors un plat salé : soupe de nouilles, riz cuit au lait de coco, etc. Ce petit-déj aux céréales est justement un sous-repas et ça va contre l’idée qu’il faudrait bien manger le matin...

      De ce que j’ai cru comprendre de la vie rurale (et j’ai un copain paysan qui vit comme ça !), les gens avant prenaient un petit truc le matin, de préférence liquide, parce que tôt c’est difficile de manger, et faisaient une bonne collation vers 9h ou 10h, quand l’appétit arrivait. Aujourd’hui, tu te lèves tôt et tu dois partir tout de suite, c’est parfois difficile d’avoir un vrai petit-déj à une heure correcte. (Les rythmes scolaires et de travail ne respectent pas ces besoins.) Les céréales passent peut-être mieux...

      Ensuite, comme le soir est le seul moment libre pour manger à son goût, c’est un repas qui est plus riche que ce qu’il devrait être pour bien dormir.

      Il y a une maxime populaire qui dit « manger le matin comme un roi, le midi comme un prince et le soir comme un gueux » et j’ai retrouvé quasiment la même en malais ! Comment est-ce que le bol de céréales se fait passer pour un repas de roi et surfe sur ce précepte ? Mystère !

    • La vie moderne ne respecte rien des besoins des personnes : ni sommeil, ni bouffe, ni repos, ni socialisation, rien.
      Le truc est de nous transformer en robots, de peur de leur laisser la place.

      J’avais fait des expériences sur moi à la fin de l’adolescence et début de l’âge adulte. Un bon repas salé dans l’heure qui suit le lever est ce qu’il y a de plus efficient.
      Le mieux a été l’inversion des repas français : diner le matin et petit dej le soir. Ni lourdeur, ni coup de pompe, de l’énergie et un poids idéal sans y penser.

  • Alstom : le document qui prouve que GE n’a pas tenu ses engagements
    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/110619/alstom-le-document-qui-prouve-que-ge-n-pas-tenu-ses-engagements

    Début novembre 2014, le gouvernement français et General Electric signaient un accord censé encadrer les conditions de reprise d’Alstom et son futur en France. Trois ans après, aucun des engagements pris par le groupe américain n’a été tenu. Les 1 000 emplois promis n’ont pas été créés. Belfort, qui devait être promu comme la division mondiale du groupe pour les turbines à gaz pendant dix ans, est aujourd’hui menacé.

    #INDUSTRIE #Alstom,_emploi,_GE,_industrie,_Belfort,_A_la_Une

  • Uber and Lyft Are Doomed - Shelly Palmer
    https://www.shellypalmer.com/2019/06/uber-lyft-doomed

    Was bleibt als Aussicht für Taxifahrer?

    Die Voraussagen des Unternehmensberaters Shelly Palmer über die Zukunft von Lyft und Uber decken sich mit den Schlußfolgerungen, zu denen man bei Betrachtung des internationalen und deutschen Taxi- und Mietwagenmarktes kommt:

    Entweder kaufen Uber und Lyft die Autokonzerne oder die Autokonzerne kaufen die Vermittlungsplattformen.

    Wir beobachten einerseits Milliarderinvestitionen von Toyota in Uber und nicht ganz so große Milliardeninvestitionen der deutschen Autobauer in Mytaxi und andere Mobilitäts-Startups. Auf der anderen Seite kauft Uber durch Mittelsmänner Mietwagenunternehmen, um den deutschen Taxi-Markt zu übernehmen.

    Palmers Überlegungen beruhen auf einer einfachen und sehr plausiblen Analyse der zukünftigen Profitmöglichkeiten. Er hat Recht mit der Schlußfolgerung, dass die Mobilitätsvermittler auf Dauer nur mit ähnlichen, vergleichsweise niedrigen Gewinnen rechnen können, wie sie Taxi- und Mietwagenunternehmen heute erwirtschaften. Aus diesem Grund werden die Vermittler in absehbarer Zeit von den Automobilkonzernen geschluckt oder umgekehrt, was volkswirtschaftlich gesehen auf das Gleiche hinausläuft.

    Eine andere These lautet, dass die Absicht mit Uber Profit zu machen nur vorgeschoben ist, um die wahren Absichten der Konzern-Geldgeber zu verschleiern. Sie würde zu vollkommen anderen Vorhersagen führen.

    Diese Phantomas-These, bei der es um Weltherrschaft um jeden Preis geht, trifft vielleicht sogar bei manchen Uber-Machern zu, verrückt genug dafür sind einige unter ihnen. Die revolutionäre Umgestaltung und vollkommene Beherrschung der Welt nach dem Uber-Modell wird sich jedoch kaum langfristig verwirklichen lassen, weil sie im Widerspruch zu den Gesetzen des kapitalistischen Wirtschaftsprozeß steht. Palmers Analyse ist eine Anwendng dieser Erkenntnis. Auf Nebenkriegsschauplätzen können die Dollarmilliarden, die für solche megalomanischen Pläne eingesetzt werden, jedoch großen Schaden anrichten.

