company:springer nature

  • 2019 Big Deals Survey Report- An Updated Mapping of Major Scholarly Publishing Contracts in Europe
    By Rita Morais, Lennart Stoy and Lidia Borrell-Damián
    https://eua.eu/resources/publications/829:2019-big-deals-survey-report.html

    Conducted in 2017-2018, the report gathers data from 31 consortia covering an unprecedented 167 contracts with five major publishers: Elsevier, Springer Nature, Taylor & Francis, Wiley and American Chemical Society. Readers will discover that *the total costs reported by the participating consortia exceed one billion euros for periodicals, databases, e-books and other resources – mainly to the benefit of large, commercial scholarly publishers*.

  • Publications scientifiques : la justice française ordonne aux FAI de bloquer Sci-Hub et LibGen, à la demande des éditeurs Elsevier et Springer Nature
    https://www.developpez.com/actu/253749/Publications-scientifiques-la-justice-francaise-ordonne-aux-FAI-de-bloqu

    En France, comme dans d’autres pays, #Elsevier et #Springer Nature ont donc saisi la justice pour obliger les fournisseurs d’accès internet à bloquer #Sci-Hub ainsi que #LibGen, un moteur de recherche d’articles et livres scientifiques qui facilite aussi l’accès aux contenus soumis à un péage. Les deux hébergeraient respectivement plus de 70 millions et plus de 25 millions d’articles scientifiques, d’après les éditeurs.

    Le verdict est tombé plus tôt ce mois de mars. Le tribunal de grande instance (TGI) de Paris a statué que les éditeurs ont suffisamment démontré que les plateformes Sci-Hub et LibGen sont entièrement dédiées ou quasi entièrement dédiées au piratage de leurs articles. Il a donc demandé à Orange, SFR, Free et Bouygues Telecom de mettre tout en oeuvre pour bloquer l’accès aux domaines de Sci-Hub et LibGen, soit une liste de 57 domaines (y compris des adresses de redirection). Le blocage devra être en vigueur pendant un an.

    Le tribunal estime que s’ils ne sont pas responsables du contenu auquel ils donnent accès, « les FAI et les hébergeurs sont tenus de contribuer à la lutte contre les contenus illicites, et plus particulièrement, contre la contrefaçon de droits d’auteur et droits voisins, dès lors qu’ils sont les mieux à même de mettre fin à ces atteintes ». Le TGI précise également qu’aucun texte ne s’oppose à ce que les mesures à mettre en oeuvre pour mettre fin à ces violations soient supportées par les intermédiaires techniques, c’est-à-dire ici les FAI, quand bien même ces mesures sont susceptibles de représenter pour eux un coût important. Donc le coût de la mise en oeuvre des mesures nécessaires restera à la charge des FAI.

    Même si les FAI décidaient de ne pas faire appel de cette décision, on pourrait se décider s’il est vraiment possible de bloquer ces différents sites. La réalité est qu’après de tels blocages, il y a toujours des sites miroirs qui réapparaissent. Conscients de cela, les deux éditeurs avaient demandé que les FAI surveillent la réapparition de sites miroirs et les bloquent systématiquement ; une demande que le tribunal ne leur a pas accordée. Cela veut dire que si, après avoir été bloqués, Sci-Hub et LibGen réapparaissent sous d’autres domaines, les éditeurs devront à nouveau se rendre au tribunal pour actualiser leur liste de domaines à bloquer. Ce qui prendra du temps et permettra aux sites ciblés de rester en ligne presque sans interruption.

    #savoirs #partage #publications #paywall

  • The Mystery of the Exiled Billionaire Whistle-Blower - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/10/magazine/the-mystery-of-the-exiled-billionaire-whistleblower.html

    From a penthouse on Central Park, Guo Wengui has exposed a phenomenal web of corruption in China’s ruling elite — if, that is, he’s telling the truth.

    By Lauren Hilgers, Jan. 10, 2018

    阅读简体中文版閱讀繁體中文版

    On a recent Saturday afternoon, an exiled Chinese billionaire named Guo Wengui was holding forth in his New York apartment, sipping tea while an assistant lingered quietly just outside the door, slipping in occasionally to keep Guo’s glass cup perfectly full. The tycoon’s Twitter account had been suspended again — it was the fifth or sixth time, by Guo’s count — and he blamed the Communist Party of China. “It’s not normal!” he said, about this cycle of blocking and reinstating. “But it doesn’t matter. I don’t need anyone.”

    Guo’s New York apartment is a 9,000-square-foot residence along Central Park that he bought for $67.5 million in 2015. He sat in a Victorian-style chair, his back to a pair of west-facing windows, the sunset casting craggy shadows. A black-and-white painting of an angry-looking monkey hung on the wall to Guo’s right, a hat bearing a star-and-wreath Soviet insignia on its head and a cigarette hanging from its lips. Guo had arrived dressed entirely in black, except for two silver stripes on each lapel. “I have the best houses,” he told me. Guo had picked his apartment for its location, its three sprawling balconies and the meticulously tiled floor in the entryway. He has the best apartment in London, he said; the biggest apartment in Hong Kong. His yacht is docked along the Hudson River. He is comfortable and, anyway, Guo likes to say that as a Buddhist, he wants for nothing. If it were down to his own needs alone, he would have kept his profile low. But he has a higher purpose. He is going to save China.

    Guo pitches himself as a former insider, a man who knows the secrets of a government that tightly controls the flow of information. A man who, in 2017, did the unthinkable — tearing open the veil of secrecy that has long surrounded China’s political elite, lobbing accusations about corruption, extramarital affairs and murder plots over Facebook and Twitter. His YouTube videos and tweets have drawn in farmers and shopkeepers, democracy activists, writers and businesspeople. In China, people have been arrested for chatting about Guo online and distributing T-shirts with one of his slogans printed on the front (“This is only the beginning!”). In New York, Guo has split a community of dissidents and democracy activists down the middle. Some support him. Others believe that Guo himself is a government spy.

    Nothing in Guo’s story is as straightforward as he would like it to seem. Guo is 47 years old, or 48, or 49. Although he has captured the attention of publications like The Guardian, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, the articles that have run about him have offered only hazy details about his life. This is because his biography varies so widely from one source to the next. Maybe his name isn’t even Guo Wengui. It could be Guo Wugui. There are reports that in Hong Kong, Guo occasionally goes by the name Guo Haoyun.

    When pressed, Guo claims a record of unblemished integrity in his business dealings, both in real estate and in finance (when it comes to his personal life, he strikes a more careful balance between virility and dedication to his family). “I never took a square of land from the government,” he said. “I didn’t take a penny of investment from the banks.” If you accept favors, he said, people will try to exploit your weaknesses. So, Guo claims, he opted to take no money and have no weaknesses.

    Yet when Guo left China in 2014, he fled in anticipation of corruption charges. A former business partner had been detained just days before, and his political patron would be detained a few days afterward. In 2015, articles about corruption in Guo’s business dealings — stories that he claims are largely fabrications — started appearing in the media. He was accused of defrauding business partners and colluding with corrupt officials. To hear Guo tell it, his political and business opponents used a national corruption campaign as a cover for a personal vendetta.

    Whatever prompted Guo to take action, his campaign came during an important year for China’s president, Xi Jinping. In October, the Communist Party of China (C.P.C.) convened its 19th National Congress, a twice-a-decade event that sets the contours of political power for the next five years. The country is in the throes of a far-reaching anti-corruption campaign, and Xi has overseen a crackdown on dissidents and human rights activists while increasing investment in censorship and surveillance. Guo has become a thorn in China’s side at the precise moment the country is working to expand its influence, and its censorship program, overseas.

    In November 2017, the Tiananmen Square activist Wang Dan warned of the growing influence of the C.P.C. on university campuses in the United States. His own attempts to hold “China salons” on college campuses had largely been blocked by the Chinese Students and Scholars Association — a group with ties to China’s government. Around the same time, the academic publisher Springer Nature agreed to block access to hundreds of articles on its Chinese site, cutting off access to articles on Tibet, Taiwan and China’s political elite. Reports emerged last year that China is spending hundreds of thousands of dollars quarterly to purchase ads on Facebook (a service that is blocked within China’s borders). In Australia, concerns about China’s growing influence led to a ban on foreign political donations.

    “That’s why I’m telling the United States they should really be careful,” Guo said. China’s influence is spreading, he says, and he believes his own efforts to change China will have global consequences. “Like in an American movie,” he told me with unflinching self-confidence. “In the last minutes, we will save the world.”

    Propaganda, censorship and rewritten histories have long been specialties of authoritarian nations. The aim, as famously explained by the political philosopher Hannah Arendt, is to confuse: to breed a combination of cynicism and gullibility. Propaganda can leave people in doubt of all news sources, suspicious of their neighbors, picking and choosing at random what pieces of information to believe. Without a political reality grounded in facts, people are left unmoored, building their world on whatever foundation — imaginary or otherwise — they might choose.

    The tight grip that the C.P.C. keeps on information may be nothing new, but China’s leadership has been working hard to update the way it censors and broadcasts. People in China distrusted print and television media long before U.S. politicians started throwing around accusations of “fake news.” In 2016, President Xi Jinping was explicit about the arrangement, informing the country’s media that it should be “surnamed Party.” Likewise, while the West has only recently begun to grapple with government-sponsored commenters on social media, China’s government has been manipulating online conversations for over a decade.

    “They create all kinds of confusion,” said Ha Jin, the National Book Award-winning American novelist born in China’s Liaoning Province, and a vocal supporter of Guo. “You don’t know what information you have and whether it’s right. You don’t know who are the informers, who are the agents.”

    Online, the C.P.C. controls information by blocking websites, monitoring content and employing an army of commenters widely known as the 50-cent party. The name was used as early as 2004, when a municipal government in Hunan Province hired a number of online commenters, offering a stipend of 600 yuan, or about $72. Since then, the 50-cent party has spread. In 2016, researchers from Harvard, Stanford and the University of California-San Diego estimated that these paid commenters generated 448 million social-media comments annually. The posts, researchers found, were conflict averse, cheerleading for the party rather than defending it. Their aim seemed not to be engaging in argument but rather distracting the public and redirecting attention from sensitive issues.

