• #Coronavirus : l’Italie ne reprend provisoirement plus de requérants d’asile de Suisse

    En raison de la propagation du coronavirus, les autorités italiennes ont décidé de ne plus reprendre jusqu’à nouvel ordre de requérants d’asile dans le cadre du système Dublin. Les #transferts qui avaient déjà été planifiés sont donc reportés.

    Le Secrétariat d’État aux migrations (SEM) a été informé de cette mesure par le ministère italien de l’Intérieur. Elle concerne tous les pays européens qui souhaitent transférer en Italie des requérants d’asile dont la demande relève, conformément au règlement Dublin, de sa compétence. La décision a été prise en raison de la propagation du coronavirus dans plusieurs régions de la péninsule. La suspension des transferts Dublin doit permettre de préparer et de mettre en œuvre d’autres mesures dans le domaine de la santé.

    Compte tenu de cette décision, le SEM doit donc reporter les transferts qui avaient déjà été programmés. Plusieurs vols devant embarquer un total de dix requérants ces prochains jours ont ainsi dû être annulés. Les personnes concernées demeureront provisoirement dans les centres d’asile de la Confédération ou dans des structures cantonales.

    https://www.admin.ch/gov/fr/accueil/documentation/communiques.msg-id-78264.html
    #Italie #Dublin #asile #migrations #réfugiés #renvois_Dublin #suspension #report

  • Trapped in Dublin

    ECRE’s study (https://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2020/842813/EPRS_STU(2020)842813_EN.pdf) on the implementation of the Dublin Regulation III, has just been published by the Europpean Parliament Research Service which commissioned it.

    Drawing largely on statistics from the Asylum Information Database (AIDA) database, managed by ECRE and fed by national experts from across Europe, and on ongoing Dublin-related litigation, the study uses the European Commission’s own Better Regulation toolbox. The Better Regulation framework is designed to evaluate any piece of Regulation against the criteria of effectiveness, efficiency, relevance, coherence and EU added value.

    There are no surprises:

    Assessing the data shows that Dublin III is not effective legislation as it does not meet its own objectives of allowing rapid access to the procedure and ending multiple applications. The hierarchy of criteria it lays down is not fully respected. It appears inefficient – financial costs are significant and probably disproportionate. Notable are the large investments in transfers that do not happen and the inefficient sending of different people in different directions. The human costs of the system are considerable – people left in limbo, people forcibly transferred, the use of detention. The relevance and EU added value of the Regulation in its current form should be questioned. The coherence of the Dublin Regulation is weak in three ways: internal coherence is lacking due to the differing interpretations of key articles across the Member States+; coherence with the rest of the asylum acquis is not perfect; and coherence with fundamental rights is weak due to flaws in drafting and implementation.

    So far, so already well known.

    None of this is news: everybody knows that Dublin is flawed. Indeed, in this week’s hearing at the European Parliament, speaker after speaker stood up to condemn Dublin, including all the Member States present. Even the Member States that drove the Dublin system and whose interests it is supposed to serve (loosely known as the northern Member States), now condemn it openly: it is important to hear Germany argue in a public event that the responsibility sharing rules are unfair and that both trust among states and compliance across the Common European Asylum System is not possible without a fundamental reform of Dublin.

    More disturbing is the view from the persons subject to Dublin, with Shaza Alrihawi from the Global Refugee-led Network describing the depression and despair resulting from being left in limbo while EU countries use Dublin to divest themselves of responsibility. One of the main objectives of Dublin is to give rapid access to an asylum procedure but here was yet another case of someone ready to contribute and to move on with their life who was delayed by Dublin. It is no surprise that “to Dublin” has become a verb in many European languages – “dubliner” or “dublinare”, and a noun: “I Dublinati” – in all cases with a strong negative connotation, reflecting the fear that people understandably have of being “dublinated”.

    With this picture indicating an unsatisfactory situation, what happens now?

    Probably not much. While there is agreement that Dublin III is flawed there is profound disagreement on what should replace it. But the perpetual debate on alternatives to Dublin needs to continue. Dysfunctional legislation which fails the Commission’s own Better Regulation assessment on every score cannot be allowed to sit and fester.

    All jurisdictions have redundant and dysfunctional legislation on their statute books; within the EU legal order, Dublin III is not the only example. Nonetheless, the damage it does is profound so it requires attention. ECRE’s study concludes that the problems exist at the levels of design and implementation. As well as the unfair underlying principles, the design leaves too much room for policy choices on implementation – precisely the problem that regulations as legal instruments are supposed to avoid. Member States’ policy choices on implementation are currently (and perhaps forever) shaped by efforts to minimise responsibility. This means that a focus on implementation alone is not the answer; changes should cover design and implementation.

    The starting point for reform has to be a fundamental overhaul, tackling the responsibility allocation principles. While the original Dublin IV proposal did not do this, there are multiple alternatives, including the European Parliament’s response to Dublin IV and the Commission’s own alternatives developed but not launched in 2016 and before.

    Of course, Dublin IV also had the other flaws, including introducing inadmissibility procedures pre-Dublin and reduction of standards in other ways. Moving forward now means it is necessary to de-link procedural changes and the responsibility-sharing piece.

    Unfortunately, the negotiations, especially between the Member States, are currently stuck in a cul-de-sac that focuses on exactly this kind of unwelcome deal. The discussion can be over-simplified as follows: “WE will offer you some ‘solidarity’ – possibly even a reform of Dublin – but only if, in exchange, YOU agree to manage mandatory or expanded border procedures of some description”. These might be expanded use of current optional asylum procedures at the border; it might be other types of rapid procedures or processes to make decisions about people arriving at or transferred to borders. In any case, the effect on the access to asylum and people’s rights will be highly detrimental, as ECRE has described at length. But they also won’t be acceptable to the “you” in this scenario, the Member States at the external borders.

    There is no logical or legal reason to link the procedural piece and responsibility allocation so closely. And why link responsibility allocation and procedures and not responsibility allocation and reception, for instance? Or responsibility allocation and national/EU resources? This derives from the intrusion of a different agenda: the disproportionate focus on onward movement, also known as (the) “secondary” movement (obsession).

    If responsibility allocation is unfair, then it should be reformed in and of itself, not in exchange for something. The cry will then go out that it is not fair because the MS perceived to “benefit” from the reform will get something for nothing. Well no: any reform could – and should – be accompanied with strict insistence on compliance with the rest of the asylum acquis. The well-documented implementation gaps at the levels of reception, registration, decision-making and procedural guarantees should be priority.

    Recent remarks by Commissioner Schinas (https://euobserver.com/migration/147511) present nothing new and among many uncertainties concerning the fate of the 2016 reforms is whether or not a “package approach” will be maintained by either or both the co-legislators – and whether indeed that is desirable. One bad scenario is that everything is reformed except Dublin. There are provisional inter-institutional agreements on five files, with the Commission suggesting that they move forward. ECRE’s view is that the changes contained in the agreements on these files would reduce protection standards and not add value; other assessments are that protection standards have been improved. Either way, there are strong voices in both the EP and among the MS who don’t want to go ahead without an agreement on Dublin. Which is not wrong – allocation of responsibility is essential in a partially harmonised system: with common legal provisions but without centralised decision-making, responsibility allocation is the gateway to access rights and obligations flowing from the other pieces of legislation. Thus, to pass other reforms without tackling Dublin seems rather pointless.

    While certainly not the best option, the best bet (if one had to place money on something) would be that nothing changes for the core legislation of the CEAS. For that reason, ECRE’s study also lists extensive recommendations for rights-based compliance with Dublin III.

    For example, effectiveness would be improved through better respect for the hierarchy of responsibility criteria, the letter of the law: prioritise family unity through policy choices, better practice on evidential standards, and greater use of Articles 16 and 17. Minimise the focus on transfers based on take-back requests, especially when they are doomed to fail. To know from the start that a transfer is doomed to fail yet to persist with it is an example of a particularly inhumane political dysfunction. Effectiveness also requires better reporting to deal with the multiple information gaps identified, and clarity on key provisions, including through guidance from the Commission.

    Solidarity among Member States could be fostered through use of Article 33 in challenging situations, which allows for preventive actions by the Commission and by Member States, and along with the Temporary Protection Directive, provides better options than some of the new contingency plans under discussion. The use of Article 17, 1 and 2, provides a legal basis for the temporary responsibility-sharing mechanisms which are needed in the absence of deeper reform.

    In perhaps the most crucial area, fundamental rights compliance could be significantly improved: avoid coercive transfers; implement CJEU and ECtHR jurisprudence on reasons for suspension of transfers – there is no need to show systemic deficiencies (CK, Jawo); make a policy decision to suspend transfers to the EU countries where conditions are not adequate and human rights violations are commonplace, rather than waiting for the courts to block the transfer. Resources and political attention could focus on the rights currently neglected: the right to family life, the best interests of the child, right to information, alternatives to detention. Evaluating implementation should be done against the Charter of Fundamental Rights and should always include the people directly affected.

    Even with flawed legislation, there are decisions on policy and resource allocation to be made that could make for better compliance and, in this case, compliance in a way that generates less suffering.

    https://www.ecre.org/weekly-editorial-trapped-in-dublin

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Dublin #Dublin_III #Better_Regulation #efficacité #demandes_multiples (le fameux #shopping_de_l'asile) #accélération_des_procédures #coût #transferts_Dublin #renvois_Dublin #coûts_humains #rétention #limbe #détention_administrative #renvois_forcés #cohérence #droits_humains #dépression #désespoir #santé_mentale #responsabilité #Dublin_IV #procédure_d'asile #frontières #frontière #mouvements_secondaires #unité_familiale #inhumanité #solidarité #Temporary_Protection_Directive #protection_temporaire #droits #intérêt_supérieur_de_l'enfant

    –—

    Commentaire de Aldo Brina à qui je fais aveuglement confiance :

    Les éditos de #Catherine_Woollard, secrétaire générale de l’#ECRE, sont souvent bons… mais celui-ci, qui porte sur Dublin, gagne à être lu et largement diffusé

    ping @karine4 @isskein

  • January 2020 Report on Rights Violations and Resistance in Lesvos

    A. Situation Report in Lesvos, as of 15/1/2020

    Total population of registered asylum seekers and refugees on Lesvos: 21,268
    Registered Population of Moria Camp & Olive Grove: 19,184
    Registered unaccompanied minors: 1,049
    Total Detained: 88
    Total Arrivals in Lesvos from Turkey in 2020: 1,015

    Over 19,000 people are now living in Moria Camp – the main refugee camp on the island – yet the Camp lacks any official infrastructure, such as housing, security, electricity, sewage, schools, health care, etc. While technically, most individuals are allowed to leave this camp, it has become an open-air prison, as they must spend most of their day in hours long lines for food, toilets, doctors, and the asylum office. Sexual and physical violence is common – and three people have died as a result of violence and desperation in as many weeks. The Greek government has also implemented a new asylum law 1 January 2020 with draconian measures that restrict the rights of migrants. This new law expands grounds to detain asylum seekers, increases bureaucratic hurdles to make appeals, and removes previous protections for vulnerable individuals who arrive to the Greek islands. Specifically, all individuals that arrive from Turkey are now prohibited from leaving the islands until their applications are processed, unless geographic restrictions are lifted at the discretion of the authorities. These changes ultimately will lead to an increased population of asylum seekers trapped in Lesvos, and an increasing number of people trapped here who have had their asylum claims rejected and face deportation to Turkey. We will not detail here the current catastrophic conditions on the island for migrants, as they have already been detailed by others.

    B. Legal Updates

    Since the implementation of the new asylum law in Greece in January 2020, 4636/2019, it remains to be seen to what extent the Greek state will have the capacity to implement the various draconian provisions enacted into law. Below we have documented the following violations in the first few weeks of 2020, and procedural and practical complications in the implementation of the new law.

    1. Right to Work Denied: According to article 53 of the Law 4636/2019, asylum seekers have the right to work six (6) months after they have submitted their asylum application, if they have not yet received a negative first instance decision. Under the previously enforced asylum law, 4375/2016, asylum seekers had the right to work with no limitations. However, as one of its first acts after the New Democracy party came into power in Greece, on the 11 July 2019 the Minister of Employment & Social Affairs, Mr Vroutsis, issued a decision stopping the issuance of social security numbers (AMKA) to asylum seekers (Protocol number: Φ.80320/οικ.31355 /Δ18.2084). Although the newly enacted law allows for the issuance of a “temporary insurance number and healthcare of foreigners” (Π.Α.Α.Υ.Π.Α.) to asylum seekers, under Article 55 para. 2, the joint ministerial decision regulating this has not been issued, and it has yet to be set in force. The possession of a Π.Α.Α.Υ.Π.Α. or AMKA is a prerequisite to be hired in Greece, therefore, it is practically impossible for asylum seekers who have not already obtained an AMKA to work and have access to healthcare, despite having the right to do so.

    2. Access to Asylum Procedure Effectively Denied: According to article 65 para. 7 of the Law 4636/2019, there is a deadline of seven (7) days between the simple and full registration of an applicant’s asylum application. If the applicant does not present themselves before the competent authorities within 7 days, the case is archived with a decision of the head of the competent asylum office (article 65 para. 7 and 5). However, because of the number of asylum seekers currently living in Lesvos, many cannot access the asylum office on the day they are scheduled to register, as there are always hundreds of people waiting outside – and the asylum office is heavily guarded by the private security company G4S. This could lead to many people missing the deadline and being denied the right to apply for asylum. As a result their asylum cases could be closed, and they could face detention and deportation.

    3. Risk of Rejection of Asylum Claims Due to Inability to Renew Asylum Seeker ID Card: For asylum applications being examined under the border procedure (the procedure implemented for all those who arrive to the Greek islands from Turkey), the renewal of the asylum seeker’s card must take place every 15 days, under article 70 para. 4(c) of law 4636/2019. With over 20.000 asylum seekers currently in Lesvos, it is nearly impossible for them to access the office in order to renew an asylum seeker card that is expiring. Some have reported they have to pay (20 Euros) to other asylum seekers who are ‘controlling’ the line just to get a spot on line, where they must wait overnight in extreme weather conditions. After implementing the new law for the first few weeks of 2020 and requiring renewal of asylum seeker’s cards every 15 days, the Lesvos Regional Asylum Office (RAO) realized this is a practical impossibility and returned to the former system of renewing every 30 days, as announced to legal actors via UNHCR this week. Despite this, it still remains extremely difficult to access the asylum office, given the demand. Often the assistance of a lawyer is needed just to book an appointment or get in the door. The consequences of failing to renew an asylum seeker card under the new legislation are extremely harsh – asylum seekers must appear at the asylum office within one day of the expiration date, otherwise the asylum seeker’s card stops being valid ex officio, according to article 70 para. 6 of law 4636/2019. Their asylum claim will be implicitly withdrawn under article 81 para. 2 law 4636/2019, and this implicit withdrawal will be considered a final decision on the merits of their asylum claim, under article 81 para. 1 of law 4636/2019, despite never having had their asylum claim heard (if the implicit withdrawal is prior to their interview). While it may sound like a technical and insignificant difference, receiving a final decision on the merits means that they would need to appeal this denial to the Appeals Committee, rather than simply requesting the continuation of their case – which as described below involves additional obstacles that are likely to be impossible to overcome for many asylum seekers.

    4. Prioritization of Claims Filed in 2020: The new asylum law allows for the accelerated processing of asylum application under the border procedures – i.e. for all those who arrive to Lesvos from Turkey. As RAO and EASO transition to the new law, they have prioritized the processing of the asylum claims of new arrivals, at the expense of the thousands of asylum seekers who arrived and applied for asylum in Lesvos in 2018/2019. Those that have arrived in 2020 are registered and scheduled for interviews with the EASO within a few days of arrival. This means that it is extremely difficult for these individuals to access legal information or legal aid prior to their asylum interviews. Individuals who arrived last year, however, and are waiting months to be heard, are having their interviews postponed in order to accommodate the scheduling of interviews for new arrivals. We have also received information that EASO has not only prioritized new arrivals for interviews, but also prioritized the issuance of opinions for the cases of new arrivals, meaning that decisions for those who were interviewed in 2019 will also be delayed.

    5. Delay in Designation of Vulnerabilities Results in Continued Imposition of Geographic Restrictions for pre-2020 Arrivals: The designation of vulnerability under the previous asylum law led to the lifting of geographic restrictions to Lesvos, as ‘vulnerable’ individuals were referred form the border procedure to the regular asylum procedure. Vulnerable groups, as defined by pre 2020 law included: unaccompanied minors; persons who have a disability or suffering from an incurable or serious illness; the elderly; women in pregnancy or having recently given birth; single parents with minor children; victims of torture, rape or other serious forms of psychological, physical or sexual violence or exploitation; persons with a post-traumatic disorder, in particularly survivors and relatives of victims of ship-wrecks; victims of human trafficking. In 2018, 80% of asylum seekers in Lesvos were designated vulnerable (or approved for transfer to another European State under the Dublin III Regulation), and therefore able to leave Lesvos prior to the final processing of their asylum claims. Under the new legislation, however, vulnerable individuals continue to have their asylum claims processed under the border procedures, as specified in article 39 para. 6 of law 4636/2019. Many individuals who arrived in 2019 and should have been designated vulnerable through the Reception and Identification Procedures’ mandatory medical screening, provided by Article 9 para. 1c of the law 4375/2016, were not designated as such in 2019 due to delays and failure to have a thorough medical screening. For example, just in the past two weeks we have met with survivors of torture, sexual assault and people suffering from serious illnesses who arrived to Lesvos months ago, but have not been designated vulnerable due to a lack of a thorough medical assessment. If designated vulnerable in 2020, the State is currently applying the new law to these individuals, and continues to process their claims under the border procedures, rather than lifting geographic restrictions and referring to the regular asylum procedure. They have now missed the opportunity to have geographic restrictions lifted while they await their interviews, through fault of the Greek state. We should also note that the new legislation also requires a medical screening under Article 39, para. 5 4636/2019, however, this does not carry the same legal consequences, as those found vulnerable under the new legislation are not referred from the border to regular procedure.