    Was bedeuten diese absehbaren Entwicklungen für Taxifahrer und -unternehmer in Deutschland?

    Im besten Fall gelingt es Politik und Gesellschaft, sich gegen das Uber-Gesellschaftsmodell zusammenzuschließen, eine gerechtere Verteilung von Macht und Wohlstand zu verhandeln, wobei ausländische wie inländische Markt-Extremisten ihres Besitz verlustig gehen. Dann hätten Klein- und mittelständische Taxiunternehmer wieder eine Chance, gutes Geld zu vedienen und ihre Fahrer könnten höhere Löhne einfordern, da der Mindestlohnsektor staatlich abgeschafft würde. Im Prinzip ist das kein Problem, da er auch staatlich beschlossen und eingeführt wurde. Das wäre nach dem Geschmack der sozialliberalen Strömungen in Linkspartei, SPD, Grünen und einiger FDP-Methusalems und wird nicht passieren.

    Nicht einmal die lautstarkt protestierenden Taxiunternehmer schreiben sich gesellschaftliche Änderungen auf ihre Fahnen, sondern fordern einfach „fairen Wettbewerb“ für alle Marktteilnehmer. Den werden sie kriegen, und wir wissen auch wie es ausgeht, wenn Großkonzerne ihre Marktanteile in „fairem Wettbewerb“ auf Kosten kleiner und mittelständischer Unternehmen vergrößern. Die Tante-Emma-Läden sind tot, sogar das zunächst kleingewerbliche Bio-Segment wird heute von Handelskettfen beherrscht. Bäckermeister, die vom Verkauf ihres Brots im eigenen Laden leben, haben ebenfalls seit den 1970ger Jahren Exotenstatus.

    Alle die im Taxi, um das Taxi und um das Taxi herum Geld verdienen wollen, müssen sich auf den selben Verdrängungsprozess einstellen, egal ob heute Minister Scheuers Eckpunkte Gesetz werden oder nicht. Es geht um große technologische, politische und finanzielle Entwicklungen. Das deutsche Taxigewerbe ist heute besonders in den Großstädten ein absehbar schrumpfendes, das gleichzeitig immer mehr Autos mit immer schlechter bezahlten Fahrern auf die Straße bringt.

    Angestellte Fahrer haben Anspruch auf den gesetzlichen Mindestlohn, der ihnen von ihren Chefs verweigert wird.

    Selbstfahrende Unternehmer erwirtschaften weniger als dem gesetzlichen Mindestlohn entsprechen würde, wenn alle Arbeitszeiten für Wartung und Verwaltung in Anschlag gebracht und die Kosten der Kranken- Renten und Pflegeversicherung berücksichtigt werden.

    Mehrwagenunternehmer verdienen gutes Geld nur noch, wenn sie computeroptimierte Methoden für Arbeitszeitbetrug nutzen und zusätzlich Steuern und Sozialabgaben hinterziehen. Außerdem benötigen sie ein zweites wirtschaftliches Standbein mit hohen Profitmargen, für das der Betrieb von Taxis of genug die Grundlage ist.

    Das Taxigewerbe wie wir es kennen wird verschwinden und mit ihm die mittelständischen Vermittlungen. Nur eine kleine Gruppe von hochmotivirten und qualifizierten Unternehmen und Fahrern wird einen Nischenmarkt abdecken und in Konkurrenz zu Mietwagen und Tourismusunternehmen überleben.

    Für die Taxifahrerinnen und -fahrer, allein in Berlin dürften es um die 16.000 sein, sieht die Zukunft schlecht aus. Sie werden nach und nach auf andere Tätigkeiten umsatteln und, wenn ihnen das aufgrund von Alter oder mangelnder Qualifikation nicht gelingt, auf Dauer von Sozialhilfe und familiärer Unterstützung leben müssen.

    Bei den kommenden Verwerfungen ist der einzige Freund und Unterstützer der Taxifahrer ihre Gewerkschaft. Wohl denen, die klug genug sind, Mitglied bei Ver.di zu sein. Sie können mitreden und Einfluß nehmen, im Betrieb und bei der Gestaltung der gesellschaftlichen Änderungsprozesse.

    Es ist an Staat und Gesellschaft, Beratungs- und Umschulungsmöglichkeiten zu schaffen, für Ausstiegsszenarien und Mindestrenten zu sorgen, die ihnen ein würdiges Leben ermöglichen. Vielleicht gelingt es ja, die Gewinner zur Finanzierung des Lebens ihrer Opfer zu bewegen. Im Vergleich zu den absehbaren Profiten würde es sie nur die berühmten Peanuts kosten.

