• Refugee protection at risk

    Two of the words that we should try to avoid when writing about refugees are “unprecedented” and “crisis.” They are used far too often and with far too little thought by many people working in the humanitarian sector. Even so, and without using those words, there is evidence to suggest that the risks confronting refugees are perhaps greater today than at any other time in the past three decades.

    First, as the UN Secretary-General has pointed out on many occasions, we are currently witnessing a failure of global governance. When Antonio Guterres took office in 2017, he promised to launch what he called “a surge in diplomacy for peace.” But over the past three years, the UN Security Council has become increasingly dysfunctional and deadlocked, and as a result is unable to play its intended role of preventing the armed conflicts that force people to leave their homes and seek refuge elsewhere. Nor can the Security Council bring such conflicts to an end, thereby allowing refugees to return to their country of origin.

    It is alarming to note, for example, that four of the five Permanent Members of that body, which has a mandate to uphold international peace and security, have been militarily involved in the Syrian armed conflict, a war that has displaced more people than any other in recent years. Similarly, and largely as a result of the blocking tactics employed by Russia and the US, the Secretary-General struggled to get Security Council backing for a global ceasefire that would support the international community’s efforts to fight the Coronavirus pandemic

    Second, the humanitarian principles that are supposed to regulate the behavior of states and other parties to armed conflicts, thereby minimizing the harm done to civilian populations, are under attack from a variety of different actors. In countries such as Burkina Faso, Iraq, Nigeria and Somalia, those principles have been flouted by extremist groups who make deliberate use of death and destruction to displace populations and extend the areas under their control.

    In states such as Myanmar and Syria, the armed forces have acted without any kind of constraint, persecuting and expelling anyone who is deemed to be insufficiently loyal to the regime or who come from an unwanted part of society. And in Central America, violent gangs and ruthless cartels are acting with growing impunity, making life so hazardous for other citizens that they feel obliged to move and look for safety elsewhere.

    Third, there is mounting evidence to suggest that governments are prepared to disregard international refugee law and have a respect a declining commitment to the principle of asylum. It is now common practice for states to refuse entry to refugees, whether by building new walls, deploying military and militia forces, or intercepting and returning asylum seekers who are travelling by sea.

    In the Global North, the refugee policies of the industrialized increasingly take the form of ‘externalization’, whereby the task of obstructing the movement of refugees is outsourced to transit states in the Global South. The EU has been especially active in the use of this strategy, forging dodgy deals with countries such as Libya, Niger, Sudan and Turkey. Similarly, the US has increasingly sought to contain northward-bound refugees in Mexico, and to return asylum seekers there should they succeed in reaching America’s southern border.

    In developing countries themselves, where some 85 per cent of the world’s refugees are to be found, governments are increasingly prepared to flout the principle that refugee repatriation should only take place in a voluntary manner. While they rarely use overt force to induce premature returns, they have many other tools at their disposal: confining refugees to inhospitable camps, limiting the food that they receive, denying them access to the internet, and placing restrictions on humanitarian organizations that are trying to meet their needs.

    Fourth, the COVID-19 pandemic of the past nine months constitutes a very direct threat to the lives of refugees, and at the same time seems certain to divert scarce resources from other humanitarian programmes, including those that support displaced people. The Coronavirus has also provided a very convenient alibi for governments that wish to close their borders to people who are seeking safety on their territory.

    Responding to this problem, UNHCR has provided governments with recommendations as to how they might uphold the principle of asylum while managing their borders effectively and minimizing any health risks associated with the cross-border movement of people. But it does not seem likely that states will be ready to adopt such an approach, and will prefer instead to introduce more restrictive refugee and migration policies.

    Even if the virus is brought under some kind of control, it may prove difficult to convince states to remove the restrictions that they have introduced during the COVD-19 emergency. And the likelihood of that outcome is reinforced by the fear that the climate crisis will in the years to come prompt very large numbers of people to look for a future beyond the borders of their own state.

    Fifth, the state-based international refugee regime does not appear well placed to resist these negative trends. At the broadest level, the very notions of multilateralism, international cooperation and the rule of law are being challenged by a variety of powerful states in different parts of the world: Brazil, China, Russia, Turkey and the USA, to name just five. Such countries also share a common disdain for human rights and the protection of minorities – indigenous people, Uyghur Muslims, members of the LGBT community, the Kurds and African-Americans respectively.

    The USA, which has traditionally acted as a mainstay of the international refugee regime, has in recent years set a particularly negative example to the rest of the world by slashing its refugee resettlement quota, by making it increasingly difficult for asylum seekers to claim refugee status on American territory, by entirely defunding the UN’s Palestinian refugee agency and by refusing to endorse the Global Compact on Refugees. Indeed, while many commentators predicted that the election of President Trump would not be good news for refugees, the speed at which he has dismantled America’s commitment to the refugee regime has taken many by surprise.

    In this toxic international environment, UNHCR appears to have become an increasingly self-protective organization, as indicated by the enormous amount of effort it devotes to marketing, branding and celebrity endorsement. For reasons that remain somewhat unclear, rather than stressing its internationally recognized mandate for refugee protection and solutions, UNHCR increasingly presents itself as an all-purpose humanitarian agency, delivering emergency assistance to many different groups of needy people, both outside and within their own country. Perhaps this relief-oriented approach is thought to win the favour of the organization’s key donors, an impression reinforced by the cautious tone of the advocacy that UNHCR undertakes in relation to the restrictive asylum policies of the EU and USA.

    UNHCR has, to its credit, made a concerted effort to revitalize the international refugee regime, most notably through the Global Compact on Refugees, the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework and the Global Refugee Forum. But will these initiatives really have the ‘game-changing’ impact that UNHCR has prematurely attributed to them?

    The Global Compact on Refugees, for example, has a number of important limitations. It is non-binding and does not impose any specific obligations on the countries that have endorsed it, especially in the domain of responsibility-sharing. The Compact makes numerous references to the need for long-term and developmental approaches to the refugee problem that also bring benefits to host states and communities. But it is much more reticent on fundamental protection principles such as the right to seek asylum and the notion of non-refoulement. The Compact also makes hardly any reference to the issue of internal displacement, despite the fact that there are twice as many IDPs as there are refugees under UNHCR’s mandate.

    So far, the picture painted by this article has been unremittingly bleak. But just as one can identify five very negative trends in relation to refugee protection, a similar number of positive developments also warrant recognition.

    First, the refugee policies pursued by states are not uniformly bad. Countries such as Canada, Germany and Uganda, for example, have all contributed, in their own way, to the task of providing refugees with the security that they need and the rights to which they are entitled. In their initial stages at least, the countries of South America and the Middle East responded very generously to the massive movements of refugees out of Venezuela and Syria.

    And while some analysts, including the current author, have felt that there was a very real risk of large-scale refugee expulsions from countries such as Bangladesh, Kenya and Lebanon, those fears have so far proved to be unfounded. While there is certainly a need for abusive states to be named and shamed, recognition should also be given to those that seek to uphold the principles of refugee protection.

    Second, the humanitarian response to refugee situations has become steadily more effective and equitable. Twenty years ago, it was the norm for refugees to be confined to camps, dependent on the distribution of food and other emergency relief items and unable to establish their own livelihoods. Today, it is far more common for refugees to be found in cities, towns or informal settlements, earning their own living and/or receiving support in the more useful, dignified and efficient form of cash transfers. Much greater attention is now given to the issues of age, gender and diversity in refugee contexts, and there is a growing recognition of the role that locally-based and refugee-led organizations can play in humanitarian programmes.

    Third, after decades of discussion, recent years have witnessed a much greater engagement with refugee and displacement issues by development and financial actors, especially the World Bank. While there are certainly some risks associated with this engagement (namely a lack of attention to protection issues and an excessive focus on market-led solutions) a more developmental approach promises to allow better long-term planning for refugee populations, while also addressing more systematically the needs of host populations.

    Fourth, there has been a surge of civil society interest in the refugee issue, compensating to some extent for the failings of states and the large international humanitarian agencies. Volunteer groups, for example, have played a critical role in responding to the refugee situation in the Mediterranean. The Refugees Welcome movement, a largely spontaneous and unstructured phenomenon, has captured the attention and allegiance of many people, especially but not exclusively the younger generation.

    And as has been seen in the UK this year, when governments attempt to demonize refugees, question their need for protection and violate their rights, there are many concerned citizens, community associations, solidarity groups and faith-based organizations that are ready to make their voice heard. Indeed, while the national asylum policies pursued by the UK and other countries have been deeply disappointing, local activism on behalf of refugees has never been stronger.

    Finally, recent events in the Middle East, the Mediterranean and Europe have raised the question as to whether refugees could be spared the trauma and hardship of making dangerous journeys from one country and continent to another by providing them with safe and legal routes. These might include initiatives such as Canada’s community-sponsored refugee resettlement programme, the ‘humanitarian corridors’ programme established by the Italian churches, family reunion projects of the type championed in the UK and France by Lord Alf Dubs, and the notion of labour mobility programmes for skilled refugee such as that promoted by the NGO Talent Beyond Boundaries.

    Such initiatives do not provide a panacea to the refugee issue, and in their early stages at least, might not provide a solution for large numbers of displaced people. But in a world where refugee protection is at such serious risk, they deserve our full support.

    http://www.against-inhumanity.org/2020/09/08/refugee-protection-at-risk

    #réfugiés #asile #migrations #protection #Jeff_Crisp #crise #crise_migratoire #crise_des_réfugiés #gouvernance #gouvernance_globale #paix #Nations_unies #ONU #conflits #guerres #conseil_de_sécurité #principes_humanitaires #géopolitique #externalisation #sanctuarisation #rapatriement #covid-19 #coronavirus #frontières #fermeture_des_frontières #liberté_de_mouvement #liberté_de_circulation #droits_humains #Global_Compact_on_Refugees #Comprehensive_Refugee_Response_Framework #Global_Refugee_Forum #camps_de_réfugiés #urban_refugees #réfugiés_urbains #banque_mondiale #société_civile #refugees_welcome #solidarité #voies_légales #corridors_humanitaires #Talent_Beyond_Boundaries #Alf_Dubs

    via @isskein
    ping @karine4 @thomas_lacroix @_kg_ @rhoumour

    –—
    Ajouté à la métaliste sur le global compact :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/739556

  • Unemployment drives Kurdish refugees back to Rojava - Rudaw

    Unemployment exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic has driven many Syrians Kurds in the Kurdistan Region to return to northeast Syria.

    Since October 2019, 2,500 Syrians have returned to northeast Syria, also known as Rojava, according to Rashid Hussein of the UNHCR office in Duhok.

    #Covid-19#Moyen-Orient#Iraq#Syrie#Rojava#KRG#Frontière#Crise_migratoire#Déplacés#Economie#Emploi#migrant#migration

    https://www.rudaw.net/english/middleeast/syria/14062020

  • In the shadow of COVID19: how to respond to the worsening humanitarian situation in North East Syria - Fight for humanity

    While global attention is naturally focussed on the COVID-19 sanitary crisis, the humanitarian situation in North East Syria has worsened since the beginning of the pandemic, not because of the number of COVID-19 cases which has remained low but as a result of a severe economic and humanitarian crisis.

    The living conditions of the population in the region have recently deteriorated due to the economic crisis in Syria and the sharp devaluation of the Syrian lira. In addition, COVID-19 travel and movement restrictions as well as limitations in authorized cross-border and cross-line movements, have made the delivery of humanitarian assistance to the population more difficult.

    #Covid-19#Iraq#Syrie#Humanitaire#Crise_migratoire#Webinaire#migrant#migration

    https://www.fightforhumanity.org/post/in-the-shadow-of-covid19-how-to-respond-to-the-worsening-humanitar

  • As a direct effect of coronavirus on Iraqi kurdistan, Rojava refugees are going back home despite tough conditions there and unstable Syrian Lira. Lack of job opportunities is the main lockdown results. Some say with money of house rent we can live a month there - NBC NEWS

    #Covid-19#Moyen-Orient#Iraq#Syrie#Rojava#KRG#Frontière#Crise_migratoire#Déplacés#migrant#migration

    https://twitter.com/Mahmodshikhibra

  • Over 150 tons of aid dispatched through KRG border to Rojava: Dindar Zebari -Kurdistan 24

    he Kurdistan Regional Government’s (KRG) Coordinator for International Advocacy, Dindar Zebari, on Tuesday told Kurdistan 24 that over 150 tons of aid have been dispatched to Rojava through the KRG’s border-crossing of Semelka by international aid groups to assist Rojava in its fight with the coronavirus pandemic.

    In late April, Human Rights Watch (HRW) published a report titled, “Syria: Aid Restrictions Hinder Covid-19 Response,” in which it claimed the KRG had imposed restrictions on medical aid being supplied to Syrian Kurdistan (Rojava).

    Following the report, Zebari denied the claims, citing several NGOs such as Doctors without Borders and International Medical Corps (IMC) that delivered aid to Rojava.

    #Covid-19#Moyen-Orient#Iraq#Syrie#Rojava#KRG#Frontière#Crise_migratoire#Aide_humanitaire#migrant#migration

    https://www.kurdistan24.net/en/news/0eecc327-7254-4eaf-bb55-23932b40e3c6

  • EASO warns of uptick in migration in response to COVID-19 crisis - InfoMigrants

    A report published by the European Asylum Support Office (EASO) says that there could be increases in asylum applications in the EU in the future. The document highlights that the threat of the novel coronavirus spreading in lower income countries could lead to a rise in migration.

    #Covid-19#Moyen-Orient#Europe#Iraq#Syrie#Frontière#Crise_migratoire#Demandeur_asile#Aide_humanitaire#ONU#migrant#migration

    https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/24733/easo-warns-of-uptick-in-migration-in-response-to-covid-19-crisis

  • How the media contributed to the migrant crisis

    Disaster reporting plays to set ideas about people from ‘over there’.

    When did you notice the word “migrant” start to take precedence over the many other terms applied to people on the move? For me it was in 2015, as the refugee crisis in Europe reached its peak. While debate raged over whether people crossing the Mediterranean via unofficial routes should be regarded as deserving candidates for European sympathy and protection, it seemed as if that word came to crowd out all others. Unlike the other terms, well-meaning or malicious, that might be applied to people in similar situations, this one word appears shorn of context; without even an im- or an em- attached to it to indicate that the people it describes have histories or futures. Instead, it implies an endless present: they are migrants, they move, it’s what they do. It’s a form of description that, until 2015, I might have expected to see more often in nature documentaries, applied to animals rather than human beings.
    Lose yourself in a great story: Sign up for the long read email
    Read more

    But only certain kinds of human beings. The professional who moves to a neighbouring city for work is not usually described as a migrant, and neither is the wealthy businessman who acquires new passports as easily as he moves his money around the world. It is most often applied to those people who fall foul of border control at the frontiers of the rich world, whether that’s in Europe, the US, Australia, South Africa or elsewhere. That’s because the terms that surround migration are inextricably bound up with power, as is the way in which our media organisations choose to disseminate them.

    The people I met during the years I spent reporting on the experiences of refugees at Europe’s borders, for my book Lights in the Distance, were as keenly aware of this as any of us. There was the fixer I was introduced to in Bulgaria, a refugee himself, who was offering TV news crews a “menu” of stories of suffering, with a price range that corresponded with the value the media placed on them. Caesar, a young man from Mali I met in Sicily, told me he was shocked to find that Italian television would usually only show images of Africa in reports about war or poverty. Some refugees’ stories, he felt, were treated with more urgency than others because of what country they came from. Or there was Hakima, an Afghan woman who lived with her family in Athens, who confronted me directly: “We keep having journalists visit, and they want to hear our stories, but, tell me, what can you do?” Often, people I met were surprised at the lack of understanding, even indifference, they felt was being shown to them. Didn’t Europe know why people like them were forced to make these journeys? Hadn’t Europe played an intimate role in the histories and conflicts of their own countries?

    Europe’s refugee crisis, or more properly, a disaster partly caused by European border policies, rather than simply the movement of refugees towards Europe, was one of the most heavily mediated world events of the past decade. It unfolded around the edges of a wealthy and technologically developed region, home to several major centres of the global media industry. Scenes of desperation, suffering and rescue that might normally be gathered by foreign correspondents in harder-to-access parts of the world were now readily available to reporters, news crews, filmmakers and artists at relatively low cost.

    The people at the centre of the crisis were, at least for a time, relatively free to move around once they had reached safety and to speak to whoever they pleased. This gave certain advantages to the kind of media coverage that was produced. Most of all, it allowed quick and clear reporting on emergency situations as they developed. Throughout 2015, the crisis narrative was developed via a series of flashpoints at different locations within and around the European Union. In April, for example, attention focused on the smuggler boat route from Libya, after the deadliest shipwreck ever recorded in the Mediterranean. A month or so later focus shifted to Calais, where French and British policies of discouraging irregular migrants from attempting to cross the Channel had led to a growing spectacle of mass destitution. By the summer, the number of boat crossings from Turkey to Greece had dramatically increased, and images and stories of people stepping on to Aegean shores, or of piles of orange lifejackets, came to dominate. Then came the scenes of people moving through the Balkans, and so on, and so on.

    https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/2fe295c2e8dc7ea934d7091beaee84d9c5c3c804/42_649_3645_2186/master/3645.jpg?width=880&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=4029d3e00eba3245a92c5c

    In all of these situations the news media were able to do their basic job in emergency situations, which is to communicate what’s happening, who’s affected, what’s needed the most. But this is usually more than a matter of relaying dry facts and figures. “Human stories” have the greatest currency among journalists, although it’s an odd term if you think about it.

    What stories aren’t human? In fact, it’s most commonly used to denote a particular kind of human story; one that gives individual experience the greatest prominence, that tells you what an event felt like, both physically and emotionally. It rests on the assumption that this is what connects most strongly with audiences: either because it hooks them in and keeps them watching or reading, or because it helps them identify with the protagonist, perhaps in a way that encourages empathy, or a particular course of action in response. As a result, the public was able to easily and quickly access vivid accounts and images of people’s experiences as they attempted to cross the EU’s external borders, or to find shelter and welcome within Europe.

    The trade-off was that this often fit into predetermined ideas about what disasters look like, who needs protection, who is innocent and who is deserving of blame. Think, for example, about the most recognisable image of the refugee crisis in 2015: the picture of a Turkish police officer carrying the lifeless body of three-year-old Alan Kurdi away from the water’s edge on a beach near Bodrum.

    As the Dutch documentary Een zee van beelden – A Sea of Images – (Medialogica, 2016) asked: why did this image in particular strike such a chord? After all, many news editors see images of death on a daily basis, yet for the most part decide to exclude them. The documentary showed how the apparently viral spread of the Alan Kurdi photograph on social media was in large part the result of a series of decisions taken by senior journalists and NGO workers.

    https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/dae2df82cc5f6e0366d71f29daacfa5fdbc32e71/0_285_4500_2700/master/4500.jpg?width=880&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=08662beb01cdef62f0e718

    First, a local photo agency in Turkey decided to release the image to the wires because they were so fed up with the lack of political response to the crisis on their shores. The image was shared by an official at a global human rights NGO with a large Twitter following, and retweeted by several prominent correspondents for large news organisations. Picture editors at several newspapers then decided, independently of one another, to place the photo on the front pages of their next editions; only after that point did it reach its widest circulation online. The image gained the status it did for a mix of reasons – political, commercial, but also aesthetic. One of the picture editors interviewed in the documentary commented on how the position of the figures in the photo resembled that of Michelangelo’s Pietà, an iconography of suffering and sacrifice that runs deep in European culture.

    But if this way of working has its advantages, it also has its dark side. News media that rush from one crisis point to another are not so good at filling in the gaps, at explaining the obscured systems and long-term failures that might be behind a series of seemingly unconnected events. To return to the idea of a “refugee crisis”, for example, this is an accurate description in one sense, as it involved a sharp increase in the number of people claiming asylum in the European Union; from around 430,000 in 2013, according to the EU statistics agency Eurostat, to well over a million in 2015 and 2016 each. In global terms this was a relatively small number of refugees: the EU has a population of over 500 million, while most of the world’s 68.5 million forcibly displaced people are hosted in poorer parts of the world. But the manner of people’s arrival was chaotic and often deadly, while there was a widespread institutional failure to ensure that their needs – for basic necessities, for legal and political rights – were met. To stop there, however, risks giving the false impression that the crisis was a problem from elsewhere that landed unexpectedly on European shores.

    This impression is false on two counts. First, Europe has played a key role, historically, in the shaping of a world where power and wealth are unequally distributed, and European powers continue to pursue military and arms trading policies that have caused or contributed to the conflicts and instability from which many people flee. Second, the crisis of 2015 was a direct effect of the complex and often violent system of policing immigration from outside the EU that has been constructed in the last few decades.

    In short, this has involved the EU and its members signing treaties with countries outside its borders to control immigration on its behalf; an increasingly militarised frontier at the geographical edges of the EU; and an internal system for regulating the movement of asylum seekers that aims to force them to stay in the first EU country they enter. This, cumulatively, had the effect of forcing desperate people to take narrower and more dangerous routes by land and sea, while the prioritising of border control over safe and dignified reception conditions compounded the disaster. How well, really, did media organisations explain all this to their audiences?

    The effect, all too often, was to frame these newly arrived people as others; people from “over there”, who had little to do with Europe itself and were strangers, antagonistic even, to its traditions and culture. This was true at times, of both well-meaning and hostile media coverage. A sympathetic portrayal of the displaced might focus on some of those images and stories that matched stereotypes of innocence and vulnerability: children, women, families; the vulnerable, the sick, the elderly.

