• Denying aid on the basis of EU migration objectives is wrong

    –-> extrait du communiqué de presse de CONCORD:

    The Development Committee of the European Parliament has been working on the report “Improving development effectiveness and efficiency of aid” since January 2020. However, shortly before the plenary vote on Wednesday, #Tomas_Tobé of the EPP group, suddenly added an amendment to allow the EU to refuse to give aid to partner countries that don’t comply with EU migration requirements.

    https://concordeurope.org/2020/11/27/denying-aid-on-the-basis-of-eu-migration-objectives-is-wrong

    –---

    Le rapport du Parlement européen (novembre 2020):

    REPORT on improving development effectiveness and the efficiency of aid (2019/2184(INI))

    E. whereas aid effectiveness depends on the way the principle of Policy Coherence for Development (PCD) is implemented; whereas more efforts are still needed to comply with PCD principles, especially in the field of EU migration, trade, climate and agriculture policies;
    3. Stresses that the EU should take the lead in using the principles of aid effectiveness and aid efficiency, in order to secure real impact and the achievement of the SDGs, while leaving no-one behind, in its partner countries; stresses, in this regard, the impact that EU use of development aid and FDI could have on tackling the root causes of migration and forced displacement;
    7. Calls on the EU to engage directly with and to build inclusive sustainable partnerships with countries of origin and transit of migration, based on the specific needs of each country and the individual circumstances of migrants;
    62. Notes with grave concern that the EU and Member States are currently attaching conditions to aid related to cooperation by developing countries on migration and border control efforts, which is clearly a donor concern in contradiction with key internationally agreed development effectiveness principles; recalls that aid must keep its purposes of eradicating poverty, reducing inequality, respecting and supporting human rights and meeting humanitarian needs, and must never be conditional on migration control;
    63. Reiterates that making aid allocation conditional on cooperation with the EU on migration or security issues is not compatible with agreed development effectiveness principles;

    EXPLANATORY STATEMENT

    As agreed in the #European_Consensus_on_Development, the #EU is committed to support the implementation of the #Sustainable_Development_Goals in our development partner countries by 2030. With this report, your rapporteur would like to stress the urgency that all EU development actors strategically use the existing tools on aid effectiveness and efficiency.

    Business is not as usual. The world is becoming more complex. Geopolitical rivalry for influence and resources as well as internal conflicts are escalating. The impact of climate change affects the most vulnerable. The world’s population is growing faster than gross national income, which increases the number of people living in poverty and unemployment. As of 2030, 30 million young Africans are expected to enter the job market per year. These challenges point at the urgency for development cooperation to have a real impact and contribute to peaceful sustainable development with livelihood security and opportunities.

    Despite good intentions, EU institutions and Member States are still mainly guided by their institutional or national goals and interests. By coordinating our efforts in a comprehensive manner and by using the aid effectiveness and efficiency tools we have at our disposal our financial commitment can have a strong impact and enable our partner countries to reach the Sustainable Development Goals.

    The EU, as the world’s biggest donor, as well as the strongest international actor promoting democracy and human rights, should take the lead. We need to implement the policy objectives in the EU Consensus on Development in a more strategic and targeted manner in each partner country, reinforcing and complementing the EU foreign policy goals and values. The commitments and principles on aid effectiveness and efficiency as well as international commitments towards financing needs are in place. The Union has a powerful toolbox of instruments and aid modalities.

    There are plenty of opportunities for the EU to move forward in a more comprehensive and coordinated manner:

    First, by using the ongoing programming exercise linked to NDICI as an opportunity to reinforce coordination. Joint programming needs to go hand in hand with joint implementation: the EU should collectively set strategic priorities and identify investment needs/gaps in the pre-programming phase and subsequently look at ways to optimise the range of modalities in the EU institutions’ toolbox, including grants, budget support and EIB loans, as well as financing from EU Member States.

    Second, continue to support sectors where projects have been successful and there is a high potential for future sustainability. Use a catalyst approach: choose sectors where a partner country has incentives to continue a project in the absence of funding.

    Third, using lessons learned from a common EU knowledge base in a strategic and results-oriented manner when defining prioritised sectors in a country.

    Fourth, review assessments of successful and failed projects where the possibilities for sustainability are high. For example, choose sectors that to date have been received budget support and where investment needs can be addressed through a combination of EIB loans/Member State financial institutions and expertise.

    Fifth, using EU and Member State headquarters/delegations’ extensive knowledge of successful and unsuccessful aid modalities in certain sectors on the ground. Continue to tailor EU aid modalities to the local context reflecting the needs and capacity in the country.

    Sixth, use the aid effectiveness and efficiency tools with the aim of improving transparency with our partner countries.

    We do not need to reinvent the wheel. Given the magnitude of the funding gap and limited progress towards achieving the SDGs, it is time to be strategic and take full advantage of the combined financial weight and knowledge of all EU institutions and EU Member States - and to use the unique aid effectiveness and efficiency tools at our disposal - to achieve real impact and progress.

    https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/A-9-2020-0212_EN.html

    –—

    L’#amendement de Tomas Tobé (modification de l’article 25.):
    25.Reiterates that in order for the EU’s development aid to contribute to long-term sustainable development and becompatible with agreed development effectiveness principles, aid allocation should be based on and promote the EU’s core values of the rule of law, human rights and democracy, and be aligned with its policy objectives, especially in relation to climate, trade, security and migration issues;

    Article dans le rapport:
    25.Reiterates that making aid allocation conditional on cooperation with the EU on migration issues is notcompatible with agreed development effectiveness principles;

    https://concordeurope.org/2020/11/27/denying-aid-on-the-basis-of-eu-migration-objectives-is-wrong
    https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/B-9-2019-0175-AM-001-002_EN.pdf

    –—

    Texte amendé
    https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/TA-9-2020-0323_EN.html
    –-> Texte adopté le 25.11.2020 par le parlement européen avec 331 votes pour 294 contre et 72 abstentions.

    https://www.europarl.europa.eu/news/en/press-room/20201120IPR92142/parliament-calls-for-better-use-of-the-eu-development-aid

    –-

    La chronologie de ce texte:

    On 29 October, the Committee on Development adopted an own-initiative report on “improving development effectiveness and efficiency of aid” presented by the Committee Chair, Tomas Tobé (EPP, Sweden). The vote was 23 in favour, 1 against and 0 abstentions: https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/TA-9-2020-0323_EN.html.

    According to the report, improving effectiveness and efficiency in development cooperation is vital to help partner countries to reach the Sustainable Development Goals and to realise the UN 2030 Agenda. Facing enormous development setbacks, limited resources and increasing needs in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, the report by the Development Committee calls for a new impetus to scale-up the effectiveness of European development assistance through better alignment and coordination with EU Member States, with other agencies, donors and with the priorities of aid recipient countries.

    On 25 November, the report was adopted by the plenary (331 in favour, 294 against, 72 abstentions): https://www.europarl.europa.eu/news/en/press-room/20201120IPR92142/parliament-calls-for-better-use-of-the-eu-development-aid

    https://www.europarl.europa.eu/committees/en/improving-development-effectiveness-and-/product-details/20200921CDT04141

    #SDGs #développement #pauvreté #chômage #coopération_au_développement #aide_au_développement #UE #Union_européenne #NDICI #Rapport_Tobé #conditionnalité_de_l'aide_au_développement #migrations #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #root_causes #causes_profondes

    ping @_kg_ @karine4 @isskein @rhoumour

    –—

    Ajouté dans la métaliste autour du lien développement et migrations:
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733358#message768701

    • Le #Parlement_européen vote pour conditionner son aide au développement au contrôle des migrations

      Le Parlement européen a adopté hier un rapport sur “l’#amélioration de l’#efficacité et de l’#efficience de l’aide au développement”, qui soutient la conditionnalité de l’aide au développement au contrôle des migrations.

      Cette position était soutenue par le gouvernement français dans une note adressée aux eurodéputés français.

      Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, directrice France de ONE, réagit : « Le Parlement européen a décidé de modifier soudainement son approche et de se mettre de surcroit en porte-à-faux du #traité_européen qui définit l’objectif et les valeurs de l’aide au développement européenne. Cela pourrait encore retarder les négociations autour de ce budget, et donc repousser sa mise en œuvre, en pleine urgence sanitaire et économique. »

      « Les études montrent justement que lier l’aide au développement aux #retours et #réadmissions des ressortissants étrangers dans leurs pays d’origine ne fonctionne pas, et peut même avoir des effets contre-productifs. L’UE doit tirer les leçons de ses erreurs passées en alignant sa politique migratoire sur les besoins de ses partenaires, pas sur des priorités politiques à court terme. »

      « On prévoit que 100 millions de personnes supplémentaires tomberont dans l’extrême pauvreté à cause de la pandémie, et que fait le Parlement européen ? Il tourne le dos aux populations les plus fragiles, qui souffriraient directement de cette décision. L’aide au développement doit, sans concessions, se concentrer sur des solutions pour lutter contre l’extrême #pauvreté, renforcer les systèmes de santé et créer des emplois décents. »

      https://www.one.org/fr/press/alerte-le-parlement-europeen-vote-pour-conditionner-son-aide-au-developpement-a

  • ITALY : UPTICK IN CHAIN-REMOVALS

    While the exact number of persons arriving via the Slovenian-Italian border is unknown, there has been a sharp rise since April (http://www.regioni.it/dalleregioni/2020/11/09/friuli-venezia-giulia-immigrazione-fedriga-ripensare-politiche-di-controllo-) of people entering Italy from the Balkan route. Not only in Trieste, but also around the province of #Udine, arrivals have increased compared to last year. In Udine, around 100 people (https://www.ansa.it/friuliveneziagiulia/notizie/2020/11/30/migranti-oltre-cento-persone-rintracciate-nelludinese_9fdae48d-8174-4ea1-b221-8) were identified in one day. This has been met with a huge rise in chain pushbacks, initiated by Italian authorities via readmissions to Slovenia. From January to October 2020, 1321 people (https://www.rainews.it/tgr/fvg/articoli/2020/11/fvg-massimiliano-fedriga-migranti-arrivi-emergenza-98da1880-455e-4c59-9dc9-6) have been returned via the informal readmissions agreement, representing a fivefold increase when compared with the statistics from 2019.

    In this context, civil society groups highlight that “the returns are being carried out so quickly there is no way Italian authorities are implementing a full legal process at the border to determine if someone is in need of international protection.” The pushbacks to Slovenia appear to be indiscriminate. According to Gianfranco Schiavone (https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/news-feature/2020/11/17/europe-italy-bosnia-slovenia-migration-pushbacks-expulsion), from ASGI (Associazione per gli studi giuridici sullʼim-migrazione), “[they] have involved everybody, regardless of nationality,” he said. “They pushed back Afghans, Syrians, people from Iraq, people in clear need of protection.” As stated by Anna Brambilla, lawyer at ASGI, the Italian Ministry of the Interior (https://altreconomia.it/richiedenti-asilo-respinti-al-confine-tra-italia-e-slovenia-la-storia-d):
    “confirmed that people who have expressed a desire to apply for international protection are readmitted to Slovenia and that readmissions are carried out without delivering any provision relating to the readmission itself.”

    Crucially, the well publicised nature of chain removals from Slovenia, and onwards through Croatia, mean the authorities are aware of the violent sequence they are enter-ing people into, and thus complicit within this #violence.

    But instead of dealing with this deficit in adherence to international asylum law, in recent months Italian authorities have only sought to adapt border controls to apprehend more people. Border checks are now focusing on trucks, cars and smaller border crossings (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fu4es3xXVc8&feature=youtu.be

    ), rather than focusing solely on the military patrols of the forested area. This fits into a strategy of heightened control, pioneered by the Governor of the Friuli Venezia Giulia Region Massimiliano Fedriga who hopes to deploy more detection equipment at the border. The aim is to choke off any onward transit beyond the first 10km of Italian territory, and therefore apply the fast tracked process of readmission to the maximum number of new arrivals.

    https://www.borderviolence.eu/wp-content/uploads/BVMN-November-Report.pdf

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #refoulements #push-backs #Italie #Slovénie #droit_d'asile #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #10_km #refoulements_en_chaîne

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur la création de #zones_frontalières (au lieu de lignes de frontière) en vue de refoulements :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/795053

    • Schiavone: «#Lamorgese ammetta che l’Italia sta facendo respingimenti illegali»

      «Le riammissioni informali dei richiedenti asilo non hanno alcuna base giuridica», spiega Gianfranco Schiavone, del direttivo dell’Asgi, Associazione per gli Studi Giuridici sull’immigrazione. Nel 2020 sono state riammesse in Slovenia 1301 persone. «Sostenere, come ha fatto la ministra dell’interno Lamorgese durante l’interrogazione del deputato di Leu, Erasmo Palazzotto, che la Slovenia e soprattutto la Croazia siano “Paesi sicuri” nonostante le prove schiaccianti della violenza esercitata dalla polizia croata sulle persone in transito, ha dell’incredibile, un’affermazione indecorosa»

      Quelle che il governo italiano chiama “riammissioni” in realtà altro non sono che respingimenti illegali dei profughi che arrivano dalla Rotta Balcanica a Trieste e Gorizia. Pakistani, iracheni, afghani, e talvolta anche siriani che avrebbero diritto di chiedere asilo nel nostro Paese ma neanche mettono piede sul suolo italiano che già sono in marcia per fare forzatamente la Rotta Balcanica al contrario: all’Italia alla Slovenia, dalla Slovenia alla Croazia, dalla Croazia alla Bosnia.

      Lo scorso 13 gennaio il deputato di Leu, Erasmo Palazzotto durante la sua interrogazione ha ricordato alla ministra dell’Interno Lamorgese quanto sia disumano quello che sta succedendo in Bosnia, alle porte dell’Europa e di come testimoni il fallimento dell’Unione nella gestione dei flussi migratori sottolinenando che "Il nostro Paese deve sospendere le riammissioni informali verso la Slovenia e porre la questione in sede di Consiglio Europeo per gestire in maniera umana questo fenomeno. Va messa la parola fine a questa barbarie”. Ma Lamorgese sembra ancora continuare a non curarsi di quello che avviene dentro i nostri confini. Nel 2020 sono state respinte illegalmente in Slovenia 1301 persone.

      «Quello che succede al confine italiano sono veri e propri respingimenti illegali», spiega Gianfranco Schiavone, del direttivo di Asgi, Associazione per gli Studi Giuridici sull’Immigrazione. «Anche nel 2018 si erano registrati casi di respingimenti illegittimi ma in numero contenuto. Allora la risposta fu principalmente quella di negare i fatti. In ogni caso, oggi, il fenomeno dei respingimenti illegali è aumentato enormemente in termini di quantità ma soprattutto nella loro rivendicazione ideologica. Mentre in passato la giustificazione poggiava sulla tesi che non si trattasse di richiedenti asilo oggi si tende a giustificare (pur usando volutamente un linguaggio ambiguo) che si possono respingere anche i richiedenti perchè la domanda di asilo si può fare in Slovenia».

      Stando a quanto ha affermato la ministra le riammissioni sono possibili in virtù dell’accordo bilaterale firmato dai due Paesi, Italia e Slovenia, nel 1996. Si tratta di “riammissioni” effettuate non in ragione del ripristino dei controlli alle frontiere interne, mai formalmente avvenuto, ma in applicazione dell’Accordo bilaterale fra il Governo della Repubblica italiana e il Governo della Repubblica di Slovenia sulla riammissione delle persone alla frontiera, firmato a Roma il 3 settembre 1996, che contiene previsioni finalizzate a favorire la riammissione sul territorio dei due Stati sia di cittadini di uno dei due Stati contraenti sia cittadini di Stati terzi.

      «In primis», spiega Schiavone, «occorre rilevare come tale accordo risulti illegittimo per contrarietà al sistema costituzionale interno italiano e per violazione di normative interne. È infatti dubbia la legittimità nell’ordinamento italiano dell’Accordo bilaterale fra il Governo della Repubblica italiana e il Governo della Repubblica di Slovenia e di ogni altro analogo tipo di accordi intergovernativi per due ordini di ragioni: nonostante abbiano infatti una chiara natura politica, essi non sono stati ratificati con legge di autorizzazione alla ratifica ai sensi dell’art. 80 Cost.;in quanto accordi intergovernativi stipulati in forma semplificata, in ogni caso essi non possono prevedere modifiche alle leggi vigenti in Italia (altro caso in cui l’art. 80 Cost. prevede la preventiva legge di autorizzazione alla ratifica) e dunque essi neppure possono derogare alle norme di fonte primaria dell’ordinamento giuridico italiano. In ogni caso, anche volendo prescindere da ogni ulteriore valutazione sui profili di illegittimità dell’Accordo di riammissione è pacifico che ne è esclusa appunto l’applicazione ai rifugiati riconosciuti ai sensi della Convenzione di Ginevra (all’epoca la nozione di protezione sussidiaria ancora non esisteva) come chiaramente enunciato all’articolo 2 del medesimo Accordo. Del tutto priva di pregio sotto il profilo dell’analisi giuridica sarebbe l’obiezione in base alla quale l’accordo fa riferimento ai rifugiati e non ai richiedenti asilo giacché come è noto, il riconoscimento dello status di rifugiato (e di protezione sussidiaria) è un procedimento di riconoscimento di un diritto soggettivo perfetto i cui presupposti che lo straniero chiede appunto di accertare. Non v’è pertanto alcuna possibilità di distinguere in modo arbitrario tra richiedenti protezione e rifugiati riconosciuti dovendosi comunque garantire in ogni caso l’accesso alla procedura di asilo allo straniero che appunto chiede il riconoscimento dello status di rifugiato. A chiudere del tutto l’argomento sotto il profilo giuridico, è il noto Regolamento Dublino III che prevede che ogni domanda di asilo sia registrata alla frontiera o all’interno dello Stato nel quale il migrante si trova. Una successiva complessa procedura stabilita se il Paese competente ad esaminare la domanda è eventualmente diverso da quello nel quale il migrante ha chiesto asilo e in ogni caso il Regolamento esclude tassativamente che si possano effettuare riammissioni o respingimenti di alcun genere nel paese UE confinante solo perchè il richiedente proviene da lì. Anzi, il Regolamento è nato in primo luogo per evitare rimpalli di frontiera tra uno stato e l’altro. Violare, come sta avvenendo, questa fondamentale procedura, significa scardinare il Regolamento e in ultima analisi, il sistema europeo di asilo. È come se fossimo tornati indietro di trent’anni, a prima del 1990».

      Inoltre secondo la ministra "la Slovenia aderisce alla Convenzione di Ginevra e che la stessa Slovenia, come la Croazia sono considerati Paesi sicuri sul piano del rispetto dei diritti umani e delle convenzioni internazionali. Pertanto le riammissioni avvengono verso uno stato europeo, la Slovenia, dove vigono normative internazionali analoghe a quelle del nostro paese”.

      «Lamorgese», continua Schiavone, «ha fatto una figura veramente imbarazzante che ricade sul nostro Paese. Bisogna avere il coraggio di ammettere che abbiamo fatto una cosa illegale riammettendo i richiedenti asilo in Slovenia e da là, attraverso una collaudata catena, in Crozia e infine in Bosnia. E anche se nell’audizione dice tre parole, solo un piccolo inciso, sul fatto che non possono essere riamessi i migranti che hanno fatto richiesta d’asilo, nei fatti la sostanza non cambia. Infine sostenere che la Slovenia e soprattutto la Croazia siano “Paesi sicuri” nonostante le prove schiaccianti della violenza esercitata dalla polizia croata sulle persone in transito ha dell’incredibile. Un ministro non può permettersi di dire che quelli sono Paesi sicuri, perchè per i migranti della Rotta Balcanica non lo sono. E alla domanda “come finirà la questione?” La ministra non è stata in grado di formulare nessuna risposta chiara sul fatto che verrà posta fine alla pratica delle riammissioni dei richiedenti. Ed è forse questa la cosa più grave».

      http://www.vita.it/it/article/2021/01/18/schiavone-lamorgese-ammetta-che-litalia-sta-facendo-respingimenti-ille/158020

  • Rapporti di monitoraggio

    Sin dal 2016 il progetto ha pubblicato report di approfondimento giuridico sulle situazioni di violazione riscontrate presso le diverse frontiere oggetto delle attività di monitoraggio. Ciascun report affronta questioni ed aspetti contingenti e particolarmente interessanti al fine di sviluppare azioni di contenzioso strategico.

    Elenco dei rapporti pubblicati in ordine cronologico:

    “Le riammissioni di cittadini stranieri a Ventimiglia (giugno 2015): profili di illegittimità“

    Il report è stato redatto nel giugno del 2015 è costituisce una prima analisi delle principali criticità riscontrabili alla frontiera italo-francese verosimilmente sulla base dell’Accordo bilaterale fra il Governo della Repubblica italiana e il Governo della Repubblica francese sulla cooperazione transfrontaliera in materia di polizia e dogana (Accordo di Chambery)
    #Vintimille #Ventimiglia #frontière_sud-alpine #Alpes #Menton #accord_bilatéral #Accord_de_Chambéry #réadmissions

    Ajouté à la #métaliste de liens autour d’#accords_de_réadmission entre pays européens...
    https://seenthis.net/messages/736091
    Et plus précisément ici:
    https://seenthis.net/messages/736091#message887941

    –---

    “Le riammissioni di cittadini stranieri alla frontiera di Chiasso: profili di illegittimità”

    Il report è stato redatto nell’estate del 2016 per evidenziare la situazione critica che si era venuta a creare in seguito al massiccio afflusso di cittadini stranieri in Italia attraverso la rotta balcanica scatenata dalla crisi siriana. La frontiera italo-svizzera è stata particolarmente interessata da numerosi tentativi di attraversamento del confine nei pressi di Como e il presente documento fornisce una analisi giuridica delle criticità riscontrate.

    Ajouté à la #métaliste de liens autour d’#accords_de_réadmission entre pays européens...
    https://seenthis.net/messages/736091
    Et plus précisément ici:
    https://seenthis.net/messages/736091#message887940

    –-----

    “Lungo la rotta del Brennero”

    Il report, redatto con la collaborazione della associazione Antenne Migranti e il contributo della fondazione Alex Langer nel 2017, analizza le dinamiche della frontiera altoatesina e sviluppa una parte di approfondimento sulle violazioni relative al diritto all’accoglienza per richiedenti asilo e minori, alle violazioni all’accesso alla procedura di asilo e ad una analisi delle modalità di attuazione delle riammissioni alla frontiera.

    #Brenner #Autriche

    –---

    “Attività di monitoraggio ai confini interni italiani – Periodo giugno 2018 – giugno 2019”

    Report analitico che riporta i dati raccolti e le prassi di interesse alle frontiere italo-francesi, italo-svizzere, italo-austriache e italo slovene. Contiene inoltre un approfondimento sui trasferimenti di cittadini di paesi terzi dalle zone di frontiera indicate all’#hotspot di #Taranto e centri di accoglienza del sud Italia.

    #Italie_du_Sud

    –------

    “Report interno sopralluogo Bosnia 27-31 ottobre 2019”

    Report descrittivo a seguito del sopralluogo effettuato da soci coinvolti nel progetto Medea dal 27 al 31 ottobre sulla condizione delle persone in transito in Bosnia. Il rapporto si concentra sulla descrizione delle strutture di accoglienza presenti nel paese, sull’accesso alla procedura di protezione internazionale e sulle strategie di intervento future.

