• Turkey : Hundreds of Refugees Deported to Syria

    EU Should Recognize Turkey Is Unsafe for Asylum Seekers

    Turkish authorities arbitrarily arrested, detained, and deported hundreds of Syrian refugee men and boys to Syria between February and July 2022, Human Rights Watch said today.

    Deported Syrians told Human Rights Watch that Turkish officials arrested them in their homes, workplaces, and on the street, detained them in poor conditions, beat and abused most of them, forced them to sign voluntary return forms, drove them to border crossing points with northern Syria, and forced them across at gunpoint.

    “In violation of international law Turkish authorities have rounded up hundreds of Syrian refugees, even unaccompanied children, and forced them back to northern Syria,” said Nadia Hardman, refugee and migrant rights researcher at Human Rights Watch. “Although Turkey provided temporary protection to 3.6 million Syrian refugees, it now looks like Turkey is trying to make northern Syria a refugee dumping ground.”

    Recent signs from Turkey and other governments indicate that they are considering normalizing relations with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. In May 2022, President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan of Turkey announced that he intends to resettle one million refugees in northern Syria, in areas not controlled by the government, even though Syria remains unsafe for returning refugees. Many of those returned are from government-controlled areas, but even if they could reach them, the Syrian government is the same one that produced over six million refugees and committed grave human rights violations against its own citizens even before uprisings began.

    The deportations provide a stark counterpoint to Turkey’s record of generosity as host to more refugees than any other country in the world and almost four times as many as the whole European Union (EU), for which the EU has provided billions of Euros in funding for humanitarian support and migration management.

    Between February and August, Human Rights Watch interviewed by phone or in person inside Turkey 37 Syrian men and 2 Syrian boys who had been registered for temporary protection in Turkey. Human Rights Watch also interviewed seven relatives of Syrian refugee men and a refugee woman whom Turkish authorities deported to northern Syria during this time.

    Human Rights Watch sent letters with queries and findings to the European Commission, the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs, and the Turkish Interior Ministry. Human Rights Watch received a response from Bernard Brunet, of the EU’s Directorate-General for Neighborhood and Enlargement Negotiations. The content of this letter is reflected in the section on removal centers.

    Turkish officials deported 37 of the people interviewed to northern Syria. All said they were deported together with dozens or even hundreds of others. All said they were forced to sign forms either at removal centers or the border with Syria. They said that officials did not allow them to read the forms and did not explain what the forms said, but all said they understood the forms to be allegedly agreeing to voluntary repatriation. Some said that officials covered the part of the form written in Arabic with their hands. Most said they saw authorities at these removal centers processing other Syrians in the same way.

    Many said that they saw Turkish officials beat other men who had initially refused to sign, so they felt they had no choice. Two men detained at a removal center in Adana said they were given the choice of signing a form and going back to Syria or being detained for a year. Both chose to leave because they could not bear the thought of a year in detention and needed to support their families.

    Ten people were not deported. Some were released and warned that if they did not move back to their city of registration they would be deported if found elsewhere. Others managed to contact lawyers through the intervention of family members to help secure their release. Several are still in removal centers waiting for a resolution to their case, unaware why they are being detained and fearing deportation. Those released described life in Turkey as dangerous, saying that they are staying at home with their curtains closed and limiting movement to avoid the Turkish authorities.

    Deportees were driven to the border from removal centers, sometimes in rides lasting up to 21 hours, handcuffed the whole way. They said they were forced to cross border checkpoints at either Öncüpınar/Bab al-Salam or Cilvegözü/Bab al-Hawa, which lead to non-government- controlled areas of Syria. At the checkpoint, a 26-year-old man from Aleppo recalled a Turkish official telling him, “We’ll shoot anyone who tries cross back.”

    In June 2022, the UN refugee agency, UNHCR, said that 15,149 Syrian refugees had voluntarily returned to Syria so far this year. The local authorities who control Bab al-Hawa and Bab al-Salam border crossings respectively publish monthly numbers of people crossing through their checkpoints from Turkey to Syria. Between February and August 2022, 11,645 people were returned through Bab al-Hawa and 8,404 through Bab al-Salam.

    Turkey is bound by treaty and customary international law to respect the principle of nonrefoulement, which prohibits the return of anyone to a place where they would face a real risk of persecution, torture or other ill-treatment, or a threat to life. Turkey must not coerce people into returning to places where they face serious harm. Turkey should protect the basic rights of all Syrians, regardless of where they are registered and should not deport refugees who are living and working in a city other than where their temporary protection ID and address are registered.

    On October 21, Dr. Savaş Ünlü, head of the Presidency for Migration Management, responded by letter to Human Rights Watch’s letter of October 3 sharing this report’s findings. Emphasizing that Turkey hosts the largest number of refugees in the world, Dr. Ünlü rejected Human Rights Watch’s findings in their totality, calling the allegations baseless. Setting out the services provided by law to people seeking protection in Turkey, he underscored that Turkey “carries out migration management in accordance with national and international law.”

    “The EU and its member states should acknowledge that Turkey does not meet its criteria for a safe third country and suspend its funding of migration detention and border controls until forced deportations cease,” Hardman said. “Declaring Turkey a ‘safe third country’ is inconsistent with the scale of deportations of Syrian refugees to northern Syria. Member states should not make this determination and should focus on relocating asylum seekers by increasing resettlement numbers.”

    Human Rights Watch focused on the deportation of Syrian refugees who had been recognized by Turkey’s temporary protection regime but whom authorities nevertheless deported or threatened with deportation to Syria in 2022. All 47 Syrian refugees whose cases were examined had been living and working in cities across Turkey, the majority in Istanbul, before they were arrested, detained, and in most cases deported. All detainees are identified with pseudonyms for their protection.

    All but two had a Turkish temporary protection ID permit when they lived in Turkey, commonly called a kimlik, which protects Syrian refugees against forced return to Syria. Several said they had both a temporary protection ID and a work permit.

    Refugees, Asylum Seekers, and Migrants in Turkey

    Turkey shelters over 3.6 million Syrians and is the world’s largest refugee-hosting country. Under a geographical limitation that Turkey has applied to its accession to the UN Refugee Convention, Syrians and others coming from countries to the south and east of Turkey’s borders are not granted full refugee status. Syrian refugees are registered under a “temporary protection” regulation, which Turkish authorities say automatically applies to all Syrians seeking asylum.

    Turkey’s Temporary Protection Regulation grants Syrian refugees access to basic services including education and health care but generally requires them to live in the province in which they are registered. Refugees must obtain permission to travel between provinces. In late 2017 and early 2018, Istanbul and nine provinces on the border with Syria suspended registration of newly arriving asylum seekers.

    In February 2022, Turkey’s Deputy Interior Minister Ismail Çataklı said applications for temporary and international protection would not be accepted in 16 provinces: Ankara, Antalya, Aydın, Bursa, Çanakkale, Düzce, Edirne, Hatay, Istanbul, Izmir, Kırklareli, Kocaeli, Muğla, Sakarya, Tekirdağ, and Yalova. He also said residency permit applications by foreigners would not be accepted in any neighborhood in which 25 percent or more of the population consisted of foreigners. He reported that registration had already been closed in 781 neighborhoods throughout Turkey because foreigners in those locations exceeded 25 percent of the population.

    In June, Interior Minister Süleyman Soylu announced that from July 1 onward, the proportion would be reduced to 20 percent and the number of neighborhoods closed to foreigners’ registration increased to 1,200, with cancellation of temporary protection status of Syrians who traveled in the country without applying for permission. Many interviewees explained that they could not find employment in their city of registration and could not survive there but could find work in Istanbul.

    Rising Xenophobia in Turkey

    Over the past two years, there has been an increase in racist and xenophobic attacks against foreigners, notably against Syrians. On August 11, 2021, groups of Turkish residents attacked workplaces and homes of Syrians in a neighborhood in Ankara a day after a Syrian youth stabbed and killed a Turkish youth in a fight.

    In the lead-up to general elections in spring 2023, opposition politicians have made speeches that fuel anti-refugee sentiment and suggest that Syrians should be returned to war-torn Syria. President Erdoğan’s coalition government has responded with pledges to resettle Syrians in Turkish-occupied areas of northern Syria.

    Arrests

    Most of those interviewed were arrested on the streets of Istanbul, and others during raids in their workplaces or homes. The arresting officials sometimes introduced themselves as Turkish police officers, and all demanded to see the refugees’ identification documents.

    Under Turkey’s temporary protection regulation, Syrian refugees are required to live in the province where they first register as refugees. Seventeen of these 47 refugees were living and working in their city of registration, while the rest were living and working in a different province.

    Five refugees said they were arrested because of complaints or spurious allegations from neighbors or employers, ranging from making too much noise to being a terrorist. All refugees said these accusations had no foundation. Four of them were acquitted, released, or deported; one man is still being investigated.

    Detention

    On arrest, Syrian refugees were either taken to local police stations for a short period or directly to a removal center, usually Tuzla Removal Center in Istanbul. Other removal centers included were in Pendik, Adana, Gaziantep, and Urfa. In all cases, Turkish officials confiscated the Syrians’ telephones, wallets, and other personal belongings.

    The authorities refused refugees’ requests to call their family members or lawyers. One man who asked to speak to a lawyer said an officer at the police station said, “‘Did you commit any crime?’ When I said ‘no,’ he said, ‘Then you don’t need to call a lawyer.’”

    All said the Turkish authorities kept them in cramped, unsanitary rooms in various removal centers. Beds were limited and interviewees said they often had to share them. Refugees said they were usually divided according to nationality and were generally held with other Syrians. Boys under 18 were detained with adult men.

    While some removal centers had better conditions than others, all interviewees described a lack of adequate food and access to washroom facilities, as well as other unsanitary conditions. In Tuzla, where the majority of interviewees passed through, Syrians described being held outside in areas described as “basketball courts” for hours on end while waiting to be assigned a space, which was usually inside a cramped metal container.

    “Ahmad” described conditions at Tuzla Removal Center, where he was detained alongside unrelated children in overcrowded metal containers:

    There were six beds in my cell and two or three people had to share each bed, and in my cell, one kid was 16 and one was 17. At first there were 15 of us [in the cell] but then they added more people. We stayed 12 days without taking a shower because they didn’t have one.

    Beatings and Ill-Treatment

    All interviewees said Turkish officials in the removal centers either assaulted them or they witnessed officials kicking or beating other Syrians with their hands or wooden or plastic batons. “Fahad,” a 22-year-old man from Aleppo, described the beatings in Tuzla Removal Center:

    I was beaten in Tuzla…. I dropped my bread by accident and I tried to pick it up from the floor. An officer kicked me and I fell down. He started to beat me with a wooden stick. I couldn’t defend myself. I witnessed beatings of other people. In the evening if people smoked they were beaten. They [the guards] were always humiliating us. One man was smoking … and five guards started to beat him very hard and they made his eye black and blue and beat his back with a stick. And everyone who tried to intervene was beaten.

    “Ahmad,” a 26-year-old man from Aleppo, said Turkish police arrested him at his workplace, a tailor shop in Istanbul, and took him to Tuzla Removal Center where he was severely beaten on multiple occasions:

    I was beaten in Tuzla three times; the last time was the harshest for me. I was arguing about the fact that I should be allowed to go out of the doors of the prison, I should have been allowed time for breaks. So they [the guards] cursed me and insulted me and my family. I said I would complain to their director. I was beaten on my face with a wooden stick, and they [the guards] broke my teeth.

    Ahmad was eventually deported to northern Syria through the Bab al-Salam border crossing and is now staying in Azaz city, currently under the control of the Turkey-backed Syrian Interim Government, an opposition group, as he cannot cross into Syrian government-controlled Aleppo city because he is wanted by the Syrian army. “I fled the war [in Syria] because I am against violence,” he said. “Now they [the Turkish authorities] sent me back here. I just want to be in a safe place.”

    “Hassan,” a 27-year-old former political prisoner and survivor of torture from Damascus, was arrested at his house when his neighbors complained about the noise coming from his apartment. He spent a few months being transferred between various removal centers. At the last one, he was told to sign a voluntary return form. When he refused to sign, Hassan said, “I was put inside a cage, like a cage for a dog. It was metal … approximately 1.5 meters by one meter. When the sun hit the cage it was so hot.”

    When he was first arrested, Hassan managed to contact his wife before his phone was confiscated. She found a lawyer who helped secure his release.

    Forced to Sign “Voluntary Return” Forms

    Many deportees said Turkish officials – either removal center guards, or officials they described as “police” or “jandarma” interchangeably – used violence or the threat of violence to force them into signing “voluntary” return forms.

    Human Rights Watch gathered testimony indicating deportees were forced to sign “voluntary return” forms at removal centers in Adana, Tuzla, Gaziantep, and Diyarbakır, and a migration office in Mersin.

    “Mustafa,” a 21-year-old man from Idlib, was arrested on the streets in the Esenyurt neighborhood of Istanbul. After several days in a removal center in Pendik, he was transferred to Adana, where he was put in a small cell with 33 other Syrian men for a night. In the morning, Mustafa said, a jandarma officer came to take detainees separately to another room:

    When my turn came, they took two of us into a room where there were four officials: a jandarma, a plain-clothed man, the [Adana Removal Center] migration director, and a translator. I saw three people sitting on the floor under the table who had been taken earlier from our cell and their faces were swollen.

    The translator asked the man who was with me to sign some papers, but when he saw one was a voluntary return form he didn’t want to sign. The jandarma and the plain-clothed guy started beating him with their hands and their batons and kicked him. After about 10 minutes they tied his hands and moved him next to the men already on the floor under the table. The translator asked me if I wanted to taste what the others had tasted before me. I said no and signed the paper.

    Mustafa was later deported from Cilvegözü/Bab al-Hawa border crossing and is now staying in al-Bab city in northern Aleppo province.

    Syria Remains Unsafe for Returns

    Most people interviewed said they originated from government-controlled areas in Syria. They said they could not cross from the opposition-controlled areas of northern Syria to their places of origin for fear Syrian security agencies would arbitrarily arrest them and otherwise violate their rights. Those deported to northern Syria told Human Rights Watch they felt “stuck” there, unable to go to home or to forge a life amid the instability of clashes in northern Syria.

    “I cannot go back to Damascus because it is too dangerous,” said “Firaz,” 31, in a telephone interview, who is from the Damascus Countryside and was deported from Turkey in July 2022 and is now living in Afrin in northern Syria. “There is fighting and clashes [in Afrin]. What do I do? Where do I go?”

    In October 2021, Human Rights Watch documented that Syrian refugees who returned to Syria between 2017 and 2021 from Lebanon and Jordan faced grave human rights abuses and persecution at the hands of the Syrian government and affiliated militias, demonstrating that Syria is not safe for returns.

    While active hostilities may have decreased in recent years, the Syrian government has continued to inflict the same abuses onto citizens that led them to flee in the first place, including arbitrary detention, mistreatment, and torture. In September, the UN Commission of Inquiry on Syria once again concluded that Syria is not safe for returns.

    In addition to the fear of arrest and persecution, 10 years of conflict have decimated Syria’s infrastructure and social services, resulting in massive humanitarian needs. Over 13 million Syrians needed humanitarian assistance as of early 2021. Millions of people in northeast and northwest Syria, many of whom are internally displaced, rely on the cross-border flow of food, medicine, and other lifesaving assistance.

    International Law

    Turkey is a party to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) and the European Convention on Human Rights, both of which prohibit arbitrary arrest and detention and inhuman and degrading treatment. If Turkey detains a person to deport them but there is no realistic prospect of doing so, including because they would face harm in the destination country, or the person is unable to challenge their removal, the detention is arbitrary.

    Turkey’s treaty obligations under the European Convention, the ICCPR, the Convention Against Torture, and the 1951 Refugee Convention also require it to uphold the principle of nonrefoulement, which prohibits the return of anyone to a place where they would face a real risk of persecution, torture or other ill-treatment, or a threat to life.

    Turkey may not use violence or the threat of violence or detention to coerce people to return to places where they face harm. This includes Syrian asylum seekers, who are entitled to automatic protection under Turkish law, including any who have been blocked from registration for temporary protection since late 2017. It is important that it also applies to refugees who have sought employment outside the province in which they are registered. Children should never be detained for reasons solely related to their immigration status, or detained alongside unrelated adults.

    EU Funding of Turkey’s Migration Management

    The implementation of the March 2016 EU-Turkey deal, which aimed to control the number of migrants reaching the EU by sending them back to Turkey, is based on the flawed premise that Turkey would be a safe third country to which to return Syrian asylum seekers. However, Turkey has never met the EU’s safe third country criteria as defined by EU law. The recent violent deportations show that any Syrian forcibly returned from the EU to Turkey would face a risk of onward refoulement to Syria.

    In June 2021, the Greek government adopted a Joint Ministerial Decision determining that Turkey was safe third country for asylum seekers from Syria, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Somalia.

    Turkey’s removal centers have been constructed and maintained with significant funding from the European Union. Prior to 2016, under the Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA I and IPA II), the EU provided more than €89 million for the construction, renovation, or other support of removal centers in Turkey. Some €54 million of this funding in 2007 and 2008 was for the construction of seven removal centers in six provinces with a capacity for 3,750 people. In 2014, it provided another €6.7 million for renovation and refurbishment of 17 removal centers. In 2015, the EU provided about €29 million for the construction of six new removal centers with a capacity for 2,400 people.

    Following the first €3 billion committed to Turkey as part of the EU-Turkey deal of March 2016, the EU’s Facility for Refugees in Turkey (FRiT) provided €60 million to the then-Directorate General for Migration Management to “support Turkey in the management, reception and hosting of migrants, in particular irregular migrants detected in Turkey, as well as migrants returned from EU Member States territories to Turkey.” This funding was used for the construction and refurbishment of the Çankırı removal center and for staffing 22 other removal centers.

    The EU provided another €22.3 million to the DGMM for improving services and physical conditions in removal centers, including funding for “the safe and organized transfer of irregular migrants and refugees within Turkey,” and €3.5 million for “capacity-building assistance aimed at strengthening access to rights and services.”

    On December 21, 2021, the European Commission announced a €30 million financing decision to support the Turkish Interior Ministry’s Presidency of Migration Management’s “capacity building and improving the standards and conditions for migrants in Turkey’s hosting centers … to improve the management of reception and hosting centers in line with human rights standards and gender-sensitive approaches” and to ensure “safe and dignified transfer of irregular migrants.”

    https://www.hrw.org/news/2022/10/24/turkey-hundreds-refugees-deported-syria

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #réfugiés_syriens #Turquie #renvois #expulsions #retour_au_pays #déportation #arrestations #rétention #détention_administrative

    –—

    ajouté à la métaliste Sur le #retour_au_pays / #expulsions de #réfugiés_syriens...
    https://seenthis.net/messages/904710

  • En Allemagne, des chercheurs désobéissent pour le climat

    Depuis un an, les membres allemands de #Scientist_Rebellion, un collectif de #scientifiques_activistes implanté dans une vingtaine de pays, multiplient les actions de désobéissance civile non violente pour alerter sur l’#urgence_climatique. Une #radicalisation inhabituelle qui divise la #communauté_scientifique, soumise au #devoir_de_réserve et dépendante des financements.

    L’apocalypse n’est pas que dans la pluie torrentielle qui lessive les militants pour le climat collés à la glu à la vitrine d’une agence de la Deutsche Bank, à Munich. Elle est aussi dans leurs mises en garde sur la destruction des écosystèmes et la “folie des fossiles”. Cette scène du mois de mai ne serait pas si étonnante si elle n’avait quelque chose de singulier : les militants portent des blouses blanches sur lesquelles est inscrit “Scientist Rebellion”. Des scientifiques sortis de leurs laboratoires et de leurs salles de cours pour se lancer dans la désobéissance civile.

    Que des chercheurs s’immiscent dans le #débat_public n’a rien de nouveau – songez à la pandémie. Mais les membres de Scientist Rebellion (SR) ne se contentent pas de manifester ou de participer à des débats sur les plateaux de télévision : ils mettent au placard leur devoir de réserve et se rebellent. C’est là un exercice d’équilibre où se joue leur crédibilité. En effet, bien que les chercheurs puissent se prévaloir de la liberté d’enseignement garantie par la Constitution allemande, l’#impartialité fait partie de leur #déontologie.

    Cette #mobilisation des scientifiques apparaît comme un signe supplémentaire de la radicalisation du mouvement climatique. “Nous avons épuisé nos méthodes conventionnelles”, constate Nana-Maria Grüning, membre de SR.

    “Nous n’avons plus d’autre choix pour tenter de stopper la destruction.”

    Cette biologiste de 39 ans de l’hôpital de la Charité, à Berlin [l’un des premiers centres hospitaliers universitaires du monde], mène des recherches sur le métabolisme des cellules. Un travail qui la confronte au quotidien avec le dérèglement climatique, la destruction des écosystèmes, le réchauffement de la planète, l’extinction des espèces – ou “l’extinction de masse”, selon ses propres termes.

    (#paywall)

    https://www.courrierinternational.com/article/urgence-en-allemagne-des-chercheurs-desobeissent-pour-le-clim

    #désobéissance #désobéissance_civile #recherche #université #facs #activisme #climat
    ping @karine4 @_kg_ @cede

  • #Latvia: Refugees and migrants arbitrarily detained, tortured and forced to ‘voluntarily’ return to their countries

    Latvian authorities have violently pushed back refugees and migrants at the country’s borders with Belarus, subjecting many to grave human rights violations, including secret detention and even torture, according to new findings published in a report by Amnesty International.

    Latvia: Return home or never leave the woods reveals the brutal treatment of migrants and refugees – including children – who have been held arbitrarily in undisclosed sites in the Latvian forest, and unlawfully and violently returned to Belarus. Many faced beatings and electric shocks with tasers, including on their genitals. Some were unlawfully forced to return ‘voluntarily’ to their home countries.

    “Latvia has given refugees and migrants a cruel ultimatum: accept to return ‘voluntarily’ to their country, or remain stranded at the border facing detention, unlawful returns and torture. In some cases, their arbitrary detention at the border may amount to enforced disappearance,” said Eve Geddie, Director of Amnesty International’s European Institutions Office.

    “The Latvian authorities have left men, women and children to fend for themselves in freezing temperatures, often stranded in forests or held in tents. They have violently pushed them back to Belarus, where they have no chance of seeking protection. These actions have nothing to do with border protection and are brazen violations of international and EU law.”

    On 10 August 2021, Latvia introduced a state of emergency following an increase in numbers of people encouraged to come to the border by Belarus. In contrast with EU and international law and the principle of non-refoulement, the emergency rules suspended the right to seek asylum in four border areas and allowed Latvian authorities to forcibly and summarily return people to Belarus.

    Latvian authorities have repeatedly extended the state of emergency, currently until November 2022, despite the decrease of movements over time, and their own admission that the number of attempted entries were the result of multiple crossings by the same people.

    Dozens of refugees and migrants have been arbitrarily held in tents at the border in unsanitary conditions, A small percentage of people were allowed into Latvia, the vast majority of whom were placed in detention centres and offered limited or no access to asylum processes, legal assistance or independent oversight.

    Amnesty’s report on Latvia follows and supplements similar reports focussing on abuses against refugees and migrants by Belarus, Poland and Lithuania.
    Violent pushbacks, arbitrary detention and possible enforced disappearances

    Under the state of emergency, Latvian border guards, in cooperation with unidentified “commandos”, the army and the police, repeatedly subjected people to summary, unlawful and violent forced returns. In response, Belarusian authorities would then systematically push people back to Latvia.

    Zaki, a man from Iraq who was stranded at the border for around three months, told Amnesty International that he had been pushed back more than 150 times, sometimes eight times in a single day.

    Hassan, another man from Iraq who spent five months at the border, said: “They forced us to be completely naked, sometimes they beat us when naked and then they forced us to cross back to Belarus, sometimes having to cross a river which was very cold. They said they would shoot us if we didn’t cross.”

    In between pushbacks, people were forced to spend prolonged periods stranded at the border or in tents set up by the authorities in isolated areas of the forest. Latvian authorities have so far denied using tents for anything other than providing “humanitarian assistance”, but Amnesty International’s findings show that tents were heavily guarded sites used to arbitrarily hold refugees and migrants and as outposts for illegal returns.

    Those not held in tents sometimes ended up stranded in the open at the border, as winter temperatures at times fell to -20C. Adil, a man from Iraq, who spent several months in the forest since August 2021, told Amnesty International: “We used to sleep in the forest on the snow. We used to light fire to get warm, there were wolves, bears.”

    At the border and in the tents, authorities confiscated people’s mobile phones to prevent any communication with the outside world. Some families searched for people who were last known to be in Latvia but could not be reached by phone. A Latvian NGO reported that between August and November 2021, they were contacted by the relatives of more than 30 refugees and migrants feared to have gone missing.

    Holding migrants and refugees in tents in undisclosed locations or leaving them stranded at the border without access to communication or safe alternatives to being continuously shuttled back and forth between Latvia and Belarus constitutes ‘secret detention’ and could amount to enforced disappearance.
    Forced returns, abuse and torture

    With no effective access to asylum under the state of emergency, Latvian officers coerced some people held at the border into agreeing to return ‘voluntarily’ to their countries of origin as the only way to be taken out of the forest.