    Negative coverage, meanwhile, might focus more on the men, the able-bodied, nameless and sometimes faceless people massed at fences or gates. Or people from particular countries would be focused on to suit a political agenda. The Sun, one of Britain’s most widely read newspapers, for example, led with a picture of Alan Kurdi on its front page in September 2015, telling its readers that the refugee crisis was a matter of life and death, and that the immediate action required was further British military intervention in Syria. A few weeks later it gave another refugee boat story the front page, but in contrast to the earlier one the language was about “illegals” who were seeking a “back door”. This time, the refugees were from Iraq, and they had landed on the territory of a British air force base in Cyprus, which legally made them the responsibility of the UK.

    The fragmented and contradictory media coverage of the crisis left room for questions to go unanswered and myths to circulate: who are these people and what do they want from us? Why don’t they stop in the first safe country they reach? Why don’t the men stay behind and fight? How can we make room for everyone? Are they bringing their problems to our shores? Do they threaten our culture and values? The problem is made worse by those media outlets that have an active desire to stoke hostility and misunderstanding.

    One of the first people I met in the course of my reporting was Azad, a young Kurdish man from northern Syria, in a hastily constructed refugee camp in Bulgaria at the end of 2013. At the time, the inability of Bulgarian and EU authorities to adequately prepare for the arrival of a few thousand people – the camp, at Harmanli in southern Bulgaria, marked the first time Médecins sans Frontières had ever set up emergency medical facilities within Europe – seemed like an unusual development. Everyone was new to this situation, and the camp’s inhabitants, largely Syrians who had fled the war there but decided that Syria’s neighbouring countries could not offer them the security they needed, were shocked at what they found. Several of them told me this couldn’t possibly be the real Europe, and that they would continue moving until they found it. Azad was friendly and wanted to know lots about where I came from, London, and to find out what he could about the other countries in Europe, and where people like him might find a place to settle.

    I went back to meet Azad several times over the next two years, as he and his family made their way across Bulgaria, and then central Europe, to Germany. During that time, the backlash against refugees grew stronger, a fact Azad was keenly aware of. In Sofia, in the spring of 2014, he pointed out places in the city centre where homeless Syrians had been attacked by street gangs. Later that year, in eastern Germany, we walked through a town where lampposts were festooned with posters for a far-right political party.

    https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/fa2e141ab6724115920ad9c8da0a9a8f5062613a/178_3160_7900_4740/master/7900.jpg?width=880&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=f94d910248f1757de42634

    By the autumn of 2015, Azad and his family were settled in Germany’s Ruhr area, and he was much warier of me than he had been in our early meetings. He could see that hostility ran alongside the curiosity and welcome that had greeted the new arrivals to Europe; and he knew how giving too many details away to journalists could threaten what stability people in his situation had managed to find. Within a few months, a series of events – the Islamic State attack in Paris in November 2015, the robberies and sexual assaults in Cologne that New Year’s Eve – had provided the excuse for some media outlets to tie well-worn stereotypes about savage, dark foreigners and their alleged threat to white European purity to the refugees of today.

    The most brazen of these claims – such as the Polish magazine wSieci, which featured a white woman draped in the EU flag being groped at by the arms of dark-skinned men, under the headline The Islamic Rape of Europe – directly echoed the Nazi and fascist propaganda of Europe’s 20th century. But racist stereotyping was present in more liberal outlets too. The Süddeutsche Zeitung, in its coverage of the Cologne attacks, prominently featured an illustration of a woman’s legs silhouetted in white, with the space in between taken up by a black arm and hand. Racism is buried so deep in European history that at times like these it can remain unspoken yet still make its presence clear.

    Now, several years on from the peak of the refugee crisis, we are faced with a series of uncomfortable facts. The EU has tried to restore and strengthen the border system that existed before 2015 by extending migration control deep into Africa and Asia. The human rights of the people this affects, not least the many migrants trapped in horrendous conditions in Libya, are taking a back seat. Far right and nationalist movements have made electoral gains in many countries within the EU, and they have done this partly by promising to crack down on migration, to punish refugees for daring to ask for shelter from disasters that Europe was all too often the midwife to. Politicians of the centre are being pulled to the right by these developments, and a dangerous narrative threatens to push out all others: that European culture and identity are threatened by intrusions from outside. If we come to view culture in this way – as something fixed and tightly bounded by the ideologies of race and religion, or as a means for wealthy parts of the world to defend their privilege – then we are headed for further, greater disasters.

    The irony is that you can only believe in this vision if you ignore not only Europe’s history, but its present too. Movement, exchange, new connections, the making and remaking of tradition – these things are happening all around us, and already involve people who have been drawn here from other parts of the world by ties not just of conflict but of economics, history, language and technology. By the same token, displacement is not just a feature of the lives of people from elsewhere in the world; it’s been a major and recent part of Europe’s history too. And what has kept people alive, what has preserved traditions and allowed people to build identities and realise their potential, is solidarity: the desire to defend one another and work towards common goals.

    If there is a failure to recognise this, then the way people are represented by our media and cultural institutions has to be at fault, and setting this right is an urgent challenge. This isn’t only in terms of how people are represented and when, but who gets to participate in the decision-making; who gets to speak with authority, or with political intent, or with a collective voice rather than simply as an individual.

    All too often, the voices of refugees and other marginalised people are reduced to pure testimony, which is then interpreted and contextualised on their behalf. One thing that constantly surprised me about the reporting on refugees in Europe, for instance, was how little we heard from journalists who had connections to already settled diaspora communities. Immigration from Africa, Asia or the Middle East is hardly new to Europe, and this seems like a missed opportunity to strengthen bridges we have already built. Though it’s never too late.

    Any meaningful response to this has to address the question of who gets to tell stories, as well as what kinds of stories are told. The Refugee Journalism Project, a mentoring scheme for displaced journalists, based at London College of Communication – disclosure: I’m on the steering committee, and it is supported by the Guardian Foundation – focuses not only on providing people with a media platform, but helping them develop the skills and contacts necessary for getting jobs.

    All too often the second part is forgotten about. But although initiatives like these are encouraging, we also need to rethink the way our media organisations are run: who owns them, who makes the decisions, who does the work. This reminds me of what I heard Fatima, a women’s rights activist originally from Nigeria, tell an audience of NGO workers in Italy in 2016: “Don’t just come and ask me questions and sell my story or sell my voice; we need a change.”

    The more those of us who work in media can help develop the connections that already exist between us, the more I think we can break down the idea of irreconcilable conflict over migration. Because, really, there is no “over there” – just where we are.

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/2019/aug/01/media-framed-migrant-crisis-disaster-reporting
    #médias #journalisme #presse #crise #terminologie #mots #vocabulaire #asile #migrations #réfugiés #crise_migratoire

  • Ceci n’est pas une crise | Les Belges surestiment le nombre de réfugiés accueillis
    https://asile.ch/2019/05/13/belgique-les-belges-surestiment-le-nombre-de-refugies-accueilli

    La fondation Ceci n’est pas une crise vient de publier une enquête d’opinion intitulée « Les réfugiés, l’Europe déchirée et les amnésiques ». L’étude est consacrée à la perception des réfugiés en Belgique. Celle-ci révèle qu’une majorité de la population surestime le nombre de réfugiés et de demandeurs d’asile. Seules 13% des personnes interrogées indiquent un pourcentage proche […]

  • Quand l’#Union_europeénne se met au #fact-checking... et que du coup, elle véhicule elle-même des #préjugés...
    Et les mythes sont pensés à la fois pour les personnes qui portent un discours anti-migrants ("L’UE ne protège pas ses frontières"), comme pour ceux qui portent des discours pro-migrants ("L’UE veut créer une #forteresse_Europe")...
    Le résultat ne peut être que mauvais, surtout vu les pratiques de l’UE...

    Je copie-colle ici les mythes et les réponses de l’UE à ce mythe...


    #crise_migratoire


    #frontières #protection_des_frontières


    #Libye #IOM #OIM #évacuation #détention #détention_arbitraire #centres #retours_volontaires #retour_volontaire #droits_humains


    #push-back #refoulement #Libye


    #aide_financière #Espagne #Grèce #Italie #Frontex #gardes-frontière #EASO


    #Forteresse_européenne


    #global_compact


    #frontières_intérieures #Schengen #Espace_Schengen


    #ONG #sauvetage #mer #Méditerranée


    #maladies #contamination


    #criminels #criminalité


    #économie #coût #bénéfice


    #externalisation #externalisation_des_frontières


    #Fonds_fiduciaire #dictature #dictatures #régimes_autoritaires

    https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/sites/homeaffairs/files/what-we-do/policies/european-agenda-migration/20190306_managing-migration-factsheet-debunking-myths-about-migration_en.p
    #préjugés #mythes #migrations #asile #réfugiés
    #hypocrisie #on_n'est_pas_sorti_de_l'auberge
    ping @reka @isskein

  • Voir la « crise migratoire autrement » : le cas libyen

    Cette série de trois articles est le résultat d’un travail de recherche en géopolitique d’un an, effectué à l’Institut Français de Géopolitique (IFG), sous la direction de Mr. Ali Bensâad, chercheur renommé et spécialiste de la Libye. Ce projet d’environ 150 pages, se fonde sur un large corpus documentaire et une enquête de terrain d’un mois à Tunis en juin-juillet 2018 où est délocalisée depuis 2014 la réponse internationale à la crise libyenne (U.E, ONU, HCR, ONG…). Des diplomates, des journalistes ou des chercheurs ont été interviewés dans le cadre de cette recherche. Cette série tentera donc d’offrir une perspective relativement originale sur la crise migratoire de la méditerranée centrale à l’aide des éléments de cette production en géopolitique.

    http://www.lejournalinternational.info/voir-la-crise-migratoire-autrement-le-cas-libyen-1-3

    Deuxième volet :
    http://www.lejournalinternational.info/voir-la-crise-migratoire-autrement-le-cas-libyen-2-3

    Troisième :
    http://www.lejournalinternational.info/voir-la-crise-migratoire-autrement-le-cas-libyen-3-3

    #Libye #asile #migrations #réfugiés
    #crise #crise_migratoire

  • The Mediterranean crush

    http://www.synaps.network/the-mediterranean-crush

    Du grand Harling.

    The Mediterranean was born in a massive collision between North and South, when the African, Arab and Eurasian plates ground into each other—a process started millions of years ago and ongoing today. Mountains rose, volcanoes erupted, and a depression was formed, which was fated to become a crucible of civilizations. Contemporary Europeans, if they had it their way, would reverse this tectonic encounter, push back incoming continents, and turn the sea our world once revolved around into an ocean.

    #méditerranée
    A space intimately associated with much of what we Europeans cherish culturally—from the foundations of philosophy to the better sides of religion, through to the renaissance and its ensuing humanism—is now increasingly associated with terrorism and unwelcome migration. The estrangement between the two sides of the Mediterranean is catalyzing a wishful, paranoid and self-destructive retreat: as Europe’s heterogeneous societies play up the fear of the Other, they sow mistrust among and within themselves. The more Europe locks down in response to the fragmentation of the Arab world, the more it seems to break apart along its own myriad fault-lines.

  • Podcast : #migrants ou #réfugiés ? Crise ou phénomène durable ?
    http://theconversation.com/podcast-migrants-ou-refugies-crise-ou-phenomene-durable-106866

    Alors qu’en 2018 le nombre de migrants en Europe est le plus faible des dernières années, et que l’on ne cesse de parler de « crise des migrants », retour sur un débat à la fois lexical, politique et socio-économique avec trois experts de disciplines différentes.

    #migration #asile

  • Esclave en #Tunisie : le calvaire d’une migrante ivoirienne séquestrée par une riche famille de #Tunis (1/4)

    Depuis l’été 2018, de plus en plus d’embarcations partent de Tunisie pour traverser la mer #Méditerranée. En face, l’Union européenne grince des dents. Pourtant, Tunis ne réagit pas, ou si peu. Déjà confronté à une crise économique et sociale majeure, le pays n’a pas - encore - fait de la #crise_migratoire une priorité. La Tunisie n’a toujours pas mis en place une politique nationale d’asile et il n’existe presqu’aucune structure d’aide pour les migrants. InfoMigrants s’est rendu sur place pour enquêter et a rencontré Jeanne-d’Arc, une migrante ivoirienne, séquestrée et réduite en #esclavage pendant plusieurs mois par une famille tunisienne aisée. Elle se dit aujourd’hui abandonnée à son sort.

    Son visage exprime une détermination sans faille, la voix est claire, forte. « Non, je ne veux pas témoigner de manière anonyme, filmez-moi, montrez-moi. Je veux parler à visage découvert. Pour dénoncer, il ne faut pas se cacher ». Jeanne-d’Arc, est dotée d’un courage rare. Cette Ivoirienne, à la tête d’un salon de coiffure afro à Tunis, #sans_papiers, refuse l’anonymat tout autant que le mutisme. « Il faut que je raconte ce que j’ai subi il y quelques années pour éviter à d’autres filles de se faire piéger ».

    C’était il y a 5 ans, en décembre 2013, et les souvenirs sont toujours aussi douloureux. Pendant 5 mois, Jeanne-d’Arc a été l’#esclave_domestique d’une famille aisée de Tunis. « L’histoire est si banale…, commence-t-elle. Vous avez un #trafiquant qui promet à votre famille de vous faire passer en Europe et puis qui trahit sa promesse et vous vend à quelqu’un d’autre », résume-t-elle, assise sur le canapé de son salon dont les néons éclairent la pièce d’une lumière blafarde. « Quand nous sommes arrivées à Tunis, j’ai vite compris que quelque chose ne tournait pas rond, il y avait plusieurs jeunes filles comme nous, on nous a emmenées dans un appartement puis réparties dans des familles... Je n’ai rien pu faire. Une fois que vous êtes sortie de votre pays, c’est déjà trop tard, vous avez été vendue ».

    #Passeport_confisqué

    Comme de nombreuses autres Ivoiriennes, Jeanne-d’Arc a été victime de réseaux criminels « bien rôdés » dont l’intention est d’attirer des migrantes d’#Afrique_subsaharienne pour ensuite les « louer » à de riches familles tunisiennes. Pendant 5 mois, Jeanne-d’Arc ne dormira « que quand sa patronne s’endormira », elle nettoiera chaque jour ou presque « les 6 chambres, 4 salons et deux cuisines » du triplex de ses « patrons » qui vivent dans une banlieue chic de la capitale, la « #cité_el_Ghazala ». « La patronne m’a confisqué mon passeport. Évidemment je n’étais pas payée. Jamais. On me donnait l’autorisation de sortir de temps en temps, je pouvais dormir aussi, j’avais plus de chance que certaines. »

    Jeanne d’Arc a raconté son histoire au Forum tunisien des droits économiques et sociaux (FTDES), une association qui vient en aide, entre autres, aux migrants. L’association tente depuis longtemps d’alerter les autorités sur ces réseaux - ivoiriens notamment - de #traite_d’êtres_humains. Des mafias également bien connues de l’organisation internationale des migrations (#OIM). « Comme beaucoup de pays dans le monde, la Tunisie n’est pas épargnée par ce phénomène [de traite] dont les causes sont multiples et profondes », a écrit l’OIM dans un de ces communiqués. Depuis 2012, l’OIM Tunisie a détecté 440 victimes de traite, 86 % viennent de #Côte_d'Ivoire.

    Pour lutter contre ce fléau, la Tunisie a adopté en août 2016 une #loi relative à la prévention et à la lutte contre la traite des personnes - loi qui poursuit et condamne les auteurs de trafics humains (#servitude_domestique, #exploitation_sexuelle…). Ce cadre juridique devrait en théorie permettre aujourd’hui de protéger les victimes – qui osent parler - comme Jeanne-d’Arc. Et pourtant, « l’État ne fait rien », assure-t-elle. « L’OIM non plus… Une loi, c’est une chose, la réalité, c’est autre chose ».

    L’enfer des « #pénalités » imposées aux migrants sans-papiers en Tunisie

    Car Jeanne-d’Arc a essayé de s’en sortir après sa « libération », un jour de janvier 2014, quand sa patronne lui a rendu son passeport et lui a ordonné de partir sur le champ, elle a cru son calvaire terminé. Elle a cru que l’État tunisien allait la protéger.

    « C’est tout le contraire... À peine libérée, un ami m’a parlé de l’existence de ’pénalités’ financières en Tunisie… Il m’a dit que j’allais certainement devoir payer une amende. Je ne connaissais pas ce système. Je ne pensais pas être concernée. J’étais prise au #piège, j’ai été anéantie ».

    La demande d’asile de Jeanne-d’Arc a été rejetée en 2015. Crédit : InfoMigrants

    En Tunisie, selon la loi en vigueur, les étrangers en #situation_irrégulière doivent s’acquitter de « pénalités de dépassement de séjour », sorte de sanctions financières contre les sans papiers. Plus un migrant reste en Tunisie, plus les pénalités s’accumulent. Depuis 2017, cette amende est plafonnée à 1 040 dinars tunisiens (environ 320 euros) par an, précise le FTDES. « C’est une triple peine, en plus d’être en situation irrégulière et victime de la traite, une migrante doit payer une taxe », résume Valentin Bonnefoy, coordinateur du département « Initiative pour une justice migratoire » au FTDES.

    Malgré l’enfer qu’elle vient de vivre, Jeanne d’Arc est confrontée à une nouvelle épreuve. « Mon ami m’a dit : ‘Tu pourras vivre ici, mais tu ne pourras pas partir’... » En effet, les « fraudeurs » ne sont pas autorisés à quitter le sol tunisien sans s’être acquitté de leur dette. « Si j’essaie de sortir du pays, on me réclamera l’argent des pénalités que j’ai commencé à accumuler quand j’étais esclave !… Et ça fait 5 ans que je suis en Tunisie, maintenant, le calcul est vite fait, je n’ai pas assez d’argent. Je suis #bloquée ».

    Asile rejeté

    Ces frais effraient les étrangers de manière générale – qui craignent une accumulation rapide de pénalités hebdomadaires ou mensuelles. « Même les étudiants étrangers qui viennent se scolariser en Tunisie ont peur. Ceux qui veulent rester plus longtemps après leurs études, demander une carte de séjour, doivent parfois payer ces pénalités en attendant une régularisation. C’est environ 20 dinars [6 euros] par semaine, pour des gens sans beaucoup de ressources, c’est compliqué », ajoute Valentin Bonnefoy de FTDES.

    Pour trouver une issue à son impasse administrative et financière, Jeanne-d’Arc a donc déposé en 2015 un dossier de demande d’asile auprès du Haut-commissariat à l’ONU – l’instance chargée d’encadrer les procédures d’asile en Tunisie. Elle pensait que son statut de victime jouerait en sa faveur. « Mais ma demande a été rejetée.La Côte d’Ivoire n’est pas un pays en guerre m’a-t-on expliqué. Pourtant, je ne peux pas y retourner, j’ai des problèmes à cause de mes origines ethniques », dit-elle sans entrer dans les détails. Jeanne d’arc a aujourd’hui épuisé ses recours. « J’ai aussi pensé à dénoncer la famille qui m’a exploitée à la justice, mais à quoi bon... Je suis fatiguée… »

    « J’ai le seul salon afro du quartier »

    Après une longue période d’abattement et de petits boulots, Jeanne-d’Arc a récemment repris du poil de la bête. « Je me suis dit : ‘Ce que tu veux faire en Europe, pourquoi ne pas le faire ici ?’ ». Avec l’aide et le soutien financier d’un ami camerounais, la trentenaire sans papiers a donc ouvert un salon de coiffure afro, dans un quartier populaire de Tunis. « Je paye un loyer, le bailleur se fiche de ma situation administrative, du moment que je lui donne son argent ».

    Les revenus sont modestes mais Jeanne d’Arc défend sa petite entreprise. « Je me suis installée ici, dans un quartier sans migrants, parce que je ne voulais pas de concurrence. Je suis le seul salon afro du secteur, et plus de 90 % de ma clientèle est tunisienne », dit-elle fièrement, en finissant de tresser les nattes rouges et noires d’une jeune fille. Mais les marchandises manquent et ses étals sont ostensiblement vides. « J’ai besoin de produits, de mèches, d’extensions… Mais pour m’approvisionner, il faudrait que je sorte de Tunisie... Je ne sais pas comment je vais faire ».

    Pour les migrants comme Jeanne-d’Arc acculés par les pénalités, la seule solution est souvent la fuite par la mer. « Payer un #passeur pour traverser la Méditerranée peut s’avérer moins cher que de payer cette amende », résume Valentin Bonnefoy de FTDES. Une ironie que souligne Jeanne d’Arc en souriant. « En fait, ce gouvernement nous pousse à frauder, à prendre des dangers… Mais moi, que vais-je faire ? », conclut-elle. « Je ne veux pas aller en #Europe, et je ne peux pas retourner vivre en Côte d’Ivoire. Je suis définitivement prisonnière en Tunisie ».

    http://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/12875/esclave-en-tunisie-le-calvaire-d-une-migrante-ivoirienne-sequestree-pa

    #UNHCR #demande_d'asile

  • 2.3 million Venezuelans now live abroad

    More than 7% of Venezuela’s population has fled the country since 2014, according to the UN. That is the equivalent of the US losing the whole population of Florida in four years (plus another 100,000 people, give or take).

    The departing 2.3 million Venezuelans have mainly gone to neighboring Colombia, Ecuador, Brazil, and Peru, putting tremendous pressure on those countries. “This is building to a crisis moment that we’ve seen in other parts of the world, particularly in the Mediterranean,” a spokesman for the UN’s International Organization for Migration said recently.

    This week, Peru made it a bit harder for Venezuelans to get in. The small town of Aguas Verdes has seen as many as 3,000 people a day cross the border; most of the 400,000 Venezuelans in Peru arrived in the last year. So Peru now requires a valid passport. Until now, ID cards were all that was needed.

    Ecuador tried to do the same thing but a judge said that such a move violated freedom-of-movement rules agreed to when Ecuador joined the Andean Community. Ecuador says 4,000 people a day have been crossing the border, a total of 500,000 so far. It has now created what it calls a “humanitarian corridor” by laying on buses to take Venezuelans across Ecuador, from the Colombian border to the Peruvian border.

