• La garantie d’emploi, un outil au potentiel révolutionnaire | Romaric Godin
    http://www.contretemps.eu/chomage-economie-garantie-emploi-depassement-capitalisme

    L’ouvrage de Pavlina Tcherneva qui inaugure la collection « Économie politique » avance une proposition qui peut paraître a priori insensée : fournir à tous les citoyens qui le souhaitent un travail rémunéré, permettant de vivre décemment. Tout l’intérêt de son propos est de montrer que, précisément, cette proposition n’a rien d’insensé, mais qu’elle est parfaitement réalisable pour peu que l’on se libère de certaines certitudes qui ne sont que des constructions politiques. L’idée que le chômage soit le mode d’ajustement « normal » de l’économie est déjà un choix politique remarquablement déconstruit par l’autrice. Source : (...)

  • Is the world poor, or unjust ?

    Social media has been ablaze with this question recently. We know we face a crisis of mass poverty: the global economy is organized in such a way that nearly 60% of humanity is left unable to meet basic needs. But the question at stake this time is different. A couple of economists on Twitter have claimed that the world average income is $16 per day (PPP). This, they say, is proof that the world is poor in a much more general sense: there is not enough for everyone to live well, and the only way to solve this problem is to press on the accelerator of aggregate economic growth.

    This narrative is, however, hobbled by several empirical problems.

    1. $16 per day is not accurate

    First, let me address the $16/day claim on its own terms. This is a significant underestimate of world average income. The main problem is that it relies on household surveys, mostly from Povcal. These surveys are indispensable for telling us about the income and consumption of poor and ordinary households, but they do not capture top incomes, and are not designed to do so. In fact, Povcal surveys are not even really legitimate for capturing the income of “normal” high-income households. Using this method gives us a total world household income of about $43 trillion (PPP). But we know that total world GDP is $137 trillion (PPP). So, about two-thirds of global income is unaccounted for.

    What explains this discrepancy? Some of the “missing” income is the income of the global rich. Some of it is consumption that’s related to housing, NGOs, care homes, boarding schools, etc, which are also not captured by these surveys (but which are counted as household consumption in national accounts). The rest of it is various forms of public expenditure and public provisioning.

    This final point raises a problem that’s worth addressing. The survey-based method mixes income- and consumption-based data. Specifically, it counts non-income consumption in poor countries (including from commons and certain kinds of public provisioning), but does not count non-income consumption or public provisioning in richer countries. This is not a small thing. Consider people in Finland who are able to access world-class healthcare and higher education for free, or Singaporeans who live in high-end public housing that’s heavily subsidized by the government. The income equivalent of this consumption is very high (consider that in the US, for instance, people would have to pay out of pocket for it), and yet it is not captured by these surveys. It just vanishes.

    Of course, not all government expenditure ends up as beneficial public provisioning. A lot of it goes to wars, arms, fossil fuel subsidies and so on. But that can be changed. There’s no reason that GDP spent on wars could not be spent on healthcare, education, wages and housing instead.

    For these reasons, when assessing the question of whether the world is poor in terms of income, it makes more sense to use world average GDP, which is $17,800 per capita (PPP). Note that this is roughly consistent with the World Bank’s definition of a “high-income” country. It is also well in excess of what is required for high levels of human development. According to the UNDP, some nations score “very high” (0.8 or above) on the life expectancy index with as little as $3,300 per capita, and “very high” on the education index with as little as $8,700 per capita. In other words, the world is not poor, in aggregate. Rather, income is badly maldistributed.

    To get a sense for just how badly it is maldistributed, consider that the richest 1% alone capture nearly 25% of world GDP, according to the World Inequality Database. That’s more than the GDP of 169 countries combined, including Norway, Argentina, all of the Middle East and the entire continent of Africa. If income was shared more fairly (i.e., if more of it went to the workers who actually produce it), and invested in universal public goods, we could end global poverty many times over and close the health and education gap permanently.

    2. GDP accounting does not reflect economic value

    But even GDP accounting is not adequate to the task of determining whether or not the world is poor. The reason is because GDP is not an accurate reflection of value; rather, it is a reflection of prices, and prices are an artefact of power relations in political economy. We know this from feminist economists, who point out that labour and resources mobilized for domestic reproduction, primarily by women, is priced at zero, and therefore “valued” at zero in national accounts, even though it is in reality essential to our civilization. We also know this from literature on unequal exchange, which points out that capital leverages geopolitical and commercial monopolies to artificially depress or “cheapen” the prices of labour in the global South to below the level of subsistence.

    Let me illustrate this latter point with an example. Beginning in the 1980s, the World Bank and IMF (which are controlled primarily by the US and G7), imposed structural adjustment programmes across the global South, which significantly depressed wages and commodity prices (cutting them in half) and reorganized Southern economies around exports to the North. The goal was to restore Northern access to the cheap labour and resources they had enjoyed during the colonial era. It worked: during the 1980s the quantity of commodities that the South exported to the North increased, and yet their total revenues on this trade (i.e., the GDP they received for it) declined. In other words, by depressing the costs of Southern labour and commodities, the North is able to appropriate a significant quantity effectively for free.

    The economist Samir Amin described this as “hidden value”. David Clelland calls it “dark value” – in other words, value that is not visible at all in national or corporate accounts. Just as the value of female domestic labour is “hidden” from view, so too are the labour and commodities that are net appropriated from the global South. In both cases, prices do not reflect value. Clelland estimates that the real value of an iPad, for example, is many times higher than its market price, because so much of the Southern labour that goes into producing it is underpaid or even entirely unpaid. John Smith points out that, as a result, GDP is an illusion that systematically underestimates real value.

    There is a broader fact worth pointing to here. The whole purpose of capitalism is to appropriate surplus value, which by its very nature requires depressing the prices of inputs to a level below the value that capital actually derives from them. We can see this clearly in the way that nature is priced at zero, or close to zero (consider deforestation, strip mining, or emissions), despite the fact that all production ultimately derives from nature. So the question is, why should we use prices as a reflection of global value when we know that, under capitalism, prices by their very definition do not reflect value?

    We can take this observation a step further. To the extent that capitalism relies on cheapening the prices of labour and other inputs, and to the extent that GDP represents these artificially low prices, GDP growth will never eradicate scarcity because in the process of growth scarcity is constantly imposed anew.

    So, if GDP is not an accurate measure of the value of the global economy, how can we get around this problem? One way is to try to calculate the value of hidden labour and resources. There have been many such attempts. In 1995, the UN estimated that unpaid household labour, if compensated, would earn $16 trillion in that year. More recent estimates have put it at many times higher than that. Similar attempts have been made to value “ecosystem services”, and they arrive at numbers that exceed world GDP. These exercises are useful in illustrating the scale of hidden value, but they bump up against a problem. Capitalism works precisely because it does not pay for domestic labour and ecosystem services (it takes these things for free). So imagining a system in which these things are paid requires us to imagine a totally different kind of economy (with a significant increase in the money supply and a significant increase in the price of labour and resources), and in such an economy money would have a radically different value. These figures, while revealing, compare apples and oranges.

    3. What matters is resources and provisioning

    There is another approach we can use, which is to look at the scale of the useful resources that are mobilized by the global economy. This is preferable, because resources are real and tangible and can be accurately counted. Right now, the world economy uses 100 billion tons of resources per year (i.e., materials processed into tangible goods, buildings and infrastructure). That’s about 13 tons per person on average, but it is highly unequal: in low and lower-middle income countries it’s about 2 tons, and in high-income countries it’s a staggering 28 tons. Research in industrial ecology indicates that high standards of well-being can be achieved with about 6-8 tons per per person. In other words, the global economy presently uses twice as much resources as would be required to deliver good lives for all.

    We see the same thing when it comes to energy. The world economy presently uses 400 EJ of energy per year, or 53 GJ per person on average (again, highly unequal between North and South). Recent research shows that we could deliver high standards of welfare for all, with universal healthcare, education, housing, transportation, computing etc, with as little as 15 GJ per capita. Even if we raise that figure by 75% to be generous it still amounts to a global total of only 26 GJ. In other words, we presently use more than double the energy that is required to deliver good lives for everyone.

    When we look at the world in terms of real resources and energy (i.e., the stuff of provisioning), it becomes clear that there is no scarcity at all. The problem isn’t that there’s not enough, the problem, again, is that it is maldistributed. A huge chunk of global commodity production is totally irrelevant to human needs and well-being. Consider all the resources and energy that are mobilized for the sake of fast fashion, throwaway gadgets, single-use stadiums, SUVs, bottled water, cruise ships and the military-industrial complex. Consider the scale of needless consumption that is stimulated by manipulative advertising schemes, or enforced by planned obsolescence. Consider the quantity of private cars that people have been forced to buy because the fossil fuel industry and automobile manufactures have lobbied so aggressively against public transportation. Consider that the beef industry alone uses nearly 60% of the world’s agricultural land, to produce only 2% of global calories.

    There is no scarcity. Rather, the world’s resources and energy are appropriated (disproportionately from the global South) in order to service the interests of capital and affluent consumers (disproportionately in the global North). We can state it more clearly: our economic system is not designed to meet human needs; it is designed to facilitate capital accumulation. And in order to do so, it imposes brutal scarcity on the majority of people, and cheapens human and nonhuman life. It is irrational to believe that simply “growing” such an economy, in aggregate, will somehow magically achieve the social outcomes we want.

    We can think of this in terms of labour, too. Consider the labour that is rendered by young women in Bangladeshi sweatshops to produce fast fashion for Northern consumption; and consider the labour rendered by Congolese miners to dig up coltan for smartphones that are designed to be tossed every two years. This is an extraordinary waste of human lives. Why? So that Zara and Apple can post extraordinary profits.

    Now imagine what the world would be like if all that labour, resources and energy was mobilized instead around meeting human needs and improving well-being (i.e., use-value rather than exchange-value). What if instead of appropriating labour and resources for fast fashion and Alexa devices it was mobilized around providing universal healthcare, education, public transportation, social housing, organic food, water, energy, internet and computing for all? We could live in a highly educated, technologically advanced society with zero poverty and zero hunger, all with significantly less resources and energy than we presently use. In other words we could not only achieve our social goals, but we could meet our ecological goals too, reducing excess resource use in rich countries to bring them back within planetary boundaries, while increasing resource use in the South to meet human needs.

    There is no reason we cannot build such a society (and it is achievable, with concrete policy, as I describe here, here and here), except for the fact that those who benefit so prodigiously from the status quo do everything in their power to prevent it.

    https://www.jasonhickel.org/blog/2021/2/21/is-the-world-poor-or-unjust

    #pauvreté #injustice #économie #croissance_économique #inégalités #Povcal #statistiques #chiffres #revenus #monde #PIB #sondage

  • Production

    Jean Robert

    https://lavoiedujaguar.net/Production

    Don Bartolo habite une masure derrière ma maison. Comme beaucoup d’autres personnes déplacées, c’est un intrus, un « envahisseur » ou un « parachutiste », comme on dit au Mexique. Avec du carton, des bouts de plastique et de la tôle ondulée, il a édifié une cabane dans un terrain au propriétaire absent. S’il a de la chance, un jour il construira en dur et couronnera les murs d’un toit d’amiante-ciment ou de tôle. Derrière sa demeure, il y a un terrain vague que son propriétaire lui permet de cultiver. Don Bartolo y a établi une milpa : un champ de maïs ensemencé juste au début de la saison des pluies afin qu’il puisse donner une récolte sans irrigation. Dans la perspective de l’homme moderne, l’action de Bartolo peut paraître profondément anachronique.

    Après la fin de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, le Mexique, comme le reste du « Tiers-Monde », fut envahi par l’idée du développement. La popularité de ce concept doit beaucoup au président Harry Truman, qui en fit l’axe politique de son discours de prise de pouvoir en 1949. Selon Truman, la politique du développement consiste à « appuyer tous les peuples libres dans leurs efforts pour augmenter la production d’aliments, de textiles pour l’habillement et de matériaux de construction de maisons, ainsi que celle de nouvelles forces motrices pour alléger leur effort physique ». Il ajoutait que « la clé du développement est la croissance de la production et la clé de celle-ci, l’application ample et vigoureuse des connaissances scientifiques et techniques ».

    #Jean_Robert #Mexique #milpa #développement #production #Kant #Goethe #Defoe #Adam_Smith #valeur #Ricardo #rareté #Marx #économie #progrès #destructivité #croissance #Keynes #maïs

  • De quel bois se chauffer ?
    https://laviedesidees.fr/De-quel-bois-se-chauffer.html

    À propos de : François Jarrige et Alexis Vrignon (dir.), Face à la puissance, Une #Histoire des énergies alternatives à l’âge industriel, La Découverte. Comment sortir de la #croissance énergivore ? La question n’est pas nouvelle, un groupe d’historiens recense les tentatives passées, toutes avortées, pour constituer des sociétés écologiques. Un répertoire d’idées pour l’avenir ?

    #énergie #écologie #industrie #pollution
    https://laviedesidees.fr/IMG/pdf/20210111_berard.pdf
    https://laviedesidees.fr/IMG/docx/20210111_berard.docx

  • The Big Thaw: How Russia Could Dominate a Warming World — ProPublica
    https://www.propublica.org/article/the-big-thaw-how-russia-could-dominate-a-warming-world

    no country may be better positioned to capitalize on climate change than Russia. Russia has the largest land mass by far of any northern nation. It is positioned farther north than all of its South Asian neighbors, which collectively are home to the largest global population fending off displacement from rising seas, drought and an overheating climate. Like Canada, Russia is rich in resources and land, with room to grow. Its crop production is expected to be boosted by warming temperatures over the coming decades

    (...) Draw a line around the planet at the latitude of the northern borders of the United States and China, and just about every place south, across five continents, stands to lose out. Productivity, Burke found, peaks at about 55 [F] degrees average temperature and then drops as the climate warms. He projects that by 2100, the national per capita income in the United States might be a third less than it would be in a nonwarming world; India’s would be nearly 92% less; and China’s future growth would be cut short by nearly half. The mirror image, meanwhile, tells a different story: Incredible growth could await those places soon to enter their prime. Canada, Scandinavia, Iceland and Russia each could see as much as fivefold bursts in their per capita gross domestic products by the end of the century so long as they have enough people to power their economies at that level.

  • C’est le #changement qui fait peur, pas la migration

    Les changements très rapides engendrent des réactions de #défense. Certes, la migration est perçue comme un aspect du changement sociétal. Cependant, ce n’est pas la migration en soi qui fait #peur, mais les conséquences liées à la #croissance, comme l’activité soutenue du bâtiment, l’augmentation du #trafic_routier ou l’#appauvrissement redouté de la #vie_sociale. Telles sont les conclusions de la dernière étude de la Commission fédérale des migrations CFM. L’étude de terrain « Vivre-ensemble et côte-à-côte dans les communes suisses - Migration : #perceptions de la population résidente » donne une image variée des #sensibilités. Il s’avère également que la majorité des personnes interrogées attachent beaucoup d’importance à l’#échange sur le plan local et aux possibilités de #rencontre.

    Environ 45 pourcent des habitants de Suisse vivent aujourd’hui dans des agglomérations. C’est là où l’évolution des dernières décennies est la plus visible et perceptible. Dans le cadre de l’étude, huit communes (Agno, Belp, Le Locle, Losone, Lutry, Oftringen, Rheinfelden, Rümlang) ont été visitées. La procédure avec des résultats ouverts comprenait des discussions informelles, de courts entretiens et un sondage ludique sur tablette.

    La migration vue comme un aspect de la #transformation_sociétale

    Les personnes interviewées sont conscientes à la fois des aspects positifs et négatifs du changement. Et elles les jugent d’une manière beaucoup plus différenciée que ce qui s’exprime souvent dans les débats politiques. La migration est généralement évoquée en relation avec d’autres sujets et est rarement mentionnée directement comme un problème majeur. Cependant, une #attitude négative à l’égard des changements dans l’agglomération peut se traduire par une position critique vis-à-vis des immigrés. Cela est notamment le cas lorsqu’ils sont perçus non seulement comme une composante, mais aussi comme les responsables du changement de la société. On leur attribue alors l’intensification de la #pollution de l’#environnement ou du trafic routier, de l’activité de construction et de l’#individualisation de la société - tous ces éléments portant préjudice à la qualité du #vivre_ensemble.

    La présence et la participation importent plus que l’origine

    La cohabitation avec des personnes venues de « pays proches » est jugée moins problématique. Mais l’étude démontre aussi que la #résidence durable dans la commune et la #participation à la #vie_locale relativisent l’importance que les résidents attachent à l’origine des membres de la communauté. La participation à la vie économique et les #compétences_linguistiques sont considérées comme des conditions importantes pour être accueillis dans la collectivité. D’un point de vue local, cela peut également être vu comme l’expression de la volonté et de l’intérêt de la population résidente d’échanger avec les nouveaux arrivants.

    L’attitude de #pessimisme face aux changements s’accompagne de #scepticisme à l’égard de la migration

    L’attitude des personnes vis-à-vis des changements varie selon la durée de leur présence dans la commune, selon leurs liens avec le lieu, leur âge et leur orientation politique. En particulier les #personnes_âgées, les résidents de longue date et les personnes attachées aux lieux ont tendance à être plus critiques à l’égard de la croissance locale et de l’arrivée d’étrangers. Ils accordent beaucoup d’importance à la préservation de l’aspect du lieu, du #paysage environnant et des #usages_locaux. À l’inverse, les personnes jeunes, mobiles, sympathisantes de gauche, les femmes et les personnes issues de la migration ont plus souvent tendance à éprouver les changements et la migration comme des phénomènes normaux. Les attitudes négatives envers les étrangers expriment donc des réserves face au changement social et à la #modernisation.

    Diversité vécue et communauté doivent s‘équilibrer

    Pour le futur développement des agglomérations, il est important de tenir compte des besoins de tous les habitants et de créer des passerelles entre les anciens habitants et les nouveaux arrivants. C’est pourquoi les changements rapides devraient être accompagnés, communiqués et si cela est possible planifiés avec des modalités basées sur la #participation.

    https://www.ekm.admin.ch/ekm/fr/home/aktuell/mm.msg-id-81673.html
    #préjugés #asile #migrations #réfugiés #changement_sociétal #perception #Suisse

    –—

    Transformation des communes : une étude avec et pour les habitants
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=We7Ke1zvddY&feature=youtu.be

    Pour télécharger la version succincte de l’étude :
    https://www.ekm.admin.ch/dam/ekm/fr/data/dokumentation/materialien/studie-migration-ansaessige-bevoelkerung.pdf

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Toi aussi tu peux sauver le capitalisme : fait toi vacciner. Ça ne sert plus à grand chose contre la pandémie, ça ne sert à rien du tout pour le climat, ça ne te rendra pas les libertés qu’on t’a supprimées, mais pense à tous ces actionnaires qui comptent sur toi !

    #Covid-19 : la #croissance mondiale va rebondir grâce aux #vaccins, estime l’#OCDE
    https://www.lefigaro.fr/conjoncture/covid-19-la-croissance-mondiale-va-rebondir-grace-aux-vaccins-estime-l-ocde

    • Dernièrement j’ai visionné Hold-Up, le fameux « documentaire complotiste » dont on parle dans les salons parisiens. Bon, il y a a boire et à manger là-dedans* mais ce que je trouve amusant c’est de lire dans le Figaro, qui plus est dans la rubrique économie, cette information qui confirme d’une certaine façon que cette pandémie fait les affaires de la finance mondiale.

      (*) La thèse « vaccin + nanoparticules + 5G » de la 2ème moitié du documentaire nuit à tout le reste de ce qui y est évoqué et avéré dans la première heure :mensonges et incompétence des gouvernements, dévastation du système hospitalier, atteinte aux libertés et mise en place d’un état policier, corruption de l’OMS et du Lancet, etc.

  • Au delà du PIB, et après ?
    https://laviedesidees.fr/Au-dela-du-PIB-et-apres.html

    Quels indicateurs sociaux et économiques peuvent permettre de changer nos modes de production pour les rendre plus justes et compatibles avec la sauvegarde de l’environnement ? Quelles sont les conditions politiques et économiques d’un tel changement ? Réponse d’Éloi Laurent à Étienne Espagne.

    #Économie #environnement #santé #écologie #croissance
    https://laviedesidees.fr/IMG/docx/20201201_eloilaurent.docx
    https://laviedesidees.fr/IMG/docx/20201201_eloilaurent-2.docx
    https://laviedesidees.fr/IMG/pdf/20201201_eloilaurent.pdf

  • Au delà du PIB
    https://laviedesidees.fr/Au-dela-du-PIB.html

    À propos de : Éloi Laurent, Sortir de la #croissance, mode d’emploi, Les liens qui libèrent. Éloi Laurent offre une remarquable synthèse des débats théoriques comme des initiatives pratiques des tenants d’un au-delà du PIB. Son mode d’emploi est enthousiasmant, au risque cependant d’occulter les conditions politiques d’une telle transformation.