    In early 2017, Guo issued his first salvos against China’s ruling elite through more traditional channels. He contacted a handful of Chinese-language media outlets based in the United States. He gave interviews to the Long Island-based publication Mingjing News and to Voice of America — a live event that was cut short by producers, leading to speculation that V.O.A. had caved to Chinese government pressure. He called The New York Times and spoke with reporters at The Wall Street Journal. It did not take long, however, before the billionaire turned to direct appeals through social media. The accusations he made were explosive — he attacked Wang Qishan, Xi Jinping’s corruption czar, and Meng Jianzhu, the secretary of the Central Political and Legal Affairs Commission, another prominent player in Xi’s anti-corruption campaign. He talked about Wang’s mistresses, his business interests and conflicts within the party.

    In one YouTube video, released on Aug. 4, Guo addressed the tension between Wang and another anti-corruption official named Zhang Huawei. He recounted having dinner with Zhang when “he called Wang Qishan’s secretary and gave him orders,” Guo said. “Think about what Wang had to suffer in silence back then. They slept with the same women, and Zhang knew everything about Wang.” In addition, Guo said, Zhang knew about Wang’s corrupt business dealings. When Zhang Huawei was placed under official investigation in April, Guo claimed, it was a result of a grudge.

    “Everyone in China is a slave,” Guo said in the video. “With the exception of the nobility.”

    To those who believe Guo’s claims, they expose a depth of corruption that would surprise even the most jaded opponent of the C.P.C. “The corruption is on such a scale,” Ha Jin said. “Who could imagine that the czar of anti-corruption would himself be corrupt? It is extraordinary.”

    Retaliation came quickly. A barrage of counteraccusations began pouring out against Guo, most published in the pages of the state-run Chinese media. Warrants for his arrest were issued on charges of corruption, bribery and even rape. China asked Interpol to issue a red notice calling for Guo’s arrest and extradition. He was running out of money, it was reported. In September, Guo recorded a video during which he received what he said was a phone call from his fifth brother: Two of Guo’s former employees had been detained, and their family members were threatening suicide. “My Twitter followers are so important they are like heaven to me,” Guo said. But, he declared, he could not ignore the well-being of his family and his employees. “I cannot finish the show as I had planned,” he said. Later, Guo told his followers in a video that he was planning to divorce his wife, in order to shield her from the backlash against him.

    Guo quickly resumed posting videos and encouraging his followers. His accusations continued to accumulate throughout 2017, and he recently started his own YouTube channel (and has yet to divorce his wife). His YouTube videos are released according to no particular schedule, sometimes several days in a row, some weeks not at all. He has developed a casual, talkative style. In some, Guo is running on a treadmill or still sweating after a workout. He has demonstrated cooking techniques and played with a tiny, fluffy dog, a gift from his daughter. He invites his viewers into a world of luxury and offers them a mix of secrets, gossip and insider knowledge.

    Wang Qishan, Guo has claimed, is hiding the money he secretly earned in the Hainan-based conglomerate HNA Group, a company with an estimated $35 billion worth of investments in the United States. (HNA Group denies any ties to Wang and is suing Guo.) He accused Wang of carrying on an affair with the actress Fan Bingbing. (Fan is reportedly suing Guo for defamation.) He told stories of petty arguments among officials and claimed that Chinese officials sabotaged Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which disappeared in 2014 en route to Beijing, in order to cover up an organ-harvesting scheme. Most of Guo’s accusations have proved nearly impossible to verify.

    “This guy is just covered in question marks,” said Minxin Pei, a professor at Claremont McKenna who specializes in Chinese governance.

    The questions that cover Guo have posed a problem for both the United States government and the Western journalists who, in trying to write about him, have found themselves buffeted by the currents of propaganda, misinformation and the tight-lipped code of the C.P.C. elite. His claims have also divided a group of exiled dissidents and democracy activists — people who might seem like Guo’s natural allies. For the most part, the democracy activists who flee China have been chased from their country for protesting the government or promoting human rights, not because of corruption charges. They tell stories of personal persecution, not insider tales of bribery, sex and money. And perhaps as a consequence, few exiled activists command as large an audience as Guo. “I will believe him,” Ha Jin said, “until one of his serious accusations is proved to be false.”

    Pei, the professor, warns not to take any of Guo’s accusations at face value. The reaction from the C.P.C. has been so extreme, however, that Pei believes Guo must know something. “He must mean something to the government,” he said. “They must be really bothered by this billionaire.” In May, Chinese officials visited Guo on visas that did not allow them to conduct official business, causing a confrontation with the F.B.I. A few weeks later, according to The Washington Times, China’s calls for Guo’s extradition led to a White House showdown, during which Jeff Sessions threatened to resign if Guo was sent back to China.

    Guo has a history of cultivating relationships with the politically influential, and the trend has continued in New York. He famously bought 5,000 copies of a book by Cherie Blair, Tony Blair’s wife. (“It was to give to my employees,” Guo told me. “I often gave my employees books to read.”) Guo has also cultivated a special relationship with Steve Bannon, whom he says he has met with a handful of times, although the two have no financial relationship. Not long after one of their meetings, Bannon appeared on Breitbart Radio and called China “an enemy of incalculable power.”

    Despite Guo’s high-powered supporters and his army of online followers, one important mark of believability has continued to elude him. Western news organizations have struggled to find evidence that would corroborate Guo’s claims. When his claims appear in print, they are carefully hedged — delivered with none of his signature charm and bombast. “Why do you need more evidence?” Guo complained in his apartment. “I can give them evidence, no problem. But while they’re out spending time investigating, I’m waiting around to get killed!”

    The details of Guo’s life may be impossible to verify, but the broad strokes confirm a picture of a man whose fortunes have risen and fallen with the political climate in China. To hear Guo tell it, he was born in Jilin Province, in a mining town where his parents were sent during the Cultural Revolution. “There were foreigners there,” Guo says in a video recorded on what he claims is his birthday. (Guo was born on Feb. 2, or May 10, or sometime in June.) “They had the most advanced machinery. People wore popular clothing.” Guo, as a result, was not ignorant of the world. He was, however, extremely poor. “Sometimes we didn’t even have firewood,” he says. “So we burned the wet twigs from the mountains — the smoke was so thick.” Guo emphasizes this history: He came from hardship. He pulled himself up.

    The story continues into Guo’s pre-teenage years, when he moved back to his hometown in Shandong Province. He met his wife and married her when he was only 15, she 14. They moved to Heilongjiang, where they started a small manufacturing operation, taking advantage of the early days of China’s economic rise, and then to Henan. Guo got his start in real estate in a city called Zhengzhou, where he founded the Zhengzhou Yuda Property Company and built the tallest building the city had seen so far, the Yuda International Trade Center. According to Guo, he was only 25 when he made this first deal.

    The string of businesses and properties that Guo developed provide some of the confirmable scaffolding of his life. No one disputes that Guo went on to start both the Beijing Morgan Investment Company and Beijing Zenith Holdings. Morgan Investment was responsible for building a cluster of office towers called the Pangu Plaza, the tallest of which has a wavy top that loosely resembles a dragon, or perhaps a precarious cone of soft-serve ice cream. Guo is in agreement with the Chinese media that in buying the property for Pangu Plaza, he clashed with the deputy mayor of Beijing. The dispute ended when Guo turned in a lengthy sex tape capturing the deputy mayor in bed with his mistress.

    There are other details in Guo’s biography, however, that vary from one source to the next. Guo says that he never took government loans; Caixin, a Beijing-based publication, quoted “sources close to the matter” in a 2015 article claiming that Guo took out 28 loans totaling 588 million yuan, or about $89 million. Guo, according to Caixin, eventually defaulted. At some point in this story — the timeline varies — Guo became friends with the vice minister of China’s Ministry of State Security, Ma Jian. The M.S.S. is China’s answer to the C.I.A. and the F.B.I. combined. It spies on civilians and foreigners alike, conducting operations domestically and internationally, amassing information on diplomats, businessmen and even the members of the C.P.C. Describing Ma, Guo leans back in his chair and mimes smoking a cigarette. “Ma Jian! He was fat and his skin was tan.” According to Guo, Ma sat like this during their first meeting, listening to Guo’s side of a dispute. Then Ma told him to trust the country. “Trust the law,” he told Guo. “We will treat you fairly.” The older master of spycraft and the young businessman struck up a friendship that would become a cornerstone in Guo’s claims of insider knowledge, and also possibly the reason for the businessman’s downfall in China.

    Following the construction of Pangu Plaza in Beijing, Guo’s life story becomes increasingly hard to parse. He started a securities business with a man named Li You. After a falling-out, Li was detained by the authorities. Guo’s company accused Li and his company of insider trading. According to the 2015 article in Caixin, Li then penned a letter to the authorities accusing Guo of “wrongdoing.”

    As this dispute was going on, China’s anti-​corruption operation was building a case against Ma Jian. In Guo’s telling, Ma had long been rumored to be collecting intelligence on China’s leaders. As the anti-corruption campaign gained speed and officials like Wang Qishan gained power, Ma’s well of intelligence started to look like a threat. It was Guo’s relationship with Ma, the tycoon maintains, that made officials nervous. Ma was detained by the authorities in January 2015, shortly after Guo fled the country. Soon after Ma’s detention, accounts began appearing in China’s state-run media claiming that Ma had six Beijing villas, six mistresses and at least two illegitimate sons. In a 2015 article that ran in the party-run newspaper The China Daily, the writer added another detail: “The investigation also found that Ma had acted as an umbrella for the business ventures of Guo Wengui, a tycoon from Henan Province.”

    In the mix of spies, corrupt business dealings, mistresses and sex scandals, Guo has one more unbelievable story to tell about his past. It is one reason, he says, that he was mentally prepared to confront the leaders of the Communist Party. It happened nearly 29 years ago, in the aftermath of the crackdown on Tiananmen Square. According to Guo, he had donated money to the students protesting in the square, and so a group of local police officers came to find him at his home. An overzealous officer fired off a shot at Guo’s wife — at which point Guo’s younger brother jumped in front of the bullet, suffering a fatal wound. “That was when I started my plan,” he said. “If your brother had been killed in front of your eyes, would you just forget it?” Never mind the fact that it would take 28 years for him to take any public stand against the party that caused his brother’s death. Never mind that the leadership had changed. “I’m not saying everyone in the Communist Party is bad,” he said. “The system is bad. So what I need to oppose is the system.”