    Brazil’s Amazon border crossing in the state of Roraima with Venezuela gets 500 people a day. It was briefly shut down earlier this month—but that, too, was overturned by a court order.

    Venezuela is suffering from severe food shortages—the UN said more than 1 million of those who had fled since 2014 are malnourished—and hyperinflation. Things could still get worse, which is really saying something for a place where prices are doubling every 26 days. The UN estimated earlier this year that 5,000 were leaving Venezuela every day; at that rate, a further 800,000 people could leave before the end of the year (paywall).

    A Gallup survey from March showed that 53% of young Venezuelans want to move abroad permanently. And all this was before an alleged drone attack on president Nicolas Maduro earlier this month made the political situation even more tense, the country’s opposition-led National Assembly said that the annual inflation rate reached 83,000% in July, and the chaotic introduction of a new currency.

    https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2018/08/venezuela-has-lost-2-3-million-people-and-it-could-get-even-worse
    #Venezuela #asile #migrations #réfugiés #cartographie #visualisation #réfugiés_vénézuéliens

    Sur ce sujet, voir aussi cette longue compilation initiée en juin 2017 :
    http://seen.li/d26k

    • Venezuela. L’Amérique latine cherche une solution à sa plus grande #crise_migratoire

      Les réunions de crise sur l’immigration ne sont pas l’apanage de l’Europe : treize pays latino-américains sont réunis depuis lundi à Quito pour tenter de trouver des solutions communes au casse-tête migratoire provoqué par l’#exode_massif des Vénézuéliens.


      https://www.courrierinternational.com/article/venezuela-lamerique-latine-cherche-une-solution-sa-plus-grand

    • Bataille de #chiffres et guerre d’images autour de la « #crise migratoire » vénézuélienne

      L’émigration massive qui touche actuellement le Venezuela est une réalité. Mais il ne faut pas confondre cette réalité et les défis humanitaires qu’elle pose avec son instrumentalisation, tant par le pouvoir vénézuélien pour se faire passer pour la victime d’un machination que par ses « ennemis » qui entendent se débarrasser d’un gouvernement qu’ils considèrent comme autoritaire et source d’instabilité dans la région. Etat des lieux d’une crise très polarisée.

      C’est un véritable scoop que nous a offert le président vénézuélien le 3 septembre dernier. Alors que son gouvernement est avare en données sur les sujets sensibles, Nicolas Maduro a chiffré pour la première fois le nombre de Vénézuéliens ayant émigré depuis deux ans à 600 000. Un chiffre vérifiable, a-t-il assuré, sans toutefois donner plus de détails.

      Ce chiffre, le premier plus ou moins officiel dans un pays où il n’y a plus de statistiques migratoires, contraste avec celui délivré par l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) et le Haut-Commissariat aux Réfugiés (HCR). Selon ces deux organisations, 2,3 millions de Vénézuéliens vivraient à l’étranger, soit 7,2% des habitants sur un total de 31,8 millions. Pas de quoi tomber de sa chaise ! D’autres diasporas sont relativement bien plus nombreuses. Ce qui impressionne, c’est la croissance exponentielle de cette émigration sur un très court laps de temps : 1,6 million auraient quitté le pays depuis 2015 seulement. Une vague de départs qui s’est accélérée ces derniers mois et affectent inégalement de nombreux pays de la région.
      Le pouvoir vénézuélien, par la voix de sa vice-présidente, a accusé des fonctionnaires de l’ONU de gonfler les chiffres d’un « flux migratoire normal » (sic) pour justifier une « intervention humanitaire », synonyme de déstabilisation. D’autres sources estiment quant à elles qu’ils pourraient être près de quatre millions à avoir fui le pays.

      https://www.cncd.be/Bataille-de-chiffres-et-guerre-d
      #statistiques #guerre_des_chiffres

    • La formulation est tout de même étrange pour une ONG… : pas de quoi tomber de sa chaise, de même l’utilisation du mot ennemis avec guillemets. Au passage, le même pourcentage – pas si énorme …– appliqué à la population française donnerait 4,5 millions de personnes quittant la France, dont les deux tiers, soit 3 millions de personnes, au cours des deux dernières années.

      Ceci dit, pour ne pas qu’ils tombent… d’inanition, le Programme alimentaire mondial (agence de l’ONU) a besoin de sous pour nourrir les vénézuéliens qui entrent en Colombie.

      ONU necesita fondos para seguir atendiendo a emigrantes venezolanos
      http://www.el-nacional.com/noticias/mundo/onu-necesita-fondos-para-seguir-atendiendo-emigrantes-venezolanos_25311

      El Programa Mundial de Alimentos (PMA), el principal brazo humanitario de Naciones Unidas, informó que necesita 22 millones de dólares suplementarios para atender a los venezolanos que entran a Colombia.

      «Cuando las familias inmigrantes llegan a los centros de recepción reciben alimentos calientes y pueden quedarse de tres a cinco días, pero luego tienen que irse para que otros recién llegados puedan ser atendidos», dijo el portavoz del PMA, Herve Verhoosel.
      […]
      La falta de alimentos se convierte en el principal problema para quienes atraviesan a diario la frontera entre Venezuela y Colombia, que cuenta con siete puntos de pasaje oficiales y más de un centenar informales, con más de 50% de inmigrantes que entran a Colombia por estos últimos.

      El PMA ha proporcionado ayuda alimentaria de emergencia a más de 60.000 venezolanos en los departamentos fronterizos de Arauca, La Guajira y el Norte de Santander, en Colombia, y más recientemente ha empezado también a operar en el departamento de Nariño, que tiene frontera con Ecuador.
      […]
      De acuerdo con evaluaciones recientes efectuadas por el PMA entre inmigrantes en Colombia, 80% de ellos sufren de inseguridad alimentaria.

    • Migrants du Venezuela vers la Colombie : « ni xénophobie, ni fermeture des frontières », assure le nouveau président colombien

      Le nouveau président colombien, entré en fonction depuis hier (lundi 8 octobre 2018), ne veut pas céder à la tentation d’une fermeture de la frontière avec le Venezuela.


      https://la1ere.francetvinfo.fr/martinique/migrants-du-venezuela-colombie-xenophobie-fermeture-frontieres-a
      #fermeture_des_frontières #ouverture_des_frontières

    • Fleeing hardship at home, Venezuelan migrants struggle abroad, too

      Every few minutes, the reeds along the #Tachira_River rustle.

      Smugglers, in ever growing numbers, emerge with a ragtag group of Venezuelan migrants – men struggling under tattered suitcases, women hugging bundles in blankets and schoolchildren carrying backpacks. They step across rocks, wade into the muddy stream and cross illegally into Colombia.

      This is the new migration from Venezuela.

      For years, as conditions worsened in the Andean nation’s ongoing economic meltdown, hundreds of thousands of Venezuelans – those who could afford to – fled by airplane and bus to other countries far and near, remaking their lives as legal immigrants.

      Now, hyperinflation, daily power cuts and worsening food shortages are prompting those with far fewer resources to flee, braving harsh geography, criminal handlers and increasingly restrictive immigration laws to try their luck just about anywhere.

      In recent weeks, Reuters spoke with dozens of Venezuelan migrants traversing their country’s Western border to seek a better life in Colombia and beyond. Few had more than the equivalent of a handful of dollars with them.

      “It was terrible, but I needed to cross,” said Dario Leal, 30, recounting his journey from the coastal state of Sucre, where he worked in a bakery that paid about $2 per month.

      At the border, he paid smugglers nearly three times that to get across and then prepared, with about $3 left, to walk the 500 km (311 miles) to Bogota, Colombia’s capital. The smugglers, in turn, paid a fee to Colombian crime gangs who allow them to operate, according to police, locals and smugglers themselves.

      As many as 1.9 million Venezuelans have emigrated since 2015, according to the United Nations. Combined with those who preceded them, a total of 2.6 million are believed to have left the oil-rich country. Ninety percent of recent departures, the U.N. says, remain in South America.

      The exodus, one of the biggest mass migrations ever on the continent, is weighing on neighbors. Colombia, Ecuador and Peru, which once welcomed Venezuelan migrants, recently tightened entry requirements. Police now conduct raids to detain the undocumented.

      In early October, Carlos Holmes Trujillo, Colombia’s foreign minister, said as many as four million Venezuelans could be in the country by 2021, costing national coffers as much as $9 billion. “The magnitude of this challenge,” he said, “our country has never seen.”

      In Brazil, which also borders Venezuela, the government deployed troops and financing to manage the crush and treat sick, hungry and pregnant migrants. In Ecuador and Peru, workers say that Venezuelan labor lowers wages and that criminals are hiding among honest migrants.

      “There are too many of them,” said Antonio Mamani, a clothing vendor in Peru, who recently watched police fill a bus with undocumented Venezuelans near Lima.
      “WE NEED TO GO”

      By migrating illegally, migrants expose themselves to criminal networks who control prostitution, drug trafficking and other rackets. In August, Colombian investigators discovered 23 undocumented Venezuelans forced into prostitution and living in basements in the colonial city of Cartagena.

      While most migrants are avoiding such straits, no shortage of other hardship awaits – from homelessness, to unemployment, to the cold reception many get as they sleep in public squares, peddle sweets and throng already overburdened hospitals.

      Still, most press on, many on foot.

      Some join compatriots in Brazil and Colombia. Others, having spent what money they had, are walking vast regions, like Colombia’s cold Andean passes and sweltering tropical lowlands, in treks toward distant capitals, like Quito or Lima.

      Johana Narvaez, a 36-year-old mother of four, told Reuters her family left after business stalled at their small car repair shop in the rural state of Trujillo. Extra income she made selling food on the street withered because cash is scarce in a country where annual inflation, according to the opposition-led Congress, recently reached nearly 500,000 percent.

      “We can’t stay here,” she told her husband, Jairo Sulbaran, in August, after they ran out of food and survived on corn patties provided by friends. “Even on foot, we must go.” Sulbaran begged and sold old tires until they could afford bus tickets to the border.

      Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro has chided migrants, warning of the hazards of migration and that emigres will end up “cleaning toilets.” He has even offered free flights back to some in a program called “Return to the Homeland,” which state television covers daily.

      Most migration, however, remains in the other direction.

      Until recently, Venezuelans could enter many South American countries with just their national identity cards. But some are toughening rules, requiring a passport or additional documentation.

      Even a passport is elusive in Venezuela.

      Paper shortages and a dysfunctional bureaucracy make the document nearly impossible to obtain, many migrants argue. Several told Reuters they waited two years in vain after applying, while a half-dozen others said they were asked for as much as $2000 in bribes by corrupt clerks to secure one.

      Maduro’s government in July said it would restructure Venezuela’s passport agency to root out “bureaucracy and corruption.” The Information Ministry didn’t respond to a request for comment.
      “VENEZUELA WILL END UP EMPTY”

      Many of those crossing into Colombia pay “arrastradores,” or “draggers,” to smuggle them along hundreds of trails. Five of the smugglers, all young men, told Reuters business is booming.

      “Venezuela will end up empty,” said Maikel, a 17-year-old Venezuelan smuggler, scratches across his face from traversing the bushy trails. Maikel, who declined to give his surname, said he lost count of how many migrants he has helped cross.

      Colombia, too, struggles to count illegal entries. Before the government tightened restrictions earlier this year, Colombia issued “border cards” that let holders crisscross at will. Now, Colombia says it detects about 3,000 false border cards at entry points daily.

      Despite tougher patrols along the porous, 2,200-km border, officials say it is impossible to secure outright. “It’s like trying to empty the ocean with a bucket,” said Mauricio Franco, a municipal official in charge of security in Cucuta, a nearby city.

      And it’s not just a matter of rounding up undocumented travelers.

      Powerful criminal groups, long in control of contraband commerce across the border, are now getting their cut of human traffic. Javier Barrera, a colonel in charge of police in Cucuta, said the Gulf Clan and Los Rastrojos, notorious syndicates that operate nationwide, are both involved.

      During a recent Reuters visit to several illegal crossings, Venezuelans carried cardboard, limes and car batteries as barter instead of using the bolivar, their near-worthless currency.

      Migrants pay as much as about $16 for the passage. Maikel, the arrastrador, said smugglers then pay gang operatives about $3 per migrant.

      For his crossing, Leal, the baker, carried a torn backpack and small duffel bag. His 2015 Venezuelan ID shows a healthier and happier man – before Leal began skimping on breakfast and dinner because he couldn’t afford them.

      He rested under a tree, but fretted about Colombian police. “I’m scared because the “migra” comes around,” he said, using the same term Mexican and Central American migrants use for border police in the United States.

      It doesn’t get easier as migrants move on.

      Even if relatives wired money, transfer agencies require a legally stamped passport to collect it. Bus companies are rejecting undocumented passengers to avoid fines for carrying them. A few companies risk it, but charge a premium of as much as 20 percent, according to several bus clerks near the border.

      The Sulbaran family walked and hitched some 1200 km to the Andean town of Santiago, where they have relatives. The father toured garages, but found no work.

      “People said no, others were scared,” said Narvaez, the mother. “Some Venezuelans come to Colombia to do bad things. They think we’re all like that.”

      https://www.reuters.com/article/us-venezuela-migration-insight/fleeing-hardship-at-home-venezuelan-migrants-struggle-abroad-too-idUSKCN1MP

      Avec ce commentaire de #Reece_Jones:

      People continue to flee Venezuela, now often resorting to #smugglers as immigration restrictions have increased

      #passeurs #fermeture_des_frontières

    • ’No more camps,’ Colombia tells Venezuelans not to settle in tent city

      Francis Montano sits on a cold pavement with her three children, all their worldly possessions stuffed into plastic bags, as she pleads to be let into a new camp for Venezuelan migrants in the Colombian capital, Bogota.

      Behind Montano, smoke snakes from woodfires set amid the bright yellow tents which are now home to hundreds of Venezuelans, erected on a former soccer pitch in a middle-class residential area in the west of the city.

      The penniless migrants, some of the millions who have fled Venezuela’s economic and social crisis, have been here more than a week, forced by city authorities to vacate a makeshift slum of plastic tarps a few miles away.

      The tent city is the first of its kind in Bogota. While authorities have established camps at the Venezuelan border, they have resisted doing so in Colombia’s interior, wary of encouraging migrants to settle instead of moving to neighboring countries or returning home.

      Its gates are guarded by police and officials from the mayor’s office and only those registered from the old slum are allowed access.

      “We’ll have to sleep on the street again, under a bridge,” said Montano, 22, whose children are all under seven years old. “I just want a roof for my kids at night.”

      According to the United Nations, an estimated 3 million Venezuelans have fled as their oil-rich country has sunk into crisis under President Nicolas Maduro. Critics accuse the Socialist leader of ravaging the economy through state interventions while clamping down on political opponents.

      The exodus - driven by violence, hyperinflation and shortages of food and medicines - amounts to one in 12 of the population, placing strain on neighboring countries, already struggling with poverty.

      Colombia, which has borne the brunt of the migration crisis, estimates it is sheltering 1 million Venezuelans, with some 3,000 arriving daily. The government says their total numbers could swell to 4 million by 2021, costing it nearly $9 billion a year.

      Municipal authorities in Bogota say the camp will provide shelter for 422 migrants through Christmas. Then in mid January, it will be dismantled in the hope jobs and new lodgings have been found.


      https://www.reuters.com/article/us-venezuela-migration-colombia/no-more-camps-colombia-tells-venezuelans-not-to-settle-in-tent-city-idUSKCN

      #camps #camps_de_réfugiés #tentes #Bogotá #Bogotà

    • Creativity amid Crisis: Legal Pathways for Venezuelan Migrants in Latin America

      As more than 3 million Venezuelans have fled a rapidly collapsing economy, severe food and medical shortages, and political strife, neighboring countries—the primary recipients of these migrants—have responded with creativity and pragmatism. This policy brief explores how governments in South America, Central America, and Mexico have navigated decisions about whether and how to facilitate their entry and residence. It also examines challenges on the horizon as few Venezuelans will be able to return home any time soon.

      Across Latin America, national legal frameworks are generally open to migration, but few immigration systems have been built to manage movement on this scale and at this pace. For example, while many countries in the region have a broad definition of who is a refugee—criteria many Venezuelans fit—only Mexico has applied it in considering Venezuelans’ asylum cases. Most other Latin American countries have instead opted to use existing visa categories or migration agreements to ensure that many Venezuelans are able to enter legally, and some have run temporary programs to regularize the status of those already in the country.

      Looking to the long term, there is a need to decide what will happen when temporary statuses begin to expire. And with the crisis in Venezuela and the emigration it has spurred ongoing, there are projections that as many as 5.4 million Venezuelans may be abroad by the end of 2019. Some governments have taken steps to limit future Venezuelan arrivals, and some receiving communities have expressed frustration at the strain put on local service providers and resources. To avoid widespread backlash and to facilitate the smooth integration of Venezuelans into local communities, policymakers must tackle questions ranging from the provision of permanent status to access to public services and labor markets. Done well, this could be an opportunity to update government processes and strengthen public services in ways that benefit both newcomers and long-term residents.

      https://www.migrationpolicy.org/research/legal-pathways-venezuelan-migrants-latin-america

    • Venezuela: Millions at risk, at home and abroad

      Venezuela has the largest proven oil reserves in the world and is not engulfed in war. Yet its people have been fleeing on a scale and at a rate comparable in recent memory only to Syrians at the height of the civil war and the Rohingya from Myanmar.

      As chronicled by much of our reporting collected below, some three to four million people have escaped the economic meltdown since 2015 and tried to start afresh in countries like Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. This exodus has placed enormous pressure on the region; several governments have started making it tougher for migrants to enter and find jobs.

      The many millions more who have stayed in Venezuela face an acute humanitarian crisis denied by their own government: pervasive hunger, the resurgence of disease, an absence of basic medicines, and renewed political uncertainty.

      President Nicolás Maduro has cast aside outside offers of aid, framing them as preludes to a foreign invasion and presenting accusations that the United States is once again interfering in Latin America.

      Meanwhile, the opposition, led by Juan Guaidó, the president of the National Assembly, has invited in assistance from the US and elsewhere.

      As aid becomes increasingly politicised, some international aid agencies have chosen to sit on the sidelines rather than risk their neutrality. Others run secretive and limited operations inside Venezuela that fly under the media radar.

      Local aid agencies, and others, have had to learn to adapt fast and fill the gaps as the Venezuelan people grow hungrier and sicker.

      https://www.irinnews.org/special-report/2019/02/21/venezuela-millions-risk-home-and-abroad
      #cartographie #visualisation

    • Leaving Home Through a Darkened Border

      I’m sitting on the edge of a boat on the shore of the Grita river, a few kilometers from the Unión bridge. The border between San Antonio del Tachira (Venezuela) and Cucuta (Colombia), one of the most active in Latin America, is tense, dark and uneasy. I got there on a bus from Merida, at around 4:00 a.m., and people were commenting, between WhatsApp messages and audios, that Maduro had opened the border, closed precisely the last time I went through in a violent haze.

      Minutes after I got off the bus, I could see hundreds standing in an impossible queue for the Venezuelan immigration office, at Boca de Grita. Coyotes waited on motorbikes, telling people how much cheaper and faster it’d be if they paid to cross through the side trail. I approached the first motorbike I saw, paid 7,000 Colombian pesos (a little over $2) and sleepily made my way through the wet, muddy paths down to the river.
      Challenge 1: From Merida to the border

      Fuel shortages multiplied the bus fares to the border in less than a month; the few buses that can still make the trip are already malfunctioning. The lonely, dark roads are hunting grounds for pirates, who throw rocks at car windows or set up spikes on the pavement to blow tires. Kidnapping or robberies follow.

      The bus I was in stopped several times when the driver saw a particularly dark path ahead. He waited for the remaining drivers traveling that night to join him and create a small fleet, more difficult to attack. The criminals are after what travelers carry: U.S. dollars, Colombian pesos, Peruvian soles, gold, jewelry (which Venezuelans trade at the border for food or medicine, or a ride to Peru or Chile). “It’s a bad sign to find a checkpoint without soldiers,” the co-driver said, as he got off to stretch his legs. “We’ll stop here because it’s safe; we’ll get robbed up ahead.” Beyond the headlights, the road was lost in dusk. This trip usually takes five hours, but this time it took seven, with all the stops and checkpoints along the way.
      Challenge 2: Across the river from Venezuela to Colombia

      Reaching the river, I noticed how things had changed since the last time I visited. There was no trace of the bottles with smuggled fuel, barrels, guards or even containers over the boats. In fact, there weren’t even that many boats, just the one, small and light, pushed by a man with a wooden stick through muddy waters. I was the only passenger.

      The paracos (Colombian paramilitaries) were in a good mood. Their logic is simple: if Maduro opened the border, lots of people would try to cross, but since many couldn’t go through the bridge due to the expensive bribes demanded by the Venezuelan National Guard and immigration agents, this would be a good day for trafficking.

      The shortage of fuel in states like Tachira, Merida and Zulia destroyed their smuggling of incredibly cheap Venezuelan fuel to Colombia, and controlling the irregular crossings is now the most lucrative business. Guerrillas and paracos have been at it for a while, but now Venezuelan pro-Maduro colectivos, deployed in Tachira in February to repress protests, took over the human trafficking with gunfire, imposing a new criminal dynamic where, unlike Colombian paramilitaries, they assault and rob Venezuelan migrants.

      A woman arrives on a motorbike almost half an hour after me, and comes aboard. “Up there, they’re charging people with large suitcases between 15,000 and 20,000 pesos. It’s going to be really hard to cross today. People will grow tired, and eventually they’ll come here. They’re scared because they’ve heard stories, but everything’s faster here.”

      Her reasoning is that of someone who has grown accustomed to human trafficking, who uses these crossings every day. Perhaps she’s missing the fact that, in such a critical situation as Venezuela’s in 2019, most people can no longer pay to cross illegally and, if they have some money, they’d rather use it to bribe their way through the bridge. The binational Unión bridge, 60 km from Cucuta, isn’t that violent, making it the preferred road for families, pregnant women and the elderly.