    #Bosnie #Bosnie-Herzégovine

    –---

    “Report attività frontiere interne terrestri, porti adriatici e Bosnia”

    Rapporto di analisi dettagliata sulle progettualità sviluppate nel corso del periodo luglio 2019 – luglio 2020 sulle diverse frontiere coinvolte (in particolare la frontiera italo-francese, italo-slovena, la frontiera adriatica e le frontiere coinvolte nella rotta balcanica). Le novità progettuali più interessanti riguardano proprio l’espansione delle progettualità rivolte ai paesi della rotta balcanica e alla Grecia coinvolta nelle riammissioni dall’Italia. Nel periodo ad oggetto del rapporto il lavoro ha avuto un focus principale legato ad iniziative di monitoraggio, costituzione della rete ed azioni di advocacy.

    #Slovénie #mer_Adriatique #Adriatique

    https://medea.asgi.it/rapporti

    #rapport #monitoring #medea #ASGI
    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières
    #frontières_internes #frontières_intérieures #Balkans #route_des_balkans

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • AIBD - Indignation de passagers sénégalais après des contrôles à l’embarquement faits par des policiers français et espagnols : la #souveraineté sénégalaise à rude épreuve !

    Des témoignages de passagers qui ont transité cette semaine par l’Aéroport Blaise Diagne de #Diass font état d’une situation inédite au niveau du contrôle préalable à l’embarquement. Pour la plupart en route pour des pays européens, ils ont remarqué selon certains qui ont bien voulu témoigner à Dakaractu, un contrôle a posteriori effectué par des éléments qui semblaient appartenir à des polices étrangères. En effet, après le contrôle des sociétés habituelles et connues à l’#AIBD, des policiers étrangers et principalement français et espagnols se chargeaient en dernier lieu, de vérifier la paperasse des passagers.

    Dakaractu qui a cherché à en savoir plus, a câblé quelques hauts gradés de la sécurité intérieure du pays. Selon un responsable c’est deux coopérants espagnols qui étaient à l’AIBD. Il a ainsi écarté toute présence de policiers français sur le périmètre du contrôle aéroportuaire. Un fait infirmé par les témoignages des passagers qui confirment bien l’enseigne de la #police française sur les tenues des agents avec le drapeau tricolore à l’appui.

    Une situation inédite qui a révulsé plus d’un passager qui ne se sont pas privés de commenter « cette bizarrerie ». D’autant plus que personne n’imagine voir un jour des policiers sénégalais préposés au contrôle dans un aéroport Européen, quel que puisse être le pays.

    Mais du côté de notre interlocuteur au niveau de la sécurité intérieure toujours, on se défend en indiquant que « ces deux agents étaient dans ce que l’on appelle dans le jargon de la sécurité publique, des « #mentors ». Leur présence entre dans le cadre d’un #accord nommé #programme_opérationnel_conjoint entre l’État et l’Union européenne, a-t-il renseigné en outre. Ils devraient selon lui, former de jeunes policiers sénégalais à certaines méthodes de #dissimulation. Sauf que selon nos sources de l’aéroport du côté des passagers, il n’y avait nulle part trace de policiers sénégalais près des « fameux mentors » en mission de #formation. Quoi de plus logique ?

    Du côté des passagers qui ont câblé Dakaractu on pense vraiment qu’un aéroport mais aussi le port restent des symboles de la #souveraineté_nationale d’un pays. De petites choses que l’État sénégalais « minimise », se plaignent nos interlocuteurs, mais qui donnent encore raison aux activistes qui pensent que le « Sénégal est toujours sous le joug de l’impérialisme français ».

    https://www.dakaractu.com/AIBD-Indignation-de-passagers-senegalais-apres-des-controles-a-l-embarque
    #aéroport #asile #migrations #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #externalisation #Sénégal #contrôles_d'identité #police #France #Espagne #officiers_de_liaison_immigration (#OLI)

    ping @rhoumour @karine4 @_kg_

  • Frontex, Civil Society Organsations, and Human Rights at EU Borders: A Complex Relationship

    On March 26th 2020, the EU celebrated the 25th anniversary of the abolition of border checks among the first seven European Member States that implemented the Schengen Agreement. Needless to say, celebrations this year did not seem particularly relevant, nor particularly fitting the climate of uncertainty and fear looming over Europe. Indeed, the COVID-19 pandemic has imposed the closure of EU internal and external borders in an effort to stop the spreading of the virus from one country to the other. However, the closure of EU borders, while halting regular crossings, deterred only briefly irregular crossings towards the EU, exacerbated the unsafe, unhealthy and too often inhumane conditions of people waiting at the doors of the EU to flee from poverty, climate change and persecution, among others (e.g., on the Balkan route and in Libya).

    Ensuring the protection and promotion of human rights of people trying to cross the EU borders has been at the core of the advocacy activity of many civil society organisations (CSOs), including NGOs, especially since the last decade. In the last decade, indeed, the arrival of migrants and refugees on EU shores (i.e., in 2011 and 2015) that became known as “migration and refugee crisis” was perceived as an “invasion” (de Haas, 2008) and thus triggered the creation of virtual and real fences. These EU fences have had one major outcome identified by CSOs and scholars: deaths and inhuman treatment of people attempting to cross the European borders. In order to increase the effectiveness of their advocacy activity, some of these CSOs have expanded their presence and advocacy efforts at the EU level, while many other CSOs continue to remain outside EU headquarters and to advocate for human and migrants’ rights from below. Both categories, however, have been facing harsh criticism and even criminalisation for their activities — for example, search and rescue at sea and at land borders — at national and local levels, something that has been widely addressed by the authors of Border Criminologies blog (see here: https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/research-subject-groups/centre-criminology/centreborder-criminologies/blog/2018/04/pushing-migrants, here: https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/research-subject-groups/centre-criminology/centreborder-criminologies/blog/2018/04/pushing-0 and here: https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/research-subject-groups/centre-criminology/centreborder-criminologies/blog/2019/04/humanitarian).

    Against this background, there is one peculiar experience of cooperation between the European Border and Coast Guard agency (EBCG) – most commonly known as Frontex – and CSOs concerned for the protection and promotion of human rights at the EU borders: the #Frontex_Consultative_Forum_on_fundamental_rights (CF). Frontex is the most controversial EU actor in the field of border control and migration management: since its inception in 2004, Frontex has been not only strongly blamed by migrant rights’ advocates and human rights’ activists, but it has also been repeatedly questioned by members of the European Parliament and by the European Ombudsman regarding the respect of fundamental rights at the external borders of the EU, all the while growing exponentially in terms of funds, competences and human resources. For these reasons, in 2011 Frontex had to establish a Consultative Forum on fundamental rights, whose role is to assist the EU agency with independent advice on fundamental rights issues. The CF became operational in 2012 with nine CSO members together with four international organizations (i.e., UNHCR, OSCE/ODIHR, Council of Europe, and IOM) and two other EU agencies, namely European Asylum Support Office (EASO) and Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA). In January 2020, the composition of the CF was reduced to fourteen members, with CSOs that currently count six members: Amnesty International EIO, Churches’ Commission for Migrants in Europe, International Commission of Jurists, Jesuit Refugee Service Europe, Red Cross EU Office, and Save the Children. In this last composition of the CF several relevant organisations have disappeared, such as the AIRE centre, Caritas Europa, ECRE and PICUM. The mixed nature and the small composition of this CF is peculiar to Frontex, as other EU agencies’ consultative fora (i.e., EASO Consultative forum) are significantly more numerous and include mainly CSOs.

    The opportunity for CSOs to lobby Frontex from within the CF is unique for several reasons. First, the ability of CF members to request information from Frontex on fundamental rights related issues and to visit and observe Frontex operations first hand. Indeed, since 2014, CF members have started to travel to the borders of the EU and to observe Frontex operations first visiting air borders operations (i.e., airports), then also land and sea borders and the highly contested return operations. However, the CF has repeatedly lamented issues with access to information, which should be effective as per art. 108 of the EBCG regulation (2019/1896); in the CF annual report of 2017 this is clearly stated: “the Forum continues to face serious and further limitations particularly in relation to relevant operational reference and guiding documents”. Second, the close relationship between CF members and Frontex officers, Heads of Unit and even Management Board members, which is developed also through the organisation not only of formal meetings and exchanges between the CF and Frontex staff, but also focus groups on specific issues, such as the discussion on the observation of return operations. Finally, the CF as a whole has to publish a publicly available annual report on its activities and observations on Frontex activity, which is usually detailed and highly informative, and the two CF chairs can present the work and findings of the Forum to the European Parliament (i.e., to the LIBE committee).

    However, the choice of CSOs to cooperate with Frontex is constrained by a number of internal and external factors. CSOs that gained access to Frontex CF share a high level of professionalization and expertise, they also generally have an established network at the EU level, both with other CSOs and with institutional actors, and considerable financial and human resources; in addition, the majority of these organizations have an EU office with its own staff (usually small) based in Brussels. These CSOs have also the possibility to contest Frontex and to monitor its operations from outside, often being where Frontex operations and activities take place. However, while the general criteria for the selection of CSOs for the CF is public, the actual selection made by Frontex is not transparent in terms of which organisations are left out and why. Moreover, there is a clear pattern of keeping in the same members from the very beginning – five out of six members have been CF members for more than one mandate.

    In conclusion, questions regarding Frontex human rights’ accountability have not subsided and the attention of CSOs and other interested parties is still high. In a webinar organised during the pandemic (April 21st, 2020) by the The Greens/EFA in the European Parliament titled “Under Surveillance: Monitoring at the border”, both panels questioned the accountability and transparency of the EU agency and stressed the need for a stronger monitoring system to be enforced. A recent development in this sense is the establishment, in cooperation with FRA, of fundamental rights monitors whose task will be to monitor Frontex operations at EU borders. Notwithstanding the need for a more defined judicial accountability of Frontex and a more effective monitoring and complaints mechanism, CSOs’ advocacy and monitoring activity remains crucial to ensure that both European citizens and EU institutions are alerted and aware on how the first fully European border and coast guard force enforces its duty to protect and promote fundamental rights during its operations.

    https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/research-subject-groups/centre-criminology/centreborder-criminologies/blog/2020/10/frontex-civil

    #frontex #droits_fondamentaux #frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #droits_humains #contrôles_frontaliers

    ping @isskein @karine4 @_kg_

  • 6 out of 10 people worldwide live in a country that has built border walls

    Days after the drawn-out U.S. elections, a new report reveals that the wall sold by Trump as a supposed achievement of his administration is just one of more than 63 new border walls built along borders or in occupied territories worldwide.

    Today, 31 years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, we find ourselves in a world with more walls than ever. 4.679 billion people in the world (60.98%) live in a country that has built one of these walls on its borders, concludes the report “Walled world: towards Global Apartheid” co published by the Centre Delàs d’Estudis per la Pau, Transnational Institute, Stop Wapenhandel and Stop the Wal Campaign.

    Beyond the surge in physical walls, many more countries have militarized their frontiers through the deployment of troops, ships, aircraft, drones, and digital surveillance, patrolling land, sea and air. If we counted these ‘walls’, they would number hundreds. As a result, it is now more dangerous and deadly than ever to cross borders for people fleeing poverty and violence.

    In addition, the research highlights that, as in the United States, immigration and terrorism are the main reasons given by states for the construction of walls, both justifications together represent 50%, half of the world’s walls.

    Israel tops the list of countries that have built the most walls, with a total of 6. It is followed by Morocco, Iran and India with 3 walls each. Countries with 2 border walls are South Africa, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Jordan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, Hungary and Lithuania.

    “The global trend in border management policies is to build a world in which segregation and inequality are reinforced. In this walled world, commerce and capital are not restricted, yet it increasingly excludes people based on their class and origin”, states Ainhoa ​​Ruiz Benedicto, co-author of the report and researcher at the Centre Delàs d’Estudis per la Pau.

    The report focuses on a few specific walls in different regions, highlighting the following:

    Four of the five countries bordering Syria have built walls: Israel, Turkey, Jordan and Iraq.
    India has built 6,540 km of barriers against its neighboring countries, covering 43% of its borders.
    Morocco built an occupation wall with Western Sahara considered “the greatest functional military barrier in the world”, 2,720 km long.

    In addition to physical walls, the militarization of border areas continues to increase, in which walls are just one means of stopping people crossing territories.. The report highlights two cases:

    Mexico has notably militarized its border with Guatemala with equipment and financing through the US funded Frontera Sur program.
    Australia has turned the sea into a barrier with the deployment of its armed forces and the Maritime Border Command of the Australian Border Force, in addition to an offshore detention system that violates human rights.

    The business of building walls

    Finally, the report analyzes the industry that profits from this surge in wall-building and the criminalization of people fleeing poverty and violence. The report concludes that the border security industry is diverse, as shown by the number of companies involved in the construction of Israel’s walls, with more than 30 companies from the military, security, technology and construction sectors.

    “Many walls and fences are built by local construction companies or by state entities, such as the military. However, the walls are invariably accompanied by a range of technological systems, such as monitoring, detection and identification equipment, vehicles, aircraft and arms, which military and security firms provide”, explains Mark Akkerman, co-author of the report and researcher at Stop Wapenhandel. Companies such as Airbus, Thales, Leonardo, Lockheed Martin, General Dynamics, Northrop Grumman and L3 Technologies are the main beneficiaries of border contracts - in particular providing the technology that accompanies the walls in both the US and in EU member states. In the specific cases studied in the report, companies such as Elbit, Indra, Dat-Con, CSRA, Leidos and Raytheon also stand out as key contractors.

    “Three decades after the fall of the Berlin Wall, it is extremely sad that the wall has become the symbol of our time. Not only is it a betrayal of people’s hopes in 1989, but it also locks us into a fortress with no way out in which we lose our very humanity. All the research tells us that we can expect more migration in the coming decades. Therefore, it is of profound importance to seek other dignified and humane ways to respond to the needs of people who are forced to flee their homes for reasons of poverty, violence and climate change”, warns Nick Buxton, co-editor of the report and researcher at TNI.

    https://www.tni.org/en/article/6-out-of-10-people-worldwide-live-in-a-country-that-has-built-border-walls

    #murs #barrières_frontalières #cartographie #visualisation #frontières #business #complexe_militaro-industriel #migrations #asile #réfugiés #Airbus #Thales #Leonardo #Lockheed_Martin #General_Dynamics #Northrop_Grumman #L3_Technologies #Elbit #Indra #Dat-Con #CSRA #Leidos #Raytheon #chiffres #statistiques #militarisation_des_frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #terrorisme #anti-terrorisme #Israël #Maroc #Inde #Iran #ségrégation #monde_ségrégué #monde_muré #technologie

    #rapport #TNI

    ping @reka @karine4 @_kg_

  • With @ItalyMFA support; IOM has built a new police border post at the Assamaka border, equipped with the Migration Information and Data Analysis System (MIDAS). This project aims to reinforce the operational capacities of the Government of Niger on border management.

    https://twitter.com/OIM_Niger/status/1326033475514855424
    #IOM #Niger #contrôles_frontaliers #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #OIM #Assamaka #MIDAS #Migration_Information_and_Data_Analysis_System #poste-frontière

    Localisation de Assamaka :

    via @rhoumour (twitter)

    ping @isskein @karine4

    • IOM Supports Safe Migration with New Police Post at Niger’s Border with Algeria

      Situated in the heart of the Sahara at only 15 km from Niger’s border with Algeria, the town of Assamaka is a major migratory hub, as the main point of entry for migrants returning from Algeria, and the last place of transit for migrants coming from Niger on their way to Algeria.

      Since late 2017, over 30,000 migrants have arrived in Assamaka from Algeria, mostly from West African countries of origins.

      On Wednesday (14/10), the Government of Niger and the International Organization for Migration (IOM) inaugurated the first fixed border police post in Assamaka, built and equipped with funding from the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation.

      This extensive, impoverished and sparsely populated area has long been exploited by criminal and smuggling networks. Nowadays, these ancestral trade and migration routes between Niger and Algeria are often used for smuggling illicit goods and migrants.

      In recent years, border management and border security have become top priorities for the Sahel and for Niger in particular. The Government of Niger strives to reduce illicit cross-border activities, including human smuggling and trafficking, and to prevent the entry of members of violent extremism organizations through the country’s borders.

      In addition to a sharp rise in crime in the border town, Assamaka also faces increasingly high migration flows, due to its position on the trans-Saharan migration route. These are proving difficult to manage to the detriment of the town’s 1,000 or so permanent inhabitants.

      Watch video: New Police Border Post in Assamaka

      Up to now, migrant registration had always been done manually or through IOM’s Mobile Border Post, temporarily deployed by the Government of Niger to the Agadez region. This truck-borne mobile police post was adapted specifically for meeting the challenges in remote desert locations. But it cannot replace a fixed police station.

      The newly constructed border post and its facilities will allow the police to be compliant with national and international norms and fulfill the required security and safety standards.

      The border post is part of a larger project whose objective is to strengthen the capacities of Niger’s immigration service – the Directorate for Territorial Surveillance (DST). The project also aims to reinforce the cooperation between Nigerien and Algerian law enforcement agencies, as well as the coordination between Nigerien security forces, local authorities and relevant technical services, such as the Regional Directorate of Public Health in the Agadez region.

      Through this new border post, eight workstations are equipped with the Migration Information and Data Analysis System (MIDAS), developed by IOM. These will allow authorities to digitally register people transiting the border. The data collected can be transmitted in real time to a central server, allowing authorities to better track and manage migration flows in and out of Niger.

      “We hope that this new infrastructure will alleviate some of the current challenges faced by local authorities and will improve cross-border cooperation,” said Barbara Rijks, IOM’s Chief of Mission in Niger. “Ultimately, this border post aims to contribute to the improvement of the security and stability in Assamaka and its surroundings.”


      https://www.iom.int/news/iom-supports-safe-migration-new-police-post-nigers-border-algeria

      Autres photos sur twitter:


      https://twitter.com/OIM_Niger/status/1317040811536715778

  • Pourquoi les migrants iraniens transitent par les Alpes

    De plus en plus d’Iraniens franchissent de nuit la frontière franco-italienne. La plupart tentent ensuite de rejoindre le Royaume-Uni ou l’Allemagne.

    Il est 21 heures à Montgenèvre en cette mi-octobre, et la station de ski des Hautes-Alpes est plongée dans l’obscurité. C’est ici, à 1 800 mètres d’altitude, que les migrants traversent la frontière franco-italienne. Il faut environ huit heures de marche pour rallier Briançon (Hautes-Alpes) depuis #Clavière, le dernier village côté italien. Entre les deux, le col de Montgenèvre, l’obscurité et la police aux frontières (PAF) qui patrouille. Ces dernières années, plusieurs migrants sont morts de froid en tentant le passage. À l’approche de l’hiver, plusieurs militants et bénévoles de l’ONG Médecins du Monde ont donc repris les maraudes. Leur objectif : récupérer les migrants après la frontière et les ramener au Refuge solidaire de Briançon, une quinzaine de kilomètres plus bas, avant de se faire attraper par la police.

    François*, 32 ans, est moniteur de ski saisonnier et bénévole au refuge. Caché derrière des arbres, il guette la pénombre à la recherche d’un signe de vie quand deux silhouettes apparaissent derrière un buisson. Ils s’appellent Azad* et Hedi et sont iraniens. « How much ? » nous questionnent-ils avant de comprendre que François n’est pas passeur mais bénévole. Ils finissent par le suivre. Arman a 28 ans, a étudié le génie civil en Iran puis travaillé dans une pharmacie. Mais son père est opposant politique au régime : « Il a insisté pour que je quitte le pays », raconte-t-il. « Il a donné 18 000 euros à un réseau de passeurs pour me faire arriver en Angleterre. » Cette nuit, Azad et Hedi dormiront au chaud et en sécurité au refuge solidaire. Demain, ils repartiront en train en direction de Dunkerque, pour tenter de passer au Royaume-Uni.
    Une jeunesse sans débouchés

    Ces derniers mois, les bénévoles du Refuge solidaire ont noté un changement de population. Les Guinéens, Ivoiriens et Maliens qui étaient majoritaires en 2017 ont laissé leur place aux Afghans et Iraniens. En 2017, ils n’étaient que 3, en 2018, ils étaient 55, et depuis début 2020, 357 Iraniens sont passés par le refuge, soit 23 % des arrivées, selon les statistiques transmises par le Refuge solidaire. L’Ofpra enregistre la même évolution concernant les nouvelles demandes d’asile iraniennes : 349 en 2017, 510 en 2018 et 443 en 2019. La plupart des nouveaux venus sont diplômés, comme Peshro, 26 ans, diplômé d’une licence en économie, et Peshawa, 29 ans, rencontrés au Refuge solidaire. Les deux frères viennent de la province kurde au nord-ouest de l’Iran : « On n’avait pas de travail, pas d’argent », explique Peshro.

    Depuis que les États-Unis ont rétabli les sanctions économiques contre l’Iran en 2018, la situation est devenue très dure pour la population. En juin 2020, le rial, la monnaie locale, avait perdu la moitié de sa valeur par rapport à mai 2018. Au-delà des difficultés économiques, les émeutes sanglantes survenues entre 2017 et 2019 pour protester contre la corruption du régime, et la répression qui s’abat sur les minorités ethniques (kurdes, arabes) et religieuses (derviche, bahaï) expliquent cette hausse des départs. Environ 200 000 Iraniens quitteraient chaque année le pays, selon Nader Vahabi, principalement pour la Turquie qui ne requiert pas de visa.

    Une fois en Turquie, ils traversent l’Europe, en passant par la Grèce et les Balkans ou directement en bateau jusqu’en Italie. Comme beaucoup, Azad rêve d’Angleterre, perçue comme la terre promise pour les immigrés. Là-bas, ils retrouvent leur seconde langue, les contrôles d’identité n’existent pas et le marché du travail est plus flexible qu’ailleurs. D’après l’Observatoire des migrations de l’université d’Oxford, en 2019, le Royaume-Uni a enregistré environ 45 000 premières demandes d’asiles, un record, avec une majorité d’Iraniens, Irakiens et Pakistanais. Mais la traversée de la Manche est toujours aussi périlleuse. Le 27 octobre, toute une famille iranienne a trouvé la mort au large de Dunkerque, lorsque l’embarcation sur laquelle elle se trouvait a chaviré. Il s’agit du pire drame migratoire survenu dans l’histoire de La Manche.

    https://www.lepoint.fr/societe/pourquoi-les-migrants-iraniens-transitent-par-les-alpes-15-11-2020-2401095_2

    #Alpes #montagne #Hautes-Alpes #refuge_solidaire #Briançon #asile #migrations #réfugiés #réfugiés_iraniens #Iran #Montgenèvre #France #frontières #Italie #réfugiés_afghans

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur les Hautes-Alpes :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733721#message886920

    via @isskein

  • Medios aéreos y marítimos como plan de choque del Gobierno de España para «bloquear la salida de cayucos y pateras» hacia Canarias

    La ministra de Política Territorial anuncia que el Estado contará con dos buques oceánicos, una patrullera de altura, un avión, un helicóptero y una embarcación sumergida en la ruta atlántica.