    On an unusually warm Saturday afternoon in Flushing, Queens, a group of around 30 of Guo’s supporters gathered for a barbecue in Kissena Park. They laid out a spread of vegetables and skewers of shrimp and squid. Some children toddled through the crowd, chewing on hot dogs and rolling around an unopened can of Coke. The adults fussed with a loudspeaker and a banner that featured the name that Guo goes by in English, Miles Kwok. “Miles Kwok, NY loves U,” it said, a heart standing in for the word “loves.” “Democracy, Justice, Liberty for China.” Someone else had carried in a life-size cutout of the billionaire.

    The revelers decided to hold the event in the park partly for the available grills but also partly because the square in front of Guo’s penthouse had turned dangerous. A few weeks earlier, some older women had been out supporting Guo when a group of Chinese men holding flags and banners showed up. At one point, the men wrapped the women in a protest banner and hit them. The park was a safer option. And the protesters had learned from Guo — it wasn’t a live audience they were hoping for. The group would be filming the protest and posting it on social media. Halfway through, Guo would call in on someone’s cellphone, and the crowd would cheer.

    Despite this show of support, Guo’s claims have divided China’s exiled dissidents to such an extent that on a single day near the end of September, two dueling meetings of pro-democracy activists were held in New York, one supporting Guo, the other casting doubt on his motivations. (“They are jealous of me,” Guo said of his detractors. “They think: Why is he so handsome? Why are so many people listening to him?”) Some of Guo’s claims are verifiably untrue — he claimed in an interview with Vice that he paid $82 million for his apartment — and others seem comically aggrandized. (Guo says he never wears the same pair of underwear twice.) But the repercussions he is facing are real.

    In December, Guo’s brother was sentenced to three years and six months in prison for destroying accounting records. The lawsuits filed against Guo for defamation are piling up, and Guo has claimed to be amassing a “war chest” of $150 million to cover his legal expenses. In September, a new set of claims against Guo were made in a 49-page document circulated by a former business rival. For Ha Jin, Guo’s significance runs deeper than his soap-opera tales of scandal and corruption. “The grand propaganda scheme is to suppress and control all the voices,” Jin said. “Now everybody knows that you can create your own voice. You can have your own show. That fact alone is historical.” In the future, Jin predicts, there will be more rebels like Guo. “There is something very primitive about this, realizing that this is a man, a regular citizen who can confront state power.”

    Ho Pin, the founder of Long Island’s Mingjing News, echoed Jin. Mingjing’s reporters felt that covering Guo was imperative, no matter the haziness of the information. “In China, the political elite that Guo was attacking had platforms of their own,” Ho said. “They have the opportunity, the power and the ability to use all the government’s apparatus to refute and oppose Guo Wengui. So our most important job is to allow Guo Wengui’s insider knowledge reach the fair, open-minded people in China.” Still, people like Pei urge caution when dealing with Guo’s claims. Even Guo’s escape raises questions. Few others have slipped through the net of China’s anti-corruption drive. “How could he get so lucky?” Pei asked. “He must have been tipped off long before.”

    At the barbecue, a supporter named Ye Rong tucked one of his children under his arm and acknowledged that Guo’s past life is riddled with holes. There was always the possibility that Guo used to be a thug, but Ye didn’t think it mattered. The rules of the conflict had been set by the Communist Party. “You need all kinds of people to oppose the Chinese government,” Ye said. “We need intellectuals; we also need thugs.”

    Guo, of course, has his own opinions about his legacy. He warned of dark times for Americans and for the world, if he doesn’t succeed in his mission to change China. “I am trying to help,” he told me. “I am not joking with you.” He continued: “I will change China within the next three years. If I don’t change it, I won’t be able to survive.”
    Correction: Jan. 12, 2018

    An earlier version of this article misidentified the name of the province where the Chinese government hired online commenters in 2004. It is Hunan Province, not Henan.

    #Chine #politique #corruption #tireurs_d_alarme

  • Quand les scientifiques se révoltent contre les géants de l’édition savante Marco Fortier - 25 Janvier 2019 - Le Devoir
    https://www.ledevoir.com/societe/education/546298/rebellion-contre-une-revue-predatrice

    Les 27 membres du comité éditorial du magazine « Journal of Informetrics » — qui proviennent d’universités établies dans 11 pays — ont démissionné en bloc, le 10 janvier, pour protester contre les pratiques commerciales jugées abusives de leur éditeur Elsevier.

    La bataille du milieu scientifique contre les géants de l’édition savante gagne en intensité. Le comité éditorial d’un des magazines les plus prestigieux, publié par le conglomérat Elsevier, vient de démissionner en bloc pour fonder sa propre publication, qui offrira tous ses articles en libre accès, loin des tarifs exorbitants exigés par les revues dites « prédatrices ».

    Ce coup d’éclat fait grand bruit dans le monde normalement feutré de l’édition scientifique. Les 27 membres du comité éditorial du magazine Journal of Informetrics qui proviennent d’universités établies dans 11 pays ont démissionné en bloc, le 10 janvier, pour protester contre les pratiques commerciales jugées abusives de leur éditeur Elsevier. Ils ont lancé dès le lendemain leur propre revue savante, Quantitative Science Studies, https://www.mitpressjournals.org/loi/qss qui vise à devenir la nouvelle référence dans le monde pointu de la recherche en bibliométrie.

    « C’est une grande décision : on saborde la revue qui est la plus prestigieuse dans la discipline et on lance notre propre publication », dit Vincent Larivière, professeur à l’École de bibliothéconomie et des sciences de l’information de l’Université de Montréal.

    M. Larivière a été nommé éditeur intérimaire (et bénévole) du nouveau magazine. Il est un des meneurs de cette rébellion contre le géant Elsevier, plus important éditeur scientifique de la planète, qui a fait des profits de 1,2 milliard $US en 2017 https://www.relx.com/~/media/Files/R/RELX-Group/documents/reports/annual-reports/relx2017-annual-report.pdf en hausse de 36 %.

    « Ça fait des années qu’on dénonce les pratiques de l’industrie de l’édition scientifique. Il faut être cohérents et reprendre le contrôle de nos publications », explique le professeur, qui est titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada sur les transformations de la communication savante.

    Contre une « arnaque »
    Vincent Larivière n’hésite pas à parler d’une « arnaque » lorsqu’il décrit les pratiques commerciales des cinq plus grands éditeurs scientifiques, qui publient plus de la moitié des articles savants dans le monde. Ces cinq conglomérats — les groupes Elsevier, Springer Nature, John Wiley Sons, Taylor Francis et Sage Publications — étouffent littéralement les bibliothèques universitaires en accaparant entre 70 et 80 % des budgets d’acquisition. Le problème est si grave que plusieurs bibliothèques n’ont plus les moyens d’acheter des livres, a rapporté Le Devoir en juin dernier https://www.ledevoir.com/societe/education/531214/les-geants-de-l-edition-etouffent-les-bibliotheques .

    Le modèle d’affaires de ces géants est simple : ils obtiennent gratuitement leurs articles, qu’ils revendent à gros prix aux bibliothèques universitaires. Les chercheurs ne sont pas payés pour leur travail. Les textes sont aussi révisés gratuitement par des pairs. Les bibliothèques universitaires n’ont pas le choix de s’abonner aux périodiques savants pour que professeurs et étudiants aient accès à la littérature scientifique.

    Plus préoccupant encore, les grands éditeurs font payer des milliers de dollars aux chercheurs qui veulent publier leurs articles en libre accès. Ce modèle d’affaires est remis en question avec de plus en plus de véhémence dans les universités de partout dans le monde.

    Appui du MIT
    Le nouveau magazine fondé par les 27 professeurs de bibliométrie, le Quantitative Science Studies, sera ainsi publié en collaboration avec l’éditeur du prestigieux Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Il s’agit d’une association toute « naturelle », indique au Devoir Nick Lindsay, directeur des périodiques et des données ouvertes chez MIT Press.

    « Nous sommes déterminés à trouver des façons de publier davantage de livres et de journaux sur le modèle du libre accès », précise-t-il. MIT Press a publié à ce jour une centaine de livres et huit périodiques en données ouvertes, donc accessibles gratuitement.

    La fondation de la Bibliothèque nationale de science et technologie d’Allemagne s’est aussi engagée à verser 180 000 euros (272 772 $CAN) sur trois ans au nouveau magazine.

    Les membres du comité éditorial du Journal of Informetrics ont négocié en vain durant plus d’un an et demi avec Elsevier dans l’espoir de changer le modèle d’affaires du magazine, explique Vincent Larivière. Ils tenaient notamment à baisser les frais de 1800 $US exigés des chercheurs qui veulent publier en libre accès (le nouveau Quantitative Science Studies facturera entre 600 $ et 800 $ aux auteurs).

    Ils voulaient aussi que les références citées dans le texte soient offertes gratuitement, ce qu’Elsevier a refusé — et que la nouvelle publication offrira.

    Le comité éditorial voulait d’abord et avant tout que la société savante de la discipline — l’International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics (ISSI) — devienne propriétaire du magazine, ce qui n’était « pas négociable », a indiqué Elsevier dans une longue déclaration publiée le 15 janvier https://www.elsevier.com/connect/about-the-resignation-of-the-journal-of-informetrics-editorial-board .

    « Il arrive parfois que les comités éditoriaux et les éditeurs aient des opinions divergentes au sujet de l’avenir et de la direction d’un journal. Dans certains cas, une entente ne peut être conclue. Le comité éditorial peut décider d’offrir ses services ailleurs, surtout s’il reçoit du soutien financier », a écrit Tom Reller, vice-président aux communications chez Elsevier.

    « Toute démission d’un comité éditorial est malheureuse », ajoute-t-il, mais l’éditeur conserve des relations fructueuses avec les membres des dizaines d’autres publications de l’entreprise. Il y a trois ans, le comité éditorial du magazine Lingua, propriété du groupe Elsevier, avait claqué la porte dans des circonstances similaires. Lingua a survécu. Son nouveau concurrent aussi.