    This week the Legal Centre Lesvos represented one couple from Afghanistan, in which the wife is pregnant (a category of vulnerability). In late 2019, they had been designated vulnerable and referred to the regular procedure, however, when in 2020 they were issued their asylum seeker card, it was with geographic restrictions. Only after the intervention of the Legal Centre Lesvos, were they advised that this was merely a ‘mistake’ and they would be referred back to the regular procedure and geographic restrictions would be lifted when they next renewed their asylum seeker card. Meanwhile, for the next two weeks they are unlawfully restricted to Lesvos.

    6. Insurmountable Hurdles to Appeal Negative Decisions: Under the new legislation, asylum applicants who receive a negative decision must describe specifically the grounds in which they are making an appeal in order for their appeal to be admissible by the Appeals Committees, according to articles 92 and 93 of 4636/2019. This is practically impossible without a lawyer to assess the decision and determine the grounds of appeal. Although the state is obligated to provide a lawyer on appeal (article 71 para. 3), this right has been denied for over two years in Lesvos. Nevertheless, the Lesvos RAO appears to be enforcing the new provision of the law requiring individuals to provide the grounds for appeal in order to lodge an appeal, but continues to deny applicants lawyers on appeal in order to determine these grounds – meaning that many are practically unable to lodge an appeal. Others are physically blocked from even accessing the asylum office in order to lodge the appeal due to the hundreds of people attempting to access the asylum office at any given time. We have documented at least one case of a family with two small children, that were arbitrarily given a five day deadline to lodge their appeal and moreover they were unable to enter the asylum office despite trying every day. Only through the intervention of a Legal Centre Lesvos attorney – accompanying the family on multiple days – the family was able to access the asylum office in order to lodge their appeal in due time. Furthermore, it will be a practical impossibility to accompany every asylum seeker whose case is rejected, and many are or will likely miss the deadline to lodge their appeal, if practices are not immediately changed.

    7. Denial of Interpreter for Detained Asylum Seekers Speaking Rare Languages at Every Stage of the Procedure: In November 2019, 28 asylum seekers’ claims were rejected with no interview having taken place, on the basis that no interpreter could be found to translate for them in their languages. The Legal Centre Lesvos and other legal actors represented these individuals on appeal, and denounced this illegal practice. Now, it appears the Lesvos RAO is attempting a new practice to reject the asylum claims of detained asylum seekers. Last week several men from sub-Saharan African countries who were detained upon arrival (based on the practice of arbitrarily detaining ‘low profile refugees’ based on nationality) were scheduled for interviews this week in either French or English, depending on whether they came from an area of the African continent that had previously been colonized by France or by Great Britain. This is despite the fact that they requested an interview in their native language, as is their right, under article 77 para. 12 of 4636/2019. The lasting effects of colonization – also a driving factor in continued migration from Africa to Europe – has continued to haunt these individuals, as even after they have managed to make it into Europe, they are now expected to explain their eligibility for asylum in their former colonizer’s language. The clear attempt to reject detained asylum seekers’ claims without regard to the law is a worrying trend, combined with the provisions of the new legislation which allow for expanded grounds for detention and expanded length of detention of asylum seekers. The Legal Centre has taken on representation of one of these individuals in order to advocate for the right of asylum seekers to be interviewed in a language they can communicate comfortably and fluently in.

    8. Apparent Suicide in Moria Detention Centre Followed Failure by Greek State to Provide Obligated Care. On 6 January a 31-year-old Iranian man was found dead, hung in a cell inside the PRO.KE.K.A. (Pre-Removal Detention Centre) According to other people detained with him, he spent just a short time with other people, before being moved to isolation for approximately two weeks. While in solitary confinement, even for the hours he was taken outside, he was alone, as it was at a different time than other people. For multiple days he was locked in his cell without being allowed to leave at all, as far as others detained saw. His food was served to him through the window in his cell during these days. His distressed mental state was obvious to all the others detained with him and to the police. He cried during the nights and banged on his door. He had also previously threatened to harm himself. Others detained with him never saw anyone visit him, or saw him taken out of his cell for psychological support or psychiatric evaluation. Healthcare in the PRO.KE.K.A is run by AEMY (a healthcare utility supervised by the Greek state). Its medical team supposedly consists of one social worker and one psychologist. However, the social worker quit in April 2019 and was never replaced. The psychologist was on leave between 19 December and 3 January. The man was found dead on 6 January meaning that there were only two working days in which AEMY was staffed during the last three weeks of his life, when he could have received psychological support. This is dangerously inadequate in a prison currently holding approximately 100 people. EODY is the only other state institution able to make mental health assessments, yet it has publicly declared that it will not intervene in the absence of AEMY staff, not even in emergencies, and that in any case it will not reassess somebody’s mental health. For more details, see Legal Centre Lesvos publication, here. Of note is that there is no permanent interpretation service inside the detention centre.

    C. Legal Centre Lesvos Updates

    Despite the hostile political environment in Lesvos, a few significant successes confirm the importance of continued monitoring, litigation, and coordination with other actors in advocating for migrant rights in Lesvos.

    On 25th November 2019 we joined other legal actors on Lesvos in representing 28 men from African countries whose asylum claims were rejected before they had even had an interview on their claims. These individuals – through the long denounced ‘pilot’ project – were arbitrarily detained upon arrival to Lesvos from Turkey, based only on their nationality – as they are from countries with a ‘low refugee profile.’ The RAO further denied these individuals their rights in November 2019, when their asylum claims were rejected on the basis that there was a lack of interpreter to carry out the interviews. In the case of the Legal Centre Lesvos client, he was rejected because apparently a Portuguese interpreter could not be found! We collaborated with other legal actors on the island and UNHCR in representing these individuals on appeal, and engaging in joint advocacy to denounce this illegal practice. Following this joint advocacy initiative, the Lesvos RAO has continued the illegal practice of arbitrary detention based on nationality, and has attempted new tactics to accelerate the procedure, rejection, and ultimate deportation of these individuals (as described above), but there have been no reports of denial of asylum claims based on lack of interpretation since our joint advocacy in November 2019.

    Following our successful submission to the European Court of Human Rights in November 2019, which led to the last minute halting of a scheduled deportation, the police appeared to have changed their policies. In the month prior to our filing, at least six individuals were deported to Turkey, after having filing appeals in administrative court, and motions to suspend their deportation pending resolution of their appeals. Despite the fact that the administrative court had not yet ruled on the suspension motions, these individuals were forcibly deported to Turkey. Since our petition to the ECHR, in which we raised the lack of effective remedy in Greece, there have been no reported cases of deportation of individuals who have filed administrative appeals on their asylum claims. Our efforts in making this change were not alone, as advocacy from other legal actors and the Ombudsman’s Office against this practice likely contributed to the changed policy.

    Dublin Successes in Increasingly hostile climate: Since late 2017, there has been an increase in the number of refusals of ‘take charge’ requests for family reunification sent by the Greek Dublin Unit to Germany under the Dublin III regulations, with a variety of reasons used to deny the reunification of families who have often been separated by war and persecution. The family reunification procedure under the Dublin regulations is one of the rare legal routes protecting family unity and allowing for legal migration for asylum seekers out of Greece to other European states.

    In the period of October 2019 – December 2019 four families we represented had their applications for family reunification through Dublin III Regulations approved, enabling our clients to reunite with family members in France, Germany, and Sweden.

    Our most recent Dublin success involved the reunification of a family with two minor sons who are living in Germany. The two minor sons had left Afghanistan 5 years ago and had been separated from their family ever since. There is a trend from the German Dublin Unit to reject the cases in which families make the difficult decision to first send their minor children to safety when the entire family is not able to leave together. The German Dublin Unit has denied these cases on the basis that it is not in the best interest of the child to reunite minor children with parents who used smugglers to send their children to safety. We have consistently argued that when the children’s life is at risk, the parents should not be punished for using whatever means they can to find safety for their children, when legal and safe routes of migration are denied to them. The German Dublin Unit agreed in this case after advocacy from the Legal Centre Lesvos and the Greek Dublin Unit.

    https://legalcentrelesvos.org/2020/01/22/january-2020-report-on-rights-violations-and-resistance-in-lesvos
    #Lesbos #Moria #hotspots #droits #hotspot #Grèce #violation #statistiques #chiffres #surpopulation #Dublin #règlement_Dublin #accès_aux_droits

  • Dubliner et terroriser

    Le règlement Dublin s’applique à tous les États Schengen et s’impose à tous les demandeurs d’asile de cette zone. Il les contraint à ne pas choisir librement leur pays d’installation. Il leur rend la vie impossible. Le #documentaire_sonore DUBLINER ET TERRORISER évoque par la parole de ceux qui le vivent au quotidien, ce règlement. Il analyse son fonctionnement et questionne sa logique.

    https://audioblog.arteradio.com/blog/98862/podcast/141806/dubliner-et-terroriser
    #audio #Dublin #règlement_dublin #asile #migrations #réfugiés #témoignage

    ping @karine4 @isskein

  • #TAF | Les transferts Dublin vers l’Italie soumis à des conditions plus strictes

    Dans sa #jurisprudence récente, le Tribunal administratif fédéral (TAF) avait déjà constaté, s’agissant de la prise en charge des familles transférées vers l’Italie dans le cadre du #règlement_Dublin, que les assurances données par les autorités italiennes suite à l’entrée en vigueur du #décret_Salvini étaient trop générales. L’arrêt E-962/2019 confirme et concrétise cette jurisprudence : le transfert des familles en Italie doit être suspendu, tant et aussi longtemps que les autorités italiennes n’ont pas fourni des garanties plus concrètes et précises sur les conditions actuelles de leur prise en charge. Le TAF étend en outre son analyse aux personnes souffrant de graves problèmes de santé et nécessitant une prise en charge immédiate à leur arrivée en Italie. Pour ces dernières, les autorités suisses doivent désormais obtenir de leurs homologues italiennes des garanties formelles que les personnes concernées auront accès, dès leur arrivée en Italie, à des soins médicaux et à un hébergement adapté.

    Le communiqué du Tribunal administratif fédéral (TAF) que nous reproduisons ci-dessous a été diffusé le 17 janvier 2020. Il correspond à l’arrêt daté du même jour : E-962 2019 : https://asile.ch/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/E-962_2019.pdf

    En septembre 2019, l’OSAR alertait sur les conditions d’accueil en Italie “Italie, une prise en charge toujours insuffisante“ : https://asile.ch/2019/09/27/osar-italie-une-prise-en-charge-toujours-insuffisante

    Le blog Le temps des réfugiés rédigé par Jasmine Caye a repris l’information le 24 septembre en y apportant d’autres liens utiles dans le billet “Pourquoi la Suisse doit stopper les transferts Dublin vers l’Italie” : https://blogs.letemps.ch/jasmine-caye/category/migrants-et-refugies

    Vous trouverez ici le feuillet de présentation “Dublin. Comment ça marche ? ” (https://asile.ch/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/DUBLIN_commentcamarche.pdf) réalisé par Vivre Ensemble en 2018, qui rappelle le fonctionnement des accords de Dublin.

    https://asile.ch/2020/01/20/taf-les-transferts-dublin-vers-litalie-soumis-a-des-conditions-plus-strictes
    #justice #Suisse #Dublin #renvois_Dublin #Italie #asile #migrations #réfugiés

    ping @isskein @karine4

    • L’asile selon Dublin III : les renvois vers l’Italie sont problématiques

      La Suisse renvoie régulièrement des requérant-e-s d’asile vers l’Italie conformément au règlement Dublin entré en vigueur en décembre 2008 (Dublin III depuis 2013). Pourtant, les conditions de survie dans ce pays dit sûr sont extrêmement précaires pour les requérant-e-s d’asile. Divers rapports et appels d’organisations de la société civile dénoncent les conditions d’accueil en Italie ainsi que le formalisme excessif des renvois par la Suisse. L’Organisation suisse d’aide aux réfugié-e-s (OSAR) a effectué une nouvelle enquête de terrain et sorti un rapport courant 2016 sur les conditions d’accueils en Italie et l’application par la Suisse des accords Dublin. Selon l’OSAR les « rapports [précédents paru en 2009 et 2013] n’ont pas provoqué jusqu’ici une remise en question fondamentale de la pratique de transferts en Italie au sein des autorités suisses compétentes en matière d’asile. Les autorités et les tribunaux ont trop peu tenu compte des constats résultants du rapport de 2013 ». L’OSAR souligne que « L’Italie ne dispose toujours pas d’un système d’accueil cohérent, global et durable ; l’accueil y est basé sur des mesures d’urgence à court terme et est fortement fragmenté ».
      Conditions déplorables et absence de protection en Italie

      En Italie, les requérant-e-s d’asile - mais aussi les réfugié-e-s reconnu-e-s ! - n’ont aucune garantie de pouvoir être hébergé-e-s et bon nombre se retrouvent à la rue après leur renvoi. Malgré une augmentation de leurs capacités d’accueil, celles-ci sont totalement surchargées, si bien que la grande majorité des requérant-e-s se retrouve ainsi à dormir dans des parcs ou des maisons vides, ne survivant qu’à l’aide d’organisations caritatives. En hiver, leur situation devient dramatique.

      Selon Caritas Rome, la situation est encore plus précaire pour les « renvoyé-e-s » les plus vulnérables, comme les mineur-e-s, les femmes enceintes, les malades ou les personnes traumatisées. Malgré un statut prioritaire, les centres d’hébergement ne sont pas toujours capables de les recevoir, la liste d’attente étant très longue. Elles se retrouvent donc trop souvent sans protection, sans aide à l’intégration ni accès assuré à l’alimentation ou aux soins médicaux les plus basiques.

      Europe, un flipper géant ?

      Si l’ancien Office fédéral des migrations (ODM, maintenant SEM) estimait en avril 2009 pouvoir tirer un bilan positif des accords de Dublin, les Observatoires du droit d’asile et des étrangers en Suisse étaient critiques : « Nos observations sont claires, avait écrit l’ODAE romand : des personnes qui fuient de graves persécutions ne trouvent désormais plus en Europe de terre d’asile, mais sont renvoyées de pays en pays, comme des caisses de marchandise. De plus, les renvois s’effectuent la plupart du temps vers des pays du sud de l’Europe dont la politique d’asile est défaillante. »

      La création en 2015 des « centres de crise- Hotspots » accélère encore ces processus. En effet, Amnesty dénonce les méthodes violentes utilisées notamment pour la prise d’empreintes ainsi que l’évaluation précipitée des personnes venant d’arriver, ce qui risque de les priver de la possibilité de demander l’asile ainsi que des protections auxquelles elles ont droit. L’association souligne que « l’accent mis par l’Europe sur une augmentation des expulsions, qu’importe si cela implique des accords avec des gouvernements bien connus pour leurs violations des droits humains, a pour conséquence le renvoi de personnes vers des endroits où elles risquent d’être exposées à la torture ou à d’autres graves violations des droits humains. »

      Ainsi, l’Italie a été condamnée à plusieurs reprises par la Cour européenne des droits de l’Homme pour ne pas avoir respecté le principe de non-refoulement. Le bon fonctionnement dont se vante le SEM qualifie en fait une gestion purement administrative de flux, une gestion qui ne semble pas se soucier de la vie des êtres humains.
      Stop aux renvois vers l’Italie

      Face à cette situation, plusieurs organisations de la société civile attendent de la Suisse qu’elle renonce aux renvois Dublin vers l’Italie, notamment pour les personnes vulnérables. L’OSAR notamment, dénonce « le Secrétariat d’Etat aux migrations (SEM) ne renonce à des transferts en Italie que dans des cas exceptionnels. Le Tribunal administratif fédéral (TAF) se rallie largement à cette pratique, de sorte qu’il n’existe guère non plus de perspectives au niveau judiciaire ». Amnesty relève que de « telles pratiques contreviennent aux Conventions des Nations unies relatives aux droits de l’enfant et aux droits des personnes handicapées, et au droit humain à la famille. […] Dans le cas des mineurs, les autorités suisses ont le devoir de respecter l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant dans chaque décision, que l’enfant soit ou non accompagné d’un adulte. »
      Application aveugle

      Ceci fait ressortir l’usage excessif et l’application aveugle que la Suisse fait des accords Dublin (voir notre article sur le sujet). La Suisse a la possibilité, au travers de la clause de souveraineté de mener elle-même la procédure d’asile et de renvoi lorsque l’Etat Dublin compétent n’offre pas de garantie quant au respect des conventions mentionnées. Indépendamment de cette possibilité, la Suisse a le devoir, selon l’art. 3 par. 2 Dublin III de poursuivre la procédure d’asile dans un autre Etat membre ou en Suisse « lorsqu’il est impossible de transférer un demandeur vers l’État membre initialement désigné comme responsable parce qu’il y a de sérieuses raisons de croire qu’il existe dans cet État membre des défaillances systémiques dans la procédure d’asile et les conditions d’accueil des demandeurs, qui entraînent un risque de traitement inhumain ou dégradant au sens de l’article 4 de la charte des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne ».
      Arrêt Tarakhel

      Par ailleurs, l’arrêt Tarakhel de la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme en 2014 (voir notre article) implique que la Suisse se doit d’analyser au cas par cas la situation des requérant-e-s en cas de renvoi vers l’Italie, d’autant plus lorsque des enfants sont parmi eux. Le renvoi ne pourra alors avoir lieu que lorsque le premier pays d’accueil, en l’occurrence l’Italie, pourra garantir que les requérant-e-s d’asile puissent être accueilli-e-s dans le respect des droits de l’enfant et de la dignité humaine.