    La ministra de Política Territorial del Gobierno de España, Carolina Darias, ha anunciado este viernes en su visita a Tenerife las medidas extraordinarias adoptadas desde el Ejecutivo nacional en un plan de choque para acabar con la crisis migratoria que atraviesa Canarias. Las llegadas en pateras y cayucos a Europa por Canarias suponen el 57% del total de llegadas al continente. Por ello, el Ministerio del Interior, de Exteriores, de Migraciones y de Política Territorial, en coordinación con la Vicepresidencia segunda del Gobierno estatal, han elaborado un decálogo de medidas para gestionar la situación migratoria en las Islas. Según la ministra, se trata de un «refuerzo» a las medidas ya existentes que intentan dar respuesta al fenómeno migratorio. Un fenómeno que tiene naturaleza «estructural» y que la pandemia ha complicado aún más. «La ruta atlántica ha vuelto a coger muchísima fuerza», subraya Darias, que fue subdelegada del Gobierno en el Archipiélago en 2006, durante la conocida como crisis de los cayucos.

    El Gobierno de España ha decidido apostar por reforzar a las fuerzas y cuerpos de seguridad del Estado y la vía diplomática con los países de origen para evitar que los migrantes salgan en patera o cayuco del continente africano hacia Europa. El Ejecutivo pretende reforzar la política de cooperación para mejorar las condiciones de vida de las personas en sus países de origen a través de una «respuesta conjunta y coordinada con la Unión Europea». «Tenemos que ser altamente sensibles y hacer políticas responsables porque estamos hablando de seres humanos. Debemos hacer pedagogía y rechazar cualquier manifestación xenófoba, porque Canarias nunca ha sido racista y no lo puede ser», apuntó.
    Ministerio del Interior

    Las medidas implantadas por el Ministerio del Interior, dirigido por Fernando Grande-Marlaska, pretenden «acabar con la inmigración irregular». La línea principal de actuación pasa por el refuerzo de la cooperación efectiva con los países emisores. «Vamos a contar con dos buques oceánicos, una patrullera de altura, un avión, un helicóptero y una embarcación sumergida», anuncia Darias.

    La agencia Frontex permanecerá hasta el 21 de enero de 2021 va a colaborar con el despliegue de equipos en Gran Canaria para reforzar las labores de la Policía: «Es nuestro objetivo combatir a las redes que trafican con personas». Además, el Gobierno de España está negociando con Senegal y con Frontex desplegar medios aéreos en la ruta atlántica.

    Interior va a instalar un Centro de Atención Temporal de Migrantes (CATE) en Barranco Seco que permita a la Policía Nacional contar con un espacio adecuado para realizar la reseña policial de los migrantes. Hasta el momento, el Ejército de Tierra ha instalado 23 tiendas de campaña para albergar a unas 800 personas.

    Darias ha anunciado que el ministro del Interior realizará una visita el próximo 20 de noviembre a Marruecos. Este será el séptimo viaje al país que haga Grande-Marlaska.

    Asimismo, Darias ha celebrado que se retomen las conexiones con Mauritania que permitan deportar migrantes. El pasado martes tuvo lugar el primer vuelo de deportación tras la pandemia, en el que 22 personas fueron expulsadas de Gran Canaria. De ellas, solo una era nacional mauritana. Esa misma noche, las autoridades de Mauritania confirmaron que expulsarían también de Nouakchot a las personas llegadas desde Canarias. «El Gobierno pondrá énfasis en la deportación de las personas que no estén en situación de vulnerabilidad. Las que sí lo están han sido derivadas poco a poco a la Península», asegura. Sin embargo, afirmó que no contaba con datos sobre el número de traslados al territorio peninsular desde las Islas que se han dado este año.
    Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores

    El Gobierno de España incrementará en 500 millones de euros el presupuesto destinado a la cooperación, contando con una partida de 3.100.000 euros. Además, la ministra Arancha González visitará Senegal antes de que acabe el año.
    Ministerio de Migraciones

    El Ministerio de Defensa ha cedido el espacio de El Matorral, en Fuerteventura, al Ministerio de Migraciones y a Interior. En Tenerife, el Ejército de Tierra instala ya un nuevo espacio cedido por Defensa en Las Raíces, que se suma al acuartelamiento de Las Canteras. Es una capacidad alojativa «amplia», ha dicho Darias.

    En Gran Canaria, además del CATE del antiguo polvorín de Barranco Seco, el Colegio León de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria se abrirá como espacio de acogida «en cuestión de días». «El objetivo es que la imagen de Arguineguín no se vuelva a repetir», ha aseverado la ministra. Carolina Darias ha querido agradecer a las corporaciones locales su predisposición a colaborar con el Estado en la gestión de la acogida. Sin embargo, la ministra no ha dado una fecha concreta para el desmantelamiento del muelle. «Cuanto antes», ha respondido. «Ya han visto lo rápido que hemos instalado el CATE de Barranco Seco», defendió. Así, preguntada por los medios sobre la lentitud del Ministerio de Defensa para habilitar nuevos espacios, Darias ha defendido que «las personas que están en el muelle no son las mismas que hace unos meses». «Se ha intentado desalojar, pero las llegadas han sido frecuentes», justifica.

    Respecto a las carencias en la asistencia letrada de las personas que han llegado a las Islas en los últimos meses, la ministra ha asegurado que el Gobierno de España cumple con esta obligación. Pero ha justificado que «la intensa llegada» de migrantes ha provocado «algunas dificultades».

    El presidente del Gobierno de Canarias, Ángel Víctor Torres, ha recordado en su intervención a las personas que han muerto intentando llegar al Archipiélago. Este viernes, Senegal ha convocado una jornada de duelo a iniciativa de la población en memoria de las 480 personas que han fallecido o desaparecido rumbo a Europa.

    Torres incidió en la necesidad de cumplir con los derechos de asilo de la población migrante. «La gente que llega a Canarias en cayucos y pateras llega a Europa», reivindicó el presidente canario, apelando a la necesidad de crear corredores humanitarios con el continente. Una práctica a la que ya se comprometió la comisaria europea Ylva Johansson durante su visita al Archipiélago.

    «La llegada de inmigrantes ha sido utilizada por algunos partidos políticos para promover una fobia hacia los extranjeros», ha leído Torres, compartiendo la carta publicada por los obispos de Canarias este jueves para combatir la xenofobia y el racismo. «Es verdad que la inmigración es un fenómeno complejo, pero forma parte de nuestra historia», concluyó el presidente.

    https://www.eldiario.es/canariasahora/migraciones/gobierno-espana-anuncia-nuevas-medidas-evitar-salida-cayucos-pateras-canari

    #Canaries #îles_canaries #militarisation_des_frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #contrôles_frontaliers

    –---

    Résumé de Raphaëla Laspalmas via la mailing-list Migreurop (14.11.2020):

    Le gouvernement espagnol va munir les Canaries de nouveaux moyens : 2 navires, un bateau de patrouille « en haute altitude » (pas sûre de la traduction), un avion, un hélicoptère et un sous-marin.
    Selon l’article, les arrivées en bateaux de fortune vers l’Europe par les Canaries supposent 57% du total des arrivées sur le continent ( à vérifier)
    Le gouvernement espagnol négocie avec le #Sénégal et #Frontex de nouveaux #moyens_aériens sur la #route_atlantique.
    Les autorités mauritaniennes ont annoncé qu’elles expulseraient à leur tour les migrants d’autres nationalités déportés sur son sol.
    500 millions d’euros du gouvernement espagnol pour la coopération (la nature de ladite coopération n’est pas précisée...).
    Les autorités reconnaissent des failles dans l’assistance juridique et s’en défausse sur le nombre d’arrivées.

    #Mauritanie #Espagne

  • UN warns of impact of smart borders on refugees: ‘Data collection isn’t apolitical’

    Special rapporteur on racism and xenophobia believes there is a misconception that biosurveillance technology is without bias

    Robotic lie detector tests at European airports, eye scans for refugees and voice-imprinting software for use in asylum applications are among new technologies flagged as “troubling” in a UN report.

    The UN’s special rapporteur on racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance, Prof Tendayi Achiume, said digital technologies can be unfair and regularly breach human rights. In her new report, she has called for a moratorium on the use of certain surveillance technologies.

    Achiume, who is from Zambia, told the Guardian she was concerned about the rights of displaced people being compromised. She said there was a misconception that such technologies, often considered “a humane” option in border enforcement, are without bias.

    “One of the key messages of the report is that we have to be paying very close attention to the disparate impact of this technology and not just assuming that because it’s technology, it’s going to be fair or be neutral or objective in some way.”

    She cited the example of pushback against Donald Trump’s effort to build a wall between the US and Mexico. “You see that there isn’t a similar sense of outrage when digital technologies are deployed to serve the same function … if you actually look at some of the statistics, and if you look at some of the research, which I cite in my report, it turns out that border deaths have increased in places where smart borders have been implemented.”

    She also raised concerns about the ways in which humanitarian agencies are engaging with surveillance. The report notes that in Afghanistan, the UN refugee agency (UNHCR) requires returning refugees to undergo iris registration as a prerequisite for receiving assistance.

    While the UNHCR has justified the use of this technology as a way to prevent fraud, “the impact of processing such sensitive data can be grave when systems are flawed or abused”, the report said.

    Last year the UN’s World Food Programme partnered with Palantir Technologies, a data mining company, on a $45m (£34m) contract, sharing the data of 92 million aid recipients.

    “Data collection is not an apolitical exercise,” notes Achiume’s report, “especially when powerful global north actors collect information on vulnerable populations with no regulated methods of oversights and accountability.”

    Covid-19 has also accelerated “biosurveillance” – focused on tracking people’s movements and health. Biosurveillance has everyday uses, such as the “track and trace” app in the UK, but there are concerns about the regulation of large-scale data harvested from populations.

    One example is the “Covi-Pass”, a health passport developed by Mastercard and Gavi, a private-public health alliance, that is reportedly due to be rolled out across west Africa. The UN report highlighted the implications of such passports for freedom of movement, “especially for refugees”.

    Petra Molnar from the Refugee Law Lab in Toronto said it was clear that the pandemic was increasing digital rights violations. “State responses to the pandemic are exacerbating the turn towards biosurveillance, with refugees and people on the move acting as communities on which to test various interventions and fast-track tech development,” she said.

    Molnar, who contributed to the UN rapporteur’s report, has noted the dehumanising impact of some technologies on displaced people in her own research. One asylum seeker she spoke to in Belgium said the amount of personal data he’d given up made him feel, “like a piece of meat without a life, just fingerprints and eye scans”.

    “Our conversations with refugees and people crossing borders show how little attention is being paid to the lived experiences of people who are at the sharp edges of these high-risk technological experiments,” said Molnar.

    The intersection of technology and human rights violations were highlighted in a recent investigation into the European border agency Frontex, which allegedly witnessed pushbacks of migrants in the Aegean Sea via some of its assets, including drones.

    Konstantinos Kakavoulis from Homo Digitalis, a Greek organisation focused on digital rights, said technologies often outpaced the legal framework.

    “There is no clear regulation for the use of drones or body-worn cameras by the Greek police,” he said. “The police have signed a contract for the provision of a facial recognition software with Intracom Telecom, a Greek company, without receiving the opinion of the Greek data protection authority.”

    He added: “Apart from the insufficiency of legal safeguards, we also lack transparency; and this is not only remarkable, but highly problematic.”

    Achiume said that until the impact of surveillance technologies on human rights could be understood, use of such technologies should be halted. “Until we can understand and mitigate those harms, there should just be a moratorium on them.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2020/nov/11/un-warns-of-impact-of-smart-borders-on-refugees-data-collection-isnt-ap

    #frontières #smart_borders #frontières_intelligentes #réfugiés #asile #migrations #technologie #politique #biopolitique #technologies_digitales #droits_fondamentau #droits_humains #surveillance #contrôles_frontaliers #neutralité #Palantir_Technologies #données #biosurveillance #Covi-Pass #Mastercard #Gavi #complexe_militaro-industriel #covid-19 #coronavirus #reconnaissance_faciale #Intracom_Telecom

    ping @karine4 @isskein @etraces @thomas_lacroix

  • L’UE achète des drones à #Airbus pour repérer les bateaux transportant des migrants

    Airbus et deux sociétés d’armement israéliennes ont reçu 100 millions d’euros pour faire voler des drones au-dessus de la #Méditerranée. Le but : identifier les bateaux chargés de migrants qui tentent d’atteindre l’#Europe, selon le Guardian. Un article d’Euractiv Italie.

    Dans le cadre des « services de #surveillance_aérienne_maritime » qu’elle assure, l’#UE a décidé de recourir à des #appareils_téléguidés volant à moyenne altitude à longue endurance, connus du grand public sous le nom de drones. C’est Airbus qui a été mandaté par Bruxelles pour fournir les engins. Le conglomérat européen spécialisé dans l’aéronautique et la défense travaillera avec la société publique #Israel_Aerospace_Industries (#IAI). Un deuxième contrat a été signé avec #Elbit_Systems, une société d’#armement israélienne privée. Les deux contrats s’élèvent à 50 millions d’euros chacun, selon une information du journal britannique The Guardian.

    Les opérations seront menées en #Grèce et/ou en #Italie et/ou à #Malte selon le contrat-cadre signé entre #Frontex et les fournisseurs, dans le cadre des mesures de contrôle des frontières du sud de l’Europe.

    Le #budget de l’agence européenne de garde-frontières et de gardes-côtes (Frontex), est passé de 6 millions d’euros en 2005 à 460 millions d’euros cette année, ce qui reflète l’importance croissante donnée au contrôle des frontières extérieures en raison de l’immigration. Le service de surveillance aérienne comprendra la mise à disposition d’un flux de #données fiable en temps réel et la capacité de partager ces données en temps réel.

    L’IAI affirme que son drone #Heron, employé couramment par les forces armées israéliennes et allemandes, est en mesure de voler pendant plus de 24 heures et peut parcourir jusqu’à 1 000 miles à partir de sa base à des altitudes supérieures à 35 000 pieds.

    Elbit Systems soutient pour sa part que ses drones #Hermes peuvent voler jusqu’à 36 heures à 30 000 pieds. Le mois dernier, Elbit a annoncé que des drones Hermes avaient été testés avec l’Agence maritime et des garde-côtes britannique au large de la côte ouest du Pays de Galles pour des opérations de recherche et de sauvetage.

    Les drones israéliens sont le résultat d’une technologie de surveillance qu’Israël a développée et testée lors d’une série d’attaques sur Gaza, comme le détaille un rapport de Human Rights Watch. Airbus a fait savoir que son modèle n’était pas en mesure de transporter des armes, et qu’il serait peint en blanc avec le label « Frontex ». Les premiers tests seront effectués en Grèce sur l’île de #Crète.

    Dans le cadre du programme Frontex, le drone italien #Falco_Evo de l’entreprise #Leonardo avait déjà été testé pour des activités de surveillance maritime aérienne dans l’espace aérien civil italien et maltais.

    En juin 2919, le drone avait permis de mettre au jour une pratique fréquemment utilisée par les passeurs : le transbordement de dizaines de personnes d’un « vaisseau -mère » vers une embarcation qui est ensuite laissée à la dérive. La Guardia di Finanza, la police dounière italienne, alertée par les images du drone, avait alors intercepté et saisi un bateau de pêche.

    Reste que l’utilisation de ce type de technologie suscite de nombreuses craintes. Les détracteurs les plus acharnés de la surveillance aérienne par des drones affirment que l’obligation légale d’aider un navire en danger et de sauver des naufragés ne s’applique pas à un engin aérien sans pilote, quel qu’il soit.

    https://www.euractiv.fr/section/migrations/news/lue-achete-des-drones-a-airbus-pour-reperer-les-bateaux-transportant-des-mi
    #complexe_militaro-industriel #business #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #drones #contrôles_frontaliers #surveillance_des_frontières #Israël #EU #Union_européenne #UE

    ping @e-traces

  • Machine-Readable Refugees

    Hassan (not his real name; other details have also been changed) paused mid-story to take out his wallet and show me his ID card. Its edges were frayed. The grainy, black-and-white photo was of a gawky teenager. He ran his thumb over the words at the top: ‘Jamhuri ya Kenya/Republic of Kenya’. ‘Somehow,’ he said, ‘no one has found out that I am registered as a Kenyan.’

    He was born in the Kenyan town of Mandera, on the country’s borders with Somalia and Ethiopia, and grew up with relatives who had escaped the Somali civil war in the early 1990s. When his aunt, who fled Mogadishu, applied for refugee resettlement through the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, she listed Hassan as one of her sons – a description which, if understood outside the confines of biological kinship, accurately reflected their relationship.

    They were among the lucky few to pass through the competitive and labyrinthine resettlement process for Somalis and, in 2005, Hassan – by then a young adult – was relocated to Minnesota. It would be several years before US Citizenship and Immigration Services introduced DNA tests to assess the veracity of East African refugee petitions. The adoption of genetic testing by Denmark, France and the US, among others, has narrowed the ways in which family relationships can be defined, while giving the resettlement process the air of an impartial audit culture.

    In recent years, biometrics (the application of statistical methods to biological data, such as fingerprints or DNA) have been hailed as a solution to the elusive problem of identity fraud. Many governments and international agencies, including the UNHCR, see biometric identifiers and centralised databases as ways to determine the authenticity of people’s claims to refugee and citizenship status, to ensure that no one is passing as someone or something they’re not. But biometrics can be a blunt instrument, while the term ‘fraud’ is too absolute to describe a situation like Hassan’s.

    Biometrics infiltrated the humanitarian sector after 9/11. The US and EU were already building centralised fingerprint registries for the purposes of border control. But with the start of the War on Terror, biometric fever peaked, most evidently at the borders between nations, where the images of the terrorist and the migrant were blurred. A few weeks after the attacks, the UNHCR was advocating the collection and sharing of biometric data from refugees and asylum seekers. A year later, it was experimenting with iris scans along the Afghanistan/Pakistan frontier. On the insistence of the US, its top donor, the agency developed a standardised biometric enrolment system, now in use in more than fifty countries worldwide. By 2006, UNHCR agents were taking fingerprints in Kenya’s refugee camps, beginning with both index fingers and later expanding to all ten digits and both eyes.

    Reeling from 9/11, the US and its allies saw biometrics as a way to root out the new faceless enemy. At the same time, for humanitarian workers on the ground, it was an apparently simple answer to an intractable problem: how to identify a ‘genuine’ refugee. Those claiming refugee status could be crossed-checked against a host country’s citizenship records. Officials could detect refugees who tried to register under more than one name in order to get additional aid. Biometric technologies were laden with promises: improved accountability, increased efficiency, greater objectivity, an end to the heavy-handed tactics of herding people around and keeping them under surveillance.

    When refugees relinquish their fingerprints in return for aid, they don’t know how traces of themselves can travel through an invisible digital architecture. A centralised biometric infrastructure enables opaque, automated data-sharing with third parties. Human rights advocates worry about sensitive identifying information falling into thehands of governments or security agencies. According to a recent privacy-impact report, the UNHCR shares biometric data with the Department of Homeland Security when referring refugees for resettlement in the US. ‘The very nature of digitalised refugee data,’ as the political scientist Katja Jacobsen says, ‘means that it might also become accessible to other actors beyond the UNHCR’s own biometric identity management system.’

    Navigating a complex landscape of interstate sovereignty, caught between host and donor countries, refugee aid organisations often hold contradictory, inconsistent views on data protection. UNHCR officials have long been hesitant about sharing information with the Kenyan state, for instance. Their reservations are grounded in concerns that ‘confidential asylum-seeker data could be used for non-protection-related purposes’. Kenya has a poor record of refugee protection. Its security forces have a history of harassing Somalis, whether refugees or Kenyan citizens, who are widely mistrusted as ‘foreigners’.

    Such well-founded concerns did not deter the UNHCR from sharing data with, funding and training Kenya’s Department of Refugee Affairs (now the Refugee Affairs Secretariat), which since 2011 has slowly and unevenly taken over refugee registration in the country. The UNHCR hasconducted joint verification exercises with the Kenyan government to weed out cases of double registration. According to the anthropologist Claire Walkey, these efforts were ‘part of the externalisation of European asylum policy ... and general burden shifting to the Global South’, where more than 80 per cent of the world’s refugees live. Biometrics collected for protection purposes have been used by the Kenyan government to keep people out. Tens of thousands of ethnic Somali Kenyan citizens who have tried to get a Kenyan national ID have been turned away in recent years because their fingerprints are in the state’s refugee database.

    Over the last decade, biometrics have become part of the global development agenda, allegedly a panacea for a range of problems. One of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals is to provide everyone with a legal identity by 2030. Governments, multinational tech companies and international bodies from the World Bank to the World Food Programme have been promoting the use of digital identity systems. Across the Global South, biometric identifiers are increasingly linked to voting, aid distribution, refugee management and financial services. Countries with some of the least robust privacy laws and most vulnerable populations are now laboratories for experimental tech.

    Biometric identifiers promise to tie legal status directly to the body. They offer seductively easy solutions to the problems of administering large populations. But it is worth asking what (and who) gets lost when countries and international bodies turn to data-driven, automated solutions. Administrative failures, data gaps and clunky analogue systems had posed huge challenges for people at the mercy of dispassionate bureaucracies, but also provided others with room for manoeuvre.

    Biometrics may close the gap between an ID and its holder, but it opens a gulf between streamlined bureaucracies and people’s messy lives, their constrained choices, their survival strategies, their hopes for a better future, none of which can be captured on a digital scanner or encoded into a database.

    https://www.lrb.co.uk/blog/2020/september/machine-readable-refugees
    #biométrie #identité #réfugiés #citoyenneté #asile #migrations #ADN #tests_ADN #tests_génétiques #génétique #nationalité #famille #base_de_donnée #database #HCR #UNHCR #fraude #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #iris #technologie #contrôle #réinstallation #protection_des_données #empreintes_digitales #identité_digitale

    ping @etraces @karine4
    via @isskein

  • Impact of the use of private military and security services in immigration and border management on the protection of the rights of all migrants

    The present report covers the activities of the Working Group on the use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights and impeding the exercise of the right of peoples to self-determination since its previous report to the Council (A/HRC/42/42). It also highlights the impact on the protection of the human rights of all migrants of the increased use of private military and security services in immigration and border management.

    In the report, the Working Group outlines the overall context in which these services are provided and the relevant normative framework. It examines four main categories of services: provision of research and technical expertise; border security technologies and monitoring services; immigration detention, returns and removals; and the implementation of “externalization” policies. It shines a light on the impact of these services on the human rights of all migrants. It then looks at the lack of transparency, oversight and accountability of companies operating in this sector, and the impact on effective remedies for victims of violations and abuses by these companies.

    It concludes that, at times, companies are directly responsible for human rights abuses of migrants, notably in situations of deprivation of liberty; while in other instances, they are complicit in widespread human rights violations and abuse caused by other actors, such as immigration and border authorities.