    #elsevier #édition_scientifique #université #recherche #open_access #science #publications_scientifiques #résistance #publications #business #partage #articles_scientifiques #savoir #édition #openaccess #Informetrics #bibliométrie #édition_scientifique #rébellion #libre_accès #Springer_Nature #John_Wiley_Sons #Taylor_Francis #Sage_Publications #racket #escroqueries #MIT #universités

  • #Paywall : The Business of Scholarship

    Paywall: The Business of Scholarship, produced by #Jason_Schmitt, provides focus on the need for open access to research and science, questions the rationale behind the $25.2 billion a year that flows into for-profit academic publishers, examines the 35-40% profit margin associated with the top academic publisher Elsevier and looks at how that profit margin is often greater than some of the most profitable tech companies like Apple, Facebook and Google. For more information please visit: Paywallthemovie.com


    https://vimeo.com/273358286

    #édition_scientifique #université #documentaire #film #elsevier #profit #capitalisme #savoir #impact_factor #open_access
    signalé par @fil, que je remercie

    –-----------

    Quelques citations du tirés du film...

    John Adler, prof. Standford University :

    “Publishing is so profitable, because the workers dont’ get paid”

    Paul PETERS, CEO #Hindawi :

    “The way we are adressing the problem is to distinguish the assessment of an academic from the journals in which they publish. And if you’re able to evaluate academics based on the researchers they produce rather than where their research has been published, you can then start to allow researchers to publish in journals that provide better services, better access”

    Paul PETERS, CEO Hindawi :

    “Journals that are highly selective reject work that is perfectly publishable and perfectly good because it is not a significant advance, it’s not gonna made the headline as papers on disease or stemcells”

    Alexandra Elbakyan :

    “Regarding the company itself (—> Elsevier), I like their slogan ’Making Uncommon Knowledge Common’ very much. But as far as I can tell, Elsevier has not mastered this job well. And sci-hub is helping them, so it seems, to fulfill their mission”

    • je suis tres surpris par un point mentionne plusieurs fois : il faut que la recherche sur la sante, le rechauffement climatique, etc, bref, tout ce qui a « un vrai impact » soit ouvert, parce qu’il y a des vrais problemes, et donc il faut du monde pour y participer.... Mais je n’ai pas entendu grand chose sur la recherche fondamentale... Je ne sais pas si ca tient du fait que la recherche fondamentale etant moins « remuneratrice », le probleme est moins flagrant... Mais ca me met mal a l’aise cette separation entre « les vrais problemes de la vie » et les questions fondamentales qui n’interessent pas grand monde....

    • The Oligopoly of Academic Publishers in the Digital Era

      The consolidation of the scientific publishing industry has been the topic of much debate within and outside the scientific community, especially in relation to major publishers’ high profit margins. However, the share of scientific output published in the journals of these major publishers, as well as its evolution over time and across various disciplines, has not yet been analyzed. This paper provides such analysis, based on 45 million documents indexed in the Web of Science over the period 1973-2013. It shows that in both natural and medical sciences (NMS) and social sciences and humanities (SSH), Reed-Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Springer, and Taylor & Francis increased their share of the published output, especially since the advent of the digital era (mid-1990s). Combined, the top five most prolific publishers account for more than 50% of all papers published in 2013. Disciplines of the social sciences have the highest level of concentration (70% of papers from the top five publishers), while the humanities have remained relatively independent (20% from top five publishers). NMS disciplines are in between, mainly because of the strength of their scientific societies, such as the ACS in chemistry or APS in physics. The paper also examines the migration of journals between small and big publishing houses and explores the effect of publisher change on citation impact. It concludes with a discussion on the economics of scholarly publishing.

      https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0127502

    • L’accès ouvert, un espoir qui donne le vertige…

      Les années 2018 et 2019 marquent une étape importante dans la politique scientifique de l’accès ouvert. Avec #Horizon_2020, l’Europe a annoncé l’obligation d’assurer le libre accès aux publications issues des projets de recherche qu’elle finance. En septembre 2018 #cOALition_S, un consortium européen d’établissements de financement de la recherche (l’ANR pour la France), soutenu par la commission européenne et l’ERC, publie les 10 principes de son Plan S. L’objectif est clairement désigné : “d’ici 2020, les publications scientifiques résultant de recherches financées par des subventions publiques accordées par les conseils de recherche et organismes de financement nationaux et européens participants doivent être publiées dans des journaux Open Access conformes ou sur des plates-formes Open Access conformes.”

      Le problème est que l’expression « #open_access » peut recouvrir des modèles économiques très différents : le “#green_open_access” (auto-archivage par l’auteur de ses travaux), le “#gold_open_access”, avec toute l’ambiguïté qu’il comporte puisque pour Couperin, il inclut aussi bien les articles dans des revues à comité de lecture en accès ouvert pour les lecteurs, payé par les auteurs avec des APC (Article processing charges) que le modèle Freemium OpenEdition, sans coût pour les auteurs ou encore les revues intégralement en accès ouvert[i]. C’est la raison pour laquelle a été introduit un nouvel intitulé dans les modèles celui de la voie “#diamant” ou “#platine” en opposition précisément à la voie “dorée” de plus en plus identifiée comme la voie de l’auteur/payeur (#APC).

      Alors que l’objectif ne concerne à ce stade que les articles scientifiques et non les ouvrages, chapitres d’ouvrages etc., les dissensions s’affichent au grand jour et dans les médias. Pour nombre de chercheurs, le Plan S de l’Union européenne ne va pas assez loin. Ils n’hésitent pas à dénoncer ouvertement les pratiques “anticoncurrentielles” d’Elsevier en saisissant la Direction générale de la commission européenne[ii]. La maison d’édition s’est en effet engagée depuis plusieurs années dans le « tout accès ouvert »[iii]. Il faut traduire ce que signifie ce « gold open access » ainsi promu : si les lecteurs ont accès aux articles gratuitement, les auteurs paient pour être publiés des APC (« author processing charges ») dont le montant, variable, engendre des profits inédits.

      De l’autre côté, logiquement, des associations d’éditeurs et les sociétés commerciales d’édition scientifique se sont élevées contre ce plan qui semble menacer leurs intérêts. Ils ont été soutenus par au moins 1700 chercheurs qui ont signé une Lettre ouverte[iv] lancée le 28 novembre à l’Union européenne contre le plan S. En France, d’autres ont publié en octobre 2018 une tribune dans Le Monde[v] contre ce même plan, non sans quelques confusions tellement la complexité du paysage est savamment entretenue, avec des arguments plus recevables qu’on ne l’aurait pensé. Qui croire ?

      Le Consortium national des bibliothèques françaises Couperin[vi] nous apporte une information utile sur les APC sur le site d’OpenAPC qui ont été versées aux éditeurs commerciaux en 2017, par chacun des 39 grands établissements de recherche enquêtés. Au total, 4 660 887 euros ont été dépensés par ces établissements pour publier 2635 articles, soit environ 1769 euros par article[vii]. Cela vient s’ajouter aux abonnements aux bouquets de revues et aux accès aux bases de données bibliométriques (Scopus d’Elsevier, WOS de Clarivate) dont les coûts, négociés, ne sont pas publiés.

      On mesure le bénéfice que les éditeurs retirent pour chaque article en comparant ces montants avec ceux estimés pour traiter un article dans l’alternative Freemium. A Cybergeo , en incluant les coûts d’un ingénieur CNRS qui encadre l’activité de la revue, du temps moyen investi par les évaluateurs, les correcteurs bénévoles et l’éditeur, ainsi que les coûts de la maintenance de la plateforme éditoriale, nous sommes parvenus à un coût moyen de 650 euros pour un article… Si Cybergeo appliquait le coût moyen des APC, elle en retirerait un revenu de près de 100 000 euros/an !

      Le plus extraordinaire dans ces calculs est que ni les APC ni cette dernière estimation “frugale” de 650 euros/article ne prennent en compte la vraie valeur ajoutée des articles, les savoir et savoir-faire scientifiques dépensés par les auteurs et par les évaluateurs. Voilà qui devrait confirmer, s’il en était encore besoin, que la “production scientifique” est bien une activité qui ne peut décidément se réduire aux “modèles économiques” de notre système capitaliste, fût-il avancé…

      L’exigence de mise en ligne des articles en accès ouvert financés sur des fonds publics s’est donc institutionnalisée, mais on peut se demander si, loin d’alléger les charges pour la recherche publique, cette obligation ne serait pas en train d’ouvrir un nouveau gouffre de dépenses sans aucun espoir de retour sur investissement. Les bénéfices colossaux et sans risques de l’édition scientifique continuent d’aller aux actionnaires. Et le rachat en 2017 par Elsevier (RELX Group) de Bepress la plate-forme d’archives ouvertes, créée en 1999 sous le nom de Berkeley Electronic Press par deux universitaires américains de l’université de Berkeley, pour un montant estimé de 100 millions d’euros, n’est pas non plus pour nous rassurer sur le devenir du “green open access” (archives ouvertes) dans ce contexte.

      https://cybergeo.hypotheses.org/462

    • Open APC

      The #Open_APC initiative releases datasets on fees paid for Open Access journal articles by universities and research institutions under an Open Database License.

      https://treemaps.intact-project.org
      #database #base_de_données #prix #statistiques #chiffres #visualisation

      Pour savoir combien paient les institutions universitaires...


      https://treemaps.intact-project.org/apcdata/openapc/#institution

      12 millions d’EUR pour UCL selon ce tableau !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • Communiqué de presse : L’#Académie_des_sciences soutient l’accès gratuit et universel aux #publications_scientifiques

      Le 4 juillet 2018, le ministère de l’Enseignement supérieur, de la Recherche et de l’Innovation a publié un plan national pour la science ouverte, dans lequel « la France s’engage pour que les résultats de la recherche scientifique soient ouverts à tous, chercheurs, entreprises et citoyens, sans entrave, sans délai, sans paiement ». Le 4 septembre 2018, onze agences de financement européennes ont annoncé un « Plan cOAlition S(cience) » indiquant que dès 2020, les publications issues de recherches financées sur fonds publics devront obligatoirement être mises en accès ouvert.