      Coyotes get three more people on the boat, the boatman sails into the river, turns on the rudimentary diesel engine and, in a few minutes, we’re on the other side. It’s not dawn yet and I’m certain this is going to be a very long day.

      “I hope they remove those containers from the border,” an old man coming from Trujillo with a prescription for insulin tells me. “I’m sure they’ve started already.” After the failed attempt to deliver humanitarian aid in February, the crossing through the bridges was restricted to all pedestrians and only in a few exceptions a medical patient could be let through (after paying the bribe). The rest still languishes on the Colombian side.
      Challenge 3: Joining the Cucuta crowd

      I finally reach Cucuta and six hours later, mid-afternoon, I meet with American journalist Joshua Collins at the Simón Bolívar bridge. According to local news, about 70,000 people are crossing it this Saturday alone.

      The difference with what I saw last time, reporting the Venezuela Live Aid concert, is astounding: the mass of Venezuelans lifts a cloud that covers everything with a yellowish, dirty and pale nimbus. The scorching desert sunlight makes everyone bow their heads while they push each other, crossing from one side to the other. There’s a stagnant, bitter smell in the air, a kind of musk made of filth, moisture and sweat.

      Joshua points to 20 children running barefoot and shirtless after cabs and vehicles. “Those kids wait here every day for people who want to cross in or out with packs of food and merchandise. They load it all on their shoulders with straps on around their heads.” These children, who should be in school or playing with their friends, are the most active carriers nowadays, working for paramilitaries and colectivos.

      The market (where you can buy and sell whatever you can think of) seems relegated to the background: what most people want right now is to cross, buy food and return before nightfall. The crowd writhes and merges. People shout and fight, frustrated, angry and ashamed. The Colombian police tries to help, but people move how they can, where they can. It’s unstoppable.

      The deepening of the complex humanitarian crisis in the west, plus the permanent shortage of gasoline, have impoverished migrants to a dangerous degree of vulnerability. Those who simply want to reach the border face obstacles like the absence of safe transportation and well-defined enemies, such as the human trafficking networks or the pro-Maduro criminal gangs controlling the roads now. The fear of armed violence in irregular crossings and the oppressive tendencies of the people controlling them, as well as the growing xenophobia of neighboring countries towards refugees, should be making many migrants wonder whether traveling on foot is a good idea at all.

      Although the border’s now open, the regime’s walls grow thicker for the poor. This might translate into new internal migrations within Venezuela toward areas less affected by the collapse of services, such as Caracas or the eastern part of the country, and perhaps the emergence of poor and illegal settlements in those forgotten lands where neither Maduro’s regime, nor Iván Duque’s government hold any jurisdiction.

      For now, who knows what’s going to happen? The sun sets over the border and a dense cloud of dust covers all of us.

      https://www.caracaschronicles.com/2019/06/11/leaving-home-through-a-darkened-border

  • Migrants : l’irrationnel au pouvoir ?

    Les dispositifs répressifs perpétuent le « problème migratoire » qu’ils prétendent pourtant résoudre : ils créent des migrants précaires et vulnérables contraints de renoncer à leur projet de retour au pays.
    Très loin du renouveau proclamé depuis l’élection du président Macron, la politique migratoire du gouvernement Philippe se place dans une triste #continuité avec celles qui l’ont précédée tout en franchissant de nouvelles lignes rouges qui auraient relevé de l’inimaginable il y a encore quelques années. Si, en 1996, la France s’émouvait de l’irruption de policiers dans une église pour déloger les grévistes migrant.e.s, que de pas franchis depuis : accès à l’#eau et distributions de #nourriture empêchés, tentes tailladées, familles traquées jusque dans les centres d’hébergement d’urgence en violation du principe fondamental de l’#inconditionnalité_du_secours.

    La #loi_sur_l’immigration que le gouvernement prépare marque l’emballement de ce processus répressif en proposant d’allonger les délais de #rétention administrative, de généraliser les #assignations_à_résidence, d’augmenter les #expulsions et de durcir l’application du règlement de #Dublin, de restreindre les conditions d’accès à certains titres de séjour, ou de supprimer la garantie d’un recours suspensif pour certain.e.s demandeur.e.s d’asile. Au-delà de leur apparente diversité, ces mesures reposent sur une seule et même idée de la migration comme « #problème ».

    Cela fait pourtant plusieurs décennies que les chercheurs spécialisés sur les migrations, toutes disciplines scientifiques confondues, montrent que cette vision est largement erronée. Contrairement aux idées reçues, il n’y a pas eu d’augmentation drastique des migrations durant les dernières décennies. Les flux en valeur absolue ont augmenté mais le nombre relatif de migrant.e.s par rapport à la population mondiale stagne à 3 % et est le même qu’au début du XXe siècle. Dans l’Union européenne, après le pic de 2015, qui n’a par ailleurs pas concerné la France, le nombre des arrivées à déjà chuté. Sans compter les « sorties » jamais intégrées aux analyses statistiques et pourtant loin d’être négligeables. Et si la demande d’asile a connu, en France, une augmentation récente, elle est loin d’être démesurée au regard d’autres périodes historiques. Au final, la mal nommée « #crise_migratoire » européenne est bien plus une crise institutionnelle, une crise de la solidarité et de l’hospitalité, qu’une crise des flux. Car ce qui est inédit dans la période actuelle c’est bien plus l’accentuation des dispositifs répressifs que l’augmentation de la proportion des arrivées.

    La menace que représenteraient les migrant.e.s pour le #marché_du_travail est tout autant exagérée. Une abondance de travaux montre depuis longtemps que la migration constitue un apport à la fois économique et démographique dans le contexte des sociétés européennes vieillissantes, où de nombreux emplois sont délaissés par les nationaux. Les économistes répètent qu’il n’y a pas de corrélation avérée entre #immigration et #chômage car le marché du travail n’est pas un gâteau à taille fixe et indépendante du nombre de convives. En Europe, les migrant.e.s ne coûtent pas plus qu’ils/elles ne contribuent aux finances publiques, auxquelles ils/elles participent davantage que les nationaux, du fait de la structure par âge de leur population.

    Imaginons un instant une France sans migrant.e.s. L’image est vertigineuse tant leur place est importante dans nos existences et les secteurs vitaux de nos économies : auprès de nos familles, dans les domaines de la santé, de la recherche, de l’industrie, de la construction, des services aux personnes, etc. Et parce qu’en fait, les migrant.e.s, c’est nous : un.e Français.e sur quatre a au moins un.e parent.e ou un.e grand-parent immigré.e.

    En tant que chercheur.e.s, nous sommes stupéfait.e.s de voir les responsables politiques successifs asséner des contre-vérités, puis jeter de l’huile sur le feu. Car loin de résoudre des problèmes fantasmés, les mesures, que chaque nouvelle majorité s’est empressée de prendre, n’ont cessé d’en fabriquer de plus aigus. Les situations d’irrégularité et de #précarité qui feraient des migrant.e.s des « fardeaux » sont précisément produites par nos politiques migratoires : la quasi-absence de canaux légaux de migration (pourtant préconisés par les organismes internationaux les plus consensuels) oblige les migrant.e.s à dépenser des sommes considérables pour emprunter des voies illégales. La #vulnérabilité financière mais aussi physique et psychique produite par notre choix de verrouiller les frontières est ensuite redoublée par d’autres pièces de nos réglementations : en obligeant les migrant.e.s à demeurer dans le premier pays d’entrée de l’UE, le règlement de Dublin les prive de leurs réseaux familiaux et communautaires, souvent situés dans d’autres pays européens et si précieux à leur insertion. A l’arrivée, nos lois sur l’accès au séjour et au travail les maintiennent, ou les font basculer, dans des situations de clandestinité et de dépendance. Enfin, ces lois contribuent paradoxalement à rendre les migrations irréversibles : la précarité administrative des migrant.e.s les pousse souvent à renoncer à leurs projets de retour au pays par peur qu’ils ne soient définitifs. Les enquêtes montrent que c’est l’absence de « papiers » qui empêche ces retours. Nos politiques migratoires fabriquent bien ce contre quoi elles prétendent lutter.

    Les migrant.e.s ne sont pas « la #misère_du_monde ». Comme ses prédécesseurs, le gouvernement signe aujourd’hui les conditions d’un échec programmé, autant en termes de pertes sociales, économiques et humaines, que d’inefficacité au regard de ses propres objectifs.

    Imaginons une autre politique migratoire. Une politique migratoire enfin réaliste. Elle est possible, même sans les millions utilisés pour la rétention et l’expulsion des migrant.e.s, le verrouillage hautement technologique des frontières, le financement de patrouilles de police et de CRS, les sommes versées aux régimes autoritaires de tous bords pour qu’ils retiennent, reprennent ou enferment leurs migrant.e.s. Une politique d’#accueil digne de ce nom, fondée sur l’enrichissement mutuel et le respect de la #dignité de l’autre, coûterait certainement moins cher que la politique restrictive et destructrice que le gouvernement a choisi de renforcer encore un peu plus aujourd’hui. Quelle est donc sa rationalité : ignorance ou électoralisme ?

    http://www.liberation.fr/debats/2018/01/18/migrants-l-irrationnel-au-pouvoir_1623475
    Une tribune de #Karen_Akoka #Camille_Schmoll (18.01.2018)

    #irrationalité #rationalité #asile #migrations #réfugiés #préjugés #invasion #afflux #répression #précarisation #vulnérabilité #France #économie #coût

    • Karine et Camille reviennent sur l’idée de l’économie qui ne serait pas un gâteau...
      #Johan_Rochel a très bien expliqué cela dans son livre
      Repenser l’immigration. Une boussole éthique
      http://www.ppur.org/produit/810/9782889151769

      Il a appelé cela le #piège_du_gâteau (#gâteau -vs- #repas_canadien) :

      « La discussion sur les bienfaits économiques de l’immigration est souvent tronquée par le piège du gâteau. Si vous invitez plus de gens à votre anniversaire, la part moyenne du gâteau va rétrécir. De même, on a tendance à penser que si plus de participants accèdent au marché du travail, il en découlera forcément une baisse des salaires et une réduction du nombre d’emplois disponible.
      Cette vision repose sur une erreur fondamentale quant au type de gâteau que représente l’économie, puisque, loin d’être de taille fixe, celui-ci augmente en fonction du nombre de participants. Les immigrants trouvant un travail ne osnt en effet pas seulement des travailleurs, ils sont également des consommateurs. Ils doivent se loger, manger, consommer et, à ce titre, leur présence stimule la croissance et crée de nouvelles opportunités économiques. Dans le même temps, cette prospérité économique provoque de nouvelles demandes en termes de logement, mobilité et infrastructure.
      L’immigration n’est donc pas comparable à une fête d’anniversaire où la part de gâteau diminuerait sans cesse. La bonne image serait plutôt celle d’un repas canadien : chacun apporte sa contribution personnelle, avant de se lancer à la découverte de divers plats et d’échanger avec les autres convives. Assis à cette table, nous sommes à la fois contributeurs et consommateurs.
      Cette analogie du repas canadien nous permet d’expliquer pourquoi un petit pays comme la Suisse n’a pas sombré dans la pauvreté la plus totale suite à l’arrivée de milliers d’Européens. Ces immigrants n’ont pas fait diminuer la taille du gâteau, ils ont contribué à la prospérité et au festin commun. L’augmentation du nombre de personnes actives sur le marché du travail a ainsi conduit à une forte augmentation du nombre d’emplois à disposition, tout en conservant des salaires élevés et un taux de chômage faible.
      Collectivement, la Suisse ressort clairement gagnante de cette mobilité internationale. Ce bénéfice collectif ’national’ ne doit cependant pas faire oublier les situations difficiles. Les changements induits par l’immigration profitent en effet à certains, tandis que d’autres se retrouvent sous pression. C’est notamment le cas des travailleurs résidents dont l’activité ou les compétences sont directement en compétition avec les nouveaux immigrés. Cela concerne tout aussi bien des secteurs peu qualifiés (par exemple les anciens migrants actifs dans l’hôtellerie) que dans les domaines hautement qualifiés (comme le management ou la recherche).
      Sur le plan éthique, ce constat est essentiel car il fait clairement apparaître deux questions distinctes. D’une part, si l’immigration profite au pays en général, l’exigence d’une répartition équitable des effets positifs et négatifs de cette immigration se pose de manière aiguë. Au final, la question ne relève plus de la politique migratoire, mais de la redistribution des richesses produites. Le douanier imaginaire ne peut donc se justifier sous couvert d’une ’protection’ générale de l’économie.
      D’autre part, si l’immigration met sous pression certains travailleurs résidents, la question de leur éventuelle protection doit être posée. Dans le débat public, cette question est souvent présentée comme un choix entre la défense de ’nos pauvres’ ou de ’nos chômeurs’ face aux ’immigrés’. Même si l’immigration est positive pour la collectivité, certains estiment que la protection de certains résidents justifierait la mise en œuvre de politiques migratoires restrictives » (Rochel 2016 : 31-33)

    • People on the move : migration and mobility in the European Union

      Migration is one of the most divisive policy topics in today’s Europe. In this publication, the authors assess the immigration challenge that the EU faces, analyse public perceptions, map migration patterns in the EU and review the literature on the economic impact of immigration to reflect on immigration policies and the role of private institutions in fostering integration.

      http://bruegel.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/People_on_the_move_ONLINE.pdf
      #travail #économie #éducation #intégration #EU #UE #asile #invasion #afflux #préjugés #statistiques #chiffres

      Je copie-colle ici deux graphiques.

      Un sur le nombre de #immigrants comparé au nombre de #émigrants, où l’on voit que le #solde_migratoire (en pourcentage de la population) est souvent négatif... notamment en #France et en #Italie :

      Et un graphique sur les demandes d’asile :

    • The progressive case for immigration

      “WE CAN’T restore our civilisation with somebody else’s babies.” Steve King, a Republican congressman from Iowa, could hardly have been clearer in his meaning in a tweet this week supporting Geert Wilders, a Dutch politician with anti-immigrant views. Across the rich world, those of a similar mind have been emboldened by a nativist turn in politics. Some do push back: plenty of Americans rallied against Donald Trump’s plans to block refugees and migrants. Yet few rich-world politicians are willing to make the case for immigration that it deserves: it is a good thing and there should be much more of it.

      Defenders of immigration often fight on nativist turf, citing data to respond to claims about migrants’ damaging effects on wages or public services. Those data are indeed on migrants’ side. Though some research suggests that native workers with skill levels similar to those of arriving migrants take a hit to their wages because of increased migration, most analyses find that they are not harmed, and that many eventually earn more as competition nudges them to specialise in more demanding occupations. But as a slogan, “The data say you’re wrong” lacks punch. More important, this narrow focus misses immigration’s...

      #paywall
      https://www.economist.com/finance-and-economics/2017/03/18/the-progressive-case-for-immigration?fsrc=scn/fb/te/bl/ed/theprogressivecaseforimmigrationfreeexchange?fsrc=scn/tw/te/bl/ed/theprogressivecaseforimmigrationfreeexchange

    • #Riace, l’economia e la rivincita degli zero

      Premessa

      Intendiamoci, il ministro Salvini può fare tutto quello che vuole. Criminalizzando le ONG può infangare l’operato di tanti volontari che hanno salvato migliaia di persone dall’annegamento; può chiudere i porti ai migranti, sequestrarli per giorni in una nave, chiudere gli Sprar, ridurre i finanziamenti per la loro minima necessaria accoglienza; può togliere il diritto ai migranti di chiedere lo stato di rifugiato, può cancellare modelli di integrazione funzionanti come Riace, può istigare all’odio razziale tramite migliaia di post su facebook in una continua e ansiosa ricerca del criminale (ma solo se ha la pelle scura). Al ministro Salvini è permesso tutto: lavorare sulle paure delle persone per incanalare la loro frustrazione contro un nemico inventato, può persino impedire a dei pullman di raggiungere Roma affinché le persone non possano manifestare contro di lui. Può prendersela con tutti coloro che lo criticano, sdoganare frasi del cupo ventennio fascista, minacciare sgomberi a tutti (tranne che a casapound) e rimanendo in tema, può chiedere il censimento dei ROM per poterli cacciare. Può fare tutto questo a torso nudo, tramite una diretta facebook, chiosando i suoi messaggi ai suoi nemici giurati con baci e abbracci aggressivo-passivi, o mostrandosi sorridente nei suoi selfie durante le tragedie che affliggono il nostro paese. Al ministro Salvini è permesso di tutto, non c’è magistratura o carta costituzionale che tenga.

      Ma una cosa è certa: il ministro Salvini non può vietare alle persone di provare empatia, di fare ed essere rete, di non avere paura, di non essere solidale. E soprattutto, il ministro Salvini, non può impedirci di ragionare, di analizzare lo stato dell’arte tramite studi e ricerche scientifiche, capire la storia, smascherare il presente, per provare a proporre valide alternative, per un futuro più aperto ed inclusivo per la pace e il benessere delle persone.

      Tutto questo è lo scopo del presente articolo, che dedico a mio padre. Buona lettura.

      I migranti ci aiutano a casa nostra

      In un mio precedente post, sempre qui su Econopoly, ho spiegato -studi alla mano- come fosse conveniente, anche e soprattutto dal punto di vista economico, avere una politica basata sull’accoglienza: la diversità e la relativa inclusione conviene a tutti. Molti dei commenti critici che ho avuto modo di leggere sui social, oltre alle consuete offese degli instancabili haters possono riassumersi in un solo concetto: “gli altri paesi selezionano i migranti e fanno entrare solo quelli qualificati, mentre in Italia accogliamo tutti”. Premesso che non è così, che l’Italia non è l’unico paese ad offrire ospitalità a questo tipo di migranti, e che non tutte le persone disperate che raggiungono le nostre coste sono poco istruite, non voglio sottrarmi alla critica e voglio rispondere punto su punto nel campo di gioco melmoso e maleodorante da loro scelto. Permettetemi quindi di rivolgermi direttamente a loro, in prima persona.

      Prima di tutto mi chiedo come si possa sperare di attirare migranti “qualificati” se non riusciamo neanche a tenerci le nostre migliori menti. Il nostro problema principale è infatti l’emigrazione, non l’immigrazione: più di 250mila italiani emigrano all’estero, perché l’Italia non è più capace di offrire loro un futuro dignitoso. Ma tutto questo evidentemente non rientra tra le priorità del governo del cambiamento.

      Tolti i migranti “qualificati”, ci rimangono quindi quelli che gli anglosassoni definiscono “low skilled migrants”, e le obiezioni che i nostri amici rancorosi ci pongono sono sempre le stesse: “per noi sono solo un costo”, “prima gli italiani che non arrivano alla fine del mese”, “ospitateli a casa vostra”, e così via vanverando. Proviamo a rispondere con i numeri, con i dati, sempre che i dati possano avere ancora un valore in questo paese in perenne campagna elettorale, sempre alla ricerca del facile consenso. Correva l’anno 2016, un numero record di sbarchi raggiungeva le nostre coste e lo stato spendeva per loro ben 17,5 miliardi di spesa pubblica. Bene, prima che possiate affogare nella vostra stessa bava, senza che nessuna ONG possa venirvi a salvare, sappiate che gli introiti dello Stato grazie ai contributi da loro versati, nelle varie forme, è stato di 19,2 miliardi: in pratica con i contributi dei migranti lo stato ha guadagnato 1,7 miliardi di euro. Potete prendervela con me che ve lo riporto, o magari con il centro studi e ricerche Idos e con il centro Unar (del dipartimento delle pari opportunità) che questo report lo hanno prodotto, ma la realtà non cambia. Forse fate prima a cambiare voi la vostra percezione, perché dovremmo ringraziarli quei “low skilled migrants”, visto che con quel miliardo e sette di euro ci hanno aiutato a casa nostra, pagando -in parte- la nostra pensione, il nostro ospedale, la nostra scuola.

      Studi confermano che i migranti contribuiscono al benessere del paese ospitante

      Prima di andare avanti in questo discorso, vale la pena di menzionare un importante e imponente studio di Giovanni Peri e Mette Foged del 2016: i due autori hanno esaminato i salari di ogni singola persona in Danimarca per un periodo di ben 12 anni, nei quali vi era stato un forte afflusso di migranti. Il governo danese distribuì i rifugiati per tutto il territorio, fornendo agli economisti tutti i dati necessari per permettere a loro di analizzarli. Da questi dati emerse che i danesi che avevano i rifugiati nelle vicinanze, avevano visto i propri salari crescere molto più velocemente, rispetto ai connazionali senza rifugiati. Questo si spiega perché i low skilled migrants essendo poco istruiti, generalmente vanno a coprire quei lavori che non richiedono particolari competenze, permettendo -per contrasto- ai locali di specializzarsi nei lavori che invece sono meglio pagati, perché più produttivi.

      Quando i migranti non convengono e sono solo un costo

      Tuttavia i migranti, per poter versare i propri contributi allo stato, devono -ovviamente- essere messi in grado di lavorare. Non sto dicendo che si debba trovare loro un lavoro, perché sono capaci di farlo da soli, ma semplicemente di dare a loro i necessari permessi burocratici per poter vivere, lavorare, consumare, spendere. Questo alimenterebbe un mercato del lavoro -che molti italiani ormai disdegnano- e aumenterebbe l’indotto delle vendite di beni di consumo ai “nostri” piccoli commercianti italiani e non.

      “Potrebbe sembrare controintuitivo, ma i paesi che hanno politiche più severe e restrittive nei confronti dei rifugiati, finiscono per avere un costo maggiore per il mantenimento dei migranti”, afferma Erik Jones, professore alla Johns Hopkins University School. Quindi paradossalmente (ma neanche tanto), più rinchiudiamo i migranti nei centri di accoglienza senza permettere a loro di avere una vita e un lavoro, più sale il loro costo a spese dei cittadini italiani.