    #Économie #écologie
    https://laviedesidees.fr/IMG/pdf/20201130_croissance.pdf
    https://laviedesidees.fr/IMG/docx/20201130_croissance.docx

  • La grande course à la ruine
    http://carfree.fr/index.php/2020/11/13/la-grande-course-a-la-ruine

    Philippe Saint-Marc est un pionnier de l’écologie, auteur de Progrès ou déclin de l’homme (Stock, 1978), Socialisation de la #nature (Stock, 1975) et L’Economie barbare (Frison Roche, 1994). Né le Lire la suite...

    #Destruction_de_la_planète #Fin_de_l'automobile #2000 #civilisation #critique #croissance #culte #histoire #religion

  • La déraison de la #croissance (des #transports)
    http://carfree.fr/index.php/2020/09/18/la-deraison-de-la-croissance-des-transports

    Les transports, tout particulièrement internationaux, sont une illustration de l’aberration de notre logique actuelle de fonctionnement. Il s’agit d’une des activités les plus polluantes et les plus consommatrices d’énergie. Et Lire la suite...

    #Destruction_de_la_planète #Fin_de_l'automobile #Fin_des_autoroutes #Fin_du_pétrole #Réchauffement_climatique #camions #décroissance #économie #local #marchandises #mondialisation #société

  • Un livre conseillé par une personne rencontrée lors du voyage dans les Appenins (amie d’ami·es)... et dont j’ai beaucoup aimé la vision sur l’#allaitement

    Il mio bambino non mi mangia - #Carlos_González

    La madre si prepara a dare da mangiare a suo figlio mentre lo distrae con un giocattolo. Lei prende un cucchiaio e lui, subito, predispone il suo piano strategico contro l’eccesso di cibo: la prima linea di difesa consiste nel chiudere la bocca e girare la testa. La madre preoccupata insiste con il cucchiaio. Il bambino si ritira allora nella seconda trincea: apre la bocca e lascia che gli mettano qualsiasi cosa, però non la inghiotte. I liquidi e i passati gocciolano spettacolarmente attraverso la fessura della sua bocca e la carne si trasforma in un’immensa palla.

    Questa situazione, più caratteristica di un campo di battaglia che di un’attività quotidiana, illustra con umorismo la tesi centrale di questo libro: l’inappetenza è un problema di equilibrio tra quello che un bambino mangia e quello che sua madre si aspetta che mangi. Mai obbligarlo. Non promettere regali, non dare stimolanti dell’appetito, né castighi. Il bambino conosce molto bene ciò di cui ha bisogno.

    Il pediatra Carlos González, responsabile della rubrica sull’allattamento materno della rivista Ser Padres, sdrammatizza il problema e, indicando regole chiare di comportamento, tranquillizza quelle madri che vivono il momento dell’allattamento e dello svezzamento come una questione personale, con angustia e sensi di colpa.

    Le mamme impareranno a riconoscere:

    – l’importanza dell’allattamento al seno;

    – quello che non bisogna fare all’ora dei pasti;

    – i luoghi comuni e i falsi miti legati allo svezzamento…

    e soprattutto a rispettare le preferenze e le necessità del loro bambino.

    https://www.bonomieditore.it/home-collana-educazione-pre-e-perinatale-ora-lo-so/il-mio-bambino-non-mi-mangia
    #maternité #livre #parentalité #éducation #alimentation #enfants #enfance #bébés

  • Les politiques d’#austérité : à cause d’une erreur Excel ?

    Comment un article économique ayant eu une influence majeure sur les politiques d’austérité s’est finalement révélé faux, à cause d’une erreur de calcul sous #Excel.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yeX_Zs7zztY&feature=youtu.be


    #science #politique #science_et_politique #croissance #dette #vidéo #économie #erreur #dette_publique #90_pourcent #politique_économique #Thomas_Herndon

    Le seuil de 90% de dette, cité dans l’article de #Reinhart - #Rogoff comme étant le seuil qui ne permet plus de croissance, et utilisé par les politiciens depuis...

    • The #Reinhart - #Rogoff error – or how not to Excel at economics

      Last week we learned a famous 2010 academic paper, relied on by political big-hitters to bolster arguments for austerity cuts, contained significant errors; and that those errors came down to misuse of an Excel spreadsheet.

      Sadly, these are not the first mistakes of this size and nature when handling data. So what on Earth went wrong, and can we fix it?

      Harvard’s Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff are two of the most respected and influential academic economists active today.

      Or at least, they were. On April 16, doctoral student Thomas Herndon and professors Michael Ash and Robert Pollin, at the Political Economy Research Institute at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, released the results of their analysis of two 2010 papers by Reinhard and Rogoff, papers that also provided much of the grist for the 2011 bestseller Next Time Is Different.

      Reinhart and Rogoff’s work showed average real economic growth slows (a 0.1% decline) when a country’s debt rises to more than 90% of gross domestic product (GDP) – and this 90% figure was employed repeatedly in political arguments over high-profile austerity measures.

      During their analysis, Herndon, Ash and Pollin obtained the actual spreadsheet that Reinhart and Rogoff used for their calculations; and after analysing this data, they identified three errors.

      The most serious was that, in their Excel spreadsheet, Reinhart and Rogoff had not selected the entire row when averaging growth figures: they omitted data from Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada and Denmark.

      In other words, they had accidentally only included 15 of the 20 countries under analysis in their key calculation.

      When that error was corrected, the “0.1% decline” data became a 2.2% average increase in economic growth.

      So the key conclusion of a seminal paper, which has been widely quoted in political debates in North America, Europe Australia and elsewhere, was invalid.

      The paper was cited by the 2012 Republican nominee for the US vice presidency Paul Ryan in his proposed 2013 budget The Path to Prosperity: A Blueprint for American Renewal.

      Undoubtedly, without Reinhart and Rogoff, Ryan would have found some other data to support his conservative point of view; but he must have been delighted he had heavyweight economists such as Reinhart and Rogoff apparently in his corner.

      Mind you, Reinhart and Rogoff have not tried to distance themselves from this view of their work.
      Keeping records

      As said at the outset, this is not the first time a data- and/or math-related mistake resulted in major embarrassment and expense. In a summary of such historical clangers, Bloomberg journalist Matthew Zeitlin recently pointed to:

      NASA’s Mariner 1 spacecraft, destroyed minutes after launch in 1962, thanks to “a missing hyphen in its computer code for transmitting navigation instructions”
      an Excel spreadsheet error by a first-year law firm associate, who added 179 contracts to an agreement to buy the bankrupt firm Lehman Brothers’ assets, on behalf of Barclay’s bank
      the 2010 European flight ban, following the eruption of Iceland’s Eyjafjallajokull, for which “many of the assumptions in the computer models were not backed by scientific evidence”

      While many different types of errors were involved in these calamities, the fact that the errors in the Reinhart-Rogoff paper were not identified earlier can be ascribed by the pervasive failure of scientific and other researchers to make all data and computer code publicly available at an early stage – preferably when the research paper documenting the study is submitted for review.

      We’ve discussed this topic in a previous article on Math Drudge and another in the Huffington Post – emphasising that the culture of computing has not kept pace with its rapidly ascending pre-eminence in modern scientific and social science research.

      Most certainly the issue is not just one for political economists, although the situation seems worst in the social sciences. In a private letter now making the rounds – which we have read – behavioural psychologist Daniel Kahneman (a Nobel economist) has implored social psychologists to clean up their act to avoid a “train wreck”.

      Kahneman specifically discusses the importance of replication of experiments and studies on priming effects.

      Traditionally, researchers have been taught to record every detail of their work, including experimental design, procedures, equipment, raw results, data processing, statistical methods and other tools used to analyse the results.

      In contrast, relatively few researchers who employ computing in modern science – ranging from large-scale, highly parallel climate simulations to simple processing of social science data – typically take such care in their work.

      In most cases, there is no record of workflow, hardware and software configuration, and often even the source code is no longer available (or has been revised numerous times since the study was conducted).

      We think this is a seriously lax environment in which deliberate fraud and genuine error can proliferate.
      Raising standards

      We believe, and have argued, there should be new and significantly stricter standards required of papers by journal editors and conference chairs, together with software tools to facilitate the storage of files relating to the computational workflow.

      But there’s plenty of blame to spread around. Science journalists need to do a better job of reporting such critical issues and not being blinded by seductive numbers. This is not the first time impressive-looking data, later rescinded, has been trumpeted around the media. And the stakes can be enormous.

      If Reinhart and Rogoff (a chess grandmaster) had made any attempt to allow access to their data immediately at the conclusion of their study, the Excel error would have been caught and their other arguments and conclusions could have been tightened.

      They might still be the most dangerous economists in the world, but they would not now be in the position of saving face in light of damning critiques in the Atlantic and elsewhere.

      As Matthew O’Brien put it last week in The Atlantic:

      For an economist, the five most terrifying words in the English language are: I can’t replicate your results. But for economists Carmen Reinhart and Ken Rogoff of Harvard, there are seven even more terrifying ones: I think you made an Excel error.

      Listen, mistakes happen. Especially with Excel. But hopefully they don’t happen in papers that provide the intellectual edifice for an economic experiment — austerity — that has kept millions out of work. Well, too late.

      https://theconversation.com/the-reinhart-rogoff-error-or-how-not-to-excel-at-economics-13646

  • #Décroissance #aéronautique : ne pas céder aux sirènes de l’éco-kérosène
    http://www.socialter.fr/fr/module/99999672/923/dcroissance_aronautique__ne_pas_cder_aux_sirnes_de_lco_krosne

    La volonté même de recourir à des « #éco-carburants » pose question lorsqu’il s’agit clairement de soutenir le #tourisme lointain, premier pourvoyeur en passagers. En effet, si tant est qu’existent un jour des carburants « verts », leur but premier, comme celui de toute #énergie renouvelable, devrait être de se substituer aux #ressources fossiles, non de permettre de nouveaux usages ou d’accroître ceux existants. Or les intentions mentionnées précédemment s’appuient sur le programme Corsia dont l’objectif affiché est le soutien de la #croissance immodérée du secteur #aérien, qui affichait sans vergogne un quadruplement du trafic d’ici 30 ans au prix d’un triplement de la #consommation énergétique (4).

    La lutte contre le changement climatique n’a aucune chance d’aboutir favorablement si l’on poursuit l’empilement énergétique. En outre, les carburants renouvelables actuels, tous confondus, ne représentent que quelques pourcents des consommations d’essence, de gazole et de fioul : la priorité d’usage d’hypothétiques nouveaux carburants « verts » se doit d’être celle d’usages essentiels, incompressibles, le reste (en l’occurrence le tourisme de masse à travers le monde) devant « quoi qu’il en coûte » décroître.

  • #EU #Development #Cooperation with #Sub-Saharan #Africa 2013-2018: Policies, funding, results

    How have EU overall development policies and the EU’s overall policies vis-à-vis Sub-Saharan Africa in particular evolved in the period 2013-2018 and what explains the developments that have taken place?2. How has EU development spending in Sub-Saharan Africa developed in the period 2013-2018 and what explains these developments?3.What is known of the results accomplished by EU development aid in Sub-Saharan Africa and what explains these accomplishments?

    This study analyses these questions on the basis of a comprehensive desk review of key EU policy documents, data on EU development cooperation as well as available evaluation material of the EU institutionson EU external assistance. While broad in coverage, the study pays particular attention to EU policies and development spending in specific areas that are priority themes for the Dutch government as communicated to the parliament.

    Authors: Alexei Jones, Niels Keijzer, Ina Friesen and Pauline Veron, study for the evaluation department (IOB) of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands, May 2020

    = https://ecdpm.org/publications/eu-development-cooperation-sub-saharan-africa-2013-2018-policies-funding-resu

  • TRIBUNE #Covid-19 : l’impératif coopératif et solidaire

    Nous, acteurs, chercheurs, élus, territoires et réseaux de l’ESS des Hauts-de-France appelons à un #engagement véritablement coopératif et solidaire pour sortir par le haut de cette #crise sans précédent.

    Les crises se succèdent à un rythme effréné

    En un temps court, nos sociétés ont été amenées à faire face à une succession de crises majeures que l’on songe à la crise financière internationale de 2008, à la crise sociale et démocratique des gilets jaunes depuis 2018, à la crise écologique qu’incarnent le changement climatique et l’effondrement de la biodiversité. L’arrivée et la diffusion mondiale du coronavirus fin 2019 et les réponses qui ont été fournies ont cette fois provoqué une crise multidimensionnelle sans précédent.

    À chaque crise, l’État est appelé à la rescousse : il retrouve de sa superbe, n’est plus conspué ni par ceux qui d’habitude idolâtrent la privatisation des gains ni par ceux qui vantent les bienfaits de l’austérité. À chaque crise, qui provoque un accroissement effroyable des inégalités (sociales, territoriales, de logement etc.), des appels solennels à la solidarité et à la coopération sont lancés. Quelques actes philanthropiques trouvent un large écho dans la presse : tel grand groupe décide de réorienter une ligne de production vers des produits de première nécessité sanitaire ; tel autre achète « à ses frais » des équipements en Chine ou ailleurs ; tel autre encore réduit la part des dividendes qui seront versés à ses actionnaires, tandis qu’il profite par ailleurs du filet de protection sociale du chômage partiel assuré par l’État. Telle grande fortune appelle aussi à une redistribution ponctuelle des revenus (souvent financiers) engrangés.

    L’économie sociale et solidaire, un acteur discret de réponse à ces crises

    Une partie de l’économie pourtant, fait de ces appels, là-bas ponctuels, le cœur structurel de son organisation et de son activité du quotidien. Crise ou pas crise, les initiatives solidaires, l’économie sociale et solidaire, les communs interrogent le sens de ce qu’ils réalisent, orientent leurs productions vers des activités d’utilité sociale, qui répondent à des besoins écologiques et sociaux, fondent leurs décisions sur des principes égalitaires, font de la solidarité et de la coopération la grammaire de leur dynamique.

    De nombreuses initiatives citoyennes, comme autant de solidarités auto-organisées, ont été réactives pour répondre à la crise. Souvent à bas bruit, elles ont abattu, et abattent, un travail considérable pour pallier les défaillances industrielles, et assurer, par exemple, la fabrication de masques via de simples machines à coudre, et parfois via des FabLabs et tiers lieux. Des acteurs de l’économie sociale et solidaire jouent un rôle de proximité dans le déploiement des circuits courts alimentaires, proposent des paniers de fruits et légumes en zones urbaines. Des actions autour de l’alimentaire sont démultipliées grâce à des acteurs de tiers lieux en lien avec des métropoles, ou proposent des solutions de plateformes type « open food network ». Des associations maintiennent une continuité des services publics dans le sanitaire et social malgré les risques de non distanciation physique, qu’on songe à l’aide à domicile, aux Ehpad gérés de manière associative, aux IME, aux maisons d’accueil spécialisées, dont beaucoup ont décidé de rester ouverts. Des associations continuent de défendre les sans-abris et les réfugiés, d’autres encore structurent l’entraide de proximité au quotidien. Tous les secteurs économiques sont durement touchés. Les activités culturelles et artistiques sont parmi les plus affectées. Seuls les réseaux de coopération et de solidarité leur permettent de ne pas disparaître de l’espace public. Dans l’urgence de leur survie, et conscientes de leur forte utilité sociale, certains de ses acteurs nouent des appuis politique et économique avec l’économie sociale et solidaire.

    L’État et les collectivités locales et territoriales savent bien d’ailleurs, en temps de crise, qu’ils peuvent compter sur cette économie solidaire de proximité, et plus largement sur ce tissu socioéconomique territorial, pour en amortir les effets, tandis que les mêmes ont parfois déployé une énergie non dissimulée pour réduire, avant la crise, leurs moyens d’agir et l’ont parfois instrumentalisée ici ou là comptant sur elle pour maintenir une paix sociale à moindres coûts.

    Quelles alternatives ?

    Dans quelques semaines ou quelques mois, chacun des grands acteurs économiques multinationaux espérera la reprise du « monde d’avant », un business as usual qui nous a pourtant conduits dans cette situation. Las. Les crises multiples traversées, et celles qui se succéderont certainement dans les années à venir, rendent urgent de repenser l’économie autrement. Mais vraiment autrement. Il est urgent de remplacer les dogmes du vieux monde par de nouvelles manières de penser et de pratiquer l’économie et par de nouvelles manières de vivre la démocratie. Cela est possible. L’économie sociale et solidaire en est un témoin en actes et un acteur décisif de cet après crise. Le logiciel de l’économie « conventionnelle » est suranné : logiciel de la croissance, logiciel du tout marché, logiciel techno-optimiste : non ce n’est pas dans la croissance pour la croissance, dans le marché et dans le lucre qu’on trouvera le salut de tous nos maux. Cette crise en est le plus spectaculaire contre-exemple.

    Il faut donc réhabiliter l’économie soutenable comme organisation sociale qui se donne les moyens de répondre aux besoins sociaux tout en prenant soin de ses patrimoines, écologique, social, démocratique.

    Faire toute sa place aux « corps intermédiaires »

    Les différentes crises révèlent aussi les faiblesses de nos pratiques de la démocratie. En se privant des expertises et des expériences sociotechniques et politiques des acteurs de terrains, des réseaux, des corps intermédiaires, l’État finit par produire des politiques publiques hors sol ou à rebours des urgences. Les associations écologistes alertent depuis de nombreuses années sur l’urgence climatique ; les acteurs du médico-social ne cessent d’exprimer, et bien avant le Covid-19, le manque de moyens pour faire un vrai travail de soin et de care ; les acteurs de la recherche et de la médiation scientifique en lien étroit avec l’économie sociale et solidaire contribuent à éclairer le débat et à redonner à la science sa juste place dans la société : celle qui permet le maintien d’un esprit critique ; les acteurs de proximité de l’économie sociale et solidaire, alertent depuis longtemps sur la fracture sociale (et numérique) à l’origine du mouvement des Gilets Jaunes.

    L’expertise, le regard et l’avis de tous ces corps intermédiaires, constitués de citoyens organisés et structurés, devront être pris en compte dans les choix de politiques publiques de demain.

    Démocratiser et relocaliser l’économie

    Par-dessus tout, il faut démocratiser les économies : ouvrir des espaces de délibération sur l’identification des activités essentielles, sur le pilotage des politiques publiques, en particulier locales ou sur l’impact environnemental et social des entreprises. Il faut repenser la hiérarchie des priorités économiques. Cette idée n’est pas nouvelle : au Québec, dès 1997 un collectif de l’éducation populaire, le « Collectif pour un Québec sans pauvreté » propose au ministre des Finances de l’époque l’élaboration d’un « produit intérieur doux » : il s’agissait, par la délibération démocratique, de trier les activités utiles socialement des activités nuisibles pour les sociétés. Il s’agissait aussi d’appeler à identifier des activités contributrices au bien-être social et qui étaient ignorées des comptes. De nouvelles initiatives vont dans ce sens aujourd’hui et réclament des délibérations collectives pour définir l’utilité sociale des activités.

    La démocratie ne doit plus non plus rester aux portes de l’entreprise. Il est temps de valoriser les gouvernements d’entreprise qui s’appuient sur un véritable équilibre des pouvoirs, qui rénovent les pratiques managériales et qui réinterrogent le sens du travail humain. L’expérience d’une partie des coopératives, des SCIC, CAE etc., qui sont autant de démarches coopératives et de fabriques sociales démocratiques, permet de construire les capacités socio-économiques locales dont les territoires et leurs écosystèmes ont besoin.

    La relocalisation de la production ne doit pas être synonyme de repli sur soi. L’impératif coopératif et solidaire implique un soutien massif porté, notamment, aux systèmes de santé des pays du Sud. Grands perdants de la mondialisation ils seront les plus durement touchés, à terme, par cette crise sanitaire, comme ils le sont et le seront par la crise écologique. Face aux tentations identitaires et autoritaires, ces valeurs et pratiques de solidarité internationale sont une urgence.

    Les activités du care

    Les activités de service de care et de soin, d’intérêt général ne doivent plus être mises entre les mains du marché. Il n’est pas besoin d’épiloguer, la fuite en avant du tout marché pour les activités sociales montre toutes ses failles. Il faut appeler à des partenariats durables État, collectivités locales et territoriales et ESS pour la création et le financement d’un service public du grand âge et de la perte d’autonomie : il doit être financé publiquement et géré par des organismes publics ou à but non lucratif. Il doit permettre une revalorisation structurelle des métiers dont la crise a montré de manière éclatante toute la nécessité, alors qu’ils sont souvent les moins bien considérés et les moins bien rémunérés.

    Coopérer et être solidaire

    Il faut appeler à une coopération et une solidarité plutôt qu’une concurrence et une compétitivité qui loin d’amener le bien-être s’avèrent mortifères. La crise écologique rend d’autant plus urgente et nécessaire la remise en cause de ce modèle. Les initiatives types pôles territoriaux de coopération économiques (PTCE) devront être consolidées, étendues, enrichies. Lorsqu’ils jouent vraiment la carte de la coopération, ils deviennent de véritables projets d’avenir. Ils pourront s’appuyer sur les initiatives solidaires et les communs qui s’expérimentent en continu partout sur les territoires. Les monnaies locales complémentaires pourront aussi en être un vecteur innovant, un repère utile pour orienter production et consommation vers des biens et services soutenables.