    Autonomous vehicles (AVs) are about to dramatically change the world of on-demand car services. Viewed through that lens, Uber and Lyft’s current business models are doomed to fail. Think about this…
    Big IPOs

    Uber and Lyft, the two biggest US-based on-demand car service companies, went public this year. Uber posted a $1 billion loss on revenue of $3.1 billion. That loss was in line with the company’s forecast, as Uber has called 2019 an “investment year.” Uber reported that costs were up 35% in the quarter (due in large part to the ramp-up to the IPO), but noted that gross bookings (total value of rides before expenses) were up 34%, YoY. Lyft posted quarterly losses of more than $1 billion, as it found itself, similar to Uber, in “its most money-losing year yet.” Lyft reported a loss of $1.14 billion (compared with a loss of $234.3 million in the same quarter last year), primarily due to the $894 million charge for stock-based compensation. Revenue was up 95% (to $776 million). In both cases, the market seems to have priced the expected losses into the share prices.
    The Theoretical Economics of AVs

    In theory, it costs approximately $2 per mile to put a human driver behind the wheel of a car service car. This number varies depending on a known number of variables such as the driver’s commission structure, price of insurance, time the driver is willing to spend driving, density of population in the covered area, average length of a ride, prevailing competitive landscape, and other factors.

    In theory, it will cost approximately 30 cents per mile to have an AV do the same job.

    These financial assumptions are generally espoused at conferences and summits by pundits and experts in the automotive industry. I’ve taken an average, and I’m sure the actual numbers are wrong, but let’s agree that the ratio of human cost-per-mile to AV cost-per-mile will be very large (the actual number won’t matter for this argument).

    At first glance, an extra $1.70 per mile seems irresistible. An 85 percent uptick in gross profit would get anyone’s attention. But there is more to the story.
    The On-Demand Cliché

    How many times have you heard someone say something like, “The world’s largest taxi firm, Uber, owns no cars. The world’s most popular media company, Facebook, creates no content. The world’s most valuable retailer, Alibaba, carries no stock. And the world’s largest accommodation provider, Airbnb, owns no property”?

    Meta-services like those mentioned above take advantage of inefficiencies in existing marketplaces. Uber’s first mission was to utilize the time black car drivers wasted waiting for a fare. Uber priced the service between yellow cabs and black cars, and it worked so well, Uber needed more drivers – so it invented a supply chain.

    Today, if you have a car and a commercial driver’s license and you can prove you are not an axe murderer, you can become an Uber driver. Both Lyft and Uber pivoted, and their business models have significantly changed.
    Meta-Service vs. Fleet Ownership

    The future of on-demand car services is said to include fleets of AVs. You can choose your own timeline. My guess (which will be as bad as yours) is more than three years and less than 10.

    Let’s assume that Uber and Lyft have become the de facto ways to get from place to place in certain areas and the companies need to purchase (or lease) 200,000 AVs to augment their human-driven fleets. (Again, choose any large number of AVs; it won’t matter for this argument).

    Owning a car is quite different from paying for a percentage of someone’s time because that person has a car and chooses to drive it for you. When you own the car, you are responsible for fuel, insurance, maintenance, loan or lease payments, storage when not in use (parking, charging, etc.) – the list goes on and on.

    All of a sudden, an on-demand car service transforms from a meta-service profiting from inefficiencies in the marketplace to a good, old-fashioned rental car fleet with some software that makes short-term, point-to-point rentals (on-demand rides) possible.

    If you want to understand the economics of owning a fleet of vehicles, you don’t have to work very hard. It’s a mature business, and no publicly traded fleet owner is enjoying valuations that are anything like an 8x-plus multiple on revenue.
    Strategies for the Future

    There’s a lot to love about on-demand car service! I love Uber and Lyft. I use them multiple time each day. The services are outstanding. You rate the drivers; the drivers rate you. The cars are clean. Most drivers use Waze, so directions are not an issue.

    That said, I’m not sure how long it can last. Prices are artificially low because in certain markets there are subsidized price wars. There is zero loyalty because the services are completely undifferentiated. If Uber says 14 min and Lyft says 5 min, you cancel Uber and go with Lyft. If Lyft turns out to then really say 12 min, you open Uber and check again. And on and on. Any car you get is likely to have both a Lyft and an Uber sticker in the window, which is the definition of undifferentiated.

    So, future strategies will have to include all kinds of other on-demand services or some as yet undefined strategic direction. Or perhaps something different will happen.
    My Best Guess

    I think Uber and Lyft will get acquired – or simply replaced – by Big Auto (BMW, Daimler, Ford, or GM, for example). Here’s why.