      Le conseguenze del decreto sicurezza

      Stranamente è proprio questa la direzione che il ministro Salvini ha deciso di intraprendere con il suo “decreto sicurezza”: togliendo lo SPRAR ai migranti e rendendo più difficoltosa la possibilità di richiedere asilo, verrà impedito a loro di integrarsi nel tessuto sociale del nostro paese, di lavorare, di produrre ricchezza. Insomma questo decreto finiranno per pagarlo caramente gli italiani, che per il ministro Salvini, sarebbero dovuti “venire prima” (forse intendeva alla cassa).

      Non è un caso se al momento in cui scrivo città come Torino, Bergamo, Bologna e Padova hanno espresso forti preoccupazioni nel far attuare il cosiddetto “decreto sicurezza” firmato da Salvini. Il fatto che a Torino governi il m5s che siede nei banchi di governo insieme al ministro degli interni, ha provocato non pochi mal di pancia dentro la maggioranza e conferma quanto questo decreto sia in realtà molto pericoloso per gli italiani stessi. «Io capisco che siamo in campagna elettorale permanente – ha concluso Sergio Giordani ma non si possono prendere decisioni sulla pelle delle persone. Che si scordino di farlo su quella dei padovani», ha affermato il sindaco di Padova. Non è un lapsus, ha proprio detto “sulla pelle dei padovani”, non dei migranti.

      Perché il modello Riace ha funzionato

      Un interessante studio, diretto dal Prof. Edward Taylor, per la Harvard Business Review, ci spiega quali sono le giuste modalità che permettano ai migranti di sostenere l’economia del paese ospitante, e lo fa spiegandoci due importanti lezioni che ha imparato dopo aver studiato attentamente i costi economici e i benefici di tre campi in Rwanda gestiti dall’UNCHR:
      1. Give cash, not food. La prima lezione imparata è quella di fornire direttamente i soldi ai migranti per comprarsi il cibo e di non dare a loro direttamente il cibo. Questo serve ad alimentare il mercato locale, aiutando in un’ottica win-win i contadini locali e i piccoli commercianti del posto
      2. Promote long-term integration. La seconda lezione imparata che ci spiega il prof. Edward Taylor, riguarda il necessario tempo di integrazione che si deve concedere ai migranti, al fine di permettere un importante ritorno economico al paese ospitante: in poche parole i migranti devono avere il tempo di sistemarsi, di creare una forza lavoro locale, di integrarsi nel tessuto sociale del luogo ospitante

      Quando ho letto questo studio non ho potuto fare altro che pensare all’esperienza di Riace, considerata giustamente un modello vincente di integrazione, diventato famoso in tutto il mondo: infatti quello che consiglia il Prof Taylor è esattamente ciò che ha fatto il sindaco Domenico Lucano nel suo paese! La ricetta è talmente la stessa, che ad un certo punto ho pensato di aver letto male e che il Prof. Taylor si riferisse, in realtà, all’esperienza del paesino calabrese, non a quella del Rwanda.

      Per quanto riguarda il primo punto, il sindaco Lucano si è dovuto inventare una moneta locale per permettere ai migranti di essere indipendenti e di spenderli nel territorio ospitante, promuovendo ed aiutando l’economia dell’intero paese; per quanto riguarda il secondo punto, Lucano ha trasformato la natura dei fondi dello SPRAR, che in realtà prevedono una sistemazione del migrante in soli sei mesi, in una integrazione a medio e lungo termine. Per permettere ai migranti di ritornare un valore (anche economico), è necessario del tempo, ed è obiettivamente impossibile immaginarlo fattibile nel limite temporale dei sei mesi. E’ importante sottolineare come le accuse che gli vengono mosse dalla magistratura, che gli sta attualmente impedendo di tornare nella sua Riace, nascano proprio da questo suo approccio ben descritto nelle due lezioni del Prof. Taylor. Altro concetto importante da ribadire è che all’inizio, il sindaco Lucano, si è mosso in questa direzione principalmente per aiutare i suoi compaesani italiani, visto che il paese si stava spopolando. Ad esempio, l’asilo era destinato a chiudere, ma grazie ai figli dei migranti questo non è accaduto.

      Tutto questo mi ha fatto pensare al sindaco di Riace, come ad un vero e proprio manager illuminato, oltre che ad una persona di una generosità smisurata, non certamente ad un criminale da punire ed umiliare in questo modo.

      Lunga vita a Riace (grazie alla rete)

      Dovremmo essere tutti riconoscenti al sindaco Riace, ma non solo esprimendogli solidarietà con le parole. Ho pertanto deciso di concludere questo articolo con delle proposte concrete che possano aiutare Lucano, i riacesi e i migranti che vi abitano. Ognuno può dare il proprio “give-back” al Sindaco Lucano, in base al proprio vissuto, ai propri interessi, alle proprie competenze. Ad esempio, per il lavoro che faccio, a me viene facile pensare che la Digital Transformation che propongo alle aziende possa aiutare in modo decisivo Riace e tutte le “Riaci del mondo” che vogliano provare ad integrare e non a respingere i migranti. Penso ad esempio che Riace meriti una piattaforma web che implementi almeno tre funzioni principali:
      1. Funzione divulgativa, culturale. E’ necessario far conoscere le storie delle persone, perché si è stranieri solo fino a quando non ci si conosce l’un l’altro. Per questo penso, ad esempio, ad una web radio, magari ispirata all’esperienza di Radio Aut di Peppino Impastato, visto che Mimmo lo considera, giustamente, una figura vicina alle sue istanze. Contestualmente, sempre attraverso la piattaforma web farei conoscere, tramite dei video molto brevi, le storie e le testimonianze dei singoli migranti
      2. Funzione di sostentamento economico. Ogni migrante infatti potrebbe avere un profilo pubblico che potrebbe permettere a tutti noi non solo di conoscere la sua storia ma anche di aiutarlo economicamente, comprando i suoi prodotti, che possano essere di artigianato o di beni di consumo come l’olio locale di Riace. Insomma, una piattaforma che funzionerebbe da e-commerce, seppur con una forte valenza etica. Infatti il “made in Riace”, potrebbe diventare un brand, la garanzia che un commercio equo e solidale possa essere veramente possibile, anche in questo mondo
      3. Funzione di offerta lavoro. La piattaforma potrebbe ospitare un sistema che metta in comunicazione la domanda con l’offerta di lavoro. Penso ai tanti lavori e lavoretti di cui la popolazione locale potrebbe avere bisogno, attratta magari dai costi più bassi: il muratore, l’elettricista, l’idraulico, etc. Per non parlare di professioni più qualificanti, perché spesso ad imbarcarsi nei viaggi della speranza ci sono anche molti dottori e professionisti

      Ed infine, sempre grazie alla rete, i migranti di un paesino sperduto come Riace, potrebbero tenere lezioni di inglese e francese, tramite skype, a milioni di italiani (che ne hanno veramente bisogno). Credo infine che -rimanendo in tema- potrebbero nascere a Riace, come in tanti altri paesi del nostro belpaese, anche dei laboratori di informatica visto che attualmente moltissime società per trovare un programmatore disponibile sono costrette a cercarlo fuori Italia, data la spropositata differenza tra la domanda e l’offerta in questo settore in continua evoluzione.

      Se al sindaco Lucano interessa, il mio personale give-back è tutto e solo per lui.

      Conclusioni

      Il ministro Salvini, che può tutto, ha definito il sindaco di Riace “uno zero”, pensando di offenderlo ma è evidente che non lo conosce affatto. Come non conosce affatto le dinamiche della rete, nonostante il suo entourage social si vanti di aver creato il profilo pubblico su facebook con più followers. Ma é proprio questo lo sbaglio di fondo, il grande fraintendimento: la rete non è mai stata pensata in ottica di “followers e following”, questa è una aberrazione dei social network che nulla ha a che fare con la rete e le sue origini. La rete è nata per condividere, collaborare, comunicare, contaminare. Ricordiamoci che grazie alla rete, in pochissimi giorni, si sono trovati i fondi per permettere ai figli dei migranti di usufruire della mensa scolastica dei propri bambini, che leghista di Lodi gli aveva tolto. Siamo tutti degli zero, ministro Salvini, non solo il sindaco Riace. Ma lei, sig. ministro, non ha minimamente idea di cosa siano capace di fare gli zero, quando si uniscono con gli uni, se lo faccia dire da un informatico. La rete è solidale by design.

      https://www.econopoly.ilsole24ore.com/2018/11/11/riace-economia-rivincita-degli-zero/?refresh_ce=1

    • L’immigration rapporte 3 500 euros par individu chaque année

      D’après un rapport de l’OCDE dévoilé par La Libre Belgique, l’immigration « rapporterait » en moyenne près de 3.500 euros de rentrées fiscales par individu par an . Toutefois, l’insertion d’une partie d’entre eux ferait toujours l’objet de discrimination : un véritable gâchis pour les économistes et les observateurs.

      https://www.levif.be/actualite/belgique/l-immigration-rapporte-3-500-euros-par-individu-chaque-annee/article-normal-17431.html?cookie_check=1545235756

      signalé par @kassem :
      https://seenthis.net/messages/745460

    • The progressive case for immigration. Whatever politicians say, the world needs more immigration, not less

      “WE CAN’T restore our civilisation with somebody else’s babies.” Steve King, a Republican congressman from Iowa, could hardly have been clearer in his meaning in a tweet this week supporting Geert Wilders, a Dutch politician with anti-immigrant views. Across the rich world, those of a similar mind have been emboldened by a nativist turn in politics. Some do push back: plenty of Americans rallied against Donald Trump’s plans to block refugees and migrants. Yet few rich-world politicians are willing to make the case for immigration that it deserves: it is a good thing and there should be much more of it.

      Defenders of immigration often fight on nativist turf, citing data to respond to claims about migrants’ damaging effects on wages or public services. Those data are indeed on migrants’ side. Though some research suggests that native workers with skill levels similar to those of arriving migrants take a hit to their wages because of increased migration, most analyses find that they are not harmed, and that many eventually earn more as competition nudges them to specialise in more demanding occupations. But as a slogan, “The data say you’re wrong” lacks punch. More important, this narrow focus misses immigration’s biggest effects.

      Appeal to self-interest is a more effective strategy. In countries with acute demographic challenges, migration is a solution to the challenges posed by ageing: immigrants’ tax payments help fund native pensions; they can help ease a shortage of care workers. In Britain, for example, voters worry that foreigners compete with natives for the care of the National Health Service, but pay less attention to the migrants helping to staff the NHS. Recent research suggests that information campaigns in Japan which focused on these issues managed to raise public support for migration (albeit from very low levels).

      Natives enjoy other benefits, too. As migrants to rich countries prosper and have children, they become better able to contribute to science, the arts and entrepreneurial activity. This is the Steve Jobs case for immigration: the child of a Muslim man from Syria might create a world-changing company in his new home.

      Yet even this argument tiptoes around the most profound case for immigration. Among economists, there is near-universal acceptance that immigration generates huge benefits. Inconveniently, from a rhetorical perspective, most go to the migrants themselves. Workers who migrate from poor countries to rich ones typically earn vastly more than they could have in their country of origin. In a paper published in 2009, economists estimated the “place premium” a foreign worker could earn in America relative to the income of an identical worker in his native country. The figures are eye-popping. A Mexican worker can expect to earn more than 2.5 times her Mexican wage, in PPP-adjusted dollars, in America. The multiple for Haitian workers is over 10; for Yemenis it is 15 (see chart).

      No matter how hard a Haitian worker labours, he cannot create around him the institutions, infrastructure and skilled population within which American workers do their jobs. By moving, he gains access to all that at a stroke, which massively boosts the value of his work, whether he is a software engineer or a plumber. Defenders of open borders reckon that restrictions on migration represent a “trillion dollar bills left on the pavement”: a missed opportunity to raise the output of hundreds of millions of people, and, in so doing, to boost their quality of life.
      We shall come over; they shall be moved

      On what grounds do immigration opponents justify obstructing this happy outcome? Some suppose it would be better for poor countries to become rich themselves. Perhaps so. But achieving rich-world incomes is the exception rather than the rule. The unusual rapid expansion of emerging economies over the past two decades is unlikely to be repeated. Growth in China and in global supply chains—the engines of the emerging-world miracle—is decelerating; so, too, is catch-up to American income levels (see chart). The falling cost of automating manufacturing work is also undermining the role of industry in development. The result is “premature deindustrialisation”, a phenomenon identified by Dani Rodrik, an economist, in which the role of industry in emerging markets peaks at progressively lower levels of income over time. However desirable economic development is, insisting upon it as the way forward traps billions in poverty.

      An argument sometimes cited by critics of immigration is that migrants might taint their new homes with a residue of the culture of their countries of origin. If they come in great enough numbers, this argument runs, the accumulated toxins could undermine the institutions that make high incomes possible, leaving everyone worse off. Michael Anton, a national-security adviser to Donald Trump, for example, has warned that the culture of “third-world foreigners” is antithetical to the liberal, Western values that support high incomes and a high quality of life.

      This argument, too, fails to convince. At times in history Catholics and Jews faced similar slurs, which in hindsight look simply absurd. Research published last year by Michael Clemens and Lant Pritchett of the Centre for Global Development, a think-tank, found that migration rules tend to be far more restrictive than is justified by worries about the “contagion” of low productivity.

      So the theory amounts to an attempt to provide an economic basis for a cultural prejudice: what may be a natural human proclivity to feel more comfortable surrounded by people who look and talk the same, and to be disconcerted by rapid change and the unfamiliar. But like other human tendencies, this is vulnerable to principled campaigns for change. Americans and Europeans are not more deserving of high incomes than Ethiopians or Haitians. And the discomfort some feel at the strange dress or speech of a passer-by does not remotely justify trillions in economic losses foisted on the world’s poorest people. No one should be timid about saying so, loud and clear.

      https://www.economist.com/finance-and-economics/2017/03/18/the-progressive-case-for-immigration?fsrc=scn/tw/te/bl/ed
      #USA #Etats-Unis

    • Migrants contribute more to Britain than they take, and will carry on doing so. Reducing immigration will hurt now, and in the future

      BRITAIN’S Conservative Party has put reducing immigration at the core of its policies. Stopping “uncontrolled immigration from the EU”, as Theresa May, the prime minister, put it in a speech on September 20th, appears to be the reddest of her red lines in the negotiations over Brexit. Any deal that maintains free movement of people, she says, would fail to respect the result of the Brexit referendum.

      In her “Chequers” proposal, Mrs May outlined her vision of Britain’s future relationship with the block, which would have placed restrictions on immigration from the EU. But the block rejected it as unworkable, and the stalemate makes the spectre of a chaotic Brexit next March without any agreement far more likely.

      Even if she were to manage to reduce migration significantly, however, Mrs May’s successors might come to regret it. According to the government’s latest review on immigration, by the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC), immigrants contribute more to the public purse on average than native-born Britons do. Moreover, European newcomers are the most lucrative group among them. The MAC reckons that each additional migrant from the European Economic Area (EEA) will make a total contribution to the public purse of approximately £78,000 over his or her lifetime (in 2017 prices). Last year, the average adult migrant from the EEA yielded £2,370 ($3,000) more for the Treasury than the average British-born adult did. Even so, the MAC recommended refining the current immigration system to remove the cap on high-skilled migrants and also said that no special treatment should be given to EU citizens.

      With Britain’s population ageing, the country could do with an influx of younger members to its labour force. If net migration were reduced to the Tories’ target of fewer than 100,000 people per year by 2030, every 1,000 people of prime working age (20-64) in Britain would have to support 405 people over the age of 65. At the present level of net migration, however, those 1,000 people would have to support only 389. This gap of 16 more pension-aged people rises to 44 by 2050. The middle-aged voters who tend to support the Conservatives today are the exact cohort whose pensions are at risk of shrinking if their desired immigration policies were put into practice.

      https://www.economist.com/graphic-detail/2018/09/26/migrants-contribute-more-to-britain-than-they-take-and-will-carry-on-doing-so?fsrc=scn/tw/te/bl/ed/migrantscontributemoretobritainthantheytakeandwillcarryondoingsodailychar
      #UK #Angleterre

    • Étude sur l’impact économique des migrants en Europe : « Les flux migratoires sont une opportunité et non une charge »

      Pour #Ekrame_Boubtane, la co-auteure de l’étude sur l’impact positif de la migration sur l’économie européenne (https://seenthis.net/messages/703437), « les flux migratoires ont contribué à améliorer le niveau de vie moyen ».

      Selon une étude du CNRS, les migrants ne sont pas une charge économique pour l’Europe. L’augmentation du flux de migrants permanent produit même des effets positifs. C’est ce que démontre Ekrame Boubtane, économiste, maître de conférence à l’Université Clermont Auvergne, co-auteure de l’étude sur l’impact positif de la migration sur l’économie européenne.

      Cette étude intervient alors que la Hongrie, dirigée par Viktor Orban, met en place une nouvelle loi travail qui autorise les employeurs à demander à leurs salariés 400 heures supplémentaires par an, payées trois ans plus tard. Cette disposition, adoptée dans un contexte de manque de main d’oeuvre, est dénoncée par ses opposants comme un « droit à l’esclavage » dans un pays aux salaires parmi les plus bas de l’UE

      500 000 Hongrois sont partis travailler à l’Ouest ces dernières années, là où les salaires sont deux à trois fois plus élevés. La nouvelle loi travail portée par le gouvernement hongrois est-elle une solution au manque de main d’oeuvre dans le pays selon vous ?

      Ekrame Boubtane : C’est un peu curieux de répondre à un besoin de main d’oeuvre en remettant en cause les droits des travailleurs qui restent en Hongrie. Je pense que c’est un mauvais signal qu’on envoie sur le marché du travail hongrois en disant que les conditions de travail dans le pays vont se détériorer encore plus, incitant peut-être même davantage de travailleurs hongrois à partir dans d’autres pays.

      Ce qui est encore plus inquiétant, c’est que le gouvernement hongrois a surfé politiquement sur une idéologie anti-immigration [avec cette barrière à la frontière serbe notamment où sont placés des barbelés, des miradors...] et aujourd’hui il n’a pas une position rationnelle par rapport au marché du travail en Hongrie. Proposer ce genre de mesure ne semble pas très pertinent du point de vue de l’ajustement sur le marché du travail.

      En Hongrie, six entreprises sur dix sont aujourd’hui en situation de fragilité. La pénurie de main d’oeuvre dans certains secteurs en tension pourrait-elle être compensée par l’immigration aujourd’hui ?

      Je suppose que la législation hongroise en matière de travail est très restrictive pour l’emploi de personnes étrangères, mais ce qu’il faut aussi préciser c’est que les Hongrois qui sont partis travailler dans les autres pays européens n’ont pas forcément les qualifications ou les compétences nécessaires dans ces secteurs en tension. Ce sont des secteurs (bâtiment, agroalimentaire) qui ont besoin de main d’oeuvre. Ce sont des emplois relativement pénibles, payés généralement au niveau minimum et qui ne sont pas très attractifs pour les nationaux.

      Les flux migratoires sont une source de main d’oeuvre flexible et mobile. L’Allemagne comme la France ont toujours eu un discours plutôt rationnel et un peu dépassionné de la question migratoire. Je pense à une initiative intéressante en Bretagne où le secteur agroalimentaire avait des difficultés pour pourvoir une centaine de postes. Le pôle emploi local n’a pas trouvé les travailleurs compétents pour ces tâches-là. Le Conseil régional Bretagne et Pôle Emploi ont donc investi dans la formation de migrants, principalement des Afghans qui venaient d’avoir la protection de l’Ofpra [Office français de protection des réfugiés et apatrides]. Ils les ont formés, et notamment à la maîtrise de la langue, pour pourvoir ces postes.

      Les flux migratoires peuvent donc être une chance pour les économies européennes ?

      C’est ce que démontrent tous les travaux de recherches scientifiques. Lorsque l’on va parler de connaissances ou de savoir plutôt que d’opinions ou de croyances, les flux migratoires dans les pays européens sont une opportunité économique et non pas une charge. Lorsqu’on travaille sur ces questions-là, on voit clairement que les flux migratoires ont contribué à améliorer le niveau de vie moyen ou encore le solde des finances publiques.

      On oublie souvent que les migrants - en proportion de la population - permettent de réduire les dépenses de retraite donc ils permettent de les financer. Généralement on se focalise sur les dépenses et on ne regarde pas ce qui se passe du côté des recettes, alors que du côté des recettes on établit clairement que les migrants contribuent aussi aux recettes des administrations publiques et donc, finalement, on a une implication des flux migratoires sur le solde budgétaire des administrations publiques qui est positif et clairement identifié dans les données.

      https://www.francetvinfo.fr/monde/europe/migrants/etude-sur-l-impact-economique-des-migrants-en-europe-les-flux-migratoir

    • Une étude démontre que les migrants ne sont pas un fardeau pour les économies européennes

      Le travail réalisé par des économistes français démontre qu’une augmentation du flux de migrants permanents à une date donnée produit des effets positifs jusqu’à quatre ans après.

      Une étude réalisée par des économistes français et publiée dans le magazine Sciences advences, mercredi 20 juin, démontre que les migrants ne sont pas un fardeau pour les économies européennes. Les trois chercheurs du CNRS, de l’université de Clermont-Auvergne et de Paris-Nanterre se sont appuyés sur les données statistiques de quinze pays de l’Europe de l’Ouest, dont la France. Les chercheurs ont distingué les migrants permanents des demandeurs d’asile, en situation légale le temps de l’instruction de leur demande et considérés comme résidents une fois leur demande acceptée.