    Others were coerced or misled into accepting voluntary returns in detention centres or police stations.

    Hassan, from Iraq, told Amnesty International that he tried to explain that his life would be in danger if he was returned: “The commando responded: ‘You can die here too’”.

    Another Iraqi, Omar, described how an officer hit him from behind and forced him to sign a return paper: “He held my hand and said you should do the signature, and then with force, he made me do the signature.”

    In some cases, the IOM representative for Latvia ignored evidence that people transferred as part of “voluntary” return procedures had not provided their genuine consent to returning.

    “Latvia, Lithuania and Poland, continue to commit grave abuses, under the pretext of being under a ‘hybrid attack’ from Belarus. As winter approaches and movements at the border have resumed, the state of emergency continues to allow Latvian authorities to unlawfully return people to Belarus. Many more could be exposed to violence, arbitrary detention and other abuses, with limited or no independent oversight,” said Eve Geddie.

    “Latvia’s shameful treatment of people arriving at its borders presents a vital test for European institutions, which must take urgent measures to ensure that Latvia ends the state of emergency and restores the right to asylum across the country for everyone seeking safety, irrespective of their origin or how they crossed the border.”
    Background

    As pushbacks at the Belarus border with Latvia, Lithuania and Poland re-intensify, the EU Council is prioritizing the adoption of a Regulation on the “instrumentalization” of migrants and asylum seekers. This would allow member states facing situations of “instrumentalization” – as experienced by Latvia – to derogate from their obligations under EU asylum and migration law. The proposal disproportionately impacts the rights of refugees and migrants and risks undermining the uniform application of EU asylum law.

    In June, the Court of Justice of the EU ruled that the Lithuanian law on asylum and migration, which limited people’s ability to make asylum applications under the state of emergency and provided for the automatic detention of asylum seekers, was incompatible with EU law.

    The Court’s analysis and conclusions should apply directly to the situation in Latvia, where, since August 2021, the state of emergency effectively prevents most people entering or attempting to enter “irregularly” from Belarus from accessing asylum.

    https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2022/10/latvia-refugees-and-migrants-arbitrarily-detained-tortured-and-forced-to-vo

    #Lettonie #réfugiés #asile #migrations #détention #détention_arbitraire #torture #retour_volontaire (sic) #renvois_forcés #pays_baltes #rapport #Amnesty #Amnesty_international #Biélorussie #forêt #push-backs #refoulements #état_d'urgence #police #gardes-frontière #armée #militarisation_des_frontières #violence #abandon #limbe #encampement #commando #milices

    ping @isskein @reka

  • L’#asile au prisme du #terrorisme

    Un dernier épisode sur les évolutions récentes des pratiques juridiques en matière de droit d’asile en France en lien avec le terrorisme, et en particulier le traitement politique et médiatique de ce que l’on a appelé, à tort ou à raison, la "#question_tchétchène".

    Autour du témoignage, à Paris puis à Grenoble où il est aujourd’hui assigné à résidence, d’un jeune homme tchétchène accusé de terrorisme et l’analyse de son avocate Lucie Simon – mise en perspective par un professeur de droit public (Thibaut Fleury-Graff) et une historienne spécialiste de la Russie contemporaine (Anne le Huérou) –,ce dernier épisode est consacré à la question des rapports entre droit d’asile et terrorisme.

    Que ressent un jeune homme qui a grandi en France face à la menace d’#expulsion qui plane sur lui ; “Étant arrivé en France à seulement sept ans, devoir me justifier sur des choses de mon pays d’accueil, c’est très compliqué. C’est vraiment dur de se dire qu’il faille se justifier. Parce que j’ai grandi en France et je suis allé à l’école en France. J’ai tout vécu en France. En réalité, si on regarde bien, ma vie a commencé en France, ce n’était pas vraiment une vie avant cela. Donc devoir se justifier, oui, à ce sujet-là, c’est plutôt compliqué.”

    Quelle évolution récente de l’accueil des personnes réfugiées en France au prisme du terrorisme ? Qu’est-ce qu’une note blanche que l’avocat Gilles Piquois qualifie “d’insupportable” et “de #bobard_politique” ? Et dans quelle mesure ce document discrétionnaire des #services_de_renseignement joue-t-il dorénavant un rôle décisif dans l’examen des demandes d’asile formulées auprès de la Cour Nationale du Droit d’Asile (#CNDA) ?

    Plus spécifiquement, peut-on parler d’une #stigmatisation des ressortissants tchétchènes depuis l’assassinat de #Samuel_Patty (octobre 2020) et les affrontements de Dijon (juin 2020) ? Qu’est-ce que l’affaire dite "#Gadaev" ?

    Et enfin, dans quelle mesure peut-on dire, comme l’affirmera Gilles Piquois, que l’importance de la défense du droit des étrangers revient en fin de compte à prendre la défense des droits et du droit plus largement ? En effet, il alerte : “Attention, un train peut en cacher un autre. Il est bien clair que le droit des étrangers est un #laboratoire de ce qui nous attend après nous, les nationaux. On commence les saloperies sur les étrangers et ensuite, ce ne sont plus que les étrangers qui en sont victimes. Et ça, on peut vous démontrer que ça existe, et que ça a toujours existé. C’est pour ça que défendre les #droits_des_étrangers, ce n’est pas un altruisme totalement d’une autre planète, c’est au contraire la défense de nos droits. Nos droits sont les mêmes, il n’y a pas de différence entre national et étranger et c’est la #défense_des_droits et du droit qui doit absolument être menée avec fermeté.”

    https://www.radiofrance.fr/franceculture/podcasts/lsd-la-serie-documentaire/l-asile-au-prisme-du-terrorisme-9657805

    –—

    Où Me Lucie Simon raconte de la résistance d’un steward (à partir de la min 13’20) :

    « On a un steward, en civil, qui était en passager sur le vol, qui est venu nous voir de lui-même et qui nous a dit : ’J’ai compris, je vais appeler le commandant de bord’. C’est là où on a à nouveau foi en l’humanité, parce qu’on voit ce commandant de bord qui arrive et qui nous dit : ’Moi, je fais du transport de passagers, je ne fais pas du transport de bétail’. Et il ajout qu’il n’est pas dans son avion et il ne montera pas dans son avion. »

    –-> ajouté à la métaliste sur la #résistance de #passagers (mais aussi de #pilotes) aux #renvois_forcés :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/725457

    #Djakhar #anti-terrorisme #justice #droit_d'asile #migrations #réfugiés #CRA #rétention #détention_administrative #réfugiés_tchétchènes #podcast #audio #renvois

  • #Corsica_Linea accueille des Ukrainiens et expulse des Algériens

    La même compagnie de bateaux qui a accueilli des réfugiés ukrainiens à Marseille sert désormais à expulser des sans-papiers de l’autre côté de la Méditerranée. C’est ce que révèlent les témoignages de plusieurs employés de la compagnie Corsica Linea.

    La compagnie de transport maritime Corsica Linea était fière, le 23 mars 2022, d’annoncer aux côtés de la préfecture des Bouches-du-Rhône l’ouverture du premier centre d’accueil de réfugiés ukrainiens. 1.700 places au total. L’un de ses #ferries, le « Méditerranée », est mis à disposition pour héberger jusqu’à 800 Ukrainiens. Dans les Echos, on apprend que l’initiative humanitaire vient du #Club_Top_20, qui regroupe les entreprises les plus influentes du territoire marseillais.

    Une fois vidés de leurs réfugiés, début juin, les bateaux de Corsica Linea ont repris la mer. À 20 mètres de la cabine du commandant de bord, cachés de la vue des passagers lambdas : d’autres étrangers. Des #sans-papiers que la France expulse vers l’Algérie. La compagnie corse préfère cette fois rester discrète.

    Un mécano découvre le pot aux roses

    Camille (1), la quarantaine, travaille comme ouvrier mécanicien sur l’un des bateaux de la compagnie Corsica Linea. Le mardi 20 septembre, il embarque à Marseille direction Alger, à bord du ferry Danielle Casanova. Un nom donné en hommage à une résistante communiste corse. Il a l’habitude de faire ce voyage. Mais cette fois-ci, il se passe quelque chose de différent :

    « La veille, l’officier me demande de remettre en état “les cellules des gardes et des prisonniers” parce qu’on est susceptibles de rapatrier des mecs le lendemain. Je ne comprends pas de quoi il s’agit. »

    Le mardi matin avant 8 heures, il fait son boulot et retape les sanitaires. Le marin se pose des questions :

    « Je remarque que tout est arrondi pour ne pas se blesser. »

    « Je demande à mes collègues, personne ne sait rien. Je me dis que la seule chose que je peux faire, c’est de faire durer le temps. Alors un truc que je peux faire en 30 minutes, j’y passe deux heures », décrit Camille.

    Puis vient un moment de flottement. Aux alentours de 9 heures et demi, le mécano entend « des mecs arriver, c’était bruyant. Là, je vois la #police_aux_frontières (#Paf) arriver avec des migrants, ça se bouscule… Ils sont trois, la trentaine, escortés, un flic devant, un flic derrière ». Camille ajoute :

    « Ils ont les poignets menottés, des casques de boxeur sur la tête [pour ne pas se blesser le crâne]. »

    Le jeune ouvrier décide d’entamer une discussion avec les hommes de la Paf. « Ils me disent que les #expulsions ont commencé en juin sur le bateau “Méditerranée” ». Le même qui a servi d’accueil aux Ukrainiens. « Les flics me parlent d’une reconduite prévue la semaine prochaine, et lancent un : “Et ça continuera” », rapporte Camille dans son uniforme bleu marine, d’un ton qui se veut calme.

    D’après son témoignage, les cabines en inox sont surnommées : « La #prison » et surveillées par des caméras vidéo 24 heures sur 24. Elles sont fermées à clef de l’extérieur, pas de hublot. La coursive devant la prison est verrouillée par deux portes à code. Selon un rapport interne du Contrôleur général des lieux de privation de liberté (CGLPL) sur les #éloignements en bateau vers l’Algérie, « aucune procédure d’exploitation des enregistrements n’existe et la surveillance vidéo n’est pas signalée ». Le marin confie :

    « J’ai été chialer un bon coup dans les chiottes. Moi, je n’ai pas signé pour virer des Arabes, ça non ».

    Il se met à travailler salement pour appeler un collègue nettoyeur et lui montrer ce qu’il a vu :

    « Je simule un problème de mécanique, je fais exprès de faire un taf de porc pour faire traîner les choses. »

    Son collègue Alix (1) monte de l’hôtellerie pour nettoyer ce qu’a fait Camille. Il a accepté de livrer son témoignage. « Quand je vois ces #cellules_d’isolement en métal, je suis un peu choqué. Trois hommes [les Algériens] me regardent, ils ont l’air apeurés. » Il continue :

    « C’est comme une prison. Je me suis souvenu des Ukrainiens, ils n’étaient pas au même endroit ni traités de la même façon. Je n’ai pas compris ce qui se passait, je n’avais jamais vu une cellule de ma vie, sauf à la télé ».

    Des menaces

    Le jeune marin chargé de l’entretien a été témoin d’un autre moment sur le bateau. « J’étais à la réception quand la Paf est arrivée, elle a demandé à parler au commissaire de bord », raconte Alix. « J’ai rempli pour eux la feuille des besoins spécifiques, et tout en bas, il y avait déjà deux noms inscrits pour des visas “courte durée” : c’était pour la police. On leur attribue des cabines et des tickets-repas ».

    Les agents de la Paf vont manger au self avec les marins, se promener sur le pont, et ce pendant toute la traversée en mer aller-retour, du mardi au jeudi. Le mardi soir, un matelot de garde aurait crié : « Il y a une merde en cellule avec les reconduits, j’appelle les forces de l’ordre ! ». Selon les marins, tout le monde pouvait entendre ces mots, passagers compris.

    Dans un enregistrement fourni par Camille, on entend distinctement un policier menacer un migrant de l’attacher s’il continue de crier et de gesticuler. Le jeune détenu pleure et tape sur les murs :

    « Je vais casser ma tête, comme ça le commandant, il m’emmène à l’hôpital et je pars pas ».

    Puis on entend le policier dire à ses collègues :

    « S’il nous fait trop chier, on lui fait une piqûre de calmant ».

    Il revient vers lui :

    « Prends sur toi, ça va être casse-couille pendant 20 heures, mais prends sur toi, allez. »

    On entend Camille poser une question à l’agent de la Paf, qui lui répond froidement :

    « Je ne sais pas, c’est la première fois que je viens. »

    Dans un autre enregistrement, on entend un migrant hurler : « Un être humain il est pas capable de rester là wallah ». Et un autre, d’une voix aiguë : « Monsieur, monsieur, je vous en prie, il faut ouvrir, monsieur je suis tranquille, je vous en prie… » Camille enchérit :

    « C’est intenable. Je me retiens de pleurer plusieurs fois, j’ai fait des exercices de respiration, je me sentais impuissant. »

    Il faut dire que le marin vient du militantisme « no-border », pour la libre circulation des personnes. « Je ne peux pas recevoir des migrants chez moi et en expulser ensuite, ce n’est pas possible. Et même s’ils ont été condamnés par la justice, ils n’avaient pas le choix de commettre des délits pour survivre, vu qu’ils n’ont pas le droit de travailler », pointe le mécanicien, reprenant illico sa casquette d’activiste.

    Quand ils arrivent à Alger, le débarquement dure de 9h à 14h. « C’est normal, c’est la #Hogra (dialecte algérien signifiant humiliation publique, injustice, excès de pouvoir) », sourit Alix. Il leur est interdit de sortir de l’enceinte portuaire. Puis les marins ne voient plus la Paf, jusqu’au mardi suivant. Même scénario le 27 septembre : d’autres expulsions vers Alger ont lieu. Camille simule un problème mécanique et en profite pour faire des vidéos des #cellules.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZuG0MR5n1PA&feature=emb_logo

    Un bras de fer franco-algérien

    Comme l’avaient révélé StreetPress et Mediapart, Alger a pendant de longs mois refusé le retour de ses ressortissants. En guise de représailles, « l’État français [a] décidé de réduire de 50 % le nombre de #visas délivrés aux ressortissants algériens », précise l’ONG Euromed Rights, une association de défense des droits des étrangers basée au Danemark. Mais les tensions semblent s’apaiser et les expulsions auraient démarré au mois de juin avec une pause pendant l’été. « Près de 80 % des incarcérés en centre de rétention administrative (#Cra) sont des Algériens. C’est une très très forte majorité », affirme une source d’un Cra du Sud de la France. « Ils sont piochés d’un peu partout, mais principalement au Cra de Marseille. Le test PCR n’est même plus imposé ». Avant cela, les exilés pouvaient refuser et ainsi retarder l’échéance.

    Dans un retour de mail daté du mois de juin, la préfecture des Bouches-du-Rhône confirme utiliser plusieurs « vecteurs disponibles » – aériens, terrestres ou maritimes – pour les #reconduites_aux_frontières des étrangers en situation irrégulière sur le territoire français. Jointe à nouveau début octobre, elle ne souhaite rien commenter ou ajouter. Même si elle ne répond pas à nos questions sur ce contrat entre le ministère de l’Intérieur et Corsica Linea, elle ne dément pas. Selon la presse algérienne et Euromed Rights, la France a signé un contrat en juin avec la société privée Corsica Linea pour le retour des migrants par la mer.

    Une détention arbitraire ?

    D’après les témoignages de Camille et Alix, les reconduits ne sortent pas des cellules avant que le bateau ne soit à quai à Alger. Ils sont alors remis aux autorités algériennes, et souvent à nouveau emprisonnés pour « immigration illégale ».

    Patrick Henriot, magistrat honoraire, secrétaire général du groupe d’information et de soutien des immigrés (Gisti) souligne que les textes applicables à l’exécution forcée des #mesures_d’éloignement n’autorisent pas les services de police à priver les personnes de liberté pendant leur acheminement vers le pays de renvoi.

    Certes ils peuvent user d’une certaine contrainte mais elle doit être « strictement nécessaire » et en toutes circonstances rester « proportionnée ». La Paf est là pour sécuriser ces personnes. « Or le #confinement_forcé, pendant toute la durée du trajet, dans une cabine fermée qui n’est rien d’autre qu’une cellule, apparaît manifestement disproportionné » explique Patrick Henriot, qui continue :

    « Sans compter qu’il y a là une atteinte à la dignité des personnes au regard des conditions dans lesquelles se déroule cet emprisonnement qui ne dit pas son nom. »

    Le magistrat ajoute : « Sur un navire, c’est le capitaine qui est titulaire du pouvoir de police. Certes, il peut demander aux policiers de lui prêter main-forte dans l’exercice de ce pouvoir mais la contrainte doit s’exercer sous sa responsabilité, et il doit lui-même veiller à ce qu’elle reste proportionnée ». Selon nos informations, le capitaine n’accompagnait à aucun moment les policiers, leur laissant le plein pouvoir.

    Contactée plusieurs fois par mail et par téléphone, la compagnie Corsica Linea s’est refusée à tout commentaire.

    https://www.streetpress.com/sujet/1665408878-corsica-linea-accueille-ukraniens-expulse-algeriens-marseill
    #tri #catégorisation #réfugiés #réfugiés_ukrainiens #réfugiés_algériens #expulsion #bateaux #Algérie #France #détention_arbitraire

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • À l’abri des regards : l’#enfermement illégal à la frontière franco-italienne

    À l’heure de discussions autour d’une nouvelle loi sur l’immigration et l’asile en France et d’une réforme de l’espace Schengen et du Pacte européen sur la migration et l’asile, un même constat s’impose : les politiques migratoires de l’Union européenne et de ses États membres sont constitutives de violations des droits fondamentaux et de la dignité des personnes en migration. Dans ce contexte, l’Anafé publie aujourd’hui un dossier sur l’enfermement illégal constaté depuis 2015 à la frontière franco-italienne, enfermement qui illustre les conséquences de ces politiques violentes.

    Ce dossier – composé d’une cartographie en ligne (https://ferme.yeswiki.net/fermons_les_zones_d-attente/?PagePrincipale), d’un guide de sensibilisation et d’une note d’analyse – décrit les lieux privatifs de liberté créés par les autorités françaises à la frontière franco-italienne depuis 2015 ainsi que les conditions indignes dans lesquelles les personnes en migration y sont enfermées, tout en démontrant le caractère ex frame, c’est-à-dire hors de tout cadre légal, de ces #lieux_d’enfermement.

    Prenant le contrepoint des autorités qui se retranchent derrière le vocabulaire d’une soi-disant « #mise_à_l’abri » pour qualifier ces locaux et des juridictions qui ne condamnent pas ces pratiques abjectes, l’Anafé entend, par ce dossier, témoigner de ces faits qui démontrent en réalité des pratiques de #détention_arbitraire à la frontière franco-italienne.

    « On n’enferme pas, on ne prive pas de liberté, de la protection de l’asile, d’eau, de nourriture, de soins ou de dignité celles et ceux que l’on entend mettre à l’abri. A l’abri de quoi ? Lorsque l’on déconstruit la sémantique des autorités policières et gouvernementales françaises, la vérité apparaît : elles mentent et enferment illégalement des centaines de femmes, d’enfants et d’hommes chaque année, en toute #impunité et parfois avec la #complicité des autorités judiciaires. », dénonce Alexandre Moreau, président de l’Anafé.

    Ce dossier entend ainsi rendre visible les logiques des politiques migratoires françaises, les violations quotidiennes des #droits_fondamentaux et mettre à jour la réalité de ce que l’administration française cherche, pour sa part, à éloigner des regards.

    « #Discrimination, #stigmatisation, #criminalisation et #déshumanisation des personnes en migration sont les fils conducteurs de politiques migratoires qui, depuis des décennies, mettent l’enfermement aux frontières au cœur de leur arsenal de mesures visant à lutter contre une soi-disant « invasion » de personnes en migration. Inefficace et violente, la privation de liberté est toujours utilisée pour empêcher les personnes d’avoir accès au territoire européen ou au sein des pays qui composent l’Union. Ce dossier vient ainsi rappeler que, pour garantir un État respectueux des droits fondamentaux, un impératif doit être respecté : la détention arbitraire des personnes en migration doit cesser. », commente Laure Palun, directrice de l’Anafé.

    Rappelant le constat de pratiques d’enfermement illégal dans les aéroports et les ports français qui, il y a 30 ans, a mené à la création de l’Anafé et au cadre légal de la zone d’attente, ce dossier s’inscrit dans la campagne menée depuis un an par l’Anafé contre l’enfermement aux frontières. Ainsi, aux côtés de la demande portée par l’Anafé de fermeture des zones d’attente, ce dossier conclut sur un seul et unique impératif : la fermeture des lieux d’enfermement ex frame à la frontière franco-italienne.

    http://www.anafe.org/spip.php?article648

    #frontière_sud-alpine #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Hautes-Alpes #Alpes_maritimes #Alpes #montagne #Italie #France #Modane #privation_de_liberté #détention #Menton #Menton_Garavan #Montgenèvre #Fréjus

  • « Les #réfugiés sont les #cobayes des futures mesures de #surveillance »

    Les dangers de l’émigration vers l’Europe vont croissant, déplore Mark Akkerman, qui étudie la #militarisation_des_frontières du continent depuis 2016. Un mouvement largement poussé par le #lobby de l’#industrie_de_l’armement et de la sécurité.

    Mark Akkerman étudie depuis 2016 la militarisation des frontières européennes. Chercheur pour l’ONG anti-militariste #Stop_Wapenhandel, il a publié, avec le soutien de The Transnational Institute, plusieurs rapports de référence sur l’industrie des « #Safe_Borders ». Il revient pour Mediapart sur des années de politiques européennes de surveillance aux frontières.

    Mediapart : En 2016, vous publiez un premier rapport, « Borders Wars », qui cartographie la surveillance aux frontières en Europe. Dans quel contexte naît ce travail ?

    Mark Akkerman : Il faut se rappeler que l’Europe a une longue histoire avec la traque des migrants et la sécurisation des frontières, qui remonte, comme l’a montré la journaliste d’investigation néerlandaise Linda Polman, à la Seconde Guerre mondiale et au refus de soutenir et abriter des réfugiés juifs d’Allemagne. Dès la création de l’espace Schengen, au début des années 1990, l’ouverture des frontières à l’intérieur de cet espace était étroitement liée au renforcement du contrôle et de la sécurité aux frontières extérieures. Depuis lors, il s’agit d’un processus continu marqué par plusieurs phases d’accélération.

    Notre premier rapport (https://www.tni.org/en/publication/border-wars) est né durant l’une de ces phases. J’ai commencé ce travail en 2015, au moment où émerge le terme « crise migratoire », que je qualifierais plutôt de tragédie de l’exil. De nombreuses personnes, principalement motivées par la guerre en Syrie, tentent alors de trouver un avenir sûr en Europe. En réponse, l’Union et ses États membres concentrent leurs efforts sur la sécurisation des frontières et le renvoi des personnes exilées en dehors du territoire européen.

    Cela passe pour une part importante par la militarisation des frontières, par le renforcement des pouvoirs de Frontex et de ses financements. Les réfugiés sont dépeints comme une menace pour la sécurité de l’Europe, les migrations comme un « problème de sécurité ». C’est un récit largement poussé par le lobby de l’industrie militaire et de la sécurité, qui a été le principal bénéficiaire de ces politiques, des budgets croissants et des contrats conclus dans ce contexte.

    Cinq ans après votre premier rapport, quel regard portez-vous sur la politique européenne de sécurisation des frontières ? La pandémie a-t-elle influencé cette politique ?

    Depuis 2016, l’Europe est restée sur la même voie. Renforcer, militariser et externaliser la sécurité aux frontières sont les seules réponses aux migrations. Davantage de murs et de clôtures ont été érigés, de nouveaux équipements de surveillance, de détection et de contrôle ont été installés, de nouveaux accords avec des pays tiers ont été conclus, de nouvelles bases de données destinées à traquer les personnes exilées ont été créées. En ce sens, les politiques visibles en 2016 ont été poursuivies, intensifiées et élargies.

    La pandémie de Covid-19 a certainement joué un rôle dans ce processus. De nombreux pays ont introduit de nouvelles mesures de sécurité et de contrôle aux frontières pour contenir le virus. Cela a également servi d’excuse pour cibler à nouveau les réfugiés, les présentant encore une fois comme des menaces, responsables de la propagation du virus.

    Comme toujours, une partie de ces mesures temporaires vont se pérenniser et on constate déjà, par exemple, l’évolution des contrôles aux frontières vers l’utilisation de technologies biométriques sans contact.

    En 2020, l’UE a choisi Idemia et Sopra Steria, deux entreprises françaises, pour construire un fichier de contrôle biométrique destiné à réguler les entrées et sorties de l’espace Schengen. Quel regard portez-vous sur ces bases de données ?

    Il existe de nombreuses bases de données biométriques utilisées pour la sécurité aux frontières. L’Union européenne met depuis plusieurs années l’accent sur leur développement. Plus récemment, elle insiste sur leur nécessaire connexion, leur prétendue interopérabilité. L’objectif est de créer un système global de détection, de surveillance et de suivi des mouvements de réfugiés à l’échelle européenne pour faciliter leur détention et leur expulsion.