    Big Auto already has a nationwide dealer network to store and maintain a massive fleet of AVs. There are car dealerships in every town in America. Big Auto manufactures the vehicles, so ride-sharing or on-demand service (short-term rentals) is actually a great way to maximize the profit on any particular vehicle. Why sell it once at the lowest possible price through a two-step distribution model when you can rent it over and over again at a profit?

    For Uber and Lyft to accomplish the same thing, they would have to pay the full markup on the purchase (Big Auto knows how to sell fleet vehicles). Uber and Lyft would get a discount for volume, but nothing like the margins Big Auto could accomplish for itself. Then, the on-demand car services are going to have to acquire the infrastructure to store and maintain the vehicles. Where will that money come from? I just don’t see Uber and Lyft transforming from meta-services to fleet owners in a profitable way. But the path for Big Auto seems clear.

    When will this happen? I don’t know, but the current business models for Uber and Lyft are probably not sustainable. Funding their AV evolution looks even less likely. On the other hand, perhaps Uber or Lyft will purchase one of the Big Auto manufacturers. That would take the word “disruption” to another level entirely.

    ##Uber #disruption

  • Le naufrage d’Alstom va-t-il entraîner Macron ? (Sputnik)
    https://www.crashdebug.fr/actualites-france/16106-le-naufrage-d-alstom-va-t-il-entrainer-macron-sputnik

    Des intermédiaires de la vente d’Alstom qui apparaissent dans le financement de la campagne d’Emmanuel Macron, un ex-conseiller responsable de la vente du fleuron français aux Américains à la tête de GE France : des éléments à charges contre l’ancien secrétaire général adjoint puis ministre de l’Économie de François Hollande se précisent.

    « Je reste persuadé que l’affaire Alstom est une affaire extrêmement grave, qu’elle a mis en péril un fleuron de l’industrie française et je souhaite qu’aujourd’hui, où l’on voit que General Electric se dégage, notamment du site de Belfort, nous puissions nationaliser à nouveau la partie nucléaire et hydraulique et que même nous puissions avoir le contrôle de ce qui s’est passé sur les turbines à gaz. Car aujourd’hui on sait avec sérieux que General Electric a transmis à ses usines (...)

  • (20+) La justice s’intéresse aux conditions de la vente d’Alstom Energie à GE - Libération
    https://www.liberation.fr/france/2019/06/05/la-justice-s-interesse-aux-conditions-de-la-vente-d-alstom-energie-a-ge_1


    Emmanuel Macron lors d’une visite le 28 mai 2015 aux installations d’Alstom à Belfort.
    Photo Frederick Florin. AFP

    Il y a un peu plus d’un an, le député LR d’Eure-et-Loir, Olivier Marleix, avait pointé du doigt le rôle décisif d’Emmanuel Macron dans la vente d’Alstom Energie à l’américain General Electric lorsqu’il était ministre de l’Economie sous François Hollande entre 2014 et 2016 : « En autorisant la vente d’Alstom à GE, l’Etat a failli à préserver les intérêts nationaux », accusait-il. Mais le rapport de la commission d’enquête parlementaire qu’il présidait sur « les décisions de l’Etat en matière de politique industrielle », et en particulier le dossier Alstom, avait été « neutralisé » par la majorité LREM à l’Assemblée et rangé sur une étagère. Voilà que la justice s’intéresse désormais aux circonstances de cette cession annoncée en 2014 et finalisée en 2015, a-t-on appris moins d’une semaine après l’annonce de plus d’un millier de suppressions d’emplois chez GE France. Un plan social drastique qui frappe durement Belfort et contredit complètement les engagements du groupe américain.

    Selon nos confrères de l’Obs, Olivier Marleix, qui avait saisi en janvier la justice pour qu’elle enquête sur les conditions de la vente de la branche énergie d’Alstom à GE il y a quatre ans pour près 10 milliards d’euros, a été entendu le 29 mai sur son signalement par les enquêteurs de l’Office anticorruption de la police judiciaire (Oclciff) à la demande du parquet de Paris. Ce dernier « souhaitait lui faire préciser les termes de sa dénonciation », selon une source judiciaire citée par l’hebdomadaire. Laquelle précise : « S_on signalement et ses déclarations sont désormais en cours d’analyse au parquet qui étudie les suites à donner. »
    […]
    Des affirmations que l’entourage d’Emmanuel Macron a toujours réfutées, en les qualifiant d’« _affabulations
     » et de « basses manœuvres politiques » de la part d’un parlementaire « en manque de publicité ». Dans un livre sorti lui aussi mi-janvier, le Piège américain (JC Lattès), l’ancien cadre d’Alstom au cœur de l’affaire américaine, Frédéric Pierucci, accrédite pour sa part la thèse d’un chantage du Département de la justice américain (DoJ) pour contraindre les Français à vendre la branche énergie d’Alstom à General Electric : l’abandon des poursuites pouvant remonter jusqu’au PDG d’Alstom de l’époque, Patrick Kron, aurait été négocié, selon lui, en échange de la vente forcée de l’entreprise française à GE. Le tout avec l’aval du gouvernement français de l’époque et de son ministre de l’Economie, Emmanuel Macron. Son prédécesseur à Bercy, Arnaud Montebourg, s’était lui opposé à ce deal, avant de devoir quitter le gouvernement.