    The Working Group ends its report with recommendations addressed primarily to States and private military and security companies, aimed at triggering a fundamental evaluation of the role that companies play in reinforcing security over humanitarian approaches to immigration and border management, as well as the specific security services they provide in this sector.

    https://undocs.org/A/HRC/45/9
    #rapport #frontières #migrations #asile #réfugiés #contrôles_frontaliers #mercenaires #militarisation_des_frontières #droits_humains #armée #armée_privée #privatisation #technologie #rétention #détention #renvois #expulsions

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Border pre-screening centres part of new EU migration pact

    The European Commission’s long-awaited and long-delayed pact on migration will include new asylum centres along the outer rim of the European Union, EUobserver has been told.

    The idea is part of a German proposal, floated last year, that seeks to rapidly pre-screen asylum seekers before they enter European Union territory.

    Michael Spindelegger, director-general of the Vienna-based International Centre for Migration Policy Development (ICMPD) told EUobserver on Thursday (9 July) that the European Commission had in fact decided to include it into their upcoming migration pact.

    “I got some information that this will be part of these proposals from the European Commission. So this is what I can tell you. I think this really is something that could bring some movement in the whole debate,” he said.

    Spindelegger was Austria’s minister of foreign affairs and finance minister before taking over the ICMPD in 2016, where he has been outspoken in favour of such centres as a means to unblock disagreements among member states on the overhaul of the future EU-wide asylum system.

    The German non-paper published in November 2019 proposed a mandatory initial assessment of asylum applications at the external border.

    The idea is to prevent irregular and economic migrants from adding to the administrative bottlenecks of bona-fide asylum seekers and refugees.

    “Manifestly unfounded or inadmissible applications shall be denied immediately at the external border, and the applicant must not be allowed to enter the EU,” stated the paper.

    EUobserver understands the new pact may also include a three-tiered approach.

    Abusive claims would be immediately dismissed and returned, those clearly in the need for protection would be relocated to an EU state, while the remainder would end up in some sort of facility.

    Spindelegger concedes the idea has its detractors - noting it will be also be tricky to find the legal framework to support it.

    “To give people, within some days, the right expectation is a good thing - so this is more or less a surprise that the European Commission took this initiative, because there are also some people who are totally against this,” he said.
    EU ’hotspots’ in Greece

    Among those is Oxfam International, an NGO that says people may end up in similar circumstances currently found in the so-called hotspots on the Greek islands.

    “We are very concerned that the Greek law and the hotspots on the islands are going to be the blueprint for the new asylum and migration pact and we have seen them failed in every criteria,” said Oxfam International’s Raphael Shilhav, an expert on migration.

    The hotspots were initially touted as a solution by the European Commission to facilitate and expedite asylum claims of people seeking international protection, who had disembarked from Turkey to the Greek islands.

    The zones on the islands quickly turned into overcrowded camps where people, including women and children, are forced to live amid filth and violence.

    Shilvav said some people at the hotspots who deserved asylum ended up falling through the cracks, noting new Greek laws effectively bar many people who do not have legal support from appealing an asylum rejection.

    EUobserver has previously spoken to one asylum seeker from the Congo who had spent almost three years living in a tent with others at the hotspot in Moria on Lesbos island.

    The new pact is a cornerstone policy of the Von der Leyen Commission and follows years of bickering among member states who failed to agree on a previous proposal to overhaul the existing EU-wide asylum rules.

    “Over the past few years, many member states simply refused to find a solution,” Germany’s interior minister Horst Seehofer said ahead of the current German EU presidency’s first debate on home affairs issues.

    The commission has so far refused to release any specific details of the plan - which has been delayed until September, following the eruption of the pandemic and on-going debates over the EU’s next long-term budget.

    “This proposal will be there to protect and defend the right to asylum and that includes the possibility to apply for asylum, that is a right for everybody to do so,” EU home affairs commissioner Ylva Johansson told MEPs earlier this week.

    For its part, the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) says the new pact needs to be common and workable.

    “This means establishing fair and fast asylum procedures to quickly determine who needs international protection and who does not,” a UNHCR spokeswoman said, in an emailed statement.

    She also noted that some 85 percent of the world’s refugees are currently hosted in neighbouring and developing countries and that more funds are needed for humanitarian and development support.

    https://euobserver.com/migration/148902
    #migration_pact #pacte_migratoire #Europe #identification #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #pré-identification #centres_d'identification #hotspots #Grèce #contrôles_migratoires #contrôles_frontaliers #externalisation #EU #UE #frontières_extérieures #relocalisation #renvois #expulsions

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • War & Pacification

    TNI’s War & Pacification work concerns the nexus between militarisation, security and globalisation. It confronts the structures and interests that underpin a new era of permanent war, makes visible the technologies of control and repression, highlights the impacts on people considered threatening or worthless by the powerful, and advocates alternatives based on peacebuilding, conflict transformation and respect for fundamental human rights.

    TNI uses the term ‘pacification’ to describe what is frequently presented as ‘security’. Our research has long shown that the effect of many policies adopted in the name of security is increased social control, allowing the maintenance of social orders that are deeply unequal and unjust. Pacification thus encompasses elite attempts to police the contours of globalisation’s discontents – the unworthy and expendable, the restive and resistant – and close down the progressive spaces occupied by civil society.

    –-> avec une série d’articles et analyses sur le sujet à trouver sur le site web du TNI :

    https://www.tni.org/en/war-pacification

    #militarisation #globalisation #répression #contrôle #technologie #guerre #exclusion #dépossession #coercition #conflits #peace-building #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #militarisation_des_frontières #privatisation #violence #mouvements_sociaux

    –-

    @karine4 :

    TNI uses the term ‘pacification’ to describe what is frequently presented as ‘security’.

    #terminologie #pacification #sécurité #mots #vocabulaire

    ping @isskein

  • Chronique Monde | #Mauritanie. Un partenariat européen au goût amer

    La Mauritanie fait figure d’exception au Sahel pour sa relative stabilité. Contrairement à d’autres États de la région, ce pays grand comme presque deux fois la France, à cheval entre le Maghreb et l’Afrique subsaharienne, n’a pas connu d’attentat terroriste depuis 2011. Dans ce contexte, Nouakchott est devenu un partenaire de choix dans le cadre de la lutte internationale contre le terrorisme et l’immigration irrégulière. Face à de tels impératifs, le respect des droits humains sur place passe largement au second plan.

    Tour d’horizon des droits humains

    Depuis le 1er août 2019, la Mauritanie est dirigée par Mohamed Ould El-Ghazaouani. Même si son élection au premier tour est contestée par l’opposition, elle marque la première transition présidentielle pacifique de l’histoire politique mauritanienne. Lors de son investiture, Amnesty International a qualifié de « déplorable » le bilan en matière de droits humains laissé par son prédécesseur, Mohamed Ould Abdel Aziz, citant notamment l’esclavage, les discriminations raciales ainsi que les atteintes à la liberté d’expression, d’association et de réunion.

    Même si l’esclavage a été officiellement aboli en 1981, criminalisé en 2007 et élevé au rang de crime contre l’humanité en 2012, sa pratique touchait environ 43000 personnes en 2016. Dans le même temps, Haratines et Afro- Mauritanien-ne-s restent largement exclu·e·s des postes de responsabilité et donc moins susceptibles de faire valoir leurs droits économiques et sociaux. Depuis l’indépendance, la quasi-totalité des pouvoirs politiques, militaires et économiques est détenue par les Beydanes, une communauté elle-même extrêmement hiérarchisée.

    Celles et ceux qui s’attaquent à ces questions sensibles s’exposent aux représailles de la part de l’État. L’exemple le plus parlant est celui du blogueur Mohamed Ould Mkhaïtir, condamné à mort en 2014 pour « apostasie » après avoir dénoncé l’usage de la religion pour légitimer les pratiques discriminatoires dont est victime la communauté dite des forgerons. Sa peine a depuis été réduite à deux années de prison et il vit actuellement en exil après avoir été libéré en juillet 2019.

    Une tradition d’hospitalité remise en cause

    La Mauritanie est à la fois un pays de transit pour les réfugié-e-s et les migrant-e-s qui se rendent en Afrique du Nord et en Europe et un pays de destination pour celles et ceux à la recherche d’emplois saisonniers dans les secteurs de la pêche et de l’industrie minière ou d’une protection internationale. Signataire de la Convention relative au statut des réfugiés, la Mauritanie a ouvert ses portes en 2012 à plus de 55000 réfugié-e-s malien-ne-s installé-e-s dans le camp de Mbera situé non loin de la frontière malienne.

    Cette politique d’accueil doit néanmoins être nuancée à la lumière de l’externalisation des frontières européennes. L’#Union_européenne (UE) a fait pression sur la Mauritanie pour qu’elle signe en 2003 un #accord_de_réadmission avec l’Espagne qui l’oblige à reprendre sur son territoire non seulement ses nationaux, mais également les ressortissant-e-s de pays tiers dont il est « vérifié » ou « présumé » qu’ils ou elles auraient transité par le territoire mauritanien. Un #centre_de_rétention avait été mis sur pied à #Nouadhibou avec l’aide de l’#Espagne. Il est aujourd’hui fermé (voir VE 135 / décembre 2011 : https://asile.ch/chronique/mauritanie-nouvelle-frontiere-de-leurope).

    Parallèlement, la Mauritanie a reçu entre 2007 et 2013 huit millions d’euros dans le cadre du #Fonds_européen_de_développement afin d’« appuyer et de renforcer les capacités de gestion, de suivi et de planification des flux migratoires » à travers notamment la révision du dispositif pénal relatif aux migrations.

    Résultat : la politique migratoire s’est durcie durant la présidence Aziz. Les autorités ont multiplié les contrôles aux frontières, placé en détention et renvoyé de force des milliers de personnes et soumis certaines d’entre elles à des tortures et mauvais traitements.

    L’ensemble de ces mesures a contribué à déplacer les routes migratoires vers le désert du #Sahara et la #Méditerranée_centrale. Le nombre d’arrivées dans l’archipel espagnol des #Canaries en provenance des côtes mauritaniennes a chuté de 30 000 à moins d’un millier entre 2006 et 2015.

    Cette dynamique est néanmoins en train de s’inverser à mesure que la #Libye apparaît comme une zone de plus en plus inhospitalière. Cette reconfiguration préfigure une recrudescence des naufrages dans l’#Atlantique faute de voies migratoires sûres. Le 4 décembre 2019, une embarcation de fortune partie de #Gambie a sombré au large de #Nouadhibou provoquant la mort d’une soixantaine de personnes.

    https://asile.ch/2020/04/17/chronique-monde-mauritanie-un-partenariat-europeen-au-gout-amer
    #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #UE #EU #aide_au_développement #développement #coopération_au_développement #contrôles_frontaliers #routes_migratoires
    via @vivre
    ping @rhoumour @isskein @karine4 @_kg_

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste « externalisation » :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765327

    Et la métaliste aide au développement et conditionnalité de l’aide :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733358#message768701

  • Covid-19, la #frontiérisation aboutie du #monde

    Alors que le virus nous a rappelé la condition de commune humanité, les frontières interdisent plus que jamais de penser les conditions du cosmopolitisme, d’une société comme un long tissu vivant sans couture à même de faire face aux aléas, aux menaces à même d’hypothéquer le futur. La réponse frontalière n’a ouvert aucun horizon nouveau, sinon celui du repli. Par Adrien Delmas, historien et David Goeury, géographe.

    La #chronologie ci-dessus représente cartographiquement la fermeture des frontières nationales entre le 20 janvier et le 30 avril 2020 consécutive de la pandémie de Covid-19, phénomène inédit dans sa célérité et son ampleur. Les données ont été extraites des déclarations gouvernementales concernant les restrictions aux voyages, les fermetures des frontières terrestres, maritimes et aériennes et des informations diffusées par les ambassades à travers le monde. En plus d’omissions ou d’imprécisions, certains biais peuvent apparaitre notamment le décalage entre les mesures de restriction et leur application.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=64&v=mv-OFB4WfBg&feature=emb_logo

    En quelques semaines, le nouveau coronavirus dont l’humanité est devenue le principal hôte, s’est propagé aux quatre coins de la planète à une vitesse sans précédent, attestant de la densité des relations et des circulations humaines. Rapidement deux stratégies politiques se sont imposées : fermer les frontières nationales et confiner les populations.

    Par un processus de #mimétisme_politique global, les gouvernements ont basculé en quelques jours d’une position minimisant le risque à des politiques publiques de plus en plus drastiques de contrôle puis de suspension des mobilités. Le recours systématique à la fermeture d’une limite administrative interroge : n’y a-t-il pas, comme répété dans un premier temps, un décalage entre la nature même de l’#épidémie et des frontières qui sont des productions politiques ? Le suivi de la diffusion virale ne nécessite-t-il un emboîtement d’échelles (famille, proches, réseaux de sociabilité et professionnels…) en deçà du cadre national ?

    Nous nous proposons ici de revenir sur le phénomène sans précédent d’activation et de généralisation de l’appareil frontalier mondial, en commençant par retrouver la chronologie précise des fermetures successives. Bien que resserrée sur quelques jours, des phases se dessinent, pour aboutir à la situation présente de fermeture complète.

    Il serait vain de vouloir donner une lecture uniforme de ce phénomène soudain mais nous partirons du constat que le phénomène de « frontiérisation du monde », pour parler comme Achille Mbembe, était déjà à l’œuvre au moment de l’irruption épidémique, avant de nous interroger sur son accélération, son aboutissement et sa réversibilité.

    L’argument sanitaire

    Alors que la présence du virus était attestée, à partir de février 2020, dans les différentes parties du monde, la fermeture des frontières nationales s’est imposée selon un principe de cohérence sanitaire, le risque d’importation du virus par des voyageurs était avéré. Le transport aérien a permis au virus de faire des sauts territoriaux révélant un premier archipel économique liant le Hubei au reste du monde avant de se diffuser au gré de mobilités multiples.

    Pour autant, les réponses des premiers pays touchés, en l’occurrence la Chine et la Corée du Sud, se sont organisées autour de l’élévation de barrières non-nationales : personnes infectées mises en quarantaine, foyers, ilots, ville, province etc. L’articulation raisonnée de multiples échelles, l’identification et le ciblage des clusters, ont permis de contrôler la propagation du virus et d’en réduire fortement la létalité. A toutes ces échelles d’intervention s’ajoute l’échelle mondiale où s‘est organisée la réponse médicale par la recherche collective des traitements et des vaccins.

    Face à la multiplication des foyers de contamination, la plupart des gouvernements ont fait le choix d’un repli national. La fermeture des frontières est apparue comme une modalité de reprise de contrôle politique et le retour aux sources de l’État souverain. Bien que nul dirigeant ne peut nier avoir agi « en retard », puisque aucun pays n’est exempt de cas de Covid-19, beaucoup d’États se réjouissent d’avoir fermé « à temps », avant que la vague n’engendre une catastrophe.

    L’orchestration d’une réponse commune concertée notamment dans le cadre de l’OMS est abandonnée au profit d’initiatives unilatérales. La fermeture des frontières a transformé la pandémie en autant d’épidémies nationales, devenant par là un exemple paradigmatique du nationalisme méthodologique, pour reprendre les termes d’analyse d’Ulrich Beck.

    S’impose alors la logique résidentielle : les citoyens présents sur un territoire deviennent comptables de la diffusion de l’épidémie et du maintien des capacités de prise en charge par le système médical. La dialectique entre gouvernants et gouvernés s’articule alors autour des décomptes quotidiens, de chiffres immédiatement comparés, bien que pas toujours commensurables, à ceux des pays voisins.

    La frontiérisation du monde consécutive de la pandémie de coronavirus ne peut se résumer à la seule somme des fermetures particulières, pays par pays. Bien au contraire, des logiques collectives se laissent entrevoir. A défaut de concertation, les gouvernants ont fait l’expérience du dilemme du prisonnier.

    Face à une opinion publique inquiète, un chef de gouvernement prenait le risque d’être considéré comme laxiste ou irresponsable en maintenant ses frontières ouvertes alors que les autres fermaient les leurs. Ces phénomènes mimétiques entre États se sont démultipliés en quelques jours face à la pandémie : les États ont redécouvert leur maîtrise biopolitique via les mesures barrières, ils ont défendu leur rationalité en suivant les avis de conseils scientifiques et en discréditant les approches émotionnelles ou religieuses ; ils ont privilégié la suspension des droits à grand renfort de mesures d’exception. Le risque global a alors légitimé la réaffirmation d’une autorité nationale dans un unanimisme relatif.

    Chronologie de la soudaineté

    La séquence vécue depuis la fin du mois janvier de l’année 2020 s’est traduite par une série d’accélérations venant renforcer les principes de fermeture des frontières. Le développement de l’épidémie en Chine alarme assez rapidement la communauté internationale et tout particulièrement les pays limitrophes.

    La Corée du Nord prend les devants dès le 21 janvier en fermant sa frontière avec la Chine et interdit tout voyage touristique sur son sol. Alors que la Chine développe une stratégie de confinement ciblé dès le 23 janvier, les autres pays frontaliers ferment leurs frontières terrestres ou n’ouvrent pas leurs frontières saisonnières d’altitude comme le Pakistan.

    Parallèlement, les pays non frontaliers entament une politique de fermeture des routes aériennes qui constituent autant de points potentiels d’entrée du virus. Cette procédure prend des formes différentes qui relèvent d’un gradient de diplomatie. Certains se contentent de demander aux compagnies aériennes nationales de suspendre leurs vols, fermant leur frontière de facto (Algérie, Égypte, Maroc, Rwanda, France, Canada, entre autres), d’autres privilégient l’approche plus frontale comme les États-Unis qui, le 2 février, interdisent leur territoire au voyageurs ayant séjournés en Chine.

    La propagation très rapide de l’épidémie en Iran amène à une deuxième tentative de mise en quarantaine d’un pays dès le 20 février. Le rôle de l’Iran dans les circulations terrestres de l’Afghanistan à la Turquie pousse les gouvernements frontaliers à fermer les points de passage. De même, le gouvernement irakien étroitement lié à Téhéran finit par fermer la frontière le 20 février. Puis les voyageurs ayant séjourné en Iran sont à leur tour progressivement considérés comme indésirables. Les gouvernements décident alors de politiques d’interdiction de séjour ciblées ou de mises en quarantaine forcées par la création de listes de territoires à risques.

    Le développement de l’épidémie en Italie amène à un changement de paradigme dans la gestion de la crise sanitaire. L’épidémie est dès lors considérée comme effectivement mondiale mais surtout elle est désormais perçue comme incontrôlable tant les foyers de contamination potentiels sont nombreux.

    La densité des relations intra-européennes et l’intensité des mobilités extra-européennes génèrent un sentiment d’anxiété face au risque de la submersion, le concept de « vague » est constamment mobilisé. Certains y ont lu une inversion de l’ordre migratoire planétaire. Les pays aux revenus faibles ou limités décident de fermer leurs frontières aux individus issus des pays aux plus hauts revenus.

    Les derniers jours du mois de février voient des gouvernements comme le Liban créer des listes de nationalités indésirables, tandis que d’autres comme Fiji décident d’un seuil de cas identifiés de Covid-19. Les interdictions progressent avec le Qatar et l’Arabie Saoudite qui ferment leur territoire aux Européens dès le 9 mars avant de connaître une accélération le 10 mars.

    Les frontières sont alors emportées dans le tourbillon des fermetures.

    La Slovénie débute la suspension de la libre circulation au sein de l’espace Schengen en fermant sa frontière avec l’Italie. Elle est suivie par les pays d’Europe centrale (Tchéquie, Slovaquie). En Afrique et en Amérique, les relations avec l’Union européenne sont suspendues unilatéralement. Le Maroc ferme ses frontières avec l’Espagne dès le 12 mars. Ce même jour, les États-Unis annonce la restriction de l’accès à son territoire aux voyageurs issu de l’Union européenne. La décision américaine est rapidement élargie au monde entier, faisant apparaitre l’Union européenne au cœur des mobilités planétaires.

    En quelques jours, la majorité des frontières nationales se ferment à l’ensemble du monde. Les liaisons aériennes sont suspendues, les frontières terrestres sont closes pour éviter les stratégies de contournements.

    Les pays qui échappent à cette logique apparaissent comme très minoritaires à l’image du Mexique, du Nicaragua, du Laos, du Cambodge ou de la Corée du Sud. Parmi eux, certains sont finalement totalement dépendants de leurs voisins comme le Laos et le Cambodge prisonniers des politiques restrictives du Vietnam et de la Thaïlande.

    Au-delà de ces gouvernements qui résistent à la pression, des réalités localisées renseignent sur l’impossible fermeture des frontières aux mobilités quotidiennes. Ainsi, malgré des discours de fermeté, exception faite de la Malaisie, des États ont maintenus la circulation des travailleurs transfrontaliers.

    Au sein de l’espace Schengen, la Slovénie maintient ses relations avec l’Autriche, malgré sa fermeté vis-à-vis de l’Italie. Le 16 mars, la Suisse garantit l’accès à son territoire aux salariés du Nord de l’Italie et du Grand Est de la France, pourtant les plus régions touchées par la pandémie en Europe. Allemagne, Belgique, Norvège, Finlande, Espagne font de même.

    De l’autre côté de l’Atlantique, malgré la multiplication des discours autoritaires, un accord est trouvé le 18 mars avec le Canada et surtout le 20 mars avec le Mexique pour maintenir la circulation des travailleurs. Des déclarations conjointes sont publiées le 21 mars. Partout, la question transfrontalière oblige au bilatéralisme. Uruguay et Brésil renoncent finalement à fermer leur frontière commune tant les habitants ont développé un « mode de vie binational » pour reprendre les termes de deux gouvernements. La décision unilatérale du 18 mars prise par la Malaisie d’interdire à partir du 20 mars tout franchissement de sa frontière prend Singapour de court qui doit organiser des modalités d’hébergement pour plusieurs dizaines de milliers de travailleurs considérés comme indispensables.

    Ces fermetures font apparaitre au grand jour la qualité des coopérations bilatérales.

    Certains États ferment d’autant plus facilement leur frontière avec un pays lorsque préexistent d’importantes rivalités à l’image de la Papouasie Nouvelle Guinée qui ferme immédiatement sa frontière avec l’Indonésie pourtant très faiblement touchée par la pandémie. D’autres en revanche, comme la Tanzanie refusent de fermer leurs frontières terrestres pour maintenir aux États voisins un accès direct à la mer.

    Certains observateurs se sont plu à imaginer des basculements dans les rapports de pouvoirs entre l’Afrique et l’Europe notamment. Après ces fermetures soudaines, le bal mondial des rapatriements a commencé, non sans de nombreuses fausses notes.

    L’accélération de la frontiérisation du monde

    La fermeture extrêmement rapide des frontières mondiales nous rappelle ensuite combien les dispositifs nationaux étaient prêts pour la suspension complète des circulations. Comme dans bien des domaines, la pandémie s’est présentée comme un révélateur puissant, grossissant les traits d’un monde qu’il est plus aisé de diagnostiquer, à présent qu’il est suspendu.

    Ces dernières années, l’augmentation des mobilités internationales par le trafic aérien s’est accompagnée de dispositifs de filtrage de plus en plus drastiques notamment dans le cadre de la lutte contre le terrorisme. Les multiples étapes de contrôle articulant dispositifs administratifs dématérialisés pour les visas et dispositifs de plus en plus intrusifs de contrôle physique ont doté les frontières aéroportuaires d’une épaisseur croissante, partageant l’humanité en deux catégories : les mobiles et les astreints à résidence.