    Bien sûr il faut faire tout cela sans angélisme. Si l’économie sociale et solidaire est souvent exemplaire, elle n’est pas toujours exempte de critiques. Des financements, devenus scandaleusement exsangues, ont conduit certains acteurs à l’oubli du projet associatif, à la soumission volontaire à la concurrence, à l’acceptation de la précarisation de l’emploi. Tout cela a parfois pris le pas sur l’affirmation du projet politique et sur la coopération et la solidarité.

    C’est la raison pour laquelle il faut en appeler à des coopérations avec l’État, les collectivités locales et les entreprises locales reconnaissant véritablement les fondements et pratiques de l’économie sociale et solidaire. L’ESS doit aussi se mobiliser, avec d’autres forces sociales, pour éviter un retour au vieux monde et impulser sur une large échelle les dynamiques et les initiatives dont elle est porteuse. La mobilisation doit s’opposer au détricotage de la protection sociale, des solidarités locales, des droits démocratiques. En bref. Elle doit être un appel à prendre soin et développer les communs sociaux des territoires.

    Les crises qui ne manqueront pas d’arriver rendent cette mobilisation impérative.

    Les réseaux, acteurs, personnes signataires du présent texte sont conscients de l’immensité de la tâche, et sont convaincus que seule une coopération de tous les acteurs permettra d’infléchir le mouvement, et d’obtenir des décisions utiles à tous les niveaux politiques, institutionnels et sociaux nécessaires.

    Ils s’emploient à en concrétiser les engagements au sein de leurs réseaux par leurs initiatives respectives.

    https://chairess.org/tribune-covid-19-limperatif-cooperatif-et-solidaire
    #recherche #le_monde_d'après #solidarité #ESS #philanthropie #redistribution #alternative #business_as_usual #démocratie #économie #croissance #économie_soutenable #corps_intermédiaires #expertise #relocalisation #relocalisation_de_l'économie #éducation_populaire #produit_intérieur_doux #bien-être_social #utilité_sociale #care #soin #coopération #concurrence #compétitivité #monnaies_locales #communs #commons

  • La #désillusion d’une 3start-up de l’#économie_circulaire

    Annonce d’#arrêt_d’activité et bilan - #La_Boucle_Verte

    En ce début février 2020, nous avons fait le choix de cesser définitivement notre activité d’économie circulaire portant sur la collecte innovante d’emballages. Après plus de 3 ans, nous n’avons pas su rendre notre entreprise pérenne et surtout, nous avons perdu beaucoup d’intérêt pour notre projet.

    L’objet de cet article est de vous faire part des raisons de notre échec mais aussi de nos désillusions. Par ce retour d’expérience critique, nous souhaitons expliquer en quoi nous nous sommes trompés et éviter à de jeunes porteurs de projets de reproduire les mêmes erreurs que nous, tant sur le plan entrepreneurial qu’environnemental. Nous souhaitons également faire part au grand public des conclusions que nous avons tirées quant à la durabilité de notre modèle de société, notamment en ce qui concerne le recyclage et l’idée de croissance verte. Enfin, nous vous donnerons notre vision actualisée de ce que devrait être un avenir souhaitable et du changement de mentalité que cela implique pour y parvenir de bon cœur.
    1) La naissance du projet, son développement, sa mort

    L’aventure La Boucle Verte débute en Octobre 2016 à Toulouse. Tout juste diplômés d’une école de commerce, sensibilisés à l’entrepreneuriat et un peu rêveurs, nous voulions créer notre entreprise. Notre idée de départ pouvait se résumer ainsi :

    La croissance et la consommation sont les moteurs de notre économie. Cependant, les ressources de la planète sont limitées. « Et si on créait une entreprise capable de collecter tout objet, reste ou résidu pour le recycler, pour transformer tout déchet en une matière première qui a de la valeur. Une entreprise capable de réconcilier croissance économique et développement durable. »

    Ça y est, nous sommes gonflés à bloc, il nous reste maintenant à savoir par quel bout commencer. Un seul problème, nous n’avons ni argent, ni expérience, ni réseau, ni crédibilité. Il fallait commencer par quelque chose de très simple et cette bonne vieille canette métallique nous a séduit ! Soi-disant composée à 100% de métal et recyclable à l’infini, nous pensions pouvoir créer une logistique bien rodée afin de les collecter dans les fast-foods pour les revendre à des grossistes en métaux et qu’elles soient recyclées. Après avoir ruiné le coffre de la Seat Ibiza et s’être attiré les foudres des voisins pour avoir stocké les canettes dégoulinantes dans la cave de notre immeuble, il était temps d’apporter notre butin chez le ferrailleur grâce à la camionnette d’un ami. Une fois arrivés sur cette étrange planète boueuse et peuplée de centaines de carcasses de bagnoles, les canettes alu et acier préalablement triées sont pesées. Après s’être fait enregistrés, nous dégotons notre premier chèque. Et quel choc ! Il n’y avait pas d’erreur de zéro, nous avions bel et bien gagné 38€, même pas de quoi payer l’essence de ce mois de collecte et tout juste de quoi rentabiliser les sacs poubelles. A ce moment-là nous avons fait un grand pas dans notre compréhension du secteur du recyclage : la majorité des déchets ne valent pas le prix de l’effort qu’il faut faire pour les collecter, et, sans obligation réglementaire ou volonté de leur propriétaire de les trier, ces derniers n’ont aucune chance d’être recyclés.

    Pas question pour autant de baisser les bras, en tant que dignes start-upers very smart and very agile, nous devions simplement pivoter pour trouver notre business model et notre value proposition en disruptant le marché. OKAYYY !! Sinon en Français, il fallait trouver une nouvelle idée pour rentabiliser la collecte. Près de 5 mois s’écoulèrent pendant lesquels nous expérimentions tous types de solutions jusqu’à ce que le Can’ivor voie le jour : un collecteur de canettes mis gratuitement à disposition des fast-foods et qui sert de support publicitaire. Plus besoin de gagner des sous avec la vente des canettes, il suffisait de vendre de la pub sur le collecteur pour financer le service de collecte et dégager une marge. Une idée à première vue géniale que nous avons rapidement concrétisée en bricolant des bidons d’huile dans notre garage.

    Mais, après 6 mois de démarchage commercial à gogo, pas le moindre client pour nous acheter nos espaces publicitaires ! Sans doute n’étions-nous pas assez sexy pour les annonceurs, il fallait que ça ait plus de gueule et qu’on transforme l’image de la poubelle pour que le tri sélectif devienne un truc stylé et que la pub devienne responsable ! Notre ami Steve Jobs nous a enseigné que le design et le marketing étaient la clé pour pousser un nouveau produit sur un nouveau marché… Après avoir changé le look du Can’ivor, de logo, de slogan, de site internet, de plaquette commerciale, gagné quelques concours, chopé quelques articles, s’être payé les services de super graphistes, avoir créé toute une série de mots nouveaux, s’être familiarisés avec le jargon de la pub, avoir lancé la mode du « cool recycling », et réalisé une vidéo cumulant 3,3 millions de vues sur Facebook, nous commencions à peser dans le start-up game ! Et… les emplacements publicitaires se vendaient ! On parlait de nous dans les médias, nous passions sur BFM business, la success story voyait enfin le jour. Plus motivés que jamais, nous rêvions d’inonder la France avec nos collecteurs et faisions du repérage à Paris et Bordeaux…

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n306emV4JSU&feature=emb_logo

    Le problème, c’est que nos clients étaient en réalité plus intéressés par le fait de nous filer un coup de pouce et de s’associer à notre image écolo que par notre service d’affichage en lui-même. Une fois le buzz terminé, les ventes s’essoufflèrent… Après s’être débattus pendant plus d’un an à tout repenser, il fallait se rendre à l’évidence, il n’y avait pas de marché pour notre service. Et nous avons pris en pleine poire la seule leçon importante qu’il fallait retenir en cours d’entrepreneuriat : se focaliser sur le besoin client. A vouloir absolument trouver un modèle économique pour collecter nos canettes, nous avons complètement oublié que pour vendre quelque chose il faut répondre au besoin propre à un individu ou une entreprise et qu’un besoin « sociétal » comme l’écologie ne suffit pas.

    Fin 2019, nous avons fait le choix de retirer l’intégralité de nos collecteurs munis d’emplacements publicitaires pour jouer notre dernière carte, celle du service de collecte payant. En l’espace de 3 ans, les mentalités avaient bien changé, nous étions reconnus à Toulouse et avions l’espoir que ce modèle plus simple fonctionne. Nous nous sommes alors mis à proposer des services de collecte multi déchets à tous types de clients en centre-ville. Malheureusement, après 4 mois d’essai, nous en sommes revenus à l’un de nos premiers constats qui était que la majorité des structures étaient prêtes à payer pour un service de collecte que si elles en étaient contraintes par un marché réglementaire. Après tant de tentatives, nous étions à bout de force, démotivés et à cours de trésorerie. Mais surtout, nous avions perdu foi en ce que nous faisions, nous ne nous retrouvions plus dans nos envies de départ. Même si nous sommes parvenus à collecter des centaines de milliers de canettes, nous étions principalement devenus des vendeurs de publicité. Et ces deux mondes sont tellement antinomiques, que nous avons perdu intérêt dans le projet. Et le pire (ou le mieux) dans tout ça, c’est que nous avons également perdu confiance dans le secteur tout entier du recyclage et dans cette idée de croissance « verte ». La Boucle Verte mourut.
    2) Les réalités de la filière emballages et du recyclage

    Lorsque nous nous sommes lancés dans le projet, notre premier réflexe a été de nous renseigner sur les emballages de notre quotidien pour en apprendre plus sur leur prix, leur recyclabilité, leur taux de recyclage et l’accessibilité des filières de valorisation. A l’issue de cela, la canette nous paraissait être un emballage idéal. De nombreux sites internet lui attribuaient le mérite d’être l’emballage le plus léger qui soit entièrement recyclable et à l’infini. On pouvait lire qu’une canette triée redonnait naissance à une canette neuve en 60 jours et que cet emballage était bien recyclé en France (60% d’entre elles). Persuadés de participer à une œuvre écologique et de pouvoir encore améliorer ce taux de recyclage, nous avons foncé tête baissée pour collecter nos canettes ! Mais, la suite de nos aventures et notre longue immersion dans les coulisses du secteur nous a montré une vérité tout autre. Nous ne parlerons pas de mensonges organisés, mais disons que bon nombre d’informations que l’on trouve sur internet sont très superficielles, enjolivées et se passent d’explications approfondies concernant le devenir des déchets. La manière dont sont rédigés ces documents nous laisse penser que la filière est très aboutie et s’inscrit dans une logique parfaite d’économie circulaire mais en réalité, les auteurs de ces documents semblent se complaire dans l’atteinte d’objectifs écologiques médiocres. Et pour cause, ces documents sont en majorité rédigés par les acteurs économiques du secteur ou les géants du soda eux-mêmes qui n’ont pour autre but que de défendre leurs intérêts en faisant la promotion des emballages. La filière boisson préfère vendre son soda dans des emballages jetables (c’est bien plus rentable), la filière canette promeut son emballage comme étant le meilleur et la filière en charge de la collecte ne peut gagner sa croûte que si des emballages sont mis sur le marché : principe de l’éco-contribution. Il est cependant un peu facile de leur dresser un procès quand nous sommes nous-mêmes consommateurs de ces boissons, mais il est grand temps de réformer ce modèle qui ne peut pas conduire à une réduction de la production d’emballages.

    Pour revenir aux fameux documents, on peut lire qu’en France, « 60% des canettes aluminium sont recyclées ». L’idée qui vient à l’esprit de toute personne lisant ceci, est que ces 60% proviennent de la collecte sélective, mais en réalité pas du tout. Seulement 20% des canettes sont captées par le tri sélectif à la source, le reste se retrouve avec le « tout venant » et est enfoui ou incinéré. Les 40% recyclés restant ne proviennent donc pas des centres de tri mais des résidus de combustion des incinérateurs (les mâchefers) qui contiennent également des dizaines d’éléments différents mélangés et carbonisés dont des métaux lourds. De cette part ci, 45% de l’aluminium (qui a grandement perdu en qualité) est extrait et parvient à rejoindre la filière classique (les fonderies) tandis que les 55% restants sont irrécupérables et utilisés avec les autres résidus dans le BTP comme sous couche pour les routes. Par ruissellement, les particules polluantes de ces déchets se retrouvent ainsi dans les nappes phréatiques…

    En bref, voici grossièrement ce qui devrait être écrit sur ces documents : « En France, 38% des canettes sont recyclées comme matière première secondaire, 22% sont valorisées en sous-couche routière, et 40% sont directement enfouies en décharge ». C’est tout de suite moins sexy.

    D’autre part, quiconque a déjà visité un centre de tri (ce pourrait être intéressant à l’école), est en mesure de comprendre qu’il est impossible de séparer parfaitement les milliers de modèles d’emballages différents, de toutes tailles, qui sont souvent des assemblages (carton + plastique), qui sont souillés et qui défilent à toute vitesse sur les tapis roulants. Et puis il y’a les erreurs de tri, qui sont en réalité la norme car même après avoir baigné 3 ans dans le milieu, nous-mêmes avons parfois des doutes pour certains emballages peu courants… C’est dingue, mais absolument personne ne sait faire le tri parfaitement et ce sont souvent les gens les plus soucieux de l’environnement qui ont tendance à trop en mettre dans leur bac ! Sur 5 camions qui arrivent au centre de tri, 2 repartent en direction de l’incinérateur : il y’a 40% d’erreurs ! Et cette infime part de nos déchets, qui parvient à sortir en vie des centres de tri devient alors une précieuse ressource comme le voudrait l’économie circulaire ! Mais non, même pas. Lorsque ces emballages ne trouvent pas de repreneurs (notamment quand les asiatiques ne veulent plus de nos déchets), certains matériaux comme le carton voient leur valeur devenir négative ! Oui, il faut payer pour s’en débarrasser… Et ce n’est pas fini, après la collecte et le tri, il faut passer au recyclage !

    Fin mai 2019, nous avons été invités par la filière aluminium à une réunion de travail et une visite du plus grand site de recyclage français de Constellium dans le Haut-Rhin. Alors que nous étions persuadés que nos bonnes vieilles canettes redonneraient un jour vie à de nouvelles canettes, nous avons eu la stupéfaction d’apprendre par les ingénieurs qui y travaillaient que les balles d’aluminium provenant des centres de tri français étaient inexploitables. Leur qualité était médiocre et il était par conséquent impossible de les utiliser comme matière première car la fabrication de canettes utilise des technologies très pointues et ne peut s’opérer qu’à partir de métaux d’une grande pureté… C’était le comble ! Depuis le début, aucune de nos canettes n’avait redonné vie à d’autres canettes. Quand on sait que les emballages métalliques sont considérés parmi les plus durables et facilement recyclables, on n’ose même pas imaginer le devenir de nos bouteilles plastiques et encore moins de tous ces nouveaux emballages qui font désormais partie de « l’extension de la consigne de tri ». Et même dans un monde idéal, très connecté et intelligent comme le voudraient certains, une canette ne pourrait être recyclable à 100% puisqu’elle n’est pas 100% métallique. En effet, sa paroi extérieure est recouverte de vernis et sa paroi intérieure est couverte d’une fine couche de plastique qui évite que le liquide ne soit en contact avec le métal. De plus, à chaque fois qu’un métal est fondu, une portion de celui-ci disparaît, on appelle cela « la perte au feu ». Quelque que soit donc la performance de notre système de collecte et de tri, il sera impossible de continuer d’en produire pour les siècles des siècles sans continuer d’extraire de la bauxite en Amérique Latine. Vous l’avez compris, le recyclage ce n’est pas la panacée ! Il devrait n’intervenir qu’en dernier recours et non pour récupérer la matière d’objets n’ayant servis que quelques minutes.

    La conclusion que nous avons tiré de cette histoire est que ce secteur, en très lente évolution, ne répondra pas aux enjeux de la crise écologique et qu’il promeut malgré lui la production d’objets peu durables et donc le gaspillage de ressources. Comme se plaisent à le répéter bon nombre d’associations « le meilleur déchet est celui qu’on ne produit pas » et dans un monde idéal, le seul déchet que nous devrions produire est celui d’origine naturelle, celui qui peut retourner à la terre n’importe où pour l’enrichir. La vision de La Boucle Verte était de créer des modèles d’économie circulaire qui fonctionnent comme la nature, mais quelle arrogance ! Lorsqu’une feuille tombe d’un arbre, elle ne part pas en camion au centre de tri. Et lorsqu’un animal meurt dans un bois, il n’est pas incinéré. La vraie économie circulaire, ce n’est pas celle qui tente d’imiter la nature, c’est celle qui tente d’en faire partie.
    3) L’illusion de la croissance verte

    Mais ne soyons pas trop durs avec le secteur du tri et du recyclage à qui l’on demande l’impossible. Nos problèmes sont bien plus profonds, ils émanent principalement de notre culture et sont accentués par un système économique globalisé et débridé. Avançant peu à peu dans ce monde de start-ups à la recherche de croissance rapide, nous avons fini par ouvrir les yeux sur plusieurs points.

    Tout d’abord sur l’innovation, innovation au sens du progrès technique et des nouvelles technologies. Cette formidable capacité humaine à innover a trouvé son lieu de prédilection en entreprise là où tout « jeune cadre dynamique » ne jure que par elle. Cette innovation permet de trouver des solutions aux problèmes que l’entreprise essaye de résoudre, tout en permettant de gagner un avantage compétitif. Globalement, ce que cette recherche constante d’innovation a apporté, c’est une complexification extrême de notre société, rendant au passage le travail de nos dirigeants infernal. Et dans un même temps, ces innovations technologiques successives ont eu un autre effet néfaste, nous pousser à consommer.

    Par exemple, internet était censé nous emmener vers une économie dématérialisée, nous pensions réduire drastiquement notre consommation de papier en nous orientant vers le numérique. Pourtant, entre 2000 et 2020, notre consommation de papier est restée quasiment la même et à côté de cela, l’ère du numérique a créé une infinité de nouveaux besoins et de nouvelles pratiques générant des consommations faramineuses d’énergie, la création de milliards de terminaux composés de métaux rares, et la fabrication d’infrastructures climatisées pour héberger des serveurs. Et bien qu’à première vue immatériel, envoyer un email émet autant de CO2 que de laisser une ampoule allumée pendant 1h… De plus, bon nombre d’innovations parfaitement inutiles voire nuisibles ont vu le jour. C’est le cas du Bit Coin dont la consommation électrique annuelle dépasse celle de la Suisse. Ces innovations participent de plus en plus à aggraver les inégalités et quand on sait qu’un avatar de jeu vidéo consomme plus d’électricité qu’un Ethiopien, il n’y pas de quoi se réjouir. Bien sûr, tout n’est pas à jeter à la poubelle (sans faire le tri) et nous sommes tous contents d’aller chez le médecin du 21ème siècle.

    Ces constats nous amènent tout droit à l’idée de croissance et plus particulièrement de croissance verte, en laquelle nous avions cru, et qui est actuellement plébiscitée par la majorité des pays qui voudraient que l’innovation technologique soit un remède aux problèmes écologiques (eux même engendrés par l’innovation technologique). Bon nombre d’entreprises et de start-ups s’attaquent alors aux grands défis à base de Green Tech, de Green Finance et de Green Energy… Le problème, c’est que la logique fondamentale reste inchangée : complexifier le système, corriger inlassablement les dégâts causés par les innovations précédentes et se trouver une excuse pour continuer de consommer autant qu’avant voire plus ! Pire encore, ces initiatives ont même un effet inverse délétère dans la mesure où elles ralentissent la transition en laissant penser aux gens qu’un avenir durable sans concessions et sans modification de nos comportements est possible grâce à l’innovation. Et cela nous l’avons vécu ! Au cours de notre aventure, nous avons été très surpris de constater à quel point une partie de la population pouvait avoir confiance en notre projet. Nous savions que notre impact environnemental positif n’était que limité à côté du désastre en cours, mais quelques personnes nous considéraient comme la génération de « sauveurs » ou alors déculpabilisaient d’acheter une canette, puisqu’après tout elle serait parfaitement recyclée.

    Et puis allez, soyons fous, gardons espoir dans la croissance. De la même manière que certains déclarent la guerre pour rétablir la paix, nous pourrions accélérer, croître encore plus vite pour passer un cap technologique et rétablir le climat ? Qu’en est-il vraiment ?

    A en croire les chiffres et les études de nombreux scientifiques, depuis 50 ans, la croissance du PIB a été parfaitement couplée à la consommation d’énergie (notamment fossile).

    Cela peut se comprendre de manière assez simple : plus nous produisons d’énergie, plus nos industries et nos machines tournent, plus nous produisons de nouveaux produits, plus nous croissons. Si l’on en croit ce couplage et cette logique simple, quoi que nous fassions, nous serons contraints pour continuer à croitre, de consommer toujours plus d’énergie !

    Faisons un petit calcul : Nous sommes en 2020 et nous partons du principe que nous consommons 100 unités d’énergie et que la consommation d’énergie continue d’être parfaitement couplée à la croissance du PIB. Si nous voulons 2% de croissance par an, quelle sera notre consommation d’énergie dans 50 ans ? Et dans 1000 ans ?