    Cela contribue à créer une nouvelle forme d’« apartheid ». Ces fichiers sont destinés certes à accélérer les processus de contrôles aux frontières pour les citoyens nationaux et autres voyageurs acceptables mais, surtout, à arrêter ou expulser les migrantes et migrants indésirables grâce à l’utilisation de systèmes informatiques et biométriques toujours plus sophistiqués.

    Quelles sont les conséquences concrètes de ces politiques de surveillance ?

    Il devient chaque jour plus difficile et dangereux de migrer vers l’Europe. Parce qu’elles sont confrontées à la violence et aux refoulements aux frontières, ces personnes sont obligées de chercher d’autres routes migratoires, souvent plus dangereuses, ce qui crée un vrai marché pour les passeurs. La situation n’est pas meilleure pour les personnes réfugiées qui arrivent à entrer sur le territoire européen. Elles finissent régulièrement en détention, sont expulsées ou sont contraintes de vivre dans des conditions désastreuses en Europe ou dans des pays limitrophes.

    Cette politique n’impacte pas que les personnes réfugiées. Elle présente un risque pour les libertés publiques de l’ensemble des Européens. Outre leur usage dans le cadre d’une politique migratoire raciste, les technologies de surveillance sont aussi « testées » sur des personnes migrantes qui peuvent difficilement faire valoir leurs droits, puis introduites plus tard auprès d’un public plus large. Les réfugiés sont les cobayes des futures mesures de contrôle et de surveillance des pays européens.

    Vous pointez aussi que les industriels qui fournissent en armement les belligérants de conflits extra-européens, souvent à l’origine de mouvements migratoires, sont ceux qui bénéficient du business des frontières.

    C’est ce que fait Thales en France, Leonardo en Italie ou Airbus. Ces entreprises européennes de sécurité et d’armement exportent des armes et des technologies de surveillance partout dans le monde, notamment dans des pays en guerre ou avec des régimes autoritaires. À titre d’exemple, les exportations européennes au Moyen-Orient et en Afrique du Nord des dix dernières années représentent 92 milliards d’euros et concernent des pays aussi controversés que l’Arabie saoudite, l’Égypte ou la Turquie.

    Si elles fuient leur pays, les populations civiles exposées à la guerre dans ces régions du monde se retrouveront très certainement confrontées à des technologies produites par les mêmes industriels lors de leur passage aux frontières. C’est une manière profondément cynique de profiter, deux fois, de la misère d’une même population.

    Quelles entreprises bénéficient le plus de la politique européenne de surveillance aux frontières ? Par quels mécanismes ? Je pense notamment aux programmes de recherches comme Horizon 2020 et Horizon Europe.

    J’identifie deux types d’entreprises qui bénéficient de la militarisation des frontières de l’Europe. D’abord les grandes entreprises européennes d’armement et de sécurité, comme Airbus, Leonardo et Thales, qui disposent toutes d’une importante gamme de technologies militaires et de surveillance. Pour elles, le marché des frontières est un marché parmi d’autres. Ensuite, des entreprises spécialisées, qui travaillent sur des niches, bénéficient aussi directement de cette politique européenne. C’est le cas de l’entreprise espagnole European Security Fencing, qui fabrique des fils barbelés. Elles s’enrichissent en remportant des contrats, à l’échelle européenne, mais aussi nationale, voire locale.

    Une autre source de financement est le programme cadre européen pour la recherche et l’innovation. Il finance des projets sur 7 ans et comprend un volet sécurité aux frontières. Des programmes existent aussi au niveau du Fonds européen de défense.

    Un de vos travaux de recherche, « Expanding the Fortress », s’intéresse aux partenariats entre l’Europe et des pays tiers. Quels sont les pays concernés ? Comment se manifestent ces partenariats ?

    L’UE et ses États membres tentent d’établir une coopération en matière de migrations avec de nombreux pays du monde. L’accent est mis sur les pays identifiés comme des « pays de transit » pour celles et ceux qui aspirent à rejoindre l’Union européenne. L’Europe entretient de nombreux accords avec la Libye, qu’elle équipe notamment en matériel militaire. Il s’agit d’un pays où la torture et la mise à mort des réfugiés ont été largement documentées.

    Des accords existent aussi avec l’Égypte, la Tunisie, le Maroc, la Jordanie, le Liban ou encore l’Ukraine. L’Union a financé la construction de centres de détention dans ces pays, dans lesquels on a constaté, à plusieurs reprises, d’importantes violations en matière de droits humains.

    Ces pays extra-européens sont-ils des zones d’expérimentations pour les entreprises européennes de surveillance ?

    Ce sont plutôt les frontières européennes, comme celle d’Evros, entre la Grèce et la Turquie, qui servent de zone d’expérimentation. Le transfert d’équipements, de technologies et de connaissances pour la sécurité et le contrôle des frontières représente en revanche une partie importante de ces coopérations. Cela veut dire que les États européens dispensent des formations, partagent des renseignements ou fournissent de nouveaux équipements aux forces de sécurité de régimes autoritaires.

    Ces régimes peuvent ainsi renforcer et étendre leurs capacités de répression et de violation des droits humains avec le soutien de l’UE. Les conséquences sont dévastatrices pour la population de ces pays, ce qui sert de moteur pour de nouvelles vagues de migration…

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/040822/les-refugies-sont-les-cobayes-des-futures-mesures-de-surveillance

    cité dans l’interview, ce rapport :
    #Global_Climate_Wall
    https://www.tni.org/en/publication/global-climate-wall
    déjà signalé ici : https://seenthis.net/messages/934948#message934949

    #asile #migrations #complexe_militaro-industriel #surveillance_des_frontières #Frontex #problème #Covid-19 #coronavirus #biométrie #technologie #Idemia #Sopra_Steria #contrôle_biométrique #base_de_données #interopérabilité #détection #apartheid #informatique #violence #refoulement #libertés_publiques #test #normalisation #généralisation #Thales #Leonardo #Airbus #armes #armements #industrie_de_l'armement #cynisme #Horizon_Europe #Horizon_2020 #marché #business #European_Security_Fencing #barbelés #fils_barbelés #recherche #programmes_de_recherche #Fonds_européen_de_défense #accords #externalisation #externalisation_des_contrôles_frontaliers #Égypte #Libye #Tunisie #Maroc #Jordanie #Liban #Ukraine #rétention #détention_administrative #expérimentation #équipements #connaissance #transfert #coopérations #formations #renseignements #répression

    ping @isskein @karine4 @_kg_

    • Le système électronique d’#Entrée-Sortie en zone #Schengen : la biométrie au service des #frontières_intelligentes

      Avec la pression migratoire et la vague d’attentats subis par l’Europe ces derniers mois, la gestion des frontières devient une priorité pour la Commission.

      Certes, le système d’information sur les #visas (#VIS, #Visa_Information_System) est déployé depuis 2015 dans les consulats des États Membres et sa consultation rendue obligatoire lors de l’accès dans l’#espace_Schengen.

      Mais, depuis février 2013, est apparu le concept de « #frontières_intelligentes », (#Smart_Borders), qui recouvre un panel ambitieux de mesures législatives élaborées en concertation avec le Parlement Européen.

      Le système entrée/sortie, en particulier, va permettre, avec un système informatique unifié, d’enregistrer les données relatives aux #entrées et aux #sorties des ressortissants de pays tiers en court séjour franchissant les frontières extérieures de l’Union européenne.

      Adopté puis signé le 30 Novembre 2017 par le Conseil Européen, il sera mis en application en 2022. Il s’ajoutera au « PNR européen » qui, depuis le 25 mai 2018, recense les informations sur les passagers aériens.

      Partant du principe que la majorité des visiteurs sont « de bonne foi », #EES bouleverse les fondements mêmes du #Code_Schengen avec le double objectif de :

      - rendre les frontières intelligentes, c’est-à-dire automatiser le contrôle des visiteurs fiables tout en renforçant la lutte contre les migrations irrégulières
      - créer un #registre_central des mouvements transfrontaliers.

      La modernisation de la gestion des frontières extérieures est en marche. En améliorant la qualité et l’efficacité des contrôles de l’espace Schengen, EES, avec une base de données commune, doit contribuer à renforcer la sécurité intérieure et la lutte contre le terrorisme ainsi que les formes graves de criminalité.

      L’#identification de façon systématique des personnes qui dépassent la durée de séjour autorisée dans l’espace Schengen en est un des enjeux majeurs.

      Nous verrons pourquoi la reconnaissance faciale en particulier, est la grande gagnante du programme EES. Et plus seulement dans les aéroports comme c’est le cas aujourd’hui.

      Dans ce dossier web, nous traiterons des 6 sujets suivants :

      - ESS : un puissant dispositif de prévention et détection
      - La remise en cause du code « frontières Schengen » de 2006
      - EES : un accès très réglementé
      - La biométrie faciale : fer de lance de l’EES
      - EES et la lutte contre la fraude à l’identité
      - Thales et l’identité : plus de 20 ans d’expertise

      Examinons maintenant ces divers points plus en détail.

      ESS : un puissant dispositif de prévention et détection

      Les activités criminelles telles que la traite d’êtres humains, les filières d’immigration clandestine ou les trafics d’objets sont aujourd’hui la conséquence de franchissements illicites de frontières, largement facilités par l’absence d’enregistrement lors des entrées/ sorties.

      Le scénario de fraude est – hélas – bien rôdé : Contrôle « standard » lors de l’accès à l’espace Schengen, puis destruction des documents d’identité dans la perspective d’activités malveillantes, sachant l’impossibilité d’être authentifié.

      Même si EES vise le visiteur « de bonne foi », le système va constituer à terme un puissant dispositif pour la prévention et la détection d’activités terroristes ou autres infractions pénales graves. En effet les informations stockées dans le nouveau registre pour 5 ans– y compris concernant les personnes refoulées aux frontières – couvrent principalement les noms, numéros de passeport, empreintes digitales et photos. Elles seront accessibles aux autorités frontalières et de délivrance des visas, ainsi qu’à Europol.

      Le système sera à la disposition d’enquêtes en particulier, vu la possibilité de consulter les mouvements transfrontières et historiques de déplacements. Tout cela dans le plus strict respect de la dignité humaine et de l’intégrité des personnes.

      Le dispositif est très clair sur ce point : aucune discrimination fondée sur le sexe, la couleur, les origines ethniques ou sociales, les caractéristiques génétiques, la langue, la religion ou les convictions, les opinions politiques ou toute autre opinion.

      Sont également exclus du champ d’investigation l’appartenance à une minorité nationale, la fortune, la naissance, un handicap, l’âge ou l’orientation sexuelle des visiteurs.​

      La remise en cause du Code frontières Schengen

      Vu la croissance attendue des visiteurs de pays tiers (887 millions en 2025), l’enjeu est maintenant de fluidifier et simplifier les contrôles.

      Une initiative particulièrement ambitieuse dans la mesure où elle remet en cause le fameux Code Schengen qui impose des vérifications approfondies, conduites manuellement par les autorités des Etats Membres aux entrées et sorties, sans possibilité d’automatisation.

      Par ailleurs, le Code Schengen ne prévoit aucun enregistrement des mouvements transfrontaliers. La procédure actuelle exigeant seulement que les passeports soient tamponnés avec mention des dates d’entrée et sortie.

      Seule possibilité pour les gardes-frontières : Calculer un éventuel dépassement de la durée de séjour qui elle-même est une information falsifiable et non consignée dans une base de données.

      Autre contrainte, les visiteurs réguliers comme les frontaliers doivent remplacer leurs passeports tous les 2-3 mois, vue la multitude de tampons ! Un procédé bien archaïque si l’on considère le potentiel des technologies de l’information.

      La proposition de 2013 comprenait donc trois piliers :

      - ​La création d’un système automatisé d’entrée/sortie (Entry/ Exit System ou EES)
      - Un programme d’enregistrement de voyageurs fiables, (RTP, Registered Traveller Program) pour simplifier le passage des visiteurs réguliers, titulaires d’un contrôle de sûreté préalable
      – La modification du Code Schengen

      Abandon de l’initiative RTP

      Trop complexe à mettre en œuvre au niveau des 28 Etats Membres, l’initiative RTP (Registered Travelers Program) a été finalement abandonnée au profit d’un ambitieux programme Entry/ Exit (EES) destiné aux visiteurs de courte durée (moins de 90 jours sur 180 jours).

      Précision importante, sont maintenant concernés les voyageurs non soumis à l’obligation de visa, sachant que les détenteurs de visas sont déjà répertoriés par le VIS.

      La note est beaucoup moins salée que prévue par la Commission en 2013. Au lieu du milliard estimé, mais qui incluait un RTP, la proposition révisée d’un EES unique ne coutera « que » 480 millions d’EUR.

      Cette initiative ambitieuse fait suite à une étude technique menée en 2014, puis une phase de prototypage conduite sous l’égide de l’agence EU-LISA en 2015 avec pour résultat le retrait du projet RTP et un focus particulier sur le programme EES.

      Une architecture centralisée gérée par EU-LISA

      L’acteur clé du dispositif EES, c’est EU-LISA, l’Agence européenne pour la gestion opérationnelle des systèmes d’information à grande échelle dont le siège est à Tallinn, le site opérationnel à Strasbourg et le site de secours à Sankt Johann im Pongau (Autriche). L’Agence sera en charge des 4 aspects suivants :

      - Développement du système central
      - Mise en œuvre d’une interface uniforme nationale (IUN) dans chaque État Membre
      - Communication sécurisée entre les systèmes centraux EES et VIS
      - Infrastructure de communication entre système central et interfaces uniformes nationales.

      Chaque État Membre sera responsable de l’organisation, la gestion, le fonctionnement et de la maintenance de son infrastructure frontalière vis-à-vis d’EES.

      Une gestion optimisée des frontières

      Grâce au nouveau dispositif, tous les ressortissants des pays tiers seront traités de manière égale, qu’ils soient ou non exemptés de visas.

      Le VIS répertorie déjà les visiteurs soumis à visas. Et l’ambition d’EES c’est de constituer une base pour les autres.

      Les États Membres seront donc en mesure d’identifier tout migrant ou visiteur en situation irrégulière ayant franchi illégalement les frontières et faciliter, le cas échéant, son expulsion.

      Dès l’authentification à une borne en libre–service, le visiteur se verra afficher les informations suivantes, sous supervision d’un garde-frontière :

      - ​Date, heure et point de passage, en remplacement des tampons manuels
      - Notification éventuelle d’un refus d’accès.
      - Durée maximale de séjour autorisé.
      - Dépassement éventuelle de la durée de séjour autorisée
      En ce qui concerne les autorités des Etats Membres, c’est une véritable révolution par rapport à l’extrême indigence du système actuel. On anticipe déjà la possibilité de constituer des statistiques puissantes et mieux gérer l’octroi, ou la suppression de visas, en fonction de mouvements transfrontières, notamment grâce à des informations telles que :

      - ​​​Dépassements des durées de séjour par pays
      - Historique des mouvements frontaliers par pays

      EES : un accès très réglementé

      L’accès à EES est très réglementé. Chaque État Membre doit notifier à EU-LISA les autorités répressives habilitées à consulter les données aux fins de prévention ou détection d’infractions terroristes et autres infractions pénales graves, ou des enquêtes en la matière.

      Europol, qui joue un rôle clé dans la prévention de la criminalité, fera partie des autorités répressives autorisées à accéder au système dans le cadre de sa mission.

      Par contre, les données EES ne pourront pas être communiquées à des pays tiers, une organisation internationale ou une quelconque partie privée établie ou non dans l’Union, ni mises à leur disposition. Bien entendu, dans le cas d’enquêtes visant l’identification d’un ressortissant de pays tiers, la prévention ou la détection d’infractions terroristes, des exceptions pourront être envisagées.​

      Proportionnalité et respect de la vie privée

      Dans un contexte législatif qui considère le respect de la vie privée comme une priorité, le volume de données à caractère personnel enregistré dans EES sera considérablement réduit, soit 26 éléments au lieu des 36 prévus en 2013.

      Il s’agit d’un dispositif négocié auprès du Contrôleur Européen pour la Protection des Données (CEPD) et les autorités nationales en charge d’appliquer la nouvelle réglementation.

      Très schématiquement, les données collectées se limiteront à des informations minimales telles que : nom, prénom, références du document de voyage et visa, biométrie du visage et de 4 empreintes digitales.

      A chaque visite, seront relevés la date, l’heure et le lieu de contrôle frontière. Ces données seront conservées pendant cinq années, et non plus 181 jours comme proposé en 2013.

      Un procédé qui permettra aux gardes-frontières et postes consulaires d’analyser l’historique des déplacements, lors de l’octroi de nouveaux visas.
      ESS : privacy by design

      La proposition de la Commission a été rédigée selon le principe de « respect de la vie privée dès la conception », mieux connue sous le label « Privacy By Design ».

      Sous l’angle du droit, elle est bien proportionnée à la protection des données à caractère personnel en ce que la collecte, le stockage et la durée de conservation des données permettent strictement au système de fonctionner et d’atteindre ses objectifs.

      EES sera un système centralisé avec coopération des Etats Membres ; d’où une architecture et des règles de fonctionnement communes.​

      Vu cette contrainte d’uniformisation des modalités régissant vérifications aux frontières et accès au système, seul le règlement en tant que véhicule juridique pouvait convenir, sans possibilité d’adaptation aux législations nationales.

      Un accès internet sécurisé à un service web hébergé par EU-LISA permettra aux visiteurs des pays tiers de vérifier à tout moment leur durée de séjour autorisée.

      Cette fonctionnalité sera également accessible aux transporteurs, comme les compagnies aériennes, pour vérifier si leurs voyageurs sont bien autorisés à pénétrer dans le territoire de l’UE.

      La biométrie faciale, fer de lance du programme EES

      Véritable remise en question du Code Schengen, EES permettra de relever la biométrie de tous les visiteurs des pays tiers, alors que ceux soumis à visa sont déjà enregistrés dans le VIS.

      Pour les identifiants biométriques, l’ancien système envisageait 10 empreintes digitales. Le nouveau combine quatre empreintes et la reconnaissance faciale.

      La technologie, qui a bénéficié de progrès considérables ces dernières années, s’inscrit en support des traditionnelles empreintes digitales.

      Bien que la Commission ne retienne pas le principe d’enregistrement de visiteurs fiables (RTP), c’est tout comme.

      En effet, quatre empreintes seront encore relevées lors du premier contrôle pour vérifier que le demandeur n’est pas déjà répertorié dans EES ou VIS.

      En l’absence d’un signal, l’autorité frontalière créera un dossier en s’assurant que la photographie du passeport ayant une zone de lecture automatique (« Machine Readable Travel Document ») correspond bien à l’image faciale prise en direct du nouveau visiteur.

      Mais pour les passages suivants, c’est le visage qui l’emporte.

      Souriez, vous êtes en Europe ! Les fastidieux (et falsifiables) tampons sur les passeports seront remplacés par un accès à EES.

      La biométrie est donc le grand gagnant du programme EES. Et plus seulement dans les aéroports comme c’est le cas aujourd’hui.

      Certains terminaux maritimes ou postes frontières terrestres particulièrement fréquentés deviendront les premiers clients de ces fameuses eGates réservées aujourd’hui aux seuls voyageurs aériens.

      Frontex, en tant qu’agence aidant les pays de l’UE et les pays associés à Schengen à gérer leurs frontières extérieures, va aider à harmoniser les contrôles aux frontières à travers l’UE.

      EES et la lutte contre la fraude à l’identité

      Le dispositif EES est complexe et ambitieux dans la mesure où il fluidifie les passages tout en relevant le niveau des contrôles. On anticipe dès aujourd’hui des procédures d’accueil en Europe bien meilleures grâce aux eGates et bornes self-service.

      Sous l’angle de nos politiques migratoires et de la prévention des malveillances, on pourra immédiatement repérer les personnes ne rempliss​​ant pas les conditions d’entrée et accéder aux historiques des déplacements.

      Mais rappelons également qu’EES constituera un puissant outil de lutte contre la fraude à l’identité, notamment au sein de l’espace Schengen, tout visiteur ayant été enregistré lors de son arrivée à la frontière.

      Thales et l’identité : plus de 20 ans d’expertise

      Thales est particulièrement attentif à cette initiative EES qui repose massivement sur la biométrie et le contrôle des documents de voyage.

      En effet, l’identification et l’authentification des personnes sont deux expertises majeures de Thales depuis plus de 20 ans. La société contribue d’ailleurs à plus de 200 programmes gouvernementaux dans 80 pays sur ces sujets.

      La société peut répondre aux objectifs du programme EES en particulier pour :

      - Exploiter les dernières technologies pour l’authentification des documents de voyage, l’identification des voyageurs à l’aide de captures et vérifications biométriques, et l’évaluation des risques avec accès aux listes de contrôle, dans tous les points de contrôle aux frontières.
      - Réduire les coûts par l’automatisation et l’optimisation des processus tout en misant sur de nouvelles technologies pour renforcer la sécurité et offrir davantage de confort aux passagers
      - Valoriser des tâches de gardes-frontières qui superviseront ces dispositifs tout en portant leur attention sur des cas pouvant porter à suspicion.
      - Diminuer les temps d’attente après enregistrement dans la base EES. Un facteur non négligeable pour des frontaliers ou visiteurs réguliers qui consacreront plus de temps à des activités productives !

      Des bornes d’enregistrement libre-service comme des frontières automatiques ou semi-automatiques peuvent être déployées dans les prochaines années avec l’objectif de fluidifier les contrôles et rendre plus accueillant l’accès à l’espace Schengen.

      Ces bornes automatiques et biométriques ont d’ailleurs été installées dans les aéroports parisiens d’Orly et de Charles de Gaulle (Nouveau PARAFE : https://www.thalesgroup.com/fr/europe/france/dis/gouvernement/controle-aux-frontieres).

      La reconnaissance faciale a été mise en place en 2018.

      Les nouveaux sas PARAFE à Roissy – Septembre 2017

      Thales dispose aussi d’une expertise reconnue dans la gestion intégrée des frontières et contribue en particulier à deux grand systèmes de gestion des flux migratoires.

      - Les systèmes d’identification biométrique de Thales sont en particulier au cœur du système américain de gestion des données IDENT (anciennement US-VISIT). Cette base de données biographiques et biométriques contient des informations sur plus de 200 millions de personnes qui sont entrées, ont tenté d’entrer et ont quitté les États-Unis d’Amérique.

      - Thales est le fournisseur depuis l’origine du système biométrique Eurodac (European Dactyloscopy System) qui est le plus important système AFIS multi-juridictionnel au monde, avec ses 32 pays affiliés. Le système Eurodac est une base de données comportant les empreintes digitales des demandeurs d’asile pour chacun des états membres ainsi que des personnes appréhendées à l’occasion d’un franchissement irrégulier d’une frontière.

      Pour déjouer les tentatives de fraude documentaire, Thales a mis au point des équipements sophistiqués permettant de vérifier leur authenticité par comparaison avec les modèles en circulation. Leur validité est aussi vérifiée par connexion à des bases de documents volés ou perdus (SLTD de Interpol). Ou a des watch lists nationales.

      Pour le contrôle des frontières, au-delà de ses SAS et de ses kiosks biométriques, Thales propose toute une gamme de lecteurs de passeports d’équipements et de logiciels d’authentification biométriques, grâce à son portefeuille Cogent, l’un des pionniers du secteur.

      Pour en savoir plus, n’hésitez pas à nous contacter.​

      https://www.thalesgroup.com/fr/europe/france/dis/gouvernement/biometrie/systeme-entree-sortie
      #smart_borders #Thales #overstayers #reconnaissance_faciale #prévention #détection #fraude_à_l'identité #Registered_Traveller_Program (#RTP) #EU-LISA #interface_uniforme_nationale (#IUN) #Contrôleur_Européen_pour_la_Protection_des_Données (#CEPD) #Privacy_By_Design #respect_de_la_vie_privée #empreintes_digitales #biométrie #Frontex #bornes #aéroport #PARAFE #IDENT #US-VISIT #Eurodac #Gemalto

  • Gaining Ground: Promising Practice to Reduce & End Immigration Detention

    Immigration detention represents one of the most flagrant human rights violations of our time. In recent years, IDC has seen a number of governments begin to recognise that effective and feasible #alternatives_to_detention (#ATD) do exist. This paper was written to provide an overview of practical examples and recent developments in the field of alternatives to detention (ATD), in order to highlight promising practice and encourage further progress in this area. It aims to inspire and embolden governments, local authorities, international organisations, civil society and community actors and other stakeholders, with steps they can take to move away from the use of immigration detention. This report includes an Annex compiling short country profiles for the 47 countries included in the research mapping.

    https://idcoalition.org/publication/gaining-ground-promising-practice-to-reduce-end-immigration-detention
    #rétention #détention_administrative #asile #migrations #réfugiés #rapport #IDC #alternatives #exemples

  • A la frontière avec la Turquie, des migrants enrôlés de force par la police grecque pour refouler d’autres migrants

    Une enquête du « Monde » et de « Lighthouse Reports », « Der Spiegel », « ARD Report Munchen » et « The Guardian » montre que la police grecque utilise des migrants pour renvoyer les nouveaux arrivants en Turquie.