      Suisse des records

      Malgré l’arrêt de la CrEDH et la marge de manœuvre dont dispose la Suisse, elle reste le pays effectuant le plus de renvois Dublin vers l’Italie. Le rapport de l’OSAR fait état qu’en 2015 sur 24’990 demandes, 11’073 émanaient de la Suisse seule. Cependant, l’Italie n’a reconnu sa responsabilité que dans 4’886 de ces cas. Cela signifie qu’une majorité des demandes de transferts de la Suisse ont été adressées à tort à l’Italie. De plus, la Suisse n’a accueilli à ce jour que 112 demandeurs/ demandeuses d’asile en provenance de l’Italie au travers du programme de relocalisation, chiffre minime en comparaison des renvois effectués et montrant une fois encore un grave défaut de solidarité.

      Autres pays dans le colimateur

      Suite à une large mobilisation et un arrêt de la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme en janvier 2011, les renvois vers la Grèce, autre pays largement dénoncé pour ses conditions d’accueil, dans le cadre des accords Dublin ont été suspendus en août 2011 par le Tribunal administratif fédéral, jusqu’à ce que la Grèce respecte à nouveau les standards communs (voir notre article sur le sujet). La société civile appelle depuis presque dix ans à une même décision pour les renvois vers l’Italie. Les renvois vers d’autres pays tels que la Hongrie sont de plus fortement dénoncés.

      https://www.humanrights.ch/fr/droits-humains-suisse/interieure/asile/loi/lasile-selon-dublin-ii-renvois-vers-litalie-grece-problematiques?force=1

    • Les personnes requérantes d’asile en Italie menacées de violations des droits humains

      Les personnes requérantes d’asile en Italie font face à des conditions de vie misérables. Le Tribunal administratif fédéral a ainsi dernièrement demandé au Secrétariat d’Etat aux migrations (SEM) de se pencher de manière plus approfondie sur la situation en Italie. Comme en atteste un rapport publié récemment par l’Organisation suisse d’aide aux réfugiés (OSAR), les personnes requérantes d’asile renvoyées en Italie dans le cadre d’une procédure Dublin ont rarement accès à un hébergement adéquat et leurs droits fondamentaux ne sont pas garantis. C’est pourquoi l’OSAR recommande de renoncer aux transferts vers l’Italie. 21.01.2020

      Bien que le nombre de personnes réfugiées traversant la Méditerranée centrale pour rejoindre l’Italie ne cesse de baisser, les conditions de vie des personnes requérantes d’asile dans le pays ont connu une détérioration majeure. En effet, le système d’accueil a fait l’objet de réductions financières massives et d’un durcissement de la législation. Dans son dernier rapport sur les conditions d’accueil en Italie (https://www.osar.ch/assets/herkunftslaender/dublin/italien/200121-italy-reception-conditions-en.pdf), l’OSAR apporte des preuves détaillées des effets dramatiques sur les personnes requérantes d’asile des changements législatifs introduits en octobre 2018 par l’ancien ministre de l’Intérieur Matteo Salvini.

      Le quatrième rapport de l’OSAR sur les conditions d’accueil en Italie s’appuie notamment sur une mission d’enquête à l’automne 2019 et sur de nombreux entretiens menés avec des expert-e-s, des employé-e-s des autorités italiennes, ainsi qu’avec le personnel du HCR et d’organisations non gouvernementales en Italie.

      L’OSAR a ainsi constaté qu’il n’existait plus d’hébergements adéquats, en particulier pour les personnes requérantes d’asile vulnérables, telles que les familles avec des enfants en bas âge ou les victimes de la traite des êtres humains. En outre, les personnes qui ont déjà été hébergées en Italie avant de poursuivre leur route vers un autre pays perdent leur droit à une place d’hébergement et donc à toutes les prestations de l’État. Elles risquent ainsi fortement de subir des violations des droits humains.

      Le système social italien repose sur la solidarité familiale. Or, les personnes requérantes d’asile n’ont pas de famille sur place pour les soutenir. Elles se retrouvent ainsi souvent dans une situation de grande précarité, même si elles bénéficient d’un statut de protection, et sont exposées à un risque d’exploitation et de dénuement matériel extrême.
      Adapter la pratique Dublin

      La Suisse a adopté une application très stricte des règles Dublin. Elle renvoie ainsi systématiquement les personnes requérantes d’asile dans le pays où elles ont pour la première fois foulé le sol européen, à savoir l’Italie pour la plupart. Bien que le règlement Dublin III prévoie explicitement une clause de prise en charge volontaire, la Suisse n’en fait que peu usage. A la lumière des récentes constatations qu’elle a faites sur place, l’OSAR recommande de renoncer aux transferts vers l’Italie. Elle demande en particulier aux autorités suisses de ne pas transférer de personnes vulnérables en Italie et d’examiner leurs demandes d’asile en Suisse.

      Le Tribunal administratif fédéral ainsi que plusieurs tribunaux allemands ont partiellement reconnu la situation problématique en Italie dans leur jurisprudence actuelle et ont approuvé plusieurs recours. Dans divers arrêts de l’année dernière, le Tribunal administratif fédéral a demandé au SEM d’évaluer de manière plus approfondie la situation en Italie. Les tribunaux se sont appuyés, entre autres, sur divers rapports de l’OSAR. Dans son rapport de suivi de décembre 2018 (https://www.refugeecouncil.ch/assets/herkunftslaender/dublin/italien/monitoreringsrapport-2018.pdf), l’OSAR a documenté les conditions d’accueil exécrables auxquelles sont confrontées les personnes requérantes d’asile vulnérables en Italie. Les renseignements fournis par l’OSAR en mai 2019 (https://www.fluechtlingshilfe.ch/assets/herkunftslaender/dublin/italien/190508-auskunft-italien.pdf) donnaient déjà un survol des principaux changements législatifs en Italie. Le rapport complet qui est publié aujourd’hui montre l’impact de ces changements tant au niveau juridique que pratique. Il souligne la nécessité pour les autorités suisses de clarifier davantage la situation en Italie et d’adapter leur pratique.

      https://www.osar.ch/medias/communiques-de-presse/2020/les-personnes-requerantes-dasile-en-italie-menacees-de-violations-des-droits-hu

  • Unzureichende medizinische Versorgung in AHE

    Darmstadt, 3.1.2020

    Seit dem 9. Dezember 2019 ist Mohamed B., 32 Jahre, in der
    Abschiebehafteinrichtung Darmstadt-Eberstadt inhaftiert. Er ist aufgrund politischer Verfolgung aus seinem Heimatland Guinea geflohen. Dort setzte er sich in der Oppositionspartei UFDG für Demokratie und Korruptionsbekämpfung ein. Nun soll er spätestens Anfang Februar diesen Jahres wegen des Dublin-Systems nach Italien abgeschoben werden.

    B. leidet schon seit längerer Zeit an starker Wassereinlagerung in seinen Füßen sowie an Herz- und Nierenschmerzen. Die Beschwerden haben sich seit seiner Inhaftierung deutlich verschlechtert. Er kann aktuell nicht mehr beschwerdefrei gehen und muss die meiste Zeit im Bett liegen. Seiner Aussage nach, war sogar mindestens ein diensthabender Beamter über den stark geschwollenen Zustand seiner Füße erstaunt. Dennoch hatte er seit dem 20. Dezember keine ärztliche Visite mehr erhalten - trotz wiederholtem Erbittens dieser, sowie mehrfacher Versprechungen einer solchen für den nächsten Tag durch verschiedene Beamt*innen.

    Auch wir vom Bündnis Community 4 All haben am 30.12.19 sowohl das Gefängnispersonal, als auch die Sozialarbeiterin, die Seelsorger und den Beirat der AHE über den kritischen Gesundheitszustand informiert. Dennoch ist diesbezüglich nichts passiert. Im Gegenteil wurde ihm seitens des Gefängnispersonals mitgeteilt, er habe „keinen Anspruch auf eine ärztliche Untersuchung und sollte nur die Medikamente nehmen“.

    Laut B. sind dies 10-12 Tabletten täglich, die enorme
    gesundheitsbeeinträchtigende Nebenwirkungen, wie Unwohlsein, Schlaflosigkeit, Kopf-, Bauch- und Gelenkschmerzen, hätten.
    Erst während des Verfassens dieser Pressemitteilung, bekam er nach nun exakt zwei Wochen, eine ärztliche Behandlung. Er sagte hiernach, dass sich die behandelnde Ärztin auch sehr überrascht über den Zustand seiner Füße zeigte, allerdings keine weitere Behandlung veranlasste, während er weiterhin stark leide.

    Wir als Community 4 All halten es für absolut unrechtmäßig und
    menschenverachtend, dass Menschen in dieser Stadt offenbar einen völlig unzureichenden Zugang zu medizinischer Versorgung haben und fordern deutlich diese allen Gefangenen umgehend zu gewährleisten – auch zwischen den Jahren!

    Dieser aktuelle Vorfall zeigt erneut in aller Deutlichkeit, dass die Institution Abschiebegefängnis eine Blackbox ohne öffentliche Kontrolle ist, in der solche Vorfälle vorprogrammiert sind.

    Alle Abschiebegefängnisse ersatzlos schließen!

    Flucht ist kein Verbrechen!

    Originalstatement von Mohamed B. - 2.1.20:

    Mon nom est Mohamed B., je suis née le ../../1987 à Conakry/Guinée. Je suis diplômé en sciences de l’éducation depuis 2012 à l’institut supérieur des sciences et l’éducation de Guinée( ISSEG) et j’ai exercé la fonction d’enseignant dans mon pays. Actuellement je suis demandeur d’asile en République Fédérale d’Allemagne.

    En effet, j’ai fui mon pays le 21/04/2018 à cause des persécutions politiques mais aussi pour la cause des enseignants, j’ai été torturé et reçu des menaces de mort en laissant derrière moi un enfant qui avait 1 an dans ce combat.

    A l’aide de notre parti politique UFDG présidé par Elhadj Cellou Dalein Diallo, je me suis retrouvé en République fédérale d’Allemagne le 08/08/2018 sans papier en passant par l’Italie. Après 3 mois de demande d’asile ici, j’ai été confronter à un problème de Dublin de l’Italie alors qu’en passant dans ce pays je n’ai effectué aucune demande d’asyle, et ma condition de santé ne me permettait de rester de vivre sur la route. J’ai tout fait pour contester cette desicion du Bureau d’immigration en le payant 500 € mais ça n’a pas marché. J’ai été expulsé pour l’Italie malgré toute mes consultations.

    L’importance dans tout ça est que j’ai commencé à parler la langue allemande après 4 mois d’école mais surtout avec mes propres efforts.

    Après mon expulsion, l’Italie m’a déjà confirmé que je n’ai pas de … là-bas. Je me suis retourné en ici et en raccourci c’était toujours la même chose. Actuellement je suis dans un centre d’expulsion (Abschiebungshafte Darmstadt) Marienburgstr. 78 / 64297 Darmstadt. Ça fait presque un mois de puis que je suis là et
    dans une condition déplorable. Je suis malade, ma condition de santé est très critique : j’ai un problème de cœur, et tout mes deux pieds sont enflés que je ne n’arrive même pas à marcher, je ne ressens que la douleur. Ça fait 3 semaines que je prends régulièrement les médicaments, je prends 10 à 12 comprimés par jour qui ne font que me doper et me créer d’autres problèmes de santé : le malaise, l’insomnie, maux de tête, maux de ventre,
    douleur articulaire.

    Cela fait 2 semaines je réclame une visite médicale et même le médecin de ce centre ne vient pas. D’ailleurs d’après les agents de garde, quand on l’appelle elle dit que « je n’ai pas droit à une visite médicale, et que je dois seulement prendre des médicaments » qui
    créent d’autres problèmes à ma santé.

    Je me sens aujourd’hui triste, abandonné, ridiculisé, minimisé que je considère dans cette prison comme une sorte de torture. Je suis démunis de mes droit de l’homme ici tandis que la République Fédérale d’Allemagne est un pays de droit et de la liberté.
    Même s’ils doivent m’expulser de ce pays mais que ça soit que je me trouve en bonne état de santé. Je n’ai pas peur de l’expulsion, des dizaines de personnes sont morts devant dans les manifestations alors je ne crains en rien, c’est seulement ma santé qui est la plus importante.

    Alors j’appelle à votre aide pour que je retrouve ma santé et continuer mes procédures de demande d’asile dans de bonnes conditions.

    Merci pour votre bonne compréhension et je vous remercie.

    Source: via HFR Mailing list —>

    Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren,

    anbei eine aktuelle Pressemitteilung zu einem Fall von unzureichender medizinischer Versorgung in der Abschiebungshafteinrichtung Darmstadt unseres Bündnisses ‚Community4All – Solidarische Gemeinschaften statt
    Abschiebegefängnis’. Wir senden Ihnen unsere PM aus aktuellem Anlass, mit der Bitte um zeitnahe Veröffentlichung.

    Angehängt sind neben der PM ein Statement des Betroffenen im Original (Französisch, sowie als Übersetzung).

    #Allemagne #Darmstadt #Community4All #asyle #migration #détention #centre_d'expulsion #santé #accès_aux_soins

  • Question concernant les #statistiques reçue via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 29.11.2019 et que je mets ici pour archivage, car la question des #chiffres autour des #migrations, de l’#asile, des #réfugiés et des #frontières revient souvent...

    La question concerne le pourcentage d’#entrées_irrégulières des personnes ayant obtenu une protection en Europe .

    Je n’arrive pas à trouver d’infos fiables sur le sujet.
    Ici en France nos politiques rivalisent de chiffres hasardeux...
    Il y a quelques mois une étude visant à promouvoir la mise en place de visas humanitaires avancait le chiffre de 90% de réfugiés étant entrés irrégulièrement en Europe.
    https://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2018/621823/EPRS_STU(2018)621823_EN.pdf
    "Currently, up to 90% of the total population of subsequently recognised refugees and beneficiaries of subsidiary protection reach the territory of Member States irregularly."

    Comme source de cette info, ils indiquent ce document :
    https://www.fluechtlingshilfe.ch/assets/asylrecht/rechtsgrundlagen/exploring-avenues-for-protected-entry-in-europe.pdf
    ...qui date de 2012, et c’est une « estimation », sans citer de sources.
    "According to estimates, approximately 90% of all asylum seekers enter Europe in an irregular manner, since legal entry has become more and more difficult and in most cases impossible. »

    Est-ce quelqu’un saurait ou il est possible de trouver cette info, c’est à dire le pourcentage d’entrée irrégulière ou via un visa, parmi les demandeurs d’asile d’une part, et ceux qui obtiennent un statut de réfugié, en Europe ?

    ping @simplicissimus @reka

    • Je n’ai pas su répondre à cette question, mais il y a un commentaire à faire par rapport à ce que les deux citations mettent en avant (pas la même chose, à mon avis, même si les deux donnent le même chiffre... ce qui montre qu’il y a un problème). Et des information à donner en complément, d’autres statistiques (et leur #manipulation) dans d’autres contextes, mais toujours sur la question du passage irrégulier des frontières...

      Voici ma réponse :

      J’envoie à toi et aux autres abonné·es de la liste le graphique ci-dessous :


      tiré du livre « Méditerranée : des frontières à la dérive »

      https://lepassagerclandestin.fr/catalogue/bibliotheque-des-frontieres/mediterranee-des-frontieres-a-la-derive.html

      On y voit que les « interception des migrants à la frontière » (donc sans visa, qui entre « irrégulièrement ») représentent 1 à 3% des entrées sur le territoire européen...

      ça ne répond pas à ta question, mais c’est intéressant de l’avoir en tête... pour montrer que la très très très grande majorité des personnes non-européennes entrent de manière régulière sur le territoire, avec des visas.

      Mais là, il ne s’agit pas de ce que tu cherches.

      Ce qui est sûr c’est que tes deux citations se contredisent :
      1. « Currently, up to 90% of the total population of subsequently recognised refugees and beneficiaries of subsidiary protection reach the territory of Member States irregularly. »
      –-> % des personnes entrées irrégulièrement sur les personnes reconnues réfugiées ou qui ont obtenu une protection subsidiaire, après être entrées sur le territoire européen.

      Ce qui n’est pas la même chose de dire que

      2. « According to estimates, approximately 90% of all asylum seekers enter Europe in an irregular manner »
      –-> car là la base de calcul sont les demandeurs d’asile, ce qui comportent d’y intégrer aussi des personnes qui seront après examen de la demande déboutées de l’asile.