    En parallèle, les routes terrestres et maritimes internationales sont restées actives et se sont même réinventées dans le cadre des mobilités dites illégales. Or là encore, l’obsession du contrôle a favorisé un étalement de la frontière par la création de multiples marches frontalières faisant de pays entiers des lieux de surveillance et d’assignation à résidence avec un investissement continu dans les dispositifs sécuritaires.

    L’épaisseur des frontières se mesure désormais par la hauteur des murs mais aussi par l’exploitation des obstacles géophysiques : les fleuves, les cols, les déserts et les mers, où circulent armées et agences frontalières. À cela s’est ajouté le pistage et la surveillance digitale doublés d’un appareil administratif aux démarches labyrinthiques faites pour ne jamais aboutir.

    Pour décrire ce phénomène, Achille Mbembe parlait de « frontiérisation du monde » et de la mise en place d’un « nouveau régime sécuritaire mondial où le droit des ressortissants étrangers de franchir les frontières d’un autre pays et d’entrer sur son territoire devient de plus en plus procédural et peut être suspendu ou révoqué à tout instant et sous n’importe quel prétexte. »

    La passion contemporaine pour les murs relève de l’iconographie territoriale qui permet d’appuyer les représentations sociales d’un contrôle parfait des circulations humaines, et ce alors que les frontières n’ont jamais été aussi polymorphes.

    Suite à la pandémie, la plupart des gouvernements ont pu mobiliser sans difficulté l’ingénierie et l’imaginaire frontaliers, en s’appuyant d’abord sur les compagnies aériennes pour fermer leur pays et suspendre les voyages, puis en fermant les aéroports avant de bloquer les frontières terrestres.

    Les réalités frontalières sont rendues visibles : la Norvège fait appel aux réservistes et retraités pour assurer une présence à sa frontière avec la Suède et la Finlande. Seuls les pays effondrés, en guerre, ne ferment pas leurs frontières comme au sud de la Libye où circulent armes et combattants.

    Beaucoup entretiennent des fictions géographiques décrétant des frontières fermées sans avoir les moyens de les surveiller comme la France en Guyane ou à Mayotte. Plus que jamais, les frontières sont devenues un rapport de pouvoir réel venant attester des dépendances économiques, notamment à travers la question migratoire, mais aussi symboliques, dans le principe de la souveraineté et son autre, à travers la figure de l’étranger. Classe politique et opinion publique adhèrent largement à une vision segmentée du monde.

    Le piège de l’assignation à résidence

    Aujourd’hui, cet appareil frontalier mondial activé localement, à qui l’on a demandé de jouer une nouvelle partition sanitaire, semble pris à son propre piège. Sa vocation même qui consistait à décider qui peut se déplacer, où et dans quelles conditions, semble égarée tant les restrictions sont devenues, en quelques jours, absolues.

    Le régime universel d’assignation à résidence dans lequel le monde est plongé n’est pas tant le résultat d’une décision d’ordre sanitaire face à une maladie inconnue, que la simple activation des dispositifs multiples qui préexistaient à cette maladie. En l’absence d’autres réponses disponibles, ces fermetures se sont imposées. L’humanité a fait ce qu’elle savait faire de mieux en ce début du XXIe siècle, sinon la seule chose qu’elle savait faire collectivement sans concertation préalable, fermer le monde.

    L’activation de la frontière a abouti à sa consécration. Les dispositifs n’ont pas seulement été activés, ils ont été renforcés et généralisés. Le constat d’une entrave des mobilités est désormais valable pour tous, et la circulation est devenue impossible, de fait, comme de droit. Pauvres et riches, touristes et hommes d’affaires, sportifs ou diplomates, tout le monde, sans exception aucune, fait l’expérience de la fermeture et de cette condition dans laquelle le monde est plongé.

    Seuls les rapatriés, nouveau statut des mobilités en temps de pandémie, sont encore autorisés à rentrer chez eux, dans les limites des moyens financiers des États qu’ils souhaitent rejoindre. Cette entrave à la circulation est d’ailleurs valable pour ceux qui la décident. Elle est aussi pour ceux qui l’analysent : le témoin de ce phénomène n’existe pas ou plus, lui-même pris, complice ou victime, de cet emballement de la frontiérisation.

    C’est bien là une caractéristique centrale du processus en cours, il n’y a plus de point de vue en surplomb, il n’y a plus d’extérieur, plus d’étranger, plus de pensée du dehors. La pensée est elle-même confinée. Face à la mobilisation et l’emballement d’une gouvernementalité de la mobilité fondée sur l’entrave, l’abolition pure et simple du droit de circuler, du droit d’être étranger, du droit de franchir les frontières d’un autre pays et d’entrer sur son territoire n’est plus une simple fiction.

    Les dispositifs de veille de ces droits, bien que mis à nus, ne semblent plus contrôlables et c’est en ce sens que l’on peut douter de la réversibilité de ces processus de fermeture.

    Réversibilité

    C’est à l’aune de ce constat selon lequel le processus de frontiérisation du monde était à déjà l’œuvre au moment de l’irruption épidémique que l’on peut interroger le caractère provisoire de la fermeture des frontières opérée au cours du mois de mars 2020.

    Pourquoi un processus déjà enclenché ferait machine arrière au moment même où il accélère ? Comme si l’accélération était une condition du renversement. Tout se passe plutôt comme si le processus de frontiérisation s’était cristallisé.

    La circulation internationale des marchandises, maintenue au pic même de la crise sanitaire, n’a pas seulement permis l’approvisionnement des populations, elle a également rappelé que, contrairement à ce que défendent les théories libérales, le modèle économique mondial fonctionne sur l’axiome suivant : les biens circulent de plus en plus indépendamment des individus.

    Nous venons bien de faire l’épreuve du caractère superflu de la circulation des hommes et des femmes, aussi longtemps que les marchandises, elles, circulent. Combien de personnes bloquées de l’autre côté d’une frontière, dans l’impossibilité de la traverser, quand le moindre colis ou autre produit traverse ?

    Le réseau numérique mondial a lui aussi démontré qu’il était largement à même de pallier à une immobilité généralisée. Pas de pannes de l’Internet à l’horizon, à l’heure où tout le monde est venu y puiser son travail, ses informations, ses loisirs et ses sentiments.

    De là à penser que les flux de data peuvent remplacer les flux migratoires, il n’y qu’un pas que certains ont déjà franchi. La pandémie a vite fait de devenir l’alliée des adeptes de l’inimitié entre les nations, des partisans de destins et de développement séparés, des projets d’autarcie et de démobilité.

    Alors que le virus nous a rappelé la condition de commune humanité, les frontières interdisent plus que jamais de penser les conditions du cosmopolitisme, d’une société comme un long tissu vivant sans couture à même de faire face aux aléas, aux zoonoses émergentes, au réchauffement climatique, aux menaces à même d’hypothéquer le futur.

    La réponse frontalière n’a ouvert aucun horizon nouveau, sinon celui du repli sur des communautés locales, plus petites encore, formant autant de petites hétérotopies localisées. Si les étrangers que nous sommes ou que nous connaissons se sont inquiétés ces dernières semaines de la possibilité d’un retour au pays, le drame qui se jouait aussi, et qui continue de se jouer, c’est bien l’impossibilité d’un aller.

    https://blogs.mediapart.fr/adrien-delmas/blog/280520/covid-19-la-frontierisation-aboutie-du-monde
    #frontières #fermeture_des_frontières #migrations #covid-19 #coronavirus #immobilité #mobilité #confinement #cartographie #vidéo #animation #visualisation #nationalisme_méthodologique #ressources_pédagogiques #appareil_frontalier_mondial #cohérence_sanitaire #crise_sanitaire #transport_aérien #Hubei #clusters #échelle #repli_national #contrôle_politique #Etat-nation #unilatéralisme #multilatéralisme #dilemme_du_prisonnier #mesures_barrière #rationalité #exceptionnalité #exceptionnalisme #autorité_nationale #soudaineté #routes_aériennes #Iran #Italie #Chine #vague #nationalités_indésirables #travailleurs_étrangers #frontaliers #filtrage #contrôles_frontaliers #contrôle #surveillance #marches_frontalières #assignation_à_résidence #pistage #surveillance_digitale #circulations #imaginaire_frontalier #ingénierie_frontalière #compagnies_aériennes #frontières_terrestres #aéroports #fictions_géographiques #géographie_politique #souveraineté #partition_sanitaire #rapatriés #gouvernementalité #droit_de_circuler #liberté_de_circulation #liberté_de_mouvement #réversibilité #irréversibilité #provisoire #définitif #cristallisation #biens #marchandises #immobilité_généralisée #cosmopolitisme #réponse_frontalière

    ping @mobileborders @karine4 @isskein @thomas_lacroix @reka

    • Épisode 1 : Liberté de circulation : le retour des frontières

      Premier temps d’une semaine consacrée aux #restrictions de libertés pendant la pandémie de coronavirus. Arrêtons-nous aujourd’hui sur une liberté entravée que nous avons tous largement expérimentée au cours des deux derniers mois : celle de circuler, incarnée par le retour des frontières.

      https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/cultures-monde/droits-et-libertes-au-temps-du-corona-14-liberte-de-circulation-le-ret

    • #Anne-Laure_Amilhat-Szary (@mobileborders) : « Nous avons eu l’impression que nous pouvions effectivement fermer les frontières »

      En Europe, les frontières rouvrent en ordre dispersé, avec souvent le 15 juin pour date butoir. Alors que la Covid-19 a atteint plus de 150 pays, la géographe Anne-Laure Amilhat-Szary analyse les nouveaux enjeux autour de ces séparations, nationales mais aussi continentales ou sanitaires.

      https://www.franceculture.fr/geopolitique/anne-laure-amilhat-szary-nous-avons-eu-limpression-que-nous-pouvions-e

    • « Nous sommes très loin d’aller vers un #repli à l’intérieur de #frontières_nationales »
      Interview avec Anne-Laure Amilhat-Szary (@mobileborders)

      Face à la pandémie de Covid-19, un grand nombre de pays ont fait le choix de fermer leurs frontières. Alors que certains célèbrent leurs vertus prophylactiques et protectrices, et appellent à leur renforcement dans une perspective de démondialisation, nous avons interrogé la géographe Anne-Laure Amilhat Szary, auteure notamment du livre Qu’est-ce qu’une frontière aujourd’hui ? (PUF, 2015), sur cette notion loin d’être univoque.

      Usbek & Rica : Avec la crise sanitaire en cours, le monde s’est soudainement refermé. Chaque pays s’est retranché derrière ses frontières. Cette situation est-elle inédite ? À quel précédent historique peut-elle nous faire penser ?

      Anne-Laure Amilhat Szary : On peut, semble-t-il, trouver trace d’un dernier grand épisode de confinement en 1972 en Yougoslavie, pendant une épidémie de variole ramenée par des pèlerins de La Mecque. 10 millions de personnes avaient alors été confinées, mais au sein des frontières nationales… On pense forcément aux grands confinements historiques contre la peste ou le choléra (dont l’efficacité est vraiment questionnée). Mais ces derniers eurent lieu avant que l’État n’ait la puissance régulatrice qu’on lui connaît aujourd’hui. Ce qui change profondément désormais, c’est que, même confinés, nous restons connectés. Que signifie une frontière fermée si l’information et la richesse continuent de circuler ? Cela pointe du doigt des frontières aux effets très différenciés selon le statut des personnes, un monde de « frontiérités » multiples plutôt que de frontières établissant les fondements d’un régime universel du droit international.

      Les conséquences juridiques de la fermeture des frontières sont inédites : en supprimant la possibilité de les traverser officiellement, on nie l’urgence pour certains de les traverser au péril de leur vie. Le moment actuel consacre en effet la suspension du droit d’asile mis en place par la convention de Genève de 1951. La situation de l’autre côté de nos frontières, en Méditerranée par exemple, s’est détériorée de manière aiguë depuis début mars.

      Certes, les populistes de tous bords se servent de la menace que représenteraient des frontières ouvertes comme d’un ressort politique, et ça marche bien… jusqu’à ce que ces mêmes personnes prennent un vol low-cost pour leurs vacances dans le pays voisin et pestent tant et plus sur la durée des files d’attentes à l’aéroport. Il y a d’une part une peur des migrants, qui pourraient « profiter » de Schengen, et d’autre part, une volonté pratique de déplacements facilités, à la fois professionnels et de loisirs, de courte durée. Il faut absolument rappeler que si le coronavirus est chez nous, comme sur le reste de la planète, c’est que les frontières n’ont pas pu l’arrêter ! Pas plus qu’elles n’avaient pu quelque chose contre le nuage de Tchernobyl. L’utilité de fermer les frontières aujourd’hui repose sur le fait de pouvoir soumettre, en même temps, les populations de différents pays à un confinement parallèle.

      Ne se leurre-t-on pas en croyant assister, à la faveur de la crise sanitaire, à un « retour des frontières » ? N’est-il pas déjà à l’œuvre depuis de nombreuses années ?

      Cela, je l’ai dit et écrit de nombreuses fois : les frontières n’ont jamais disparu, on a juste voulu croire à « la fin de la géographie », à l’espace plat et lisse de la mondialisation, en même temps qu’à la fin de l’histoire, qui n’était que celle de la Guerre Froide.

      Deux choses nouvelles illustrent toutefois la matérialité inédite des frontières dans un monde qui se prétend de plus en plus « dématérialisé » : 1) la possibilité, grâce aux GPS, de positionner la ligne précisément sur le terrain, de borner et démarquer, même en terrain difficile, ce qui était impossible jusqu’ici. De ce fait, on a pu régler des différends frontaliers anciens, mais on peut aussi démarquer des espaces inaccessibles de manière régulière, notamment maritimes. 2) Le retour des murs et barrières, spectacle de la sécurité et nouvel avatar de la frontière. Mais attention, toute frontière n’est pas un mur, faire cette assimilation c’est tomber dans le panneau idéologique qui nous est tendu par le cadre dominant de la pensée contemporaine.

      La frontière n’est pas une notion univoque. Elle peut, comme vous le dites, se transformer en mur, en clôture et empêcher le passage. Elle peut être ouverte ou entrouverte. Elle peut aussi faire office de filtre et avoir une fonction prophylactique, ou bien encore poser des limites, à une mondialisation débridée par exemple. De votre point de vue, de quel type de frontières avons-nous besoin ?

      Nous avons besoin de frontières filtres, non fermées, mais qui soient véritablement symétriques. Le problème des murs, c’est qu’ils sont le symptôme d’un fonctionnement dévoyé du principe de droit international d’égalité des États. À l’origine des relations internationales, la définition d’une frontière est celle d’un lieu d’interface entre deux souverainetés également indépendantes vis-à-vis du reste du monde.

      Les frontières sont nécessaires pour ne pas soumettre le monde à un seul pouvoir totalisant. Il se trouve que depuis l’époque moderne, ce sont les États qui sont les principaux détenteurs du pouvoir de les fixer. Ils ont réussi à imposer un principe d’allégeance hiérarchique qui pose la dimension nationale comme supérieure et exclusive des autres pans constitutifs de nos identités.

      Mais les frontières étatiques sont bien moins stables qu’on ne l’imagine, et il faut aujourd’hui ouvrir un véritable débat sur les formes de frontières souhaitables pour organiser les collectifs humains dans l’avenir. Des frontières qui se défassent enfin du récit sédentaire du monde, pour prendre véritablement en compte la possibilité pour les hommes et les femmes d’avoir accès à des droits là où ils vivent.

      Rejoignez-vous ceux qui, comme le philosophe Régis Debray ou l’ancien ministre socialiste Arnaud Montebourg, font l’éloge des frontières et appellent à leur réaffirmation ? Régis Débray écrit notamment : « L’indécence de l’époque ne provient pas d’un excès mais d’un déficit de frontières »…

      Nous avons toujours eu des frontières, et nous avons toujours été mondialisés, cette mondialisation se réalisant à l’échelle de nos mondes, selon les époques : Mer de Chine et Océan Indien pour certains, Méditerranée pour d’autres. À partir des XII-XIIIe siècle, le lien entre Europe et Asie, abandonné depuis Alexandre le Grand, se développe à nouveau. À partir du XV-XVIe siècle, c’est l’âge des traversées transatlantiques et le bouclage du monde par un retour via le Pacifique…

      Je ne suis pas de ces nostalgiques à tendance nationaliste que sont devenus, pour des raisons différentes et dans des trajectoires propres tout à fait distinctes, Régis Debray ou Arnaud Montebourg. Nous avons toujours eu des frontières, elles sont anthropologiquement nécessaires à notre constitution psychologique et sociale. Il y en a même de plus en plus dans nos vies, au fur et à mesure que les critères d’identification se multiplient : frontières de race, de classe, de genre, de religion, etc.

      Nos existences sont striées de frontières visibles et invisibles. Pensons par exemple à celles que les digicodes fabriquent au pied des immeubles ou à l’entrée des communautés fermées, aux systèmes de surveillance qui régulent l’entrée aux bureaux ou des écoles. Mais pensons aussi aux frontières sociales, celles d’un patronyme étranger et racialisé, qui handicape durablement un CV entre les mains d’un.e recruteur.e, celles des différences salariales entre femmes et hommes, dont le fameux « plafond de verre » qui bloque l’accès aux femmes aux fonctions directoriales. Mais n’oublions pas les frontières communautaires de tous types sont complexes car mêlant à la fois la marginalité choisie, revendiquée, brandie comme dans les « marches des fiertés » et la marginalité subie du rejet des minorités, dont témoigne par exemple la persistance de l’antisémitisme.

      La seule chose qui se transforme en profondeur depuis trente ans et la chute du mur de Berlin, c’est la frontière étatique, car les États ont renoncé à certaines des prérogatives qu’ils exerçaient aux frontières, au profit d’institutions supranationales ou d’acteurs privés. D’un côté l’Union Européenne et les formes de subsidiarité qu’elle permet, de l’autre côté les GAFAM et autres géants du web, qui échappent à la fiscalité, l’une des raisons d’être des frontières. Ce qui apparaît aussi de manière plus évidente, c’est que les États puissants exercent leur souveraineté bien au-delà de leurs frontières, à travers un « droit d’ingérence » politique et militaire, mais aussi à travers des prérogatives commerciales, comme quand l’Arabie Saoudite négocie avec l’Éthiopie pour s’accaparer ses terres en toute légalité, dans le cadre du land grabbing.

      Peut-on croire à l’hypothèse d’une démondialisation ? La frontière peut-elle être précisément un instrument pour protéger les plus humbles, ceux que l’on qualifie de « perdants de la mondialisation » ? Comment faire en sorte qu’elle soit justement un instrument de protection, de défense de certaines valeurs (sociales notamment) et non synonyme de repli et de rejet de l’autre ?

      Il faut replacer la compréhension de la frontière dans une approche intersectionnelle : comprendre toutes les limites qui strient nos existences et font des frontières de véritables révélateurs de nos inégalités. Conçues comme des instruments de protection des individus vivant en leur sein, dans des périmètres où l’Etat détenteur du monopole exclusif de la violence est censé garantir des conditions de vie équitables, les frontières sont désormais des lieux qui propulsent au contraire les personnes au contact direct de la violence de la mondialisation.

      S’il s’agit de la fin d’une phase de la mondialisation, celle de la mondialisation financière échevelée, qui se traduit par une mise à profit maximalisée des différenciations locales dans une mise en concurrence généralisée des territoires et des personnes, je suis pour ! Mais au vu de nos technologies de communication et de transports, nous sommes très loin d’aller vers un repli à l’intérieur de frontières nationales. Regardez ce que, en période de confinement, tous ceux qui sont reliés consomment comme contenus globalisés (travail, culture, achats, sport) à travers leur bande passante… Regardez qui consomme les produits mondialisés, du jean à quelques euros à la farine ou la viande produite à l’autre bout du monde arrivant dans nos assiettes moins chères que celle qui aurait été produite par des paysans proches de nous… Posons-nous la question des conditions dans lesquelles ces consommateurs pourraient renoncer à ce que la mondialisation leur offre !

      Il faut une approche plus fine des effets de la mondialisation, notamment concernant la façon dont de nombreux phénomènes, notamment climatiques, sont désormais établis comme étant partagés - et ce, sans retour possible en arrière. Nous avons ainsi besoin de propositions politiques supranationales pour gérer ces crises sanitaires et environnementales (ce qui a manqué singulièrement pour la crise du Cocid-19, notamment l’absence de coordination européenne).

      Les frontières sont des inventions humaines, depuis toujours. Nous avons besoin de frontières comme repères dans notre rapport au monde, mais de frontières synapses, qui font lien en même temps qu’elles nous distinguent. De plus en plus de personnes refusent l’assignation à une identité nationale qui l’emporterait sur tous les autres pans de leur identité : il faut donc remettre les frontières à leur place, celle d’un élément de gouvernementalité parmi d’autres, au service des gouvernants, mais aussi des gouvernés. Ne pas oublier que les frontières devraient être d’abord et avant tout des périmètres de redevabilité. Des espaces à l’intérieur desquels on a des droits et des devoirs que l’on peut faire valoir à travers des mécanismes de justice ouverts.

      https://usbeketrica.com/article/on-ne-va-pas-vers-repli-a-interieur-frontieres-nationales

  • Appel à l’annulation d’un contrat entre l’#UE et des entreprises israéliennes pour la surveillance des migrants par drones

    Les contrats de l’UE de 59 millions d’euros avec des entreprises militaires israélienne pour s’équiper en drones de guerre afin de surveiller les demandeurs d’asile en mer sont immoraux et d’une légalité douteuse.
    L’achat de #drones_israéliens par l’UE encourage les violations des droits de l’homme en Palestine occupée, tandis que l’utilisation abusive de tout drone pour intercepter les migrants et les demandeurs d’asile entraînerait de graves violations en Méditerranée, a déclaré aujourd’hui Euro-Mediterranean Human Rights Monitor dans un communiqué.
    L’UE devrait immédiatement résilier ces #contrats et s’abstenir d’utiliser des drones contre les demandeurs d’asile, en particulier la pratique consistant à renvoyer ces personnes en #Libye, entravant ainsi leur quête de sécurité.

    L’année dernière, l’Agence européenne des garde-frontières et des garde-côtes basée à Varsovie, #Frontex, et l’Agence européenne de sécurité maritime basée à Lisbonne, #EMSA, ont investi plus de 100 millions d’euros dans trois contrats pour des drones sans pilote. De plus, environ 59 millions d’euros des récents contrats de drones de l’UE auraient été accordés à deux sociétés militaires israéliennes : #Elbit_Systems et #Israel_Aerospace_Industries, #IAI.

    L’un des drones que Frontex a obtenu sous contrat est le #Hermes_900 d’Elbit, qui a été expérimenté sur la population mise en cage dans la #bande_de_Gaza assiégée lors de l’#opération_Bordure_protectrice de 2014. Cela montre l’#investissement de l’UE dans des équipements israéliens dont la valeur a été démontrée par son utilisation dans le cadre de l’oppression du peuple palestinien et de l’occupation de son territoire. Ces achats de drones seront perçus comme soutenant et encourageant une telle utilisation expérimentale de la #technologie_militaire par le régime répressif israélien.