      Pendant la période étudiée entre 1985 et 2015, l’Europe de l’Ouest a connu une augmentation importante des flux de demandeurs d’asile à la suite des guerres dans les Balkans et à partir de 2011, en lien avec les Printemps arabes et le conflit syrien. Les flux de migrants, notamment intracommunautaires, ont eux augmenté après l’élargissement de l’Union européenne vers l’Est en 2004.
      Une hausse du flux de migrants produits des effets positifs

      L’étude démontre qu’une augmentation du flux de migrants permanents à une date donnée produit des effets positifs jusqu’à quatre ans après : le PIB par habitant augmente, le taux de chômage diminue et les dépenses publiques supplémentaires sont plus que compensées par l’augmentation des recettes fiscales. Dans le cas des demandeurs d’asile, les économistes n’observent aucun effet négatif. L’impact positif se fait sentir au bout de trois à cinq ans, lorsqu’une partie des demandeurs obtient l’asile et rejoint la catégorie des migrants permanents.

      « Il n’y a pas d’impacts négatifs. Les demandeurs d’asile ne font pas augmenter le chômage, ne réduisent pas le PIB par tête et ils ne dégradent pas le solde des finances publiques. Il y a des effets positifs sur les migrations qui sont un petit peu polémiques parce que tout le monde n’y croit pas. Ce qui est intéressant, c’est de voir que cela ne dégrade pas la situation des finances publiques européennes » a expliqué, jeudi 21 juin sur franceinfo, Hippolyte d’Albis, directeur de recherche au CNRS, professeur à l’École d’économie de Paris et co-auteur de l’étude sur l’impact des demandeurs d’asile sur l’économie.
      Investir pour rapidement intégrer le marché du travail

      « Trente ans d’accueil de demandeurs d’asile dans les quinze principaux pays d’Europe nous révèlent qu’il n’y a pas eu d’effets négatifs, explique Hippolyte d’Albis. Evidemment il y a un coût, ces personnes vont être logées, parfois recevoir une allocation, mais cet argent va être redistribué dans l’économie. Il ne faut pas voir qu’un côté, nous on a vu le côté des impôts et on a vu que ça se compensait. L’entrée sur le marché du travail, donc la contribution à l’économie va prendre du temps et ce n’est pas efficace. Il vaut mieux investir pour qu’il puisse rapidement intégrer le marché du travail. »

      En 2015, un million de personnes ont demandé l’asile dans l’un des pays de l’Union européenne selon le Haut-commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés, ce qui est un record. Les chercheurs estiment donc qu’il est peu probable que la crise migratoire en cours soit une charge économique pour les économies européennes. Elle pourrait être au contraire une opportunité.

      https://www.francetvinfo.fr/monde/europe/migrants/une-etude-demontre-que-les-migrants-ne-sont-pas-un-fardeau-pour-les-eco

    • L’impact économique positif des réfugiés sur les économies européennes

      En cette journée mondiale des réfugiés, la Bulle Economique s’intéresse à leur impact économique dans les pays d’Europe. Une étude récente montre qu’ils sont loin d’être un « fardeau ». Au contraire.

      Dans un récent tweet, la présidente du Rassemblement National se scandalisait de lire que les comptes de la Sécurité sociale allaient être sérieusement grevés par les mesures destinées aux gilets jaunes. « Incroyable de lire ça, écrit Marine Le Pen, et l’AME ça ne creuse pas le trou de la Sécu ? »

      L’AME, c’est l’Aide Médicale d’Etat, proposée aux étrangers en situation irrégulière pour leur permettre d’accéder aux soins, et abondé non pas par le budget de la sécurité sociale, mais par celui de l’Etat. Une erreur rapidement pointée du doigt par des députés, qui ont ironiquement proposé à Marine Le Pen de s’intéresser de plus près à ces deux budgets discutés tous les ans au Parlement.

      Mais au delà de cette question démagogique proposée au détour d’un tweet, la présidente du parti d’extrême droite réutilise l’argument de l’impact économique soi disant trop lourd qu’auraient les réfugiés sur les finances publiques de la France. Argument remis en cause par trois économistes du CNRS dont les travaux ont été publiés il y a un an tout juste dans la revue Sciences. Une étude à retrouver en cliquant ici.
      Un regard macro-économique

      Hippolyte d’Albis, Ekrame Boubtane et Dramane Coulibaly ont appliqué aux flux migratoires des réfugiés, les méthodes traditionnellement utilisées pour mesurer l’impact macro-économique des politiques structurelles. Ils l’ont fait pour 15 pays européens depuis 1985 jusqu’en 2015, des données statistiques qui permettent de mesurer l’effet de ces flux sur les finances publiques, le PIB par habitant et le taux de chômage. On parle ici de personnes ayant fait une demande d’asile, et présentes sur le territoire le temps de l’instruction de cette demande. Période pendant laquelle ils n’ont pas le droit de travailler. Soit, pour la France une moyenne de 20 000 entrées sur le territoire par an environ, contre 200 000 migrations de travail légales.

      Au total ces 30 ans de données statistiques font apparaître que les dépenses publiques causées par ces réfugiées sont plus que compensées par les gains économiques induits par ces mêmes réfugiés. Les auteurs font ainsi valoir que les chocs d’immigration comme a pu en connaitre l’Europe au moment de ce qu’on a appelé la crise des réfugiés, dont le pic a été atteint en 2015, ces chocs ont eu des effets positifs : ils ont augmenté le PIB par habitant, ont réduit le taux de chômage, et amélioré les finances publiques.

      S’il est vrai qu’ils induisent des dépenses publiques supplémentaires pour les accueillir, les accompagner ou les soigner le cas échéant, ce qu’ils rapportent en revenus supplémentaires, notamment fiscaux, compensent, parfois largement, leur coût. Cet impact globalement positif dure longtemps : parfois 3 à 7 années après leur arrivée, selon les auteurs de l’étude.

      Les auteurs, mais aussi d’autres chercheurs dans d’autres études qui vont dans le même sens (notamment cette étude de Clemens, Huang et Graham qui montre que les réfugiés peuvent être d’une immense contribution économique dans les pays dans lesquels ils s’installent) font remarquer que plus les états investissent tôt dans l’accueil, la formation et l’accompagnement des réfugiés, meilleure sera leur intégration et leur bénéfice économique final.
      L’Europe de mauvaise volonté

      Ce qui ressort de cette étude, c’est que l’Europe peut tout à fait se permettre d’accueillir ces demandeurs d’asile, car leur flux est quoiqu’on en dise très limité, comparé par exemple aux afflux de populations réfugiées qu’ont à supporter des pays comme le Jordanie ou le Liban.

      Le Liban dont les 4 millions d’habitants ont vu affluer un million et demi de réfugiés syriens. Les conséquences de ce « choc d’immigration » ( et dans ce cas l’expression est juste) pour un petit Etat comme le Liban, sont très différentes : le taux de chômage a augmenté, la pauvreté s’est répandue, notamment à cause d’une plus grande concurrence sur le marché du travail selon le FMI, la croissance a ralenti, quand la dette du Liban s’est alourdie à 141 % du PIB. A tel point que la communauté internationale s’est engagée à soutenir l’économie libanaise, qui a supporté, à elle seule, la plus grande partie du flux de réfugiés syriens.

      Rien que pour cela, constate l’un des auteurs de l’étude du CNRS, l’Europe, qui fournit un quart du PIB mondial, devrait modérer ses discours parfois alarmistes. En parlant de « crise des réfugiés », elle accrédite le fait que leur afflux serait un danger économique, s’exonérant par là d’autres impératifs, humanitaires et moraux.*

      https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/la-bulle-economique/limpact-economique-positif-des-refugies-sur-les-economies-europeennes

    • La « crise migratoire », une opportunité économique pour les pays européens

      S’il est une question qui divise nombre d’Etats européens depuis plusieurs années, c’est bien celle de l’accueil des migrants, à l’aune de l’impact économique des flux migratoires, objet de nombreux désaccords, voire de fantasmes. Alors, qu’en est-il réellement ? Une récente étude orchestrée notamment par le CNRS vient tordre le cou aux clichés, montrant qu’une augmentation de flux de migrants permanents est synonyme d’augmentation de PIB par habitant et de diminution du taux de chômage.

      L’accueil des migrants et leur intégration constitue-t-il une charge pour les économies européennes ? La réponse est non, selon une étude réalisée notamment par #Hippolyte_d’Albis, directeur de recherches au CNRS (centre national de la recherche scientifique). Dans cette étude effectuée avec ses collègues #Ekrame_Boubtane, enseignant-chercheur à l’Université de Clermont-Auvergne et #Dramane_Coulibaly, enseignant-chercheur à l’Université de Paris-Nanterre, l’accent est mis sur les impacts macro-économiques de l’immigration en Europe et en France de 1985 à 2015.

      « L’essentiel de l’économie repose sur l’interaction entre les gens »

      Leur travail suggère que l’immigration non européenne a un effet positif sur la #croissance_économique, et cela se vérifie plus particulièrement encore dans le cas de la migration familiale et féminine.

      En 2015, plus d’un million de personnes ont demandé l’asile dans l’un des pays de l’Union européenne, ce qui en fait une année record. Des arrivées qui ont provoqué nombre d’interprétations et de fantasmes.

      Pour y répondre, des études s’étaient déjà penchées sur la question. Mais, avec celle qui nous intéresse, le modus operandi est nouveau. Il diffère en effet des approches classiques : ces dernières comparent les #impôts payés par les immigrés aux transferts publics qui leur sont versés, mais ne tiennent pas compte des interactions économiques. « Pour évaluer l’immigration, les méthodes sont souvent d’ordre comptable. Mais l’essentiel de l’économie est fait d’interactions entre les gens. Nous souhaitions intégrer cette approche dans l’évaluation », explique Hippolyte d’Albis.

      Quid du mode opératoire ?

      Les chercheurs ont eu recours à un modèle statistique introduit par Christopher Sims, lauréat en 2011 du prix de la Banque de Suède en sciences économiques en mémoire d’Alfred Nobel. Très utilisé pour évaluer les effets des politiques économiques, il laisse parler les données statistiques en imposant très peu d’a priori et permet d’évaluer les effets économiques sans imposer d’importantes restrictions théoriques.

      Les données macroéconomiques et les données de flux migratoires utilisées proviennent d’Eurostat et de l’OCDE, pour concerner quinze pays d’Europe de l’Ouest, dont l’Allemagne, l’Autriche, l’Espagne, la France, l’Italie et le Royaume-Uni.

      Les chercheurs ont distingué les flux des demandeurs d’asile de ceux des autres migrants. Ils ont évalué les flux de ces derniers par le solde migratoire, qui ne prend pas en compte les demandeurs d’asile.

      Les flux de demandeurs d’asile concernent des personnes en situation légale le temps de l’instruction de leur demande dans le pays d’accueil, qui ne les considérera comme résidents que si leur demande d’asile est acceptée.
      Augmentation du PIB par habitant, diminution du taux de chômage…

      L’étude montre qu’un accroissement de flux de migrants permanents (hors demandeurs d’asile) à une date donnée produit des #effets_positifs jusqu’à quatre ans après cette date : le #PIB par habitant augmente, le taux de #chômage diminue.

      Ainsi, en Europe de l’Ouest, avec un migrant pour 1.000 habitants, le PIB augmente immédiatement de 0,17 % par citoyen. Un pourcentage qui monte jusqu’à 0,32 % en année 2. Le #taux_de_chômage, lui, baisse de 0,14 points avec un effet significatif jusqu’à trois ans après.

      En résumé, les #dépenses_publiques supplémentaires entraînées par l’augmentation du flux de migrants permanents s’avèrent au final bénéfiques. Les dépenses augmentent, mais elles sont plus que compensées par l’augmentation des #recettes_fiscales. Dans le cas des demandeurs d’asile, aucun effet négatif n’est observé et l’effet devient positif au bout de trois à cinq ans, lorsqu’une partie des demandeurs obtient l’asile et rejoint la catégorie des migrants permanents.

      Comment expliquer cela ? Les demandeurs d’asile rentrent plus tardivement sur le #marché_du_travail, car ils n’y sont généralement pas autorisés lorsque leur demande d’asile est en cours d’instruction. Leur impact semble positif lorsqu’ils obtiennent le statut de résident permanent.

      Et Hippolyte d’Albis d’insister : « les résultats indiquent que les flux migratoires ne sont pas une charge économique sur la période étudiée. En moyenne, pour les quinze pays européens considérés, nous identifions des effets positifs des flux migratoires ».

      De l’urgence de réorienter le débat

      Evidemment, l’#accueil a un #coût, rappelle le chercheur. Mais, l’accueil des demandeurs d’asile n’a pas dégradé la situation financière des Etats. Cela corrobore une intuition de l’Histoire, pour Hippolyte d’Albis. « Les économies ont toujours été fortement impactées par des guerres, des crises financières ou autres… Mais historiquement, les migrations n’ont jamais détruit les économies des pays riches. C’est une fausse idée de croire cela. Certes, il y a beaucoup d’enjeux autour des migrations. Mais nous avons envie de dire aux gouvernements de se concentrer sur les questions diplomatiques et territoriales, sans s’inquiéter d’hypothétiques effets négatifs sur l’économie ».

      En résumé, « la crise migratoire en cours pourrait être une opportunité économique pour les pays européens ». Y compris dans l’Hexagone où les effets bénéficient aux revenus moyens, et ce, bien que l’immigration en France ait une caractéristique particulière : 50 % du flux migratoire est d’ordre familial. 25 % de personnes viennent pour étudier et 10 % pour le travail.

      https://guitinews.fr/data/2019/10/29/la-crise-migratoire-une-opportunite-economique-pour-les-pays-europeens

      –-------------

      L’étude dont on parle dans cet article :
      Macroeconomic evidence suggests that asylum seekers are not a “burden” for Western European countries

      This paper aims to evaluate the economic and fiscal effects of inflows of asylum seekers into Western Europe from 1985 to 2015. It relies on an empirical methodology that is widely used to estimate the macroeconomic effects of structural shocks and policies. It shows that inflows of asylum seekers do not deteriorate host countries’ economic performance or fiscal balance because the increase in public spending induced by asylum seekers is more than compensated for by an increase in tax revenues net of transfers. As asylum seekers become permanent residents, their macroeconomic impacts become positive.

      https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/6/eaaq0883.full

  • Couverture médiatique de la « crise des réfugiés » : perspective européenne (2017)

    Les médias ont joué un rôle important dans la formation du débat public sur la « crise des réfugiés » qui a culminé à l’automne 2015. Ce rapport examine les récits développés par les médias dans huit pays européens et comment ils ont contribué à la perception que le public a de la « crise », passant d’une tolérance prudente durant l’été à une effusion de solidarité et d’humanitarisme en septembre 2015 et enfin à une orientation sécuritaire du débat et un discours de peur en novembre 2015.

    Dans l’ensemble, les réfugiés et les migrants ont eu peu d’occasions d’exprimer leur point de vue sur les événements et les médias ont accordé une attention limitée à la souffrance des individus ou au contexte mondial et historique de leur déplacement. Les réfugiés et les migrants sont souvent présentés comme un groupe indiscernable d’étrangers anonymes et non qualifiés qui sont tour à tour vulnérables ou dangereux.

    La diffusion d’informations biaisées ou infondées contribue à perpétuer les stéréotypes et à créer un environnement défavorable non seulement à leur accueil, mais aussi aux perspectives à plus long terme d’intégration dans la société.


    https://edoc.coe.int/fr/rfugis/7366-couverture-mediatique-de-la-crise-des-refugies-perspective-europeenne

    #médias #journalisme #presse #réfugié #rapport #asile #migrations #Europe #crise_Des_réfugiés #crise_migratoire #couverture_médiatique

  • Migrants : l’irrationnel au pouvoir ? | Par Karen Akoka et Camille Schmoll
    http://www.liberation.fr/debats/2018/01/18/migrants-l-irrationnel-au-pouvoir_1623475

    Car loin de résoudre des problèmes fantasmés, les mesures, que chaque nouvelle majorité s’est empressée de prendre, n’ont cessé d’en fabriquer de plus aigus. Les situations d’irrégularité et de précarité qui feraient des migrant.e.s des « fardeaux » sont précisément produites par nos politiques migratoires : la quasi-absence de canaux légaux de #migration (pourtant préconisés par les organismes internationaux les plus consensuels) oblige les migrant.e.s à dépenser des sommes considérables pour emprunter des voies illégales. La vulnérabilité financière mais aussi physique et psychique produite par notre choix de verrouiller les frontières est ensuite redoublée par d’autres pièces de nos réglementations : en obligeant les migrant.e.s à demeurer dans le premier pays d’entrée de l’UE, le règlement de Dublin les prive de leurs réseaux familiaux et communautaires, souvent situés dans d’autres pays européens et si précieux à leur insertion. A l’arrivée, nos lois sur l’accès au séjour et au travail les maintiennent, ou les font basculer, dans des situations de clandestinité et de dépendance. Enfin, ces lois contribuent paradoxalement à rendre les migrations irréversibles : la précarité administrative des migrant.e.s les pousse souvent à renoncer à leurs projets de retour au pays par peur qu’ils ne soient définitifs. Les enquêtes montrent que c’est l’absence de « papiers » qui empêche ces retours. Nos politiques migratoires fabriquent bien ce contre quoi elles prétendent lutter.

    • Je mets ici le texte complet :

      Très loin du renouveau proclamé depuis l’élection du président Macron, la politique migratoire du gouvernement Philippe se place dans une triste #continuité avec celles qui l’ont précédée tout en franchissant de nouvelles lignes rouges qui auraient relevé de l’inimaginable il y a encore quelques années. Si, en 1996, la France s’émouvait de l’irruption de policiers dans une église pour déloger les grévistes migrant.e.s, que de pas franchis depuis : accès à l’#eau et distributions de #nourriture empêchés, tentes tailladées, familles traquées jusque dans les centres d’hébergement d’urgence en violation du principe fondamental de l’#inconditionnalité_du_secours.

      La #loi_sur_l’immigration que le gouvernement prépare marque l’emballement de ce processus répressif en proposant d’allonger les délais de #rétention administrative, de généraliser les #assignations_à_résidence, d’augmenter les #expulsions et de durcir l’application du règlement de #Dublin, de restreindre les conditions d’accès à certains titres de séjour, ou de supprimer la garantie d’un recours suspensif pour certain.e.s demandeur.e.s d’asile. Au-delà de leur apparente diversité, ces mesures reposent sur une seule et même idée de la migration comme « #problème ».

      Cela fait pourtant plusieurs décennies que les chercheurs spécialisés sur les migrations, toutes disciplines scientifiques confondues, montrent que cette vision est largement erronée. Contrairement aux idées reçues, il n’y a pas eu d’augmentation drastique des migrations durant les dernières décennies. Les flux en valeur absolue ont augmenté mais le nombre relatif de migrant.e.s par rapport à la population mondiale stagne à 3 % et est le même qu’au début du XXe siècle. Dans l’Union européenne, après le pic de 2015, qui n’a par ailleurs pas concerné la France, le nombre des arrivées à déjà chuté. Sans compter les « sorties » jamais intégrées aux analyses statistiques et pourtant loin d’être négligeables. Et si la demande d’asile a connu, en France, une augmentation récente, elle est loin d’être démesurée au regard d’autres périodes historiques. Au final, la mal nommée « #crise_migratoire » européenne est bien plus une crise institutionnelle, une crise de la solidarité et de l’hospitalité, qu’une crise des flux. Car ce qui est inédit dans la période actuelle c’est bien plus l’accentuation des dispositifs répressifs que l’augmentation de la proportion des arrivées.

      La menace que représenteraient les migrant.e.s pour le #marché_du_travail est tout autant exagérée. Une abondance de travaux montre depuis longtemps que la migration constitue un apport à la fois économique et démographique dans le contexte des sociétés européennes vieillissantes, où de nombreux emplois sont délaissés par les nationaux. Les économistes répètent qu’il n’y a pas de corrélation avérée entre #immigration et #chômage car le marché du travail n’est pas un gâteau à taille fixe et indépendante du nombre de convives. En Europe, les migrant.e.s ne coûtent pas plus qu’ils/elles ne contribuent aux finances publiques, auxquelles ils/elles participent davantage que les nationaux, du fait de la structure par âge de leur population.

      Imaginons un instant une France sans migrant.e.s. L’image est vertigineuse tant leur place est importante dans nos existences et les secteurs vitaux de nos économies : auprès de nos familles, dans les domaines de la santé, de la recherche, de l’industrie, de la construction, des services aux personnes, etc. Et parce qu’en fait, les migrant.e.s, c’est nous : un.e Français.e sur quatre a au moins un.e parent.e ou un.e grand-parent immigré.e.

      En tant que chercheur.e.s, nous sommes stupéfait.e.s de voir les responsables politiques successifs asséner des contre-vérités, puis jeter de l’huile sur le feu. Car loin de résoudre des problèmes fantasmés, les mesures, que chaque nouvelle majorité s’est empressée de prendre, n’ont cessé d’en fabriquer de plus aigus. Les situations d’irrégularité et de #précarité qui feraient des migrant.e.s des « fardeaux » sont précisément produites par nos politiques migratoires : la quasi-absence de canaux légaux de migration (pourtant préconisés par les organismes internationaux les plus consensuels) oblige les migrant.e.s à dépenser des sommes considérables pour emprunter des voies illégales. La #vulnérabilité financière mais aussi physique et psychique produite par notre choix de verrouiller les frontières est ensuite redoublée par d’autres pièces de nos réglementations : en obligeant les migrant.e.s à demeurer dans le premier pays d’entrée de l’UE, le règlement de Dublin les prive de leurs réseaux familiaux et communautaires, souvent situés dans d’autres pays européens et si précieux à leur insertion. A l’arrivée, nos lois sur l’accès au séjour et au travail les maintiennent, ou les font basculer, dans des situations de clandestinité et de dépendance. Enfin, ces lois contribuent paradoxalement à rendre les migrations irréversibles : la précarité administrative des migrant.e.s les pousse souvent à renoncer à leurs projets de retour au pays par peur qu’ils ne soient définitifs. Les enquêtes montrent que c’est l’absence de « papiers » qui empêche ces retours. Nos politiques migratoires fabriquent bien ce contre quoi elles prétendent lutter.