      Une des deux affirmations est donc fausse, car étant la base différente, on ne peut pas avoir le même pourcentage...

      –------------

      Je pense que je n’ai jamais vu passer les chiffres des entrées irrégulières sur la base de ceux qui après sont reconnus réfugiés... Mais je suis preneuse si jamais des personnes de la liste ont cette info, en effet.

      Je vous rappelle par contre ci-dessous d’autres contextes dans lesquels on a pu démontré que les entrées (irrégulières) ont été gonflées :
      ... les chiffres publiés par Frontex des entrées irrégulières dans les Balkans : https://theconversation.com/seeing-double-how-the-eu-miscounts-migrants-arriving-at-its-borders
      ... et la Suisse gonflait ceux des passages à la frontière depuis l’Italie : https://asile.ch/2016/08/12/parlant-de-personnes-lieu-de-cas-medias-surestiment-nombre-de-passages-a-front
      ... et puis ceux des passages entre la Grèce et l’Albanie : https://journals.openedition.org/espacepolitique/2675

      Tout cela, avec plus de documents, vous le trouvez dans ce fil de discussion sur seenthis.net :
      https://seenthis.net/messages/705957

      Je n’ai pas vraiment répondu à ta question, mais cette réponse peut peut-être être utile à des personnes sur la liste qui se posent des questions sur les statistiques des entrées sur le territoire européen...

    • A priori, seul l’OFPRA, et lui seul, serait en mesure de fournir ce chiffre et il ne le fait pas.
      https://www.ofpra.gouv.fr/fr/l-ofpra/nos-publications/rapports-d-activite

      Par ailleurs, il me semble que le chiffre de 90% d’illégaux parmi les bénéficiaires de protection signifierait qu’une (très ?) forte proportion des immigrants irréguliers demanderaient la protection. Mais je n’y connais pas grand chose.

      Je trouve quelques éléments autour de l’estimation, par construction problématique, des entrées irrégulières dans les échanges rapportés par le rapport sénatorial de 2006 (oui, ça fait loin…)
      https://www.senat.fr/rap/r05-300-1/r05-300-111.html

    • @simplicissimus :

      Par ailleurs, il me semble que le chiffre de 90% d’illégaux parmi les bénéficiaires de protection signifierait qu’une (très ?) forte proportion des immigrants irréguliers demanderaient la protection. Mais je n’y connais pas grand chose.

      –-> ça absolument, oui, car malheureusement les #voies_légales sont bouchées (politique de #visas très restrictive pour des questions liées à l’asile mais aussi pour le travail, les études, etc.), du coup, les personnes prennent la route quand même et la seule manière pour laquelle on peut traverser la frontière SANS les « bons » documents. Les frontières fermées, d’une certaine manière, pousse les personnes à passer les frontières irrégulièrement et la seule manière de ne pas être refoulé c’est en demandant l’asile (en théorie, car en pratique les Etats bafouent souvent ce droit et refoulent quand même).
      J’espère avoir été claire...

      #merci en tout cas pour le lien du Sénat...

    • Le document signalé par @simplicissimus, in extenso (pour archivage, ça date de 2006 :

      Immigration clandestine : une réalité inacceptable, une réponse ferme, juste et humaine (rapport)

      B. DES CHIFFRES SUJETS À CAUTION

      Rares sont les personnes entendues par la commission d’enquête qui se sont aventurées à fournir une évaluation chiffrée de l’immigration irrégulière. Les chiffres communiqués semblent vraisemblables mais restent sujets à caution compte tenu des lacunes du dispositif d’évaluation statistique.
      1. Les chiffres nationaux

      En juin 1998, dans son rapport au nom de la commission d’enquête du Sénat sur les régularisations d’étrangers en situation irrégulière présidée par notre ancien collègue M. Paul Masson, notre collègue M. José Balarello écrivait qu’« une estimation du nombre des clandestins entre 350.000 et 400.000 ne paraît pas éloignée de la réalité20(). »

      Selon M. Nicolas Sarkozy, ministre d’Etat, ministre de l’intérieur et de l’aménagement du territoire, entre 200.000 et 400.000 étrangers en situation irrégulière seraient aujourd’hui présents sur le territoire national et entre 80.000 et 100.000 migrants illégaux supplémentaires y entreraient chaque année.

      La direction des affaires juridiques et des libertés publiques du ministère explique que cette estimation des « flux » « résulte notamment du nombre de demandeurs d’asile, diminué du nombre de personnes ayant obtenu le statut de réfugié, du nombre de personnes ayant été régularisées et du nombre d’arrêtés de reconduite à la frontière pris et exécutés à l’encontre des demandeurs d’asile déboutés. » Quant à celle du « stock », « elle prend pour base minimale le nombre (150.000) d’étrangers en situation irrégulière qui bénéficient de l’aide médicale d’Etat. Sur cette base, et en y ajustant un pourcentage du flux annuel (pour tenir compte, d’une part, des régularisations « au fil de l’eau » et, d’autre part, des départs volontaires), on peut raisonnablement estimer ce stock à environ 400.000 personnes. »

      La controverse, par auditions devant la commission d’enquête interposées, entre le ministre d’Etat et M. François Héran, directeur de l’Institut national des études démographiques, montre combien la question est sensible et complexe.

      Le premier a reproché à l’INED d’avoir, en janvier 2004, sous-évalué le flux annuel d’immigration illégale, en l’estimant à 13.000 par an sur la base d’une analyse de la régularisation pratiquée en 1997-1998.

      Le second a observé que ces déclarations reposaient sur plusieurs méprises : d’abord, la migration illégale nette évoquée valait pour la décennie 1989-1998 ; ensuite l’INED a proposé une évaluation des flux nets ou encore du solde migratoire, c’est-à-dire du nombre d’immigrants irréguliers qui demeurent sur notre sol une fois défalquées les sorties, alors que M. Nicolas Sarkozy a évoqué les seuls flux bruts d’entrées irrégulières.

      Il a en outre jugé incompatibles les chiffres avancés par le ministre d’Etat : dans la mesure où les régularisations menées en France et en Europe montrent que la durée de séjour des immigrants illégaux s’étale sur au moins une dizaine d’années, l’arrivée de 90.000 immigrants irréguliers supplémentaires en moyenne par an devrait porter le « stock » d’immigrants illégaux présents sur notre territoire à environ 800.000 personnes ; si l’on considère en revanche que 300.000 immigrants irréguliers séjournent sur notre territoire, alors le flux annuel d’entrées se situe entre 30.000 et 40.000 personnes, évaluation tout à fait compatible avec celle de l’INED.

      La divergence porte donc davantage sur l’évaluation des flux que sur celle du stock qui, si elle reste sujette à caution, semble vraisemblable.

      Par ailleurs -et c’est l’un des rares chiffres qu’elle a accepté de communiquer à la commission d’enquête- Mme Jacqueline Costa-Lascoux, membre du Haut conseil à l’intégration et directrice de l’Observatoire statistique de l’immigration et de l’intégration, a fait état d’estimations selon lesquelles le nombre d’enfants scolarisés dont les parents sont en situation irrégulière serait compris entre 15.000 et 20.000. Mme Armelle Gardien, représentante du Réseau éducation sans frontières, a pour sa part estimé à plus de 10.000 le nombre des jeunes étrangers sans papiers scolarisés, tout en soulignant la difficulté de disposer d’évaluations fiables.

      Enfin, environ 3.000 mineurs étrangers isolés sont pris en charge par les services de l’Etat (protection judiciaire de la jeunesse) ou des départements (aide sociale à l’enfance).

      Dans un rapport21() paru au moins de janvier 2005, l’inspection générale des affaires sociales note, sur la base d’une enquête auprès des départements à laquelle 64 conseils généraux ont répondu qu’« environ 3.100 mineurs auraient été admis à l’aide sociale à l’enfance en 2003 ; 2.300 sur les neuf premiers mois de 2004. Près de 2.500 mineurs étaient présents au 30 septembre 2004 dans les mêmes départements. (...). Des origines et des trajectoires de migration diverses sont perceptibles, qui laissent néanmoins apparaître des dominantes. 5 nationalités dominent les flux depuis plusieurs années : Roumanie, Chine, Maroc, Albanie, Congo, avec une apparition plus récente de l’Angola. L’enquête commanditée par la direction des populations et des migrations en 2001 distinguait cinq grands types qui demeurent pertinents : les exilés (souvent africains) ; les mandatés (chinois, indiens...) ; les exploités -catégorie qui peut recouper les précédentes- (Europe de l’Est et Balkans) ; les fugueurs (Afrique du Nord) ; les errants. »

      Le rapport relève également que « la réalité de l’isolement n’est pas toujours aisée à établir, dans la mesure où ces jeunes sont parfois venus rejoindre un parent plus ou moins éloigné » mais que « le caractère relatif de cet isolement ne minimise pas le danger auquel ces jeunes sont exposés car les adultes auxquels ils ont été confiés sont inégalement désireux de les accueillir et les conditions d’accueil se dégradent parfois rapidement sans compter les situations extrêmes d’exploitation (esclavage domestique ou prostitution par exemple). »

      20 Rapport n° 470 (Sénat, 1997-1998), page 22.

      21 Mission d’analyse et de proposition sur les conditions d’accueil des mineurs étrangers isolés en France - Rapport n° 2005 010, présenté par Jean Blocquaux, Anne Burstin et Dominique Giorgi, membres de l’inspection générale des affaires sociales - janvier 2005.

      https://www.senat.fr/rap/r05-300-1/r05-300-111.html

      Source : Rapport de commission d’enquête n° 300 (2005-2006) de MM. #Georges_OTHILY et #François-Noël_BUFFET, fait au nom de la commission d’enquête, déposé le 6 avril 2006

    • Intéressant de voir le vocabulaire, qui n’a guère changé depuis, autour de #fermeté et #humanité
      voir notamment cet article de Véronique Albanel :
      Humanité et fermeté

      https://www.cairn.info/revue-etudes-2018-4-page-4.htm

      En #France, mais aussi en #Belgique...
      #Asile et #immigration en #Belgique (I) : la Méthode #De_Block, ou la #fermeté_déshumanisante

      Au plus haut dans les sondages et cajolée par les médias, la Secrétaire d’Etat à l’Asile et à l’Immigration #Maggie_De_Block voit sa gestion restrictive des flux migratoires couronnée de succès politique. Son secret ? Une #communication habile sur un dosage présenté comme équilibré entre #fermeté et #humanité. Une formule dont les deux éléments présentent tous les traits d’un #oxymore aux conséquences humaines désastreuses.

      https://seenthis.net/messages/213382

      #terminologie #vocabulaire #mots

    • C’est vrai qu’il s’agit de celles et ceux qui se sont fait intercepter et qu’ils n’ont plus guère d’options…

      Reste, comme toujours, à estimer celles et ceux qui sont passés à travers les mailles des filets…

      a parte, je vais pouvoir tester ces jours-ci la gare de Champel flambant neuve, inaugurée ce week-end…

    • Vous le savez, on est plusieurs à se poser pas mal de questions sur les statistiques françaises sur l’asile.
      Les chiffres officiels de la DGEF sont souvent très différents des statisques officielles européenne d’#Eurostat.
      C’est assez « pratique » pour le gouvernement, qui justifie sa politique migratoire selon les chiffres qui l’arrange…

      Gérard Sadik, de la Cimade, l’a évoqué il y a déjà plusieurs mois : la France ne comptabilisait pas les #dublinés.
      Afin de vérifier, j’avais contacté les journalistes du service « CheckNews » du journal Libération, fin novembre.
      Ils ont enquêté, et diffusé leurs résultats aujourd’hui :
      https://www.liberation.fr/checknews/2020/01/20/demandes-d-asile-eurostat-epingle-la-france-pour-avoir-tronque-des-statis

      L’article est réservé aux abonnés, je copie/colle en fin de message l’article complet, mais à ne pas rediffuser publiquement par respect pour leur travail.

      En résumé ils confirment que la France ne respecte pas les consignes statistiques européennes... en ne prenant pas en compte les demandeurs d’asile dublinés, notre pays fausse les comparaisons.
      Bilan : il est très difficile d’avoir une vision précise des statistiques sur l’asile, à cause de l’incompétence française.
      Ce qui n’empêche pas le gouvernement français de s’appuyer sur ces chiffres tronqués pour justifier le durcissement de sa politique…

      Le Ministère de l’intérieur doit justement diffuser demain les premiers chiffres de 2019… qui ne seront donc vraisemblablement pas conformes !

      Message de David Torondel reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 20.01.2020.

    • Selon nos informations, Eurostat a récemment pris contact avec les autorités françaises, en raison de statistiques tronquées fournies par Paris quant au nombre de demandeurs d’asile. L’office statistique européen s’est en effet rendu compte que la France, depuis plusieurs années, ne comptabilisait pas dans ses chiffres les demandeurs sous procédure de Dublin (personnes demandant l’asile mais qui doivent en théorie être prises en charge par le pays dans lequel elles sont entrées dans l’UE). Ce qui a pour effet de minorer chaque mois de plusieurs milliers de demandeurs, et de biaiser toute comparaison. Ce qui est pourtant l’objet d’Eurostat.

      #paywall

  • Migration : et si on laissait les demandeurs d’asile choisir leur pays d’accueil ?

    Des chercheurs belges ont planché pendant des mois sur une réforme de la politique d’asile et de migration en Europe. Leurs propositions viennent d’être présentées devant les députés européens.

    En prenant la présidence du Conseil, il y a six mois, la Fin-lande se fixait pour objectif no-table de paver le terrain pour permettre une réforme de la politique migratoire et d’asile européenne jusque-là totale-ment bloquée. C’est à Helsinki que la France et l’Allemagne ont posé les premières pierres d’un mécanisme de ré-partition des migrants. A Tampere, que des spécialistes du droit européen de la migration ont été rassemblés pour tes-ter une série de propositions de ré-forme, emmenés par une équipe de chercheurs belges. En ressort un pro-gramme présenté lundi devant un public épars de députés européens, « De Tampere 20 à Tampere 2.0 » (une référence au Conseil européen de 1999 de Tampere, un des textes fondateurs des principes de la politique migratoire européenne). La Commission von der Leyen, fraîchement installée, souhaite présenter début 2020 un « nouveau pacte européen sur la migration » qui inclurait une réforme du règlement de #Dublin, un système d’asile européen « réellement commun » et un renforcement de #Frontex. Des pistes trouvant écho dans les propositions de Tampere. « Il fautun consensus entre la Commission, le Parlement et le Conseil », souligne le rapport des chercheurs, qui propose une « task team » qui ferait le tour des capitales européennes pour évaluer la situation et mesurer les attentes. Quitte à prendre le temps, dans un contexte politique où la question migratoire est extrêmement clivante. « Des conversations en profondeur seront nécessaires pour restaurer la confiance et faciliter une réflexion innovante. »

    https://plus.lesoir.be/264352/article/2019-12-02/migration-et-si-laissait-les-demandeurs-dasile-choisir-leur-pays-daccuei
    #répartition #choix #liberté #asile #migrations #réfugiés

    #paywall

    Si quelqu’un trouve le rapport...

    ping @simplicissimus @karine4 @isskein

  • La France devient le « premier pays » d’Europe pour les demandes d’asile

    VIDÉO. La France dépasse l’Allemagne avec 120 900 demandes d’asile en 2019 contre 119 900 de l’autre côté du Rhin. Une inversion radicale par rapport à 2018.

    https://www.lepoint.fr/societe/la-france-devient-le-premier-pays-d-europe-pour-les-demandes-d-asile-21-11-2
    #statistiques #asile #migrations #réfugiés #chiffres #France

    ping @karine4 @simplicissimus

    Une discussion autour de ces chiffres a lieu via la mailing-list de Migreurop. Je reproduis ici les discussions, car, comme vous le savez maintenant, j’aime beaucoup déconstruire les statistiques sur l’asile...

    • Premier commentaire de ces chiffres :

      Vous avez du le voir, depuis hier la plupart des médias reprennent une dépêche #AFP indiquant que la France deviendrait « le premier pays de demandes d’asile », passant devant l’Allemagne.
      https://www.lepoint.fr/societe/la-france-devient-le-premier-pays-d-europe-pour-les-demandes-d-asile-21-11-2

      D’après Place Beauvau : 120 900 demandes enregistrées en France depuis le début de l’année, contre 119 900 en Allemagne.

      Mais les chiffres #Eurostat sont très différents.

      Quelques heures après...

      Un contact au gouvernement me dit que ce sont bien des chiffres d’EASO, mais pas encore public…
      Mais c’est quand même bizarre qu’ils soient si différents de ceux d’Eurostat.

    • Deuxième commentaire :

      En France, les demandes d’asile peuvent durer plusieurs années et donc être décomptées plusieurs fois (une fois chaque année) avant une acceptation ou un refus. En est-il de même en Allemagne ? Il faudrait connaître le chiffre des demandes d’asile déposées pendant l’année en cours.

    • Troisième commentaire :

      ‘The data shared with EASO by the EU+ countries are provisional and unvalidated, and therefore may differ from validated data submitted to Eurostat (according to Regulation (EC) No 862/2007). In line with the dissemination guide on EPS data, EASO cannot publish data disaggregated per EU+ country.’