    « Il est scandaleux pour l’UE d’acheter des drones à des fabricants de drones israéliens compte tenu des moyens répressifs et illégaux utilisés pour opprimer les Palestiniens vivant sous occupation depuis plus de cinquante ans », a déclaré le professeur Richard Falk, président du conseil d’administration d’Euromed-Monitor.

    Il est également inacceptable et inhumain pour l’UE d’utiliser des drones, quelle que soit la manière dont ils ont été obtenus pour violer les droits fondamentaux des migrants risquant leur vie en mer pour demander l’asile en Europe.

    Les contrats de drones de l’UE soulèvent une autre préoccupation sérieuse car l’opération Sophia ayant pris fin le 31 mars 2020, la prochaine #opération_Irini a l’intention d’utiliser ces drones militaires pour surveiller et fournir des renseignements sur les déplacements des demandeurs d’asile en #mer_Méditerranée, et cela sans fournir de protocoles de sauvetage aux personnes exposées à des dangers mortels en mer. Surtout si l’on considère qu’en 2019 le #taux_de_mortalité des demandeurs d’asile essayant de traverser la Méditerranée a augmenté de façon spectaculaire, passant de 2% en moyenne à 14%.

    L’opération Sophia utilise des navires pour patrouiller en Méditerranée, conformément au droit international, et pour aider les navires en détresse. Par exemple, la Convention des Nations Unies sur le droit de la mer (CNUDM) stipule que tous les navires sont tenus de signaler une rencontre avec un navire en détresse et, en outre, de proposer une assistance, y compris un sauvetage. Étant donné que les drones ne transportent pas d’équipement de sauvetage et ne sont pas régis par la CNUDM, il est nécessaire de s’appuyer sur les orientations du droit international des droits de l’homme et du droit international coutumier pour guider le comportement des gouvernements.

    Euro-Med Monitor craint que le passage imminent de l’UE à l’utilisation de drones plutôt que de navires en mer Méditerranée soit une tentative de contourner le #droit_international et de ne pas respecter les directives de l’UE visant à sauver la vie des personnes isolées en mer en situation critique. Le déploiement de drones, comme proposé, montre la détermination de l’UE à dissuader les demandeurs d’asile de chercher un abri sûr en Europe en facilitant leur capture en mer par les #gardes-côtes_libyens. Cette pratique reviendrait à aider et à encourager la persécution des demandeurs d’asile dans les fameux camps de détention libyens, où les pratiques de torture, d’esclavage et d’abus sexuels sont très répandues.

    En novembre 2019, l’#Italie a confirmé qu’un drone militaire appartenant à son armée s’était écrasé en Libye alors qu’il était en mission pour freiner les passages maritimes des migrants. Cela soulève de sérieuses questions quant à savoir si des opérations de drones similaires sont menées discrètement sous les auspices de l’UE.

    L’UE devrait décourager les violations des droits de l’homme contre les Palestiniens en s’abstenant d’acheter du matériel militaire israélien utilisé dans les territoires palestiniens occupés. Elle devrait plus généralement s’abstenir d’utiliser des drones militaires contre les demandeurs d’asile civils et, au lieu de cela, respecter ses obligations en vertu du droit international en offrant un refuge sûr aux réfugiés.

    Euro-Med Monitor souligne que même en cas d’utilisation de drones, les opérateurs de drones de l’UE sont tenus, en vertu du droit international, de respecter les #droits_fondamentaux à la vie, à la liberté et à la sécurité de tout bateau de migrants en danger qu’ils rencontrent. Les opérateurs sont tenus de signaler immédiatement tout incident aux autorités compétentes et de prendre toutes les mesures nécessaires pour garantir que les opérations de recherche et de sauvetage soient menées au profit des migrants en danger.

    L’UE devrait en outre imposer des mesures de #transparence et de #responsabilité plus strictes sur les pratiques de Frontex, notamment en créant un comité de contrôle indépendant pour enquêter sur toute violation commise et prévenir de futures transgressions. Enfin, l’UE devrait empêcher l’extradition ou l’expulsion des demandeurs d’asile vers la Libye – où leur vie serait gravement menacée – et mettre fin à la pratique des garde-côtes libyens qui consiste à arrêter et capturer des migrants en mer.

    http://www.france-palestine.org/Appel-a-l-annulation-d-un-contrat-entre-l-UE-et-des-entreprises-is
    #Europe #EU #drones #Israël #surveillance #drones #migrations #asile #réfugiés #Méditerranée #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #militarisation_des_frontières #complexe_militaro-industriel #business #armée #droits_humains #sauvetage

    ping @etraces @reka @nepthys @isskein @karine4

  • Monitoring being pitched to fight Covid-19 was tested on refugees

    The pandemic has given a boost to controversial data-driven initiatives to track population movements

    In Italy, social media monitoring companies have been scouring Instagram to see who’s breaking the nationwide lockdown. In Israel, the government has made plans to “sift through geolocation data” collected by the Shin Bet intelligence agency and text people who have been in contact with an infected person. And in the UK, the government has asked mobile operators to share phone users’ aggregate location data to “help to predict broadly how the virus might move”.

    These efforts are just the most visible tip of a rapidly evolving industry combining the exploitation of data from the internet and mobile phones and the increasing number of sensors embedded on Earth and in space. Data scientists are intrigued by the new possibilities for behavioural prediction that such data offers. But they are also coming to terms with the complexity of actually using these data sets, and the ethical and practical problems that lurk within them.

    In the wake of the refugee crisis of 2015, tech companies and research consortiums pushed to develop projects using new data sources to predict movements of migrants into Europe. These ranged from broad efforts to extract intelligence from public social media profiles by hand, to more complex automated manipulation of big data sets through image recognition and machine learning. Two recent efforts have just been shut down, however, and others are yet to produce operational results.

    While IT companies and some areas of the humanitarian sector have applauded new possibilities, critics cite human rights concerns, or point to limitations in what such technological solutions can actually achieve.

    In September last year Frontex, the European border security agency, published a tender for “social media analysis services concerning irregular migration trends and forecasts”. The agency was offering the winning bidder up to €400,000 for “improved risk analysis regarding future irregular migratory movements” and support of Frontex’s anti-immigration operations.

    Frontex “wants to embrace” opportunities arising from the rapid growth of social media platforms, a contracting document outlined. The border agency believes that social media interactions drastically change the way people plan their routes, and thus examining would-be migrants’ online behaviour could help it get ahead of the curve, since these interactions typically occur “well before persons reach the external borders of the EU”.

    Frontex asked bidders to develop lists of key words that could be mined from platforms like Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube. The winning company would produce a monthly report containing “predictive intelligence ... of irregular flows”.

    Early this year, however, Frontex cancelled the opportunity. It followed swiftly on from another shutdown; Frontex’s sister agency, the European Asylum Support Office (EASO), had fallen foul of the European data protection watchdog, the EDPS, for searching social media content from would-be migrants.

    The EASO had been using the data to flag “shifts in asylum and migration routes, smuggling offers and the discourse among social media community users on key issues – flights, human trafficking and asylum systems/processes”. The search covered a broad range of languages, including Arabic, Pashto, Dari, Urdu, Tigrinya, Amharic, Edo, Pidgin English, Russian, Kurmanji Kurdish, Hausa and French.

    Although the EASO’s mission, as its name suggests, is centred around support for the asylum system, its reports were widely circulated, including to organisations that attempt to limit illegal immigration – Europol, Interpol, member states and Frontex itself.

    In shutting down the EASO’s social media monitoring project, the watchdog cited numerous concerns about process, the impact on fundamental rights and the lack of a legal basis for the work.

    “This processing operation concerns a vast number of social media users,” the EDPS pointed out. Because EASO’s reports are read by border security forces, there was a significant risk that data shared by asylum seekers to help others travel safely to Europe could instead be unfairly used against them without their knowledge.

    Social media monitoring “poses high risks to individuals’ rights and freedoms,” the regulator concluded in an assessment it delivered last November. “It involves the use of personal data in a way that goes beyond their initial purpose, their initial context of publication and in ways that individuals could not reasonably anticipate. This may have a chilling effect on people’s ability and willingness to express themselves and form relationships freely.”

    EASO told the Bureau that the ban had “negative consequences” on “the ability of EU member states to adapt the preparedness, and increase the effectiveness, of their asylum systems” and also noted a “potential harmful impact on the safety of migrants and asylum seekers”.

    Frontex said that its social media analysis tender was cancelled after new European border regulations came into force, but added that it was considering modifying the tender in response to these rules.
    Coronavirus

    Drug shortages put worst-hit Covid-19 patients at risk
    European doctors running low on drugs needed to treat Covid-19 patients
    Big Tobacco criticised for ’coronavirus publicity stunt’ after donating ventilators

    The two shutdowns represented a stumbling block for efforts to track population movements via new technologies and sources of data. But the public health crisis precipitated by the Covid-19 virus has brought such efforts abruptly to wider attention. In doing so it has cast a spotlight on a complex knot of issues. What information is personal, and legally protected? How does that protection work? What do concepts like anonymisation, privacy and consent mean in an age of big data?
    The shape of things to come

    International humanitarian organisations have long been interested in whether they can use nontraditional data sources to help plan disaster responses. As they often operate in inaccessible regions with little available or accurate official data about population sizes and movements, they can benefit from using new big data sources to estimate how many people are moving where. In particular, as well as using social media, recent efforts have sought to combine insights from mobile phones – a vital possession for a refugee or disaster survivor – with images generated by “Earth observation” satellites.

    “Mobiles, satellites and social media are the holy trinity of movement prediction,” said Linnet Taylor, professor at the Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology and Society in the Netherlands, who has been studying the privacy implications of such new data sources. “It’s the shape of things to come.”

    As the devastating impact of the Syrian civil war worsened in 2015, Europe saw itself in crisis. Refugee movements dominated the headlines and while some countries, notably Germany, opened up to more arrivals than usual, others shut down. European agencies and tech companies started to team up with a new offering: a migration hotspot predictor.

    Controversially, they were importing a concept drawn from distant catastrophe zones into decision-making on what should happen within the borders of the EU.

    “Here’s the heart of the matter,” said Nathaniel Raymond, a lecturer at the Yale Jackson Institute for Global Affairs who focuses on the security implications of information communication technologies for vulnerable populations. “In ungoverned frontier cases [European data protection law] doesn’t apply. Use of these technologies might be ethically safer there, and in any case it’s the only thing that is available. When you enter governed space, data volume and ease of manipulation go up. Putting this technology to work in the EU is a total inversion.”
    “Mobiles, satellites and social media are the holy trinity of movement prediction”

    Justin Ginnetti, head of data and analysis at the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre in Switzerland, made a similar point. His organisation monitors movements to help humanitarian groups provide food, shelter and aid to those forced from their homes, but he casts a skeptical eye on governments using the same technology in the context of migration.

    “Many governments – within the EU and elsewhere – are very interested in these technologies, for reasons that are not the same as ours,” he told the Bureau. He called such technologies “a nuclear fly swatter,” adding: “The key question is: What problem are you really trying to solve with it? For many governments, it’s not preparing to ‘better respond to inflow of people’ – it’s raising red flags, to identify those en route and prevent them from arriving.”
    Eye in the sky

    A key player in marketing this concept was the European Space Agency (ESA) – an organisation based in Paris, with a major spaceport in French Guiana. The ESA’s pitch was to combine its space assets with other people’s data. “Could you be leveraging space technology and data for the benefit of life on Earth?” a recent presentation from the organisation on “disruptive smart technologies” asked. “We’ll work together to make your idea commercially viable.”

    By 2016, technologists at the ESA had spotted an opportunity. “Europe is being confronted with the most significant influxes of migrants and refugees in its history,” a presentation for their Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems Programme stated. “One burning issue is the lack of timely information on migration trends, flows and rates. Big data applications have been recognised as a potentially powerful tool.” It decided to assess how it could harness such data.

    The ESA reached out to various European agencies, including EASO and Frontex, to offer a stake in what it called “big data applications to boost preparedness and response to migration”. The space agency would fund initial feasibility stages, but wanted any operational work to be jointly funded.

    One such feasibility study was carried out by GMV, a privately owned tech group covering banking, defence, health, telecommunications and satellites. GMV announced in a press release in August 2017 that the study would “assess the added value of big data solutions in the migration sector, namely the reduction of safety risks for migrants, the enhancement of border controls, as well as prevention and response to security issues related with unexpected migration movements”. It would do this by integrating “multiple space assets” with other sources including mobile phones and social media.

    When contacted by the Bureau, a spokeswoman from GMV said that, contrary to the press release, “nothing in the feasibility study related to the enhancement of border controls”.

    In the same year, the technology multinational CGI teamed up with the Dutch Statistics Office to explore similar questions. They started by looking at data around asylum flows from Syria and at how satellite images and social media could indicate changes in migration patterns in Niger, a key route into Europe. Following this experiment, they approached EASO in October 2017. CGI’s presentation of the work noted that at the time EASO was looking for a social media analysis tool that could monitor Facebook groups, predict arrivals of migrants at EU borders, and determine the number of “hotspots” and migrant shelters. CGI pitched a combined project, co-funded by the ESA, to start in 2019 and expand to serve more organisations in 2020.
    The proposal was to identify “hotspot activities”, using phone data to group individuals “according to where they spend the night”

    The idea was called Migration Radar 2.0. The ESA wrote that “analysing social media data allows for better understanding of the behaviour and sentiments of crowds at a particular geographic location and a specific moment in time, which can be indicators of possible migration movements in the immediate future”. Combined with continuous monitoring from space, the result would be an “early warning system” that offered potential future movements and routes, “as well as information about the composition of people in terms of origin, age, gender”.

    Internal notes released by EASO to the Bureau show the sheer range of companies trying to get a slice of the action. The agency had considered offers of services not only from the ESA, GMV, the Dutch Statistics Office and CGI, but also from BIP, a consulting firm, the aerospace group Thales Alenia, the geoinformation specialist EGEOS and Vodafone.

    Some of the pitches were better received than others. An EASO analyst who took notes on the various proposals remarked that “most oversell a bit”. They went on: “Some claimed they could trace GSM [ie mobile networks] but then clarified they could do it for Venezuelans only, and maybe one or two countries in Africa.” Financial implications were not always clearly provided. On the other hand, the official noted, the ESA and its consortium would pay 80% of costs and “we can get collaboration on something we plan to do anyway”.

    The features on offer included automatic alerts, a social media timeline, sentiment analysis, “animated bubbles with asylum applications from countries of origin over time”, the detection and monitoring of smuggling sites, hotspot maps, change detection and border monitoring.

    The document notes a group of services available from Vodafone, for example, in the context of a proposed project to monitor asylum centres in Italy. The proposal was to identify “hotspot activities”, using phone data to group individuals either by nationality or “according to where they spend the night”, and also to test if their movements into the country from abroad could be back-tracked. A tentative estimate for the cost of a pilot project, spread over four municipalities, came to €250,000 – of which an unspecified amount was for “regulatory (privacy) issues”.

    Stumbling blocks

    Elsewhere, efforts to harness social media data for similar purposes were proving problematic. A September 2017 UN study tried to establish whether analysing social media posts, specifically on Twitter, “could provide insights into ... altered routes, or the conversations PoC [“persons of concern”] are having with service providers, including smugglers”. The hypothesis was that this could “better inform the orientation of resource allocations, and advocacy efforts” - but the study was unable to conclude either way, after failing to identify enough relevant data on Twitter.

    The ESA pressed ahead, with four feasibility studies concluding in 2018 and 2019. The Migration Radar project produced a dashboard that showcased the use of satellite imagery for automatically detecting changes in temporary settlement, as well as tools to analyse sentiment on social media. The prototype received positive reviews, its backers wrote, encouraging them to keep developing the product.

    CGI was effusive about the predictive power of its technology, which could automatically detect “groups of people, traces of trucks at unexpected places, tent camps, waste heaps and boats” while offering insight into “the sentiments of migrants at certain moments” and “information that is shared about routes and motives for taking certain routes”. Armed with this data, the company argued that it could create a service which could predict the possible outcomes of migration movements before they happened.

    The ESA’s other “big data applications” study had identified a demand among EU agencies and other potential customers for predictive analyses to ensure “preparedness” and alert systems for migration events. A package of services was proposed, using data drawn from social media and satellites.

    Both projects were slated to evolve into a second, operational phase. But this seems to have never become reality. CGI told the Bureau that “since the completion of the [Migration Radar] project, we have not carried out any extra activities in this domain”.

    The ESA told the Bureau that its studies had “confirmed the usefulness” of combining space technology and big data for monitoring migration movements. The agency added that its corporate partners were working on follow-on projects despite “internal delays”.

    EASO itself told the Bureau that it “took a decision not to get involved” in the various proposals it had received.

    Specialists found a “striking absence” of agreed upon core principles when using the new technologies

    But even as these efforts slowed, others have been pursuing similar goals. The European Commission’s Knowledge Centre on Migration and Demography has proposed a “Big Data for Migration Alliance” to address data access, security and ethics concerns. A new partnership between the ESA and GMV – “Bigmig" – aims to support “migration management and prevention” through a combination of satellite observation and machine-learning techniques (the company emphasised to the Bureau that its focus was humanitarian). And a consortium of universities and private sector partners – GMV among them – has just launched a €3 million EU-funded project, named Hummingbird, to improve predictions of migration patterns, including through analysing phone call records, satellite imagery and social media.

    At a conference in Berlin in October 2019, dozens of specialists from academia, government and the humanitarian sector debated the use of these new technologies for “forecasting human mobility in contexts of crises”. Their conclusions raised numerous red flags. They found a “striking absence” of agreed upon core principles. It was hard to balance the potential good with ethical concerns, because the most useful data tended to be more specific, leading to greater risks of misuse and even, in the worst case scenario, weaponisation of the data. Partnerships with corporations introduced transparency complications. Communication of predictive findings to decision makers, and particularly the “miscommunication of the scope and limitations associated with such findings”, was identified as a particular problem.

    The full consequences of relying on artificial intelligence and “employing large scale, automated, and combined analysis of datasets of different sources” to predict movements in a crisis could not be foreseen, the workshop report concluded. “Humanitarian and political actors who base their decisions on such analytics must therefore carefully reflect on the potential risks.”

    A fresh crisis

    Until recently, discussion of such risks remained mostly confined to scientific papers and NGO workshops. The Covid-19 pandemic has brought it crashing into the mainstream.

    Some see critical advantages to using call data records to trace movements and map the spread of the virus. “Using our mobile technology, we have the potential to build models that help to predict broadly how the virus might move,” an O2 spokesperson said in March. But others believe that it is too late for this to be useful. The UK’s chief scientific officer, Patrick Vallance, told a press conference in March that using this type of data “would have been a good idea in January”.

    Like the 2015 refugee crisis, the global emergency offers an opportunity for industry to get ahead of the curve with innovative uses of big data. At a summit in Downing Street on 11 March, Dominic Cummings asked tech firms “what [they] could bring to the table” to help the fight against Covid-19.

    Human rights advocates worry about the longer term effects of such efforts, however. “Right now, we’re seeing states around the world roll out powerful new surveillance measures and strike up hasty partnerships with tech companies,” Anna Bacciarelli, a technology researcher at Amnesty International, told the Bureau. “While states must act to protect people in this pandemic, it is vital that we ensure that invasive surveillance measures do not become normalised and permanent, beyond their emergency status.”

    More creative methods of surveillance and prediction are not necessarily answering the right question, others warn.

    “The single largest determinant of Covid-19 mortality is healthcare system capacity,” said Sean McDonald, a senior fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation, who studied the use of phone data in the west African Ebola outbreak of 2014-5. “But governments are focusing on the pandemic as a problem of people management rather than a problem of building response capacity. More broadly, there is nowhere near enough proof that the science or math underlying the technologies being deployed meaningfully contribute to controlling the virus at all.”

    Legally, this type of data processing raises complicated questions. While European data protection law - the GDPR - generally prohibits processing of “special categories of personal data”, including ethnicity, beliefs, sexual orientation, biometrics and health, it allows such processing in a number of instances (among them public health emergencies). In the case of refugee movement prediction, there are signs that the law is cracking at the seams.
    “There is nowhere near enough proof that the science or math underlying the technologies being deployed meaningfully contribute to controlling the virus at all.”

    Under GDPR, researchers are supposed to make “impact assessments” of how their data processing can affect fundamental rights. If they find potential for concern they should consult their national information commissioner. There is no simple way to know whether such assessments have been produced, however, or whether they were thoroughly carried out.

    Researchers engaged with crunching mobile phone data point to anonymisation and aggregation as effective tools for ensuring privacy is maintained. But the solution is not straightforward, either technically or legally.

    “If telcos are using individual call records or location data to provide intel on the whereabouts, movements or activities of migrants and refugees, they still need a legal basis to use that data for that purpose in the first place – even if the final intelligence report itself does not contain any personal data,” said Ben Hayes, director of AWO, a data rights law firm and consultancy. “The more likely it is that the people concerned may be identified or affected, the more serious this matter becomes.”

    More broadly, experts worry that, faced with the potential of big data technology to illuminate movements of groups of people, the law’s provisions on privacy begin to seem outdated.

    “We’re paying more attention now to privacy under its traditional definition,” Nathaniel Raymond said. “But privacy is not the same as group legibility.” Simply put, while issues around the sensitivity of personal data can be obvious, the combinations of seemingly unrelated data that offer insights about what small groups of people are doing can be hard to foresee, and hard to mitigate. Raymond argues that the concept of privacy as enshrined in the newly minted data protection law is anachronistic. As he puts it, “GDPR is already dead, stuffed and mounted. We’re increasing vulnerability under the colour of law.”

    https://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/stories/2020-04-28/monitoring-being-pitched-to-fight-covid-19-was-first-tested-o
    #cobaye #surveillance #réfugiés #covid-19 #coronavirus #test #smartphone #téléphones_portables #Frontex #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #Shin_Bet #internet #big_data #droits_humains #réseaux_sociaux #intelligence_prédictive #European_Asylum_Support_Office (#EASO) #EDPS #protection_des_données #humanitaire #images_satellites #technologie #European_Space_Agency (#ESA) #GMV #CGI #Niger #Facebook #Migration_Radar_2.0 #early_warning_system #BIP #Thales_Alenia #EGEOS #complexe_militaro-industriel #Vodafone #GSM #Italie #twitter #détection #routes_migratoires #systèmes_d'alerte #satellites #Knowledge_Centre_on_Migration_and_Demography #Big_Data for_Migration_Alliance #Bigmig #machine-learning #Hummingbird #weaponisation_of_the_data #IA #intelligence_artificielle #données_personnelles

    ping @etraces @isskein @karine4 @reka

    signalé ici par @sinehebdo :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/849167

  • Latest Tactic to Push Migrants From Europe ? A Private, Clandestine Fleet

    The government of Malta enlisted three privately owned fishing trawlers to intercept migrants in the Mediterranean, and force them back to a war zone, officials and a boat captain say.

    With the onset of the coronavirus, Malta announced that it was too overwhelmed to rescue migrants making the precarious crossing of the Mediterranean Sea, where the tiny island nation has been on the front line of the maritime migration route over the past decade.