    Dans 50 ans : 100 x 1,02^50 = 269 unités

    Dans 1000 ans : 100 x 1,02^1000 = 39 826 465 165 unités

    Aussi incroyable que cela puisse paraitre, en 50 ans, on multiplierait notre consommation d’énergie par 2,69 et en 1000 ans par presque 400 millions ! Le problème de la croissance en math, c’est qu’elle suit une courbe exponentielle. Que nous fassions donc que 0,5% de croissance par an, que ce couplage finisse par se découpler un peu ou pas, que nous soyons 1 milliard sur terre ou 10 milliards, la croissance perpétuelle restera toujours insoutenable à long terme, alors pourquoi la continuer un an de plus ?

    Et là certains nous dirons : « C’est faux, on peut croitre sans consommer grâce à l’économie de la connaissance » ; « On peut produire de l’énergie qui ne pollue pas grâce aux énergie renouvelables ». Mais en fait non ! Nous sommes en 2020, et malgré une économie tertiarisée depuis longtemps, nous n’avons toujours pas perçu de découplage entre croissance du PIB et consommation d’énergie. Comme nous l’avons décrit à propos de l’ère du numérique, un service en apparence immatériel cache toujours une consommation d’une ressource matérielle. L’économie de la connaissance aura forcément besoin de supports physiques (ordinateurs, serveurs etc…) et nous serons toujours incapable de recycler tout parfaitement et sans pertes s’il ne s’agit pas de matière organique.

    Et pour ce qui est des énergies renouvelables, aucune à ce jour, n’est complètement satisfaisante sur le plan environnemental. Les éoliennes sont des monstres d’acier, sont composées de terres rares et produisent de l’énergies seulement quand il y’a du vent. Stocker l’énergie de ces épisodes venteux pour la restituer plus tard n’est pas viable à grande échelle ou pas performant (batteries au Lithium, barrages réversibles). Les panneaux photovoltaïques ont un mauvais bilan environnemental (faible recyclabilité et durée de vie). Il n’y a pas de région montagneuse partout sur la planète pour fabriquer des barrages hydroélectriques et ces derniers perturbent la faune aquatique et la circulation des sédiments… Cette incapacité à produire et stocker de l’énergie proprement rend donc notre fameuse voiture électrique aussi nuisible que la voiture thermique. Sa seule différence est qu’elle pollue de manière délocalisée : là où est produite l’électricité qui la fait rouler. Que cela soit clair, dans un monde limité où PIB et consommations de ressources sont liées, nous devrons décroître, de gré ou de force.

    Et même si cela était possible, et que nous devenions des humains augmentés, bourrés d’intelligence artificielle, capables de créer une sorte de nouvel écosystème technologique stable permettant d’assouvir notre besoin insatiable de croissance en colonisant d’autres planètes… Ne rigolez pas, pour certains ce n’est pas de la science-fiction ! Le milliardaire Elon Musk, véritable gourou des Startups, se penche déjà sur la question… Mais avons-nous vraiment envie de cela ?

    Alors après tout, est-ce que la croissance est indispensable ? Dans le modèle économique que nous avons créé, il semblerait… que oui ! (Sinon, le chômage augmente et on perd en qualité de vie). Et pourtant dans la vraie vie, quand une population est stable, il ne devrait pas y avoir besoin de voir ses revenus augmenter en permanence pour continuer de vivre de la même manière et que chacun ait sa place dans la société. En fait, il ne s’agit que d’un modèle économique, d’une convention humaine et en aucun cas de quelque chose d’immuable. Jusqu’à présent, on ne s’en plaignait pas parce qu’il y avait probablement plus d’avantages que d’inconvénients à croître, mais maintenant nous avons atteint les limites alors il faut changer de modèle, c’est aussi simple que ça ! Nous ne devrions pas pleurer comme un enfant qui apprend qu’il va déménager, le changement ça ne fait que du bien et quand on repense au passé on se dit parfois : comment ai-je pu accepter cela !?

    4) Une décroissance choisie et non subie

    Bon, on ne va non plus cracher sur l’ancien monde et revenir au Moyen Age. Cette croissance a permis des trucs plutôt cools il faut le dire : globalement il y’a plus d’obèses mais nous vivons en meilleure santé, il y’a moins d’esclaves et plus d’égalité homme femme, il y’a moins d’analphabètes et plus d’accès à la culture… Mais les faits sont là et comme le préconise le GIEC, nous devons en gros diviser par 3 notre consommation d’ici 2050. Du coup ça reviendrait à peu près au même que d’avoir le train de vie qu’avaient nos grands-parents quand ils étaient jeunes.

    Mais après tout, ne pourrait-on pas garder certaines bonnes choses et supprimer les moins bonnes. Et comment définir les bonnes et les moins bonnes ? Au lieu de faire notre sélection sur des critères économiques, on pourrait privilégier des axes assez simples comme l’intérêt pour la société et l’impact sur l’environnement.

    Alalala vous le sentez venir le débat infernal ! Déjà que les choses ne bougent pas vite mais alors là, avec un système où on doit débattre de tout ce qu’il faut garder et supprimer on n’est pas sortis de l’auberge ! Il y’aura toujours une bonne raison de justifier un produit polluant par sa dimension sociale ou culturelle et d’ici qu’on se soit mis d’accord, Français fous que nous sommes, il sera trop tard.

    A vrai dire, pour parvenir à nos objectifs dans la joie et la bonne humeur, tout se résume en quelques mots : il faut simplement changer de culture, changer d’idéal de vie, réaliser qu’acheter un nouvel Iphone ou des écouteurs sans fils n’est absolument pas nécessaire pour être heureux, se convaincre que la valeur d’une personne n’est pas définie par son salaire ou son job. En gros il faut tuer l’américain qui sommeille en nous et réveiller le poète. Et le mieux dans tout ça, c’est qu’on finit par y prendre gout. On se désintoxique de ce monde consumériste et on apprend à créer de nouveaux plaisirs, de nouvelles tendances ! La mode c’est vraiment quelque chose de rigolo, il suffit que des gens connus s’y mettent pour qu’on veuille tous s’y mettre comme des moutons. Si tous les chanteurs et joueurs de foot se trimbalaient avec des fringues de chez Emaus et des Nokia 3310, on vous garantit qu’on ferait cette transition écologique en moonwalk (mais en marche avant) ! D’accord, là on s’emballe un peu mais c’est pourtant bien la réalité. Une des seules craintes de l’être humain est de ne pas être accepté par la communauté. C’est encore difficile pour la majorité d’entre nous de s’imaginer vivre comme des « partisans de la décroissance » mais plus de gens s’y mettront, plus les autres suivront. Et pour ça, il suffit de changer de disque ! Certaines personnes arrivent à changer de religion, il y’a 400 ans, les rois portaient des perruques sur la tête et encore aujourd’hui sur cette planète, il y’a des tribus de gens avec des plumes plantées dans le derrière qui chassent à la sarbacane. Est-ce si absurde que ça de décroître ? Nous les Homos Sapiens (Hommes Sages parait-il) sommes très malins mais aussi très bêtes, parfois rationnel, parfois pas du tout. Nous sommes capables de nous empêtrer dans une situation pendant des siècles pour finalement en changer brusquement. Alors, dans cette dernière partie, on ne va pas vous bassiner avec des conseils éco-responsables bidons du type : « pensez à débrancher votre frigo quand vous partez en vacances pour économiser 10% d’énergie ». En fait, si la transition écologique doit se passer comme ça, elle va être chiante à mourir et en plus de ça on va échouer ! Alors oui, il faut drastiquement réduire notre consommation et aller acheter des carottes bio en vélo le samedi matin ne suffira pas. Il faut arrêter de prendre la voiture tous les jours, ne plus prendre l’avion et arrêter d’acheter des engins téléguidés au petit Mathéo pour son anniversaire. Mais honnêtement, est-ce vraiment grave !? La transition écologique ne doit pas être une punition mais une fête, elle doit être une volonté commune de changer de vie, un départ en vacances prolongé et bien mérité. Nous ne sommes pas des machines ! Il faut que la génération du « burn out » se transforme en génération du « go out ». Il faut qu’on arrête de bosser toute la semaine en ne pensant qu’au shopping qu’on va faire le weekend, il faut qu’on arrête de vouloir gagner la super cagnotte de 130 millions d’€ du vendredi 13, il faut qu’on arrête de s’entasser dans des métros tous les matins pour finalement avoir besoin de partir faire un break en Thaïlande pour déconnecter. Nous ne prenons même pas le temps d’apprécier la beauté de la nature au pied de notre porte alors pourquoi irions-nous faire un safari en Afrique ? Mais d’ailleurs, apprécions-nous réellement ces voyages quand nous passons les ¾ de notre temps derrière l’écran de notre appareil photo, que nous sommes regroupés avec d’autres occidentaux aussi inintéressants que nous et que nous continuons d’acheter du CocaCola à l’autre bout du monde ? Pour une fois, peut être que regarder un reportage animalier depuis notre canapé nous aurait fait plus rêver que de voir ces lions domestiqués se gratter contre la roue de notre 4x4 !

    Alors pour commencer, répartissons-nous sur le territoire, retournons vivre dans les villages au lieu de s’agglutiner en ville et redevenons des paysans, ce sera bien plus dépaysant ! Ces changements, ils sont déjà en train de se produire et tout va aller de plus en plus vite ! Il y’a 6 ans, pleins de potes de l’école rêvaient de devenir trader, parce que c’était un métier stylé où on gagne plein d’oseille. Mais aujourd’hui c’est devenu carrément la honte et les gens stylés sont des artisans, des artistes ou des agriculteurs. Et ça tombe bien parce que ce nouveau monde sera nécessairement un monde agricole. Pas avec des grosses moissonneuses batteuses, mais avec des milliers de petites mains qui travaillent la terre, qui produisent de la vraie nourriture, qui comprennent la nature, qui vivent de petites récoltes mieux valorisées et en circuits courts.

    Les entreprises aussi auront un rôle à jouer, mais en innovant pour simplifier la société et non pour la complexifier, en relocalisant les productions au plus près de consommateurs moins voraces, en préférant les produits durables à l’obsolescence programmée, en favorisant le réemploi plutôt que le recyclage, et en préférant les bonnes vieilles astuces de grand-mères aux artifices technologiques.

    Alors bien sûr, on se trouvera toujours des excuses pour passer à l’acte : « Je vais d’abord travailler dans le marketing à Paris histoire de mettre un peu d’argent de côté et que mes parents ne m’aient pas payé cette école pour rien », « Avec mon mari, on va attendre que la petite Lucie passe en CM2, il ne faudrait pas que ça la perturbe ». « Mais ! Comment vais-je trouver un travail à la campagne, je n’ai pas la formation qu’il faut ? ». Des excuses on s’en trouvera toujours et nous les premiers avons eu vraiment du mal à s’avouer vaincus et à lâcher La Boucle Verte. C’est difficile de construire quelque chose pendant longtemps, de dépenser beaucoup d’énergie pour finalement devoir repartir à zéro. Et pourtant c’est bel et bien ce que nous devons faire collectivement et dès maintenant. Bien que tragique, cette crise du Coronavirus est une chance inouïe, c’est une aubaine. Elle aura cassé notre lente routine destructrice, elle nous aura libéré de la consommation excessive, nous aura fait ralentir et vivre une récession. Alors saisissons cette chance et ne reprenons pas tout comme avant le 11 mai.

    Un grand merci à tous ceux qui nous ont soutenu et ont participé à l’aventure La Boucle Verte. Nous souhaitons beaucoup de succès à nos compères toulousains Les Alchimistes Occiterra et En boîte le plat qui de par leurs projets sont respectivement dans une logique de valorisation naturelle des biodéchets et de réduction des emballages à la source. Pour ce qui nous concerne, nous allons profiter de cette période pour prendre un peu de repos à la campagne. Et quand nous reviendrons, il est fort probable que ce soit à base de low tech ou d’agriculture. On essaiera de vous donner des nouvelles sur les réseaux sociaux La Boucle Verte et de vous partager des articles qui nous inspirent !

    Bonne santé et bon courage à tous pour affronter cette crise.

    L’équipe La Boucle Verte

    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/la-d%C3%A9sillusion-dune-start-up-de-l%C3%A9conomie-circulaire-charles-dau
    #économie #croissance_verte #emballages #recyclage #entrepreneuriat #start-up_nation #développement_durable #croissance_économique #canettes #aluminium #alu #ferrailleur #déchets #publicité #marketing #cool_recycling #buzz #besoin #écologie #tri #Constellium #perte_au_feu

  • Tiens, les militants de l’économie sortent leur tribune dans Libération.
    On peut déconfiner pépouze, disent-ils, les températures vont augmenter à l’approche de l’été et perturber la propagation du virus. CQFD.

    https://www.liberation.fr/debats/2020/04/24/coronavirus-et-climat-tirer-les-lecons-du-cas-francais_1786267

    Une implication politique de ces résultats est qu’il est plus probable qu’on ne le croit généralement que les mesures de confinement dans l’hémisphère Nord puissent être assouplies avec succès et de plus en plus à l’approche de l’été.

    #covid19 #Croissance #militant_de_l'économie

  • Outbreaks like coronavirus start in and spread from the edges of cities

    Emerging infectious disease has much to do with how and where we live. The ongoing coronavirus is an example of the close relationships between urban development and new or re-emerging infectious diseases.

    Like the SARS pandemic of 2003, the connections between accelerated urbanization, more far-reaching and faster means of transportation, and less distance between urban life and non-human nature due to continued growth at the city’s outskirts — and subsequent trans-species infection — became immediately apparent.

    The new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, first crossed the animal-human divide at a market in Wuhan, one of the largest Chinese cities and a major transportation node with national and international connections. The sprawling megacity has since been the stage for the largest quarantine in human history, and its periphery has seen the pop-up construction of two hospitals to deal with infected patients.

    When the outbreak is halted and travel bans lifted, we still need to understand the conditions under which new infectious diseases emerge and spread through urbanization.
    No longer local

    Infectious disease outbreaks are global events. Increasingly, health and disease tend to be urban as they coincide with prolific urban growth and urban ways of life. The increased emergence of infectious diseases is to be expected.

    SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) hit global cities like Beijing, Hong Kong, Toronto and Singapore hard in 2003. COVID-19, the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, goes beyond select global financial centres and lays bare a global production and consumption network that sprawls across urban regions on several continents.

    To study the spread of disease today, we have to look beyond airports to the European automobile and parts industry that has taken root in central China; Chinese financed belt-and-road infrastructure across Asia, Europe and Africa; and in regional transportation hubs like Wuhan.

    While the current COVID-19 outbreak exposes China’s multiple economic connectivities, this phenomenon is not unique to that country. The recent outbreak of Ebola in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, for example, shone a light on the myriad strategic, economic and demographic relations of that country.
    New trade connections

    In January 2020, four workers were infected with SARS-CoV-2 during a training session at car parts company Webasto headquartered near Munich, revealing a connection with the company’s Chinese production site in Wuhan.

    The training was provided by a colleague from the Chinese branch of the firm who didn’t know she was infected. At the time of the training session in Bavaria, she did not feel sick and only fell ill on her flight back to Wuhan.

    First one, then three more colleagues who had participated in the training event in Germany, showed symptoms and soon were confirmed to have contracted the virus and infected other colleagues and family members.

    Eventually, Webasto and other German producers stopped fabrication in China temporarily, the German airline Lufthansa, like other airlines, cancelled all flights to that country and 110 individuals who had been contact traced to have been in touch with the four infected patients in Bavaria were advised by health officials to observe “domestic isolation” or “home quarantine.”

    This outbreak will likely be stopped. Until then, it will continue to cause human suffering and even death, and economic damage. The disease may further contribute to the unravelling of civility as the disease has been pinned to certain places or people. But when it’s over, the next such outbreak is waiting in the wings.
    Disease movements

    We need to understand the landscapes of emerging extended urbanization better if we want to predict, avoid and react to emerging disease outbreaks more efficiently.

    First, we need to grasp where disease outbreaks occur and how they relate to the physical, spatial, economic, social and ecological changes brought on by urbanization. Second, we need to learn more about how the newly emerging urban landscapes can themselves play a role in stemming potential outbreaks.

    Rapid urbanization enables the spread of infectious disease, with peripheral sites being particularly susceptible to disease vectors like mosquitoes or ticks and diseases that jump the animal-to-human species boundary.

    Our research identifies three dimensions of the relationships between extended urbanization and infectious disease that need better understanding: population change and mobility, infrastructure and governance.
    Travel and transport

    Population change and mobility are immediately connected. The coronavirus travelled from the periphery of Wuhan — where 1.6 million cars were produced last year — to a distant Bavarian suburb specializing in certain auto parts.

    Quarantined megacities and cruise ships demonstrate what happens when our globalized urban lives come grinding to a halt.

    Infrastructure is central: diseases can spread rapidly between cities through infrastructures of globalization such as global air travel networks. Airports are often located at the edges of urban areas, raising complex governance and jurisdictional issues with regards to who has responsibility to control disease outbreaks in large urban regions.

    We can also assume that disease outbreaks reinforce existing inequalities in access to and benefits from mobility infrastructures. These imbalances also influence the reactions to an outbreak. Disconnections that are revealed as rapid urban growth is not accompanied by the appropriate development of social and technical infrastructures add to the picture.

    Lastly, SARS-CoV-2 has exposed both the shortcomings and potential opportunities of governance at different levels. While it is awe-inspiring to see entire megacities quarantined, it is unlikely that such drastic measures would be accepted in countries not governed by centralized authoritarian leadership. But even in China, multilevel governance proved to be breaking down as local, regional and central government (and party) units were not sufficiently co-ordinated at the beginning of the crisis.

    This mirrored the intergovernmental confusion in Canada during SARS. As we enter another wave of megaurbanization, urban regions will need to develop efficient and innovative methods of confronting emerging infectious disease without relying on drastic top-down state measures that can be globally disruptive and often counter-productive. This may be especially relevant in fighting racism and intercultural conflict.

    The massive increase of the global urban population over the past few decades has increased exposure to diseases and posed new challenges to the control of outbreaks. Urban researchers need to explore these new relationships between urbanization and infectious disease. This will require an interdisciplinary approach that includes geographers, public health scientists, sociologists and others to develop possible solutions to prevent and mitigate future disease outbreaks.

    https://theconversation.com/outbreaks-like-coronavirus-start-in-and-spread-from-the-edges-of-ci
    #villes #urban_matter #géographie_urbaine #covid-19 #coronavirus #ressources_pédagogiques

    ping @reka

    • The Urbanization of COVID-19

      Three prominent urban researchers with a focus on infectious diseases explain why political responses to the current coronavirus outbreak require an understanding of urban dynamics. Looking back at the last coronavirus pandemic, the SARS outbreak in 2002/3, they highlight what affected cities have learned from that experience for handling the ongoing crisis. Exploring the political challenges of the current state of exception in Canada, Germany, Singapore and elsewhere, Creighton Connolly, Harris Ali and Roger Keil shed light on the practices of urban solidarity as the key to overcoming the public health threat.

      Guests:

      Creighton Connolly is a Senior Lecturer in Development Studies and the Global South in the School of Geography, University of Lincoln, UK. He researches urban political ecology, urban-environmental governance and processes of urbanization and urban redevelopment in Southeast Asia, with a focus on Malaysia and Singapore. He is editor of ‘Post-Politics and Civil Society in Asian Cities’ (Routledge 2019), and has published in a range of leading urban studies and geography journals. Previously, he worked as a researcher in the Asian Urbanisms research cluster at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore.

      Harris Ali is a Professor of Sociology, York University in Toronto. He researches issues in environmental sociology, environmental health and disasters including the social and political dimensions of infectious disease outbreaks. He is currently conducting research on the role of community-based initiatives in the Ebola response in Africa.

      Roger Keil is a Professor at the Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University in Toronto. He researches global suburbanization, urban political ecology, cities and infectious disease, and regional governance. Keil is the author of “Suburban Planet” (Polity 2018) and editor of “Suburban Constellations” (Jovis 2013). A co-founder of the International Network for Urban Research and Action (INURA), he was the inaugural director of the CITY Institute at York University and former co-editor of the International Journal of Urban and Regional Research.

      Referenced Literature:

      Ali, S. Harris, and Roger Keil, eds. 2011. Networked disease: emerging infections in the global city. Vol. 44. John Wiley & Sons.

      Keil, Roger, Creighton Connolly, and Harris S. Ali. 2020. “Outbreaks like coronavirus start in and spread from the edges of cities.” The Conversation, February 17. Available online here: https://theconversation.com/outbreaks-like-coronavirus-start-in-and-spread-from-the-edges-of-ci

      https://urbanpolitical.podigee.io/16-covid19

    • Extended urbanisation and the spatialities of infectious disease: Demographic change, infrastructure and governance

      Emerging infectious disease has much to do with how and where we live. The recent COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak is an example of the close relationships between urban development and new or re-emerging infectious diseases. Like the SARS pandemic of 2003, the connections between accelerated urbanisation, more expansive and faster means of transportation, and increasing proximity between urban life and non-human nature — and subsequent trans-species infections — became immediately apparent.

      Our Urban Studies paper contributes to this emerging conversation. Infectious disease outbreaks are now global events. Increasingly, health and disease tend to be urban as they coincide with the proliferation of planetary urbanisation and urban ways of life. The increased emergence of infectious diseases is to be expected in an era of extended urbanisation.