    • 4e commentaire :

      j’ai regardé les tableaux d’Eurostat, on y trouve le nombre de demandeurs d’asile (une famille compte pour 1) sur 7 mois (la France n’a pas donné les deux derniers mois) :
      Allemagne : 83 000
      France : 59 000
      Ce sont bien des premières demandes, pas la totalité des demandes déposées l’an dernier encore en cours d’examen.

    • 5e commentaire :

      Cette question des statistiques européennes est un vrai casse-tête…
      Pour ce que j’ai compris, le souci est déjà que les différentes sources de chiffres ne partent pas tous des mêmes critères : avec ou sans les mineurs accompagnants, primo-demandeurs ou pas, etc.
      Et pour couronner le tout, certains pays, dont la France, ne donneraient pas forcément les bons chiffres à Eurostat…

      Par exemple, ici : https://appsso.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/nui/show.do?dataset=migr_asyappctzm&lang=en
      Si j’ai bien compris ce que m’a dit la Cimade, les chiffres seraient faussés parce que tous les pays, sauf la France et la Roumanie, fournissent à Eurostat le nombre d’enregistrement de demande d’asile, Y COMPRIS les demandes d’asile en procédure Dublin.
      Donc les chiffres de la France seraient faussement diminués.

      On peut avoir les bons chiffres via les stats de l’OFII, qui les diffusent maintenant mensuellement.

      Mais est-ce vraiment juste de comptabiliser les demandes d’asile Dublin dedans ?
      Il me semble que non, justement… parce qu’une personne en Dublin passe souvent ensuite en procédure normale après quelques mois ou années, donc elle va être comptabilisé 2 fois.

      Il me semble que le plus juste serait de ne comptabiliser que les demandes d’asile normales et accélérées, en enlevant les dublin.
      Mais pour avoir ce chiffre, il faudrait prendre les stats globales et en retrancher les requêtes de prise ou reprise en charge.
      Mais pour ces requêtes, il n’y à pas, sur Eurostat, de stats mensuelles, à ma connaissance.
      Les chiffres 2019 ne seront connus que début 2020.
      Donc pour l’instant, on parle plus ou moins dans le vide…

    • 6e commentaire, de Vivre Ensemble :

      En ce qui concerne les demandes d’asile et les « cas Dublin », dans la mesure où une personne dépose une demande d’asile en France, il me semble que les Etats doivent doit l’enregistrer comme telle. C’est l’Etat qui choisit ensuite de rejeter sa demande au prétexte du Règlement de Dublin (elle peut parfaitement décider d’examiner sa demande dans le cadre d’une procédure nationale). Normalement, Eurostat fixe les règles à suivre par les Etats en ce qui concerne les données à lui transmettre.

      C’est d’ailleurs dans les données relatives aux décisions, à savoir dans le calcul du taux de protection accordés par les Etats européens, qu’Eurostat a inscrit comme règle de ne pas compter les personnes relevant du règlement Dublin, pour éviter justement le double comptage :
      Eurostat indique : “Since reference year 2014, asylum applicants rejected on the basis that another EU Member State accepted responsibility to examine their asylum application under ’Dublin’ Regulation No 604/2013 are not included in data on negative decisions. This has lowered the number of rejections. Consequently, the proportion of positive decisions in the total number of first instance decisions is estimated to have increased by around 5 percentage points.” Référence : “Statistics Explained, Final decisions taken in appeal, note 3″ (https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Asylum_statistics#cite_ref-3, consulté la dernière fois le 27.07.18)

      J’avais écris un décryptage sur cette question concernant la Suisse, car celle-ci « camouflait » dans ces décisions celles relevant de Dublin malgré les directives eurostat pour faire baisser son taux de décisions positives. Et notre intervention a conduit Eurostat à demander aux autorités suisses de corriger leurs données. Lors de notre analyse, nous avions pu mesurer l’absence de contrôle « qualité » par Eurostat des données transmises par les Etats, Eurostat nous indiquant avoir une marge de manoeuvre restreinte en la matière : ce n’est que lorsque nous avions obtenu la confirmation de l’agence suisse écrite noir sur blanc qu’Eurostat s’était bougée… Bref, je pense que dans chaque Etat, il devrait y avoir un regard critique sur la façon dont les chiffres sont transmis à Eurostat.

      Voici le lien vers les décryptages statistiques publiés par Vivre Ensemble :

      - Statistiques | En Suisse, quelle reconnaissance du besoin de protection en 2017 ? https://asile.ch/2018/08/20/statistiques-en-2017-quelle-reconnaissance-du-besoin-de-protection-en-suisse
      - Carte | La loterie de l’asile 2017 https://asile.ch/2018/07/25/carte-la-loterie-de-lasile-2017
      - Statistiques : À quoi servent-elles ? https://asile.ch/2017/08/08/decryptage-statistiques-a-quoi-servent
      - Eurostat et statistiques suisses : brouillage de pistes https://asile.ch/2017/08/09/eurostat-statistiques-suisses-brouillage-de-pistes

      A noter aussi que l’association ECRE fait aussi un travail critique à l’échelle européenne (voir ECRE, « Making asylum numbers count », Policy note #10, janvier 2018. ) Peut-être ont-ils aussi un point-de-vue sur la question.

    • Demandes d’asile : #Eurostat épingle la France pour avoir tronqué des statistiques

      En contradiction avec les consignes de l’office statistique européen, la France ne comptabilise pas dans les données qu’elle a transmises les demandeurs d’asile sous procédure de #Dublin. Ce qui a pour effet de minorer les chiffres.
      La France priée de corriger sa copie. Selon nos informations, Eurostat a récemment pris contact avec les autorités françaises, en raison de statistiques tronquées fournies par Paris quant au nombre de demandeurs d’asile. L’office statistique européen s’est en effet rendu compte que la France, depuis plusieurs années, ne comptabilisait pas dans ses chiffres les demandeurs sous procédure de Dublin (personnes demandant l’asile mais qui doivent en théorie être prises en charge par le pays dans lequel elles sont entrées dans l’UE). Ce qui a pour effet de minorer chaque mois de plusieurs milliers de demandeurs, et de biaiser toute comparaison. Ce qui est pourtant l’objet d’Eurostat.

      https://www.liberation.fr/checknews/2020/01/20/demandes-d-asile-eurostat-epingle-la-france-pour-avoir-tronque-des-statis
      #paywall

  • Asile, #relocalisation et #retour des migrants : il est temps de renforcer la lutte contre les disparités entre les objectifs et les résultats

    Dans le cadre de l’audit objet du présent rapport, nous avons cherché à déterminer si le soutien en faveur de la Grèce et de l’Italie financé par l’UE a permis à cette dernière d’atteindre ses objectifs et si les procédures d’asile et de retour étaient efficaces et rapides. Nous avons également vérifié si les valeurs cibles et les objectifs des programmes temporaires de #relocalisation d’urgence avaient été atteints. Nous concluons qu’il existe des disparités entre les objectifs du soutien de l’UE et les résultats obtenus. Les valeurs cibles des programmes de #relocalisation_d'urgence n’ont pas été atteintes. Bien que les capacités des autorités grecques et italiennes aient augmenté, la mise en oeuvre des procédures d’asile continue à pâtir de longs délais de traitement et à présenter des goulets d’étranglement. Comme pour le reste de l’UE, les retours de migrants effectués depuis la Grèce et l’Italie sont peu nombreux pour les raisons que nous exposons dans le présent rapport.

    https://www.eca.europa.eu/fr/Pages/DocItem.aspx?did=51988
    #audit #cour_des_comptes #asile #migrations #réfugiés #EU #UE #Grèce #Italie #aide_financière #procédure_d'asile #expulsions #renvois ##cour_des_comptes_européenne #argent #budget

    Dans le rapport il y a plein de graphiques intéressants...

    Grèce :

    Italie :

    ping @isskein

    • La Cour des comptes de l’UE critique les disparités en matière de gestion des migrations en Grèce et en Italie

      Le 13 novembre 2019, la Cour des comptes de l’Union européenne (UE) publiait son rapport d’audit « Asile, relocalisation et retour des migrants : il est temps de renforcer la lutte contre les disparités entre les objectifs et les résultats ». Ce #rapport examine le soutien financier et opérationnel de l’UE en faveur de la Grèce et de l’Italie. Il évalue dans quelles mesures les objectifs ont été atteints et si les procédures d’asile et de retour étaient efficaces et rapides. Le rapport couvre la période 2015-2018. La Cour des comptes s’est intéressée à l’#accueil des requérants d’asile, à la procédure d’asile, au système #EURODAC et au fonctionnement du système #Dublin, aux #relocalisations des requérants d’asile vers d’autres pays de l’UE et enfin à l’efficacité des renvois vers les pays d’origine. Le rapport est truffé de recommandations qui vont inévitablement influencer les décisions des autorités suisses.

      Diminuer la pression sur la Grèce et l’Italie

      Selon les auditeurs, les mesures de l’UE visant à diminuer la pression migratoire sur la Grèce et l’Italie doivent être améliorées et intensifiées. Ils déplorent la lenteur excessive des procédures d’asile. En Italie, les demandes d’asile déposées en 2015 ont pris en moyenne quatre ans pour parvenir au stade du recours final, tandis que les demandeurs d’asile arrivant sur les îles grecques fin 2018 se voyaient attribuer une date limite pour les entretiens jusqu’en 2023.

      Parallèlement à l’accélération des procédures d’asile, les auditeurs recommandent d’améliorer les logements sur les #îles grecques, en particulier pour les nombreux requérants mineurs non accompagnés qui logent dans des conditions abominables. A ce sujet la Cour des comptes précisent ce qui suit :

      “À #Samos, nous avons visité la section du centre (#hotspot) réservée aux mineurs, qui consiste en sept conteneurs, abritant chacun une salle de bain et deux salles de séjour. Certains conteneurs n’avaient ni portes, ni fenêtres et n’étaient équipés ni de lits ni d’appareils de conditionnement de l’air. Chaque conteneur pouvait officiellement accueillir huit à dix mineurs, mais en hébergeait environ 16 non accompagnés, dont certains étaient même obligés de dormir par terre. Seuls des garçons séjournaient dans la section pour mineurs. Soixante-dix-huit mineurs non accompagnés étaient hébergés sous tente ou dans des maisons abandonnées situées à l’extérieur du point d’accès et devenues des annexes officieuses de celui-ci. Neuf filles non accompagnées dormaient au sol dans un conteneur de 10 m2 situé à côté du bureau de police, sans toilette ni douche.“

      Au moment de la publication du rapport, le maire de l’île de Samos Georgios Stantzos mentionnait l’audit et mettait en garde les autorités grecques contre les conséquences des conditions de vie « primitives » imposées aux réfugiés sur l’île.

      Trop de mouvements secondaires dans l’UE

      Concernant l’enregistrement des empreintes digitales dans le système EURODAC, la situation s’est beaucoup améliorée dans les centres hotspots en Italie et en Grèce. Cependant, entre 2015 et 2018, la Cour a remarqué un volume élevé de mouvements secondaires dans l’UE ce qui a rendu l’application du mécanisme de Dublin difficile. Les données EUROSTAT traduisent aussi de faibles taux de transferts Dublin qui s’expliquent selon les auditeurs, par la fuite ou la disparition des personnes concernées, des raisons humanitaires, des décisions de justice en suspens et des cas de regroupement familial (1).
      Les réinstallations très insatisfaisantes

      Les États membres de l’UE se sont juridiquement engagés à réinstaller 98 256 migrants, sur un objectif initial fixé à 160 000. Or seuls 34 705 ont été effectivement réinstallés (21 999 depuis la Grèce et 12 706 depuis l’Italie). Selon les auditeurs, la performance insuffisante de ces programmes s’explique surtout par le faible nombre de requérants potentiellement éligibles enregistrés en vue d’une relocalisation, surtout parce que les autorités grecques et italiennes ont eu de la peine à ‘identifier les candidats. Une fois les migrants enregistrés en vue d’une relocalisation, la solidarité à leur égard a mieux fonctionné. Les auditeurs ont cependant relevé un certain nombre de faiblesses opérationnelles dans le processus de relocalisation (2).

      Augmentation des renvois vers les pays d’origines

      Pour la Cour des comptes, le fossé entre le nombre de décisions négatives et le nombre de renvois exécutés depuis la Grèce, l’Italie ou le reste de l’UE, est trop important. Le taux de renvois des ressortissants de pays tiers ayant reçu l’ordre de quitter l’UE était d’environ 40 % en 2018 et de 20 % en Grèce et en Italie. En s’inspirant de certains centres de renvois destinés aux personnes qui acceptent volontairement de rentrer vers leurs pays d’origine, la Cour des comptes recommande différentes mesures qui permettront de faciliter les renvois dont l’ouverture de nouveaux centres de détention et l’offre plus systématique de programmes de réintégration dans les pays d’origine.

      Conclusion

      Le rapport de la Cour des comptes de l’UE est une mine d’information pour comprendre le fonctionnement des centres hotspots en Grèce et en Italie. Globalement, sa lecture donne le sentiment que l’UE se dirige à grands pas vers une prolifération de centre hotspots, un raccourcissement des procédures d’asile et une armada de mesures facilitant l’exécution des renvois vers les pays d’origine.

      https://blogs.letemps.ch/jasmine-caye/2019/11/19/la-cour-des-comptes-de-lue-critique-les-disparites-en-matiere-de-gesti
      #mineurs_non_accompagnés #MNA #hotspots #empreintes_digitales #mouvements_secondaires

    • Migrants relocation: EU states fail on sharing refugees

      A mandatory 2015 scheme to dispatch people seeking international protection from Greece and Italy across the European Union did not deliver promised results, say EU auditors.

      Although member states took in some 35,000 people from both countries, the EU auditors say at least 445,000 Eritreans, Iraqis and Syrians may have been potentially eligible in Greece alone.

      The lead author of the report, Leo Brincat, told reporters in Brussels on Wednesday (13 November) that another 36,000 could have also been possibly relocated from Italy.

      “But when it boils down to the total migrants relocated, you will find 21,999 in the case of Greece and 12,706 in the case of Italy,” he said.

      The EU auditors say the migrants relocated at the time represented only around four percent of all the asylum seekers in Italy and around 22 percent in Greece.

      Despite being repeatedly billed as a success by the European Commission, the two-year scheme had also caused massive rifts with some member states – leading to EU court battles in Luxembourg.

      When it was first launched among interior ministers in late 2015, the mandatory nature of the proposal was forced through by a vote, overturning objections from the Czech Republic, Hungary, Romania and Slovakia.

      Only last month, the advocate-general at the EU court in Luxembourg had declared the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland likely broke EU law for refusing to take in refugees from the 2015 scheme. While the Czech Republic took 12 people, both Hungary and Poland refused to host anyone at all.

      Similar battles have for years played out behind closed doors as legislators grapple with deadlocked internal EU asylum reforms.

      The concepts of sharing out asylum seekers, also known as relocation, are at the core of that deadlock.

      Politics aside, Brincat’s report honed in on the so-called “temporary emergency relocation scheme” whereby EU states had agreed to take in some 160,000 people from Greece and Italy over a period spanning from September 2015 to September 2017.

      Large numbers of people at the time were coming up through the Western Balkans into Hungary and onto Germany, while others were crossing from Turkey onto the Greek islands.

      After the EU cut a deal with Turkey early 2016, the set legal target of 160,000 had been reduced to just over 98,000.

      When the scheme finally ended in September 2017, only around 35,000 people had been relocated to member states along with Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland.

      “In our view, relocation was really a demonstration of European solidarity and with almost a 100 percent of eligible candidates in Greece and in Italy having been successfully relocated,” a European Commission spokeswoman said on Wednesday.
      Bottlenecks and other problems

      The EU auditors present a different view. They point out Greek and Italian authorities lacked the staff to properly identify people who could have been relocated, resulting in low registrations.

      They also say EU states only took in people from Greece who arrived before the deal was cut with Turkey in March 2016.

      Another issue was member states had vastly different asylum-recognition rates. For instance, asylum-recognition rates for Afghanis varied from six percent to 98 percent, depending on the member state. Iraqis had similarly variable rates.

      Some migrants also simply didn’t trust relocation concept. Others likely baulked at the idea being sent to a country where they had no cultural, language or family ties.

      Almost all of the 332 people sent to Lithuania, for example, packed up and left.

      EU Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker had even poked fun of it in late 2016. He had said asylum seekers from Greece and Italy were hard pressed to relocate to his home country of Luxembourg.

      “We found 53 after explaining to them that it was close to Germany. They are no longer there [Luxembourg],” he said.

      https://voxeurop.eu/en/2019/migration-5124053

  • Terrorist, sagt Erdoğan

    Ein in Deutschland aufgewachsener Kurde wird in die Türkei abgeschoben und flüchtet zurück nach Deutschland. Nun lebt er in einem #Ankerzentrum.

    #Murat_Akgül sitzt in einem Café in der Nürnberger Südstadt und legt einen Finger auf seine Stirn. Dort, wo die Haut noch leicht gerötet ist, ist der Anflug einer Beule zu sehen. Die Narbe ist seine Erinnerung an Bosnien und die Balkanroute. Akgül lebt seit 30 Jahren in Nürnberg, er ist hier aufgewachsen, hat hier die Schule besucht, eine Lehre gemacht, eine Familie gegründet, Eigentumswohnung, vier Kinder. Ende Mai erhielt der Kurde aus dem Südosten der Türkei einen Ausweisungsbescheid.