  • « Facebook a induit la Commission européenne en erreur lors du rachat de WhatsApp »
    https://www.lemonde.fr/economie/article/2019/06/03/facebook-a-induit-la-commission-europeenne-en-erreur-lors-du-rachat-de-whats

    Pour Tommaso Valletti, économiste en chef de la direction de la concurrence de la Commission européenne, de tels rachats doivent être mieux analysés. Tommaso Valletti, économiste en chef de la direction de la concurrence de la Commission européenne, propose que les rachats d’entreprises dans le numérique – comme ceux de WhatsApp et Instagram par Facebook – soient examinées de façon « beaucoup plus stricte » par les autorités antitrust. Professeur à l’Imperial College Business School de Londres, cet (...)

    #Apple #Google #Orange #Waze #Amazon #Facebook #Instagram #WhatsApp #manipulation #Android #procès #[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données_(RGPD)[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation_(GDPR)[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation_(GDPR) #domination (...)

    ##[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données__RGPD_[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_ ##BigData

  • A Belfort, les syndicats de General Electric se préparent à un mouvement dur
    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/economie/300519/belfort-les-syndicats-de-general-electric-se-preparent-un-mouvement-dur

    Encore sous le choc de l’annonce de la suppression de plus de 1 000 postes, essentiellement dans l’activité gaz de General Electric à Belfort, les syndicats démontent l’argumentaire fallacieux de Bruno Le Maire pour justifier le plan #SOCIAL. Ils préviennent que la colère des salariés de Belfort est immense.

    #turbines_à_gaz,_Alstom,_Belfort,_GE,_Emmanuel_Macron,_plan_social

  • 1000 #emplois supprimés par General Electric : l’histoire d’un #piège américain et d’une #trahison française
    http://www.lefigaro.fr/vox/politique/1000-emplois-supprimes-par-general-electric-l-histoire-d-un-piege-americain

    Quels enseignements tirer de cette catastrophe ? Tout d’abord, le rappel du caractère fondamentalement prédateur des #États-Unis d’Amérique, un État qui n’hésite pas à mettre sa puissance financière et militaire au service direct de ses #multinationales. Ensuite, les désastres provoqués par la #cupidité du #capitalisme français, privilégiant avec constance les profits financiers à court terme aux stratégies industrielles. L’#oligarchie française a cédé aux sirènes des marchés et des analystes financiers, notamment en démantelant les grands conglomérats industriels comme la CGE ou Thomson, à qui elle reprochait d’utiliser les profits des branches en bonne santé pour aider celles qui traversaient de mauvaises passes à se redresser. Soumis à l’#idéologie néo-libérale, donnant la priorité à la #dérégulation et à la « concurrence libre et non faussée », protestant comme le fit Lionel Jospin que « l’État ne peut pas tout », l’État a encouragé en France ces tendances suicidaires.

    Enfin, la clarté est faite quant à la complicité entre Emmanuel #Macron et GE tout au long de cette affaire, jusqu’au point où c’est son conseiller industrie lors du rachat qui est nommé à la tête de GE France pour mettre en œuvre le plan de restructuration…

    #France

    • Waw ! Le capitalisme français cupide et le néolibéralisme contre les pays dans le Fig’ !

      Jean-Charles Hourcade est ingénieur, polytechnicien, ancien Directeur Général Adjoint du groupe Thomson, ancien Directeur Général de France Brevets. Il est responsable Industrie de République Souveraine.

      La #collusion dont il parle est plus claire ici.

      Quand on sait que le même Hugh Bailey était précédemment le conseiller pour les affaires industrielles d’Emmanuel Macron à l’époque où il était ministre de l’Économie et avait piloté la vente à GE de la branche énergie d’Alstom (chaudières et turbines de génération électrique), il est urgent de revenir sur la genèse de ce nouveau coup dur et d’en tirer tous les enseignements pour préparer au mieux la riposte.

      En septembre 2015, c’est à l’issue d’un véritable thriller politico-industriel que GE prenait le contrôle de la division Energie d’Alstom, signant ainsi l’un des pires revers stratégiques qu’ait connu la France en 150 ans d’histoire industrielle.