      En 2011, 2014, 2016 et 2017, l’Académie des sciences a déjà publié des avis mentionnant la nécessité de faciliter l’accès aux publications (voir ci-dessous « En savoir plus »). Elle soutient les principes généraux de ces plans et recommande la prise en charge des frais de publications au niveau des agences de financement et des institutions de recherche. Toutefois, la mise en place concrète de ces mesures imposera au préalable des changements profonds dans les modes de publication. L’Académie des sciences attire l’attention sur le fait que ces changements dans des délais aussi courts doivent tenir compte des spécificités des divers champs disciplinaires et de la nécessaire adhésion à ces objectifs de la communauté scientifique. De nombreux chercheurs rendent déjà publiques les versions préliminaires de leurs articles sur des plates-formes ouvertes dédiées comme HAL (Hyper Articles en Ligne).

      Il est important de noter que le processus d’accès ouvert des publications ne doit pas conduire à une réduction du processus d’expertise qui assure la qualité des articles effectivement acceptés pour publication. Sans une évaluation sérieuse des publications par des experts compétents, une perte de confiance dans les journaux scientifiques serait à craindre.

      Un groupe de l’Académie des sciences travaille actuellement sur les questions soulevées par la science ouverte et un colloque sera organisé sur ce thème le 2 avril 2019 pour en débattre.


      https://www.academie-sciences.fr/fr/Communiques-de-presse/acces-aux-publications.html
      #résistance

    • Lancement de la fondation #DOAB : vers un #label européen pour les livres académiques en accès ouvert

      OpenEdition et OAPEN (Open Access Publishing in European Network, fondation implantée aux Pays-Bas) créent la fondation DOAB (Directory of Open Access Books). Cette fondation permettra de renforcer le rôle du DOAB, index mondial de référence répertoriant les ouvrages académiques en accès ouvert, et ce, notamment dans le cadre de la stratégie européenne pour le projet d’infrastructure OPERAS (Open access in the European research area through scholarly communication).


      Depuis plusieurs années les pratiques de publication en accès ouvert se multiplient en Europe du fait d’une plus grande maturité des dispositifs (archives ouvertes, plateformes de publication) et de la généralisation de politiques coordonnées au niveau des États, des financeurs de la recherche et de la Commission européenne. Ce développement du libre accès s’accompagne d’une multiplication des initiatives et des publications dont la qualité n’est pas toujours contrôlée.

      En 2003, l’Université de Lundt a créé le Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). Devenu une référence mondiale, le DOAJ garantit la qualité technique et éditoriale des revues en accès ouvert qui y sont indexées.

      En 2012 la fondation OAPEN a créé l’équivalent du DOAJ pour les livres : le Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB). Ce répertoire garantit que les livres qui y sont indexés sont des livres de recherche académique (évalués par les pairs) et en accès ouvert. Le DOAB s’adresse aux lecteurs, aux bibliothèques mais aussi aux financeurs de la recherche qui souhaitent que les critères de qualité des publications en accès ouvert soient garantis et certifiés. Il indexe aujourd’hui plus de 16 500 livres en accès ouvert provenant de 315 éditeurs du monde entier.

      En Europe, les plateformes OAPEN et OpenEdition Books structurent largement le paysage par leur étendue internationale et leur masse critique. Leur alliance constitue un événement majeur dans le champ de la science ouverte autour de la labellisation des ouvrages.

      Via la fondation DOAB, le partenariat entre OpenEdition et OAPEN permettra d’asseoir la légitimité et d’étendre l’ampleur du DOAB en Europe et dans le monde, en garantissant qu’il reflète et prenne en compte la variété des pratiques académiques dans les différents pays européens en particulier. Les deux partenaires collaborent déjà au développement technique du DOAB grâce au projet HIRMEOS financé par l’Union Européenne dans le cadre de son programme Horizon 2020.
      La création de la fondation est une des actions du Plan national pour la science ouverte adopté en 2018 par la ministre française de la Recherche, Frédérique Vidal.

      OpenEdition et OAPEN forment avec d’autres partenaires le noyau dur d’un projet de construction d’une infrastructure européenne sur leur domaine de compétence : OPERAS – Open access in the European research area through scholarly communication. Avec un consortium de 40 partenaires en provenance de 16 pays européens, OPERAS vise à proposer une offre de services stables et durables au niveau européen dont le DOAB est une part essentielle.

      Selon Eelco Ferwerda, directeur d’OAPEN : « Le DOAB est devenu une ressource essentielle pour les livres en accès ouvert et nous nous en réjouissons. Je tiens à remercier Lars Bjørnshauge pour son aide dans le développement du service et Salam Baker Shanawa de Sempertool pour avoir fourni la plateforme et soutenu son fonctionnement. Notre collaboration avec OpenEdition a été très précieuse dans l’élaboration du DOAB. Nous espérons à présent atteindre un niveau optimal d’assurance qualité et de transparence ».

      Marie Pellen, directrice d’OpenEdition déclare : « L’engagement d’OpenEdition à soutenir le développement du DOAB est l’un des premiers résultats concrets du Plan national français pour la science ouverte adopté par la ministre de la Recherche, Frédérique Vidal. Grâce au soutien conjoint du CNRS et d’Aix-Marseille Université, nous sommes heureux de participer activement à une plateforme internationale cruciale pour les sciences humaines et sociales ».

      Pour Pierre Mounier, directeur adjoint d’OpenEdition et coordinateur d’OPERAS : « La création de la Fondation DOAB est une occasion unique de développer une infrastructure ouverte dans le domaine de la publication scientifique, qui s’inscrit dans le cadre de l’effort européen d’OPERAS, pour mettre en œuvre des pratiques scientifiques ouvertes dans les sciences humaines et sociales ».
      OpenEdition

      OpenEdition rassemble quatre plateformes de ressources électronique en sciences humaines et sociales : OpenEdition Books (7 000 livres au catalogue), OpenEdition Journals (500 revues en ligne), Hypothèses (3 000 carnets de recherche), Calenda (40 000 événements publiés). Depuis 2015, OpenEdition est le représentant du DOAB dans la francophonie.

      Les principales missions d’OpenEdition sont le développement de l’édition électronique en libre accès, la diffusion des usages et compétences liées à l’édition électronique, la recherche et l’innovation autour des méthodes de valorisation et de recherche d’information induites par le numérique.
      OAPEN

      La Fondation Open Access Publishing in European Networks (OAPEN) propose une offre de dépôt et de diffusion de monographies scientifiques en libre accès via l’OAPEN Library et le Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB).

      OpenEdition et OAPEN sont partenaires pour un programme d’interopérabilité sur leur catalogue respectif et une mutualisation des offres faites par chacun des partenaires aux éditeurs.

      https://leo.hypotheses.org/15553

    • About #Plan_S

      Plan S is an initiative for Open Access publishing that was launched in September 2018. The plan is supported by cOAlition S, an international consortium of research funders. Plan S requires that, from 2020, scientific publications that result from research funded by public grants must be published in compliant Open Access journals or platforms.

      https://www.coalition-s.org

    • Les #rébellions pour le libre accès aux articles scientifiques

      Les partisans du libre accès arriveront-ils à créer une brèche définitive dans le lucratif marché de l’édition savante ?

      C’est plus fort que moi : chaque fois que je lis une nouvelle sur l’oligopole de l’édition scientifique, je soupire de découragement. Comment, en 2018, peut-on encore tolérer que la diffusion des découvertes soit tributaire d’une poignée d’entreprises qui engrangent des milliards de dollars en exploitant le labeur des scientifiques ?

      D’une main, cette industrie demande aux chercheurs de lui fournir des articles et d’en assurer la révision de façon bénévole ; de l’autre main, elle étrangle les bibliothèques universitaires en leur réclamant des sommes exorbitantes pour s’abonner aux périodiques savants. C’est sans compter le modèle très coûteux des revues « hybrides », une parade ingénieuse des éditeurs qui, sans sacrifier leurs profits, se donnent l’apparence de souscrire au libre accès − un mouvement qui prône depuis 30 ans la diffusion gratuite, immédiate et permanente des publications scientifiques.

      En effet, les journaux hybrides reçoivent un double revenu : l’abonnement et des « frais de publication supplémentaires » versés par les chercheurs qui veulent mettre leurs articles en libre accès. Autrement, leurs travaux restent derrière un mur payant, inaccessibles au public qui les a pourtant financés, en tout ou en partie, par l’entremise de ses impôts. Les grands éditeurs comme Elsevier, Springer Nature et Wiley ont ainsi pris en otage la science, dont le système entier repose sur la nécessité de publier.

      Au printemps dernier, on a assisté à une rebuffade similaire quand plus de 3 300 chercheurs en intelligence artificielle, dont Yoshua Bengio, de l’Université de Montréal, se sont engagés à ne pas participer à la nouvelle revue payante Nature Machine Intelligence.

      Un consortium universitaire allemand, Projekt DEAL, a tenté d’ébranler les colonnes du temple. Depuis deux ans, ses membres négocient avec Elsevier pour mettre fin au modèle traditionnel des abonnements négociés à la pièce, derrière des portes closes. Collectivement, les membres de Projekt DEAL veulent payer pour rendre accessibles, à travers le monde, tous les articles dont le premier auteur est rattaché à un établissement allemand. En échange, ils auraient accès à tous les contenus en ligne de l’éditeur. L’entente devrait obligatoirement être publique.

      Évidemment, cela abaisserait les prix des abonnements. Pour l’instant, Elsevier refuse toute concession et a même retiré l’accès à ses revues à des milliers de chercheurs allemands l’été dernier. La tactique pourrait toutefois se révéler vaine. Pour obtenir des articles, les chercheurs peuvent toujours demander un coup de main à leurs collègues d’autres pays, recourir à des outils gratuits comme Unpaywall qui fouillent le Web pour trouver une version en libre accès ou encore s’en remettre à Sci-Hub, un site pirate qui contourne les murs payants.

      Mais plus que la perte de ses clients, c’est l’exode de ses « fournisseurs » qui écorcherait à vif Elsevier. Déjà, des scientifiques allemands ont juré qu’ils ne contribueraient plus à son catalogue de publications – qui contient pourtant des titres prestigieux comme The Lancet et Cell.

      Au printemps dernier, on a assisté à une rebuffade similaire quand plus de 3300 chercheurs en intelligence artificielle, dont Yoshua Bengio, de l’Université de Montréal, se sont engagés à ne pas participer à la nouvelle revue payante Nature Machine Intelligence. Partisans du libre accès, ils la considèrent comme « un pas en arrière » pour l’avenir de leur discipline.