    Dans le village de #Neo_Cheimonio, situé à dix minutes du fleuve de l’Evros qui sépare la Grèce et la Turquie, les refoulements de réfugiés, une pratique contraire au droit international, sont un secret de Polichinelle. A l’heure de pointe, au café, les habitants, la cinquantaine bien passée, évoquent la reprise des flux migratoires. « Chaque jour, nous empêchons l’entrée illégale de 900 personnes », a affirmé, le 18 juin, le ministre grec de la protection civile, Takis Theodorikakos, expliquant l’augmentation de la pression migratoire exercée par Ankara.
    « Mais nous ne voyons pas les migrants. Ils sont enfermés, sauf ceux qui travaillent pour la police », lance un retraité. Son acolyte ajoute : « Eux vivent dans les conteneurs du commissariat et peuvent aller et venir. Tu les rencontres à la rivière, où ils travaillent, ou à la tombée de la nuit lorsqu’ils vont faire des courses. » Ces nouvelles « recrues » de la police grecque ont remplacé les fermiers et les pêcheurs qui barraient eux-mêmes la route, il y a quelques années, à ceux qu’ils nomment « les clandestins ».

    « Esclaves » de la police grecque

    D’après les ONG Human Rights Watch ou Josoor, cette tendance revient souvent depuis 2020 dans les témoignages des victimes de « pushbacks » [les refoulements illégaux de migrants]. A la suite des tensions à la frontière en mars 2020, lorsque Ankara avait menacé de laisser passer des milliers de migrants en Europe, les autorités grecques auraient intensifié le recours à cette pratique pour éviter que leurs troupes ne s’approchent trop dangereusement du territoire turc, confirment trois policiers postés à la frontière. Ce #travail_forcé des migrants « bénéficie d’un soutien politique. Aucun policier n’agirait seul », renchérit un gradé.

    Athènes a toujours démenti avoir recours aux refoulements illégaux de réfugiés. Contacté par Le Monde et ses partenaires, le ministère grec de la protection civile n’a pas donné suite à nos sollicitations.

    Au cours des derniers mois, Le Monde et ses partenaires de Lighthouse Reports – Der Spiegel, ARD Report Munchen et The Guardian avec l’aide d’une page Facebook « Consolidated Rescue Group » –, ont pu interviewer six migrants qui ont raconté avoir été les « esclaves » de la #police grecque, contraints d’effectuer des opérations de « pushbacks » secrètes et violentes. En échange, ces petites mains de la politique migratoire grecque se sont vu promettre un #permis_de_séjour d’un mois leur permettant d’organiser la poursuite de leur voyage vers le nord de l’Europe.

    Au fil des interviews se dessine un mode opératoire commun à ces renvois. Après leur arrestation à la frontière, les migrants sont incarcérés plusieurs heures ou plusieurs jours dans un des commissariats. Ils sont ensuite transportés dans des camions en direction du fleuve de l’Evros, où les « esclaves » les attendent en toute discrétion. « Les policiers m’ont dit de porter une cagoule pour ne pas être reconnu », avance Saber, soumis à ce travail forcé en 2020. Enfin, les exilés sont renvoyés vers la Turquie par groupe de dix dans des bateaux pneumatiques conduits par les « esclaves ».

    Racket, passage à tabac des migrants

    Le procédé n’est pas sans #violence : tous confirment les passages à tabac des migrants par la police grecque, le racket, la confiscation de leur téléphone portable, les fouilles corporelles, les mises à nu.
    Dans cette zone militarisée, à laquelle journalistes, humanitaires et avocats n’ont pas accès, nous avons pu identifier six points d’expulsion forcée au niveau de la rivière, grâce au partage des localisations par l’un des migrants travaillant aux côtés des forces de l’ordre grecques. Trois autres ont aussi fourni des photos prises à l’intérieur de #commissariats de police. Des clichés dont nous avons pu vérifier l’authenticité et la localisation.

    A Neo Cheimonio, les « esclaves » ont fini par faire partie du paysage. « Ils viennent la nuit, lorsqu’ils ont fini de renvoyer en Turquie les migrants. Certains restent plusieurs mois et deviennent chefs », rapporte un commerçant de la bourgade.

    L’un de ces leaders, un Syrien surnommé « Mike », a tissé des liens privilégiés avec les policiers et appris quelques rudiments de grec. « Son visage n’est pas facile à oublier. Il est passé faire des emplettes il y a environ cinq jours », note le négociant.
    Mike, mâchoire carrée, coupe militaire et casque de combattant spartiate tatoué sur le biceps droit, a été identifié par trois anciens « esclaves » comme leur supérieur direct. D’après nos informations, cet homme originaire de la région de Homs serait connu des services de police syriens pour des faits de trafic d’essence et d’être humains. Tout comme son frère, condamné en 2009 pour homicide volontaire.

    En contact avec un passeur basé à Istanbul, l’homme recruterait ses serviteurs, en leur faisant croire qu’il les aidera à rester en Grèce en échange d’environ 5 000 euros, selon le récit qu’en fait Farhad, un Syrien qui a vite déchanté en apprenant qu’il devrait expulser des compatriotes en Turquie. « L’accord était que nous resterions une semaine dans le poste de police pour ensuite continuer notre voyage jusqu’à Athènes. Quand on m’a annoncé que je devais effectuer les refoulements, j’ai précisé que je ne savais pas conduire le bateau. Mike m’a répondu que, si je n’acceptais pas, je perdrais tout mon argent et que je risquerais de disparaître à mon retour à Istanbul », glisse le jeune homme.
    Les anciens affidés de Mike se souviennent de sa violence. « Mike frappait les réfugiés et il nous disait de faire de même pour que les #commandos [unité d’élite de la police grecque] soient contents de nous », confie Hussam, un Syrien de 26 ans.

    De 70 à 100 refoulements par jour

    Saber, Hussam ou Farhad affirment avoir renvoyé entre 70 et 100 personnes par jour en Turquie et avoir été témoins d’accidents qui auraient pu mal tourner. Comme ce jour où un enfant est tombé dans le fleuve et a été réanimé de justesse côté turc… Au bout de quarante-cinq jours, Hussam a reçu un titre de séjour temporaire que nous avons retrouvé dans les fichiers de la police grecque. Théoriquement prévu pour rester en Grèce, ce document lui a permis de partir s’installer dans un autre pays européen.
    Sur l’une des photos que nous avons pu nous procurer, Mike prend la pose en treillis, devant un mobile-home, dont nous avons pu confirmer la présence dans l’enceinte du commissariat de Neo Cheimonio. Sur les réseaux sociaux, l’homme affiche un tout autre visage, bien loin de ses attitudes martiales. Tout sourire dans les bras de sa compagne, une Française, en compagnie de ses enfants ou goguenard au volant de sa voiture. C’est en France qu’il a élu domicile, sans éveiller les soupçons des autorités françaises sur ses activités en Grèce.

    Le Monde et ses partenaires ont repéré deux autres postes de police où cette pratique a été adoptée. A #Tychero, village d’environ 2 000 habitants, c’est dans le commissariat, une bâtisse qui ressemble à une étable, que Basel, Saber et Suleiman ont été soumis au même régime.
    C’est par désespoir, après neuf refoulements par les autorités grecques, que Basel avait accepté la proposition de « #collaboration » faite par un policier grec, « parce qu’il parlait bien anglais ». Apparaissant sur une photographie prise dans le poste de police de Tychero et partagée sur Facebook par un de ses collègues, cet officier est mentionné par deux migrants comme leur recruteur. Lors de notre passage dans ce commissariat, le 22 juin, il était présent.
    Basel soutient que les policiers l’encourageaient à se servir parmi les biens volés aux réfugiés. Le temps de sa mission, il était enfermé avec les autres « esclaves » dans une chambre cachée dans une partie du bâtiment qui ne communique pas avec les bureaux du commissariat, uniquement accessible par une porte arrière donnant sur la voie ferrée. Après quatre-vingts jours, Basel a obtenu son sésame, son document de séjour qu’il a gardé, malgré les mauvais souvenirs et les remords. « J’étais un réfugié fuyant la guerre et, tout d’un coup, je suis devenu un bourreau pour d’autres exilés, avoue-t-il. Mais j’étais obligé, j’étais devenu leur esclave. »

    https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2022/06/28/a-la-frontiere-avec-la-turquie-des-migrants-enroles-de-force-par-la-police-g

    #Evros #Thrace #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Turquie #Grèce #push-backs #refoulements #esclavage #néo-esclavage #papier_blanc #détention_administrative #rétention #esclavage_moderne #enfermement

    • “We were slaves”

      The Greek police are using foreigners as “slaves” to forcibly return asylum seekers to Turkey

      People who cross the river Evros from Turkey to Greece to seek international protection are arrested by Greek police every day. They are often beaten, robbed and detained in police stations before illegally being sent back across the river.

      The asylum seekers are moved from the detention sites towards the river bank in police trucks where they are forced onto rubber boats by men wearing balaclavas, with Greek police looking on. Then these masked men transport them back to the other side.

      In recent years there have been numerous accounts from the victims, as well as reports by human rights organisations and the media, stating that the men driving these boats speak Arabic or Farsi, indicating they are not from Greece. A months-long joint investigation with The Guardian, Le Monde, Der Spiegel and ARD Report München has for the first time identified six of these men – who call themselves slaves– interviewed them and located the police stations where they were held. Some of the slaves, who are kept locked up between operations, were forcibly recruited themselves after crossing the border but others were lured there by smugglers working with a gangmaster who is hosted in a container located in the carpark of a Greek police station. In return for their “work” they received papers allowing them to stay in Greece for 25 days.

      The slaves said they worked alongside regular police units to strip, rob and assault refugees and migrants who crossed the Evros river into Greece — they then acted as boatmen to ferry them back to the Turkish side of the river against their will. Between operations the slaves are held in at least three different police stations in the heavily militarised Evros region.

      The six men we interviewed weren’t allowed to have their phones with them during the pushback operations. But some of them managed to take some pictures from inside the police station in Tychero and others took photos of the Syrian gangmaster working with the police. These visuals helped us to corroborate the stories the former slaves told us.

      Videos and photographs from police stations in the heavily militarised zone between Greece and Turkey are rare. One slave we interviewed provided us with selfies allegedly taken from inside the police station of Tychero, close to the river Evros, but difficult to match directly to the station because of the lack of other visuals. We collected all visual material of the station that was available via open sources, and from our team, and we used it to reconstruct the building in a 3D model which made it possible to place the slave’s selfies at the precise location in the building. The 3D-model also tells us that the place where the slaves were kept outside their “working” hours is separate from the prison cells where the Greek police detain asylum seekers before they force them back to Turkey.

      We also obtained photos of a Syrian man in military fatigues in front of a container. This man calls himself Mike. According to three of the six sources, they worked under Mike’s command and he in turn was working with the Greek police. We were able to find the location of the container that serves as home for Mike and the slaves. It is in the parking lot of the police station in Neo Cheimonio in the Evros region.

      We also obtained the papers that the sources received after three months of working with the Greek police and were able to verify their names in the Greek police system. All their testimonies were confirmed by local residents in the Evros region.
      STORYLINES

      Bassel was already half naked, bruised and beaten when he was confronted with an appalling choice. Either he would agree to work for his captors, the Greek police, or he would be charged with human smuggling and go to prison.

      Earlier that night Bassel, a Syrian man in his twenties, had crossed the Evros river from Turkey into Greece hoping to claim asylum. But his group was met in the forests by Greek police and detained. Then Bassel was pulled out of a cell in the small town of Tychero and threatened with smuggling charges for speaking English. His only way out, they told him, was to do the Greeks’ dirty work for them. He would be kept locked up during the day and released at night to push back his own compatriots and other desperate asylum seekers. In return he would be given a travel permit that would enable him to escape Greece for Western Europe. Read the full story in Der Spiegel

      Bassel’s story matched with three other testimonies from asylum seekers who were held in a police station in Neo Cheimonio. All had paid up to €5,000 euros to a middleman in Istanbul to cross from Turkey to Greece with the help of a smuggler, who said there would be a Syrian man waiting for them with Greek police.

      Farhad, in his thirties and from Syria along with two others held at the station, said they too were regularly threatened by a Syrian man whom they knew as “Mike”. “Mike” was working at the Neo Cheimonio station, where he was being used by police as a gangmaster to recruit and coordinate groups of asylum seekers to assist illegal pushbacks, write The Guardian and ARD Report Munchen.
      Residents of Greek villages near the border also report that it is “an open secret” in the region that fugitives carry out pushbacks on behalf of the police. Farmers and fishermen who are allowed to enter the restricted area on the Evros have repeatedly observed refugees doing their work. Migrants are not seen on this stretch of the Evros, a local resident told Le Monde, “Except for those who work for the police.”

      https://www.lighthousereports.nl/investigation/we-were-slaves

  • Schengen borders code: Council adopts its general approach

    As part of the work carried out under the French presidency to reform and strengthen the Schengen area in the face of new challenges, the Council today adopted its general approach on the reform of the Schengen borders code.

    This reform: (i) provides new tools to combat the instrumentalisation of migrant flows; (ii) establishes a new legal framework for external border measures in the event of a health crisis, drawing on the lessons learned from the experience with COVID-19; (iii) updates the legal framework for reintroducing internal border controls in order to safeguard the principle of free movement while responding to persistent threats; (iv) introduces alternative measures to these controls.

    The general approach now enables the Council to start negotiations with the European Parliament, once the Parliament has adopted its own position.
    The fight against the instrumentalisation of migration flows

    The text defines the instrumentalisation of migrants as a situation in which a third country or non-state actor encourages or facilitates the movement of third-country nationals towards the EU’s external borders or to a member state in order to destabilise the EU or a member state. It introduces new measures to combat this phenomenon, including limiting the number of crossing points at the external border or limiting their opening hours, and intensifying border surveillance.
    External border measures in the event of a health crisis

    The text provides for the possible swift adoption of binding minimum rules on temporary travel restrictions at the external borders in the event of a threat to public health. This will strengthen the currently available tools applied during the COVID-19 pandemic, which have been based on non-binding recommendations.

    The binding implementing regulation to be adopted by the Council in such situations will include minimum restrictions, with the possibility for member states to apply stricter restrictions if the conditions so require. It will also include a list of essential travellers to be exempted from certain measures, which will be decided on a case by case basis.
    Reintroduction of internal border controls

    The text sets out more structured procedures for the reintroduction of internal border controls, with stronger safeguards. It takes into account a recent judgment by the European Court of Justice, which confirmed the principle of freedom of movement within the Schengen area, while specifying the conditions for the reintroduction of internal border controls. In this regard, it offers possible responses to persistent threats to public policy and internal security.

    If a continued need for internal border controls is confirmed beyond two years and six months, the member state concerned will need to notify the Commission of its intention to further prolong internal border controls, providing justification for doing so and specifying the date on which it expects to lift controls. The Commission will then issue a recommendation, also relating to that date, and with regard to the principles of necessity and proportionality, to be taken into account by the member state.
    Promotion of alternative measures

    The text updates the Schengen borders code by providing for alternative measures to internal border controls, in particular by proposing a more effective framework for police checks in member states’ border regions.

    The text introduces a new procedure to address unauthorised movements of irregular migrants within the EU. In the context of a bilateral cooperation framework based on voluntary action by the member states concerned, this mechanism will allow a member state to transfer third-country nationals apprehended in the border area and illegally staying in its territory to the member state from which they arrived, in the context of operational cross-border police cooperation.

    https://www.consilium.europa.eu/en/press/press-releases/2022/06/10/schengen-area-council-adopts-negotiating-mandate-reform-schengen-bo

    en français:
    https://www.consilium.europa.eu/fr/press/press-releases/2022/06/10/schengen-area-council-adopts-negotiating-mandate-reform-schengen-bo

    #Schegen #code_frontières_Schengen #frontières #frontières_extérieures #frontières_intérieures #frontières_internes #migrations #asile #réfugiés #réforme #menaces #liberté_de_circulation #surveillance_frontalière #instrumentalisation #contrôles_frontaliers #mouvements_secondaires #coopération_policière_opérationnelle_transfrontière

    • Joint Civil Society statement on the Schengen Borders Code

      The undersigned civil society organisations would like to express their concerns with regard to several aspects of the Commission’s proposal amending the Schengen Borders Code.

      Overall, the proposal embraces a very harmful narrative which assumes that people crossing borders irregularly are a threat to the EU and proposes to address it by increasing policing and curtailing safeguards. At the same time, the proposal fails to recognise the lack of regular pathways for asylum seekers, who are often forced to turn to irregular border crossings in order to seek international protection within the EU, and further complicates access to asylum. The measures put forward by the Commission would have a detrimental impact on the right to freedom of movement within the EU, the principle of non-discrimination, access to asylum and the harmonisation of procedures under EU law. Furthermore, the proposal would increase the use of monitoring and surveillance technologies, without any adequate safeguards.

      Freedom of movement within the EU and violation of the principle of non-discrimination

      Several provisions of the proposed amended Schengen Borders Code would encroach the right to freedom of movement within the EU (art. 3(2) TEU, art. 21 and 77 TFEU) by expanding the possibility to reintroduce internal border controls and facilitating the application of so-called “alternative measures” which in practice amount to discriminatory border controls. The discretionary nature of these border checks is very likely to disproportionately target racialised communities, and practically legitimise ethnic and racial profiling and expose people to institutional and police abuse.

      While the amended Schengen Borders Code reiterates that internal border controls are prohibited in the Schengen area, it also introduces the possibility to carry out police checks in the internal border areas with the explicit aim to prevent irregular migration, when these are based on “general information and experience of the competent authorities” (rec. 18 and 21 and art. 23). In addition, the proposal clarifies the meaning of “serious threat” which justifies the temporary reintroduction of border controls (which was already possible under art. 25 of the 2016 SBC). Problematically, the proposed definition of “serious threat” also includes “a situation characterised by large scale unauthorised movements of third country nationals between member states, putting at risk the overall functioning of the area without internal border control” (art. 25).[1]

      Such provisions, together with the new procedure set by article 23a and analysed below, will in practice legalise systematic border controls which target people based on their racial, ethnic, national, or religious characteristics. This practice is in clear violation of European and international anti-discrimination law and a breach to migrants’ fundamental rights.

      Research from the EU Fundamental Rights Agency in 2021 shows that people from an ‘ethnic minority, Muslim, or not heterosexual’ are disproportionately affected by police stops, both when they are walking and when in a vehicle. In addition, another study from 2014 showed that 79% of surveyed border guards at airports rated ethnicity as a helpful indicator to identify people attempting to enter the country in an irregular manner before speaking to them.

      The new provisions introduced in the amended Schengen Borders Code are likely to further increase the discriminatory and illegal practice of ethnic and racial profiling and put migrant communities at risk of institutional violence, which undermines the right to non-discrimination and stands at odds with the European Commission’s commitments under the recent Anti-Racism Action Plan.

      Lack of individual assessment and increased detention

      The proposed revisions to the Schengen Borders Code set a new procedure to “transfer people apprehended at the internal borders”. According to the proposed new rules, if a third country national without a residence permit or right to remain crosses the internal borders in an irregular way (e.g., from Germany to Belgium, or from Italy to France) and if they are apprehended “in the vicinity of the border area,” they could be directly transferred back to the competent authorities in the EU country where it is assumed they just came from, without undergoing an individual assessment (art. 23a and Annex XII). This provision is very broad and can potentially include people apprehended at train or bus stations, or even in cities close to the internal borders, if they are apprehended as part of cross-border police cooperation (e.g. joint police patrols) and if there is an indication that they have just crossed the border (for instance through documents they may carry on themselves, their own statements, or information taken from migration or other databases).

      The person will be then transferred within 24 hours.[2] During these 24 hours, Annex XII sets that the authorities might “take appropriate measures” to prevent the person from entering on the territory – which constitutes, in practice, a blanket detention provision, without any safeguards nor judicial overview. While the transfer decision could be subject to appeal, this would not have a suspensive effect. The Return Directive would also be amended, by introducing an obligation for the receiving member state to issue a return decision without the exceptions currently listed in article 6 (e.g., the possibility to issue a residence permit for humanitarian or compassionate reasons). As a consequence, transferred people would be automatically caught up in arbitrary and lengthy detention and return procedures.[3]

      Courts in Italy, Slovenia and Austria have recently ruled against readmissions taking place under informal or formal agreements, recognising them as systematic human rights violations with the potential to trigger so-called chain pushbacks. The courts found the plaintiffs were routinely returned from Italy or Austria through Slovenia to Croatia, from where they had been illegally pushed back to Bosnia and Herzegovina.

      In practice, this provision would legalise the extremely violent practice of “internal pushbacks” which have been broadly criticised by civil society organisations across the EU and condemned by higher courts. The new procedure, including the possibility to detain people for up to 24 hours, would also apply to children, even though this has been deemed illegal by courts and despite international consensus that child detention constitutes a human rights violation.

      Access to asylum

      The new Code introduces measures which member states can apply in cases of “instrumentalisation of migrants”, which is defined as “a situation where a third country instigates irregular migratory flows into the Union by actively encouraging or facilitating the movement of third country nationals to the external borders” (art. 2). In such cases, member states can limit the number of border crossing points and their opening hours, and intensify border surveillance including through drones, motion sensors and border patrols (art. 5(4) and 13(5)). The definition of instrumentalisation of migrants should also be read in conjunction with the Commission’s proposal for a Regulation addressing situations of instrumentalisation in the field of migration and asylum, which provides member states with numerous derogations to the asylum acquis.

      These measures unjustifiably penalise asylum seekers by limiting access to the territory and de facto undermining art. 31 of the Refugee Convention which prohibits States from imposing penalties on refugees on account of their entry or presence in their territory without authorization, and are therefore in violation of international law.

      Harmonisation of procedures under EU law and asylum acquis

      The proposal lifts the standstill clause introduced by the 2008 Return Directive (art. 6(3)) which prohibits member states from negotiating new bilateral readmission agreements. When negotiating the 2008 Return Directive, both the Commission and the European Parliament had clarified that bilateral readmission agreements should remain an exception, as they undermine the objective of harmonising procedures under EU law.

      By incentivising states to adopt new bilateral agreements, and proposing a new internal transfer procedure, the Commission’s proposal promotes the proliferation of exceptional procedures, which are outside the framework set by the Return Directive and the asylum acquis, and circumvents the procedural safeguards included in the Dublin Regulation.

      The proposed provisions undermine the substantive and procedural guarantees for third country nationals, such as the right to request asylum, the respect of the principle of non-refoulement, and the right to an effective remedy.

      As mentioned above, several national-level courts have ruled on the unlawfulness of readmissions carried out under formal and informal agreements, which often led to instances of chain-refoulement. There is a serious risk that readmission agreements, if they remain a part of the current legislative proposal, could be further abused to perpetrate chain refoulement and collective expulsions, which are in violation of Article 4 of Protocol No. 4 to the European Convention on Human Rights and Article 19 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union.

      Use of monitoring and surveillance technologies

      Lastly, the proposal also facilitates a more extensive use of monitoring and surveillance technologies, by clarifying that these are part of member states’ responsibility to patrol borders (art. 2). In addition, article 23, analysed above, clarifies that internal checks, including to prevent irregular migration, can be carried out “where appropriate, on the basis of monitoring and surveillance technologies generally used in the territory”.

      By removing obstacles for a more extensive use of monitoring and surveillance technologies, these provisions would create a loophole to introduce technologies which would otherwise be discouraged by pre-existing EU legislation such as the General Data Protection Regulation.[4]

      Artificial Intelligence (AI) and other automated decision-making systems, including profiling, are increasingly used in border control and management for generalised and indiscriminate surveillance. Insofar as such systems are used to ‘detect human presence’ for the purpose of ‘combating irregular migration’, there is serious concern that such systems can facilitate illegal interdiction, violence at border crossings, and further limit access to asylum and other forms of protection.