      We posit that we need to understand the landscapes of emerging extended urbanisation better if we want to predict, avoid and react to emerging disease outbreaks more efficiently. First, we need to grasp where disease outbreaks occur and how they relate to the physical, spatial, economic, social and ecological changes brought on by urbanisation. Second, we need to learn more about how the newly emerging urban landscapes can themselves play a role in stemming potential outbreaks. Rapid urbanisation enables the spread of infectious disease, with peripheral sites being particularly susceptible to disease vectors like mosquitoes or ticks and diseases that jump the animal-to-human species boundary.

      Our research identifies three dimensions of the relationships between extended urbanisation and infectious disease that need better understanding: population change and mobility, infrastructure and governance. Population change and mobility are immediately connected. Population growth in cities - driven primarily by rural-urban migration - is a major factor influencing the spread of disease. This is seen most clearly in rapidly urbanising regions such as Africa and Asia, which have experienced recent outbreaks of Ebola and SARS, respectively.

      Infrastructure is also central: diseases can spread rapidly between cities through infrastructures of globalisation such as global air travel networks. Airports are often located at the edges of urban areas, raising complex governance and jurisdictional issues with regards to who has responsibility to control disease outbreaks in large urban regions. We can also assume that disease outbreaks reinforce existing inequalities in access to and benefits from mobility infrastructures. We therefore need to consider the disconnections that become apparent as rapid demographic and peri-urban growth is not accompanied by appropriate infrastructure development.

      Lastly, the COVID-19 outbreak has exposed both the shortcomings and potential opportunities of governance at different levels. While it is awe-inspiring to see entire megacities quarantined, it is unlikely that such drastic measures would be accepted in countries not governed by centralised authoritarian leadership. But even in China, multilevel governance proved to be breaking down as local, regional and central government (and party) units were not sufficiently co-ordinated at the beginning of the crisis. This mirrored the intergovernmental confusion in Canada during SARS.

      As we enter another wave of megaurbanisation, urban regions will need to develop efficient and innovative methods of confronting emerging infectious disease without relying on drastic top-down state measures that can be globally disruptive and often ineffective. This urges upon urban researchers to seek new and better explanations for the relationships of extended urbanisation and the spatialities of infectious disease - an effort that will require an interdisciplinary approach including geographers, health scientists, sociologists.

      https://www.urbanstudiesonline.com/resources/resource/extended-urbanisation-and-the-spatialities-of-infectious-disease
      #géographie_de_la_santé #maladies_infectieuses

    • Cities after coronavirus: how Covid-19 could radically alter urban life

      Pandemics have always shaped cities – and from increased surveillance to ‘de-densification’ to new community activism, Covid-19 is doing it already.

      Victoria Embankment, which runs for a mile and a quarter along the River Thames, is many people’s idea of quintessential London. Some of the earliest postcards sent in Britain depicted its broad promenades and resplendent gardens. The Metropolitan Board of Works, which oversaw its construction, hailed it as an “appropriate, and appropriately civilised, cityscape for a prosperous commercial society”.

      But the embankment, now hardwired into our urban consciousness, is entirely the product of pandemic. Without a series of devastating global cholera outbreaks in the 19th century – including one in London in the early 1850s that claimed more than 10,000 lives – the need for a new, modern sewerage system may never have been identified. Joseph Bazalgette’s remarkable feat of civil engineering, which was designed to carry waste water safely downriver and away from drinking supplies, would never have materialised.

      From the Athens plague in 430BC, which drove profound changes in the city’s laws and identity, to the Black Death in the Middle Ages, which transformed the balance of class power in European societies, to the recent spate of Ebola epidemics across sub-Saharan Africa that illuminated the growing interconnectedness of today’s hyper-globalised cities, public health crises rarely fail to leave their mark on a metropolis.
      Coronavirus: the week explained - sign up for our email newsletter
      Read more

      As the world continues to fight the rapid spread of coronavirus, confining many people to their homes and radically altering the way we move through, work in and think about our cities, some are wondering which of these adjustments will endure beyond the end of the pandemic, and what life might look like on the other side.

      One of the most pressing questions that urban planners will face is the apparent tension between densification – the push towards cities becoming more concentrated, which is seen as essential to improving environmental sustainability – and disaggregation, the separating out of populations, which is one of the key tools currently being used to hold back infection transmission.

      “At the moment we are reducing density everywhere we can, and for good reason,” observes Richard Sennett, a professor of urban studies at MIT and senior adviser to the UN on its climate change and cities programme. “But on the whole density is a good thing: denser cities are more energy efficient. So I think in the long term there is going to be a conflict between the competing demands of public health and the climate.”

      Sennett believes that in the future there will be a renewed focus on finding design solutions for individual buildings and wider neighbourhoods that enable people to socialise without being packed “sardine-like” into compressed restaurants, bars and clubs – although, given the incredibly high cost of land in big cities like New York and Hong Kong, success here may depend on significant economic reforms as well.

      In recent years, although cities in the global south are continuing to grow as a result of inward rural migration, northern cities are trending in the opposite direction, with more affluent residents taking advantage of remote working capabilities and moving to smaller towns and countryside settlements offering cheaper property and a higher quality of life.

      The “declining cost of distance”, as Karen Harris, the managing director of Bain consultancy’s Macro Trends Group, calls it, is likely to accelerate as a result of the coronavirus crisis. More companies are establishing systems that enable staff to work from home, and more workers are getting accustomed to it. “These are habits that are likely to persist,” Harris says.

      The implications for big cities are immense. If proximity to one’s job is no longer a significant factor in deciding where to live, for example, then the appeal of the suburbs wanes; we could be heading towards a world in which existing city centres and far-flung “new villages” rise in prominence, while traditional commuter belts fade away.

      Another potential impact of coronavirus may be an intensification of digital infrastructure in our cities. South Korea, one of the countries worst-affected by the disease, has also posted some of the lowest mortality rates, an achievement that can be traced in part to a series of technological innovations – including, controversially, the mapping and publication of infected patients’ movements.

      In China, authorities have enlisted the help of tech firms such as Alibaba and Tencent to track the spread of Covid-19 and are using “big data” analysis to anticipate where transmission clusters will emerge next. If one of the government takeaways from coronavirus is that “smart cities” including Songdo or Shenzhen are safer cities from a public health perspective, then we can expect greater efforts to digitally capture and record our behaviour in urban areas – and fiercer debates over the power such surveillance hands to corporations and states.

      Indeed, the spectre of creeping authoritarianism – as emergency disaster measures become normalised, or even permanent – should be at the forefront of our minds, says Sennett. “If you go back through history and look at the regulations brought in to control cities at times of crisis, from the French revolution to 9/11 in the US, many of them took years or even centuries to unravel,” he says.

      At a time of heightened ethnonationalism on the global stage, in which rightwing populists have assumed elected office in many countries from Brazil to the US, Hungary and India, one consequence of coronavirus could be an entrenchment of exclusionary political narratives, calling for new borders to be placed around urban communities – overseen by leaders who have the legal and technological capacity, and the political will, to build them.

      In the past, after a widespread medical emergency, Jewish communities and other socially stigmatised groups such as those affected by leprosy have borne the brunt of public anger. References to the “China virus” by Donald Trump suggest such grim scapegoating is likely to be a feature of this pandemic’s aftermath as well.

      On the ground, however, the story of coronavirus in many global cities has so far been very different. After decades of increasing atomisation, particularly among younger urban residents for whom the impossible cost of housing has made life both precarious and transient, the sudden proliferation of mutual aid groups – designed to provide community support for the most vulnerable during isolation – has brought neighbours together across age groups and demographic divides. Social distancing has, ironically, drawn some of us closer than ever before. Whether such groups survive beyond the end of coronavirus to have a meaningful impact on our urban future depends, in part, on what sort of political lessons we learn from the crisis.

      The vulnerability of many fellow city dwellers – not just because of a temporary medical emergency but as an ongoing lived reality – has been thrown into sharp relief, from elderly people lacking sufficient social care to the low-paid and self-employed who have no financial buffer to fall back on, but upon whose work we all rely.

      A stronger sense of society as a collective whole, rather than an agglomeration of fragmented individuals, could lead to a long-term increase in public demands for more interventionist measures to protect citizens – a development that governments may find harder to resist given their readiness in the midst of coronavirus to override the primacy of markets.

      Private hospitals are already facing pressure to open up their beds without extra charge for those in need; in Los Angeles, homeless citizens have seized vacant homes, drawing support from some lawmakers. Will these kinds of sentiments dwindle with the passing of coronavirus, or will political support for urban policies that put community interests ahead of corporate ones – like a greater imposition of rent controls – endure?

      We don’t yet know the answer, but in the new and unpredictable connections swiftly being forged within our cities as a result of the pandemic, there is perhaps some cause for optimism. “You can’t ‘unknow’ people,” observes Harris, “and usually that’s a good thing.” Sennett thinks we are potentially seeing a fundamental shift in urban social relations. “City residents are becoming aware of desires that they didn’t realise they had before,” he says, “which is for more human contact, for links to people who are unlike themselves.” Whether that change in the nature of city living proves to be as lasting as Bazalgette’s sewer-pipe embankment remains, for now, to be seen.

      https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/26/life-after-coronavirus-pandemic-change-world
      #le_monde_d'après

    • Listening to the city in a global pandemic

      What’s the role of ‘academic experts’ in the debate about COVID-19 and cites, and how can we separate our expert role from our personal experience of being locked down in our cities and homes?

      This is a question we’ve certainly been struggling with at City Road, and we think it’s a question that a lot of academics are struggling with at the moment. Perhaps it’s a good time to listen to the experiences of academics as their cities change around them, rather than ask them to speak at us about their urban expertise. With this in mind, we asked academics from all over the world to open up the voice recorder on their phones and record a two minute report from the field about their city.

      Over 25 academics from all over the world responded. As you will hear, some of their recordings are not great quality, but their stories certainly are. Many of those who responded to our call are struggling , just like us, to make sense of their experience in the COVID-19 city.

      https://cityroadpod.org/2020/03/29/listening-to-the-city-in-a-global-pandemic

    • Ce que les épidémies nous disent sur la #mondialisation

      Bien que la première épidémie connue par une trace écrite n’ait eu lieu qu’en 430 avant J.-C. à Athènes, on dit souvent que les microbes, et les épidémies auxquels ils donnent lieu, sont aussi vieux que le monde. Mais le Monde est-il aussi vieux qu’on veutbien le dire ? Voici une des questions auxquelles l’étude des épidémies avec les sciences sociales permet d’apporter des éléments de réponse. Les épidémies ne sont pas réservées aux épidémiologistes et autres immunologistes. De grands géographes comme Peter Haggett ou Andrew Cliff ont déjà investi ce domaine, dans une optique focalisée sur les processus de diffusion spatiale. Il est possible d’aller au-delà de cette approche mécanique et d’appréhender les épidémies dans leurs interactions sociales. On verra ici qu’elles nous apprennent aussi beaucoup sur le Monde, sur l’organisation de l’espace mondial et sur la dimension sociétale du processus de mondialisation.

      http://cafe-geo.net/wp-content/uploads/epidemies-mondialisation.pdf
      #épidémie #globalisation

    • Città ai tempi del Covid

      Lo spazio pubblico urbano è uno spazio di relazioni, segnato dai corpi, dagli incontri, dalla casualità, da un ordine spontaneo che non può, se lo spazio è pubblico veramente, accettare altro che regole di buon senso e non di imposizione. È un palcoscenico per le vite di tutti noi, che le vogliamo in mostra o in disparte, protagonisti o comparse della commedia urbana e, come nella commedia, con un fondo di finzione ed un ombra di verità.
      Ma cosa accade se gli attori abbandonano la scena, se i corpi sono negati allo spazio? Come percepiamo quel che rimane a noi frequentabile di strade e piazze che normalmente percorriamo?

      Ho invitato gli studenti che negli anni hanno frequentato il seminario “Fotografia come strumento di indagine urbana”, ma non solo loro, ad inviarmi qualche immagine che documenta (e riflette su) spazio pubblico, città e loro stessi in questi giorni. Come qualcuno mi ha scritto sono immagini spesso letteralmente ‘rubate’, quasi sentendosi in colpa. Eppure documentare e riflettere è un’attività tanto più essenziale quanto la criticità si prolunga e tocca la vita di tutti noi.

      Appunti di viaggio – Iacopo Zetti Ho avuto modo, per una serie di evenienze, di attraversare Firenze di mattina e di sera. Aspettavo il silenzio ed infatti l’ho ascoltato. Il silenzio non è quello dei luoghi extraurbani. ...
      Inferriata – Eni Nurihana L’inferriata de balcone ricorda sempre di più le sbarre carcerarie 23 marzo 2020, 15:11
      Situazioni di necessità – Chiara Zavattaro Le strade della zona di Sant’Ambrogio a Firenze
      Ora d’aria – Antonella Zola Ho avuto la possibilità di scattare queste foto dopo 10 giorni di quarantena completa, in cui ho rinunciato a qualunque contatto con il mondo esterno. Alla fine sono dovuta uscire ...
      Firenze – Agnese Turchi Firenze - Agnese Turchi
      Nostalgia di Silenzi – Gabriele Pierini
      Il recinto – Laura Panichi In un libro che ho letto in questo periodo di “reclusione”, Haruki Murakami dice che quando si prova ad uscire da una gabbia alla fine si finisce sempre per trovarci ...
      Spazio solidale – Jacopo Lorenzini
      Castagneto Carducci – Cristian Farina Chissà se dall’alto qualcuno si è accorto che ci siamo fermati solo per un attimo Da lontano si scorgano i monumenti fermi nel tempo, quasi come noi, fermi nello spazio
      Firenze, mercoledì 18/03/20 ore 15.30 circa – Leonardo Ceccarelli Firenze, mercoledì 18/03/20 ore 15.30 circa - Leonardo Ceccarelli
      Firenze, marzo 2020 – Giulia D’Ercole Firenze, marzo 2020 - Giulia D’Ercole
      Feriale d’altri tempi – Dario Albamonte La mia fortuna è quella di vivere in campagna e di potermi muovere liberamente e avere molto spazio a disposizione senza varcare i confini di casa mia. Quello che mi ...
      L’architettura è fatta di mattoni e PERSONE – Laura Pagnotelli L’architettura è fatta di mattoni e PERSONE. Esse sono il fine ultimo del costruire, del dare vita a spazi sempre nuovi. Senza la loro presenza, dell’architettura non resta che una scatola vuota, priva ...
      Il traffico di Firenze – Veronica Capecchi Il Traffico di Firenze, oggi è scomparso, e lascia intravedere la città, profondamente diversa e silenziosa. Una città che è sempre viva, oggi priva della sua vitalità, dei suoi rumori, una ...
      Dalla finestra – Lucio Fiorentino Ho sentito dei rumori nella strada sotto la mia finestra e ho immaginato l’atmosfera scura di un film di Bergman, (goffamente) ho cercato di riprodurla Nel palazzo di fronte alla mia ...
      Livorno, 28 marzo – Giulia Bandini Luoghi affollati di ricordi vie trafficate di emozioni ormai vinte dal tempo ma vive nella mente di chi sa sperare forte
      Sesto Fiorentino: la piana senza smog – Alice Giordano Sesto Fiorentino: la piana senza smog - Alice Giordano
      Lari e Pontedera – Silvia Princi Ritorno alle origini – Perignano di Lari (Pi), 23 marzo 2020 La semina del trattore, rappresenta uno dei pochi segni di vitalità umana e meccanica,in questo periodo di quarantena e di ...
      A distanza sociale nel parco: Zurigo – Philipp Klaus A distanza sociale nel parco: Zurigo - Philipp Klaus
      Galleggiare in un mondo irreale – Alessio Prandin

      http://controgeografie.net/controgeografie/citta-ai-tempi-del-covid

    • Coronavirus Was Slow to Spread to Rural America. Not Anymore.

      Grace Rhodes was getting worried last month as she watched the coronavirus tear through New York and Chicago. But her 8,000-person hometown in Southern Illinois still had no reported cases, and her boss at her pharmacy job assured her: “It’ll never get here.”

      Now it has. A new wave of coronavirus cases is spreading deep into rural corners of the country where people once hoped their communities might be shielded because of their isolation from hard-hit urban centers and the natural social distancing of life in the countryside.

      The coronavirus has officially reached more than two-thirds of the country’s rural counties, with one in 10 reporting at least one death. Doctors and elected officials are warning that a late-arriving wave of illness could overwhelm rural communities that are older, poorer and sicker than much of the country, and already dangerously short on medical help.

      “Everybody never really thought it would get to us,” said Ms. Rhodes, 18, who is studying to become a nurse. “A lot of people are in denial.”

      With 42 states now urging people to stay at home, the last holdouts are the Republican governors of North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa and Arkansas. Gov. Kristi Noem of South Dakota has suggested that the stricter measures violated personal liberties, and she said her state’s rural character made it better positioned to handle the outbreak.

      “South Dakota is not New York City,” Ms. Noem said at a news conference last week.

      But many rural doctors, leaders and health experts worry that is exactly where their communities are heading, and that they will have fewer hospital beds, ventilators and nurses to handle the onslaught.

      “We’re behind the curve in rural America,” said Senator Jon Tester, Democrat of Montana, who said his state needs hundreds of thousands of masks, visors and gowns. “If they don’t have the protective equipment and somebody goes down and gets sick, that could close the hospital.”

      Rural nurses and doctors, scarce in normal times, are already calling out sick and being quarantined. Clinics are scrambling to find couriers who can speed their coronavirus tests to labs hundreds of miles away. The loss of 120 rural hospitals over the past decade has left many towns defenseless, and more hospitals are closing even as the pandemic spreads.

      Coronavirus illnesses and deaths are still overwhelmingly concentrated in cities and suburbs, and new rural cases have not exploded at the same rate as in some cities. But they are growing fast. This week, the case rate in rural areas was more than double what it was six days earlier.

      Deaths are being reported in small farming and manufacturing towns that barely had a confirmed case a week ago. Fourteen infections have been reported in the county encompassing Ms. Rhodes’s southern Illinois hometown of Murphysboro, and she recently quarantined with her parents, who are nurses, as a precaution after they got sick.

      Rich ski towns like Sun Valley, Idaho, and Vail, Colo., have some of the highest infection rates in the country, and are discouraging visitors and second homeowners from seeking refuge in the mountains. Indian reservations, which grapple daily with high poverty and inadequate medical services, are now confronting soaring numbers of cases.

      In some places, the virus has rushed in so suddenly that even leaders are falling ill. In the tiny county of Early in southwest Georgia, five people have died. And the mayor and the police chief of the county seat, Blakely, are among the county’s 92 confirmed cases. It has been a shock for the rural county of fewer than 11,000 people.

      “Being from a small town, you think it’s not going to touch us,” Blakely’s assistant police chief, Tonya Tinsley, said. “We are so small and tucked away. You have a perception that it’s in bigger cities.”

      That is all gone now.

      “You say, wait a minute, I know them!” she said. “It’s, like, oh my God, I knew them. I used to talk to them. I knew their family. Their kids. It’s a blow to the community each time.”

      Even a single local case has been enough to jolt some people out of the complacency of the earliest days of the virus, when President Trump spent weeks playing down the threat and many conservative leaders brushed it aside as politically driven hysteria.

      In Letcher County, Ky., which got its first case on Sunday, waiting for the disease to arrive has been unnerving. Brian Bowan, 48, likes the daily briefings by Gov. Andy Beshear, a Democrat, and he is glad for the governor’s relatively early actions to close nonessential businesses. Without them, Mr. Bowan said, “we could have a really bad pandemic. We could be like California or New York.”

      In Mississippi, a mostly rural state, the virus had spread to nearly every county by April, with more than 1,000 cases and nearly two dozen deaths reported, causing health care workers to wonder, nervously, when the governor would issue a stay-at-home order. Last week, he finally did, and doctors at the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson breathed a sigh of relief.

      “There was this chatter today at the medical center, people saying ‘Oh thank goodness — we need this to get people to realize how serious this is,’ ” said Dr. LouAnn Woodward, the hospital’s top executive.

      While Americans are still divided on whether they approve of how Mr. Trump has handled the crisis, the virus is uniting nearly everyone in the country with worry — urban and rural, liberal and conservative. More than 90 percent of Americans said the virus posed a threat to the country’s economy and public health, according to a Pew Research Center poll conducted from March 19 to March 24.

      “Some of the petty things that would be in the news and on social media before have sort of fallen away,” said David Graybeal, a Methodist pastor in Athens, Tenn. “There’s a sense that we are really in this together. Now it’s, ‘How can we pull through this and support one another in this social distancing?’ ”

      In Mangum, Okla., a town of 6,000 in the western part of the state, it all started with a visit. A pastor from Tulsa appeared at a local church, but got sick shortly thereafter and became the state’s first Covid-19 fatality.

      Then somebody at the local church started to feel unwell — a person who eventually tested positive for coronavirus.

      “Then it was just a matter of time,” said Mangum’s mayor, Mary Jane Scott. Before realizing they were infected, several people who eventually tested positive for the virus had moved about widely through the city, including to the local nursing home, which now has a cluster of cases.