  • Quantcast, la société derrière les fenêtres qui vous assurent que « le respect de votre vie privée est notre priorité »
    https://www.lemonde.fr/pixels/article/2019/05/25/quantcast-la-societe-derriere-les-fenetres-vous-assurant-que-le-respect-de-v

    Un an après l’entrée en vigueur du règlement européen RGPD sur la vie privée, de très nombreux sites ont recours à un service de cette société, pourtant peu connue pour recueillir votre consentement. C’est un sigle qui a pris beaucoup d’importance il y a un an, le 25 mai 2018, lorsque le règlement européen sur la protection des données personnelles (RGPD) est entré en vigueur. CMP, pour Consent Management Platform (« plate-forme de gestion du consentement »). Comme Monsieur Jourdain la prose, quasiment (...)

    #Quantcast #[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données_(RGPD)[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation_(GDPR)[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation_(GDPR) #BigData #publicité (...)

    ##[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données__RGPD_[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_ ##publicité ##données

  • General Electric supprime plus de 1000 emplois à Belfort (Le Figaro)
    https://www.crashdebug.fr/actualites-france/16074-general-electric-supprime-plus-de-1000-emplois-a-belfort-le-figaro

    Crédits photo : SEBASTIEN BOZON/AFP

    VIDÉO - Sur les 4000 emplois de l’usine de Belfort, 1044 vont être supprimés. Emmanuel Macron a affirmé mardi que le gouvernement s’assurerait que les engagements pris par GE en 2015 seraient tenus.

    À Belfort, c’est la douche froide. Les salariés de General Electric (GE) et les élus locaux savaient qu’un plan social était inévitable, mais celui dévoilé mardi matin par le conglomérat américain est pire qu’ils ne l’imaginaient. Ils s’attendaient à la disparition de 800 à 1 000 emplois, alors que GE annonce vouloir finalement en supprimer 1 044 : 792 dans la branche des turbines à gaz, en difficulté, et 252 dans les services supports de ces activités (informatique, comptabilité…).

    C’est un quart des effectifs totaux du groupe américain dans le département (4 300 personnes) et (...)

    #En_vedette #Actualités_françaises

  • En réponse au plan social, les salariés de Général Electric à Belfort prônent la réindustrialisation
    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/280519/en-reponse-au-plan-social-les-salaries-de-general-electric-belfort-pronent

    La crainte que nourrissaient les salariés de GE à Belfort était justifiée. Le groupe américain, repreneur de la branche énergie d’Alstom en 2015, a annoncé mardi 28 mai la suppression de 1 044 postes en France. Un plan social inévitable, faute de débouchés, selon le ministre des finances. Les syndicats dénoncent un mensonge, assurant que le site a tout pour se réinventer un destin industriel.

    #INDUSTRIE #Alstom,_Bruno_Le_Maire,_énergie,_General_Electric,_industrie,_Emmanuel_Macron,_turbines_à_gaz,_plan_social,_GE,_Belfort

  • Responsabiliser Facebook : mission impossible ?
    https://www.alternatives-economiques.fr/responsabiliser-facebook-mission-impossible/00089298

    C’est avec solennité qu’Emmanuel Macron a lancé hier, aux côtés de la première ministre néo-zélandaise Jacinda Ardern, l’appel de Christchurh. Référence directe à l’attentat ayant fait 51 morts dans ce pays et filmé et diffusé en direct sur Facebook, cet appel presse gouvernements et fournisseurs de service en ligne d’agir pour supprimer plus efficacement les contenus terroristes et extrêmistes violents en ligne. Une démarche qui fait écho à la réception à l’Elysée, cinq jours plus tôt, de Mark Zuckerberg, (...)

    #Google #Instagram #WhatsApp #Facebook #YouTube #algorithme #manipulation #domination #[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données_(RGPD)[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation_(GDPR)[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation_(GDPR) (...)

    ##[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données__RGPD_[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_ ##profiling

  • Les droits de la voix (1/2) : Quelle écoute pour nos systèmes ?
    https://linc.cnil.fr/les-droits-de-la-voix-12-quelle-ecoute-pour-nos-systemes

    Alors que nous donnons chaque jour de la voix auprès de nos interfaces, il est essentiel de faire un état des lieux des problématiques juridiques entourant le traitement de ces données éminemment personnelles. Voici le premier de nos deux articles consacrés à la question. Alors que la parole est généralement associée à une certaine volatilité – ne dit-on pas que les paroles s’envolent et que les écrits restent ? – la généralisation des usages des technologies de traitement automatique de la parole induit (...)

    #Marriott #CIA #MI5 #Amazon #Alexa #Nest #biométrie #[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données_(RGPD)[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation_(GDPR)[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation_(GDPR) #écoutes #profiling #voix #Safe_Harbor #domotique #CNIL (...)