      Et puis il y a le « plan S » : début septembre, 11 organismes subventionnaires européens ont annoncé que, à partir de 2020, ils ne financeront que les scientifiques promettant de diffuser leurs résultats dans des revues en libre accès. Le plan S exclurait d’office environ 85 % des journaux savants, y compris Nature et Science.

      Ces petites rébellions déboucheront-elles sur une véritable révolution de l’édition scientifique ? Difficile à dire, mais c’est suffisant pour passer du découragement à l’espoir.

      https://www.quebecscience.qc.ca/edito/rebellions-libre-acces-articles-scientifiques

  • Contre les prix trop élevés d’accès aux publications, les scientifiques font le mur - Le Temps
    https://www.letemps.ch/sciences/contre-prix-eleves-dacces-aux-publications-scientifiques-mur

    Contre les prix trop élevés d’accès aux publications, les scientifiques font le mur

    En plein essor du libre accès aux publications scientifiques, de nouveaux outils émergent pour aider à trouver facilement – et sans payer – des articles placés derrière un coûteux « paywall » ou une autre forme d’abonnement

    Les sciences ont-elles perdu leur caractère ouvert et universel ? Le mouvement de l’open access ou accès libre, dans lequel les publications scientifiques sont disponibles gratuitement et non plus contre d’onéreux abonnements, semble en tout cas en témoigner.

    L’open access, porté par des plateformes telles que PLoS, acronyme anglais pour Bibliothèque publique des sciences, constitue une alternative aux éditeurs scientifiques classiques et privés comme Elsevier, Springer Nature ou Wiley dont les tarifs, régulièrement revus à la hausse, irritent le milieu académique qui cherche des parades.

    En 2017, le Fonds national suisse de la recherche scientifique (FNS), tout comme l’Union européenne, s’est ainsi fixé l’objectif de rendre disponible en open access, à partir de 2020, la totalité des publications scientifiques qu’il finance. Le 4 septembre, onze fonds européens de financement de la recherche ont même publié un « Plan S » qui rendra cela obligatoire. Le fonds suisse soutient ce plan mais veut l’étudier juridiquement avant de le signer.
    Abonnez-vous à cette newsletter
    Sciences

    Sans abonnement, les chercheurs et le public font face à des paywalls qui obligent à payer en moyenne une trentaine de francs par article, ou plusieurs milliers de francs pour des bouquets d’abonnements à l’année. « Pour la bibliothèque de l’Université de Genève, cela représente plus de 4,5 millions de francs par année pour l’ensemble des ressources électroniques (journaux, livres, bases de données) », estime Jean-Blaise Claivaz, coordinateur open access et données de recherche à l’Université de Genève.
    Disruption illégale

    Ce marché figé a donné des idées à certains. En 2011, Alexandra Elbakyan, une chercheuse kazakhe, a créé Sci-Hub, une plateforme qui donne accès gratuitement – et illégalement – à plus de 70 millions d’articles scientifiques. Début 2016, 164 000 articles y étaient téléchargés chaque jour.

    « Actuellement, en Suisse, il n’est pas illégal de télécharger sur Sci-Hub, le téléchargeur n’est pas punissable, explique Jean-Blaize Claivaz. A l’Université de Genève, nous pourrions arrêter tous les abonnements et utiliser Sci-Hub. Ce n’est pas une position que l’université est prête à endosser mais nous ne pourrions pas être poursuivis. »

    Une autre façon légale de contourner les paywalls des éditeurs scientifiques est de chercher l’article dans les nombreuses archives numériques ouvertes des bibliothèques. Ces dernières contournent les abonnements en permettant aux chercheurs de verser leurs propres articles et de les rendre accessibles gratuitement – quoique en une version « brouillon » dépourvue des ultimes modifications apportées par les éditeurs avant publication. Mais faire sa bibliographie sur ces plateformes reste long et fastidieux, car il faut faire ses recherches sur chaque archive.

    C’est pour pallier ce problème que sont récemment apparus de nouveaux outils capables d’automatiser le processus, des sortes de moteurs de recherche qui vont simultanément interroger un grand nombre d’archives. Certains sont à visée commerciale (Kopernio, Anywhere Access), d’autres à but non lucratif (Open Access Button, Unpaywall). Si chacun possède ses particularités, le principe est le même : face à un paywall, ces outils (qui peuvent prendre la forme d’une extension de navigateur web) se chargent de trouver une version de l’article hébergée dans une archive ouverte, quelque part dans les méandres d’internet.
    Unpaywall mis en place à Genève

    Pour Jean-Blaize Claivaz, « le côté non lucratif d’Unpaywall et la présence dans son équipe de grands noms de la scène open access attirent la sympathie et une certaine confiance de la communauté scientifique. Ça lui donne un certain avantage face à ses concurrents. »

    La bibliothèque de l’Université de Genève a d’ailleurs récemment intégré un bouton Unpaywall à son système de recherche d’article scientifique. « Nous avons comparé l’accès avec et sans Unpaywall à l’Université de Genève et nous avons constaté que cette solution augmentait l’accès à la littérature scientifique en sciences de la vie d’environ 25% », ajoute-t-il.

    Les grandes entreprises du secteur voient plutôt d’un bon œil l’arrivée de ces petits acteurs qui s’inscrivent dans une position moins radicale que Sci-Hub, qui collectent des données monétisables et qu’il est possible de racheter pour mieux contrôler.

    Kopernio a été racheté en avril par Clarivate Analytics, entreprise peu connue du grand public mais propriétaire du Web of Science, rassemblement de sept grandes bases de données bibliographiques qui est derrière le calcul du fameux facteur d’impact des journaux. Fin juillet, Elsevier et Impactstory, la société éditrice d’Unpaywall, ont conclu un accord qui permet à l’éditeur d’intégrer Unpaywall dans sa propre base de données.

    Mais ces solutions demandent toutes de faire un effort d’installation et d’intégration. Malgré ses démêlés judiciaires et pour l’heure, Sci-Hub semble rester la solution la plus simple pour accéder à l’ensemble, ou presque, de la littérature scientifique.

    #sciences

  • Reçu aujourd’hui, le 13 décembre 2017, par mailing-list du #FNS (#Fonds_national_suisse_de_la_recherche_scientifique)

    Chères requérantes, chers requérants,

    L’Open Access (OA ou libre accès) vous apporte de nombreux avantages dans la recherche : vos publications sont plus visibles et produisent davantage d’impact. Vous obtenez de plus un accès rapide et illimité aux publications de vos collègues. Grâce à l’OA, toutes les personnes intéressées peuvent en outre utiliser les résultats de la recherche, indépendamment de leur revenu et de leur lieu de résidence. L’OA démocratise l’accès à la connaissance, encourage le transfert de la connaissance dans la société et l’économie et constitue l’une des bases de la science ouverte (Open Science).

    Pour le FNS, il est clair que les résultats de la recherche financée par des fonds publics représentent un bien public. Cette conception s’impose de façon accrue dans la recherche scientifique. L’OA devient la nouvelle norme d’excellence.

    Un objectif à 100 %

    En janvier 2017, les hautes écoles suisses ont établi une stratégie OA avec le soutien du FNS. A partir de 2024, elles s’engagent à rendre librement accessible toutes les publications financées à l’aide de fonds publics. Dans ce contexte, le FNS a décidé que 100 % des publications issues de projets financés par le FNS seront en libre accès à partir de 2020, c’est-à-dire disponibles de façon illimitée, gratuites et en format numérique. Jusqu’à présent, moins de 50 % des publications financées par le FNS sont en OA.

    Comment pouvez-vous satisfaire à cette obligation de libre accès ? Vous pouvez publier votre article directement dans une revue OA ou votre livre dans le cadre d’une offre éditoriale OA. Il s’agit de l’approche « golden road ». Vous pouvez également archiver l’article ou le livre dans une base de données institutionnelle ou spécifique à une discipline. Il s’agit de la méthode « green road ».

    Le FNS finance les frais de publication pour la « #golden_road »

    Le FNS adapte sa politique d’encouragement au 1er avril 2018 (« Politique OA 2020 ») afin que nous atteignions cet objectif ensemble :

    Articles : le FNS continue de financer les frais de publications d’un article (« #Article_Processing_Charges », #APC) pour les publications sans embargo dans des revues OA. Il supprime jusqu’à nouvel ordre la limite supérieure actuelle de CHF 3000.–. Cependant, les montants APC disproportionnés peuvent être réduits.
    Livres : à partir du 1er avril 2018, le FNS finance les frais de publication d’un livre (« Book Processing Charges » BPC) pour les publications sans embargo de livres OA résultant autant des projets soutenus par le FNS que des projets sans financement du FNS.
    Chapitre de livres : le FNS finance à partir du 1er octobre 2018 les frais de « Book Chapter Processing Charge » (BCPC) lors de la publication immédiate de chapitres de livres.
    Demande de montants pour publication : à partir du 1er avril 2018, vous ne devez plus spécifier les subsides de publication comme frais imputables dans une requête. Une fois l’octroi accordé, vous pouvez déposer une demande via une plateforme OA faisant partie intégrante de mySNF. Celle-ci peut se faire à partir du 1er avril 2018 pour les BPC, et à partir du 1er octobre 2018 pour les APC et les BCPC. Cette demande est également possible au-delà du terme du projet.
    « #Green_road » : comme jusqu’à présent, vous devriez avoir déposé les articles au plus tard après six mois dans une banque de données publiquement accessible. Désormais, un délai de 12 mois au lieu de 24 s’applique aux livres. D’un point de vue du contenu, les œuvres déposées dans la base de données doivent correspondre à la version éditoriale.

    Je vous remercie de bien vouloir prendre en compte à l’avenir uniquement les maisons d’édition qui acceptent les normes pour vos publications. En outre, vous devriez veiller à ne publier aucun travail dans une revue #OA_frauduleuse (« #Predatory_journal »). En cas de doute quant à la faculté d’une revue à satisfaire les critères du libre accès, veuillez consulter la liste disponible sous thinkchecksubmit.org/check.

    Vous trouverez des informations détaillées relatives à la nouvelle « Politique OA 2020 » du FNS et aux dispositions transitoires sur notre site Internet.

    En tant que membre de la communauté scientifique, je vous encourage à apporter votre contribution à l’ouverture et à la compétitivité de la recherche suisse. Ce n’est qu’en travaillant ensemble que nous pourrons ancrer plus solidement l’Open Access dans la science et dans la population.