      Over all in the town, there are now three deaths and 26 residents who have tested positive for the coronavirus — one of the highest infection rates in rural America.

      “You’d think in rural Oklahoma, that we all live so far apart, but there’s one place where people congregate, and that’s at the nursing home,” she said. “I thought I was safe here in Southwest Oklahoma, I didn’t think there would be a big issue with it, and all of a sudden, bam.”

      Mangum now has an emergency shelter-in-place order and a curfew — just like larger towns and cities around the United States.

      Just as New Yorkers have gotten accustomed to Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s daily televised briefings, residents of Mangum have turned to the mayor’s Facebook page, where she livecasts status updates and advisories. On Monday night, it was the recommendation that residents use curbside pickup when going to Walmart, a broadcast that garnered more than 1,000 views in the hour after she posted it.

      “Since we have no newspaper, it’s the only way I know to get the word out,” she told viewers, after inviting them to contact her personally with any questions or concerns.

      She also has encouraged residents to step out onto their lawns each night at 7 p.m. where she leads them in a chorus of “God Bless America.”

      The virus has complicated huge swaths of rural life. Darvin Bentlage, a Missouri rancher, says he is having trouble selling his cattle because auctions have been canceled. In areas without reliable internet access, adults are struggling to work remotely and children are having to get assignments and school updates delivered to their door.

      Rural health providers are also challenged. A clinic in Stockton, Kan., turned to a local veterinarian for a supply of masks and gowns. One rural hospital in Lexington, Neb., was recently down to its last 500 swabs. Another in Batesville, Ind., was having its staff members store their used masks in plastic baggies in case they had to sterilize and reuse them. In Georgia, a peanut manufacturer in Blakely donated a washer and dryer to the local hospital for its handmade masks and gowns.

      The financial strain of gearing up to fight the coronavirus has put much pressure on cash-strapped rural hospitals. Many have canceled all non-emergency care like the colonoscopies, minor surgeries and physical therapy sessions that are a critical source of income.

      Last month, one hospital in West Virginia and another in Kansas shut their doors altogether.

      “It’s just absolutely crazy,” said Michael Caputo, a state delegate in Fairmont, W.Va., where the Fairmont Regional Medical Center, the only hospital in the county, closed in mid-March. “Across the country, they’re turning hotels and sports complexes into temporary hospitals. And here we’ve got a hospital where the doors are shut.”

      For now, there is an ambulance posted outside the emergency room, in case sick people show up looking for help.

      Michael Angelucci, a state delegate and the administrator of the Marion County Rescue Squad, said the hospital’s closure during the pandemic is already being felt.

      On March 23, emergency medics were called to take an 88-year-old woman with the coronavirus to the hospital, Mr. Angelucci said. Instead of making a quick drive to Fairmont Regional, about two minutes away, Mr. Angelucci said that the medics had to drive to the next-nearest hospital, about 25 minutes away. A few days later, she became West Virginia’s first reported coronavirus death.

      https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/04/08/us/coronavirus-rural-america-cases.html?action=click&module=Top%20Stories&pgty
      #cartographie #visualisation

    • Coronavirus in the city: A Q&A on the catastrophe confronting the urban poor

      ‘While all populations are affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, not all populations are affected equally.’

      Health systems in the world’s megacities and crowded urban settlements are about to be put under enormous strain as the new coronavirus takes hold, with the estimated 1.2 billion people who live in informal slums and shanty-towns at particular risk.

      To understand more about the crisis confronting the urban poor, The New Humanitarian interviewed Robert Muggah, principal of The SecDev Group and co-founder of the Igarapé Institute, a think tank focused on urban innovation that has worked with the World Health Organisation to map pandemic threats and is supporting governments, businesses, and civil society groups to improve COVID-19 detection, response, and recovery.

      What has so far been a public healthcare crisis in mostly wealthier cities in East Asia, Europe, and the United States appears likely to become an even graver disaster for countries with far less resources in Latin America, Africa, and South Asia.

      Cities from Lagos to Mumbai to Rio de Janeiro have started locking down, but for residents of crowded slums the unenviable choice is often between a greater risk of catching and spreading disease or the certainty of hunger. Social distancing, self-isolation – handwashing even – are impossible luxuries.

      This interview, conducted by email on 29-30 March, has been edited for length and clarity.
      TNH: A lot has been made about the risks of coronavirus in crowded refugee and displacement camps – from Greece to Idlib. Do you feel the urban poor have been a little neglected?

      Robert Muggah: While all populations are affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, not all populations are affected equally. Lower-income households and elderly individuals with underlying health conditions are particularly at-risk. Among the most vulnerable categories are the homeless, migrants, refugees, and displaced people. In some US cities, for example, undocumented migrants are fearful of being tested or going to the hospital for fear of forcible detainment, separation from their families, and deportation. In densely populated informal settlements and displaced person camps, there is a higher likelihood of infection because of the difficulties of social distancing. The limited testing, detection, isolation, and hospitalisation capacities in these settings mean we can expect a much higher rate of direct and excess mortality. The implications are deeply worrying.

      The COVID-19 pandemic is a totalising event – affecting virtually every country, city and neighbourhood on the planet. It is also laying open the social and economic fault lines in our urban spaces. Predictably, many governments, businesses, and societies are looking inward, seeking to shore up their own health capacities and provide for their populations through aid and assistance. Yet the virus is revealing the extent of economic and social inequalities within many countries, including among OECD members. In the process, it is exposing the deficiencies of the social contract and the ways in which certain people – especially the elderly, poor, homeless, displaced – are systematically at-risk. While media attention is growing, there is comparatively limited investment in protecting refugees and displaced people facing infectious disease outbreaks. As public awareness of the sheer scale of infection, hospitalisation, and case fatalities becomes clearer in lower- and middle-income settings, we can expect this to change; at which point it may be too late.
      TNH: Can you give us a sense of the scale of the problem in the world’s megacities and slums, where social distancing and self-isolation are a fantasy for many?

      Muggah: According to the UN, there are about 33 megacities with 10 million or more people. There are another 48 cities with between five and 10 million. Compare this to the 1950s when there were just three megacities. Most of these massive cities are located in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Many of them are characterised by a concentrated metropolitan core and a sprawling periphery of informal settlements, including shanty-towns, slums, and favelas. Roughly 1.2 billion people live in densely packed informal settlements characterised by poor quality housing, limited basic services, and poor sanitation. While suffering from stigmas, these settlements tend to be a critical supply of labour for cities, an unsatisfactory answer to the crisis in housing availability and affordability. A challenge now facing large cities is that, owing to years of neglect, informal settlements are essentially “off the grid”, and as such, difficult to monitor and service.

      There are many reasons why large densely populated slums are hotbeds for the COVID-19 pandemic and other infectious disease outbreaks. In many cases, there are multiple households crammed into tiny tenements making social distancing virtually impossible. In Dharavi, Mumbai’s largest slum, there are 850,000 people per square mile. Most inhabitants of informal settlements lack access to medical and health services, making it difficult to track cases and isolate people who are infected. A majority of the people living in these areas depend on the services and informal economies, including jobs, that are most vulnerable to termination when cities are shut down and the economy begins to slow. Strictly enforced isolation won’t just lead to diminished quality of life, it will result in starvation. A large proportion of residents also frequently suffer from chronic illnesses – including respiratory infections, cancer, diabetes, and obesity – increasing susceptibility to COVID-19. These comorbidities will contribute to soaring excess deaths.

      All of these challenges are compounded by the systemic neglect and stigmatisation of these communities by the political and economic elite. Violence has already erupted in Ethiopia, Kenya, India, Liberia, and South Africa as police enforce quarantines. In Brazil, drug trafficking organisations and militia groups are enforcing social distancing and self isolation in lieu of the state authorities. In Australia, Europe, and the United States, racist and xenophobic incidents spiked against people of Asian descent. There is a real risk that governments ramp up hardline tactics and repression against marginalised populations, especially those living in lower-income communities, shanty-towns, and refugee and displaced person camps.
      TNH: How seriously were international aid agencies and other humanitarian actors taking calls to scale up urban preparedness and response before this pandemic, and to what extent is COVID-19 a wake-up call?

      Muggah: The global humanitarian aid sector was aware of the threat of a global pandemic. For more than a decade the WHO, several university and research centres, and organisations such as the CDC, the Wellcome Trust, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation have publicly warned about the catastrophic risks of pandemic outbreaks. The international community experienced a series of jolting wake-up calls with SARS, H1N1, Ebola, and other major epidemics over the past 20 years, though these were typically confined to specific regions and were generally rapidly contained. Although fears of potential outbreaks emerging from China were widely acknowledged, the sheer speed and scale of COVID-19 seems to have caught most governments, and the aid community, by surprise.

      With notable exceptions such as Singapore or Taiwan, there has not been major investment in preparing cities for dealing with pandemics, however. Most attention has been focused on national capacities, and less on the specific capabilities of urban governments, health and social safety-net services. Together with Georgetown University’s Center for Health Sciences and Security, the Igarape Institute highlighted the importance of networks of mayors to share information and strategies in 2018. This call was highlighted by the Global Parliament of Mayors in 2018 and 2019. Starting in March 2020, the Bloomberg Foundation established a mayors network focusing on pandemic preparedness in the US. The Mayors Migration Council, World Economic Forum, and UN-Habitat are also looking to ramp up assistance to cities. What is also needed are systems to support mayors, city managers, and health providers in lower- and middle-income countries.
      TNH: Part of the problem is that cities are unfamiliar territory for humanitarian responders, with many new actors to deal with, from local governments to gangs. What relationships and skill sets do they need to cultivate?

      Muggah: Well before the COVID-19 pandemic, many humanitarian agencies were already refocusing some of their operations toward urban settings. International organisations such as the International Committee of the Red Cross, Médecins Sans Frontières, and Oxfam set up policies and procedures for engaging in cities. There is a growing recognition across the relief and development sectors of the influence and impacts of urbanisation on their operations and beneficiary populations. This is more radical than it sounds. For at least half a century, most aid work was predominantly rural-focused. This was not surprising since most people in developing countries lived in rural or semi-rural areas. This has changed dramatically, however, with more than half of the world’s population now living in cities. Over the next 30 years, roughly 90 percent of all urbanisation will be occurring in lower- and middle-income countries – predominantly in Africa and Asia. The aid community only started to recognise these trends relatively recently.

      Working in urban settings requires changes in how many international and national aid agencies operate. For one, it often depends less on direct than indirect delivery, working in partnership with municipal service providers. It also requires less visible branding and marketing strategies, shoring up the legitimacy of public and non-governmental providers with less focus on the contribution of relief agencies. In some cases, aid agencies are also required to work with, or alongside, non-state providers, including armed groups. For example, in some Brazilian, Colombian, and Mexican cities organised crime and self-defence groups are engaged in social service provision, raising complex questions for aid providers about whether and how to support vulnerable communities. Similar challenges confronted aid agencies working to provide relief in Ebola-stricken villages in eastern DRC.

      A diverse range of skill sets is required to navigate support to cities affected by epidemics, including COVID-19. Some cities may need accounting assistance and expertise in budgeting to help them rapidly procure essential services. Other cities may require epidemiological and engineering capabilities to help develop rapid detection and surveillance, as well as “surge” capacity including emergency hospitals, clinics, and treatment centres. A robust communications and public outreach strategy is essential, particularly since uncertainty can contribute to social unease and even disorder. Moreover, rapid resource injections to help cities provide safety nets to the most vulnerable populations are critical, particularly as existing resources will be redirected to shoring up critical infrastructure and recurrent expenses will be difficult to cover owing to reduced tax revenue.

      TNH: Name three things aid agencies need to do quickly to get to grips with this?

      Muggah: There are a vast array of priorities for aid agencies in the context of pandemics. At a minimum, they must rapidly coordinate with public, private, and non-governmental partners to ensure they are effectively contributing rather than creating redundancy or unintentionally undermining local responses. Humanitarian organisations must also act rapidly, especially in the face of an exponential crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Agencies cannot let perfection be the enemy of the good, and focus on delivering with speed and efficiency, albeit while being mindful of the coordination challenges above. Aid agencies must also be attentive to the health, safety, and wellbeing of their own personnel and partners – they must avoid at all costs becoming a burden to hospital systems that are already overwhelmed by the crisis.

      The first thing aid agencies can do is reach out to frontline cities and assess basic needs and their organizational potential to contribute. A range of priorities are likely, including the importance of ensuring there are adequate tests kits and testing capacities, sufficient trained health professionals, medical supplies (including ICU and ventilation capacities), and related equipment for frontline workers. Providing supplementary capacity as needed is essential. Consider that in South Sudan there are believed to be just two ventilators, and in Liberia there are reportedly only three. Other critical priorities are ensuring the integrity of the local food supply and attention to critical infrastructure. This may involve deploying a surveillance system for monitoring critical supplies, providing supplementary cash and food assistance without disrupting local prices, and ensuring a capability to rapidly address distribution disruption as they arise. Aid agencies can also help leverage resources to settings that are neglected, helping mobilise funds and/or in-kind support for over-taxed public services.
      TNH: Cities like Singapore and Taipei, Hangzhou in China – to an extent Seoul – have had some success in containing COVID-19. What can other cities learn from their approaches?

      Muggah: Cities that are open, transparent, collaborative, and adopt comprehensive responses tend to be better equipped to manage infectious disease outbreaks than those that are not. While still too early to declare a success, the early response of South Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan to the COVID-19 pandemic stands out. Both Taipei and Singapore applied the lessons from past pandemics and had the investigative capacities, testing and detection services, health systems and, importantly, the right kind of leadership in place to rapidly take decisive action. They were able to flatten the pandemic curve through early detection thus keeping their health systems from becoming rapidly overwhelmed.

      Not surprisingly, cities that have robust governance and health infrastructure in place are in a better position to manage pandemics and lower case fatality rates (CFR) and excess mortality than those that do not. Adopting a combination of proactive surveillance, routine communication, rapid isolation, and personal and community protection (e.g. social distancing) measures is critical. Many of these very same measures were adopted by the Chinese city of Hangzhou within days of the discovery of the virus. Likewise, the number, quality, and accessibility (and surge capacity) of hospitals, internal care units, hospital beds, IV solution and respirators can determine whether a city effectively manages a pandemic, or not. The SecDev Group is exploring the development of an urban pandemic preparedness index to help assess health capacities as well as social and economic determinants of health. A digital tool that provides rapid insights on vulnerabilities will be key not just to planning for the current pandemic, but also the next one.
      TNH: You’ve spoken in the past about the need to develop a pandemic preparedness index. INFORM has one and Georgetown Uni has a health security assessment tool. Are these useful? What is missing?

      Muggah: The extent of a city’s preparedness depends on its capacity to prevent, detect, respond, and care for patients. This means having action plans, staff, and budgets in place for rapid response. It also requires having access to laboratories to test for infectious disease and real-time monitoring and reporting of infectious clusters as they occur. The ability to communicate and implement emergency response plans is also essential, as is the availability, quality and accessibility of hospitals, clinics, care facilities, and essential equipment.

      To this end, the Center for Global Health Science and Security at Georgetown University has created an evaluation tool – the Rapid Urban Health Security Assessment (RUHSA) – as a resource for assessing local-level public health preparedness and response capacities. The RUHSA draws from multiple guidance and evaluation tools. It was designed precisely to help city decision-makers prioritise, strengthen, and deploy strategies that promote urban health security. These kinds of platforms need to be scaled, and quickly.

      There is widespread recognition that a preparedness index would be useful. In November of 2019, the Global Parliament of Mayors issued a call for such a platform. It called for funding from national governments to develop crucial public health capacities and to develop networks to disseminate trusted information. The mayors also committed to achieving at least 80 percent vaccination coverage, reducing the spread of misinformation, improving health literacy, and sharing information on how to prevent and reduce the spread of infectious disease. A recent article published with Rebecca Katz provides some insights into what this might look like.
      TNH: All cities are not equal in this. Without a global rundown, do you have particular concerns for certain places – because they are transmission hubs that might be hit worse, or due to existing insecurity and instability?

      Cities are vulnerable both to the direct and indirect effects of COVID-19. For example, cities with a higher proportion of elderly and inter-generational mingling are especially at risk of higher infection, hospitalisation, and case fatality rates. This explains why the pandemic has been so destructive in certain Italian, Spanish, and certain US cities in Florida and New York where there is a higher proportion of elderly and frequent travel and interaction between older and younger populations. By contrast, early detection, prevention, and containment measures such as those undertaken in Japanese, South Korean, and Taiwanese cities helped flatten the curve. Yet even when health services have been overwhelmed in wealthier cities, they tend to have more capable governments and more extensive safety nets and supply chains to lessen the secondary effects on the economy and market.

      Many cities in Africa, South and Southeast Asia, and Latin America are facing much greater direct and indirect threats from the COVID-19 pandemic than their counterparts in North America, Western Europe, or East Asia. Among the most at-risk are large and secondary cities in fragile and conflict-affected countries such as Afghanistan, Colombia, DRC, Iraq, Myanmar, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, Syria, and Venezuela. There, health surveillance and treatment capacities are already overburdened and under-resourced. While the populations tend to be younger, many are facing households that are already under- or malnourished and the danger of comorbidity is significant. Consider the case of Uganda, which has one ICU bed for every one million people (compared to the United States, which has one ICU bed for every 2,800 people). Specific categories of people – especially those living in protracted refugee or internal displacement camps – are among the most vulnerable. There are also major risks in large densely populated cities and slums such as Lagos, Dhaka, Jakarta, Karachi, Kolkata, Manila, Nairobi, or Rio de Janeiro where the secondary effects, including price shocks and repressive police responses, as well as explosive protests from jails, could lead to social and political unrest.
      TNH: The coronavirus itself is the immediate risk, but what greater risks do you see coming down the track for poorer people in urban settings?

      Muggah: The most significant threat of the COVID-19 pandemic may not be from the mortality and morbidity from infections, but the political and economic fallout from the crisis. While not as infectious or lethal as other diseases, the virus is obviously devastating for population health. It is not just people dying from respiratory illnesses and organ failures linked to the virus, but also the excess deaths from people who are unable to access treatment and care for existing diseases. We can expect several times more excess deaths than the actual caseload of people killed by the coronavirus itself. The lost economic productivity from these premature deaths and the associated toll on health systems and care-givers will be immense.

      “The most significant threat of the COVID-19 pandemic may not be from the mortality and morbidity from infections, but the political and economic fallout from the crisis.”

      COVID-19 is affecting urban populations in different ways and at different speeds. The most hard-hit groups are the urban poor, undocumented migrants, and displaced people who lack basic protections such as regular income or healthcare. Many of these people are already living in public or informal housing in under-serviced neighbourhoods experiencing concentrated disadvantage. The middle class will also experience severe impacts as the service economy grinds to a halt, schools and other services are shuttered, and mobility is constrained. Wealthier residents can more easily self-isolate either in cities or outside of them, and usually have greater access to private health alternatives. But all populations will face vulnerabilities if critical infrastructure – including health, electricity, water, and sanitation services – start to fail. Cut-backs in service provision will generate first discomfort and then outright protest.

      Most dangerous of all is the impact of COVID-19 on political and economic stability. The pandemic is generating both supply and demand shocks that are devastating for producers, retailers, and consumers. Wealthier governments will step in to enact quantitative easing and basic income where they can, but many will lack the resources to do so. As income declines and supply chains dry up, panic, unrest, and instability are real possibilities. The extent of these risks depend on how long the pandemic endures and when vaccinations or effective antivirals are developed and distributed. Governments are reluctant to tell their populations about the likely duration, not just because of uncertainties, but because the truth could provoke civil disturbance. These risks are compounded by the fact that many societies already exhibit a low level of trust and confidence in their governments.

      https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/interview/2020/04/01/coronavirus-cities-urban-poor

    • Les enjeux économiques de la #résilience_urbaine

      La notion de #résilience pour qualifier la capacité d’une ville à affronter un #choc, y compris économique, n’est pas nouvelle, mais elle revêt, en pleine crise du coronavirus, une dimension toute particulière.

      Les villes, en tant que #systèmes_urbains, ont toujours été au cœur des bouleversements que les sociétés ont connus. Pour autant, les fondements du paradigme économique qui gouverne les villes sont restés les mêmes. L’essor des capacités productives exportatrices et l’accroissement des valeurs ajoutées guident encore l’action locale en matière d’#économie.
      Corollaire d’un monde globalisé qui atteint ses limites, la crise sanitaire ébranle ces fondamentaux et en demande une révision profonde. Ainsi, au cœur de la crise, les ambitions de #relocalisation_industrielle, de #souveraineté_économique, d’#autonomie_alimentaire semblent avoir remplacé (au moins temporairement) celles liées à la #croissance et à la #compétitivité.

      https://www.pug.fr/produit/1798/9782706148668/les-enjeux-economiques-de-la-resilience-urbaine
      #livre #Magali_Talandier

    • #Eurasian_Geography_and_Economics is publishing a series of critical commentaries on the covid-19 pandemic, with some urban dimensions.

      These will be collated in issue 61(4) of the journal but will appear online first.