      Furthermore, these technologies disproportionately target racialised people, thus further exacerbating the risks of increased racial and ethnic profiling. Indeed, monitoring and surveillance technologies which make use of artificial intelligence by nature violate the right to non-discrimination insofar as they are trained on past data and decision-making, and therefore codify assumptions on the basis of nationality and other personal characteristics, which is prohibited by international racial discrimination law.[5]

      Recommendations

      In light of the concerns discussed above, the undersigned civil society organisations:

      – Express their concerns on the harmful impact of narratives which consider people crossing borders irregularly as a threat, and recommend the European Parliament and the Council to delete such references from recital 29, article 23 and article 25(1)(c);
      – Call on the EU institutions to uphold the right to freedom of movement and the principle of non-discrimination, including by prohibiting the use of technologies which make use of artificial intelligence and other automated decision-making systems. In this regard, we recommend the European Parliament and the Council to amend article 23, paragraph (a) by deleting the reference to “combat irregular residence or stay, linked to irregular migration” in point (ii) and deleting point (iv) on monitoring and surveillance technologies;
      – Urge the EU institutions to uphold the right to apply for asylum, and recommend deleting the definition of ‘instrumentalisation of migration’ in article 2, paragraph 27 and all the ensuing provisions which would apply in this circumstance;
      – Condemn the proliferation of exceptional procedures which undermine the right to an individual assessment, and recommend deleting article 23a, annex XII, and the proposed amendment to art. 6(3) of the Return Directive;
      – Express their concerns at the glaring inconsistency between some of the proposed provisions and the European Commission’s commitments under the EU Action Plan against Racism, i.e. with respect to ending racial profiling, and call on the EU institutions to uphold their commitment to address and to combat structural and institutional discrimination and include explicit references to the Action Plan against Racism in the text of the Schengen Borders Code.

      https://picum.org/joint-civil-society-statement-schengen-borders-code

      #discrimination #non-discrimination #détention #rétention #détention_administrative #réadmission

  • « Xinjiang Police Files » : révélations sur la machine répressive chinoise contre les Ouïgours
    https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2022/05/24/ouigours-au-c-ur-de-la-machine-repressive-chinoise_6127417_3210.html

    Des milliers de documents de la police chinoise, livrés à un chercheur et publiés par des médias internationaux, dont « Le Monde », racontent l’obsession sécuritaire dans les camps d’internement de la minorité musulmane en Chine.
    Publiés le 24 mai, ces « Xinjiang Police Files » ont été livrés à l’anthropologue allemand Adrian Zenz par une source qui n’a rien exigé en retour, et ont été vérifiés hors de Chine par un groupe de quatorze médias internationaux. Ils apportent, après plusieurs séries de révélations publiées depuis 2019 par ce même chercheur et des ONG, un nouvel éclairage décisif sur la répression organisée par Pékin dans la région.

    https://justpaste.it/5tgo7

    #Chine #Xinjiang #Ouigours #surveillance #répression #détention_de_masse #internement #camps

  • Poland: Detained Syrian asylum seekers continue hunger strike

    A hunger strike by a group of Syrian asylum seekers being detained in a closed center south of Warsaw is into its ninth day. The men say they have been treated “like criminals”.

    Munzer, Ghith, Shadee, Rami and Mousa began their protest at the Lesznowola Guarded Center for Foreigners in Poland on April 19. It was a move prompted by frustration and loss of hope, they said.

    “We are sorry we are doing this,” the men wrote in a letter in English to the Office for Foreigners and the manager of the center, as they began the hunger strike.

    The letter said they were feeling intense psychological pressure and exhaustion “especially with … the harsh experience that we went through in Syria and Belarus.”

    They crossed the Polish border from Belarus “illegally”, the letter continued, because they had no other option. They have been given no convincing reason for their detention at the facility, where they have remained for more than two months.

    https://gw.infomigrants.net/media/resize/my_image_big/5335ce19c0cde72d75a2c812bc6ed775c669517c.png

    “The conditions in Lesznowola are not bad, but it is not about the conditions, but about the fact that we are treated like criminals,” one of the men told OKO.press. The 39-year-old left Syria in 2021 because he did not want to be drafted into the army, he said. He gave the Polish authorities all the information they requested and he could not understand why he was being locked up.

    The Lesznowola center is in a relatively isolated area about 15 kilometers south of the Polish capital Warsaw. Social media videos and photos by the Polish Border Guard (Straż Graniczna) show a well-equipped and clean facility with a gym, computer rooms, prayer rooms, a library and large areas outside for sport and relaxation.

    https://gw.infomigrants.net/media/resize/my_image_big/106a8f331c2dac98fd48648f18a5b5446ce3d21e.jpg

    In a tweet this week the border guard said that EU commissioner Ylva Johansson had “positively assessed the conditions in the center” during a visit in February.

    In fact what Commissioner Johansson wrote was that her visit to the center showed there was “a possibility [our emphasis] to apply humane living conditions,” which, she continued, “Must be matched with efficient, fair asylum processes.”

    Grupa Granica, a network of human rights NGOs monitoring the Polish borders, called the facility a ’prison’. Activists linked to Grupa Granica said Wednesday that none of the five Syrians should be in the center, since it is against Polish law to hold people who have suffered torture in closed facilities. They note that the men have fled a violent civil war and experienced pushbacks when they attempted to cross the border to Poland.

    https://gw.infomigrants.net/media/resize/my_image_big/9dd30bcadc46888336dc1ccabd753275401b2165.png

    Posting on social media, the Polish aid group ’With Bread and Salt’ (Chlebem i Solą) said they had met two of the Syrian men last year in the woods on the border with Belarus. “We helped them to apply to the European Court of Human Rights, thanks to which they received a document that forbade the Polish authorities to once again deport them to Belarus. It was just when we knew they were safe that we called Straż Graniczna,” the group wrote. Unfortunately for the men, they were taken to closed facilties, some to the notorious Wędrzyn center, and have remained in detention ever since.

    Now into its 9th day, the hunger strike led a Polish MP, Katarzyna Piekarska, to intervene. Piekarska, from the Democratic Left Alliance, visited the center and spoke to one of the Syrian protesters, who said he was having problems with his nerves and trouble sleeping, she told OKO.press.

    According to Piekarska, the courts in Poland agree to request from the Border Guard to detain asylum seekers partly because it is “simply easier that way.”

    A spokesperson for the border guard told OKO.press that the Syrians were in detention “on the basis of a court order in connection with their illegal stay in our country.”

    https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/40162/poland-detained-syrian-asylum-seekers-continue-hunger-strike

    #Pologne #asile #migrations #réfugiés #réfugiés_syriens #grève_de_la_faim #rétention #détention #Lesznowola

  • Migrants, Asylum Seekers Locked Up in Ukraine

    Scores of migrants who had been arbitrarily detained in Ukraine remain locked up there and are at heightened risk amid the hostilities, including military activity in the vicinity, Human Rights Watch said today. Ukrainian authorities should immediately release migrants and asylum seekers detained due to their migration status and allow them to reach safety in Poland.

    “Migrants and asylum seekers are currently locked up in the middle of a war zone and justifiably terrified,” said Nadia Hardman, refugee and migrant rights researcher at Human Rights Watch. “There is no excuse, over a month into this conflict, for keeping civilians in immigration detention. They should be immediately released and allowed to seek refuge and safety like all other civilians.”

    In early March 2022, Human Rights Watch interviewed four men by telephone who are being held in the Zhuravychi Migrant Accommodation Center in Volyn’ oblast. The detention site is a former military barracks in a pine forest, one hour from Lutsk, a city in northwestern Ukraine. All interviewees said that they had been detained in the months prior to the Russian invasion for irregularly trying to cross the border into Poland.

    The men asked that their nationalities not be disclosed for security reasons but said that people of up to 15 nationalities were being held there, including people from Afghanistan, Algeria, Bangladesh, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, India, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Syria.

    Zhuravychi and two other migrant detention facilities in Ukraine are supported with EU funding. The Global Detention Project has confirmed that the center in Chernihiv has now been emptied but the center in Mykolaiv is operating. Human Rights Watch has been unable to verify whether anyone is still detained there. The men said that at the time of the interviews more than 100 men and an unknown number of women were detained at the Zhuravychi MAC. Some have since been able to negotiate their release, in some cases with help from their embassies. Lighthouse Reports, which is also investigating the issue, has estimated that up to 45 people remain there. It has not been possible to verify this figure or determine whether this includes men and women.

    Three of the men said they were in Ukraine on student visas that had expired. All four had tried to cross the border into Poland but were intercepted by Polish border guard forces and handed directly to Ukrainian border guards. The men said they were sentenced to between 6 and 18 months for crossing the border irregularly after summary court proceedings for which they were not provided legal counsel or given the right to claim asylum.

    Whatever the original basis for their detention, their continued detention at the center is arbitrary and places them at risk of harm from the hostilities, Human Rights Watch said.

    While interviewees said that conditions in the #Zhuravychi detention center were difficult prior to the conflict, the situation significantly deteriorated after February 24. In the days following the Russian invasion, they said, members of the Ukrainian military moved into the center. The detention center guards moved all migrant and asylum seekers into one of the two buildings in the complex, freeing the second building for Ukrainian soldiers.

    A video, verified and analyzed by Human Rights Watch, shows scores of Ukrainian soldiers standing in the courtyard of the Zhuravychi MAC, corroborating the accounts that the Ukrainian military is actively using the site. Another video, also verified by Human Rights Watch, shows a military vehicle slowly driving on the road outside the detention center. Recorded from the same location, a second video shows a group of approximately 30 men in camouflage uniforms walking on the same road and turning into the compound next door.

    On or around the date after the full-scale invasion, the people interviewed said a group of detainees gathered in the yard of the detention center near the gate to protest the conditions and asked to be allowed leave to go to the Polish border.

    The guards refused to open the gate and instead forcibly quelled the protest and beat the detainees with their batons, they said. Human Rights Watch analyzed a video that appears to show the aftermath of the protest: a group of men crowd around an unconscious man lying on the ground. People interviewed said that a guard had punched him. A group of guards are also visible in the video, in black uniforms standing near the gate.

    “We came out to peacefully protest,” one of those interviewed said. “We want to go. We are terrified.… We tried to walk towards the gate … and after we were marching towards the gate.… They beat us. It was terrible. Some of my friends were injured.”

    Interviewees said that guards said they could leave Zhuravychi if they joined the Ukrainian war effort and added they would all immediately be granted Ukrainian citizenship and documentation. They said that no one accepted the offer.

    On March 18, five men and one woman were released when officials from their embassy intervened and facilitated their evacuation and safe travel to the border with Poland. Ukraine should release all migrants and asylum seekers detained at the Zhuravychi detention center and facilitate their safe travel to the Polish border, Human Rights Watch said.

    The European Union (EU) has long funded Ukraine’s border control and migration management programs and funded the International Center for Migration Policy Development to construct the perimeter security systems at Zhuravychi MAC. The core of the EU’s strategy has been to stop the flow of migrants and asylum seekers into the EU by shifting the burden and responsibility for migrants and refugees to countries neighboring the EU, in this case Ukraine. Now that Ukraine has become a war zone, the EU should do all it can to secure the release and safe passage of people detained in Ukraine because of their migration status. United Nations agencies and other international actors should support this call to release civilians at Zhuravychi and any other operational migrant detention centers and provide assistance where relevant.

    “There is so much suffering in Ukraine right now and so many civilians who still need to reach safety and refuge,” Hardman said. “Efforts to help people flee Ukraine should include foreigners locked up in immigration detention centers.”

    https://www.hrw.org/news/2022/04/04/migrants-asylum-seekers-locked-ukraine
    #Ukraine #réfugiés #migrations #asile #détention_administrative #rétention #emprisonnement

    • Migrants trapped in Ukrainian detention center while war rages on

      Several dozen irregular migrants were reportedly trapped in a detention center in northwestern Ukraine weeks into the Russian invasion, an investigation by several media outlets found. An unconfirmed number of migrants appear to remain in the EU-funded facility, from where migrants are usually deported.

      Imagine you are detained without being accused of a crime and wait to be deported to somewhere while an invading army bombs the neighboring town. This horrific scenario has been the reality for scores of migrants in northwestern Ukraine for weeks.

      A joint investigation between Dutch non-profit Lighthouse Reports, which specializes on transnational investigations, Al Jazeera and German publication Der Spiegel found that over five weeks after the beginning of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, Afghani, Pakistani, Indian, Sudanese and Bangladeshi migrants were still detained in a EU-funded detention center near the northwestern Ukrainian city of #Lutsk.

      Although several people were recently released with the support of their embassies, Der Spiegel reported there were still dozens of who remained there at the end of March.

      According to the wife of one detainee who was released last week, the detention center offered no air raid shelter. Moreover, guards “ran down the street when the siren sounded,” both Der Spiegel and Al Jazeera reported.

      “The guards took away the detainees’ phones,” the woman told reporters. She also said that power outlets in the cells were no longer working and the whole situation was extremely dangerous. In fact, the nearby city of Lutsk has repeatedly come under attack since March 12.

      According to the investigation, the Zhuravychi Migrant Accommodation Centre is located in a pine forest in the Volyn region, near the Belarusian border. Constructed in 1961 as an army barracks, the facility was converted into a migrant detention center in 2007 with EU funds, Al Jazeera reported.

      Reporters involved in the investigation spoke with recently released detainees’ relatives. They also analyzed photos and documents, which “verified the detainees’ presence in Ukraine before being placed in the center,” according to Al Jazeera.
      Calls for release of detainees

      Some detainees have been released since the beginning of the Russian invasion, including several Ethiopian citizens and an Afghan family, Al Jazeera reported. But politicians and NGOs have voice fear over those who remain in the Zhuravychi Migrant Accommodation Center.

      “It is extremely concerning that migrants and refugees are still locked up in detention centers in war zones, with the risk of being attacked without any possibility to flee,” Tineke Strik, a Dutch member of the European Parliament from the Greens/EFA Group told reporters involved in the investigation.

      Human Rights Watch (HRW) also decried the ongoing detention of migrants at the facility during the war. In a report published on Monday (April 4), HRW said its staff interviewed four men by telephone who are being held in that Zhuravychi in early March. According to HRW, all four men said they had been detained in the months prior to the Russian invasion for irregularly trying to cross the border into Poland.

      “Migrants and asylum seekers are currently locked up in the middle of a war zone and justifiably terrified,” said Nadia Hardman, a refugee and migrant rights researcher with HRW. “There is no excuse, over a month into this conflict, for keeping civilians in immigration detention. They should be immediately released and allowed to seek refuge and safety like all other civilians.”

      According to the four interviewees, people from Afghanistan, Algeria, Bangladesh, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, India, Nigeria, Pakistan, Syria and four other nationalities were being held at the facility.

      Michael Flynn from the Global Detention Project told Der Spiegel that the Geneva Conventions (not to be confused with the Geneva Refugee Convention) “obliges all warring parties to protect civilians under their control from the dangers of the conflict.” He stressed that the detainees needed to be released as soon as possible.
      The EU’s bouncer

      According to the investigation, the European Union has funded at least three detention centers in Ukraine “for years,” effectively making the non-EU country a gatekeeper. The facility in question near Lutsk that’s apparently still in operation received EU support “to confine asylum seekers, many of them pushed back from the EU,” according to Lighthouse Reports.

      Der Spiegel reported that up to 150 foreigners were detained in the facility last year. Most of them tried in vain to reach the European Union irregularly and have to stay in deportation detention for up to 18 months.

      Since the turn of the millennium, according to Der Spiegel, the EU has invested more than €30 million in three detention centers.

      At the facility in Zhuravychi, Der Spiegel reported, the EU provided €1.7 million for electronic door locks and protection elements on the windows. While the EU called it an “accommodation”, Der Spiegel said was a refugee prison in reality.

      The European Commission did not respond to a request for comment about the facility and the detained migrants, Al Jazeera said. Ukrainian authorities also did not answer any questions.

      In early March, InfoMigrants talked to several Bangladeshi migrants who had been given deportation orders and were stuck inside detention centers, including in said Zhuravychi Migrant Accommodation Centre. Around a hundred migrants were staying there back then, according to Bangladeshi and Indian citizens detained there. They were released a few days later.

      “Russia has been particularly bombing military bases. That’s why we have been living in constant fear of getting bombed,” Riadh Malik, a Bangladeshi migrant told InfoMigrants. According to the New York Times, the military airfield in Lutsk was bombed on March 11.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/39678/migrants-trapped-in-ukrainian-detention-center-while-war-rages-on

    • Immigration Detention amidst War: The Case of Ukraine’s Volyn Detention Centre

      A Global Detention Project Special Report

      In early March, shortly into Russia’s war on Ukraine, the Global Detention Project (GDP) began receiving email messages and videos from individuals claiming to know people who remained trapped in an immigration detention centre inside Ukraine, even as the war approached. We also received messages from a representative of the humanitarian group Alight based in Poland, who said that they too were receiving messages from detainees at Volyn, as well as identity documents, photos, and videos.

      The information we received indicated that there were several dozen detainees still at the Volyn detention centre (formally, “#Volyn_PTPI,” but also referred to as the “#Zhuravychi_Migrant_Accommodation_Centre”), including people from Pakistan, India, Eritrea, Sudan, Afghanistan, among other countries. They had grown particularly desperate after the start of the war and had held a demonstration to demand their release when the nearby town was shelled, which reportedly was violently broken up by detention centre guards.

      The GDP located a webpage on the official website of Ukraine’s State Secretariat of Migration that provided confirmation of the operational status of the Volyn facility as well as of two others. Although the official webpage was subsequently taken down, as of late March it continued to indicate that there were three operational migration-related detention centres in Ukraine, called Temporary Stay for Foreigners or #PTPI (Пункти тимчасового перебування іноземців та осіб без громадянства): Volyn PTPI (#Zhuravychi); #Chernihiv PTPI; and #Nikolaev PTPI (also referred to as the Mykolaiv detention centre).

      We learned that the Chernihiv PTPI, located north of Kyiv, was emptied shortly after the start of the war. However, as of the end of March 2022, it appeared that both the Volyn PTPI and Nikolaev PTPI remained operational and were holding detainees. We understood that the situation at the detention centres had been brought to the attention of relevant authorities in Ukraine and that the embassies of at least some of the detainees—including India—had begun arranging the removal of their nationals. Detainees from some countries, however, reportedly indicated that they did not want assistance from their embassies because they did not wish to return and were seeking asylum.

      In our communications and reporting on this situation, including on social media and through direct outreach to officials and media outlets, the GDP consistently called for the release of all migrants trapped in detention centres in Ukraine and for international efforts to assist migrants to seek safety. We highlighted important international legal standards that underscore the necessity of releasing detainees in administrative detention in situations of ongoing warfare. Important among these is Additional Protocol 1, Article 58C, of the Geneva Conventions, which requires all parties to a conflict to take necessary measures to protect civilians under their control from the effects of the war.

      We also pointed to relevant human rights standards pertaining to administrative detention. For example, the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention, in their seminal Revised Deliberation No. 5 on the deprivation of liberty of migrants, conclude that in “instances when the obstacle for identifying or removal of persons in an irregular situation from the territory is not attributable to them … rendering expulsion impossible … the detainee must be released to avoid potentially indefinite detention from occurring, which would be arbitrary.” Similarly, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) has repeatedly found that when the purpose of such detention is no longer possible, detainees must be released (see ECHR, “Guide on Article 5 of the European Convention on Human Rights: Right to Liberty and Security,” paragraph 149.).

      In April, a consortium of press outlets—including Lighthouse Reports, Al Jazeera English, and Der Spiegel—jointly undertook an investigation into migrants trapped in detention in Ukraine and published separate reports simultaneously on 4 April. Human Rights Watch (HRW) also published their own report on 4 April, which called on authorities to immediately release the detainees. All these reports cited information provided by the GDP and interviewed GDP staff.

      HRW reported that they had spoken to some of the detainees at Volyn (Zhuravychi) and were able to confirm numerous details, including that “people of up to 15 nationalities were being held there, including people from Afghanistan, Algeria, Bangladesh, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, India, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Syria.” According to HRW, the detainees claimed to have “been detained in the months prior to the Russian invasion for irregularly trying to cross the border into Poland.” They said that there were more than 100 men and women at the facility, though according to Lighthouse Reports only an estimated 45 people remained at the centre as of 21 March.

      The interviewees said that conditions at the detention centre deteriorated after 24 February when members of the Ukrainian military moved into the centre and guards relocated the detainees to one of the two buildings in the complex, freeing the second building for the soldiers. When detainees protested and demanded to be released, the guards refused, forcibly putting an end to the protest and beating detainees. Some detainees claimed to have been told that they could leave the centre if they agreed to fight alongside the Ukrainian military, which they refused.

      An issue addressed in many of these reports is the EU’s role in financing immigration detention centres in Ukraine, which the GDP had previously noted in a report about Ukraine in 2012. According to that report, “In 2011, 30 million Euros were allocated to build nine new detention centres in Ukraine. According to the EU delegation to Ukraine, this project will ‘enable’ the application of the EU-Ukraine readmission by providing detention space for ‘readmitted’ migrants sent back to Ukraine from EU countries.”

      In its report on the situation, Al Jazeera quoted Niamh Ní Bhriain of the Transnational Institute, who said that the EU had allocated 1.7 million euros ($1.8m) for the securitisation of the Volyn centre in 2009. She added, “The EU drove the policies and funded the infrastructure which sees up to 45 people being detained today inside this facility in Ukraine and therefore it must call on Ukraine to immediately release those being held and guarantee them the same protection inside the EU as others fleeing the same war.”

      Efforts to get clarity on EU financing from officials in Brussels were stymied by lack of responsiveness on the part of EU officials. According to Al Jazeera, “The European Commission did not answer questions from Al Jazeera regarding its operation and whether there were plans to help evacuate any remaining people. Ukrainian authorities also did not respond to a request for comment.” The Guardian also reported in mid-April they had “approached the Zhuravychi detention facility and the Ukrainian authorities for comment” but had yet to receive a response as of 12 April.

      However, on 5 April, two MEPs, Tineke Strik and Erik Marquardt, raised the issue during a joint session of the European Parliament’s Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice, and Home Affairs (LIBE) and the Committee on Development (DEVE). The MEPs urged the EU to take steps to assist the release of the detainees.

      In mid-April, reports emerged that some detainees who had been released from the Volyn PTPI in Zhuravychi were later re-detained in Poland. In its 14 April report, The Guardian reported that “some of those that were released from the centre in the first few days of the war are now being held in a detention centre in Poland, after they were arrested attempting to cross the Polish border, but these claims could not be verified.” On 22 April, Lighthouse Reports cited Tigrayan diaspora representatives as saying that two former detainees at the facility were refugees fleeing Ethiopia’s war in the region, where human rights groups report evidence of a campaign of ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity. Despite being provided documents by Ukraine stipulating that they were stateless persons and being promised safe passage, Polish border guards detained the pair, arguing that there was an “extreme probability of escape.”

      Separately, human rights campaigners following the case informed the GDP in late April that they had evidence of immigration detainees still being locked up in Ukraine’s detention centres, including in particular the Nikolaev (Mykolaiv) PTPI.

      The GDP continues to call for the release of all migrants detained in Ukraine during ongoing warfare and for international efforts to help detainees to find safety, in accordance with international humanitarian and human rights law. Recognizing the huge efforts Poland is making to assist refugees from Ukraine, we nevertheless call on the Polish government to treat all people fleeing Ukraine equally and without discrimination based on race, nationality, or ethnic origin. Everyone fleeing the conflict in Ukraine is entitled to international protection and assistance and no one should be detained on arrival in Poland.

      https://www.globaldetentionproject.org/immigration-detention-amidst-war-the-case-of-ukraines-volyn-

  • Non-white refugees fleeing Ukraine detained in EU immigration facilities

    Non-white students who have fled Ukraine have been detained by EU border authorities in what has been condemned as “clearly discriminatory” and “not acceptable”.

    An investigation by The Independent, in partnership with Lighthouse Reports and other media partners, reveals that Ukraine residents of African origin who have crossed the border to escape the war have been placed in closed facilities, with some having been there for a number of weeks.

    At least four students who have fled Vladimir Putin’s invasion are being held in a long-term holding facility Lesznowola, a village 40km from the Polish capital Warsaw, with little means of communication with the outside world and no legal advice.

    One of the students said they were stopped by officials as they crossed the border and were given “no choice” but to sign a document they did not understand before they were then taken to the camp. They do not know how long they will be held there.

    A Nigerian man currently detained said he was “scared” about what will happen to him after being held in the facility for more than three weeks.

    Polish border police have confirmed that 52 third-country nationals who have fled Ukraine are currently being held in detention facilities in Poland.

    The International Organisation for Migration (IOM) said they were aware of three other facilities in Poland where people non-Ukrainians who have fled the war are being detained.

    Separately, a Nigerian student who fled the Russian invasion is understood to have been detained in Estonia after travelling to the country to join relatives, and is now being threatened with deportation.

    This is despite a EU protection directive dated 4 March which states that third country nationals studying or working in Ukraine should be admitted to the EU temporarily on humanitarian grounds.

    Maria Arena, chair of the EU parliament’s subcommittee on human rights, said: “International students in Ukraine, as well as Ukrainians, are at risk and risking their lives in the country. Detention, deportation or any other measure that does not grant them protection is not acceptable.”

    The findings of the investigation, which was carried out in collaboration with Lighhtouse Reports, Spiegal, Mediapart and Radio France, comes after it emerged that scores of Black and Asian refugees fleeing Ukraine were experiencing racial discrimination while trying to make border crossing last month.
    ‘They took us here to the camp... I’m scared’

    Gabriel*, 29, had been studying trade and economics in Kharkov before war broke out. The Nigerian national left the city and arrived at the border on 27 February, where he says his phone was confiscated by Polish border guards and he was given “no option” but to sign a form he did not understand.

    “It was written in Polish. I didn’t know what I was signing. I said I wouldn’t sign, but they insisted I signed it and that if not I would go to jail for five months,” he said in a recorded conversation with a Nigerian activist.

    The student said he was then taken to court, where there was no interpreter to translate what was being said so that he could understand, and then taken to a detention centre in the small village of Lesznowola.

    “It is a closed camp inside a forest,” said Gabriel, speaking from the facility. “There’s no freedom. Some people have been here more than nine months. Some have gone mad. I’m scared.

    “We escaped Ukraine very horrible experience, the biggest risk of my life [...] Everything was scary and I thought that was the end of it. And now we are in detention.”