    ##[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données__RGPD_[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_ ##Wikileaks

  • General Electric : un proche de Macron aux manettes d’un plan social « avant l’été » - Le Parisien
    http://www.leparisien.fr/economie/general-electric-un-proche-de-macron-aux-manettes-d-un-plan-social-avant-


    AFP/Sébastien Bozon

    Un plan de restructuration douloureux se prépare à Belfort où le parcours du nouveau directeur fait des vagues. Et pour cause : il a été le conseiller Industrie d’Emmanuel Macron.
    […]
    « Le plan devrait toucher 800 à 1000 salariés. Il va être annoncé après les élections européennes du 26 mai, sans doute en juin », précise le maire (LR) de Belfort Damien Merlot qui prend, depuis quelques jours, des contacts avec des entreprises pour les attirer à Belfort, berceau industriel où 4300 personnes sont employées par GE sur le plus grand site mondial de l’entreprise.

    Pour aider à la reconversion, l’État peut déjà compter sur un chèque de 50 millions d’euros qu’a dû signer GE pour ne pas avoir créé les 1000 emplois en France promis au moment du rachat d’Alstom en 2015. Mais ce ne sera sans doute pas suffisant pour calmer la colère des salariés qui mettent directement en cause dans ce drame industriel à venir la responsabilité d’Emmanuel Macron – ministre de l’Economie de 2014 à 2015 au moment du rachat d’Alstom.

    Voilà des mois que l’inquiétude grandit sur ce site spécialisé dans les turbines à gaz. Le 22 avril, Hugh Bailey, un nouveau directeur général a fait son arrivée à la tête de GE. Ce haut fonctionnaire de 39 ans, ancien conseiller Industrie au cabinet d’Emmanuel Macron à Bercy, sera chargé de piloter la saignée des prochains mois.

    Son arrivée n’a pas manqué de faire grincer des dents. « Nous l’avons rencontré le 6 mai et j’avais l’impression de parler à un ministre, vilipende un syndicaliste. Il n’a pas arrêté de faire des lapsus, disant Nous et General Electric comme s’il était encore en poste à Bercy », poursuit-il. « Ce mélange des genres est très mal vécu au niveau local », attaque aussi un élu.

  • Disparition du Salvator Mundi de Léonard de Vinci : « Notre patrimoine est vendu à la découpe »
    http://www.lefigaro.fr/vox/politique/disparition-du-salvator-mundi-de-leonard-de-vinci-notre-patrimoine-est-vend


    TOLGA AKMEN/AFP

    FIGAROVOX/ENTRETIEN - Depuis qu’il a été vendu aux enchères à un investisseur saoudien, le tableau est introuvable, alors que le Louvre est à sa recherche pour son exposition d’octobre prochain à l’occasion des 500 ans de la mort du génie italien. Le décryptage de Laurent Izard.

    Laurent Izard est normalien et agrégé de l’Université en économie et gestion. Diplômé en droit de l’Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, professeur de chaire supérieure, il est l’auteur de nombreux manuels d’enseignement supérieur en économie et gestion. Il vient de publier La France vendue à la découpe (L’Artilleur, janvier 2019), une enquête qui fait le récit d’un long renoncement et passe en revue de nombreux secteurs de l’économie française vendus à des capitaux étrangers.

    FIGAROVOX.- Le « Salvator Mundi » de Léonard de Vinci, adjugé 450 millions de dollars en 2017 à un milliardaire saoudien, a disparu depuis sa vente dans le monde de l’art. Le Louvre souhaite pourtant qu’il figure dans son exposition pour les 500 ans de la mort de Léonard de Vinci prévue cet automne. Quelle analyse faites-vous de cet incident ? Que des milliardaires d’Arabie Saoudite possèdent nos plus grands tableaux ne pose-t-il pas problème ?
    Laurent IZARD.- La situation du « Salvator Mundi » pose effectivement de nombreuses questions : qui en est aujourd’hui le véritable propriétaire ? Lors de la vente aux enchères à New York en 2017, l’adjudicataire était-il un simple mandataire ? Quelle est la localisation actuelle du tableau ?

    Pourquoi son exposition au Louvre d’Abu Dhabi prévue en septembre 2018 a-t-elle été reportée ? Pourra-t-on le contempler en octobre prochain lors de l’exposition prévue à Paris, au Louvre, en octobre 2019 ? Ces interrogations ravivent de surcroît des querelles artistiques beaucoup plus anciennes : s’agit-il réellement d’une œuvre de Léonard de Vinci ou a-t-il seulement participé à la réalisation de ce tableau ? Les œuvres du Maître font-elles partie du patrimoine artistique français ou italien ?

    Mais au-delà des controverses factuelles ou historiques, le « Salvator Mundi » est au cœur d’un débat beaucoup plus vaste, qui mêle des considérations juridiques, économiques et éthiques : d’un point de vue strictement juridique, l’acquéreur, titulaire d’un droit de propriété sur l’œuvre acquise en a l’entière maîtrise : il n’a aucune obligation d’exposer ou de prêter son bien.