    Man hat ihn abgeschoben und Akgül ist zurückgeflüchtet. Das ist die Geschichte. Jetzt sitzt er hier, unweit seiner Wohnung, und darf nicht die Nacht dort verbringen. Er muss zurück ins Ankerzentrum Donauwörth. Er scheint noch nicht einmal wütend, nur müde. „Manchmal denke ich“, sagt Murat Akgül, „sie sollen mich einfach nur in Ruhe lassen.“

    Als Akgül Ende Mai der Brief mit dem Ausweisungsbescheid erreicht, hat er eine Niederlassungserlaubnis. Dass er jetzt, als politisch aktiver Kurde in die Türkei abgeschoben werden soll, kann er zuerst nicht glauben. Als Begründung listet der Verfassungsschutz auf 35 Seiten „sicherheitsrechtliche Erkenntnisse“ auf.

    Das heißt: Akgül hat an zahlreichen Demonstrationen, Versammlungen, Kundgebungen und Festen des kurdischen Vereins Medya Volkshaus teilgenommen, das zuweilen auch Funktionäre der #PKK empfängt. Von Teilnehmern dieser Veranstaltungen seien verbotene Parolen gerufen und verbotene Symbole gezeigt worden. Gleichzeitig ist das Medya Volkshaus ein Treffpunkt für Kurdinnen und Kurden in Nürnberg und erhält regelmäßig städtische Kulturförderung.

    Akgül bespricht sich mit seinem Anwalt Peter Holzschuher, klagt gegen den Bescheid und erhebt einen Eilantrag, die Abschiebung bis zur Entscheidung über die Klage auszusetzen. Dass er als Vater deutscher Kinder tatsächlich abgeschoben werden würde, glauben beide nicht. Der Eilantrag wird abgewiesen und Akgül reicht Beschwerde ein. Noch während die Beschwerde bearbeitet wird, seien nicht weniger als acht Polizisten zu ihm nach Hause gekommen: Sie holen ihn aus dem Bett, verfrachten ihn in einen Transporter.

    Am selben Nachmittag landet Akgül in Istanbul. Wenn die türkischen Behörden erfahren, dass er sich auf Demos in Deutschland für die kurdische Sache starkgemacht hat, gilt er hier als Terrorist. Akgül erfindet einen Grund. Zwar hätten die Beamten, im Flughafen wie auf der Station in Istanbul, ihm nicht geglaubt, dass er wegen einer Schlägerei abgeschoben worden sei, doch: Noch liegen den Türken keine Akten zu ihm vor, man lässt ihn gehen.
    Bei 30 Grad sitzen 35 Flüchtende im Lkw

    Akgül kann abtauchen, er schläft bei Bekannten, nirgends bleibt er länger als drei Tage. Dann zurück nach Istanbul. „Zuletzt habe ich die Schlepper gefunden“, sagt er, als spräche er von einer Muschel am Strand. Wie, gefunden? „Die findest du.“ 6.500 Euro soll Akgül bezahlen, damit er zurück nach Deutschland geschleust wird. Er werde mit dem Auto heimgefahren. „Nichts, was sie gesagt haben, hat gestimmt.“ Auf den vier Wochen auf der Balkanroute, sagt er, habe er die Hölle erlebt, den Tod überstanden.

    Die Schlepper hätten eine Gruppe von etwa 30 Menschen übers Telefon gelenkt, Wegmarken genannt, die sie ansteuern sollen. Zwischen Bosnien und Kroatien seien sie durch Urwälder gelaufen. Mit Akgül laufen Mütter und Kinder. Sie durchqueren Flüsse und kriechen durch Schlamm. Ihm schwellen die Füße an, ein Ast knallt ihm gegen die Stirn. Zwei Stunden, hatte es geheißen, am Ende seien sie 15 Stunden unterwegs gewesen. Von dem Wald träumt er heute noch.

    In Kroatien aber wartet ein Lkw, der sie nach Slowenien bringen soll. Bei 30 Grad Außentemperatur quetschen sich 35 Flüchtende auf die Ladefläche. Der Laderaum ist nicht belüftet. Die Menschen hämmern gegen die Wände, bis der Fahrer anhält. Akgül kennt diese Nachrichten aus der Zeitung. Er weiß, wie es sich anfühlt, darüber zu lesen, sagt er: 15 Sekunden Mitleid, dann hat man es vergessen. Jetzt ist er selbst einer von denen. Was ist mit seinem Leben passiert? Ein Stock, in die Verkleidung des Lkws geklemmt, sorgt schließlich dafür, dass etwas Luft ins Innere gelangt.

    In Slowenien wird Akgül von der Polizei aufgegriffen und registriert. Um nicht direkt wieder abgeschoben zu werden, habe er Asyl beantragen müssen. Dann lassen die Behörden ihn weiterziehen, schließlich sind seine Kinder in Deutschland. Ende Juli ist Akgül wieder in Franken. Deutlich ärmer, eine Beule auf der Stirn, aber sonst könnte alles wieder sein, wie es vorher war. Sein Arbeitgeber, eine Reinigungsfirma, hat seine Stelle freigehalten. Er will das hinter sich lassen wie einen bösen Traum.

    Noch in der Aufnahmeeinrichtung in Zirndorf ist er wieder in Handschellen. Bei seiner Abschiebung wurde ein zehn Jahre andauerndes Einreiseverbot verhängt. Er soll sofort wieder abgeschoben werden, zurück in die Türkei, in der ihm eine langjährige Haftstrafe droht. „Ich dachte, die machen Spaß. Die wollen mich erschrecken.“ Über Rechtsanwalt Yunus Ziyal beantragt Akgül nun erneut Asyl. Er frühstückt noch mit seiner Familie, danach muss er nach Donauwörth, Ankerzentrum. Ab sofort soll er sich dreimal wöchentlich bei der Polizei melden.
    Stundenlange „Sicherheitsgespräche“

    Es ist nicht leicht, den Anwalt Ziyal zu erreichen. Zwei Wochen vergehen, Akgül wartet in Donauwörth auf seine Anerkennung als Flüchtling, scheinbar. Ziyal ist am Telefon: „Es hat sich etwas Neues ergeben.“ Der Asylantrag ist laut Dublin-Bescheid unzulässig, Akgül soll nach Slowenien ausreisen. Am Freitag, dem 20. 9., erhebt Ziyal Klage und stellt einen Eilantrag gegen den Bescheid, der nun dem Verwaltungsgericht Augsburg vorliegt.

    Die Klage gegen die erste Ausweisung ist noch immer anhängig. ­Ziyal: „Das ist absurd – er hat Familie, sogar deutsche Kinder hier. Das Dublin-Verfahren stellt die Familieneinheit an erste Stelle.“ Er hält den Bescheid daher für rechtswidrig.

    Ziyal beobachtet generell, dass politisch aktive Kurden in Bayern momentan heftiger verfolgt würden als noch vor einigen Jahren. Die KurdInnen im Umfeld des Medya Volkshauses müssten sich immer wieder stundenlangen „Sicherheitsgesprächen“ unterziehen. Das bayerische Innenministerium bestätigt gegenüber den Nürnberger Nachrichten 29 Ausweisungen in drei Jahren. Die Aktivitäten, die von der Ausländerbehörde als ursächlich für die Abschiebung genannt würden, seien aber allesamt komplett legal: eine Demonstration gegen den IS, Kundgebungen für eine friedliche Lösung der Kurdenfrage, das Neujahrsfest …

    Murat Akgül ist längst kein Einzelfall mehr, aber einer, der heraussticht: nicht nur wegen der Kinder und der Wohnung, sondern auch wegen der Unerbittlichkeit im Vorgehen der deutschen Behörden, die sich die Terrorismusdefinition von Präsident Erdoğan zu eigen zu machen scheinen. Eine Antwort auf die Bitte der taz um Stellungnahme sowohl an das Bundesamt für Migration und Flüchtlinge als auch an das Bayerische Landesamt für Asyl und Rückführungen steht aus.

    Auf einer Demonstration in Nürnberg habe Akgül eine Fahne der kurdischen Miliz YPG getragen, so der Verfassungsschutz. Die gilt einerseits als bewaffneter Arm der PKK, wurde vom Westen, sprich: USA, Frankreich, andererseits im Krieg gegen den IS unterstützt. Akgül bestreitet, eine solche Fahne zu besitzen, sagt aber auch: „Zehntausende kurdische Soldaten sind im Krieg gegen den IS gefallen.“ Das Ermittlungsverfahren in dieser Sache – das einzige gegen seine Person – wurde eingestellt.

    Warum jetzt, ist die Frage, die unweigerlich am Ende dieser Geschichte steht. Warum geht der deutsche Staatsschutz so gezielt gegen Kurdinnen und Kurden vor, nachdem jahrelang Ruhe herrschte. „Ich kann da nur spekulieren“, schickt Ziyal vorweg. „Aber: Ich weiß, dass der EU-Türkei-Flüchtlingsdeal in diese Zeit fällt, und ich weiß, dass Erdoğan Deutschland vorgeworfen hat, Terroristen zu unterstützen.“ Die Bundesrepublik pflege viele enge Wirtschaftsbeziehungen zur Türkei und rege sei auch die polizeilich-justizielle Zusammenarbeit.

    Akgül kann jeden Tag eine neue gute oder schlechte Nachricht erreichen, ein neuer Bescheid, die Abweisung seiner Klage. Auch sein Anwalt wagt nur noch Hoffnungen zu formulieren.

    Egal wo, sein Leben wird nie wieder so sein wie vor seiner Abschiebung. Er hat die Balkanroute durchlebt und weiß jetzt, wie sich ein Ankerzentrum anfühlt. Er erzählt von miesen hygienischen Bedingungen, Ratten in „Herden“ und der lähmenden Langeweile, die die Bewohner in den Drogenkonsum treibe. Am lautesten klagt er nicht darüber, sondern über die deutsche Bürokratie, über die Behörden, die einander widersprechen, und Polizisten, die nicht zuhören.

    Nach dem gescheiterten Putschversuch 2016 ist Murat Akgül nicht mehr freiwillig in die Türkei gereist. Gerade jetzt, im Krieg, ist die Situation für einen politisch aktiven Kurden in der Türkei umso dramatischer. „Aber hier, denke ich, ich lebe in einem freien, demokratischen Land. Jeder hat doch das Recht zu demonstrieren. Ich habe mich immer gegen Unterdrückung eingesetzt.“ Natürlich will er hier bleiben, natürlich auch in Zukunft zu Demonstrationen gehen. Aber: „Früher hatte ich nur in der Türkei Angst. Jetzt auch hier.“

    https://taz.de/Abschiebung-in-die-Tuerkei/!5632814
    #Turquie #purge #renvois #expulsions #Allemagne #Kurdes #migrations #réfugiés #réfugiés_kurdes #réfugiés_turcs

    ping @_kg_

  • The Protection of Family Unity in Dublin Procedures

    Prof. Maiani discusses the protection of family unity in proceedings arising under the Dublin III Regulation against the backdrop of the Swiss authorities’ practice in this area. His comprehensive analysis is, however, relevant to any national administration applying the regulation and provides important guidance for European legal practitioners in this area.

    The study demonstrates that while there is considerable tension in practice between the operation of the Dublin system and the protection of family unity, if properly interpreted, the Dublin III Regulation could afford effective protection to the families of those to whom it applies. Indeed, “in a system where the protection of family life is a ‘primary consideration,’ preserving or promoting family unity should be the norm rather than the exception and this conclusion is valid a fortiori in situations characterized by particular vulnerabilities” (Maiani § 4.3.3). As demonstrated by the study, where the regulation itself falls short, relevant human rights norms can and must fill in the gaps. These conclusions rest on extensive research including of the jurisprudence of the CJEU and other relevant European and international bodies.

    Finally, the study offers an insightful and unique critique of the underdeveloped jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights in this area. Importantly, it discusses the emerging contribution – and largely untapped potential – of the UN Treaty Bodies in closing the protection gaps for families and vulnerable persons caught up in the rigours of Dublin proceedings.


    https://centre-csdm.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/MAIANI-Dublin-Study-CSDM-14.10.2019.pdf
    #Dublin #rapport #asile #migrations #réfugiés #unité_familiale #famille #familles #Francesco_Maiani #règlement_Dublin

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Dublin : l’urgence de mettre fin à un règlement kafkaïen

    Dans un rapport publié le mardi 24 septembre, élaboré en collaboration avec des demandeurs d’asile, le Secours Catholique explique le règlement de Dublin et les conséquences de son application en France. L’association demande au gouvernement de cesser de se dégager de sa #responsabilité et de prendre en compte le choix exprimé par des milliers de personnes exilées de vivre en sécurité sur son territoire.

    https://www.secours-catholique.org/actualites/dublin-lurgence-de-mettre-fin-a-un-reglement-kafkaien
    #rapport #Dublin #France #règlement_dublin #secours_catholique #asile #migrations #réfugiés #échec #dysfonctionnement #migrerrance #ADA

    Et autour de la question du #logement #hébergement :

    Pour télécharger le rapport en pdf :
    https://www.secours-catholique.org/sites/scinternet/files/publications/rapport_dublin.pdf

    ping @karine4

  • Rapport du GIEC : le niveau des mers monte plus vite que prévu...


    ... c’est peut-être le bon argument à mettre en avant vis-à-vis de celleux qui ne veulent pas comprendre l’urgence climatique... si ce n’est pas par solidarité et humanité, au moins pour éviter que l’altérité ne viennent chez nous, dans les belles montagnes suisses, à pied et sans passer par l’Italie...
    Car là, la première case #Dublin serait la Suisse...
    #caricature #dessin_de_presse #migrations #changement_climatique #lol #climat #Alpes #montagne #Suisse #Règlement_Dublin

    ping @isskein @reka

  • Paris et Rome adoptent « une position commune » sur la répartition des migrants en Europe

    Les pays de l’UE devront participer au « #mécanisme_automatique » de répartition, voulu par MM. Macron et Conte, sous peine de pénalités financières.

    Après des mois de brouille franco-italienne, le président français, Emmanuel Macron, et le chef du gouvernement italien, Giuseppe Conte, se sont déclarés d’accord, mercredi 18 septembre, pour mettre en place un « mécanisme automatique » de répartition des migrants.

    Après deux ans de dissensions sur cet épineux dossier, ils défendront désormais au sein de l’Union européenne (UE) « une position commune pour que tous les pays participent d’une façon ou d’une autre » à l’accueil « ou bien soient pénalisés financièrement », a expliqué M. Macron.
    Lors d’une conférence de presse commune, ils ont aussi réclamé une gestion « plus efficace » du renvoi dans leur pays d’origine des migrants qui n’ont pas droit à l’asile. Le dirigeant italien a souligné que l’Italie ne « laisserait pas les trafiquants décider des entrées sur le territoire », mais aussi jugé qu’il fallait « gérer ce phénomène », quand l’ancien ministre de l’intérieur Matteo Salvini, patron de la Ligue, refusait tout débarquement de migrants.
    La France solidaire

    Regrettant de son côté « l’injustice » vécue par les Italiens, Emmanuel Macron a répété que l’UE n’avait pas été suffisamment solidaire envers l’Italie. « La France est prête à évoluer sur ce point dans le cadre de la remise à plat des accords de Dublin », qui confient actuellement aux pays d’arrivée la charge du traitement des demandes d’asile, a-t-il dit. « Je ne mésestime pas ce que le peuple italien a vécu », a expliqué M. Macron, mais « la réponse au sujet migratoire n’est pas dans le repli mais dans une solution de coopération européenne efficace. »

    Plusieurs ministres de l’intérieur de l’UE (dont les ministres français, allemand et italien) doivent se réunir lundi à Malte pour discuter de ce dossier.

    Les deux dirigeants n’ont toutefois pas évoqué devant la presse certaines des demandes de l’Italie venant en complément de la future répartition automatique des migrants en Europe. Parmi ces points qui restent à éclaircir figurent la répartition non seulement des demandeurs d’asile mais aussi des migrants économiques ainsi que la rotation des ports de débarquement, qui devrait intégrer des ports français. Fermés aux ONG secourant les migrants, les ports italiens se sont entrouverts ces derniers jours en laissant notamment débarquer sur l’île de Lampedusa 82 rescapés.
    Un sommet bilatéral programmé

    La visite du président français, la première d’un dirigeant européen depuis l’arrivée au pouvoir d’une nouvelle coalition en Italie, visait d’abord à rétablir de bonnes relations entre les deux pays, après une année de tensions avec les leaders de la précédente coalition populiste au pouvoir, notamment sur la question migratoire.

    Le chef de l’Etat français n’a passé qu’une soirée dans la capitale italienne, enchaînant un court entretien avec son homologue, Sergio Mattarella, et un dîner de travail avec le premier ministre, Giuseppe Conte, récemment reconduit à la tête d’un nouvel exécutif où le Mouvement cinq étoiles (M5S) est cette fois associé au Parti démocrate (centre gauche) et non à la Ligue (extrême droite).