    Je vous remercie de votre précieuse collaboration et vous prie d’agréer, chères requérantes, chers requérants, mes salutations les meilleures.


    Prof. Matthias Egger
    Président du Conseil national de la recherche FNS

    #hypocrisie #édition_scientifique #savoir #open_access (faux) #golden_open_access #publications_scientifiques

    –-> le diable est dans le détail... et dans ce cas dans la promotion du #gold_open_access :

    La « Gold Road » : les chercheuses et chercheurs publient directement dans une revue scientifique Open Access permettant un accès électronique, libre, gratuit et immédiat à tous ses articles. Les coûts de publications, connus sous le nom de « Article Processing Charges » (APCs), sont généralement payés par l’auteur, son institution ou un autre bailleur de fonds .

    –-> je copie-colle pour que ça soit clair :

    Les coûts de publications, connus sous le nom de « Article Processing Charges » (APCs), sont généralement payés par l’auteur, son institution ou un autre bailleur de fonds

    http://www.snf.ch/fr/leFNS/points-de-vue-politique-de-recherche/open-access/Pages/default.aspx#Variantes%20de%20l%27Open%20Access

    • Voici mon message que j’ai posté sur FB (je ne sais pas si tout le monde y a accès, mais voilà, pour archivage) :

      Je viens de recevoir un message (via newsletter) du SNF FNS SNSF. Titre : "Open Access pour toutes les publications financées par le FNS : nouvelle politique"

      Et je lis :
      "Comment pouvez-vous satisfaire à cette obligation de libre accès ? Vous pouvez publier votre article directement dans une revue OA ou votre livre dans le cadre d’une offre éditoriale OA. Il s’agit de l’approche « golden road ». Vous pouvez également archiver l’article ou le livre dans une base de données institutionnelle ou spécifique à une discipline. Il s’agit de la méthode « green road »."

      Juste pour être claire, voici ce qu’est la "golden road" :
      La "Gold Road" : les chercheuses et chercheurs publient directement dans une revue scientifique Open Access permettant un accès électronique, libre, gratuit et immédiat à tous ses articles. Les coûts de publications, connus sous le nom de "Article Processing Charges" (APCs), sont généralement payés par l’auteur, son institution ou un autre bailleur de fonds.
      (http://www.snf.ch…/points-…/open-access/Pages/default.aspx…)

      Si il y a des "coûts de de publications qui sont payés par l’auteur, son institution ou un autre bailleur de fonds" à des entreprises privées (Elsevier ou Springer Shop pour ne pas les nommées) qui sont en réalité des entreprises prédatrices et qui se font des bénéfices faramineux sur les épaules des chercheurs·ses et des universités publiques, bhein, désolée, mais c’est pour moi une autre manière de piller le savoir aux universités, sous couvert de accès libre. C’est se plier aux règles du marché, contre la science, contre la connaissance, contre le savoir.

      #hypocrisie totale.

      https://www.facebook.com/cristina.delbiaggio/posts/10154830117555938

    • Contre les prix trop élevés d’accès aux publications, les scientifiques font le mur

      En plein essor du libre accès aux publications scientifiques, de nouveaux outils émergent pour aider à trouver facilement – et sans payer – des articles placés derrière un coûteux « paywall » ou une autre forme d’abonnement.

      Les sciences ont-elles perdu leur caractère ouvert et universel ? Le mouvement de l’open access ou accès libre, dans lequel les publications scientifiques sont disponibles gratuitement et non plus contre d’onéreux abonnements, semble en tout cas en témoigner.

      L’open access, porté par des plateformes telles que PLoS, acronyme anglais pour Bibliothèque publique des sciences, constitue une alternative aux éditeurs scientifiques classiques et privés comme Elsevier, Springer Nature ou Wiley dont les tarifs, régulièrement revus à la hausse, irritent le milieu académique qui cherche des parades.
      En 2017, le Fonds national suisse de la recherche scientifique (FNS), tout comme l’Union européenne, s’est ainsi fixé l’objectif de rendre disponible en open access, à partir de 2020, la totalité des publications scientifiques qu’il finance. Le 4 septembre, onze fonds européens de financement de la recherche ont même publié un « Plan S » qui rendra cela obligatoire. Le fonds suisse soutient ce plan mais veut l’étudier juridiquement avant de le signer.

      Sans abonnement, les chercheurs et le public font face à des paywalls qui obligent à payer en moyenne une trentaine de francs par article, ou plusieurs milliers de francs pour des bouquets d’abonnements à l’année. « Pour la bibliothèque de l’Université de Genève, cela représente plus de 4,5 millions de francs par année pour l’ensemble des ressources électroniques (journaux, livres, bases de données) », estime Jean-Blaise Claivaz, coordinateur open access et données de recherche à l’Université de Genève.
      Disruption illégale

      Ce marché figé a donné des idées à certains. En 2011, Alexandra Elbakyan, une chercheuse kazakhe, a créé Sci-Hub, une plateforme qui donne accès gratuitement – et illégalement – à plus de 70 millions d’articles scientifiques. Début 2016, 164 000 articles y étaient téléchargés chaque jour.

      « Actuellement, en Suisse, il n’est pas illégal de télécharger sur Sci-Hub, le téléchargeur n’est pas punissable, explique Jean-Blaize Claivaz. A l’Université de Genève, nous pourrions arrêter tous les abonnements et utiliser Sci-Hub. Ce n’est pas une position que l’université est prête à endosser mais nous ne pourrions pas être poursuivis. »

      Une autre façon légale de contourner les paywalls des éditeurs scientifiques est de chercher l’article dans les nombreuses archives numériques ouvertes des bibliothèques. Ces dernières contournent les abonnements en permettant aux chercheurs de verser leurs propres articles et de les rendre accessibles gratuitement – quoique en une version « brouillon » dépourvue des ultimes modifications apportées par les éditeurs avant publication. Mais faire sa bibliographie sur ces plateformes reste long et fastidieux, car il faut faire ses recherches sur chaque archive.

      C’est pour pallier ce problème que sont récemment apparus de nouveaux outils capables d’automatiser le processus, des sortes de moteurs de recherche qui vont simultanément interroger un grand nombre d’archives. Certains sont à visée commerciale (Kopernio, Anywhere Access), d’autres à but non lucratif (Open Access Button, Unpaywall). Si chacun possède ses particularités, le principe est le même : face à un paywall, ces outils (qui peuvent prendre la forme d’une extension de navigateur web) se chargent de trouver une version de l’article hébergée dans une archive ouverte, quelque part dans les méandres d’internet.
      Unpaywall mis en place à Genève

      Pour Jean-Blaize Claivaz, « le côté non lucratif d’Unpaywall et la présence dans son équipe de grands noms de la scène open access attirent la sympathie et une certaine confiance de la communauté scientifique. Ça lui donne un certain avantage face à ses concurrents. »

      La bibliothèque de l’Université de Genève a d’ailleurs récemment intégré un bouton Unpaywall à son système de recherche d’article scientifique. « Nous avons comparé l’accès avec et sans Unpaywall à l’Université de Genève et nous avons constaté que cette solution augmentait l’accès à la littérature scientifique en sciences de la vie d’environ 25% », ajoute-t-il.

      Les grandes entreprises du secteur voient plutôt d’un bon œil l’arrivée de ces petits acteurs qui s’inscrivent dans une position moins radicale que Sci-Hub, qui collectent des données monétisables et qu’il est possible de racheter pour mieux contrôler.

      Kopernio a été racheté en avril par Clarivate Analytics, entreprise peu connue du grand public mais propriétaire du Web of Science, rassemblement de sept grandes bases de données bibliographiques qui est derrière le calcul du fameux facteur d’impact des journaux. Fin juillet, Elsevier et Impactstory, la société éditrice d’Unpaywall, ont conclu un accord qui permet à l’éditeur d’intégrer Unpaywall dans sa propre base de données.

      Mais ces solutions demandent toutes de faire un effort d’installation et d’intégration. Malgré ses démêlés judiciaires et pour l’heure, Sci-Hub semble rester la solution la plus simple pour accéder à l’ensemble, ou presque, de la littérature scientifique.

      https://www.letemps.ch/sciences/contre-prix-eleves-dacces-aux-publications-scientifiques-mur

    • Stratégie nationale suisse Open Access

      Depuis une dizaine d’années, le mouvement Open Access est en fort développement international. Les hautes écoles et les institutions de recherche suisses s’engagent activement dans ce processus. Elles ont ainsi développé durant ces deux dernières années une stratégie nationale Open Access ainsi qu’un plan d’action pour sa mise en œuvre.

      A la demande du Secrétariat d’Etat à la formation, à la recherche et à l’innovation (SEFRI) et avec le soutien du Fonds national suisse de la recherche scientifique (FNS), swissuniversities a développé dans le courant de l’année 2016 une stratégie nationale en faveur de l’Open Access. L’Assemblée plénière de swissuniversities, la Conférence des recteurs des hautes écoles suisses, a adopté cette stratégie le 31 janvier 2017.

      La stratégie Open Access pose les principes d’une vision commune pour les hautes écoles suisses, selon laquelle toutes les publications financées par les pouvoirs publics seront en accès libre en 2024. De manière générale, toutes les publications scientifiques en Suisse devraient être en Open Access en 2024. Cette vision s’aligne sur les modèles européens actuels. Afin de mettre en œuvre cette vision, différents champs d’action ont été identifiés, visant notamment à aligner les pratiques Open Access en Suisse, renforcer les négociations avec les éditeurs, renforcer la communication et les incitatifs auprès des chercheurs ainsi qu’envisager de nouveaux modes de publication. L’analyse des flux financiers en matière de publications scientifiques réalisée par un groupe d’expert anglais sous mandat du FNS et du programme « Information scientifique » de swissuniversities recommande un modèle basé sur une approche pragmatique et flexible.
      Plan d’action Open Access

      Afin de concrétiser la stratégie nationale suisse, une deuxième étape a consisté à développer durant l’année 2017 un plan d’action qui détermine les mesures à entreprendre pour la mise en œuvre de la stratégie nationale. Le plan d’action a été élaboré en collaboration avec les différents partenaires (FNS, SEFRI, bibliothèques des hautes écoles, représentés dans un groupe de travail) au terme d’une démarche d’analyse et de consultation auprès des hautes écoles et des autres partenaires clés. Ce plan d’action a pour but de proposer aux hautes écoles suisses des pistes et solutions pour atteindre les objectifs qu’elles se sont fixés en adoptant la stratégie nationale suisse sur l’Open Access. Les mesures proposées ont pour mission de soutenir dans leur démarche en respectant leur autonomie, leurs spécificités et la diversité des disciplines et des modes de recherche.