    Certains invoquent le caractère perpétuel et inaliénable du droit moral sur les œuvres d’art, qui s’opposerait aux prérogatives du propriétaire. Mais il est peu probable que le droit saoudien, par exemple, valide cette limitation du droit de propriété… Et d’un point de vue économique, celui qui propose la meilleure offre devient logiquement propriétaire de l’œuvre vendue aux enchères.
    Il est néanmoins choquant qu’un particulier, quel qu’il soit, puisse avoir le bénéfice exclusif d’œuvres d’un intérêt exceptionnel comme le « Salvator Mundi ». Fort heureusement, la plupart de ces œuvres sont aujourd’hui la propriété de musées. Mais pour les autres, on peut légitimement s’interroger sur une évolution possible de leur statut juridique au regard du droit international. L’Unesco qui veille à la protection des sites d’exception du patrimoine mondial ou à la sauvegarde du patrimoine immatériel culturel de l’humanité pourrait avoir un rôle moteur en la matière.
    […]
    N’y a-t-il pas aussi dans cette affaire le reflet d’une idéologie de la privatisation et de la cession de notre patrimoine qui est à l’œuvre plus globalement ? Est-ce abusif de penser qu’Emmanuel Macron en est la figure de proue ?
    Que nous le voulions ou non, nous évoluons dans une économie ouverte et mondialisée. Mais aujourd’hui, le différentiel de potentiel financier entre acteurs économiques aboutit inéluctablement à des situations de domination voire de dépendance. Les États les plus fortunés s’approprient peu à peu le patrimoine économique et culturel d’autres pays, sans que ce phénomène inquiète la plupart de nos dirigeants, plus soucieux de la stabilité du taux de croissance ou de la préservation de l’emploi. Ainsi, en l’espace de quelques décennies, une part non négligeable du patrimoine industriel, immobilier, foncier et même historique de la France a été dispersée, souvent au profit d’investisseurs internationaux. Et même si ce processus n’en est qu’à son début, de nombreuses entreprises d’origine française sont d’ores et déjà contrôlées par des fonds d’investissement, des fonds souverains ou des firmes multinationales, principalement originaires des États-Unis, d’Allemagne, d’Asie ou du Moyen-Orient. Ce phénomène concerne tous les actifs patrimoniaux qui peuvent présenter un intérêt économique direct ou indirect : les œuvres d’art, le patrimoine immobilier, les brevets, les terres agricoles, les clubs sportifs, etc.

    Évidemment, chaque cession présente un intérêt économique, industriel ou financier pour l’acquéreur comme pour le vendeur et l’on pourrait se réjouir de l’attractivité de notre pays ainsi que de la dynamique économique impulsée par les investisseurs internationaux. D’autre part, les investisseurs français rachètent également des entreprises étrangères. Mais si le jeu n’est pas à sens unique, il n’est pas non plus équilibré. Et la dispersion de notre patrimoine nous conduit peu à peu à perdre notre souveraineté économique et politique. Nous abandonnons notre pouvoir de décision et nous devenons chaque jour un peu plus dépendants d’investisseurs internationaux fortunés, publics ou privés. Les cessions de Péchiney, Arcelor ou Alcatel - comme celles de nombreux autres groupes ou de leurs filiales - ont d’autre part contribué à la désindustrialisation de notre pays, à l’aggravation de notre déficit extérieur et à la perte d’influence de la France dans le monde.

    Emmanuel Macron, en tant que ministre de l’Économie, de l’Industrie et du Numérique, puis en tant que président de la République, a joué un rôle actif dans la cession de fleurons de notre patrimoine économique. Il a notamment autorisé la privatisation de l’aéroport de Toulouse-Blagnac - cédé à un investisseur chinois peu fiable - et a approuvé le protocole de cession de la branche « énergie » d’Alstom à General Electric, qui nous prive de notre indépendance énergétique et militaire. Face au risque hégémonique chinois lié aux « Nouvelles routes de la soie », Emmanuel Macron a toutefois appelé à « la défense d’une souveraineté européenne ». Et Bruno Le Maire, quant à lui, n’a pas hésité à parler d’ « investissements de pillage ». Prise de conscience tardive ou double jeu ? Difficile de faire la part des choses.

    En tout cas, il est peu probable que les mesures de protection de nos intérêts stratégiques prévues dans la loi « Pacte » auront une quelconque efficacité : dans un passé récent, les décrets « Villepin » et « Montebourg » ont montré leurs limites. Mais une chose est sûre : par naïveté, par faiblesse ou par couardise, nous avons jusqu’à présent toléré une totale absence de réciprocité dans l’investissement international : les entrepreneurs français qui ont tenté d’acquérir une entreprise chinoise ou américaine ne démentiront pas…