    Entre l’Italie et la France existe « une amitié indestructible », a assuré le président français dont le déplacement à Rome a permis de programmer, pour 2020 en Italie, un sommet bilatéral, rendez-vous annuel lancé en 1983 mais qui n’avait pas été mis à l’agenda l’an passé pour cause de tensions entre les deux pays.

    https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2019/09/19/paris-et-rome-vont-defendre-une-position-commune-sur-la-repartition-des-migr
    #répartition #asile #migrations #réfugiés #France #Italie #solidarité #UE #EU #Europe #Dublin #règlement_dublin #coopération #ports

    L’accent est mis aussi sur les #renvois... évidemment :

    ils ont aussi réclamé une gestion « plus efficace » du renvoi dans leur pays d’origine des migrants qui n’ont pas droit à l’asile.

    #machine_à_expulsion

    Et évidemment... zéro prise en compte des compétences, envies, liens, attachements que les migrants/réfugiés pourraient exprimer et qui pourraient être prises en compte dans le choix du pays de leur installation...
    #paquets_postaux

    ping @isskein @karine4

    • Société.L’Italie obtient un accord pour la “redistribution” des migrants

      Lundi 23 septembre, à Malte, les ministres de l’Intérieur de plusieurs pays européens ont trouvé un accord pour mettre en place un mécanisme de répartition des migrants qui arrivent dans les ports méditerranéens. Un succès politique pour le nouveau gouvernement italien.

      https://www.courrierinternational.com/revue-de-presse/societe-litalie-obtient-un-accord-pour-la-redistribution-des-

    • Société.L’Italie obtient un accord pour la “redistribution” des migrants

      Lundi 23 septembre, à Malte, les ministres de l’Intérieur de plusieurs pays européens ont trouvé un accord pour mettre en place un mécanisme de répartition des migrants qui arrivent dans les ports méditerranéens. Un succès politique pour le nouveau gouvernement italien.

      https://www.courrierinternational.com/revue-de-presse/societe-litalie-obtient-un-accord-pour-la-redistribution-des-

    • Déplacement à Rome après la mise en place du nouveau gouvernement italien

      Deux semaines seulement après la mise en place du nouveau gouvernement italien, le Président Emmanuel Macron est le premier Chef d’État à se rendre à Rome pour un dîner de travail avec Giuseppe Conte, Président du Conseil des ministres italien. Cette rencontre était précédée d’un entretien avec Sergio Mattarella, Président de la République italienne.
      La visite en Italie du Président de la République était importante, tant sur le fond, dans le contexte d’un agenda européen chargé après les élections européennes, que sur le plan symbolique.

      (Re)voir la déclaration conjointe à la presse du Président de la République et du Président du Conseil des ministres italien, à l’issue de leur rencontre :

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUXMEP3Kifg

      Déclaration conjointe à la presse du Président de la République et du Président du Conseil des ministres italien

      Merci beaucoup Monsieur le Président du Conseil, cher Giuseppe.

      Je n’ai que très peu de choses à rajouter et rien à retrancher de ce qui vient d’être dit à l’instant par le Président du Conseil. Je suis très heureux d’être ici parmi vous, très heureux d’être aujourd’hui à Rome quelques jours après la formation de votre nouveau gouvernement.

      Je viens de m’entretenir à l’instant avec le Président de la République, Sergio MATTARELLA, après les entretiens que nous avons eu au printemps dernier, lors des commémorations des 500 ans de la mort de Léonard DE VINCI en France, et je suis heureux de vous retrouver ici, cher Giuseppe, à Rome dans ces responsabilités.

      Ma présence aujourd’hui, c’est d’abord la volonté marquée de travailler ensemble pour la relation bilatérale et pour le projet européen, vous l’avez parfaitement rappelé. C’est aussi un message fort et clair envoyé au peuple italien d’amitié de la part du peuple français. Votre Président l’a dit il y a quelques mois, cette amitié est indestructible. Parfois nous ne sommes pas d’accord, il se peut qu’on se dispute, il se peut qu’on ne se comprenne pas mais toujours on se retrouve. Et je crois que nous en sommes là et que la volonté du peuple français est véritablement de travailler avec le peuple italien et de réussir pleinement. Vous l’avez dit Monsieur le Président à l’instant, notre souhait est de renforcer, et nous venons de l’évoquer ensemble, la coopération bilatérale et européenne et je veux revenir simplement sur quelques sujets.

      Le premier évidemment c’est le sujet des migrations. Sur ce sujet je ne mésestime pas ce que depuis 2015 le peuple italien vit, ce que l’Italie a subi, et là aussi avec beaucoup parfois de malentendus, d’incompréhensions, d’injustices qui ont été vues, perçues, et qui ont suscité de la colère. Je crois très profondément, comme vous l’avez dit, que la réponse au sujet migratoire n’est pas dans le repli, la provocation nationaliste mais la construction de solutions et de coopérations européennes réelles et efficaces.

      D’abord, nous vivons une situation, aujourd’hui, qui n’est plus celle de 2015 parce qu’il y a eu un très gros travail qui a été mené pour prévenir avec les États d’origine, pour mieux travailler avec beaucoup de partenaires africains, la situation que nous avons pu connaître alors. Mais ce que nous voulons faire ensemble, c’est poursuivre ce travail. Nos ministres de l’Intérieur se retrouveront dans quelques jours pour travailler sur la base de notre échange. Ils élargiront leur discussion à d’autres collègues européens, je pense en particulier à leur collègue maltais et à l’ensemble des pays de la rive Sud, et ils se retrouveront précisément à Malte, et ils poursuivront ainsi le travail que nous avons pu lancer à Paris au mois de juillet dernier, incluant aussi plusieurs organisations internationales.

      Notre approche doit répondre à trois exigences auxquelles je crois pouvoir dire que nous sommes l’un et l’autre attachés. La première, c’est une exigence d’humanité. On ne peut résoudre, ce conflit, en le faisant aux dépens des vies humaines ou en acceptant des personnes bloquées en mer ou des scènes de noyade que nous avons trop souvent vécues. La deuxième, c’est la solidarité, et c’est ce qui a manqué bien trop souvent en Europe. Je l’ai dit, l’Union européenne n’a pas fait suffisamment preuve de solidarité avec les pays de première arrivée, notamment l’Italie, et la France est prête à évoluer sur ce point dans le cadre de la remise à plat des accords de Dublin. Je souhaite que nous puissions ensemble travailler à une solution nouvelle, plus forte et plus solidaire. Et puis le troisième principe, c’est celui de l’efficacité. Les désaccords politiques ont conduit à une approche qui est, au fond, très inefficace, inefficace pour prévenir les arrivées, inefficace aussi pour gérer ce qu’on appelle les mouvements secondaires, parce qu’avec notre organisation actuelle, nous avons au fond trop de non-coopération entre les États membres, et du coup une situation où beaucoup de femmes et d’hommes qui ont pris tous les risques pour quitter leur pays se retrouvent sur la rive de l’Europe, errent de pays en pays, où les responsabilités sont renvoyées des uns aux autres et où nous sommes collectivement inefficaces à bien protéger ceux qui ont le droit à l’asile et à pouvoir renvoyer au plus vite ceux qui n’y ont pas droit.

      S’agissant des sauvetages en mer et des débarquements, vous l’avez évoqué, Monsieur le Président du Conseil, je suis convaincu que nous pouvons nous mettre d’accord sur un mécanisme européen automatique de répartition de l’accueil des migrants coordonné par la Commission européenne, qui permette de garantir à l’Italie ou à Malte, avant une arrivée, que ses partenaires puissent prendre en charge rapidement toutes les personnes débarquées, et avoir une organisation beaucoup plus solidaire et efficace, comme je viens de le dire, plus largement.

      Pour être justes et efficaces, il nous faut donc partout pouvoir défendre le droit d’asile, qui fait partie, bien souvent, de nos Constitutions, c’est le cas de la France, qui fait partie de nos textes les plus fondamentaux, je pense justement au texte de la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme.Et donc protéger le droit d’asile, c’est aussi nous assurer que celles et ceux qui n’y ont pas droit sont reconduits le plus rapidement possible vers leur pays d’origine. C’est notre volonté commune d’avoir, au niveau européen, une plus grande harmonisation du droit d’asile, plus de coopération et une politique plus efficace de réadmission vers les pays d’origine lorsque les cas ne relèvent pas de l’asile. Au total, je crois que nous avons aujourd’hui une fenêtre d’opportunité pour parachever, relancer sur certains points, plus fondamentalement, le travail de remise à plat sur le plan des migrations et de l’asile en Europe aujourd’hui.

      La discussion que nous avons eue ces derniers jours et que nous venons d’avoir avec le Président du Conseil, comme la discussion que nous avons eue avec plusieurs de nos partenaires, en tout cas, me rend déterminé et volontariste sur ce sujet à vos côtés. Je crois, là aussi, que nous pourrons défendre une position commune avec la nouvelle Commission européenne pour que tous les pays participent, sous une forme ou une autre, à la solidarité européenne en la matière, ou bien soient pénalisés financièrement.

      Le deuxième sujet extrêmement important que nous avons discuté et qui est au cœur non seulement de l’agenda bilatéral mais de l’agenda européen, c’est celui de la croissance, de la création d’emplois, du contexte macroéconomique. Le Président du Conseil l’a évoqué. Nous voyons tous les chiffres en Europe, et si aujourd’hui, la croissance se tient à peu près, elle est en deçà de ce que nous avons pu connaître parce qu’il y a les incertitudes géopolitiques, parce qu’il y a la conflictualité commerciale mondiale, parce qu’il y a un ralentissement en Chine qui pèse sur plusieurs économies de la zone euro, parce qu’il y a aussi sans doute une coordination de nos politiques économiques qui n’est plus adaptée.

      Je veux, en la matière, ce soir, et le faire ici a un sens tout particulier, rendre hommage au travail de Mario DRAGHI, et tout particulièrement à ses dernières décisions. Une fois encore avec beaucoup de courage et de clairvoyance, le Président de la Banque centrale européenne a pris les décisions qui convenaient, mais il a aussi fait des déclarations qui convenaient, même si certains ne veulent pas entendre. Je le dis avec force, il a, à mes yeux, raison. La politique monétaire, depuis 2012, a fait le maximum de ce qu’elle pouvait faire pour préserver la situation européenne, éviter la déflation et nous éviter le pire. Il appartient aujourd’hui aux chefs d’État et de gouvernement de prendre leurs responsabilités en ce qui concerne leur budget propre comme en ce qui concerne les décisions que nous aurons à prendre au niveau européen, pour avoir une véritable politique de relance et de demande intérieure. Certains États membres ont des marges de manœuvre, et je salue d’ailleurs les annonces récentes à cet égard des Pays-Bas, qui ont décidé d’un plan d’investissements d’avenir dans lequel, je dois dire, je me retrouve, 50 milliards d’investissements sur les années qui viennent.

      J’attends avec impatience les décisions des autres États membres, et je pense que les décisions budgétaires que nous aurons collectivement à prendre doivent tenir compte de ce contexte macroéconomique et être au rendez-vous de l’investissement, de la relance. Nous en avons besoin parce que nous avons des défis éducatifs en matière de recherche, en matière stratégique, qui sont fondamentaux. Et je crois que nous pouvons garder le sérieux qui relève de nos traités, nous pouvons garder la politique de réformes qui relève de chaque pays, mais que nous devons conduire, et nous pouvons garder la lucidité sur le contexte macroéconomique qui est le nôtre, et refuser, en quelque sorte, que notre continent rentre dans la stagnation et plutôt s’arme pour préparer son avenir.

      Nous avons évoqué, avec le Président du Conseil, plusieurs autres sujets, évidemment la politique culturelle et les coopérations culturelles entre nos pays. Nous avons des échéances à venir extrêmement importantes : l’exposition Léonard DE VINCI, les expositions RAPHAËL qui vont être l’objet d’échanges, de partenariats entre nos deux pays et qui sont au cœur, je crois, de ce regard réciproque, de cette fierté que nous portons ensemble.

      Nous avons évoqué et nous allons travailler ce soir sur les sujets climatiques. Là aussi, nous croyons l’un et l’autre dans un agenda ambitieux sur le plan européen d’investissement, d’une banque climatique qui doit être au cœur du projet de la prochaine Commission, d’un prix du CO2 qui doit aussi prendre en compte ce défi et d’une stratégie neutralité carbone à l’horizon 2050, pour laquelle nous espérons finir de convaincre les derniers partenaires réticents. C’est cette même stratégie que nous allons défendre ensemble à New York lors du sommet climat, puis au moment où nous aurons à prendre nos engagements pour le Fonds vert dans les prochaines semaines.

      Enfin, le Président du Conseil l’a évoqué, sur plusieurs sujets internationaux, là aussi, nous avons conjugués nos efforts et nos vues. Et je crois que le sujet de la crise libyenne, qui nous a beaucoup occupé ces dernières années, fait l’objet aujourd’hui d’une vraie convergence franco-italienne, vraie convergence parce que nous avons su travailler ensemble pour passer des messages à nos partenaires. Je veux saluer la rencontre que vous avez eue avec le Président AL-SARAJ cet après-midi, et avec une conviction pleinement partagée : l’issue ne peut être trouvée que par le compromis politique et les discussions. C’est ce que nous avons d’ailleurs porté ensemble lors du G7 de Biarritz en défendant l’idée d’une conférence internationale pour la Libye incluant toutes les parties prenantes et une conférence inter-libyenne permettant cette réconciliation de toutes les parties au sein de la Libye. Vous avez rappelé ce point à l’instant. Et à ce titre, l’initiative portée par nos deux ministres des Affaires étrangères dans quelques jours à New York, rassemblant l’ensemble de leurs homologues concernés, est, à mes yeux, la mise en œuvre très concrète de cette volonté et sera, comme vous l’avez dit, une étape importante.

      Voilà sur quelques-uns des sujets importants de coopération économique, culturelle, industrielle, sur les sujets de défense dont nous allons continuer à parler dans quelques instants, sur les sujets européens, la volonté qui est la nôtre d’œuvrer ensemble. Dans quelques semaines, nous nous retrouverons autour de la table du Conseil pour parler de ces sujets et de quelques autres, et je me réjouis, Monsieur le Président du Conseil, de la perspective que vous avez ouverte d’un prochain sommet entre nos deux pays au début de l’année prochaine, qui se tiendra donc en Italie, qui nous permettra de poursuivre ce travail commun et de poursuivre aussi les travaux que nous avions lancé pour un traité du Quirinal, et donc pour parachever aussi toutes les coopérations communes entre nos deux pays. Je vous remercie.

      https://www.elysee.fr/emmanuel-macron/2019/09/18/deplacement-a-rome-apres-la-mise-en-place-du-nouveau-gouvernement-italien

    • The “#temporary_solidarity_mechanism” on relocation of people rescued at sea - what does it say?

      Germany, France, Italy and Malta have drafted a declaration (http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/sep/eu-temporary-voluntary-relocation-mechanism-declaration.pdf) establishing a “predictable and efficient temporary solidarity mechanism” aimed at ensuring the “dignified disembarkation” of people rescued at sea in the Mediterranean. If those rescued are eligible for international protection they will be relocated to a participating EU member state within four weeks, while ineligible persons will be subject to “effective and quick return.”

      See: Joint declaration of intent on a controlled emergency procedure - voluntary commitments by member states for a predictable temporary solidarity mechanism (23 September 2019: http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/sep/eu-temporary-voluntary-relocation-mechanism-declaration.pdf)

      The mechanism set out in the declaration is designed to address “the need to protect human life and provide assistance to any person in distress,” whilst preventing the emergence of any new irregular maritime routes into the EU. All signatories will be obliged to call on other EU and Schengen Member States to participate. Offers - or refusals - to do so are expected (https://www.dw.com/en/five-eu-interior-ministers-want-quotas-for-shipwrecked-refugees/a-50539788) to come at the Justice and Home Affairs Council in Luxembourg on 8 October.

      The mechanism

      Signatories to the declaration will have to ensure that persons rescued on the high seas are disembarked “in a place of safety”. Member states may also “offer an alternative place of safety on a voluntary basis”. Where rescue is carried out by a state-owned vessel, disembarkation will take place in the territory of the flag State.

      Following disembarkation, participating states should provide “swift relocation, which should not take longer than 4 weeks”, a process which will be coordinated by the European Commission - as has been the case with recent voluntary relocations (https://www.thejournal.ie/ireland-migrants-ocean-viking-4779483-Aug2019) following rescue at sea.

      The declaration requires participating states to declare pledges for relocation prior to disembarkation and “as a minimum, security and medical screening of all migrants and other relevant measures.” This should be based on “standard operating procedures, building on and improving existing practices by streamlining procedures and the full use of EURODAC,” the EU database of asylum-seekers’ fingerprints, with “support of EU Agencies, e.g. on EURODAC registration and initial interviewing.”

      It is unknown to which standard operating procedures the text refers (Statewatch has previously published those applicable in the Italian ’hotspots’ (http://statewatch.org/news/2016/may/it-hotspots-standard-operating-procedures-en.pdf)), nor what precisely “streamlining procedures” may entail for individuals seeking international protection.

      EU agencies Europol, Frontex and the European Asylum Support Office (EASO) are present in the Greek hotspots, where detainees are not provided (https://flygtning.dk/system/siden-blev-ikke-fundet?aspxerrorpath=/media/5251031/rights-at-risk_drc-policy-brief2019.pdf) with either interpreters or adequate information on removal procedures; and those in Italy, where the EU’s own Fundamental Rights Agency has identified (https://fra.europa.eu/sites/default/files/fra_uploads/fra-2019-opinion-hotspots-update-03-2019_en.pdf) a number of serious problems.