      L’Assemblée plénière de swissuniversities a adopté le plan d’action et le Conseil des hautes écoles de la Conférence suisse des hautes écoles en a pris favorablement connaissance en février 2018, permettant ainsi de lancer les activités de mise en œuvre pour les hautes écoles suisses.

      Le travail de mise en œuvre débute maintenant, sous la coordination de swissuniversities et dans le respect de l’autonomie des hautes écoles. La stratégie nationale Open Access apparaît comme un instrument essentiel pour maîtriser le processus de transformation et optimiser l’utilisation de ces ressources.
      Publications scientifiques – Négociations avec les éditeurs internationaux

      Afin d’atteindre l’objectif selon lequel les publications financées par les pouvoirs publics doivent être en accès libre en 2024, il est indispensable de disposer d’accords avec les éditeurs scientifiques permettant une publication ouverte des articles et monographies sans que cela ne crée de surcoûts pour les hautes écoles suisses. En ce sens, le comité de swissuniversities a adopté une nouvelle stratégie en matière de négociation avec les éditeurs qui privilégie le modèle « Read & Publish ». Ce modèle prévoit que les hautes écoles financent les coûts de publication et paient un tarif fixe à la lecture/téléchargements des articles et ouvrages publiés, en remplacement des abonnements classiques dont les tarifs fluctuaient selon les revues. Cette approche sera appliquée pour les négociations avec l’éditeur Springer Nature, et il est prévu d’en faire de même avec les éditeurs Elsevier et Wiley. Dans l’intérêt de réussir le processus de transition vers l’Open Access, swissuniversities a adapté l’agenda communiqué en mars 2018 à la demande de Springer Nature et négocie une #solution_transitoire.

      https://www.swissuniversities.ch/fr/themes/politique-des-hautes-ecoles/open-access

      v. aussi le factsheet :
      https://www.swissuniversities.ch/fileadmin/swissuniversities/Dokumente/Hochschulpolitik/Open_Access/180315_Factsheets_Verhandlungsstrategie_F.pdf

  • L’éditeur scientifique Springer Nature entrerait en Bourse en 2018
    https://www.actualitte.com/article/monde-edition/l-editeur-scientifique-springer-nature-entrerait-en-bourse-en-2018/86068

    Éditeur des revues scientifiques Nature ou Scientific American, entre autres, Springer Nature envisage une introduction en Bourse en 2018, à Francfort, pour une opération de valorisation de 4 à 5 milliards €, annonce l’agence Reuters. Cette IPO aurait lieu au cours de l’été 2018, et le capital de la société serait augmenté de 700 à 800 millions €.

    Né de la fusion de Macmillan Science and Education de Holtzbrinck et de l’activité Springer de BC Partners, Springer Nature a accumulé une dette de 3 milliards €, et l’objectif de cette introduction en Bourse n’est rien de moins que la réduction de cette dette qui plombe les résultats du groupe.

    #Edition_scientifique #Conflits_intérêt #Publications_scientifiques #Springer #Nature_revue

  • Le savoir en voie de confiscation par les éditeurs

    http://www.lemonde.fr/sciences/article/2017/09/26/le-savoir-en-voie-de-confiscation-par-les-editeurs_5191764_1650684.html

    Les revues scientifiques monnaient très cher l’accès à leurs contenus. Ce modèle est très critiqué. Troisième volet de notre dossier « Publier ou périr », en collaboration avec « Le Temps ».

    A qui la connaissance scientifique appartient-elle ? Aux chercheurs qui la produisent ? Au public qui la finance par ses impôts ? Ni à l’un ni à l’autre : elle est avant tout la propriété d’éditeurs, qui publient les résultats issus de la recherche dans des revues spécialisées… et veillent jalousement sur leur diffusion. Malgré les critiques dont ce système fait l’objet, des modèles alternatifs peinent encore à s’imposer.

    Traditionnellement, les revues spécialisées qui publient les études scientifiques financent leur travail d’édition par la vente d’abonnements. Problème : ce modèle restreint beaucoup l’accès aux connaissances. « Il m’arrive de ne pas pouvoir lire un article intéressant, parce qu’il a été publié dans une revue à laquelle mon université n’est pas abonnée. Et la situation est encore bien pire pour les chercheurs des pays moins riches. Sans parler de tous les autres membres de la société que ces résultats pourraient intéresser, mais qui en sont privés : enseignants, créateurs de start-up, membres d’ONG… », s’agace Marc Robinson-Rechavi, chercheur en bio-informatique à l’université de Lausanne.

    Le système actuel est par ailleurs très coûteux. « Les contribuables paient trois fois pour chaque article scientifique. D’abord, en rémunérant le chercheur qui fait les expériences. Ensuite, en s’acquittant des frais d’abonnement aux revues. Et parfois encore une fois, pour offrir un libre accès au ­contenu de l’article », s’insurge le président de l’Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Martin Vetterli. Les frais pour les bibliothèques augmentent de 8 % en moyenne par année, d’après la Ligue européenne des bibliothèques de recherche.

    De fait, la publication scientifique est un business extrêmement rentable pour les géants du domaine, Elsevier, Springer Nature et Wiley, dont les marges dépassent souvent les 30 %, dans un marché estimé à près de 30 milliards de dollars (25 milliards d’euros).

    Un modèle d’édition alternatif a émergé voilà une vingtaine d’années : celui de l’accès ouvert (ou « open access »). Le plus souvent, les frais d’édition et de diffusion de chaque article sont payés en une seule fois à l’éditeur, par l’institution scientifique du chercheur. Les articles sont alors accessibles gratuitement.

    Des articles en accès ouvert

    De nombreux journaux en accès ouvert existent désormais. Certains sont largement reconnus pour la qualité de leur travail, à l’image du pionnier américain PLOS (ou Public Library of Science), à but non lucratif. Assez variables, les coûts de publication par article sont compris entre 1 000 et 5 000 euros en moyenne. Ce mode d’édition n’interdit donc pas les ­bénéfices pour l’éditeur. Pourtant, seuls 30 % environ des articles sont actuellement publiés en accès ouvert. Un semi-échec qui s’expliquerait par le conservatisme du milieu, estime Marc Robinson-Rechavi : « Les journaux anciens sont davantage pris en compte dans la promotion des carrières. Il faudrait que les chercheurs soient incités à changer d’état d’esprit. »

    Justement, la Commission européenne a décidé que, d’ici à 2020, toutes les études publiées par des scientifiques qui reçoivent de l’argent européen devront être diffusées en libre accès. « En France, on va aussi vers un renforcement de la publication en accès libre », affirme Marin Dacos, fondateur du portail français de diffusion de sciences humaines et sociales OpenEdition, chargé d’un plan sur la science ouverte auprès du ministère français de l’enseignement supérieur, de la recherche et de l’innovation.

    Certaines institutions scientifiques sont entrées en résistance. En Allemagne, plusieurs dizaines d’universités et bibliothèques sont en plein bras de fer avec le géant néerlandais Elsevier, pour obtenir de meilleures conditions d’accès aux articles publiés par leurs propres chercheurs. Elles menacent de ne pas renouveler leurs abonnements à la fin de l’année. Une telle stratégie avait déjà permis à l’association des universités néerlandaises d’obtenir des concessions de la part d’Elsevier il y a deux ans. Des mouvements analogues se retrouvent aussi en Finlande et à Taïwan, notamment.

    Ce n’est sans doute pas un hasard si ce vent de rébellion souffle aujourd’hui : outre le ras-le-bol lié à une situation qui perdure, l’apparition en 2011 du site pirate Sci-Hub pèse dans la balance. Opérant depuis la Russie, il offre l’accès gratuitement à plusieurs dizaines de millions d’études et de livres scientifiques. Une pratique certes illégale, et déjà condamnée aux Etats-Unis après une plainte d’Elsevier en juin, mais qui garantit que les chercheurs continueront d’avoir accès à une bonne part de la littérature scientifique, quel que soit le résultat des négociations avec les maisons d’édition.

    De petits malins ont également profité du mouvement de l’open access pour s’enrichir en créant des revues présentant toutes les apparences du sérieux. Les honoraires sont raisonnables. Le chercheur se laisse convaincre. Sauf qu’en fait, le journal n’existe pas. Ou alors, il est beaucoup moins coté que ce qu’il prétend. Ou encore, il est de piètre qualité. Ces journaux dits « prédateurs » seraient au nombre de 8 000, publiant environ 400 000 articles chaque année, selon une étude parue en 2015 dans BMC Medicine.

    Est-on arrivé à un point de bascule ? Martin Vetterli veut y croire : « Le monopole des éditeurs traditionnels va finir par tomber, à part peut-être pour certains titres très prestigieux comme Science et ­Nature, qui valent aussi pour leur travail de sélection. » Marin Dacos est également optimiste et explore de nouveaux modèles, dans lesquels les auteurs ou leurs institutions n’auront plus besoin de payer les frais d’édition de leurs articles, pourquoi pas grâce à une forme de financement participatif mobilisant les bibliothèques.

    C’est ce que, depuis 2015, l’Open Library of Humanities propose en publiant de la sorte dix-neuf journaux en sciences humaines et sociales. Et c’est la voie choisie par un groupe de mathématiciens qui viennent de lancer Algebraic combinatorics, en démissionnant avec fracas d’un titre de la galaxie Springer cet été. Le nouveau venu suit les principes de la Fair Open Access Alliance. « Ces principes sont notamment un accès ouvert aux articles, l’absence de frais de publication pour les auteurs, la non-cession des droits d’auteur à l’éditeur… », indique Benoit Kloeckner, professeur de mathématiques à l’université Paris-Est et coauteur de cette charte avec une poignée de collègues. « Pour l’instant, il s’agit du seul journal à les suivre, mais nous allons montrer que cela peut marcher. »