      The first two are currently OA on the journal webpage at: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rege20/current?nav=tocList

      Xiaoling Chen (2020) Spaces of care and resistance in China: public engagement during the COVID-19 outbreak, Eurasian Geography and Economics, DOI: 10.1080/15387216.2020.1762690

      As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to unfold, the approach of the Chinese government remains under the spotlight, obscuring the complex landscape of responses to the outbreak within the country. Drawing upon the author’s social media experiences as well as textual analysis of a wide range of sources, this paper explores how the Chinese public responded to the outbreak in complex and nuanced ways through social media. The findings challenge conventional views of Chinese social media as simply sites of self-censorship and surveillance. On the contrary, during the COVID-19 outbreak, social media became spaces of active public engagement, in which Chinese citizens expressed care and solidarity, engaged in claim-making and resistance, and negotiated with authorities. This paper situates this public engagement within a broader context of China’s health-care reforms, calling attention to persistent structural and political issues, as well as the precarious positionalities of health-care workers within the health system.

      Xuefei Ren (2020) Pandemic and lockdown: a territorial approach to COVID-19 in China, Italy and the United States, Eurasian Geography and Economics, DOI: 10.1080/15387216.2020.1762103

      Three months into the Covid-19 crisis, lockdown has become a global response to the pandemic. Why have so many countries resorted to lockdown? How is it being implemented in different places? Why have some places had more success with lockdowns and others not? What does the effectiveness of lockdowns tell us about the local institutions entrusted with enforcing them? This paper compares how lockdown orders have been implemented in China, Italy, and the U.S. The analysis points to two major factors that have shaped the enforcement: tensions between national and local governments, and the strength of local territorial institutions.

    • Pourquoi Bergame ? Le virus au bout du territoire

      La région de #Bergame en Italie a été l’un des foyers les plus actifs du coronavirus en Europe. Marco Cremaschi remet en cause les lectures opposant de manière dualiste villes et campagnes et souligne la nécessité de repenser la gouvernance de ces territoires d’entre-deux.

      L’urbanisme a de longue date et durablement été influencé par les épidémies. Depuis le Moyen Âge, la peste et le choléra ont contribué à sédimenter un ensemble de critiques dirigées contre la densité et la promiscuité caractéristiques du mode de vie urbain. Particulièrement prégnante aux débuts de la recherche urbaine au XIXe siècle, sous l’influence du mouvement hygiéniste (Barles 1999), cette hypothèse anti-urbaine a régulièrement refait surface au gré des crises sanitaires. C’est ainsi presque naturellement qu’elle a été réactivée en lien avec la diffusion mondiale du Covid-19, y compris au cœur des sciences sociales.

      Selon certains géographes, la cause de la pandémie serait ainsi à chercher dans la « métropolisation du monde » (Faburel 2020), concept catch-all qui désigne à la fois la densification, le surpeuplement, la promiscuité des modes de vie uniformisés et la surmodernité ; en somme, tout ce qui nous aurait éloignés de la « nature ». Pourtant, si l’on exclut les situations de surpeuplement extrême de quelques mégapoles des pays en développement, rien n’indique que la densité de population soit un bon indicateur des relations humaines et en dernière analyse de la propagation des maladies. En effet, comme l’a déjà amplement montré la critique faite à la thèse « écologique » (Offner 2020), les caractéristiques de l’environnement physique ne reflètent que marginalement la culture et les modes de vie. Ce n’est qu’au niveau de la coprésence physique, telle qu’on la trouve dans les transports en commun, que la densité de la population conduit directement à une intensification des contacts humains.

      Cet article ne prétend pas avancer d’hypothèses épidémiologiques relatives aux modes socio-spatiaux de transmission du Covid-19 : en la matière, la prudence est de mise en raison de la modestie des éléments empiriques disponibles. Son objet est plutôt de proposer une description du territoire bergamasque à l’aune des grilles de lecture contemporaines de l’urbain et des grands modèles interprétatifs mobilisés actuellement dans le débat public – et d’en souligner ainsi les limites. Ni métropole, ni campagne, la région de Bergame en Italie a en effet été l’un des foyers les plus actifs du virus en Europe, et les conséquences de l’épidémie y ont été dramatiques.

      Cette description montre les limites des modèles interprétatifs binaires et suggère d’analyser, au-delà des causes de la pandémie, l’influence indirecte de la « formation socio-territoriale » (Bagnasco 1994), c’est-à-dire de la manière dont une société évolue et change dans les structures de la longue durée, bien plus probante que la densité ou la présumée uniformisation métropolitaine.
      Un entre-deux territorial

      La crise a commencé officiellement le dimanche 23 février à l’hôpital d’Alzano, à six kilomètres de Bergame : deux cas de Covid-19 sont identifiés. En dix jours, la situation s’est dégradée au-delà des prévisions les plus alarmistes. Au mois de mars, 5 400 décès ont été répertoriés dans la province, contre 900 en moyenne les trois années précédentes (Invernizzi 2020). La mortalité a donc été multipliée par six ; dans certaines municipalités, comme Alzano et Nembro, elle est même dix fois supérieure à la moyenne.

      Située au cœur de la Lombardie, région la plus riche et la plus urbanisée d’Italie (et l’une des plus riches d’Europe), à cinquante kilomètres au nord-est de Milan, la province de Bergame rassemble en 2020 un peu plus d’un million d’habitants (dont 120 000 seulement dans la ville-centre). Elle est marquée par une situation d’entre-deux territorial : ce n’est ni une métropole ni une simple ville moyenne environnée d’un pays rural ; ce n’est ni une centralité ni une périphérie marginale ; son économie prospère est fortement industrielle, à la fois ancrée localement et insérée dans les réseaux économiques mondiaux.

      Le modèle de développement bergamasque résiste aux grilles de lecture opposant de manière dualiste villes et campagnes, métropoles mondialisées et ancrage local, densité et dispersion. Il ne peut être qualifié de « périurbain », en raison de la vitalité de ses centres secondaires ; il est sensiblement plus dense que la città diffusa du nord-est de l’Italie, vaste région sans centre dominant parsemée de maisons individuelles et de petites entreprises (Indovina 1990) ; et son industrialisation est bien plus ancienne et ses entreprises plus grandes et plus robustes que ceux des « districts industriels » de l’Italie centrale (Rivière et Weber 2006).

      La population, en faible croissance depuis trois décennies, est moins âgée que la moyenne de la région. Un fort attachement territorial s’adosse à une faible mobilité géographique : environ trois quarts des habitants sont nés dans des municipalités voisines ou dans la région. Mais depuis l’après-guerre, le développement économique fulgurant a suscité une immigration de main-d’œuvre, notamment depuis l’étranger (environ 7 % de la population est d’origine étrangère en 2016). L’émergence de nouveaux besoins, liés notamment au vieillissement de la population (aides à domicile, soignants), a entraîné plus récemment une diversification des origines nationales des habitants.

      Une urbanisation par bandes linéaires

      Dans les communes de Alzano et Nembro, et en général dans la vallée Seriana, le bâti est dense [1], à peu près cinquante habitants par hectare (Lameri et al. 2016), mais entrecoupé de nombreux espaces ouverts, souvent des jardins avec des potagers, tandis que les champs interstitiels encore cultivés au début des années 2000 ont presque complètement disparu. Sur la bande d’en haut, les flancs des collines, les anciens pâturages, cèdent la place aux bois en expansion. À l’exception des centres-villes anciens, où les maisons sont adossées les unes aux autres tout au long d’une rue principale, les bâtiments sont presque toujours érigés sur des parcelles individuelles et organisées selon des bandes parallèles au fond de la vallée, dans un espace particulièrement étroit.

      L’urbanisation du territoire bergamasque témoigne d’un mélange de connaissances anciennes et de techniques récentes qui permettent de mettre en valeur chaque centimètre carré. Chaque maison exploite ainsi les plis des règles de construction et la pente de la vallée, sur la base d’un savoir local difficile à standardiser : un garage accessible depuis la rue du bas, la cour depuis celle située au-dessus, un étage supplémentaire sous les combles.

      Après la Seconde Guerre mondiale, de nombreuses personnes ont restauré la cabane de leurs grands-parents dans la bande urbanisée près des pâturages et ont construit la maison de leurs enfants dans la bande inférieure, en investissant les fruits du travail industriel : c’est la génération qui était jeune pendant les trente glorieuses qui est aujourd’hui décimée par le virus, avec les conséquences dramatiques en matière de mémoire et de perte culturelle que l’on peut imaginer (Barcella 2020).

      Il ne s’agit donc pas d’une ville linéaire, mais d’une organisation urbaine par bandes linéaires. Les rues sont les repères de ce ruban urbain, qui fait l’effet d’un code-barres vu d’en haut : si vous le « coupez » perpendiculairement, vous y rencontrez en premier la zone habitée la plus ancienne, disposée tout le long de ce qui était autrefois la route romaine puis vénitienne ; en parallèle, se trouvent l’ancienne et la nouvelle route départementales, en alternance avec les fossés industriels du XIXe siècle.

      De la première mondialisation à la métropole régionale

      L’industrialisation commence au milieu du XIXe siècle : des protestants suisses et des industriels milanais trouvent dans la vallée des ressources en eau bon marché et s’approprient et complètent le réseau médiéval de canaux (Honegger fit l’histoire du textile, l’Italcementi celle du béton ; les usines de papier de Pigna, aujourd’hui propriété du groupe Buffetti, y ont déménagé en 1919 en provenance de Milan). Ces industries s’installent dans le lit majeur du fleuve et occupent l’autre rive, souvent inondée jusqu’au milieu du XXe siècle. Le coût environnemental de ce développement est considérable : destruction de terres agricoles, pollution croissante, exploitation de la nappe phréatique.

      Entre Nembro et Albino, on peut observer le cœur du système productif bergamasque : des centaines de petites et moyennes entreprises se juxtaposent et font travailler près de 4 000 employés. C’est un système totalement intégré dans les réseaux de production mondiaux : l’entreprise Acerbis, par exemple, transforme la matière plastique en réservoirs et composants pour motos ; Persico produit les coques des bateaux de la Coupe de l’America ; Polini Motori est spécialisée dans les kits de mise à niveau pour les cycles et les motos.

      Ces entreprises génèrent un trafic incessant de voitures et de camions qui encombrent l’ancienne route nationale de Val Seriana, l’autoroute qui relie Cene à Nembro et atteint Seriate, et l’autoroute qui relie Venise à Milan. Depuis 2009, un tramway relie la vallée à la gare de Bergame et transporte environ 13 000 passagers par jour.

      Le mode de vie y dépend donc autant du réseau familial organisé dans le voisinage, autour du palier ou de l’autre côté de la rue, que de l’enchevêtrement des autoroutes et des lignes aériennes qui traversent la région et mènent presque partout en quelques heures : Bergamo Orio al Serio est en effet le siège du hub italien de Ryanair et le troisième aéroport du pays, 17 millions de passagers par an et des liaisons avec le monde entier.
      Le système territorial bergamasque face au Covid-19

      L’hypermobilité (Verdeil 2020) est une des clés pour comprendre l’effet de la pandémie sur ces municipalités qui sont en même temps villageoises et métropolitaines : un exemple tragique est l’itinéraire de vacances d’un couple, elle d’Alzano, lui de Nembro, parti en vacances à La Havane le 29 février et terrassé par la maladie à Madrid le 19 mars (Nava 2020).

      Mais les contacts humains dépendent de nombreux autres facteurs, comme l’interdépendance (Baratier 2020) liée aux formes sociales et culturelles. En effet, la forme des établissements humains (la sociabilité, l’organisation spatiale, les institutions) a une influence importante, et la densité n’est plus la bonne mesure. Il semble que la sociabilité augmente les contacts sociaux qui répandent le virus, tandis que les nœuds infrastructuraux les démultiplient sur des échelles territoriales variées. Toutefois, les institutions de ces territoires n’ont aucune capacité de gouverner les effets croisés de ces différents facteurs. Du point de vue territorial, cette pandémie est une nouvelle manifestation de la discontinuité entre le politique et le territoire, qui s’était déjà manifestée bien avant le coronavirus.

      On pourrait même émettre l’hypothèse contraire, selon laquelle le modèle métropolitain est plus efficace dans la gestion de distances sociales et sa gouvernance plus résiliente face au risque de propagation liée à la sociabilité de province : les distances physiques sont mieux respectées, les institutions ont un accès privilégié aux réseaux mondiaux, et si les nœuds de transports y sont plus fréquentés, la mobilité des habitants des campagnes s’étale sur des échelles bien plus vastes.

      Comme nous ne disposons pas de données stabilisées, nous ne savons pas si la crise du virus s’ajoute à la déconnexion entre la sociabilité individualiste, les réseaux technologiques indifférents à l’environnement et les institutions, ou si elle est générée par cette déconnexion. Ce qui est certain, c’est que la région de Bergame additionne et multiplie les risques et les limites qui sont propres à la sociabilité paysanne, aux nœuds infrastructuraux urbains et aux institutions métropolitaines.

      Une fois l’urgence passée, cette crise devrait conduire à ouvrir une réflexion critique sur la gouvernance de ces territoires intermédiaires. L’examen des éléments proposés ci-dessus montre que la densité, la concentration, la promiscuité ne sont pas des indicateurs suffisants de l’uniformité du modèle de développement ; il indique également le rôle à multiples facettes des formations socio-territoriales.

      Si on doit reconnaître que le monde est urbain, comme l’a montré Henri Lefebvre, on peut sans doute questionner la métropole sans ignorer la variété de projets de métropolisation ou de rapprochement de la nature dans les différentes régions du monde. On n’a pas encore une explication exhaustive des causes de l’origine du virus, et encore moins de sa propagation : les hypothèses sous examen considèrent les déséquilibres environnementaux, les maladies pulmonaires, la capacité de réponse, les modèles de santé autant que la proximité et la distance physique. Tout résumer sous l’étiquette de métropolisation risque de ressusciter la mythologie des grandes explications, quand les spécificités des territoires réclament l’accompagnement des sociétés locales par l’étude et la compréhension de leur diversité.

      Bibliographie

      Angel, S., Parent, J., Civco D. L. et Blei, A. M. 2012. Atlas of Urban Expansion, Cambridge : Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.
      Bagnasco, A. 1994. Fatti sociali formati nello spazio : cinque lezioni di sociologia urbana e regionale, Milan : Franco Angeli.
      Baratier, J. 2020. « Pandémie, résilience, villes : deux ou trois choses que nous savons d’elles », Linkedin [en ligne], 29 mars.
      Barcella, P. 2020. « Cartolina da Bergamo. Perché proprio qui ? », La Rivista del Mulino, 2 mars.
      Barles, S. 1999. La Ville délétère, Ceyzérieu : Champ Vallon.
      Faburel, G. 2020. « La métropolisation du monde est une cause de la pandémie », Reporterre [en ligne], 28 mars.
      Indovina, F. 1990. La città diffusa, Venise : Quaderno Iuav-DAEST.
      Invernizzi, I. 2020. « Coronavirus, il numero reale dei decessi : in Bergamasca 4.500 in un mese », L’Eco di Bergamo, 1er avril.
      Lameri, M. et al. 2016. Trampiù : studio delle esternalita’ territoriali generate dall’ipotesi di prolungamento della linea tranviaria T1 da Albino a Vertova, Bergame : TEB.
      Nava, F. 2020. « Mancata zona rossa nella bergamasca : storia di un contagio intercontinentale, da Alzano Lombardo a Cuba, passando per Madrid », TPI, The Post International, 31 mars.
      Offner, J.-M. 2020. Anachronismes urbains, Paris : Presses de Sciences Po.
      Rivière, D. et Weber, S. 2006. « Le modèle du district italien en question : bilan et perspectives à l’heure de l’Europe élargie », Méditerranée, n° 106, p. 57-64.
      Verdeil, E. 2020. « La métropolisation, coupable idéale de la pandémie ? », The Conversation [en ligne], 9 avril.

      https://www.metropolitiques.eu/Pourquoi-Bergame-Le-virus-au-bout-du-territoire.html

    • Rethinking the city: urban experience and the Covid-19 pandemic

      Whilst the full effects of the Covid-19 pandemic are yet to be seen, the near-global lockdown of urban centres has been a jarring experience for city-dwellers. But how does the rapid spreading of the virus change our perception of the city? Here, Ravi Ghosh argues that these conditions prompts us to see the city differently, and sets us the urgent task of extending the right to the city to all its inhabitants.

      Whilst the full effects of the Covid-19 pandemic are yet to be seen, the near-global lockdown of urban centres has been a jarring experience for city-dwellers. The optimisation narrative has been stopped in its tracks. The speed, number, and efficiency of available urban experiences are now fixed somewhere close to zero. And even the things we do to escape this logic of urban gratification — to calm the pace of everyday life — are now increasingly unavailable; without culture, community, and recreation, people are beginning to wonder what they’re actually doing here, squashed into crowded cities across the world. But, as the peak of the pandemic approaches in many countries, there are more profound forces at play beyond just the individual’s loss of activity and communication.

      To be isolating in the city is to embody an agonising contemporary paradox: that, although the coronavirus is now moving rapidly through regions like New York State and London, the connectivity, medical resources, and infrastructure in these centres means that local health prospects may actually be higher than in less infected areas. Having already spread along the avenues of globalisation — holidaying, business travel, and international supply chains — the virus is now recreating a familiar Western narrative: that of the city under siege. Whether via cabinet-war-room style depictions of central government, or makeshift hospitals in the triangle of London, Birmingham, and Manchester, cities will inevitably emerge as defiant symbols of human endeavour and resilience, irrespective of the harm their cramped organisation may also have caused.

      But what of this desire for an active city? In Urban Revolution (1970), Henri Lefebvre uses a rough axis (marked from 0 to 100% urbanisation) to imagine the city space. It starts with the political city — marked by bureaucratic power — before progressing through mercantile and industrial phases. Postindustrial society is termed ‘urban’, at which point the city undergoes a process of ‘implosion-explosion’ as it approaches the end of the axis. This rampant expansion of the ‘urban fabric’ which Lefebvre describes will evoke nostalgia to anyone living in a major hub, but unable to enjoy it:

      the tremendous concentration (of people, activities, wealth, goods, objects, instruments, means, and thought) of urban reality and the immense explosion, the projection of numerous disjunct fragments (peripheries, suburbs, vacation homes, satellite towns) into space.

      For Lefebvre, these ideas were both a loose historical commentary and a starting point for his own socialist reimagining of ‘complete urbanisation’. This is apt given the current lockdown; the current pandemic may well be an acid test for society’s infrastructure and economic model. Watching from behind closed doors as they mobilise in tandem offers an historically unique, often painful perspective. Flaws are revealed gradually, and with great cost to human life. However painful these may be now, in time they could offer a unique opportunity to remake society with the lessons learned.

      Perhaps most relevant to our current situation is Lefebvre’s broad understanding of the urban fabric; he includes vacation homes, motorways, suburbs, and even countryside supermarkets in his definition. In normal circumstances, these structures are self-sustaining and peripheral, but what we see in the current crisis is the power of individuals to balloon the city by flocking to its fringes — often at the expense of fellow citizens. When movement is coded with infection, urbanisation suddenly becomes a form of domination. Under this kind of siege, it’s better to sit tight than to flee.

      It’s interesting to see this being acknowledged by some sections of the media, even if the socio-cultural consequences remain largely unexplored. The New York Times states that to make meaningful per capita comparisons for Covid-19 cases, its data focuses upon ‘metropolitan areas’ rather than cities or countries, as they more accurately account for ‘the regions where the virus might spread quickly among families, co-workers or commuters’. The statistics for the New York area therefore include nearby suburbs in Westchester, Long Island, and northern New Jersey. And although there’s no immediate way of determining whether people are moving out of necessity or choice, a fairly obvious distinction can be made between displaced workers moving from Delhi, for example, and those in prosperous Western centres — where movement is contingent on financial stability. The pushback against needless migration is mostly anecdotal, seen through viral images of angry placards in British seaside towns, and local news stories of overwhelmed health services. The pandemic has caused a retreat into the familiarity of nation states: not just in the literal sense of repatriation, but also as a means of civic organisation, internal governance, and statistical monitoring. What some call ‘de-globalisation’ reveals what we already know: that not all nations, governments, or health services are created equal — and that this applies to sub-national groupings too. Spatial inequality will play a huge role in determining the eventual death map of the pandemic.

      In such strangely out-of-time situations, what constitutes the normal is thrown into sharp relief. Activities normally taken for granted are judged by how easily they can be replicated while upholding their essential values — which in our current time usually means a relocation to the internet. What emerges is a familiar gulf between the professional and the social. Whereas for most office-based employees, work can continue with the assistance of specialised software, communications, and adaptable management structures, the integrity of social relationships suffers far more when human contact is removed.

      We feel an acute yearning for companionship, not just because we miss our friends more than we miss our bosses, but because for the most part, the means of reproducing social intimacy online are far inferior to those which ensure the fulfilment of economic roles. That video calling is the go-to for both spheres demonstrates this; it’s somehow the optimal social medium, but exists alongside far more complex tools within the work of work, especially in highly adapted corporate industries. The overlap is somewhat inevitable given that work needs a social element to function, but it’s still grimly remarkable that to evoke all the tenderness and multiplicity of friendships, the best we’ve come up with is drinking a beer while watching someone else do the same on our phones.