    In secret, however, the Maltese authorities have worked hard to make sure no migrants actually reach the island.

    It dispatched a small fleet of private merchant vessels in April to intercept migrants at sea and return them by force to a war zone in Libya, according to information provided by the captain of one of the boats, a senior commander in the Libyan Coast Guard, and a former Maltese official involved in the episode.

    The three repurposed fishing trawlers are privately owned, but acted on the instructions of the Armed Forces of Malta, the captain and the others said.

    The clandestine operation, which some experts consider illegal under international law, is just the latest dubious measure taken by European countries in recent years to stem the migration from Africa and the Middle East that has sown political chaos in Europe and fueled a populist backlash.

    Since 2017, European states, led by Italy, have paid the Libyan government to return more migrants to Libya, hassled the private rescue organizations that try to bring them to Europe, and asked passing merchant vessels to intercept them before they enter European waters.

    But Malta’s latest tactic may be among the most egregious, maritime experts say, because it involved a designated flotilla of private vessels, based in a European port, that intercepted and expelled asylum seekers from international waters that fall within the responsibility of European coast guards.

    “Against a pattern of increased abuses against asylum seekers in recent years, this newest approach stands out,” said Itamar Mann, an expert in maritime and refugee law at the University of Haifa in Israel. “Its methods chillingly resemble organized crime, and indeed the operations of people smugglers, which European policymakers so adamantly denounce.”

    “The facts available raise serious concerns that we are seeing the emergence of a novel systematic pattern, such that may even put Maltese state officials in danger of criminal liability, at home or abroad,” Dr. Mann added.

    The Maltese government did not respond to multiple requests for comment.

    The activity was first documented on the evening of April 12, when three aging blue trawlers left the Grand Harbour in Valletta, the Maltese capital, within an hour of each other. The three boats — the Dar Al Salam 1, the Salve Regina and the Tremar — departed at the request of the Maltese authorities, according to the captain of the Tremar, Amer Abdelrazek.

    A former Maltese official, Neville Gafa, said he was enlisted by the government that same night to use his connections in Libya to ensure the safe passage of the first two boats to Libya.

    The boats did not submit paperwork to the immigration police, and switched off their satellite tracking devices soon after leaving port, maritime databases show.

    But their mission had already been determined, said Mr. Gafa, who said he had been asked by the Maltese prime minister’s chief of staff, Clyde Caruana, to help coordinate the operation. Mr. Caruana did not respond to requests for comment, but a government spokesman told The Times of Malta that Mr. Gafa had been asked to liaise with Libya on a separate matter that was unconnected to the episode.

    The trawlers were sent to intercept a migrant vessel attempting to reach Malta from Libya — and which had been issuing mayday calls for some 48 hours — and then return its passengers to Libya, Mr. Gafa said.

    The stricken migrant vessel was still in international waters, according to coordinates provided by the migrants by satellite phone to Alarm Phone, an independent hotline for shipwrecked refugees. But it had reached the area of jurisdiction of Malta’s armed forces, making it Malta’s responsibility under international maritime law to rescue its passengers and provide them with sanctuary.

    Two of the trawlers — the Dar Al Salam 1 and the Tremar — reached the migrant vessel early on April 14, guided by a Maltese military helicopter, Mr. Abdelrazek said. Several of the migrants had already drowned, according to testimony later gathered by Alarm Phone.

    The roughly 50 survivors were taken aboard the Dar Al Salam 1, Mr. Abdelrazek said.

    The Dar Al Salam 1 and the Salve Regina sailed to Tripoli on April 15, the former carrying the migrants and the latter carrying several tons of food and water, as a show of appreciation to the Libyan government, Mr. Abdelrazek and Mr. Gafa said. The Tremar waited in international waters, Mr. Abdelrazek said.

    The Maltese authorities told their Libyan counterparts that the Dar Al Salam 1 was in fact a Maltese vessel called the Maria Cristina, said Commodore Masoud Abdalsamad, who oversees international operations at the Libyan Coast Guard. To further obscure its identity, the boat’s crew had also painted over the ship’s name and flew a Maltese flag to confuse the Libyan Coast Guard.

    Though based physically in Malta and owned by a Maltese shipowner, the vessel is legally registered in Tobruk, a port in east Libya controlled by opponents of the authorities in Tripoli. The crew did not want to risk upsetting the Tripoli government by broadcasting its links to Tobruk, leading it to hide its name and home port, Mr. Abdelrazek said.

    After disembarking, the migrants were taken to a notorious detention center run by a pro-government militia, where migrants are routinely tortured, held for ransom or sold to other militias. The detention cells stand close to an arms depot, and the surrounding area was hit by shelling in December.

    Conditions at the detention center are “utterly appalling,” said Safa Msehli, a spokeswoman for the International Organization for Migration, an arm of the United Nations. “People are caged in overcrowded hangars with barely any access to food or sanitation facilities.”

    “Many tell us of the abuse they endure and the inhumane ways in which they are exploited,’’ Ms. Msehli added. ‘‘Reports of migrants being used to load weapons, and the detention center’s proximity to a military facility, raise serious concerns over the safety of people detained there arbitrarily.”

    After departing Tripoli, the Dar Al Salam 1 turned its satellite identification system back on, and the boat resurfaced off the coast of Libya on the evening of April 15, data provided by Marine Traffic, a maritime database, shows.

    The owner of the Salve Regina, Dominic Tanti, declined to comment through an intermediary, and the owner of the Tremar, Yasser Aziz, did not return a message seeking comment.

    The owner of the Dar Al Salam 1, Carmelo Grech, did not to respond to multiple requests for comment sent by text, voice message and a letter hand-delivered to his apartment. But he has confirmed his boat’s involvement to a Maltese newspaper, and several outlets have already highlighted its role, including the Italian newspaper, Avvenire, and the Maltese blogger Manuel Delia.

    Mr. Grech and his boat have colorful histories, raising questions in Malta about why the government involved them in a state-led operation.

    Mr. Grech has previously recounted how he used the boat, then known as the Mae Yemanja, to bring supplies to Libyan rebels during the Libyan revolution in 2011. In 2012, court records show it was impounded after Mr. Grech was accused, though later acquitted, of smuggling contraband cigarettes from Libya to Malta.

    In 2015, Mr. Grech was detained by a Libyan faction for several days for what he later described as a misunderstanding over his visas.

    Maltese ship records obtained by The Times show that Mr. Grech canceled his boat’s registration in Malta last February, before repainting it to show it had been re-registered in Tobruk, for undisclosed reasons.

    Mr. Abdelrazek also has a criminal history, having been convicted in 2014 of forging documents, court records show.

    After appearing briefly in Malta last week, the Dar Al Salam 1 and the Salve Regina returned again to sea on Sunday.

    Their satellite trackers were once again switched off shortly afterward.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/30/world/europe/migrants-malta.html
    #privatisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #Malte #Méditerranée #push-backs #refoulement #refoulements #Libye

    –—

    Commentaire de @isskein via la mailing-list Migreurop :

    Depuis avril fonctionne une méthode pro-active : une #flotte_privée de 3 bateaux qui se chargent d’arrêter les bateaux de migrants et de les renvoyer vers la Libye.

    Un ancien officiel maltais, #Neville_Gafà, a été engagé par le Premier Ministre pour monter l’affaire avec ses contacts libyens

    il est entre autres responsable de la #tragédie_de_Pâques : le gouvernement a ignoré durant 48h un bateau qui se trouvait dans sles eaux internationales (mais dans la juridiction des Forces armées maltaises) , puis envoyé sa flotte privée, qui a pris à son bord 51 migrants dont 8 femmes et 3 enfants, à bord 5 cadavres ; 7 migrants s’étaient noyés auparavant. Ils ont été ramenés à Tripolii
    voir https://timesofmalta.com/articles/view/the-faces-and-names-of-a-migration-tragedy.788723

    #mourir_en_mer #morts #décès

    –---
    Dans le mail reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop, Conni parle de #hotspot_mobile :

    Yesterday we got news from the Maltese media about a new strategy of the authorities to keep rescued migrants out: a floating hotspot on a cruise ship off their coast:
    https://www.maltatoday.com.mt/news/national/102051/rescued_migrants_to_be_kept_on_captain_morgan_vessel_outside_territor

    https://www.tvm.com.mt/en/news/rescued-migrants-will-remain-on-vessel-13-miles-outside-maltese-territorial-

    via @isskein

    • Rappel de Sara Prestianni sur l’utilisation des #hotspots_mobiles en #Italie (via mailing-list Migreurop, 01.05.2020) :

      The “hotspot boat” is the same system , used by Italy from April 17 , only for migrants have been intercepted by ships flying foreign flags, as decided in the inter-ministerial decree of 7 April.
      On board of the ship “hotspot” Rubattino - positioned in front of Palermo - there are at this moment almost 200 migrants, of the two rescues carried out by the ships Alan Kurdi and Aita Mari. All of them were negative to the Covid test, but it is not clear how long they will have to stay on the ship and where they will be transferred (at the beginning of the procedure there was talk of a relocation to Germany).
      Yesterday the Guarantor for the Rights of Italian Prisoners, in his bulletin, expressed concern about the establishment of these “floating” hotspots.
      http://www.garantenazionaleprivatiliberta.it/gnpl

      “The implementation of quarantine measures in extraordinary and exceptional places cannot lead to a situation of ’limbo’: migrant people are under the jurisdiction of the Italian State for the purposes of the health measures imposed on them, but at the same time they do not have the possibility - and for a period of time not indifferent - to exercise the rights that our country recognizes and protects. They cannot apply for asylum, they are not de facto - and at least temporarily - protected as victims of trafficking or unaccompanied foreign minors, nor can they have timely access to procedures for family reunification under the Dublin Regulation. - procedures which, moreover, have their own intrinsic deadlines.”
      The Guarantor also indicated that the experience of the ship “Rubattino” would not seem to remain an isolated case as the Ministry of Infrastructure and Transport launched on 19 April a procedure for the chartering of vessels to be used for the assistance and health surveillance of migrants rescued at sea or arrived on the national territory as a result of autonomous boats.

      –---

      –-> sur les hotspots mobiles, voir aussi : https://seenthis.net/tag/hotspot_mobile

    • Abela admits coordinating private boats that returned migrants to Libya

      PM says Easter manoeuvre was a ’rescue’ not a pushback.

      Prime Minister Robert Abela has admitted commissioning a boat that returned migrants to war-torn Libya on Easter weekend but has insisted it was a rescue mission and not a pushback.

      A boat commissioned by Maltese authorities picked up a group of migrants in the search and rescue area earlier this month and returned them to the North African country.

      It is a crime under international law for states to return asylum seekers to a country where they are likely to face persecution.

      Speaking publicly about the controversy for the first time on Friday, Abela admitted the manoeuvre and defended the government’s actions.

      "There was no pushback,"he said.

      "There was a rescue of migrants. Had the Maltese government not coordinated, tens of lives would have died, because a [EU coastguard] Frontex plane just flew overhead and kept on going.

      “Malta’s ports are closed but it coordinated this rescue and ensured that the irregular migrants were taken to the port that was open.”

      The country, along with Italy, closed its ports, citing concerns about the spread of coronavirus.

      Former OPM official Neville Gafa claimed under oath this week that he had coordinated the pushback.

      Asked Gafa’s involvement, Abela said his only involvement was liaising with a contact he was claiming to have in Libya so that the rescue could be facilitated. He said Gafa was not paid or promised anything.

      Abela defended using a private boat, saying that a Search and Rescue convention stipulates the legal obligations of individual states that are not obliged to carry out the actual rescues but to coordinate such rescues.

      The obligations also state that countries can use their own assets or else send private assets to rescue boats in distress, he said.

      This week, Malta has commissioned a Captain Morgan tourist boat Europa II, to house migrants until a solution for their disembarkation is found.

      “We are ready to do anything to save lives. We have nothing to be ashamed of,” Abela said, adding that the cost for the Captain Morgan boat being used to temporarily house migrants outside Maltese waters will come from aid by the EU.

      “Malta’s position is clear and we know what our obligations are. We are going to remain firm on this. We are not a safe port and we cannot guarantee our resources for rescues.

      "We are duty bound to stick to this position. It is counterproductive to close port and airports to tourists but then open ports for irregular migrants. There are hundreds of thousands of people on the Libyan coast wanting to leave there and come to Lampedusa and Malta. We are obeying international rules,” he insisted.

      He said the migration problem should not be “Malta’s alone” and called for the EU to intervene.

      Earlier on Friday, Foreign Minister Evarist Bartolo told Times of Malta that “the EU was responsible for a huge push back of migrants to Malta”.

      He said its failure to set up an effective and fair solidarity mechanism to share the burden of welcoming irregular migrants means that Malta had borne a huge burden over the years.

      He quoted a letter from a United Nations official to him in which he admitted that Europe needed to adopt a more principled migration policy that will serve European needs, that does not penalise those seeking to cross, and that does not leave countries like Malta, which are trying to do the right thing, on their own.

      “If we continue to fail, more people, Libyans and non-Libyans, will be compelled to seek safety on the European side” because of the ongoing war and the economic consequences of Covid-19.

      Bartolo said that in the first three months of the year, 3,600 irregular migrants left the Libyan coast through the Central Mediterranean route. This is over 400 per cent more than in the same period in 2019. Some 1,200 came to Malta.

      He said Malta’s centres were “overflowing” and there is no room for more migrants.

      https://timesofmalta.com/articles/view/abela-admits-coordinating-private-boats-that-returned-migrants-to.7893

    • Malte a affrété des navires privés pour renvoyer les embarcations de migrants vers la Libye

      Une enquête du New York Times révèle que les autorités maltaises ont affrété, depuis le mois d’avril, une flotte de navires privés afin d’empêcher les migrants d ’atteindre l’île et les renvoyer en Libye. Selon plusieurs experts, cette action est illégale.

      En pleine pandémie de coronavirus, Malte fait tout pour empêcher les embarcations de migrants d’atteindre l’île. A tel point que le gouvernement a discrètement dépêché en avril une flotte de navires marchands privés pour intercepter les migrants et les renvoyer en Libye, a révélé une enquête du New York Times publiée jeudi 30 avril.

      Selon le quotidien américain - qui s’appuie sur les témoignages d’un capitaine de l’un de ces bateaux, commandant en chef des garde-côtes libyens, et d’un ancien responsable maltais impliqué dans l’opération - les trois chalutiers de pêche affrétés appartiennent à des particuliers mais ont agi sur les instructions des forces armées maltaises.
      Une opération sur ordre du Premier ministre maltais

      L’opération a été documentée pour la première fois dans la soirée du 12 avril, écrit le New York Times, quand trois chalutiers ont quitté le port de la Valette, la capitale maltaise, sur ordre des autorités. Un ancien responsable maltais, Neville Gafa, a déclaré qu’il avait été enrôlé par le gouvernement le soir même pour utiliser ses relations en Libye et assurer le passage en toute sécurité des deux premiers chalutiers vers les ports libyens.

      Le Dar As Salam 1 et le Tremar, ont ainsi été envoyés pour intercepter une embarcation de migrants présente dans les eaux maltaises - qui avait émis des appels de détresse depuis deux jours - afin de les renvoyer en Libye, a précisé Neville Gafa. A bord du canot, se trouvait cinq cadavres.

      Le 15 avril, l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) avait pourtant affirmé que les migrants avaient été interceptés par un navire marchand puis remis à des garde-côtes qui les avaient alors amenés au port de Tripoli.

      Le troisième chalutier, le Salve Regina, a quant à lui navigué vers Tripoli le 15 avril, transportant plusieurs tonnes de nourriture et d’eau, en guise de remerciement au gouvernement libyen, assure au quotidien américain le capitaine du Tremar, Amer Abdelrazek.

      Devant la justice maltaise, à la suite de la plainte lancée par plusieurs ONG contre le Premier ministre sur sa responsabilité dans la mort des cinq migrants, Neville Gafa a déclaré sous serment qu’il avait agi sur ordre du cabinet du Premier ministre.

      Une opération illégale

      « Dans une tendance à l’augmentation des abus contre les demandeurs d’asile ces dernières années, cette nouvelle approche se démarque », déclare au New York Times Itamar Mann, expert en droit maritime et des réfugiés à l’université de Haïfa, en Israël. « Ces méthodes ressemblent de façon effrayante au crime organisé, aux opérations de passeurs, que les décideurs européens dénoncent avec tant de fermeté », continue le chercheur pour qui cette opération est illégale eu égard au droit international.

      En effet, comme écrit le quotidien américain, une flotte de navires privées, basée dans un port européen, qui intercepte et expulse des demandeurs d’asile des eaux internationales relèvent de la responsabilité des garde-côtes européens.

      Cette opération « pourrait mettre les fonctionnaires de l’Etat maltais en danger de responsabilité pénale, dans le pays ou à l’étranger », signale encore Itamar Mann.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/24485/malte-a-affrete-des-navires-prives-pour-renvoyer-les-embarcations-de-m

    • Malta-Libya #deal sets up centres ’against illegal migration’

      Coastguard, UN centres, EU help among items discussed

      Malta and Libya will be setting up units to coordinate operations against illegal migration, the government said on Thursday.

      These centres are expected to start operating within the coming weeks, however, the government provided no additional information.

      The announcement followed an unannounced trip by Prime Minister Robert Abela, Home Affairs Minister Byron Camilleri and Foreign Affairs Minister Evarist Bartolo to Tripoli, where they discussed migration with the Libyan government.

      The three met Fayez al-Sarraj who heads the UN-backed Government of National Accord as well as Mohammed Sheibani, deputy minister responsible for migration at the meeting in Tripoli.

      It was Abela’s first trip to war-torn Libya as prime minister.

      Sources said the meeting was held on the back of a new wave of Malta-Libya relations, and a change in approach.

      Discussions revolved around the need to push the EU to help Libya to train its coastguard, obtain funding for reception camps manned by the UN, as well as to build a realistic strategy to slow down the flow of migrants into Libya.

      “It was a positive meeting, though of course that doesn’t mean we’ve resolved the migration issue,” a source told Times of Malta.

      “Malta could be Libya’s bridge to the EU. We need to stop human trafficking as well as save lives at sea,” the source said.

      Valletta, diplomatic sources say, has been trying to build new bridges with the Libyan authorities to stem the tide of migrants leaving the North African coast.
      800,000 migrants in Libya

      In a statement issued later on Thursday, the government said that during the meeting Abela reiterated Malta’s position on the need to address and stop human trafficking. Malta, he added, was facing unprecedented and disproportionate flows and burdens.

      Meanwhile, al-Sarraj said that 800,000 migrants were currently in Libya and the country needed an effective long-term and holistic approach.

      Both leaders spoke about the need to strengthen cooperation to ensure that lives are not lost at sea and to combat human traffickers on the ground and at sea.

      According to Abela, the solution lies in concrete action on Libyan shores and its southern border. This would be done through addressing and stopping human trafficking, rather than focusing just on relocation of migrants to other countries.

      Signing a #memorandum_of_understanding, Malta and Libya agreed to set up a coordination unit in each country to assist in operations against illegal migration.

      The agreement also stipulates that Malta supports Libya when it comes to financial assistance through the upcoming Multiannual Financial Framework.

      https://timesofmalta.com/articles/view/abela-ministers-return-from-libya-after-positive-migration-talks.79484

      #accord #centres

    • Mer méditerranée : Malte renforce sa coopération avec la Libye pour lutter contre « l’immigration illégale »

      Malte a signé un accord avec le gouvernement d’union nationale (GNA) libyen dans le but de renforcer « la lutte contre l’immigration illégale » en mer Méditerranée. Le texte prévoit la création de « centres de coordination » à Tripoli et La Valette qui seront opérationnels dès le mois de juillet.

      Malte tente par tous les moyens de limiter le flux de migrants qui débarquent sur ses côtes. Pour ce faire, les autorités maltaises et libyennes viennent d’acter la création de « centres de coordination » à Tripoli et à La Valette.

      Ces deux centres « offriront le soutien nécessaire à la lutte contre l’immigration illégale en Libye et dans la région méditerranéenne », selon un protocole d’accord entre Malte et le gouvernement d’union nationale (GNA) de Fayez al-Sarraj, et présenté au Parlement maltais mercredi 3 juin (https://www.independent.com.mt/file.aspx?f=206640).

      Financé par le gouvernement maltais, ces structures seront chacune dirigées par trois fonctionnaires et limiteront leur travail « au soutien et à la coordination », indique cet accord valable pour trois ans. Les centres devraient voir le jour dès le mois de juillet.
      « L’UE a la responsabilité de parvenir à un accord global avec la Libye »

      Malte, le plus petit État de l’Union européenne (UE), de par sa taille et sa population, se plaint depuis longtemps d’être obligé d’assumer à lui seul l’arrivée des migrants en provenance de la Libye, pays en guerre.

      Actuellement, plus de 400 migrants secourus en Méditerranée sont bloqués sur quatre navires touristiques affrétés par Malte juste à la limite de ses eaux territoriales, La Valette exigeant qu’ils soient ensuite pris en charge par d’autres pays européens.

      Le ministre maltais des Affaires étrangères, Evarist Bartolo, a déclaré au Parlement mercredi que « l’UE a la responsabilité de parvenir à un accord global avec la Libye afin de limiter l’immigration clandestine ».

      « Le nombre d’immigrants arrivant à Malte est disproportionné par rapport aux autres pays européens », a insisté le ministre. Selon lui, depuis 2005 l’Europe n’a accueilli que 1 700 migrants, tandis que 22 000 sont arrivés à Malte - seuls 8% des migrants en situation irrégulière sur l’île ont été relocalisés dans d’autres pays européens.

      Selon le protocole d’accord, Malte proposera à la Commission européenne une augmentation du soutien financier pour aider le GNA à sécuriser ses frontières sud et à démanteler les réseaux de trafiquants d’êtres humains.

      La Valette proposera également le financement de « moyens maritimes supplémentaires nécessaires » pour contrôler et intercepter les passeurs de migrants en Méditerranée.


      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/25175/mer-mediterranee-malte-renforce-sa-cooperation-avec-la-libye-pour-lutt

    • Accordo Malta-Libia: insieme daranno la caccia ai migranti. Con i soldi Ue

      Centrali operative e pattugliamenti congiunti. Fonti Onu: è una regolazione dei respingimenti illegali. Intanto Frontex smentisce l’inchiesta di Malta sulla “#Strage_di_Pasquetta

      Dopo la scoperta degli accordi segreti con Tripoli, siglati tre anni fa, Malta ha deciso di uscire allo scoperto negoziando un memorandum siglato dal premier Robert Abela, fresco di archiviazione per le accuse di respingimento, e il presidente libico Fayez al Sarraj.

      I due Paesi daranno insieme la caccia ai migranti nel Mediterraneo, ma con nuovi fondi Ue da destinare a Tripoli.