      Les migrant.e.s ne sont pas « la misère du monde ». Comme ses prédécesseurs, le gouvernement signe aujourd’hui les conditions d’un échec programmé, autant en termes de pertes sociales, économiques et humaines, que d’inefficacité au regard de ses propres objectifs.

      Imaginons une autre politique migratoire. Une politique migratoire enfin réaliste. Elle est possible, même sans les millions utilisés pour la rétention et l’expulsion des migrant.e.s, le verrouillage hautement technologique des frontières, le financement de patrouilles de police et de CRS, les sommes versées aux régimes autoritaires de tous bords pour qu’ils retiennent, reprennent ou enferment leurs migrant.e.s. Une politique d’#accueil digne de ce nom, fondée sur l’enrichissement mutuel et le respect de la #dignité de l’autre, coûterait certainement moins cher que la politique restrictive et destructrice que le gouvernement a choisi de renforcer encore un peu plus aujourd’hui. Quelle est donc sa rationalité : ignorance ou électoralisme ?

      #Karen_Akoka #Camille_Schmoll #France #répression #asile #migrations #réfugiés #détention_administrative #renvois #Règlement_Dublin #3_pourcent #crise_Des_réfugiés #invasion #afflux #économie #travail #fermeture_des_frontières #migrations_circulaires #réalisme

  • 10 reasons why borders should be opened | #François_Gemenne | TEDxLiège
    https://www.youtube.com/embed/RRcZUzZwZIw
    #frontières #ouverture_des_frontières #migrations #asile #réfugiés #libre_circulation

    Les raisons :
    1. raisons humanitaires
    2. raison pragmatique pour combattre les passeurs et les trafiquants
    3. car les fermer, c’est inutile et inefficace
    4. raison économique
    5. pour contrer la migration illégale
    6. raison sociale : moins de travailleurs travaillant en dessous du minimum salarial
    7. raison financière : les frontières fermées sont un gaspillage d’argent
    8. raison #éthique : déclaration universellle des droits de l’homme (art. 13) —>jamais implementé à cause des frontières fermées... c’est quoi le point de quitter un pays si on ne peut pas entrer dans un autre ? En ouvrant les frontières, on reconnaîtrait que la migration est un droit humain —> c’est un projet de #liberté
    9. raison éthique : #injustice dans le fait que le destin d’une personne est déterminée par l’endroit où elle est née —> ouverture des frontières = projet d’#égalité
    10. raison éthique : nous sommes coincés par un « paradigme d’immobilité » (migration est un phénomène structurel et fondamental dans un monde globalisé). On continue à penser aux frontières comme à un manière de séparer « nous » de « eux » comme si ils n’étaient pas une humanité, mais seulement une addition de « nous » et « eux » #cosmopolitisme #fraternité #TedX

    • zibarre cte article !

      Exemple : moins de travailleurs travaillant en dessous du minimum salarial  ? ? ? ? ? ?
      L’exemple des travailleurs détachés, travaillant en dessous du minimum salarial, en France c’est bien la conséquence de l’ouverture des frontières ! Non ?

      L’importation d’#esclaves étrangers n’était pas suffisante pour l’#union_européenne.

      Je suppose que pour #François_Gemenne la fraude fiscale internationale est une bonne chose. L’importation des #OGM, des médicaments frelatés, et autres #glyphosates, aussi.

    • Ouvrir les frontières aux humains, une évidence. Comparer ça aux effets de la directive Bolkestein est scandaleux et amoral. #seenthis permet l’effacement des messages, n’hésitez pas.

    • Sur cette question d’ouverture de frontières, il y a aussi un livre d’éthique que je recommande :


      http://www.ppur.org/produit/810/9782889151769

      Dont voici un extrait en lien avec la discussion ci-dessus :

      « La discussion sur les bienfaits économiques de l’immigration est souvent tronquée par le piège du gâteau. Si vous invitez plus de gens à votre anniversaire, la part moyenne du gâteau va rétrécir. De même, on a tendance à penser que si plus de participants accèdent au marché du travail, il en découlera forcément une baisse des salaires et une réduction du nombre d’emplois disponible.
      Cette vision repose sur une erreur fondamentale quant au type de gâteau que représente l’économie, puisque, loin d’être de taille fixe, celui-ci augmente en fonction du nombre de participants. Les immigrants trouvant un travail ne osnt en effet pas seulement des travailleurs, ils sont également des consommateurs. Ils doivent se loger, manger, consommer et, à ce titre, leur présence stimule la croissance et crée de nouvelles opportunités économiques. Dans le même temps, cette prospérité économique provoque de nouvelles demandes en termes de logement, mobilité et infrastructure.
      L’immigration n’est donc pas comparable à une fête d’anniversaire où la part de gâteau diminuerait sans cesse. La bonne image serait plutôt celle d’un repas canadien : chacun apporte sa contribution personnelle, avant de se lancer à la découverte de divers plats et d’échanger avec les autres convives. Assis à cette table, nous sommes à la fois contributeurs et consommateurs.
      Cette analogie du repas canadien nous permet d’expliquer pourquoi un petit pays comme la Suisse n’a pas sombré dans la pauvreté la plus totale suite à l’arrivée de milliers d’Européens. Ces immigrants n’ont pas fait diminuer la taille du gâteau, ils ont contribué à la prospérité et au festin commun. L’augmentation du nombre de personnes actives sur le marché du travail a ainsi conduit à une forte augmentation du nombre d’emplois à disposition, tout en conservant des salaires élevés et un taux de chômage faible.
      Collectivement, la Suisse ressort clairement gagnante de cette mobilité internationale. Ce bénéfice collectif ’national’ ne doit cependant pas faire oublier les situations difficiles. Les changements induits par l’immigration profitent en effet à certains, tandis que d’autres se retrouvent sous pression. C’est notamment le cas des travailleurs résidents dont l’activité ou les compétences sont directement en compétition avec les nouveaux immigrés. Cela concerne tout aussi bien des secteurs peu qualifiés (par exemple les anciens migrants actifs dans l’hôtellerie) que dans les domaines hautement qualifiés (comme le management ou la recherche).
      Sur le plan éthique, ce constat est essentiel car il fait clairement apparaître deux questions distinctes. D’une part, si l’immigration profite au pays en général, l’exigence d’une répartition équitable des effets positifs et négatifs de cette immigration se pose de manière aiguë. Au final, la question ne relève plus de la politique migratoire, mais de la redistribution des richesses produites. Le douanier imaginaire ne peut donc se justifier sous couvert d’une ’protection’ générale de l’économie.
      D’autre part, si l’immigration met sous pression certains travailleurs résidents, la question de leur éventuelle protection doit être posée. Dans le débat public, cette question est souvent présentée comme un choix entre la défense de ’nos pauvres’ ou de ’nos chômeurs’ face aux ’immigrés’. Même si l’immigration est positive pour la collectivité, certains estiment que la protection de certains résidents justifierait la mise en œuvre de politiques migratoires restrictives. »

    • « Bart De Wever a raison : il faut discuter de l’ouverture des frontières », pour François Gemenne

      La tribune publiée ce mercredi dans De Morgen par le président de la N-VA est intéressante – stimulante, oserais-je dire – à plus d’un titre. En premier lieu parce qu’elle fait de l’ouverture des frontières une option politique crédible. Jusqu’ici, cette option était gentiment remisée au rayon des utopies libérales, des droits de l’Homme laissés en jachère. En l’opposant brutalement et frontalement à la préservation de la sécurité sociale, Bart De Wever donne une crédibilité nouvelle à l’ouverture des frontières comme projet politique. Surtout, elle place la question de la politique migratoire sur le terrain idéologique, celui d’un projet de société articulé autour de la frontière.

      La tribune publiée ce mercredi dans De Morgen par le président de la N-VA est intéressante – stimulante, oserais-je dire – à plus d’un titre. En premier lieu parce qu’elle fait de l’ouverture des frontières une option politique crédible. Jusqu’ici, cette option était gentiment remisée au rayon des utopies libérales, des droits de l’Homme laissés en jachère. En l’opposant brutalement et frontalement à la préservation de la sécurité sociale, Bart De Wever donne une crédibilité nouvelle à l’ouverture des frontières comme projet politique. Surtout, elle place la question de la politique migratoire sur le terrain idéologique, celui d’un projet de société articulé autour de la frontière.
      L’ouverture des frontières menace-t-elle la sécurité sociale ?

      Bart De Wever n’a pas choisi De Morgen, un quotidien de gauche, par hasard : pour une partie de la gauche, les migrations restent perçues comme des chevaux de Troie de la mondialisation, qui annonceraient le démantèlement des droits et acquis sociaux. Et l’ouverture des frontières est dès lors vue comme un projet néo-libéral, au seul bénéfice d’un patronat cupide à la recherche de main-d’œuvre bon marché. En cela, Bart De Wever, au fond, ne dit pas autre chose que Michel Rocard, qui affirmait, le 3 décembre 1989 dans l’émission Sept sur Sept, que « nous ne pouvons pas héberger toute la misère du monde » (1). Ce raisonnement, qui semble a priori frappé du sceau du bon sens, s’appuie en réalité sur deux erreurs, qui le rendent profondément caduc.

      Tout d’abord, les migrants ne représentent pas une charge pour la sécurité sociale. Dans une étude de 2013 (2) qui fait référence, l’OCDE estimait ainsi que chaque ménage immigré rapportait 5560 euros par an au budget de l’Etat. Dans la plupart des pays de l’OCDE, les migrants rapportent plus qu’ils ne coûtent : en Belgique, leur apport net représente 0.76 % du PIB. Et il pourrait être encore bien supérieur si leur taux d’emploi se rapprochait de celui des travailleurs nationaux : le PIB belge bondirait alors de 0.9 %, selon l’OCDE. Si l’immigration rapporte davantage qu’elle ne coûte, c’est avant tout parce que les migrants sont généralement beaucoup plus jeunes que la population qui les accueille. Il ne s’agit pas de nier ici le coût immédiat qu’a pu représenter, ces dernières années, l’augmentation du nombre de demandeurs d’asile, qui constituent une catégorie de particulière de migrants. Mais ce coût doit être vu comme un investissement : à terme, une vraie menace pour la sécurité sociale, ce serait une baisse drastique de l’immigration.
      Lien entre migration et frontière

      La deuxième erreur du raisonnement de Bart De Wever est hélas plus répandue : il postule que les frontières sont un instrument efficace de contrôle des migrations, et que l’ouverture des frontières amènerait donc un afflux massif de migrants. Le problème, c’est que les migrations ne dépendent pas du tout du degré d’ouverture ou de fermeture des frontières : croire cela, c’est méconnaître profondément les ressorts de la migration. Jamais une frontière fermée n’empêchera la migration, et jamais une frontière ouverte ne la déclenchera. Mais le fantasme politique est tenace, et beaucoup continuent à voir dans la frontière l’instrument qui permet de réguler les migrations internationales. C’est un leurre absolu, qui a été démonté par de nombreux travaux de recherche, à la fois sociologiques, historiques et prospectifs (3). L’Europe en a sous les yeux la démonstration éclatante : jamais ses frontières extérieures n’ont été aussi fermées, et cela n’a pas empêché l’afflux de migrants qu’elle a connu ces dernières années. Et à l’inverse, quand les accords de Schengen ont ouvert ses frontières intérieures, elle n’a pas connu un afflux massif de migrants du Sud vers le Nord, ni de l’Est vers l’Ouest, malgré des différences économiques considérables. L’ouverture des frontières n’amènerait pas un afflux massif de migrations, ni un chaos généralisé. Et à l’inverse, la fermeture des frontières n’empêche pas les migrations : elle les rend plus coûteuses, plus dangereuses et plus meurtrières. L’an dernier, ils ont été 3 116 à périr en Méditerranée, aux portes de l’Europe. Ceux qui sont arrivés en vie étaient 184 170 : cela veut dire que presque 2 migrants sur 100 ne sont jamais arrivés à destination.
      La frontière comme projet

      Ce qui est à la fois plus inquiétant et plus intéressant dans le propos de Bart De Wever, c’est lorsqu’il définit la frontière comme une « communauté de responsabilité », le socle de solidarité dans une société. En cela, il rejoint plusieurs figures de la gauche, comme Hubert Védrine ou Régis Debray, qui fut le compagnon de route de Che Guevara.

      Nous ne sommes plus ici dans la logique managériale « entre humanité et fermeté » qui a longtemps prévalu en matière de gestion des migrations, et dont le seul horizon était la fermeture des frontières. Ici, c’est la frontière elle-même qui définit le contour du projet de société.

      En cela, le propos de Bart De Wever épouse une fracture fondamentale qui traverse nos sociétés, qui divise ceux pour qui les frontières représentent les scories d’un monde passé, et ceux pour qui elles constituent une ultime protection face à une menace extérieure. Cette fracture, c’est la fracture entre souverainisme et cosmopolitisme, qu’a parfaitement incarnée la dernière élection présidentielle française, et dont la frontière est devenue le totem. Ce clivage entre souverainisme et cosmopolitisme dépasse le clivage traditionnel entre gauche et droite, et doit aujourd’hui constituer, à l’évidence, un axe de lecture complémentaire des idéologies politiques.

      La question des migrations est un marqueur idéologique fondamental, parce qu’elle interroge notre rapport à l’autre : celui qui se trouve de l’autre côté de la frontière est-il un étranger, ou est-il l’un des nôtres ?

      La vision du monde proposée par le leader nationaliste flamand est celle d’un monde où les frontières sépareraient les nations, et où les migrations seraient une anomalie politique et un danger identitaire. Cette vision est le moteur du nationalisme, où les frontières des territoires correspondraient à celles des nations.

      En face, il reste un cosmopolitisme à inventer. Cela nécessitera d’entendre les peurs et les angoisses que nourrit une partie de la population à l’égard des migrations, et de ne pas y opposer simplement des chiffres et des faits, mais un projet de société. Un projet de société qui reconnaisse le caractère structurel des migrations dans un 21ème siècle globalisé, et qui reconnaisse l’universalisme comme valeur qui puisse rassembler la gauche et la droite, de Louis Michel à Alexis Deswaef.

      Et on revient ici à l’ouverture des frontières, qui constitue à mon sens l’horizon possible d’un tel projet. Loin d’être une utopie naïve, c’est le moyen le plus pragmatique et rationnel de répondre aux défis des migrations contemporaines, de les organiser au bénéfice de tous, et de mettre un terme à la fois aux tragédies de la Méditerranée et au commerce sordide des passeurs.

      Mais aussi, et surtout, c’est un projet de liberté, qui matérialise un droit fondamental, la liberté de circulation. C’est aussi un projet d’égalité, qui permet de réduire (un peu) l’injustice fondamentale du lieu de naissance. Et c’est enfin un projet de fraternité, qui reconnaît l’autre comme une partie intégrante de nous-mêmes.

      (1) La citation n’est pas apocryphe : la suite de la phrase a été ajoutée bien plus tard. (2) « The fiscal impact of immigration in OECD countries », International Migration Outlook 2013, OCDE.

      (3) Voir notamment le projet de recherche MOBGLOB : http://www.sciencespo.fr/mobglob

      http://plus.lesoir.be/136106/article/2018-01-25/bart-de-wever-raison-il-faut-discuter-de-louverture-des-frontieres-pour-
      #sécurité_sociale #frontières

    • "Fermer les frontières ne sert à rien"

      Est-il possible de fermer les frontières ? Dans certains discours politiques, ce serait la seule solution pour mettre à l’immigration illégale. Mais dans les faits, est-ce réellement envisageable, et surtout, efficace ? Soir Première a posé la question à François Gemenne, chercheur et enseignant à l’ULG et à Science Po Paris, ainsi qu’à Pierre d’Argent, professeur de droit international à l’UCL.

      Pour François Gemenne, fermer les frontières serait un leurre, et ne servirait à rien : « Sauf à tirer sur les gens à la frontière, dit-il, ce n’est pas ça qui ralentirait les migrations. Les gens ne vont pas renoncer à leur projet de migration parce qu’une frontière est fermée. On en a l’illustration sous nos yeux. Il y a des centaines de personnes à Calais qui attendent de passer vers l’Angleterre alors que la frontière est fermée. L’effet de la fermeture des frontières, ça rend seulement les migrations plus coûteuses, plus dangereuses, plus meurtrières. Et ça crée le chaos et la crise politique qu’on connait actuellement ».

      Pour lui, c’est au contraire l’inverse qu’il faudrait envisager, c’est-à-dire les ouvrir. « C’est une question qu’on n’ose même plus aborder dans nos démocraties sous peine de passer pour un illuminé, et pourtant il faut la poser ! L’ouverture des frontières permettrait à beaucoup de personnes qui sont en situation administrative irrégulière, c’est-à-dire les sans-papiers, de rentrer chez eux. Ca permettrait beaucoup plus d’aller-retour, mais aussi, paradoxalement, de beaucoup mieux contrôler qui entre et qui sort sur le territoire ». Il explique également que cela neutraliserait le business des passeurs : « C’est parce que les gens sont prêts à tout pour franchir les frontières que le business des passeurs prospère. Donc, il y a une grande hypocrisie quand on dit qu’on veut lutter contre les passeurs, et qu’en même temps on veut fermer les frontières ».
      Des frontières pour rassurer ceux qui vivent à l’intérieur de celles-ci

      Pierre d’Argent rejoint François Gemenne dans son analyse. Mais sur la notion de frontière, il insiste un point : « Les frontières servent aussi, qu’on le veuille ou non, à rassurer des identités collectives au niveau interne. La frontière définit un corps collectif qui s’auto-détermine politiquement, et dire cela, ce n’est pas nécessairement rechercher une identité raciale ou autre. Dès lors, la suppression des frontières permettrait d’éliminer certains problèmes, mais en créerait peut-être d’autres. Reconnaissons que la vie en société n’est pas une chose évidente. Nous sommes dans des sociétés post-modernes qui sont très fragmentés. Il y a des sous-identités, et on ne peut manquer de voir que ces soucis qu’on appelle identitaires, et qui sont exprimés malheureusement dans les urnes, sont assez naturels à l’être humain. La manière dont on vit ensemble en société dépend des personnes avec qui on vit. Et si, dans une société démocratique comme la nôtre, il y a une forme d’auto-détermination collective, il faut pouvoir poser ces questions ».
      Ouvrir les frontières : quel impact sur les migrations ?

      François Gemenne en est persuadé : si l’on ouvrait les frontières, il n’y aurait pas forcément un flux migratoire énorme : « Toutes les études, qu’elles soient historiques, sociologiques ou prospectives, montrent que le degré d’ouverture d’une frontière ne joue pas un rôle dans le degré de la migration. Par exemple, quand on a établi l’espace Schengen, on n’a pas observé de migration massive de la population espagnole ou d’autres pays du sud de l’Europe vers le nord de l’Europe ».

      Pour Pierre d’Argent, il est cependant difficile de comparer l’ouverture de frontières en Europe avec l’ouverture des frontières entre l’Afrique et l’Europe, par exemple. Pour lui, il est très difficile de savoir ce qui pourrait arriver.

      https://www.rtbf.be/info/dossier/la-prem1ere-soir-prem1ere/detail_fermer-les-frontieres-ne-sert-a-rien?id=9951419

    • Migrants : l’#irrationnel au pouvoir ?

      Très loin du renouveau proclamé depuis l’élection du président Macron, la politique migratoire du gouvernement Philippe se place dans une triste #continuité avec celles qui l’ont précédée tout en franchissant de nouvelles lignes rouges qui auraient relevé de l’inimaginable il y a encore quelques années. Si, en 1996, la France s’émouvait de l’irruption de policiers dans une église pour déloger les grévistes migrant.e.s, que de pas franchis depuis : accès à l’#eau et distributions de #nourriture empêchés, tentes tailladées, familles traquées jusque dans les centres d’hébergement d’urgence en violation du principe fondamental de l’#inconditionnalité_du_secours.

      La #loi_sur_l’immigration que le gouvernement prépare marque l’emballement de ce processus répressif en proposant d’allonger les délais de #rétention administrative, de généraliser les #assignations_à_résidence, d’augmenter les #expulsions et de durcir l’application du règlement de #Dublin, de restreindre les conditions d’accès à certains titres de séjour, ou de supprimer la garantie d’un recours suspensif pour certain.e.s demandeur.e.s d’asile. Au-delà de leur apparente diversité, ces mesures reposent sur une seule et même idée de la migration comme « #problème ».

      Cela fait pourtant plusieurs décennies que les chercheurs spécialisés sur les migrations, toutes disciplines scientifiques confondues, montrent que cette vision est largement erronée. Contrairement aux idées reçues, il n’y a pas eu d’augmentation drastique des migrations durant les dernières décennies. Les flux en valeur absolue ont augmenté mais le nombre relatif de migrant.e.s par rapport à la population mondiale stagne à 3 % et est le même qu’au début du XXe siècle. Dans l’Union européenne, après le pic de 2015, qui n’a par ailleurs pas concerné la France, le nombre des arrivées à déjà chuté. Sans compter les « sorties » jamais intégrées aux analyses statistiques et pourtant loin d’être négligeables. Et si la demande d’asile a connu, en France, une augmentation récente, elle est loin d’être démesurée au regard d’autres périodes historiques. Au final, la mal nommée « #crise_migratoire » européenne est bien plus une crise institutionnelle, une crise de la solidarité et de l’hospitalité, qu’une crise des flux. Car ce qui est inédit dans la période actuelle c’est bien plus l’accentuation des dispositifs répressifs que l’augmentation de la proportion des arrivées.