    Gabriel said there are at least two other Nigerian students in the camp, along with students from Cameroon, Ghana, the Ivory Coast and French African nations.

    Guards at the centre said inmates have their mobile phones confiscated, with only those who have a second sim card given a phone without a camera.

    Many can only communicate with the outside world via email – and even this is said to be limited to certain times.

    Another individual detained at the centre is Paul, 20, a Cameroonian who had been studying management and language at Agrarian University Bila Tserkva in Kyiv for six months when the war started.

    His brother, Victor, who is in Cameroon, said Paul had told him that he had been apprehended while crossing the border and that on 2 March, a Polish judge ordered that he be transferred to Lesznowola detention centre.

    “From his explanation, the camp doesn’t seem like one that welcomes people fleeing from the war in Ukraine. It’s a camp that has been existing and has people that came to seek for asylum. No one knows why he is being detained,” he said.

    Victor said that Paul was given seven days to appeal the decision to detain him, but that he has been unable to access the internet in order to file the appeal in time.

    “Since that day he filed the appeal, police and guards try to restrict them. He used to get five minutes of internet but on that day they stopped letting them use the internet. The phone he used to communicate with me was blocked. Maybe it’s because they realised that the issue was taking on a legal dimension,” he said.
    ‘He’s not allowed to be in Estonia’

    This investigation has also heard reports that a Nigerian student, Reuben, is facing deportation from Estonia after being detained having fled the war in Ukraine.

    Prior to his arrival in the eastern European country, 32-year-old Reuben emailed the head of International House, a service centre that helps internationals in Estonia to communicate with the state, explaining that he wanted to join his cousin living in the country.

    The head of the organisation Leonardo Ortega responded by letter that he may relocate to Estonia.

    Reuben, who attended Bila Tserkva National Agrarian University in Ukraine and is married to a Ukrainian woman, arrived on 9 March through Poland with his cousin Peter.

    After being delayed for three hours at the Estonia border, the pair were escorted to a police station, according to Peter, 30, who has an Estonian residency permit.

    He said three police officers escorted his cousin away with his luggage and said he would be detained for two days themn deported back to Nigeria.

    The officers reportedly advised that the 32-year-old would be banned from entering any Schengen country for the next five years; his phone was confiscated and he’s been in detention since.

    “A few officers said ‘he’s not allowed to be in Estonia’. Even after asking for international protection, we were told that my cousin needs to have a lawyer to fight his case, but most of the lawyers I initially contacted refused to take my cousin’s case,” said Peter.

    “He received an email in advance saying it was okay to come - and after everything we went through, the next thing they want to deport and ban him for five years. I don’t know why deportation came into the picture.”

    Criney, a London-based campaigner who has been supporting the affected students on a voluntary basis, said there was an “emerging pattern of arbitrary detention of students coming out of Ukraine fleeing the war”.

    “There are other cases in Austria and Germany with regards to students who have applied for asylum or asked for permits to remain,” the campaigner said.
    Detained ‘for the purpose of identity verification’

    The EU directive on 4 March aims to help refugees fleeing the invasion to stay for at least one year in one country and also have access to the labour market and education.

    It states that it also applies to “nationals of third countries other than Ukraine residing legally in Ukraine who are unable to return in safe and durable conditions to their country or region of origin”.

    This can include third-country nationals who were studying or working in Ukraine, it states, adding that this cohort should “in any event be admitted into the union on humanitarian grounds”, without requiring valid travel documents, to ensure “safe passage with a view to returning to their country or region of origin”.

    Michał Dworczyk, a top aide to the Polish prime minister, said when war broke out that “everyone escaping the war will be received in Poland, including people without passports”.

    But the Polish government has admitted that it is sending some of this cohort to closed facilities once they cross the border.

    In a tweet on 2 March, the Polish ministry of internal affairs and administration said: “Ukrainians are fleeing the war, people of other nationalities are also fleeing. All those who do not have documents and cannot prove Ukrainian citizenship are carefully checked. If there is a need, they go to closed detention centres.”

    In a letter to a member of the EU Parliament, Poland’s border police admitted that 52 third country nationals who had fled from Ukraine had been taken to closed detention centres in the first three weeks of the war.

    The letter stated that this was necessary “to carry out administrative proceedings for granting international protection or issuing a decision on obliging a foreigner to return”.

    Ryan Schroeder, press officer at the IOM, said the organisation was aware of three other facilities in Poland where “third-country nationals arriving from Ukraine, who lack proper travel documentation, are brought to for the purpose of identity verification”.

    The Polish government, the Polish police and the Estonian authorities declined to comment on the allegations.

    A spokesperson for the Polish border force said it “couldn’t give any detail about the procedures on foreigners because of the protection on personal data”, adding that it is “the court which takes the decision each time to place people in guarded centres for foreigners”.
    ‘Clearly unsatisfactory and discriminatory’

    Steve Peers, a professor of EU law in the UK, says that even if member states choose not to apply temporary protection to legal residents of Ukraine, they should give them “simplified entry, humanitarian support and safe passage to their country of origin”.

    “In my view this is obviously a case where students could not have applied for a visa and might not meet the other usual criteria to cross the external borders, yet there are overwhelming reasons to let them cross the border anyway on humanitarian grounds. There are no good grounds for immigration detention in the circumstances,” he added.

    Jeff Crisp, a former head of policy, development and evaluation at UNHCR, said it was “clearly unsatisfactory and discriminatory” for third country nationals who have fled from Ukraine to be held in detention centres in EU states, “not least because of the trauma they will have experienced in their efforts to leave Ukraine and find safety elsewhere”.

    He added: “They should be released immediately and treated on an equal basis with all others who have been forced to leave Ukraine.”

    It comes after the UN High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi warned this week that, although he had been “humbled” by the outpouring of support seen by communities welcoming Ukrainian refugees, many minorities – often foreigners who had been studying or working there – had described a very different experience.

    “We also bore witness to the ugly reality, that some Black and Brown people fleeing Ukraine – and other wars and conflicts around the world – have not received the same treatment as Ukrainian refugees,” he said.

    “They reported disturbing incidents of discrimination, violence, and racism. These acts of discrimination are unacceptable, and we are using our many channels and resources to make sure that all people are protected equally.”

    Mr Grandi appealed to countries, in particular those neighbouring Ukraine, to continue to allow entry to anyone fleeing the conflict “without discrimination on grounds of race, colour, descent, or national or ethnic origin and regardless of their immigration status”.

    *Names have been changed

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/ukraine-refugees-detention-international-students-b2041310.html

    #étudiants #Ukraine #rétention #détention_administrative #guerre #guerre_en_Ukraine #Pologne #Estonie #réfugiés_ukrainiens #réfugiés_d'Ukraine

    • I rifugiati “non bianchi” in fuga dall’Ucraina finiscono nei centri di detenzione

      Un’indagine di The Independent in collaborazione con Lighthouse Reports lo dice chiaro e tondo: i residenti ucraini di origine africana che hanno attraversato il confine per sfuggire alla guerra sono stati rinchiusi in centri per l’immigrazione, alcuni di loro si trovano lì da diverse settimane.

      Almeno quattro studenti fuggiti dall’invasione di Vladimir Putin sono detenuti in una struttura di detenzione a lungo termine di Lesznowola, un villaggio a 40 km dalla capitale polacca Varsavia, con pochi mezzi di comunicazione con il mondo esterno e senza consulenza legale. Uno di loro ha detto di essere stato fermato dai funzionari mentre attraversavano il confine e di non aver avuto “scelta”: ha dovuto di firmare un documento che non comprendeva prima di essere trasferito al campo. Un uomo nigeriano attualmente detenuto ha detto di essere “spaventato” per quello che gli accadrà dopo essere stato trattenuto nella struttura per più di tre settimane.

      La polizia di frontiera polacca ha confermato che 52 cittadini di Paesi terzi fuggiti dall’Ucraina sono attualmente detenuti in centri di detenzione in Polonia. L’Organizzazione internazionale per le migrazioni (Oim) ha affermato di essere a conoscenza di altre tre strutture in Polonia dove sono detenute persone non ucraine fuggite dalla guerra. Uno studente nigeriano fuggito dall’invasione russa sarebbe stato detenuto in Estonia dopo essersi recato nel Paese per raggiungere i parenti e ora è minacciato di espulsione.

      Maria Arena, presidente della commissione per i diritti umani del parlamento Ue, ha dichiarato: «Gli studenti internazionali in Ucraina, così come gli ucraini, sono a rischio e rischiano la vita nel Paese. La detenzione, l’espulsione o qualsiasi altra misura che non garantisca loro protezione non è accettabile».

      Jeff Crisp, ex capo della politica, dello sviluppo e della valutazione dell’Unhcr, ha affermato che è «chiaramente insoddisfacente e discriminatorio» che cittadini di Paesi terzi fuggiti dall’Ucraina vengano trattenuti nei centri di detenzione negli Stati dell’Ue. Ha aggiunto: «Dovrebbero essere rilasciati immediatamente e trattati alla pari con tutti gli altri che sono stati costretti a lasciare l’Ucraina».

      L’Alto Commissario delle Nazioni Unite per i rifugiati Filippo Grandi ha avvertito questa settimana che, sebbene sia soddisfatto dal sostegno dei Paesi che accolgono i rifugiati ucraini, molte minoranze – spesso stranieri che vi hanno studiato o lavorato – hanno descritto un’esperienza molto diversa. «Abbiamo anche testimoniato una pessima realtà: alcuni neri in fuga dall’Ucraina – e altre guerre e conflitti in tutto il mondo – non hanno ricevuto lo stesso trattamento dei rifugiati ucraini», ha spiegato.

      Se ne parla ormai da settimane. Intanto il razzismo continua. Aiutare tutti, ma proprio tutti: questo è il dovere.

      Buon venerdì.

      https://left.it/2022/03/25/i-rifugiati-non-bianchi-in-fuga-dallucraina-finiscono-nei-centri-di-detenzione

    • Des réfugiés fuyant la guerre en Ukraine sont détenus en Pologne

      Selon une enquête menée sous l’égide de Lighthouse Reports – une ONG spécialisée dans l’investigation, à laquelle se sont joints plusieurs médias européens dont Mediapart –, plusieurs étudiants étrangers ayant fui l’Ukraine en guerre séjournent actuellement dans des centres d’accueil fermés en Pologne, en situation de détention.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/230322/des-refugies-fuyant-la-guerre-en-ukraine-sont-detenus-en-pologne

    • "C’est comme si j’étais un criminel" : des étudiants étrangers enfermés en Pologne après avoir fui l’Ukraine

      Une enquête réalisée par Radio France, en partenariat avec plusieurs médias internationaux et avec le soutien de l’ONG Lighthouse Reports, révèle que plusieurs étudiants d’origine africaine qui vivaient en Ukraine sont actuellement détenus dans des centres fermés pour étrangers en Pologne.

      Ils faisaient des études dans les technologies de l’information, dans le management, à Kharkiv, à Lutsk ou encore à Bila Tserkva…et se retrouvent désormais enfermés dans un centre de détention pour étrangers à une quarantaine de kilomètres de Varsovie, après avoir fui la guerre en Ukraine. C’est ce que révèle l’enquête de Radio France, mercredi 23 mars, menée en partenariat avec plusieurs médias internationaux et avec le soutien de l’ONG Lighthouse Reports.

      « Je ne pensais pas me retrouver dans cette situation en fuyant en Pologne, comme si j’étais un criminel », témoigne Samuel (le prénom a été changé) au téléphone, étudiant de Kharkiv, dans le nord-est de l’Ukraine. Après avoir voyagé jusqu’à Kiev, puis Lviv (près de la frontière polonaise), le jeune Nigérian explique avoir traversé la frontière le 27 février avec sa carte d’étudiant, son passeport étant resté à l’université pour des raisons administratives. « Mais quand je suis arrivé en Pologne, les garde-frontières m’ont dit qu’ils ne pouvaient pas me laisser circuler, car je n’ai pas de passeport, et pour cette raison, je devais être détenu », se remémore celui qui a de la famille en Allemagne, enfermé depuis plus de trois semaines.

      Le 25 février, Michał Dworczyk, chef du cabinet du Premier ministre polonais, assurait pourtant que « toute personne fuyant la guerre serait accueilli en Pologne, notamment les personnes sans passeport ». « Difficile de ne pas y voir du racisme », observe Małgorzata Rycharska, de l’ONG Hope & Humanity Poland, qui ajoute « ne pas comprendre pourquoi ces personnes ont été enfermées ». Contactée, l’ambassade du Cameroun à Berlin, qui a identifié pour l’instant trois de ses ressortissants dans ces centres fermés, fait part aussi de sa surprise. Et assure que les étudiants camerounais avaient des documents d’identité valides avec eux.
      52 étrangers fuyant l’Ukraine envoyés dans des centres fermés

      Dans le centre de Lesznowola, une vingtaine de non-Ukrainiens arrivant d’Ukraine sont actuellement détenus, parmi lesquels nous avons identifié pour l’instant quatre étudiants d’origine africaine. En tout, il y aurait 52 personnes étrangères fuyant l’Ukraine envoyées dans ces centres fermés du 24 février au 15 mars, selon une lettre des garde-frontières adressée au député Tomasz Anisko.

      Lettre des garde-frontières polonais indiquant que 52 personnes non-ukrainiennes mais fuyant l’Ukraine ont été envoyés du 24 février au 15 mars dans des centres pour étrangers.

      Contactés, les garde-frontières indiquent ne pas pouvoir donner davantage d’informations, pour des raisons de protection d’identité. De son côté, l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) explique « être au courant de trois centres en Pologne où les ressortissants de pays tiers arrivant d’Ukraine, sans documents de voyage adéquats, sont emmenés pour des vérifications d’identité » mais précise ne pas inclure celui de Lesznowola.

      « Nous sommes des étudiants d’Ukraine, nous ne méritons pas d’être ici », dénonce Samuel, qui ajoute ne pas comprendre pourquoi il se retrouve dans un centre où sont enfermés des migrants ayant tenté de traverser illégalement la frontière avec la Biélorussie l’an dernier. Gabriel (le prénom a été changé), un autre étudiant nigérian qui étudiait à l’Institut national du commerce et de l’économie de Kharkiv, raconte lui qu’à son arrivée en Pologne, « les garde-frontières nous ont pris nos téléphones de force ». Dans un entretien téléphonique avec un représentant de la diaspora nigériane - obtenu par Radio France -, Gabriel indique avoir été forcé à demander la protection internationale en Pologne, « sinon ils m’ont dit que j’allais en prison ». Dans l’attente de la décision, il a été envoyé dans ce camp fermé où il séjourne depuis fin février, décrivant « une situation très mauvaise ».

      Si théoriquement, la loi polonaise permet le placement en centres fermés en cas de demande d’asile dans des situations très précises (en cas de risque, par exemple, que la personne s’échappe lors de la procédure), la pratique diffère. Varsovie avait déjà été pointé du doigt par l’ONU pour la détention systématique de migrants et réfugiés lors de la crise à la frontière biélorusse l’an dernier. « Plein de gens ici sont devenus fous, je suis terrifié, il y en a qui sont là depuis neuf mois », s’effraie Gabriel. Pas d’accès à des avocats, téléphones avec caméra retirés, accès internet d’une vingtaine de minutes par jour seulement… L’étudiant, qui indique être passé devant un tribunal, menottes aux poignets, explique ne jamais avoir voulu demander l’asile en Pologne. « Nous étions juste des étudiants, répète-t-il. Ils devraient me déporter et me laisser rentrer au Nigeria, mais même cela, ça peut prendre parfois six mois », s’inquiète-t-il.

      https://www.francetvinfo.fr/monde/europe/manifestations-en-ukraine/enquete-c-est-comme-si-j-etais-un-criminel-des-etudiants-etrangers-enfe

  • Lettre ouverte : des cellules de rétention sous les rails

    Nous relayons ici une lettre ouverte à signer si vous voulez exiger l’arrêt d’un projet de "#centre_de_compétences_sécuritaires" géant dans la gare de Lausanne

    Une gare, c’est quoi ?

    C’est un possible infini de rencontre, un lieu qui n’appartient à personne, un lieu où l’on arrive, un lieu où tout peut commencer. Combien de fois dans l’Histoire, les gares ont-elles été des portes ouvertes pour des populations en errance fuyant la guerre ou chassées de chez elles par des jeux géopolitiques qui leur ordonnaient de quitter leur maison ? Combien de vies ont recommencé dans un hall de gare ? Combien de vies se sont croisées dans ces espaces de pur mouvement ? Le monde se croise là et c’est une chose précieuse.

    Aujourd’hui Lausanne est en travaux, des grues de toutes parts, on invente un nouveau visage, on s’enivre d’ambitions, de pôle muséal, de nouvelles places publiques vont sortir de terre. Au milieu, cette nouvelle gare qui va voir le jour. Assez classieuse elle aussi, on sort du langage de province, on cherche à lui donner toutes les tailles : humaine dans son contact avec la rue du Simplon, urbaine au nord et celle d’une ville en pleine croissance, qui craque un peu dans ces vêtements en son centre. On pousse les murs, on surélève la marquise historique. On laisse la place pour accueillir le grand flux grisant de cet arc lémanique en plein âge d’or.

    On laisse la place, mais les chemins sont balisés. On laisse la place, mais on projette déjà celle des personnes qui n’en ont pas. Derrière cette figure de porte se cache celle d’une impasse. On laisse la place, mais seulement pour certain·es. Les “autres” suivront le chemin qu’on leur a dessiné. Prendront la porte qui les attend, suivront des couloirs habilement localisés, des parcours qui se veulent discrets. Ces autres seront soustrait∙es au grand brouhaha et seront conduit∙es au cœur de la gare dans des cellules de rétention.

    Un #centre_de_sécurité est en train de se projeter en plein cœur de la gare de Lausanne : plus de 3000m2 de surface dédiée à la police cantonale et aux douanes notamment.
    Pratique, il n’y aura plus qu’à cueillir tranquillement ces personnes qui se croyaient le droit d’être arrivées. Des #cellules_de_rétention et des #salles_d’audition. Des espaces plus qu’exigus sans aucune vue sur l’extérieur au fond d’un long couloir sous les rails. La belle porte d’entrée que voilà !

    Dans cette Europe qui organise avec tant de tact pour les nantis l’externalisation de ses frontières, Lausanne, la bonne ville de gauche, entre pittoresque, université et grève du climat, n’y voit rien à redire. Lausanne, comme quelques consœurs de charme sur les rives du Léman, s’est pourtant déjà illustrée grâce à sa police comme détentrice d’une éthique et d’un sens de l’ouverture à géométrie variable. Rappelons Mike mort sous les coups de la police à 300 m de la gare de Lausanne il y a 4 ans. Rappelons Lamin mort dans sa cellule de rétention sans que personne ne s’en aperçoive. Il est si facile de cacher ces erreurs quand les espaces sont déjà agencés pour les faire disparaître. Il est si facile de fermer les yeux quand il n’y aura rien à voir. Personne à rencontrer pour secouer nos idées reçues, personne qui pourra par son regard nous rappeler l’autre monde, celui d’où il vient. Personne aussi pour témoigner de la violence faite à leur accueil et à leur existence. Une gare faite de gens d’ici...

    La Gare de Lausanne ainsi projetée, participe du même effort de tact que les centres fédéraux d’asile, du même zèle d’efficacité que les patrouilles libyennes sillonnant les mers. Il n’a pas suffi aux Européen.nes et aux Suisse∙sses d’être entaché∙es par Frontex, les prisons libyennes, les accords de Dublin, les centres fédéraux d’asile, les zones de détention installées dans les aéroports. Maintenant, c’est à la #gare_de_Lausanne à laquelle il nous faudra penser lorsque les mots indignité, racisme, violence étatique, crime occidental raisonneront dans nos têtes face à la misère du monde.

    Sous la terre, quelques dizaines de mètres au sud des grandes salles d’exposition de Plateforme 10, les cellules de rétention. En regardant s’étaler la belle sensibilité créative des artistes contemporains,
    entendrons-nous le murmure, les prières et les cris de ceux et celles qui sous nos pieds, se croyant arrivé.es... chutent ? Non.

    Nous, soussigné∙e∙x∙s, demandons à la Ville de Lausanne, au Canton de Vaud, aux CFF et à la Confédération d’utiliser tous les moyens possibles pour ne pas réaliser ce centre de sécurité. Ne faisons pas de la gare de Lausanne une prison cachée pour des personnes dont pour la plupart, le seul crime est d’être ici.

    https://www.change.org/p/ville-de-lausanne-lettre-ouverte-des-cellules-de-r%C3%A9tention-sous-les-rai
    #Lausanne #asile #migrations #réfugiés #sous-terrain #souterrain #gare #rétention #détention_administrative #pétition #lettre_ouverte

  • Chronique radio de janvier 2022 : demander un délai pour préparer sa défense et se retrouver en prison

    https://lasellette.org/chronique-radio-de-janvier-2022-demander-un-delai-pour-preparer-sa-defen

    En comparution immédiate, la première question posée à la personne poursuivie est la suivante : « Voulez-vous être jugée tout de suite ou sollicitez-vous un délai pour préparer votre défense ? »
    Mais si elle demande un renvoi, une autre question va se poser : sera-t-elle laissée libre jusqu’à l’audience ou sera-t-elle placée en détention provisoire ?
    La loi encadre normalement cette pratique : un⋅e prévenu⋅e ne peut être mis⋅e en détention provisoire que si c’est le seul et unique moyen d’éviter le renouvellement de l’infraction et de s’assurer qu’il ou elle viendra à son procès.
    Dans les faits, quand la personne à un casier judiciaire, ou bien qu’elle n’a pas de travail, pas de foyer ou pas de papiers, elle sera envoyée en détention provisoire. Pour le dire autrement, les prévenu⋅es de compa qui demandent un renvoi iront préparer leur défense en prison.

    #détention_provisoire #prison #justice #comparutions_immédiates

  • À l’usage des vivants

    "Fuyant le Nigéria, Semira Adamu est arrivée en Belgique en 1998. Détenue dans un centre fermé proche de l’#aéroport de Bruxelles, elle meurt étouffée avec un coussin lors d’une sixième tentative de rapatriement forcé. Vingt ans après, Pauline Fonsny remet en scène cet « assassinat d’État » qui avait secoué le plat pays et conduit à la démission du ministre de l’Intérieur de l’époque. Le récit de À l’usage des vivants, mené à deux voix, est structuré par le témoignage de Semira – incarnée à l’écran par la peintre nigériane Obi Okigbo – et en voix off, l’adaptation d’un texte que la poétesse belge Maïa Chauvier a écrit après le décès de la jeune femme. Pour contourner l’interdiction de filmer dans les centres, la cinéaste a fait appel à des maquettes qui permettent de visualiser la topographie précise des lieux où sont encore parqués les demandeurs d’asile. Au terme de cette puissante évocation documentaire, le constat est amer. Les « barbelés de la honte » se sont multipliés, des policiers peuvent ouvrir le feu sur une camionnette transportant des exilé-e-s et tuer une fillette de deux ans, sans être inquiétés."

    https://vimeo.com/groups/108294/videos/412703657
    http://www.film-documentaire.fr/4DACTION/w_fiche_film/55804_1
    #rétention #détention_administrative #Belgique #migrations #asile #réfugiés #déboutés #décès #mourir_en_rétention #mort
    #Pauline_Fonsny #film #film_documentaire

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Migrants : enquête sur le rôle de l’Europe dans le piège libyen

    Des données de vol obtenues par « Le Monde » révèlent comment l’agence européenne #Frontex encourage les #rapatriements de migrants vers la Libye, malgré les exactions qui y sont régulièrement dénoncées par l’ONU.

    300 kilomètres séparent la Libye de l’île de Lampedusa et de l’Europe. Une traversée de la #Méditerranée périlleuse, que des dizaines de milliers de migrants tentent chaque année. Depuis 2017, lorsqu’ils sont repérés en mer, une partie d’entre eux est rapatriée en Libye, où ils peuvent subir #tortures, #viols et #détentions_illégales. Des #exactions régulièrement dénoncées par les Nations unies.

    L’Union européenne a délégué à la Libye la responsabilité des #sauvetages_en_mer dans une large zone en Méditerranée, et apporte à Tripoli un #soutien_financier et opérationnel. Selon les images et documents collectés par Le Monde, cela n’empêche pas les garde-côtes libyens d’enfreindre régulièrement des règles élémentaires du #droit_international, voire de se rendre coupables de #violences graves.