      It’s tempting to read the digitalisation of work as a direct transposition of the relations of production. This may be roughly the case, but in reality, there are obvious (and often welcome) differences between urban work culture and the current isolation, which speak to Lefebvre’s earlier ideas on ‘everyday life’ (not to mention that work has been at least partially online for decades). By theorising new forms of alienation within modernity — the unpaid labour of the daily commute, for example — Lefebvre in many ways anticipated common qualms about 21st century work life. These are familiar to us, now mostly expressed in the pithy, resigned idiom of being ‘chained to the desk’, ‘meetings that could be an email’, and the general exhaustion of 24/7 communications. The lockdown has stripped back many of these rituals, revealing that much of face-to-face professional life is made up of parade, gesture, formality, and convention — even if there is enjoyment to be found in the structure and atmosphere of the office. Doing more online, and crucially, from not-the-office may be a lasting result from the current changes.

      As William Davies has recently suggested, rather than viewing the pandemic as a crisis of capitalism, ‘it might better be understood as the sort of work-making event that allows for new economic and intellectual beginnings’. While this is not the dawning of Lefebvre’s ‘urban utopia’, conceiving of digitalisation as a form of urban progression does point to potential improvements in everyday life, even if the existing internet hierarchy hardly favours citizens. As Joe Shaw and Mark Graham from Oxford Internet Institute argue in a 2017 paper, in order to democratise the city space, we need to understand contemporary urbanisation “as a period where the city is increasingly reproduced through digital information’. They focus on Google’s ability to control the reproduction of urban space through features like maps and email: ‘this is a power to choose how a city is reduced to information, and to control the manner in which it is translated into knowledge and reintroduced to material everyday reality’. Companies are utterly dominant in this area, though the relocation of work and social relations to the digital space — coupled with an overdue revaluation of critical work, a recognition of the service industry’s precarity, and an increase in corporate responsibility — could provide a turning point for some urban hierarchies. The case for universal low-cost internet will be made with renewed urgency after the pandemic; access to accurate information has suddenly become a matter of life and death. If the oft-mentioned global solidarity outlasts the pandemic, then meaningful progress could be made against tech monopolies, resource inequality, and climate breakdown.

      For all the difficulties of the lockdown, it does refine our appreciation of what came before. Social existence is naturally incidental and unpredictable — there’s a kind of randomised joy borne of living amongst others. In the city, this effect is amplified. As Lefebvre says of the city’s streets, they are ‘a place to play and learn….a form of spontaneous theatre, I become spectacle and spectator, and sometimes an actor’. There’s certainly a romantic optimism here, but as isolation brings longing, the words feel ever sincerer. A recent Financial Times article contained an amusing vignette on an empty London:

      The bankers have disappeared and new tribes with different uniforms have taken over: builders in black trousers and dusty boots; security guards in high-vis jackets pacing outside empty lobbies; and trim young men and women in lycra running or cycling through the empty streets.

      The reality, of course, is that these people were always there; it’s just that not everyone notices them. The task beyond the pandemic will be extending this right to the city to all: remaking the structures of everyday life so that they empower all citizens, and harnessing digital urbanisation rather than existing at its mercy. Extending our current social contract — which shows we are prepared to live differently to protect the vulnerable — will be a powerful first step.

      https://www.versobooks.com/blogs/4648-rethinking-the-city-urban-experience-and-the-covid-19-pandemic

    • In Dense Cities Like Boston, Coronavirus Epidemics Last Longer, Northeastern Study Finds

      An analysis by Northeastern University researchers and colleagues finds that in crowded cities — like Boston — coronavirus epidemics not only grow bigger, they also tend to last longer.

      The paper, based on data from Italy and China, looks at how quickly an epidemic peaks depending on how crowded a location is.

      “In urban areas, we tend to see long, broad epidemics — for example, Boston,” says lead co-author Samuel Scarpino from the Network Science Institute at Northeastern. “And in comparatively more suburban or rural areas we tend to see sharp, quick, burst-y epidemics.”

      Scarpino says it’s key for Massachusetts to have uniform rules across the state, because movement from one area to another — say, from a town where restaurants are closed to one where they’re open — can help spread the virus. Here are some edited excerpts of our conversation, beginning with how he sums up the research just out in the journal Nature Medicine:

      Scarpino: What we report in the paper is that the structure of communities affects both the height and the duration of COVID-19 epidemics.

      Carey Goldberg: So more dense areas will have not just more cases, but a more prolonged course?

      Right. In urban areas, we’re likely to have larger outbreaks — in terms of total number, even in terms of percentage of the population — and they will be much longer, lasting weeks and weeks or months, as we’ve seen in Boston, New York City, London and many places around the world.

      However, in rural areas, or areas that have population structures that are much more tightly knit — as opposed to a looser collection of households in neighborhoods, as we have spread out across Boston — you get sharp, intense outbreaks. They can be overwhelming in terms of the resources available for caring for patients, and quite dramatic in terms of their effects on the population.

      Think about the outbreak in rural Maine that was sparked by a super-spreading event at a wedding, and how it quickly swept through the population.

      Why do these insights about community structure and its effect on transmission matter?

      In many rural areas that are at risk of these intense outbreaks, there’s much lower health care coverage and often, especially in the United States, a lot more complacency around mask-wearing and physical distancing. These areas are largely protected because they’re isolated. However, if cases show up — as we’ve seen in places like rural Maine — the outbreaks can be quite severe and rapid.

      Also, in the more dense areas, you’re going to have cases that move around throughout the population, throughout the different neighborhoods of the city. You’re going to have outbreaks go quiet in some areas, and then become louder in other areas.

      And this process can be very, very prolonged, and can make the types of intervention measures that you need to deploy either quite severe or quite complicated, because they have to be very specifically tailored to what’s happening at the really local level within the larger cities.

      So what does this mean for policy?

      Well, in related work we show that having policies that are different across a city can lead people to move out of their neighborhoods, to go to parks or to go to restaurants with different dining restrictions, or to go to venues with different limits on capacity. And that interacts with the structure of the city to spread the outbreak much more rapidly, kind of accelerating the pace and tempo of cases.

      So that really suggests that because the outbreak is going to be so long-lasting, you really either need to focus on driving it completely out or you need to have policies that will protect all of the places with lower rates of cases while intervening in a targeted way in the places with much higher rates of cases.

      So what you don’t want to do is put in tougher measures in hot-spots, because then you’re just going to drive people out to other places where they’re going to spread it even more.

      Exactly. In the state of Massachusetts, where we have the governor relaxing measures in a fairly extreme fashion in some areas and not in other areas, you are likely to have a situation where you’re just moving the infection around and putting other communities at risk.

      So having a more intermediate level of control that’s more uniformly distributed across space is much better epidemiologically.

      But that’s not what the state is doing.

      The state in many ways is really doing almost the opposite of what our paper suggests in terms of the ways in which you need to focus on controlling COVID-19, and also related work that shows this sort of patchwork of different policies really creates quite a bit of risk.

      It seems incredibly important to have hyper-local information, because in the structure you describe, the spread happens at the level of households or neighborhoods, and then you have just a bit of crossover to other places, and that’s how it just keeps going.

      That is the implication of our work and many other studies that show that COVID-19, from an epidemiological perspective, is an amalgamation of local transmission that’s happening in households, in restaurants, in occasional longer-distance transmission that moves it into new areas. So you need to have really hyper-localized information around where the cases are occurring and to find out where the cases are coming from.

      And that, unfortunately, is one of the things that we’re still not getting clear guidance on from the state: Where are the cases coming from? So that we can understand how we need to intervene.

      Without that data, we really aren’t armed with the right kinds of information to both stop the spread and to try and implement measures that will maximally control COVID-19 while having the least possible effects on our economic health, mental health and societal health.

      https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2020/10/06/coronavirus-lasts-longer-cities-boston

  • Le #remède sera-t-il finalement pire que le #coronavirus ?

    Je ne suis pas une grande admiratrice de Donald Trump. Et son tweet du 23 mars où il affirmait « Nous ne pouvons pas laisser le remède être pire que le problème lui-même », m’a consternée. On ne peut pas comparer la perte de vies humaines à celle de points de croissance. Quelques jours avant, le 19 mars, la présidente du Conseil d’Etat vaudois Nuria Gorrite disait de son côté, à l’antenne de la RTS, le #choix terrible auquel les autorités étaient confrontées : « Ou on envoie mourir les gens ou on les envoie au #chômage. »

    Marquantes, ces deux déclarations face à l’#épidémie de coronavirus m’interpellent. Je me suis documentée, j’ai cherché des voix éclairantes dans le maelström de chiffres ascendants, de courbes alarmantes, de stratégies étatiques établies à la hâte. J’en ai trouvées très peu, au début du moins. Mais, depuis cette semaine, l’état de sidération dans lequel beaucoup d’entre nous ont été plongés se dissipe, légèrement. Les cerveaux semblent à nouveau et partiellement capables d’appréhender autre chose que le danger imminent : le coronavirus, les #morts qu’il entraîne dans son sillage, l’impact sur la chaîne de #soins_hospitaliers. Des questions sur les #externalités_négatives des choix effectués à mi-mars émergent, timidement.

    Parce que oui, se focaliser sur le #danger_imminent est normal et naturel, mais cela peut conduire à la #catastrophe. En sommes-nous là ? Nous dirigeons-nous vers une catastrophe commune, nationale, incontrôlable et inquantifiable ? « Ruiner » le pays, et la population qui va avec, est-il le bon remède pour lutter contre #Covid-19 ? Quels sont les indicateurs sur lesquels s’appuie le Conseil fédéral pour décider de l’échec ou de la réussite de sa #stratégie de lutte contre le Covid-19 ?

    Poser ces questions, c’est passer pour une personne amorale. Pourtant, elles sont nécessaires, vitales même ! Pour une simple et bonne raison : il ne s’agit pas de choisir entre morts et chômeurs ou entre vies humaines et points de #croissance. Mais aussi d’évaluer l’impact de la #déscolarisation généralisée, de l’augmentation des #violences_conjugales, de l’accentuation des #précarités_sociales et de l’impact sur la #santé en général créé par la rupture de chaîne de soins pour les patients souffrant d’autres maladies comme le soulignait le président de la Société médicale de la Suisse romande, Philippe Eggimann, dans une tribune publiée sur Heidi.news le 31 mars.

    Le #choix_moral qui nous est imposé par la situation actuelle est le suivant : combien de décès dus à Covid-19 pensent pouvoir éviter nos autorités avec les mesures prises et combien de décès sont-elles prêtes à accepter à cause desdites mesures ? Le véritable et fondamental enjeu est là.

    Et loin de moi l’envie de préférer certains morts à d’autres, mais le choix fait par le Conseil fédéral nous confronte tous à cette équation-là. Le Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine résumait bien ce point de bascule le 30 mars : « Le #confinement va nous mettre tous en #faillite, nous et nos descendants, et il est peu probable à ce stade de ralentir ou d’arrêter la circulation du virus. La situation actuelle se résume à ceci : l’#effondrement_économique est-il un prix à payer pour arrêter ou retarder ce qui est déjà parmi nous ? »

    Sortir du tunnel aveuglant

    Pour être capable de restaurer cette pensée globale nécessaire, il est urgent de combattre l’#effet_tunnel généré par la #panique. Les neurosciences étudient ce phénomène sur des personnes soumises à un #stress intense : pilotes d’avion, militaires, pompiers, etc. Confrontés à des dangers immédiats, leur cerveau « tunnelise » leur attention. Cette #tunnelisation de l’attention peut être résumée ainsi : à trop se focaliser sur un danger imminent, on n’est plus capable d’appréhender des #risques_périphériques plus dangereux.

    Dans un article paru le 17 juin 2015, le magazine français Sciences et Avenir expliquait comment « la concentration dont font preuve les pilotes de ligne lors de situation de stress intense peut se retourner contre eux », parce qu’ils ne sont alors pas capables de tenir compte d’informations périphériques cruciales pouvant mener au crash de leur appareil. Le professeur Frédéric Dehais, de l’Institut supérieur de l’aéronautique et de l’espace (ISAE) à Toulouse, travaille depuis de nombreuses années sur ce sujet et développe des « prothèses cognitives » pour l’aviation.

    Le 31 mars, Daniel Schreiber, entrepreneur américain actif dans les fintechs et directeur de Lemonade, signait une tribune sur ce même sujet perturbant : « Les décès dus à des conséquences involontaires sont difficiles à compter, mais ils doivent quand même compter ». Son propos : « Il ne suffit pas d’examiner l’impact de nos politiques sur l’#aplatissement_de_la_courbe du coronavirus ; nous devons également essayer de prendre en compte les #conséquences_cachées et involontaires de nos politiques. The Lancet, par exemple, a calculé que la grande récession de 2008 a entraîné à elle seule 500’000 décès supplémentaires dus au cancer, avec ‘des patients exclus des traitements en raison du chômage et des réductions des #soins_de_santé’. Une autre étude publiée dans le BMJ a estimé que la récession a causé 5’000 décès par suicide rien qu’en 2009. »

    Où est l’outil de pilotage ?

    A ce stade, les autorités ne semblent pas encore capables de sortir de cet abrutissant effort contre l’ennemi invisible, le seul objectif qui compte, comme l’a confirmé Grégoire Gogniat, porte-parole de l’OFSP est : « La priorité absolue pour le Conseil fédéral est la #santé de la population ».

    Des fissures dans l’édifice monolithique se font néanmoins sentir, comme la création de la Task Force scientifique Covid-19, le 31 mars. Ce qui n’empêche pas l’OFSP de camper sur ses positions accentuant encore le phénomène de persévération : tout le monde doit rester à la maison, ne doivent porter des #masques que les malades, ne doivent être testés que les personnes à risque, etc. Alors même que le groupe de neuf experts présenté jeudi 2 avril à Berne étudie le port du masque pour tous et des #tests_massifs pour l’ensemble de la population.

    Face à ces #injonctions_contradictoires, l’observatrice que je suis se pose légitimement la question : mais où est l’outil de pilotage de la #crise ? Sur quelles bases, scientifiques ou empiriques, ont été prises ces décisions ? Les nombreux observateurs et acteurs contactés depuis une dizaine de jours arrivent à la conclusion qu’une bonne partie des décisions prises mi-mars l’ont été par un petit groupe restreint au sein de l’OFSP de manière empirique, sur la base de données scientifiques lacunaires.

    Comme pour confirmer ces craintes, l’économiste du comportement et neuroéconomiste zurichois Ernst Fehr, professeur de microéconomie et de recherche économique expérimentale, ainsi que vice-président du département d’économie de l’Université de Zurich, accusait les politiciens de prendre des décisions basées sur des données insuffisantes dans une vidéo en allemand publiée sur le site de la NZZ, le 25 mars : « La base la plus importante pour la prise de décision est le nombre de nouvelles infections chaque jour. Et c’est une base de décision très imparfaite ».

    Contacté, l’office fédéral s’explique : « Ces données seront publiées. L’OFSP cite généralement les références scientifiques sur lesquelles il fonde ses décisions dans ses publications. Et les données scientifiques utilisées sont accessibles dans les sources habituelles d’informations scientifiques (Pub Med, sites de l’OMS, du Centers for Disease Control, de l’ECDC). » Sans préciser quelles études, ni avec quels experts, internes et externes.

    Le rôle du #Parlement

    La tension existant entre réponses politiques et réponses scientifiques est palpable. Pour y voir plus clair et surtout obtenir des réponses, le Parlement a un rôle crucial à jouer. C’est l’organe de contrôle du Conseil fédéral. Mais il s’est « auto-suspendu », avant de convenir de la tenue d’une session extraordinaire début mai. Les membres des Commissions de la sécurité sociale et de la santé publique (CSSS) se réunissent le 16 avril pour évoquer la crise actuelle.

    Contactés, plusieurs conseillers nationaux membres de la CSSS sont impatients de pouvoir discuter de tout cela. A l’instar de Pierre-Yves Maillard, conseiller national vaudois (PS) :

    « Le coronavirus est à l’évidence plus dangereux que la grippe, mais quels moyens se donne-t-on pour savoir à quel point et où on en est dans la diffusion de cette maladie ? Ne faudrait-il pas créer des groupes représentatifs de la population et estimer avec eux régulièrement, au moyen de #tests_sérologiques, le nombre de ceux qui ont été atteints, parfois sans le savoir ? Cela permettrait d’estimer un peu mieux les #taux_de_mortalité et de savoir à quel stade de l’épidémie nous sommes. Pour estimer mieux la gravité de cette crise, on pourrait aussi essayer de savoir où en est-on dans l’évolution globale de la #mortalité, toutes causes confondues. Ces données paraissent indispensables à un bon pilotage du Conseil fédéral. Il sera utile d’échanger avec l’OFSP sur ces questions. »

    Pour Philippe Nantermod, conseiller national valaisan (PLR), « ils s’appuient sur les mêmes indices que nous, soit ceux que les cantons leur envoient, mais on en saura davantage après le 16 avril ».

    Pour Céline Amaudruz, conseillère nationale genevoise (UDC), « le Conseil fédéral et ses services doivent jouer la transparence quant aux données dont ils disposent, ceci notamment afin d’étayer l’action qu’ils mènent. Par contre, je ne juge pas utile de distraire des forces pour fournir des données qui ne seraient pas essentielles pour lutter contre le virus. La priorité doit être la santé, le reste peut se traiter plus tard. »

    Et, enfin, pour Léonore Porchet, conseillère nationale vaudoise (Les Verts), « il est indispensable que les décisions du Conseil fédéral, en tout temps, soient prises sur la base de données et informations à disposition du Parlement. C’est pour cela que je regrette fortement que le Parlement n’ait pas pu suivre la gestion de crise et n’arrive qu’en aval de ces décisions. »

    Ma question centrale de savoir si le remède sera pire que le mal a perturbé plusieurs de mes interlocuteurs ces derniers jours. Peut-être est-ce trop « morbide », pas encore le bon moment ou simplement que la déflagration sociale va permettre aux politiciens de jouer leurs cartes partisanes pour obtenir les avancées qu’ils estiment nécessaires.

    De mon côté, je pense qu’il existe un risque (identifié par les autorités ?) de tester à large échelle parce que l’on pourrait trouver que le coronavirus est moins mortel que les données sur lesquelles les autorités se sont appuyées pour justifier le confinement.

    https://www.heidi.news/sante/le-remede-sera-t-il-finalement-pire-que-le-coronavirus
    #crise_économique #économie #éthique #démocratie #Suisse #politique #science

  • On parle beaucoup d’ #exponentielle ces derniers temps, sidérée qu’est la société devant la croissance du nombre des infecté-es par le #COVID-19.

    Non seulement ce chiffre augmente à une vitesse croissante, mais la sidération est amplifiée par le délai d’incubation, qui fait que même en agissant aujourd’hui même, l’augmentation ne peut être arrêtée avant une quinzaine...

    Alors on connaît la légende de l’échiquier https://mamot.fr/@OPiMedia/103823313798445717 mais on connaît moins peut-être la capacité de charge d’un écosystème. Voici ce qu’en dit Pablo Servigne :

    En mathématiques, une fonction exponentielle monte jusqu’au ciel. Dans le monde réel, sur Terre, il y a un plafond bien avant. En écologie, ce plafond est appelé la capacité de charge d’un écosystème (notée K). Il y a en général trois manières pour un système de réagir à une exponentielle (voir figure 1). Prenons l’exemple classique d’une population de lapins qui croît sur une prairie. Soit la population se stabilise doucement avant le plafond (elle ne croît donc plus, mais trouve un équilibre avec le milieu) (figure 1A), soit la population dépasse le seuil maximal que peut supporter la prairie puis se stabilise dans une oscillation qui dégrade légèrement la prairie (figure 1B), soit elle transperce le plafond et continue d’accélérer (overshooting), ce qui mène à un effondrement de la prairie, suivi de la population de lapins (figure 1C).

    On va voir de plus en plus souvent cette problématique, des dynamiques qui sont lancées, avec des amplitudes et des timings qui nous déstabilisent et rendent caduques les réponses habituelles. Les problématiques nouvelles ne pourront pas être réglées avec les anciennes réponses.

    Edgar Morin explique très bien l’impasse actuelle :

    Nos sociétés, singulièrement depuis la fin de la guerre, en se fondant sur la croissance économique, en réalité avaient conçu celle-ci comme un moyen de #régulation de problèmes et de #crises qui auraient éclaté sans la croissance. Ainsi par exemple, le problème de l’inflation, de la monnaie, du niveau de vie, étaient régulés par la croissance. […] Or on a fondé la régulation […] sur l’élément le plus déséquilibrant qui soit c’est-à-dire le dynamisme qui est le contraire de la régulation : une croissance exponentielle, la chose qui évidemment tend vers l’infini et vers l’explosion. 

    Demain la terre : la croissance_Sciences humaines aujourd’hui, 13/04/1974
    https://www.franceculture.fr/environnement/edgar-morin-la-croissance-exponentielle-ce-qui-
    evidemment-tend-vers-linfini-et-vers

    « Comment tout peut s’effondrer », bouquin de Pablo Servigne

    #économie #exponentielle #effondrement #croissance #PabloServigne #EdgarMorin