      SCARICA QUI IL DOCUMENTO COMPLETO: https://www.avvenire.it/c/attualita/Documents/MOU%20with%20Libya.pdf

      E’ prevista la creazione di «centri di coordinamento» nel porto di Tripoli e a La Valletta che saranno operativi da luglio. In realtà le operazioni congiunte andavano avanti da anni, ma adesso sono state ufficializzate. Le strutture congiunte «forniranno il sostegno necessario alla lotta contro l’immigrazione clandestina in Libia e nella regione del Mediterraneo», si legge. Inizialmente Malta finanzierà interamente l’attivazione delle centrali operative, ognuna delle quali sarà guidata da tre funzionari dei rispettivi governi. Fin da subito, però, il premier Abela si impegna a ottenere dall’Ue fondi aggiuntivi da destinare alla cosiddetta Guardia costiera libica, che verrà ulteriormente equipaggiata.

      Nessuna menzione si fa riguardo alla necessità di ristabilire il rispetto dei diritti umani nei campi di prigionia libici. L’unico scopo, come del resto è sempre stato in questi anni anche per Italia e Ue, è quello di trattenere i profughi in cattività, a qualunque costo. «L’UE ha la responsabilità di raggiungere un accordo globale con la Libia», c’è scritto nell’accordo che, di fatto, appalta a Malta e Libia il controllo dell’intero Canale di Sicilia, ad esclusione delle ultime 12 miglia territoriali dalla costa di Lampedusa. Malta, lo stato più piccolo dell’Unione Europea (Ue) per dimensioni e popolazione, si è lamentato da tempo di essere costretto ad assumere da solo la responsabilità dell’arrivo dei migranti dalla Libia, un paese in guerra che secondo l’Onu in alcun modo può essere ritenuto un “porto sicuro”.

      Nelle settimane scorse una nuova serie di inchieste giornalistiche internazionali ha permesso di accertare che non solo Malta ha messo in mare da tempo una flottiglia di “pescherecci fantasma” incaricati di intercettare i barconi e ricondurli in Libia, ma che spesso le Forze armate dell’isola equipaggiano i gommoni, anche con motori nuovi, affinché raggiungano le coste siciliane.

      Nei giorni scorsi il Tribunale dell’isola aveva archiviato il procedimento contro il premier laburista Robert Abela e il capo delle forze armate, accusati della morte di 12 migranti nella “strage di Pasquetta”. Forte di questa “assoluzione”, Abela si è recato a Tripoli per sigillare l’intesa con il presidente al-Sarraj. Ma proprio uno dei punti chiave utilizzati dal giudice Joe Mifsud per cestinare le accuse, ieri è stato categoricamente smentito dall’agenzia Ue Frontex che ha risposto per iscritto alle domande di Avvenire. Secondo il magistrato, infatti, il coordinamento dei soccorsi in qualche misura era attribuibile non a Malta ma a Frontex che aveva individuato con un suo aereo i barconi. Da Varsavia, rispondendo con una nota ad “Avvenire”, l’agenzia ha precisato che “è il centro di salvataggio appropriato, non Frontex, a decidere se chiedere assistenza a qualsiasi nave della zona. E Frontex non aveva navi vicino a quest’area”. La responsabilità di intervenire, dunque, era di innanzitutto di Malta che invece per giorni ha ignorato gli Sos e ha poi inviato un motopesca quando oramai 7 persone erano affogate e altre 5 sono morte di stenti durante il respingimento dalle acque maltesi verso la Libia.

      Nel fine settimana di Pasqua l’aeroobile Eagle 1, tracciato e segnalato dal giornalista Sergio Scandura di Radio Radicale “stava svolgendo - spiegano da Frontex - una missione di sorveglianza ben al di fuori dell’area operativa dell’Operazione Themis di Frontex”. Nella nota un portavoce dell’agenzia Ue precisa poi che “Frontex gestisce operazioni congiunte, nonché la sorveglianza pre-frontaliera, che veniva eseguita dall’aereo in questione”. Secondo questa ricostruzione, che avrebbe meritato maggiore puntiglio investigativo anche per accertare eventuali responsabilità esterne a Malta, “in linea con il diritto internazionale, Frontex ha avvisato i centri di soccorso competenti dell’avvistamento di una nave che riteneva necessitasse di assistenza”, si legge ancora. Parole che hanno un significato preciso e costituiscono un’accusa verso chi era stato informato e doveva prestare quell’assistenza negata per giorni. Le autorità italiane hanno apposto il segreto alle comunicazioni intercorse. Silenzio che potrebbe essere presto scardinato da indagini giudiziarie. Lo stesso per Malta, che neanche nell’atto conclusivo dell’inchiesta ha voluto rendere pubbliche le comunicazioni con Roma e con Frontex che a sua volta ribadisce ad Avvenire che “è il centro di salvataggio appropriato, non Frontex, a decidere se chiedere assistenza a qualsiasi nave della zona. Tuttavia, desidero sottolineare qui che Frontex non aveva navi vicino a quest’area”.

      Il memorandum sta creando non poco dibattito nei vertici della Marina militare italiana. A Tripoli, infatti, si trova la nave Gorgona, ufficialmente incaricata di assistere la cosiddetta guardia costiera libica per conto di Roma. E certo i marinai italiani non vogliono finire a fare gli addetti alla manutenzione delle motovedette donate dall’Italia ma che tra pochi giorni si coordineranno con Malta. «Mentre l’obiettivo dichiarato nell’accordo vi è il benessere del popolo libico e di quello maltese, il benessere delle principali vittime, cioè migranti, richiedenti asilo e rifugiati, non viene mai menzionato», ha commentato sul portale cattolico Newsbook il giudice maltese Giovanni Bonelli, già membro della Corte europea dei diritti dell’uomo. «Si potrebbe pensare - aggiunge - che questo memorandum si riferisca all’estrazione di minerali, non a degli esseri umani».Fonti delle Nazioni Unite contattate da “Avvenire” hanno reagito a caldo considerando l’intesa come una «regolamentazione di fatto dei respingimenti illegali».

      Negli anni scorsi più volte Avvenire ha documentato, anche con registrazioni audio, il collegamento diretto tra la Marina italiana e la Guardia costiera libica. Ma ora Malta si spinge oltre, ufficializzando una alleanza operativa che inoltre rischierà di causare conflitti con l’operazione navale europea Irini a guida italiana. Fonti delle Nazioni Unite contattate da Avvenire hanno reagito a caldo considerando l’intesa come una “regolamentazione di fatto dei respingimenti illegali”.

      https://www.avvenire.it/attualita/pagine/accordo-malta-libia-respingimento-migranti

    • Malta: Illegal tactics mar another year of suffering in central Mediterranean

      The Maltese government has resorted to dangerous and illegal measures for dealing with the arrivals of refugees and migrants at sea, which are exposing countless people to appalling suffering and risking their lives, Amnesty International revealed today in a report “Waves of impunity: Malta’s violations of the rights of refugees and migrants in the Central Mediterranean”. As Amnesty is launching this new report, despair is growing aboard the Maersk Etienne, which has been denied a port to disembark for over a month, after rescuing 27 people on a request from Maltese authorities

      The Maltese government’s change in approach to arrivals in the central Mediterranean in 2020 has seen them take unlawful, and sometimes unprecedented, measures to avoid assisting refugees and migrants. This escalation of tactics included arranging unlawful pushbacks to Libya, diverting boats towards Italy rather than rescuing people in distress, illegally detaining hundreds of people on ill-equipped ferries off Malta’s waters, and signing a new agreement with Libya to prevent people from reaching Malta.

      “Malta is stooping to ever more despicable and illegal tactics to shirk their responsibilities to people in need. Shamefully, the EU and Italy have normalized cooperation with Libya on border control, but sending people back to danger in Libya is anything but normal,” said Elisa De Pieri, Regional Researcher at Amnesty International.

      “EU member states must stop assisting in the return of people to a country where they face unspeakable horrors.”

      Some of the actions taken by the Maltese authorities may have involved criminal acts being committed, resulting in avoidable deaths, prolonged arbitrary detention, and illegal returns to war-torn Libya. The authorities also used the COVID-19 pandemic as a pretext to declare that Malta was not a safe place to disembark – to discourage people from seeking safety and a decent life in Europe.

      The abusive practices by Malta are part and parcel of wider efforts by EU member states and institutions to outsource the control of the central Mediterranean to Libya, in order that EU-supported Libyan authorities might intercept refugees and migrants at sea before they reach Europe.

      People are then returned to Libya and arbitrarily detained in places where torture and other ill-treatment is highly likely. From the beginning of January to 27 August 2020 7,256 people were ‘pulled back’ to Libya by the EU-supported Libyan Coast Guard, which was often alerted of the presence of boats at sea by airplanes engaged in Frontex and other EU operations.

      The Easter Monday pushback

      The case of the “Easter Monday pushback” illustrates the desperate lengths to which the Maltese authorities are willing to go to prevent people arriving on their shores.

      On 15 April 2020, a group of 51 people, including seven women and three children, were unlawfully returned to Tripoli after being rescued in Malta’s search and rescue region by the commercial fishing boat Dar Al Salam 1.

      The boat, which had been contracted by the Maltese government, took those onboard back to Libya and handed them over to the Libyan authorities, exposing refugees and migrants – who had just survived a deadly shipwreck – to further risks to their life.

      Five people were dead when the vessel reached Libya, and the survivors reported that a further seven people were missing at sea. Survivors reported that those on board were not given medical assistance. In an official statement the Maltese authorities confirmed they had coordinated the operation.

      Lack of accountability in Malta

      While a magisterial inquiry into the case was conducted, it left many questions unanswered. It is still unknown how the 12 people died and how 51 were returned to Libya despite it being illegal to transfer people there. The magistrate conducting the inquiry did not hear the testimonies of the 51 people transferred to Libya, nor probe the chain of responsibility to contract the Dar El Salam 1 and instruct it to transfer people to Libya.

      The NGO Alarm Phone has evidence that other pushbacks by Maltese authorities may also have occurred in 2019 and 2020, which have not been investigated.

      EU and Italian cooperation with Libya

      Italy in particular has worked closely with Libya, having provided support to Libyan maritime authorities by providing vessels, training and assistance in the establishment of a Libyan SAR region to facilitate pullbacks by the Libyan coastguard.

      Despite intensifying conflict and the arrival of COVID-19 threatening the humanitarian situation of refugees and migrants in Libya, Italy has continued to implement policies to keep people in Libya. These include extending its Memorandum of Understanding on Migration with Libya aimed at boosting Libyan authorities’ resources to prevent departures, for another three years, extending its military operations in the region focusing on supporting Libya’s maritime authorities, and maintaining legislation and practices aimed at the criminalization of NGOs rescuing people in the central Mediterranean.

      The central Mediterranean is the latest border on which Amnesty International is highlighting abuses by EU member states authorities. In 2020, Amnesty International has also documented abuses on the borders between Croatia and Bosnia, and Greece and Turkey. The EU urgently needs an independent and effective human rights monitoring system at its external borders to ensure accountability for violations and abuses.

      “The European Commission must turn the page when they launch the New Pact on Migration and Asylum after the summer and ensure European border control and European migration policies uphold the rights of refugees and migrants,” said Elisa De Pieri.

      “The horrors faced by people returned to Libya must caution European leaders against cooperating with countries which don’t respect human rights. By continuing to empower abusers and to hide their heads in the sand when violations are committed, those EU leaders share responsibility for them.”

      https://www.amnesty.eu/news/malta-illegal-tactics-mar-another-year-of-suffering-in-central-mediterranean/#:~:text=The%20Maltese%20government%20has%20resorted,Malta's%20violations%20

  • Esternalizzazione e diritto d’asilo, un approfondimento dell’ASGI

    Con il documento che si pubblica l’ASGI, facendo uso delle analisi, delle azioni e delle discussioni prodotte nel corso degli ultimi anni, offre una lettura del fenomeno dell’esternalizzazione delle frontiere e del diritto di asilo focalizzando la propria attenzione in particolare sulle politiche di esternalizzazione volte ad impedire o limitare l’accesso delle persone straniere attraverso la rotta del Mare Mediterraneo centrale, nonché nell’ottica della verifica del rispetto delle norme costituzionali, europee ed internazionali che tutelano i diritti fondamentali delle persone e della conseguente ricerca di strumenti giuridici di contrasto alle violazioni verificate.

    L’esternalizzazione del controllo delle frontiere e del diritto dei rifugiati viene definita come l’insieme delle azioni economiche, giuridiche, militari, culturali, prevalentemente extraterritoriali, poste in essere da soggetti statali e sovrastatali, con il supporto indispensabile di ulteriori attori pubblici e privati, volte ad impedire o ad ostacolare che i migranti (e, tra essi, i richiedenti asilo) possano entrare nel territorio di uno Stato al fine di usufruire delle garanzie, anche giurisdizionali, previste in tale Stato, o comunque volte a rendere legalmente e sostanzialmente inammissibili il loro ingresso o una loro domanda di protezione sociale e/o giuridica.

    Nell’ambito del documento è considerato prima il contesto storico della esternalizzazione, dunque quello geopolitico più recente, attinente la rotta del mar Mediterraneo centrale, infine il contesto giuridico nazionale ed internazionale che si ritiene leso da tali politiche. Vengono, dunque, indicate alcune tra le possibili strade affinché sia individuata la responsabilità dei soggetti che determinano la violazione dei diritti umani delle persone conseguenti alle politiche in materia.

    Il documento intende porsi quale strumento di dibattito nell’ambito dell’ evoluzione dell’analisi del diritto di asilo per fornire adeguati strumenti di comprensione e contrasto di un fenomeno che si ritiene particolarmente insidioso e tale da inficiare sostanzialmente la rilevanza di diritti, tra cui innanzitutto il diritto di asilo, pur formalmente riconosciuti alle persone da parte dell’Italia e degli Stati membri dell’Unione europea.

    https://www.asgi.it/asilo-e-protezione-internazionale/asilo-esternalizzazione-approfondimento
    #ASGI #rapport #externalisation #Méditerranée_centrale #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #Mer_Méditerranée #droits_fondamentaux #droit_d'asile #Libye #Italie #Trust_Fund #HCR #relocalisation #fonds_fiduciaire_d’urgence #Trust_Fund_for_Africa

    Pour télécharger le rapport:


    https://www.asgi.it/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/2020_1_Documento-Asgi-esternalizzazione.pdf

    ping @isskein

  • L’#immigration_italienne en Suisse

    Par sa proximité et son robuste marché de l’emploi, la Suisse attire les ressortissants italiens depuis longtemps déjà. Malgré des fluctuations à travers les années, ils restent la plus grande communauté étrangère du pays et leur nombre va croissant. Bref historique chiffré.

    En 1888, le recensement fédéral fait état de 41’881 Italiens établis en Suisse, un chiffre qui passe à 202’809 en 1910. La Première Guerre mondiale (1914 à 1918) fera baisser les effectifs : les transalpins ne sont plus que 134’628 en 1920.

    Besoin de main d’oeuvre
    Dans les années 1950, on lance en Suisse de grands chantiers : barrages, routes, tunnels... Et la main d’oeuvre manque. On fait donc appel à des travailleurs étrangers dont de nombreux Italiens, principalement originaires du sud du pays. (voir reportage ci-dessous)

    Des ouvriers peu ou pas qualifiés arrivent alors en masse. Entre 1950 et 1970, le nombre d’Italiens travaillant en Suisse est multiplié par quatre, passant à 583’855. A l’époque, ils représentent 54% de la population étrangère du pays.

    Une vie à la dure
    On leur impose à la frontière un examen médical humiliant. Ils habitent souvent des baraquements sommaires et exercent des métiers difficiles, voire dangereux. En 1965, sur les 88 victimes de l’accident du barrage de Mattmark (Valais), 56 étaient italiennes. En outre, leur statut de saisonniers ne les autorise à rester en Suisse que neuf mois par an et ils n’ont pas le droit de travailler lorsqu’ils rentrent en Italie.

    Les familles de ces immigrants ne peuvent pas, légalement, s’établir en Suisse avec eux. Certaines viennent malgré tout et vivent le plus discrètement possible. Dans les années 1970, des centaines d’enfants vivent cachés, sans pouvoir sortir ni être scolarisés. Ce sont « les enfants du placard ». (voir reportage ci-dessous)

    Les Italiens de Suisse aujourd’hui
    Depuis 2007, on constate un nouvel afflux d’immigrés en provenance d’Italie. Ces nouveaux arrivants sont jeunes et souvent très qualifiés. Ils viennent en Suisse exercer des professions pour lesquelles ils ne trouvent pas de poste en Italie. Il faut dire que le chômage des jeunes y atteint 35%.

    Sur les deux millions d’étrangers présents en Suisse en 2016, les Italiens formaient toujours la première communauté (15,1%), devant les Allemands (14,4%), les Portugais (12,8%) et les Français (6%).

    https://www.rts.ch/decouverte/monde-et-societe/monde/migrations/10759720-l-immigration-italienne-en-suisse.html

    #migrants_italiens #Suisse #Italie #migrations #histoire #travailleurs_étrangers #vidéo #gare #contrôles_frontaliers #Brig #Valais #contrôle_sanitaire #contrôles_sanitaires #visites_médicales #saisonniers #frontières #travail #main_d'oeuvre

    @sinehebdo —> dans la première vidéo on parle de #travailleurs_itinérants pour qualifier les saisonniers italiens...
    #mots #vocabulaire #terminologie

  • Frontières européennes et #Covid-19 : la commission des affaires européennes du Sénat sensible à l’inquiétude du directeur exécutif de #Frontex

    Jeudi 9 avril 2020

    La commission des affaires européennes du Sénat a entendu, le 8 avril
    2020, par audioconférence, Fabrice LEGGERI, directeur exécutif de
    Frontex, agence européenne chargée de la sécurité des frontières
    extérieures de l’Union européenne (UE).

    Les sénateurs ont interrogé le directeur sur la façon dont Frontex avait
    adapté ses missions à la #fermeture_des_frontières européennes et à la
    période de #confinement actuelle, sur l’évolution récente des #flux_migratoires, sur la situation à la frontière gréco-turque, et enfin sur les moyens alloués à Frontex pour remplir ses missions, en particulier mettre en place le corps européen de 10 000 gardes-frontières et gardes-côtes annoncé pour 2027.

    Fabrice LEGGERI a indiqué que Frontex devait actuellement gérer une
    double #crise : sanitaire, avec les #contrôles imposés par l’épidémie de
    Covid-19, et géopolitique, avec la pression migratoire qu’exerce la
    Turquie sur l’Union européenne en ne régulant plus le flux migratoire à
    la frontière, au mépris de l’accord conclu en 2016. Fin février-début
    mars, 20 000 migrants hébergés en Turquie se sont ainsi présentés aux
    frontières terrestres et maritimes grecques : moins de 2 000 – et non
    pas 150 000 comme allégué par les autorités turques – les ont franchies,
    dans un contexte parfois violent tout à fait inédit. Les autorités
    grecques ont été très réactives, et, avec l’appui de l’UE, la situation
    est aujourd’hui maîtrisée. En dépit du confinement, Frontex a déployé
    900 de ses garde-frontières équipés de protections sanitaires sur le
    terrain, dont 600 en Grèce, priorité du moment pour assurer la
    protection des frontières extérieures européennes.

    Le directeur exécutif a insisté sur le risque budgétaire qui pèse
    lourdement sur Frontex. Alors que cette agence devait se voir allouer 11
    milliards d’euros sur les années 2021 à 2027, les Présidences
    finlandaise puis croate du Conseil de l’UE ont proposé de réduire ce
    budget de moitié. Fabrice LEGGERI a qualifié cette situation de
    « catastrophique » : non seulement, la création du corps européen ne
    serait pas financée, alors que 7 000 candidatures ont été reçues pour
    700 postes à pourvoir au 1er janvier prochain, mais l’agence ne pourrait
    pas renforcer sa contribution au retour effectif des étrangers en
    situation irrégulière vers leur pays d’origine, question pourtant
    essentielle pour la crédibilité de la politique migratoire de l’Union
    européenne.

    Fabrice LEGGERI a indiqué que les flux migratoires avaient logiquement
    diminué dans le contexte actuel de confinement de la majorité de la
    population mondiale, mais qu’il était trop tôt pour évaluer l’effet de
    l’épidémie sur leur évolution de moyen terme. Des sorties de crise à des dates différentes selon les régions du monde devront en tout cas
    conduire à renforcer les contrôles sanitaires aux frontières extérieures
    de l’Europe pour ne pas relancer l’épidémie quand elle sera en voie de
    résorption dans l’UE.

    Le président #Jean_BIZET a déclaré : « Vouloir une Europe qui protège tout en assurant la libre circulation, qui plus est dans un contexte
    d’épidémie, requiert des moyens : il faut absolument sécuriser le #budget de Frontex pour les prochaines années ».

    http://www.senat.fr/presse/cp20200409.html
    #coronavirus #crise_sanitaire #contrôles_frontaliers #crise_géopolitique #pression_migratoire #Turquie #EU #UE #Union_européenne #accord_UE-Turquie #Grèce #frontières #migrations #asile #réfugiés #gardes-frontières #frontières_extérieures #risque_budgétaire

    –----

    –-> commentaire reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 10.04.2020 :

    D’après ce communiqué du Sénat, la pandémie cause des inquiétudes
    à Frontex.
    Mais apparemment ça ne concerne pas la santé des migrants bloqués aux frontières européennes.

    ping @thomas_lacroix @luciebacon

  • Nouvelle forme de #confinement aux portes de l’Union européenne. Actes de la conférence de Madrid (2019)

    Depuis la mise en place de « l’#approche_hotspot », en 2015, par l’Union européenne (UE), Migreurop décrypte ses conséquences et dérives dans ses publications et à l’occasion de diverses rencontres internationales (Calais 2015, Rabat 2016). Le but de ce dispositif, qui n’a rien de nouveau, est en d’empêcher les arrivées et de criminaliser la migration, ce qui s’accompagne d’une montée de la #violence et d’atteintes aux droits des migrant·e·s dans le cadre d’une politique du tout sécuritaire. Cinq ans après, qu’en est-il en Europe et au-delà ?

    Pour faire le point, Migreurop a organisé le 8 juin 2019 à Madrid une #conférence sur les nouvelles formes de confinement aux portes de l’UE, qui a permis de mettre à jour les connaissances sur les situations de #détention dans divers pays de la zone géographique couverte par le réseau.

    Grâce à nos membres et invité.e.s, ont ainsi été abordées la situation dans les hotspots grecs et italiens – véritables « #oubliettes_modernes » et indignes –, ainsi que dans les « centres de séjour temporaires pour immigrés » (#CETI) dans les enclaves de #Ceuta et #Melilla, véritables lieux de #tri et d’#attente à l’entrée de l’Europe ; les pratiques de #non-accueil à #Malte et en #Espagne et également les politiques d’#externalisation, intrinsèquement liées à « l’approche hotspot », avec les cas marocain, égyptien et libyen. Finalement, dans les hotspots, ou lieux affiliés, les exilé.e.s sont cantonné.e.s dans des espaces qui ne sont pas destinés à accueillir, mais en réalité au service de la gestion des frontières fermées.

    http://www.migreurop.org/article2976.html

    –—

    En anglais : http://www.migreurop.org/article2977.html

    #hotspot #hotspots #Europe #EU #UE #migrations #asile #réfugiés #frontières #frontières_extérieures #Maroc #Italie #Grèce #Egypte #Libye #contrôles_frontaliers #fermeture_des_frontières

    ping @karine4 @_kg_