    Surtout, l’enquête #vidéo du Monde révèle que, malgré son discours officiel, l’agence européenne de gardes-frontières Frontex semble encourager les #rapatriements de migrants en Libye, plutôt que sur les côtes européennes. Les données de vol du drone de Frontex montrent comment l’activité de l’agence européenne se concentre sur la zone où les migrants, une fois détectés, sont rapatriés en Libye. Entre le 1er juin et le 31 juillet 2021, le drone de Frontex a passé 86 % de son temps de vol opérationnel dans cette zone. Sur la même période, à peine plus de la moitié des situations de détresse localisées par l’ONG Alarm Phone y étaient enregistrées.

    https://www.lemonde.fr/international/video/2021/10/31/migrants-enquete-sur-le-role-de-l-europe-dans-le-piege-libyen_6100475_3210.h
    #responsabilité #Europe #UE #EU #Union_européenne #Libye #migrations #asile #réfugiés #pull-backs #pullbacks #push-backs #refoulements #frontières #gardes-côtes_libyens

    déjà signalé sur seenthis par @colporteur
    https://seenthis.net/messages/934958

  • « On a tous peur d’être contaminés » : dans le CRA de Lyon, les retenus s’inquiètent de la propagation du Covid-19 - InfoMigrants
    https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/37231/on-a-tous-peur-detre-contamines--dans-le-cra-de-lyon-les-retenus-sinqu

    « On a tous peur d’être contaminés » : dans le CRA de Lyon, les retenus s’inquiètent de la propagation du Covid-19
    Par Marlène Panara Publié le : 15/12/2021
    Plusieurs retenus du centre de rétention administrative (CRA) de Lyon Saint-Exupéry ont entamé, la semaine dernière, une grève de la faim de quelques jours. Ils dénoncent des conditions sanitaires déplorables, qui augmentent les risques de contamination au coronavirus. Pour les associations, l’enfermement est incompatible avec la prévention de la maladie."Les gens deviennent fous ici". Ces derniers jours, au sein du centre de rétention administrative (CRA) de Lyon Saint-Exupéry, dans le sud-est de la France, la tension est manifeste. « Dans les bâtiments, c’est impossible de se protéger du Covid. On a tous peur d’être contaminés », confie Amanhy, entré au CRA il y a 15 jours. Le 13 décembre, le collectif Anti CRA de Lyon signalait la découverte d’au moins six cas positifs au coronavirus. D’après l’exilé angolais, il y aurait aujourd’hui 10 personnes malades, placées en isolement. Pour dénoncer un protocole sanitaire insuffisant, qui favorise les risques de contaminations, une partie des retenus a entamé le 8 décembre une grève de la faim."En pleine 5e vague […] aucune mesure sanitaire sérieuse n’est prise pour protéger ou soigner les personnes", dénonce Anti CRA Lyon sur sa page Facebook. D’après une proche de retenu citée par l’association lyonnaise, « aucune mesure de protection [n’a été prise] pour les personnes retenues qui vivaient déjà dans une grande promiscuité » et « où une personne malade peut attendre plusieurs jours avant de voir un médecin ».

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#france#sante#contamination#CRA#protocolesanitaire#promiscuite#enfermement

  • Le #Danemark veut envoyer 300 #détenus_étrangers au #Kosovo
    (... encore le Danemark...)

    La ministre kosovare de la justice a confirmé jeudi l’accord qui prévoit de confier à une prison de son pays des prisonniers étrangers, condamnés au Danemark et susceptibles d’être expulsés après avoir purgé leur peine.

    Le Danemark a franchi, mercredi 15 décembre, une nouvelle étape dans sa gestion des étrangers. Le ministre de la justice, Nick Haekkerup, a annoncé que le pays nordique prévoit de louer 300 places de prison au Kosovo, pour y interner les citoyens étrangers, condamnés au Danemark, et qui doivent être expulsés vers leur pays d’origine après avoir purgé leur peine. Le 3 juin déjà, le gouvernement dirigé par les sociaux-démocrates, avait fait adopter une loi lui permettant de sous-traiter l’accueil des demandeurs d’asile et des réfugiés à un pays tiers.

    L’accord sur les détenus étrangers a été confirmé, jeudi 16 décembre, par la ministre kosovare de la justice, Albulena Haxhiu. Il s’agit d’une première pour ce petit et très pauvre pays des Balkans, dirigé depuis le début de 2021 par le parti de gauche nationaliste Autodétermination !, proche du parti socialiste européen, et qui rêve d’adhésion à l’Union européenne.

    Une lettre d’intention entre les deux gouvernements devrait être signée, lundi 20 décembre, à Pristina. Un traité sera ensuite soumis à l’approbation des deux tiers du Parlement. Mme Haxhiu a révélé que les prisonniers danois seraient enfermés dans le centre de détention de Gjilan, à l’est du pays, et assuré qu’il n’y aurait pas de terroristes, ni de prisonniers à « à haut risque » parmi eux. Selon elle, ce projet d’externalisation « est la reconnaissance du Kosovo et de ses institutions comme un pays sérieux ».
    « Une prison danoise dans un autre pays »

    A Copenhague, le ministre de la justice a fait savoir que les négociations avec Pristina avaient débuté il y a un an. Le dispositif a été présenté dans le cadre d’un accord entre les sociaux-démocrates, les conservateurs, le Parti du peuple danois et le Parti socialiste du peuple, pour réformer le système pénitentiaire. L’objectif est d’augmenter la capacité des prisons danoises pour pouvoir accueillir un millier de détenus supplémentaires.

    Parallèlement à l’ouverture de nouvelles cellules dans les établissements existant, le gouvernement compte donc libérer 300 places en se débarrassant des détenus d’origine étrangère, condamnés à l’expulsion une fois leur peine purgée. Ils étaient 368 en 2020. « Il faut s’imaginer que c’est une prison danoise. Elle se situe juste dans un autre pays », a expliqué M. Haekkerup, précisant que l’équipe dirigeant le centre de Gjilan serait danoise.

    A Pristina, Mme Haxhiu a confirmé : « Les lois en vigueur au Danemark s’appliqueront, la gestion sera danoise, mais les agents pénitentiaires seront de la République du Kosovo. Le bien-être et la sécurité [des détenus] seront sous leur entière responsabilité. »

    Avec ce dispositif, le gouvernement danois veut « envoyer un signal clair que les étrangers condamnés à l’expulsion doivent quitter le Danemark ». Au ministère de la justice, on précise toutefois que si les détenus, une fois leur peine purgée, refusent d’être expulsés dans leur pays d’origine et que Copenhague ne peut les y forcer faute d’accord avec ces pays, alors ils seront renvoyés au Danemark, pour être placés en centre de rétention.

    En échange de ses services, le Kosovo devrait obtenir 210 millions d’euros sur dix ans : « Cette compensation bénéficiera grandement aux institutions judiciaires, ainsi qu’au Service correctionnel du Kosovo, ce qui augmentera la qualité et l’infrastructure globale de ce service », a salué le gouvernement dans un communiqué. Le Danemark, de son côté, a indiqué qu’il allait aussi verser une aide de 6 millions d’euros par an au petit pays, au titre de la transition écologique.
    De nombreux problèmes juridiques

    Comme pour l’externalisation de l’asile, ce projet pose de nombreux problèmes juridiques. Le gouvernement danois a précisé que les détenus ayant une famille seraient les derniers envoyés au Kosovo, car ils doivent pouvoir « avoir des contacts avec leurs enfants ». Une aide financière au transport sera mise en place pour les proches.

    Directrice de l’Institut des droits de l’homme à Copenhague, Louise Holck parle d’une « décision controversée du point de vue des droits de l’homme », car le Danemark, rappelle-t-elle, « ne peut pas exporter ses responsabilités légales » et devra faire en sorte que les droits des prisonniers soient respectés. Professeure de droit à l’université du sud Danemark, Linda Kjær Minke estime qu’il faudra modifier la loi, ne serait-ce que « pour imposer un transfert aux détenus qui refuseraient ».

    Entre 2015 et 2018, la Norvège avait sous-traité l’emprisonnement de prisonniers aux Pays-Bas. Dans un rapport publié en 2016, le médiateur de la justice avait constaté que les autorités norvégiennes « n’avaient pas réussi à garantir une protection adéquate contre la torture et les traitements inhumains ou dégradants ». Jamais aucun pays européen n’a transféré des prisonniers aussi loin (plus de 2 000 km), et le Danemark devrait faire face aux mêmes problèmes que la Norvège, estime Linda Kjær Minke :« Même si la direction est danoise, les employés auront été formés différemment, avec peut-être d’autres façons d’utiliser la force. »

    Ces mises en garde ne semblent pas affecter le gouvernement danois, qui multiplie les décisions très critiquées, comme celle de retirer leur titre de séjour aux réfugiés syriens. Le but est de décourager au maximum les demandeurs d’asile de rejoindre le pays. La gauche et les associations d’aide aux migrants dénoncent une « politique des symboles ».

    https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2021/12/16/le-danemark-veut-envoyer-300-detenus-etrangers-au-kosovo_6106356_3210.html#x

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #externalisation #pays-tiers #rétention #détention_administrative #détention #étrangers_criminels #criminels_étrangers #expulsion #renvoi #accord #Gjilan #prison #emprisonnement #compensation_financière #aide_financière #transition_écologique #étrangers

    ping @karine4 @isskein

    • Danimarca-Kosovo: detenuti in cambio di soldi per tutela ambientale

      Da Pristina e Copenhagen arriva una notizia sconcertante. Il ministro della Giustizia del Kosovo Albulena Haxhiu ha annunciato che a breve arriveranno nel paese 300 detenuti, attualmente nelle carceri danesi e cittadini di paesi non UE, per scontare la loro pena in Kosovo. In cambio Pristina otterrà 210 milioni di euro di finanziamenti a favore dell’energia verde.

      L’accordo fa parte di una serie di misure annunciate in settimana dalle autorità danesi per alleviare il sistema carcerario del paese per far fronte ad anni di esodo del personale e al più alto numero di detenuti dagli anni ’50.

      I detenuti dovrebbero scontare le loro pene in un penitenziario di Gjilan. “I detenuti che saranno trasferiti in questo istituto non saranno ad alto rischio", ha chiarito Haxhiu in una dichiarazione.

      L’accordo deve passare ora dall’approvazione del parlamento di Pristina.

      In molti, in Danimarca e all’estero, si sono detti preoccupati per la salvaguardia dei diritti dei detenuti. Un rapporto del 2020 del Dipartimento di Stato americano ha evidenziato i problemi nelle prigioni e nei centri di detenzione del Kosovo, tra cui violenza tra i prigionieri, corruzione, esposizione a opinioni religiose o politiche radicali, mancanza di cure mediche e a volte violenza da parte del personale.

      Perplessità rimandate al mittente dal ministro della Giustizia danese Nick Hekkerup che si è dichiarato convinto che l’invio di detenuti in Kosovo sarà in linea con le norme a salvaguardia dei diritti umani a livello internazionale. «I detenuti deportati potranno ancora ricevere visite, anche se, naturalmente, sarà difficile», ha chiosato.

      https://www.balcanicaucaso.org/aree/Kosovo/Danimarca-Kosovo-detenuti-in-cambio-di-soldi-per-tutela-ambientale

    • Le Kosovo prêt à louer ses prisons au Danemark

      Le Kosovo veut louer 300 cellules de prison pendant dix ans au Danemark, en échange de 210 millions d’euros. Le pays scandinave prévoit d’y « délocaliser » des détenus étrangers avant leur potentielle expulsion définitive dans leur pays d’origine. Un projet qui piétine les libertés fondamentales.

      Le Kosovo s’apprête à signer lundi 20 décembre un accord de principe avec le Danemark pour lui louer 300 cellules de prison. Le Danemark prévoit donc de déporter à plus de 2000 km de ses frontières 300 détenus étrangers qui viendront purger la fin de leur peine au Kosovo avant d’être expulsés vers leur pays d’origine, si les procédures d’extradition le permettent. Mais ce n’est pas encore fait : une fois l’accord signé, il devra encore être ratifié par les parlements respectifs des deux pays, à la majorité des deux tiers.

      Montant de la rente de cette « location » : 210 millions d’euros pour Pristina. L’argent « sera consacré aux investissements, notamment dans les énergies renouvelables », a précisé Albulena Haxhiu, la ministre de la Justice du Kosovo, qui a tenté de déminer le terrain. « Ce ne seront pas des détenus à haut risque ou des condamnés pour terrorisme, ni des cas psychiatriques. Les institutions judiciaires bénéficieront de la compensation financière, cela aidera à améliorer la qualité et les infrastructures du Service correctionnel. »

      « Il faut s’imaginer que cela sera une prison danoise. Elle sera juste dans un autre pays », a expliqué de son côté son homologue danois, Nick Haekkerup. Mais pourquoi l’un des plus riches pays européens aurait-il besoin d’« externaliser » la prise en charge de ses détenus ? Le Danemark dit avoir besoin de 1000 places de prison supplémentaires. Pour cela, il va créer de nouvelles cellules dans les prisons existantes, et en libérer d’autres en se débarrassant de détenus étrangers. Il s’agit surtout d’envoyer un message de fermeté aux réfugiés qui souhaitent rejoindre le pays scandinave.

      Les Danois ont commencé à préparer le terrain en octobre 2020, avec une visite du système carcéral kosovar. Ils ont « évalué positivement le traitement de nos prisonniers et nos capacités », s’était alors félicité le ministère de la Justice du Kosovo. Les 300 détenus resteront soumis aux lois danoises, mais les gardiens de prison seront bien kosovars. Ce projet d’externalisation carcérale est « la reconnaissance du Kosovo comme un pays sérieux », s’est félicitée Albulena Haxhiu.

      “Le Kosovo se transforme en un lieu de détention pour les migrants indésirables. Pour un peu d’argent, notre gouvernement renforce le sentiment anti-réfugiés qui s’accroit en Europe.”

      Mais pour le Conseil de la défense des droits de l’homme (KMLDNJ), qui surveille les conditions de détention dans les prisons kosovares, cet accord « légalise la discrimination des détenus ». « Tout d’abord, vendre sa souveraineté à un autre État pour dix ans et 210 millions d’euros est un acte de violation de cette souveraineté. De plus, les conditions et le traitement de ces détenus qui viendront du Danemark seront incomparablement meilleurs des autres 1600 à 1800 détenus du Kosovo », estime l’ONG. « Les propriétés de l’État ne doivent pas être traitées comme des infrastructures privées à louer », ajoute Besa Kabashi-Ramaj, experte en questions sécuritaires.

      Cet accord a en effet surpris beaucoup d’observateurs locaux et internationaux, et ce d’autant plus que le Kosovo est actuellement gouverné par le parti de gauche souverainiste Vetëvendosje. « Le Kosovo se transforme en un lieu de détention pour les migrants indésirables. Pour un peu d’argent, notre gouvernement renforce le sentiment anti-réfugiés qui s’accroît en Europe », déplore Visar Ymeri, directeur de l’Institut pour les politiques sociales Musine Kokalari. « Aussi, quand la ministre de la Justice affirme que le Kosovo a assez de prisons mais pas assez de prisonniers, elle participe à une politique de remplacement du besoin de justice par un besoin d’emprisonnement. »

      Selon le Rapport mondial des prisons, établi par l’Université de Londres, le Kosovo avait 1642 détenus en 2020, soit un taux d’occupation de 97%. Le ministère de la Justice du Kosovo n’a, semble-t-il, pas la même façon de calculer l’espace carcéral : « Nous avons actuellement 700-800 places libres. Vu qu’au maximum nous aurons 300 détenus du Danemark, il restera encore des places libres », a même fait savoir Alban Muriqi, du ministère de la Justice.

      Le Kosovo a onze centre de détention : cinq centres de détention provisoire, une prison haute sécurité, une prison pour femmes, un centre d’éducation pour les mineurs et trois autres prisons. C’est au centre de détention à #Gjilan / #Gnjilane, dans l’est du Kosovo, que seraient louées les cellules au Danemark.

      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Kosovo-Prisonniers-Danemark

    • La Danimarca e le prigioni off-shore

      Sono immigrati incarcerati in Danimarca. Dal 2023 rischiano di scontare la propria pena in un peniteniario di Gjilian, in Kosovo. Un approfondimento sullo sconcertante accordo del dicembre scorso tra Copenhagen e Pristina

      Sebbene Danimarca e Kosovo abbiano avuto poco a che fare l’uno con l’altro, alla fine di dicembre si sono ritrovati insieme nei titoli dei giornali di tutto il mondo. Ad attirare l’attenzione della Danimarca sono state le quasi 800 celle vuote del Kosovo. I titoli dei giornali erano di questo tipo: «La Danimarca spedisce i propri prigionieri in Kosovo».

      Ci si riferiva ad un accordo firmato il 21 dicembre 2021 per inviare - in un centro di detenzione nei pressi di Gjilan, 50 chilometri a sud-est di Pristina - 300 persone incarcerate in Danimarca. Le autorità danesi hanno specificato che i 300 detenuti saranno esclusivamente cittadini di paesi terzi destinati ad essere deportati dalla Danimarca alla fine della loro pena.

      In cambio, il Kosovo dovrebbe ricevere 200 milioni di euro, suddivisi su di un periodo di 10 anni. I fondi sono stati vincolati a progetti nel campo dell’energia verde e delle riforme dello stato di diritto. Il ministro della Giustizia del Kosovo Albulena Haxhiu ha definito questi investimenti «fondamentali» e il ministro della Giustizia danese Nick Hækkerup ha affermato che «entrambi i paesi con questo accordo avranno dei vantaggi».

      L’idea di gestire una colonia penale per conto di un paese dell’UE ha messo molti kosovari a disagio, e nonostante la fiducia espressa dal governo danese, l’accordo ha ricevuto pesanti critiche anche in Danimarca. Ma cosa sta succedendo alla Danimarca e al suo sistema carcerario da spingerla a spedire i propri detenuti in uno dei paesi più poveri d’Europa?
      Problemi in paradiso?

      La Danimarca e i suoi vicini nordici sono rinomati per l’alta qualità della vita, gli eccellenti sistemi educativi e le generose disposizioni di assistenza sociale. Di conseguenza, può sorprendere che il sistema carcerario danese abbia qualche cosa che non va.

      Secondo Peter Vedel Kessing, ricercatore dell’Istituto Danese per i Diritti Umani (DIHR), non c’è da stupirsi, il sistema carcerario infatti «non è una priorità in molti stati. Tendono a non dare la priorità alla costruzione di prigioni. Vogliono spendere i soldi per qualcos’altro». E in Danimarca “hanno prigioni molto vecchie".

      Alla fine del 2020 il servizio danese per i penitenziari e la libertà vigilata (Kriminalforsogen) ha riferito che il sistema carcerario aveva la capacità di contenere 4.073 prigionieri. In media, c’erano però 4.085 detenuti ad occupare le celle nel 2020, facendole risultare leggermente sovraffollate.

      Un rapporto del gennaio 2020 dell’Annual Penal Statistics (SPACE) del Consiglio d’Europa sottolinea che la Danimarca aveva 4.140 detenuti mentre possedeva capacità per 4.035. I funzionari penitenziari hanno trovato lo spazio in più riducendo le aree comuni e dedicate ai servizi di base. Secondo un rapporto DIHR del novembre 2021, «diverse prigioni hanno chiuso sale comuni o aule per avere un numero sufficiente di celle». Il rapporto menziona anche la trasformazione di palestre, sale per le visite e uffici in celle di prigione.

      In Danimarca, ogni detenuto dovrebbe avere una cella propria. Ma nelle prigioni come quella di Nykøbing, una città a 130 chilometri a sud di Copenaghen, ci sono ora due detenuti per cella, secondo un rapporto del “Danish Prison and Probation Service”.

      Il rapporto includeva una previsione per il 2022: si aspettano di superare del 7,9% i posti a disposizione. Sia il Kriminalforsogen che l’importante media danese Jyllands Posten hanno stimato una possibile carenza di 1.000 posti entro il 2025, se non si trovano soluzioni strutturali.

      Ora, invece di erodere ulteriormente gli spazi comuni, si pensa di inviare i detenuti a 2000 chilometri di distanza. Tra le molte cose, sono stati tanti i danesi a far notare che l’accordo viola i diritti di visita dei detenuti: diventerà molto più difficile per le famiglie e gli amici dei detenuti presentarsi all’orario di visita nel Kosovo orientale.

      «Se improvvisamente ti trovi a dover andare in Kosovo per trovare tuo padre… non sarà possibile per la stragrande maggioranza delle famiglie dei detenuti. Ad esempio, un bambino di 3 anni, non è che può andare in Kosovo quando vuole e, naturalmente, il detenuto non potrà venire a trovare il bambino», sottolinea Mette Grith Stage, un avvocato che rappresenta molti imputati che si battono contro la deportazione, al quotidiano danese Politiken. «Questo significa di fatto che i deportati perdono il contatto con la loro famiglia».

      Per coprire la spesa prevista di 200 milioni di euro in un decennio, il governo danese ha recentemente annunciato che intende aumentare le tasse sulla tv. L’annuncio ha causato reazioni amare. In un’udienza parlamentare all’inizio di febbraio, il direttore delle comunicazioni dell’organizzazione Danish Media Distributors, Ib Konrad Jensen, ha dichiarato: «È un’ottima idea scrivere in fondo alla bolletta [della televisione]: ’Ecco il vostro pagamento al servizio carcerario del Kosovo’».
      Aiuto!

      Non solo c’è una carenza di spazio nel sistema penale, ma la Danimarca ha anche difficoltà nell’assumere abbastanza guardie carcerarie ed è da questo punto di vista gravemente sotto organico negli ultimi anni.

      Un rapporto del 2020 del Consiglio d’Europa mostra che l’Albania ha una proporzione di guardie carcerarie per prigionieri più alta della Danimarca. Il confronto è stato portato alla luce dai media danesi per cercare di enfatizzare la scarsa qualità delle prigioni danesi: guarda come siamo messi male, anche l’Albania sta facendo meglio di noi.

      I funzionari penitenziari si sono opposti a questo tipo di parallelismo. «L’Albania è certamente un paese eccellente», ha dichiarato Bo Yde Sørensen, presidente della Federazione delle prigioni danesi, in un articolo del quotidiano Berlingske, «ma di solito non è uno con il quale paragoniamo le nostre istituzioni sociali vitali».

      Anche altri media danesi hanno fatto paragoni denigratori con i paesi balcanici per evidenziare i problemi del proprio sistema carcerario. Nel penitenziario di Nyborg, situato sull’isola di Funen, la testata danese V2 ha riferito che la qualità del lavoro è più scadente di quella della Bulgaria, affermando che «in media, un agente penitenziario nella prigione di Nyborg gestisce 2,8 detenuti», mentre «in confronto, la media è 2,4 in una prigione media in Bulgaria».

      La diffusa scarsa opinione tra i media danesi delle condizioni dei penitenziari nei Balcani mette chiaramente in discussione le assicurazioni che il governo danese ha dato nel garantire che i propri prigionieri a Gjilan troveranno le condizioni a cui hanno diritto per la legge danese.

      Ma come è chiaro, anche in Danimarca il sistema penitenziario ha problemi a rispettare queste stesse condizioni. Nel penitenziario di Vestre, a Copenhagen, i detenuti sono chiusi nelle loro celle durante la notte perché non ci sono abbastanza guardie per sorvegliarli durante la guardia notturna. I detenuti in Danimarca avrebbero diritto al contrario di avere un alto grado di libertà di movimento all’interno della struttura carceraria, anche durante la notte.

      «Non è un segreto che il servizio penitenziario e di libertà vigilata danese si trova in una situazione molto difficile. Ci sono più detenuti e meno guardie carcerarie che mai, e questo crea sfide e mette molta pressione», afferma Sørensen in una intervista per Berlingske.

      Un comunicato stampa emesso dal Fængselsforbundet - servizio penitenziario danese - mostra i bisogno in termini chiari: «Prendiamo il 2015 come esempio. A quel tempo c’erano 2.500 agenti per 3.400 prigionieri. Cioè 1,4 detenuti per agente. Ora il rapporto è di due a uno. Duemila agenti per 4.200 detenuti».

      In risposta ai problemi di personale, le prigioni danesi sono ricorse al chiudere a chiave le celle. «Il modo per evitare la violenza e per avere una migliore atmosfera nei penitenziari», commenta Kessing, ricercatore del DIHR, è quello di «creare relazioni tra l’istituzione penitenziaria, i detenuti e il personale della prigione». «Ma a causa della diminuzione del numero di guardie, non si ha più il tempo di sviluppare relazioni», chiosa.
      La risposta? Il Kosovo

      Per superare queste sfide, la Danimarca sembra aver preso esempio dalla vicina Norvegia, che ha affrontato problemi simili nel 2015. Quell’anno la Norvegia ha inviato 242 detenuti nei Paesi Bassi per risolvere i problemi di sovraccarico dei penitenziari. Ma nel 2018 il governo norvegese ha deciso di non rinnovare l’accordo di fronte a lamentele relative a riabilitazione e giurisdizione.

      Ora la Danimarca ha gettato gli occhi - come recinto per i propri detenuti - non sui Paesi Bassi ma su uno dei paesi più poveri d’Europa.

      «Il loro futuro non è in Danimarca, e quindi non dovrebbero nemmeno scontare la loro pena qui», ha dichiarato il ministro della Giustizia Nick Hækkerup, dando conferma di una crescente retorica anti-immigrazione in Danimarca.

      Quando i detenuti cominceranno ad arrivare a Gjilan nel 2023, la prigione sarà gestita dalle autorità danesi, causando una potenziale confusione su quale giurisdizione applicare: problema simile era sorto tra Norvegia e Paesi Bassi.