      La menace que représenteraient les migrant.e.s pour le #marché_du_travail est tout autant exagérée. Une abondance de travaux montre depuis longtemps que la migration constitue un apport à la fois économique et démographique dans le contexte des sociétés européennes vieillissantes, où de nombreux emplois sont délaissés par les nationaux. Les économistes répètent qu’il n’y a pas de corrélation avérée entre #immigration et #chômage car le marché du travail n’est pas un gâteau à taille fixe et indépendante du nombre de convives. En Europe, les migrant.e.s ne coûtent pas plus qu’ils/elles ne contribuent aux finances publiques, auxquelles ils/elles participent davantage que les nationaux, du fait de la structure par âge de leur population.

      Imaginons un instant une France sans migrant.e.s. L’image est vertigineuse tant leur place est importante dans nos existences et les secteurs vitaux de nos économies : auprès de nos familles, dans les domaines de la santé, de la recherche, de l’industrie, de la construction, des services aux personnes, etc. Et parce qu’en fait, les migrant.e.s, c’est nous : un.e Français.e sur quatre a au moins un.e parent.e ou un.e grand-parent immigré.e.

      En tant que chercheur.e.s, nous sommes stupéfait.e.s de voir les responsables politiques successifs asséner des contre-vérités, puis jeter de l’huile sur le feu. Car loin de résoudre des problèmes fantasmés, les mesures, que chaque nouvelle majorité s’est empressée de prendre, n’ont cessé d’en fabriquer de plus aigus. Les situations d’irrégularité et de #précarité qui feraient des migrant.e.s des « fardeaux » sont précisément produites par nos politiques migratoires : la quasi-absence de canaux légaux de migration (pourtant préconisés par les organismes internationaux les plus consensuels) oblige les migrant.e.s à dépenser des sommes considérables pour emprunter des voies illégales. La #vulnérabilité financière mais aussi physique et psychique produite par notre choix de verrouiller les frontières est ensuite redoublée par d’autres pièces de nos réglementations : en obligeant les migrant.e.s à demeurer dans le premier pays d’entrée de l’UE, le règlement de Dublin les prive de leurs réseaux familiaux et communautaires, souvent situés dans d’autres pays européens et si précieux à leur insertion. A l’arrivée, nos lois sur l’accès au séjour et au travail les maintiennent, ou les font basculer, dans des situations de clandestinité et de dépendance. Enfin, ces lois contribuent paradoxalement à rendre les migrations irréversibles : la précarité administrative des migrant.e.s les pousse souvent à renoncer à leurs projets de retour au pays par peur qu’ils ne soient définitifs. Les enquêtes montrent que c’est l’absence de « papiers » qui empêche ces retours. Nos politiques migratoires fabriquent bien ce contre quoi elles prétendent lutter.

      Les migrant.e.s ne sont pas « la misère du monde ». Comme ses prédécesseurs, le gouvernement signe aujourd’hui les conditions d’un échec programmé, autant en termes de pertes sociales, économiques et humaines, que d’inefficacité au regard de ses propres objectifs.

      Imaginons une autre politique migratoire. Une politique migratoire enfin réaliste. Elle est possible, même sans les millions utilisés pour la rétention et l’expulsion des migrant.e.s, le verrouillage hautement technologique des frontières, le financement de patrouilles de police et de CRS, les sommes versées aux régimes autoritaires de tous bords pour qu’ils retiennent, reprennent ou enferment leurs migrant.e.s. Une politique d’#accueil digne de ce nom, fondée sur l’enrichissement mutuel et le respect de la #dignité de l’autre, coûterait certainement moins cher que la politique restrictive et destructrice que le gouvernement a choisi de renforcer encore un peu plus aujourd’hui. Quelle est donc sa rationalité : ignorance ou électoralisme ?

      http://www.liberation.fr/debats/2018/01/18/migrants-l-irrationnel-au-pouvoir_1623475
      #Karen_Akoka #Camille_Schmoll #France #répression #asile #migrations #réfugiés #détention_administrative #renvois #Règlement_Dublin #3_pourcent #crise_Des_réfugiés #invasion #afflux #économie #travail #fermeture_des_frontières #migrations_circulaires #réalisme #rationalité

    • Karine et Camille reviennent sur l’idée de l’économie qui ne serait pas un gâteau...
      #Johan_Rochel a très bien expliqué cela dans son livre
      Repenser l’immigration. Une boussole éthique
      http://www.ppur.org/produit/810/9782889151769

      Il a appelé cela le #piège_du_gâteau (#gâteau -vs- #repas_canadien) :

      « La discussion sur les bienfaits économiques de l’immigration est souvent tronquée par le piège du gâteau. Si vous invitez plus de gens à votre anniversaire, la part moyenne du gâteau va rétrécir. De même, on a tendance à penser que si plus de participants accèdent au marché du travail, il en découlera forcément une baisse des salaires et une réduction du nombre d’emplois disponible.
      Cette vision repose sur une erreur fondamentale quant au type de gâteau que représente l’économie, puisque, loin d’être de taille fixe, celui-ci augmente en fonction du nombre de participants. Les immigrants trouvant un travail ne osnt en effet pas seulement des travailleurs, ils sont également des consommateurs. Ils doivent se loger, manger, consommer et, à ce titre, leur présence stimule la croissance et crée de nouvelles opportunités économiques. Dans le même temps, cette prospérité économique provoque de nouvelles demandes en termes de logement, mobilité et infrastructure.
      L’immigration n’est donc pas comparable à une fête d’anniversaire où la part de gâteau diminuerait sans cesse. La bonne image serait plutôt celle d’un repas canadien : chacun apporte sa contribution personnelle, avant de se lancer à la découverte de divers plats et d’échanger avec les autres convives. Assis à cette table, nous sommes à la fois contributeurs et consommateurs.
      Cette analogie du repas canadien nous permet d’expliquer pourquoi un petit pays comme la Suisse n’a pas sombré dans la pauvreté la plus totale suite à l’arrivée de milliers d’Européens. Ces immigrants n’ont pas fait diminuer la taille du gâteau, ils ont contribué à la prospérité et au festin commun. L’augmentation du nombre de personnes actives sur le marché du travail a ainsi conduit à une forte augmentation du nombre d’emplois à disposition, tout en conservant des salaires élevés et un taux de chômage faible.
      Collectivement, la Suisse ressort clairement gagnante de cette mobilité internationale. Ce bénéfice collectif ’national’ ne doit cependant pas faire oublier les situations difficiles. Les changements induits par l’immigration profitent en effet à certains, tandis que d’autres se retrouvent sous pression. C’est notamment le cas des travailleurs résidents dont l’activité ou les compétences sont directement en compétition avec les nouveaux immigrés. Cela concerne tout aussi bien des secteurs peu qualifiés (par exemple les anciens migrants actifs dans l’hôtellerie) que dans les domaines hautement qualifiés (comme le management ou la recherche).
      Sur le plan éthique, ce constat est essentiel car il fait clairement apparaître deux questions distinctes. D’une part, si l’immigration profite au pays en général, l’exigence d’une répartition équitable des effets positifs et négatifs de cette immigration se pose de manière aiguë. Au final, la question ne relève plus de la politique migratoire, mais de la redistribution des richesses produites. Le douanier imaginaire ne peut donc se justifier sous couvert d’une ’protection’ générale de l’économie.
      D’autre part, si l’immigration met sous pression certains travailleurs résidents, la question de leur éventuelle protection doit être posée. Dans le débat public, cette question est souvent présentée comme un choix entre la défense de ’nos pauvres’ ou de ’nos chômeurs’ face aux ’immigrés’. Même si l’immigration est positive pour la collectivité, certains estiment que la protection de certains résidents justifierait la mise en œuvre de politiques migratoires restrictives » (Rochel 2016 : 31-33)

    • Migrants : « Ouvrir les frontières accroît à la fois la liberté et la sécurité »

      Alors que s’est achevé vendredi 29 juin au matin un sommet européen sur la question des migrations, le chercheur François Gemenne revient sur quelques idées reçues. Plutôt que de « résister » en fermant les frontières, mieux vaut « accompagner » les migrants par plus d’ouverture et de coopération.

      Le nombre de migrations va-t-il augmenter du fait des changements climatiques ?

      Non seulement elles vont augmenter, mais elles vont changer de nature, notamment devenir de plus en plus contraintes. De plus en plus de gens vont être forcés de migrer. Et de plus en plus de gens, les populations rurales les plus vulnérables, vont être incapables de migrer, parce que l’émigration demande beaucoup de ressources.

      Les gens vont se déplacer davantage, car les facteurs qui les poussent à migrer s’aggravent sous l’effet du changement climatique. Les inégalités sont le moteur premier des migrations, qu’elles soient réelles ou perçues, politiques, économiques ou environnementales.

      On est face à un phénomène structurel, mais on refuse de le considérer comme tel. On préfère parler de crise, où la migration est vue comme un problème à résoudre.

      Pourquoi les inégalités sont-elles le moteur des migrations ?

      Les gens migrent parce qu’ils sont confrontés chez eux à des inégalités politiques, économiques, environnementales. Ils vont quitter un endroit où ils sont en position de faiblesse vers un endroit qu’ils considèrent, ou qu’ils espèrent meilleur.

      Une réduction des inégalités de niveau de vie entre les pays du Nord et les pays du Sud serait-elle de nature à réduire l’immigration ?

      À long terme, oui. Pas à court terme. La propension à migrer diminue à partir du moment où le revenu moyen des personnes au départ atteint environ 15.000 $ annuels.

      Dans un premier temps, plus le niveau de la personne qui est en bas de l’échelle sociale augmente, plus la personne va avoir de ressources à consacrer à la migration. Et, tant qu’il demeure une inégalité, les gens vont vouloir migrer. Si on augmente massivement l’aide au développement des pays du Sud, et donc le niveau de revenus des gens, cela va les conduire à migrer davantage. Du moins, jusqu’à ce qu’on arrive au point d’égalité.

      L’essentiel des migrations aujourd’hui proviennent de pays un peu plus « développés ». Les migrants arrivent peu de Centrafrique ou de la Sierra Leone, les pays les plus pauvres d’Afrique. Ceux qui peuvent embarquer et payer des passeurs sont des gens qui ont économisé pendant plusieurs années.

      D’un point de vue cynique, pour éviter les migrations, il faut donc soit que les gens restent très pauvres, soit qu’ils parviennent à un niveau de richesse proche du nôtre.

      Non seulement à un niveau de richesse, mais à un niveau de droit, de sécurité, de protection environnementale proches du nôtre. Ce qui est encore très loin d’arriver, même si cela peut constituer un horizon lointain. Il faut donc accepter que, le temps qu’on y arrive, il y ait de façon structurelle davantage de migrations. On entre dans un siècle de migrations.

      Mais plutôt que de se dire « essayons de faire face à cette réalité, de l’accompagner et de l’organiser au mieux », on reste dans une logique de repli. Alors que vouloir « résister » à ce phénomène, à travers des camps au bord de l’Europe, au bord de nos villes, est une bataille perdue d’avance.

      Quand j’étais lycéen, au milieu des années 1990, nos professeurs tenaient le même discours vis-à-vis d’Internet. On organisait des grands débats au lycée — « Est-ce qu’Internet est une bonne ou une mauvaise chose ? Internet une opportunité ou un danger ? » Ce sont exactement les mêmes débats que ceux qui nous animent aujourd’hui sur les migrations !

      Et Internet s’est imposé, sans qu’on puisse l’empêcher.

      Nous avons tous accepté qu’Internet transforme tous les aspects de notre vie et de l’organisation de la société. Personne ou presque n’aurait l’idée de brider Internet. On tente d’en maximiser les opportunités et d’en limiter les dangers. Mais pour les migrations, on n’est pas encore dans cet état d’esprit.

      À très long terme, il faut donc équilibrer les niveaux de vie. À court terme que peut-on faire ?

      Il faut essayer d’organiser les choses, pour que cela se passe le mieux possible dans l’intérêt des migrants, dans l’intérêt des sociétés de destination et dans celui des sociétés d’origine.

      Parce qu’aujourd’hui, notre posture de résistance et de fermeture des frontières crée le chaos, crée cette impression de crise, crée ces tensions dans nos sociétés, du racisme, du rejet et potentiellement des violences.

      Il faut permettre des voies d’accès sûres et légales vers l’Europe, y compris pour les migrants économiques, pour mettre fin aux naufrages des bateaux et aux réseaux des passeurs. Il faut également mutualiser les moyens et l’organisation : la compétence de l’immigration doit être transférée à un niveau supranational, par exemple à une agence européenne de l’asile et de l’immigration. Et il faut davantage de coopération au niveau international, qui ne soit pas de la sous-traitance avec des pays de transit ou d’origine, comme on le conçoit volontiers dans les instances européennes.

      Paradoxalement, cette question qui, par essence, demande une coopération internationale est celle sur laquelle il y en a le moins. Les États sont convaincus qu’ils gèreront mieux la question dans le strict cadre de leurs frontières.

      À plus long terme, la plus rationnelle et la plus pragmatique des solutions, c’est simplement d’ouvrir les frontières. On en est loin. Les gouvernements et une grande partie des médias véhiculent l’idée que la frontière est l’instrument du contrôle des migrations. Si vous fermez une frontière, les gens s’arrêteraient de venir. Et si vous ouvrez la frontière, tout le monde viendrait.

      Or, toutes les recherches montrent que le degré d’ouverture ou de fermeture d’une frontière joue un rôle marginal dans la décision de migrer. Les gens ne vont pas se décider à abandonner leur famille et leur pays juste parce qu’une frontière, là-bas, en Allemagne, est ouverte. Et, des gens qui sont persécutés par les bombes qui leur tombent dessus en Syrie ne vont pas y rester parce que la frontière est fermée. À Calais, même si la frontière est complètement fermée avec le Royaume-Uni, les migrants tenteront cent fois, mille fois de la franchir.

      Par contre, le degré d’ouverture de la frontière va déterminer les conditions de la migration, son coût, son danger. Ouvrir les frontières ne veut pas dire les faire disparaître. Les États restent là. On ne supprime pas les passeports, on supprime simplement les visas. Cela permet aussi de mieux contrôler les entrées et les sorties, car les États savent exactement qui entre sur le territoire et qui en sort. Cette solution accroit à la fois la liberté et la sécurité.

      Est-ce qu’il y a des régions où cela se passe bien ?

      Il y a plein d’endroits en France où cela se passe très bien, au niveau local. Les fers de lance de l’accueil des migrants sont souvent les maires : Juppé à Bordeaux, Piolle à Grenoble, Hidalgo à Paris, Carême à Grande-Synthe.

      Au niveau d’un pays, la Nouvelle-Zélande développe une politique d’accueil relativement ouverte, qui fonctionne bien. Il y a des pays paradoxaux, comme l’Inde, qui a une frontière complètement ouverte avec le Népal, bouddhiste, et une frontière complètement fermée avec le Bangladesh, musulman. Ce cas illustre le caractère raciste de nos politiques migratoires. Ce qui nous dérange en Europe, ce ne sont pas les Belges comme moi qui émigrent. La plupart des gens sont convaincus que les Africains partent directement de leur pays pour traverser la Méditerranée et pour arriver en Europe. Or, 55 % des migrations internationales depuis l’Afrique de l’Ouest vont vers l’Afrique de l’Ouest.

      Les migrants qui arrivent de Libye vers l’Europe sont généralement classés comme des migrants économiques parce qu’ils sont noirs. Or, ils migrent avant tout parce qu’ils sont persécutés en Libye, violentés et vendus en esclaves sur les marchés. Par contre, les Syriens sont classés comme des réfugiés politiques parce que nous voyons les images de la guerre en Syrie, mais pour la plupart, ils migrent avant tout pour des raisons économiques. Ils n’étaient pas persécutés en Turquie, au Liban ou en Jordanie, mais ils vivaient dans des conditions de vie misérables. Ils migrent en Europe pour reprendre leur carrière ou pour leurs études.

      Quel rôle joue le facteur démographique dans les migrations ? Car la transition démographique ne se fait pas en Afrique, le continent va passer de 1 milliard d’habitants à 3 milliards d’ici 2050.

      Le meilleur moyen de contrôler la natalité d’Afrique serait de faire venir toute l’Afrique en Europe (rires) ! Toutes les études montrent que, dès la deuxième génération, le taux de natalité des Africaines s’aligne strictement sur celui de la population du pays d’accueil.

      Ces taux de natalité créent une peur chez nous, on craint le péril démographique en Afrique, qui va se déplacer vers l’Europe. Les gens restent dans une identité relativement figée, où l’on conçoit l’Europe comme blanche. La réalité est que nous sommes un pays métissé.

      La France black, blanche, beur, c’était il y a vingt ans ! Maintenant, le Rassemblement national et aussi la droite mettent en avant les racines et la tradition chrétienne de la France.

      Ils veulent rester catholiques, blancs. Le problème est qu’aucun autre parti n’assume la position inverse.

      Parce que cela semble inassumable politiquement, ainsi que les solutions que vous proposez. Pour le moment, l’inverse se produit : des gouvernements de plus en plus réactionnaires, de plus en plus xénophobes. Cela fait un peu peur pour l’avenir.

      C’est encore très optimiste d’avoir peur. J’ai acté que l’Europe serait bientôt gouvernée par l’extrême droite. Je suis déjà à l’étape d’après, où s’organisent des petites poches de résistance qui accueillent clandestinement des migrants.

      En Belgique, malgré un gouvernement d’extrême droite, dans un parc au nord de Bruxelles, il y a un grand mouvement de solidarité et d’accueil des migrants pour éviter qu’ils passent la nuit dehors. Près de 45.000 personnes sont organisées avec un compte Facebook pour se relayer. Ce mouvement de solidarité devient de plus en plus un mouvement politique de résistance face à un régime autoritaire.

      Les démocraties, celles pour qui la question des droits humains compte encore un peu, sont en train de devenir minoritaires en Europe ! Il nous faut organiser d’autres formes de résistance. C’est une vision de l’avenir assez pessimiste. J’espère me tromper, et que l’attitude du gouvernement espagnol va ouvrir une nouvelle voie en Europe, que les électeurs vont sanctionner positivement cette attitude d’accueil des migrants.

      https://reporterre.net/Migrants-Ouvrir-les-frontieres-accroit-a-la-fois-la-liberte-et-la-securi

    • There’s Nothing Wrong With Open Borders

      Why a brave Democrat should make the case for vastly expanding immigration.

      The internet expands the bounds of acceptable discourse, so ideas considered out of bounds not long ago now rocket toward widespread acceptability. See: cannabis legalization, government-run health care, white nationalism and, of course, the flat-earthers.

      Yet there’s one political shore that remains stubbornly beyond the horizon. It’s an idea almost nobody in mainstream politics will address, other than to hurl the label as a bloody cudgel.

      I’m talking about opening up America’s borders to everyone who wants to move here.

      Imagine not just opposing President Trump’s wall but also opposing the nation’s cruel and expensive immigration and border-security apparatus in its entirety. Imagine radically shifting our stance toward outsiders from one of suspicion to one of warm embrace. Imagine that if you passed a minimal background check, you’d be free to live, work, pay taxes and die in the United States. Imagine moving from Nigeria to Nebraska as freely as one might move from Massachusetts to Maine.

      https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/16/opinion/open-borders-immigration.html?smid=tw-nytopinion&smtyp=cur

  • CNCD 11.11.11 | Vidéo : La migration n’est pas une crise
    https://asile.ch/2017/11/05/cncd-11-11-11-video-migration-nest-crise

    Aujourd’hui, en Europe, les migrants sont perçus comme un problème. La solution en vogue, c’est de fermer les frontières. Pas moins de 585 kilomètres de murs anti-migrants ont été construits en Europe depuis la chute du mur de Berlin… L’Europe-forteresse cherche même à repousser au loin ses murailles. Elle négocie des accords avec des pays […]

    • Peeling an onion: the “refugee crisis” from a historical perspective

      This paper asks a simple question: why did Western and other European politicians become so alarmed and, in some cases, downright apocalyptic at the rise of asylum seekers in 2014–16, especially compared to the previous refugee crisis in the 1990s? This paper argues that in 2014/2015, a “perfect storm” developed, bringing together factors that in the past had been largely unrelated and then converged with new ones. Peeling the onion of societal discontent with migrants and refugees has revealed five necessary and sufficient conditions: (1) discomfort with immigration and integration of colonial and labour migrants from North Africa and Turkey (1970–80s); (2) growing social inequality and widespread pessimism about globalization (1980s–); (3) A growing discomfort with Islam (1990s–); (4) Islamist terrorism (2000s–) and (5) the rise of radical right populist parties (2000s).

      http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01419870.2017.1355975
      #islamophobie #terrorisme #crise_des_réfugiés #crise_migratoire

  • Migrants en mer : « A un moment donné, quand quelqu’un coule, vous le sauvez »
    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/130817/migrants-en-mer-un-moment-donne-quand-quelqu-un-coule-vous-le-sauvez

    © Narciso Contreras/SOS #méditerranée En Méditerranée, plusieurs #ONG interviennent pour sauver de la noyade des migrants embarqués à bord de rafiots de fortune. Ce que leur reprochent les autorités italiennes et européennes : par leurs actions, les associations favoriseraient l’immigration illégale. Une « erreur d’analyse », répond Francis Vallat, président de SOS Méditerranée.

    #International #crise_migratoire #réfugiés

  • Intéressant, alors que depuis des années on crie #crise_migratoire... attention : arrivée massive de migrants... Il faut arrêter les flux migratoires... là, dans cet article, on dit le contraire : L’Espagne est en train de sortir de la crise économique, on le voit par le #solde_migratoire positif !

    Si seulement ce discours était un peu plus présent dans la presse !

    Espagne. Après sept ans de crise, le solde migratoire est à nouveau positif

    Pour la première fois depuis 2009, l’Espagne affiche un nombre d’immigrants supérieur au nombre d’émigrants. La population du pays, en chute depuis cinq ans, a même légèrement crû en 2016.


    http://www.courrierinternational.com/article/espagne-apres-sept-ans-de-crise-le-solde-migratoire-est-nouve
    #migrations #crise_économique #économie

    Je ne sais pas quel autre #tag utiliser pour retrouver cet article... si vous avez des idées...