      Mette Grith Stage, come anche altri avvocati danesi, hanno espresso preoccupazione per questo accordo e si sono detti scettici sul fatto che le leggi penali danesi saranno applicate appieno nel sistema carcerario del Kosovo.

      In un’intervista con DR, l’emittente pubblica danese, il ministro della Giustizia Hækkerup ha però ribattuto: «Il penitenziario sarà gestito da una direzione danese che deve formare i dipendenti locali, per questo sono certo che le prigioni saranno all’altezza delle leggi e degli standard danesi. Deve essere visto come un pezzo del sistema carcerario danese che si sposta in Kosovo».

      Le dichiarazioni delle autorità danesi durante tutta la vicenda hanno spesso citato la loro «presenza significativa» in Kosovo. Tuttavia la Danimarca è l’unico paese scandinavo a non avere un’ambasciata a Pristina. L’ambasciata danese a Vienna, che supervisiona gli affari nei Balcani, ha esternalizzato il lavoro a uno studio legale nella capitale del Kosovo.

      A seguito degli obblighi NATO della Danimarca, un totale di 10.000 componenti delle proprie truppe hanno servito nella KFOR dal 1999 ad oggi. Attualmente sono 30 i militari danesi in Kosovo. Nel 2008 la Danimarca fu uno dei primi paesi a riconoscere l’indipendenza del Kosovo.

      Anche se le autorità danesi affermano di considerare il Kosovo alla pari, il semplice fatto che la Danimarca stia assumendo la gestione di una delle prigioni del Kosovo potrebbe legittimamente essere visto come una minaccia alla sovranità di quest’ultimo. Quando i prigionieri norvegesi vennero mandati nei Paesi Bassi, il penitenziario continuò ad essere sotto autorità olandese.

      Ma al di là delle preoccupazioni sulla giurisdizione, gli standard delle prigioni, i diritti di visita e i costi, ci sono questioni morali più grandi. Il popolo danese vuole veramente che a proprio nome vengano gestite strutture carcerarie offshore per i suoi immigrati incarcerati? E il popolo del Kosovo vuole essere una colonia penale dei paesi più ricchi? I governi della Danimarca e del Kosovo dicono di sì, ma cosa dice la gente?

      https://www.balcanicaucaso.org/aree/Kosovo/La-Danimarca-e-le-prigioni-off-shore-215757

  • I funerali di Majid

    Oggi si sono tenute a Monfalcone le esequie di #Majid_El_Kodra il ragazzo marocchino morto lo scorso 30 aprile.

    Protagonista delle rivolte all’interno del CIE dell’agosto dello scorso anno, non si è mai ripreso dalla caduta dal tetto del lager contro cui lottava e da cui ha cercato di fuggire.

    La gestione del suo decesso è indegna di un paese civile. I suoi congiunti sono stati avvisati una settimana dopo la sua morte con una mancanza di attenzione e sensibilità che ferisce.

    Oltre ai familiari, presenti circa un centinaio di persone tra migranti (la gran parte della multietnica comunità islamica monfalconese), attivisti antirazzisti e solidali, tra cui alcuni compagni anarchici.

    Cordoglio, dolore e rabbia erano i sentimenti che si potevano percepire tra i presenti per la morte di questo ragazzo di neanche 35 anni.

    Per quel cortocircuito della ragione che si chiama stato era Majid ad essere imputato e non coloro che lo hanno relegato fino alla morte in un lager per migranti. Lui è tragicamente scampato al procedimento giudiziario, chi ne ha indirettamente causato la morte temiamo ne uscirà con le mani pulite nonostante l’esposto depositato per i fatti accaduti al CIE da parte delle associzioni antirazziste.

    Durante il funerale c’è stata una raccolta fondi per contribuire al rientro della salma in Marocco.

    “Questo è il risultato! Questo è il risultato!” diceva un ragazzo magrebino piangendo e tenendosi la testa tra le mani.

    Questo è il risultato di un sistema criminale di gestione dei migranti ridotti in cattività solo perché privi di un pezzo di carta.

    Questo è il risultato di un sistema economico che lo stato lubrifica col sangue.

    Quello che è successo a Gradisca non deve succedere più, né qui né altrove.

    Oggi eravamo in tanti a salutare Majid.

    Ce lo ricordiamo sul tetto del CIE con le braccia alzate reclamando libertà per sé e i suoi compagni di detenzione.

    La sua lotta è la nostra lotta!

    NO CIE! Né a Gradisca né altrove!

    https://libertari-go.noblogs.org/i-funerali-di-majid
    –-> ajouté ici pour archivage.

    Décès : 30.04.2014

    #Gradisca #CIE #décès #morts #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Italie #CRA #détention_administrative #Gradisca_d'Isonzo

    • Ogni anima muore. La storia di Majid, morto di CIE
      Un documentario a cura di Ottavia Salvador

      Nella notte del 13 agosto 2013, mentre è trattenuto, da pochi giorni, nel centro di identificazione ed espulsione (CIE) di Gradisca d’Isonzo, Majid El Kodra, si procura un grave trauma cranico. Si dice che, saltando dal tetto di un edificio adibito a deposito, in un tentativo di fuga dalla struttura, sia caduto a terra, battendo violentemente la testa. Erano giorni di proteste e repressioni, nel CIE, che lo hanno spinto, con un tocco invisibile, verso una lenta morte, dopo otto mesi di coma, il 30 aprile 2014. Il suo corpo è stato rimpatriato ai familiari in Marocco, nella provincia di Taounate, in una notte di maggio, e sepolto vicino alla casa dov’era nato nel 1979 e dalla quale era partito per emigrare in Europa. Sulla sua tomba è dipinta, in rosso, l’iscrizione: “Ogni anima muore“.

      Un viaggio alla ricerca delle tracce della sua vita sconosciuta, delle parole invisibili di rabbia e dolore di chi è rimasto, dei colori del suo mondo.

      E’ online il teaser del documentario “Ogni anima muore” che Ottavia Salvador sta realizzando sulla storia di Majid. Ottavia e’ una dottoranda che si occupa della morte nella migrazione e ha seguito (e continua a seguire) la vicenda di Majid e della sua famiglia.

      https://vimeo.com/217701619?embedded=true&source=vimeo_logo&owner=66638623

      https://www.meltingpot.org/2017/05/ogni-anima-muore-la-storia-di-majid-morto-di-cie
      #documentaire #film_documentaire #film

    • Presentato un esposto alla Procura della Repubblica per i fatti del CIE di Gradisca. Morto Majid, il migrante caduto dal tetto durante le proteste dell’agosto 2013

      Oggi l’associazione Tenda per la Pace e i Diritti e molte delle associazioni aderenti alla campagna LasciateCIEntrare hanno depositato presso le Procure della Repubblica di Gorizia, di Roma e di Napoli un esposto per chiedere accertamenti e indagini sugli avvenimenti dell’agosto 2013 all’interno del CIE (Centro di Identificazione ed Espulsione) di Gradisca d’Isonzo.
      Si è trattato di scontri, pestaggi, lanci di lacrimogeni che iniziati l’8 agosto, sono durati diversi giorni e in circostanze ancora da chiarire, nella notte tra l’11 e il 12 agosto, uno dei migranti cade dal tetto e finisce in coma. Majid era nel centro da poche settimane: è morto il 30 aprile scorso all’ospedale di Monfalcone.

      Il Centro di Identificazione ed Espulsione di Gradisca d’Isonzo è chiuso da novembre 2013 a seguito dell’ennesima protesta da parte dei trattenuti ma rimangono nell’ombra molti avvenimenti.
      Nell’esposto vengono evidenziati i fatti, ricostruiti grazie alle testimonianze dei migranti, di associazioni e dei parlamentari che sono giunti sul posto chiamati d’urgenza durante quei giorni di proteste e di rivolte. Di particolare gravità risulta l’uso dei lacrimogeni CS (un gas considerato letale) da parte delle forze di sicurezza: inutile e spropositato il ricorso a questi mezzi per sedare la protesta di persone rinchiuse in una struttura chiamata “gabbia” per le alte sbarre che la circondano.
      Gli scontri e i pestaggi avvengono nella “vasca”, il cortile interno semichiuso e delimitato da pareti in plexiglass che non ha consentito ai fumi e vapori irritanti di dissolversi, causando malori ai migranti.
      Le associazioni e i firmatari dell’esposto si chiedono se non ci sia stato un abuso di potere da parte delle forze dell’ordine preposte alla vigilanza del centro.
      Sono molte le testimonianze dell’accaduto: migranti, medici, operatori umanitari e parlamentari racconteranno cosa è stato il CIE di Gradisca, perché non deve più riaprire e perché vanno chiusi tutti i CIE presenti sul territorio italiano.

      Se ne parla il 13 maggio alle ore 11.00 presso la Federazione Nazionale della Stampa Italiana in C.so Vittorio Emanuele, 249 – Roma

      Presentano l’esposto e gli sviluppi dei fatti di Gradisca:
      Galadriel Ravelli Tenda della Pace e i Diritti
      Gabriella Guido – portavoce della campagna LasciateCIEntrare
      Alberto Barbieri – Medici per i Diritti Umani
      Pietro Soldini – CGIL
      Oria Gargano – BE FREE

      Saranno mostrati video e testimonianze sugli incidenti di Gradisca che hanno portato al temporaneo svuotamento e chiusura del centro.
      Un ennesimo episodio quello di Gradisca che dimostra il fallimento del sistema di detenzione amministrativa e l’urgenza di soluzioni alternative, mentre il Governo e gli organi preposti mostrano un colpevole silenzio e totale assenza d’iniziative volte alla revisione del sistema. Un sistema di detenzione imploso, che registra una continua violazione dei diritti umani e sul quale gravano fin troppe detenzioni “illegittime”, interrogazioni parlamentari, denunce, imputazioni per reati penali commesse dagli enti gestori (tra cui Connecting People che gestiva il CIE di Gradisca e continua a gestire altre strutture), oltre che un enorme spreco in termini di risorse finanziare.

      LasciateCIEntrare denuncia inoltre quanto alla vigilia delle elezioni europee il tema dell’immigrazione venga ignorato o usato strumentalmente dai candidati di alcune forze politiche: il futuro europarlamento e l’attuale Governo italiano sono chiamati a rispondere immediatamente con soluzioni che garantiscano la difesa dei diritti umani così come l’incolumità degli uomini, donne e bambini migranti che arrivano nel nostro paese e in Europa, i meccanismi di ingresso e di soggiorno e la revisione della normativa in materia di immigrazione.

      L’esposto è stato firmato tra gli altri da:
      A BUON DIRITTO, ANTIGONE, ASGI, BE FREE, CASA INTERNAZIONALE DELLE DONNE, DA SUD, MELTING POT, ARCI Thomas Sankara e Ass. GARIBALDI 101. E dai parlamentari COSTANTINO, FRATOIANNI e PELLEGRINO di SEL e dai candidati all’europarlamento CASARINI, FURFARO e ALOTTO.

      Contatti:
      Ufficio Stampa – Paola Ferrara 328.4129242
      Coordinamento campagna LasciateCIEntrare – Gabriella Guido 329.8113338
      ggabrielle65@yahoo.it

      La campagna LasciateCIEntrare è nata nel 2011 per contrastare una circolare del Ministero dell’Interno che vietava l’accesso agli organi di stampa nei CIE (Centri di Identificazione ed Espulsione): appellandosi al diritto/dovere di esercitare l’art. 21 della Costituzione, ovvero la libertà di stampa, LasciateCIEntrare ha ottenuto l’abrogazione della circolare e oggi si batte per la chiusura dei CIE, l’abolizione della detenzione amministrativa e la revisione delle politiche sull’immigrazione.

      https://www.articolo21.org/2014/05/presentato-un-esposto-alla-procura-della-repubblica-per-i-fatti-del-cie-

  • #Libye : preuves de #crimes_de_guerre et de #crimes_contre_l’humanité, selon des experts de l’#ONU

    Parmi les exactions dénoncées par la mission onusienne : des attaques contre des écoles ou des hôpitaux ou encore les violences subies par les migrants.

    Des crimes de guerre et des crimes contre l’humanité ont été commis en Libye depuis 2016, a conclu une #mission d’#enquête d’experts de l’ONU après une enquête sur place, indique l’AFP ce lundi, confirmant des faits dénoncés de longue date.

    La mission souligne que « les civils ont payé un lourd tribut » aux #violences qui déchirent la Libye depuis cinq ans, notamment en raison des attaques contre des écoles ou des hôpitaux. « Les #raids_aériens ont tué des dizaines de familles. La destruction d’infrastructures de santé a eu un impact sur l’#accès_aux_soins et les #mines_antipersonnel laissées par des #mercenaires dans des zones résidentielles ont tué et blessé des civils », souligne le rapport.

    Par ailleurs, les #migrants sont soumis à toutes sortes de violences « dans les #centres_de_détention et du fait des trafiquants », en tentant de trouver un passage vers l’Europe en Libye, a dénoncé l’un des auteurs de l’enquête. « Notre enquête montre que les #agressions contre les migrants sont commises à une large échelle par des acteurs étatiques et non étatiques, avec un haut degré d’organisation et avec les encouragements de l’Etat - autant d’aspects qui laissent à penser qu’il s’agit de crimes contre l’humanité ».

    Les #prisons

    Les experts soulignent aussi la situation dramatique dans les prisons libyennes, où les détenus sont parfois torturés quotidiennement et les familles empêchées de visiter. La #détention_arbitraire dans des #prisons_secrètes et dans des conditions insupportables est utilisée par l’Etat et les #milices contre tous ceux qui sont perçus comme une menace.

    « La violence est utilisée à une telle échelle dans les prisons libyennes et à un tel degré d’organisation que cela peut aussi potentiellement constituer un crime contre l’humanité », a souligné Tracy Robinson.

    Les auteurs du rapport notent que la justice libyenne enquête également sur la plupart des cas évoqués par la mission de l’ONU, mais notent que « le processus pour punir les gens coupables de violations ou de #maltraitances est confronté à des défis importants ».

    La mission composée de trois experts, Mohamed Auajjar, Chaloka Beyani et Tracy Robinson, a rassemblé des centaines de documents, interviewé 150 personnes et menée l’enquête en Libye même, mais aussi en Tunisie et en Italie.

    Cette mission indépendante a toutefois décidé de ne pas publier « la liste des individus et groupes (aussi bien libyens qu’étrangers) qui pourraient être responsables pour les violations, les abus et les crimes commis en Libye depuis 2016 ». « Cette liste confidentielle le restera, jusqu’à ce que se fasse jour le besoin de la publier ou de la partager » avec d’autres instances pouvant demander des comptes aux responsables.

    Le rapport doit être présenté au Conseil des droits de l’homme à Genève - la plus haute instance de l’ONU dans ce domaine - le 7 octobre.

    https://www.liberation.fr/international/afrique/libye-preuves-de-crimes-de-guerre-et-de-crimes-contre-lhumanite-selon-des

    #torture #migrations #rapport

  • Australia signs deal with Nauru to keep asylum seeker detention centre open indefinitely

    Australia will continue its policy of offshore processing of asylum seekers indefinitely, with the home affairs minister signing a new agreement with Nauru to maintain “an enduring form” of offshore processing on the island state.Since 2012 – in the second iteration of the policy – all asylum seekers who arrive in Australia by boat seeking protection have faced mandatory indefinite detention and processing offshore.

    There are currently about 108 people held by Australia on Nauru as part of its offshore processing regime. Most have been there more than eight years. About 125 people are still held in Papua New Guinea. No one has been sent offshore since 2014.

    However, Nauru is Australia’s only remaining offshore detention centre.PNG’s Manus Island centre was forced to shut down after it was found to be unconstitutional by the PNG supreme court in 2016. Australia was forced to compensate those who had been illegally detained there, and they were forcibly moved out, mostly to Port Moresby.

    But the Nauru detention facility will remain indefinitely.

    In a statement on Friday, home affairs minister #Karen_Andrews said a new #memorandum_of_understanding with Nauru was a “significant step forwards” for both countries.

    “Australia’s strong and successful border protection policies under #Operation_Sovereign_Borders remain and there is zero chance of settlement in Australia for anyone who arrives illegally by boat,” she said.“Anyone who attempts an illegal maritime journey to Australia will be turned back, or taken to Nauru for processing. They will never settle in Australia.”Nauru president, #Lionel_Aingimea, said the new agreement created an “enduring form” of offshore processing.

    “This takes the regional processing to a new milestone.

    “It is enduring in nature, as such the mechanisms are ready to deal with illegal migrants immediately upon their arrival in Nauru from Australia.”Australia’s offshore processing policy and practices have been consistently criticised by the United Nations, human rights groups, and by refugees themselves.

    The UN has said Australia’s system violates the convention against tortureand the international criminal court’s prosecutor said indefinite detention offshore was “cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment” and unlawful under international law.

    At least 12 people have died in the camps, including being murdered by guards, through medical neglect and by suicide. Psychiatrists sent to work in the camps have described the conditions as “inherently toxic” and akin to “torture”.In 2016, the Nauru files, published by the Guardian, exposed the Nauru detention centre’s own internal reports of systemic violence, rape, sexual abuse, self-harm and child abuse in offshore detention.

    The decision to extend offshore processing indefinitely has been met with opprobrium from those who were detained there, and refugee advocates who say it is deliberately damaging to those held.

    Myo Win, a human rights activist and Rohingyan refugee from Myanmar, who was formerly detained on Nauru and released in March 2021, said those who remain held within Australia’s regime on Nauru “are just so tired, separated from family, having politics played with their lives, it just makes me so upset”.

    “I am out now and I still cannot live my life on a bridging visa and in lockdown, but it is 10 times better than Nauru. They should not be extending anything, they should be stopping offshore processing now. I am really worried about everyone on Nauru right now, they need to be released.

    ”Jana Favero from the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre said the new memorandum of understanding only extended a “failed system”.“An ‘enduring regional processing capability’ in Nauru means: enduring suffering, enduring family separation, enduring uncertainty, enduring harm and Australia’s enduring shame.

    “The #Morrison government must give the men, women and children impacted by the brutality of #offshore processing a safe and permanent home. Prolonging the failure of #offshore_processing on Nauru and #PNG is not only wrong and inhumane but dangerous.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/sep/24/australia-signs-deal-with-nauru-to-keep-asylum-seeker-detention-centre-

    #Australie #Pacific_solution #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Nauru #externalisation #île #détention #emprisonnement

    • Multibillion-dollar strategy with no end in sight: Australia’s ‘enduring’ offshore processing deal with Nauru

      Late last month, Home Affairs Minister #Karen_Andrews and the president of Nauru, #Lionel_Aingimea, quietly announced they had signed a new agreement to establish an “enduring form” of offshore processing for asylum seekers taken to the Pacific island.

      The text of the new agreement has not been made public. This is unsurprising.

      All the publicly available information indicates Australia’s offshore processing strategy is an ongoing human rights — not to mention financial — disaster.

      The deliberate opaqueness is intended to make it difficult to hold the government to account for these human and other costs. This is, of course, all the more reason to subject the new deal with Nauru to intense scrutiny.
      Policies 20 years in the making

      In order to fully understand the new deal — and the ramifications of it — it is necessary to briefly recount 20 years of history.

      In late August 2001, the Howard government impulsively refused to allow asylum seekers rescued at sea by the Tampa freighter to disembark on Australian soil. This began policy-making on the run and led to the Pacific Solution Mark I.

      The governments of Nauru and Papua New Guinea were persuaded to enter into agreements allowing people attempting to reach Australia by boat to be detained in facilities on their territory while their protection claims were considered by Australian officials.

      By the 2007 election, boat arrivals to Australia had dwindled substantially.

      In February 2008, the newly elected Labor government closed down the facilities in Nauru and PNG. Within a year, boat arrivals had increased dramatically, causing the government to rethink its policy.

      After a couple of false starts, it signed new deals with Nauru and PNG in late 2012. An expert panel had described the new arrangements as a “necessary circuit breaker to the current surge in irregular migration to Australia”.

      This was the Pacific Solution Mark II. In contrast to the first iteration, it provided for boat arrivals taken to Nauru and PNG to have protection claims considered under the laws and procedures of the host country.

      Moreover, the processing facilities were supposedly run by the host countries, though in reality, the Australian government outsourced this to private companies.

      Despite the new arrangements, the boat arrivals continued. And on July 19, 2013, the Rudd government took a hardline stance, announcing any boat arrivals after that date would have “have no chance of being settled in Australia as refugees”.
      New draconian changes to the system

      The 1,056 individuals who had been transferred to Nauru or PNG before July 19, 2013 were brought to Australia to be processed.

      PNG agreed that asylum seekers arriving after this date could resettle there, if they were recognised as refugees.

      Nauru made a more equivocal commitment and has thus far only granted 20-year visas to those it recognises as refugees.

      The Coalition then won the September 2013 federal election and implemented the military-led Operation Sovereign Borders policy. This involves turning back boat arrivals to transit countries (like Indonesia), or to their countries of origin.

      The cumulative count of interceptions since then stands at 38 boats carrying 873 people. The most recent interception was in January 2020.

      It should be noted these figures do not include the large number of interceptions undertaken at Australia’s request by transit countries and countries of origin.

      What this means is the mere existence of the offshore processing system — even in the more draconian form in place after July 2013 — has not deterred people from attempting to reach Australia by boat.

      Rather, the attempts have continued, but the interception activities of Australia and other countries have prevented them from succeeding.

      No new asylum seekers in Nauru or PNG since 2014

      Australia acknowledges it has obligations under the UN Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees — and other human rights treaties — to refrain from returning people to places where they face the risk of serious harm.

      As a result, those intercepted at sea are given on-water screening interviews for the purpose of identifying those with prima facie protection claims.

      Those individuals are supposed to be taken to Nauru or PNG instead of being turned back or handed back. Concerningly, of the 873 people intercepted since 2013, only two have passed these screenings: both in 2014.

      This means no asylum seekers have been taken to either Nauru or PNG since 2014. Since then, Australia has spent years trying to find resettlement options in third countries for recognised refugees in Nauru and PNG, such as in Cambodia and the US.

      As of April 30, 131 asylum seekers were still in PNG and 109 were in Nauru.

      A boon to the Nauruan government

      Australia has spent billions on Pacific Solution Mark II with no end in sight.

      As well as underwriting all the infrastructure and operational costs of the processing facilities, Australia made it worthwhile for Nauru and PNG to participate in the arrangements.

      For one thing, it promised to ensure spillover benefits for the local economies by, for example, requiring contractors to hire local staff. In fact, in 2019–20, the processing facility in Nauru employed 15% of the country’s entire workforce.

      And from the beginning, Nauru has required every transferee to hold a regional processing centre visa. This is a temporary visa which must be renewed every three months by the Australian government.

      The visa fee each time is A$3,000, so that’s A$12,000 per transferee per year that Australia is required to pay the Nauruan government.

      Where a transferee is found to be a person in need of protection, that visa converts automatically into a temporary settlement visa, which must be renewed every six months. The temporary settlement visa fee is A$3,000 per month — again paid by the Australian government.

      In 2019-20, direct and indirect revenue from the processing facility made up 58% of total Nauruan government revenue. It is no wonder Nauru is on board with making an “enduring form” of offshore processing available to Australia.

      ‘Not to use it, but to be willing to use it’

      In 2016, the PNG Supreme Court ruled the detention of asylum seekers in the offshore processing facility was unconstitutional. Australia and PNG then agreed to close the PNG facility in late 2017 and residents were moved to alternative accommodation. Australia is underwriting the costs.

      Australia decided, however, to maintain a processing facility in Nauru. Senator Jim Molan asked Home Affairs Secretary Michael Pezzullo about this in Senate Estimates in February 2018, saying:

      So it’s more appropriate to say that we are not maintaining Nauru as an offshore processing centre; we are maintaining a relationship with the Nauru government.

      Pezzullo responded,

      the whole purpose is, as you would well recall, in fact not to have to use those facilities. But, as in all deterrents, you need to have an asset that is credible so that you are deterring future eventualities. So the whole point of it is actually not to use it but to be willing to use it.

      This is how we ended up where we are now, with a new deal with the Nauru government for an “enduring” — that is indefinitely maintained — offshore processing capability, at great cost to the Australian people.

      Little has been made public about this new arrangement. We do know in December 2020, the incoming minister for immigration, Alex Hawke, was told the government was undertaking “a major procurement” for “enduring capability services”.

      We also know a budget of A$731.2 million has been appropriated for regional processing in 2021-22.

      Of this, $187 million is for service provider fees and host government costs in PNG. Almost all of the remainder goes to Nauru, to ensure that, beyond hosting its current population of 109 transferees, it “stands ready to receive new arrivals”.

      https://theconversation.com/multibillion-dollar-strategy-with-no-end-in-sight-australias-enduri
      #new_deal

  • Sur l’#île grecque de #Kos, la #détention des demandeurs d’asile est quasi systématique

    Depuis la fin 2019, presque tous les nouveaux arrivants sont mis en détention dans le seul centre de rétention de la mer Egée. Les ONG craignent que cette pratique ne soit étendue aux autres îles, où de nouveaux camps fermés sont en construction.

    https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2021/07/24/sur-l-ile-grecque-de-kos-la-detention-des-demandeurs-d-asile-est-quasi-syste
    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #centres_fermés #Grèce #îles