      States may cease participation in the mechanism in cases of “disproportionate migratory pressure,” to be calculated using two rather vague criteria: “limitations in reception capacities or a high number of applications for international protection.” There is no further detail on how these will be determined.

      The mechanism will be valid for no less than six months and may be renewed, although it could be terminated “in the case of misuse by third parties”, a term with no further explanation. Furthermore, if within six months the number of relocated people rises “substantially”, consultations between participating member states will begin - during which “the entire mechanism might be suspended.”

      At the same time, the text calls for “advance on the reform of the Common European Asylum System,” which should provide a binding and permanent mechanism - if the member states can ever agree on such rules.

      The announcement on the signing of the declaration by the four member states was welcomed by Amnesty International. Eva Geddie, Director of the European Institutions Office, said (https://www.amnesty.eu/news/malta-asylum-seeker-disembarkation-deal-shows-a-more-humane-approach-is-poss): “We hope this mechanism will put an end to the obscene spectacle of people left stranded on boats for weeks waiting to know where, or even if, they can disembark.” The President of the European Parliament also welcomed the news (https://www.europarl.europa.eu/news/en/press-room/20190923IPR61761/sassoli-migration-agreement-respects-fundamental-principles-of-ep-pr). The devil, however, may be in the detail.

      Return as a priority

      Return “immediately after disembarkation,” where applicable, is one of the commitments set out in paragraph 4. This seems to imply that some form of asylum assessment will take place at sea, an idea that has previously been dismissed (https://www.ecre.org/italys-proposed-idea-of-hotspots-at-sea-is-unlawful-says-asgi) as illegal and unworkable.

      Return is emphasised as a priority again in paragraph 7, which recalls the operational support role of both Frontex and the International Organisation for Migration (IOM) in “the effective and quick return of those not eligible to international protection in the EU”.

      The use of “appropriate leverages, to ensure full cooperation of countries of origin,” is encouraged. Using aid and trade policy as ’incentives’ for non-EU states to readmit their own nationals has for some years now been high on the policy agenda.

      Doublethink ahoy

      The declaration also sets out certain requirements for “all vessels engaged in rescue operations”, including “not to send light signals or any other form of communication to facilitate the departure and embarkation of vessels carrying migrants from African shores” and:

      “not to obstruct the Search and Rescue operations by official Coast Guard vessels, including the Libyan Coast Guard, and to provide for specific measures to safeguard the security of migrants and operators.”

      Whether ’rescue’ by the Libyan Coast Guard is compatible with “the security of migrants” is doubtful - return to Libya means a return to inhumane and degrading conditions and there is clear evidence (https://www.glanlaw.org/single-post/2018/05/08/Legal-action-against-Italy-over-its-coordination-of-Libyan-Coast-Guard-pull) of the Libyan Coast Guard knowingly endangering the lives of migrants in distress at sea.

      EU governments are well aware of these issues. A recent document (http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/sep/eu-libya.htm) sent to national delegations by the Finnish Presidency of the Council highlighted that:

      Another major issue is that of migrants and refugees rescued or intercepted at sea being transferred to detention centres and the lack of traceability, transparency and accountability… The Libyan government has not taken steps to improve the situation in the centres. The government’s reluctance to address the problems raises the question of its own involvement."

      Beefing up the Libyan Coast Guard and aerial surveillance

      The increasing role of the Libyan Coast Guard - and the maritime agencies of other states such as Morocco - is being deliberately enhanced by the EU. Finance and training is being provided whilst national governments are placing increasing pressure on private rescue operations (http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/sep/es-mo-sar.htm).

      Any member state that signs up to the declaration will be making a commitment to continue “enhancing the capacities of coast guards of southern Mediterranean third countries,” at the same time as encouraging “full respect of human rights in those countries.”

      One key means for assisting with the activities of non-EU coast guard agencies is “EU-led aerial surveillance”:

      “in order to ensure that migrant boats are detected early with a view to fight migrant smuggling networks, human trafficking and related criminal activity and minimizing the risk of loss of life at sea.”

      The EU’s Operation Sophia now has no boats and is largely relying on aerial surveillance to carry out its work. A recent internal Operation Sophia document seen by Statewatch says that:

      “Aerial assets will be used to enhance maritime situational awareness and the information collected will only be shared with the responsible regional Maritime Rescue Coordination Centres (MRCC).”

      That is likely to be the Libyan MRCC. According to a March 2019 letter (http://www.statewatch.org/analyses/no-344-Commission-and-Italy-tie-themselves-up-in-knots-over-libya.pdf) from the European Commission to Frontex’s Executive Director, the Italian MRCC also acts as a “communication relay” for its Libyan counterpart.

      Member states are urged to contribute assets to these surveillance operations. It is noteworthy that the declaration contains no call for states to provide vessels or other equipment for search and rescue operations.

      http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/sep/eu-relocation-deal.htm

  • The Swiss Federal Administrative suspended the return of asylum seeker to Croatia according to Dublin due to police violence taking place at the Croatian-Bosnian border. The asylum- seeker experienced violent pushbacks from the Croatian border 18 times, which left him with physical and psychological consequences. This ruling confirmed all the testimonies of refugees and numerous reports from both international and local organizations, institutions and the media that warned about this continuing practice of the Croatian police.

    Reçu via la newsletter de Inicijativa Dobrodosli, le 26.08.2019

    #suspension #Dublin #asile #renvois_Dublin #Suisse #migrations #réfugiés #expulsion #Croatie #violences_policières #frontières #violent_border #violence #Bosnie #push-back #push-backs #refoulement #police

    –------

    Source:
    Švicarski sud suspendirao vraćanje izbjeglice zbog prijetnje ponavljanja pushback-a

    Švicarski Federalni upravni sud suspendirao vraćanje po Dublinu zbog policijskog nasilja nad izbjeglicama.

    Švicarski Federalni upravni sud suspendirao je vraćanje tražitelja azila prema Dublinu u Hrvatsku zbog policijskog nasilja koje se događa na hrvatsko-bosanskoj granici. Tražitelj je 18 puta iskusio nasilne pushbackove s hrvatske granice što je na njemu ostavilo fizičke i psihičke posljedice. Ovom presudom potvrđena su sva svjedočanstva izbjeglica i mnogobrojni izvještaji kako međunarodnih tako lokalnih organizacija, institucija i medija koje već godinama upozoravaju na kontinuiranu praksu hrvatske policije.

    https://www.cms.hr/hr/azil-i-integracijske-politike/svicarski-sud-suspendirao-vracanje-izbjeglice-zbog-prijetnje-ponavljanja-pushbac

    ping @i_s_ @isskein

  • Italy receives more asylum seekers from Germany than from Libya

    Italy has a migration problem, just not the one it thinks it does.

    To illustrate the challenges facing the country, Interior Minister Matteo Salvini continues to point south, at people coming by boat across the Mediterranean.

    But in reality, in part because of the government’s hard-line approach, the number of people arriving by sea has plummeted, from over 180,000 at its peak in 2016 to a little over 3,000 so far this year.

    Instead, the greatest influx of people seeking asylum is now coming from the north — from other European countries, who are sending migrants back to Italy in accordance with the EU’s so-called Dublin regulation.

    The regulation states that a migrant’s country of arrival is responsible for fingerprinting and registering them, handling their asylum claims, hosting them if they are granted some form of protection and sending them back to their countries of origin if they are not.

    Salvini is right to call for binding commitments instead of ad hoc promises, but refusing to cooperate in the search for them might not be the wisest approach.

    If migrants travel onward — to Germany, for example — the new country has the right to send them back to where they first arrived in the European Union. In 2018, Italy accepted more than 6,300 Dublin transfers — the highest figure ever. That’s almost twice as many people as arrived by boat so far this year.

    Last year, Germany alone sent 2,292 asylum seekers back to Italy, a number that can be expected to rise this year. By comparison, less than 1,200 migrants have arrived by boat from Libya in the first seven months of 2019; the total for the year is expected to be about 1,900.

    And yet, despite the growing number of asylum seekers arriving from other EU countries, Italy is receiving far fewer than it would if the Dublin rules were working as planned.

    Over the past few years, as migration roiled Italian politics, Rome accepted only a fraction of the people it was requested to take back. Since 2013, Italy has received more than 220,000 transfer requests from European countries and accepted just 25,000. In 2018 alone, France and Germany asked Italy to take back more than 50,000 people.

    Rome has fought the Dublin system for years, arguing it’s “unfair” and pushing for the rules to be revised — without much success. Successive Italian governments have called for new mechanisms that would distribute migrants across European countries more equitably, lifting the burden for registering and managing migrants off border countries. The most recent attempt, in 2015, fell apart almost as soon as it launched, when some EU countries refused to take part and others took in only a small share of what they promised.

    The truth is that, under Dublin, Italy is doing just fine.

    The system is highly dysfunctional. Once migrants move to another EU country from their original point of arrival — often Italy, Greece, Spain, or Malta — it is very hard to send them back.

    Between 2013 and 2018, just 15 percent of those found in a different country from the one responsible for processing their asylum request were in fact returned.

    Why don’t these transfers happen? Officials will usually blame the migrants themselves, who sometimes disappear before a transfer can be carried out. In reality, political reasons play a large part. The country responsible for taking charge of a migrant can put up a myriad of tiny technical obstacles to block the transfer. And if the transfer does not happen within six months’ time, responsibility shifts to the country where the migrant is currently located.

    This is why EU countries where migrants actually want to live — like Germany, Sweden, Austria and the Benelux countries — end up receiving the most migrants, processing their asylum requests and dealing with failed asylum seekers, in spite of the Dublin rules.

    A cynic might suspect that this is also why successive Italian governments, and now Salvini, have shown so little interest in actually reforming the system despite continuously requesting “solidarity” from other EU countries.

    At a meeting in Paris earlier this week, several EU interior ministers agreed to form a “coalition of the willing” to redistribute migrants that disembark in Italy and Malta.

    Italy didn’t attend, arguing that such promises would be as empty as they proved to be in 2015 when governments failed to come to an agreement on reforming Dublin. It also objected to the fact that the deal would require Italy and Malta to allow all migrants rescued in the Central Mediterranean to be disembarked and registered in their countries.

    Salvini is right to call for binding commitments instead of ad hoc promises, but refusing to cooperate in the search for them might not be the wisest approach.

    The solution a handful of EU ministers came up with on Monday is a step in the right direction — and it’s along the lines of what Italy has been calling for.

    If Rome continues to play a blocking role in the reform of the Dublin system, its neighbors might decide they’re better off focusing their efforts on making sure the regulation is properly applied.

    https://www.politico.eu/article/italy-migration-refugees-receives-more-asylum-seekers-from-germany-than-fro
    #renvois #renvois_Dublin #Dublin #règlement_dublin #asile #migrations #réfugiés #fact-checking #afflux #préjugés #Méditerranée #Libye #invasion #Allemagne #statistiques #chiffres #arrivées #mer #terre #France
    (et la #Suisse, par contre, perd la palme de championne des renvois Dublin vers l’Italie :
    https://asile.ch/2014/11/16/jean-francois-mabut-la-suisse-championne-du-refoulement)

    ping @isskein
    @karine4 : tu as vu les statistisques pour les renvois France-Italie ?

  • USA : Dublin façon frontière Mexique/USA

    Faute d’accord avec le #Guatemala (pour l’instant bloqué du fait du recours déposé par plusieurs membres de l’opposition devant la Cour constitutionnelle) et le #Mexique les désignant comme des « #pays_sûr », les USA ont adopté une nouvelle réglementation en matière d’#asile ( « #Interim_Final_Rule » - #IFR), spécifiquement pour la #frontière avec le Mexique, qui n’est pas sans faire penser au règlement de Dublin : les personnes qui n’auront pas sollicité l’asile dans un des pays traversés en cours de route avant d’arriver aux USA verront leur demande rejetée.
    Cette règle entre en vigueur aujourd’hui et permet donc le #refoulement de toute personne « who enters or attempts to enter the United States across the southern border, but who did not apply for protection from persecution or torture where it was available in at least one third country outside the alien’s country of citizenship, nationality, or last lawful habitual residence through which he or she transited en route to the United States. »
    Lien vers le règlement : https://www.dhs.gov/news/2019/07/15/dhs-and-doj-issue-third-country-asylum-rule
    Plusieurs associations dont ACLU (association US) vont déposer un recours visant à le faire invalider.
    Les USA recueillent et échangent déjà des données avec les pays d’Amérique centrale et latine qu’ils utilisent pour débouter les demandeurs d’asile, par exemple avec le Salvador : https://psmag.com/social-justice/homeland-security-uses-foreign-databases-to-monitor-gang-activity

    Reçu via email le 16.07.2019 de @pascaline

    #USA #Etats-Unis #Dublin #Dublin_façon_USA #loi #Dublin_aux_USA #législation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #El_Salvador

    • Trump Administration Implementing ’3rd Country’ Rule On Migrants Seeking Asylum

      The Trump administration is moving forward with a tough new asylum rule in its campaign to slow the flow of Central American migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. Asylum-seeking immigrants who pass through a third country en route to the U.S. must first apply for refugee status in that country rather than at the U.S. border.

      The restriction will likely face court challenges, opening a new front in the battle over U.S. immigration policies.

      The interim final rule will take effect immediately after it is published in the Federal Register on Tuesday, according to the departments of Justice and Homeland Security.

      The new policy applies specifically to the U.S.-Mexico border, saying that “an alien who enters or attempts to enter the United States across the southern border after failing to apply for protection in a third country outside the alien’s country of citizenship, nationality, or last lawful habitual residence through which the alien transited en route to the United States is ineligible for asylum.”

      “Until Congress can act, this interim rule will help reduce a major ’pull’ factor driving irregular migration to the United States,” Homeland Security acting Secretary Kevin K. McAleenan said in a statement about the new rule.

      The American Civil Liberties Union said it planned to file a lawsuit to try to stop the rule from taking effect.

      “This new rule is patently unlawful and we will sue swiftly,” Lee Gelernt, deputy director of the ACLU’s national Immigrants’ Rights Project, said in a statement.

      Gelernt accused the Trump administration of “trying to unilaterally reverse our country’s legal and moral commitment to protect those fleeing danger.”

      The strict policy shift would likely bring new pressures and official burdens on Mexico and Guatemala, countries through which migrants and refugees often pass on their way to the U.S.

      On Sunday, Guatemala’s government pulled out of a meeting between President Jimmy Morales and Trump that had been scheduled for Monday, citing ongoing legal questions over whether the country could be deemed a “safe third country” for migrants who want to reach the U.S.

      Hours after the U.S. announced the rule on Monday, Mexican Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard said it was a unilateral move that will not affect Mexican citizens.

      “Mexico does not agree with measures that limit asylum and refugee status for those who fear for their lives or safety, and who fear persecution in their country of origin,” Ebrard said.

      Ebrard said Mexico will maintain its current policies, reiterating the country’s “respect for the human rights of all people, as well as for its international commitments in matters of asylum and political refuge.”

      According to a DHS news release, the U.S. rule would set “a new bar to eligibility” for anyone seeking asylum. It also allows exceptions in three limited cases:

      “1) an alien who demonstrates that he or she applied for protection from persecution or torture in at least one of the countries through which the alien transited en route to the United States, and the alien received a final judgment denying the alien protection in such country;

      ”(2) an alien who demonstrates that he or she satisfies the definition of ’victim of a severe form of trafficking in persons’ provided in 8 C.F.R. § 214.11; or,

      “(3) an alien who has transited en route to the United States through only a country or countries that were not parties to the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees, the 1967 Protocol, or the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.”

      The DHS release describes asylum as “a discretionary benefit offered by the United States Government to those fleeing persecution on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion.”

      The departments of Justice and Homeland Security are publishing the 58-page asylum rule as the Trump administration faces criticism over conditions at migrant detention centers at the southern border, as well as its “remain in Mexico” policy that requires asylum-seekers who are waiting for a U.S. court date to do so in Mexico rather than in the U.S.

      In a statement about the new rule, U.S. Attorney General William Barr said that current U.S. asylum rules have been abused, and that the large number of people trying to enter the country has put a strain on the system.

      Barr said the number of cases referred to the Department of Justice for proceedings before an immigration judge “has risen exponentially, more than tripling between 2013 and 2018.” The attorney general added, “Only a small minority of these individuals, however, are ultimately granted asylum.”

      https://www.npr.org/2019/07/15/741769333/u-s-sets-new-asylum-rule-telling-potential-refugees-to-apply-elsewhere

    • Le journal The New Yorker : Trump est prêt à signer un accord majeur pour envoyer à l’avenir les demandeurs d’asile au Guatemala

      L’article fait état d’un projet de #plate-forme_externalisée pour examiner les demandes de personnes appréhendées aux frontières US, qui rappelle à la fois une proposition britannique (jamais concrétisée) de 2003 de créer des processing centers extra-européens et la #Pacific_solution australienne, qui consiste à déporter les demandeurs d’asile « illégaux » de toute nationalité dans des pays voisins. Et l’article évoque la « plus grande et la plus troublante des questions : comment le Guatemala pourrait-il faire face à un afflux si énorme de demandeurs ? » Peut-être en demandant conseil aux autorités libyennes et à leurs amis européens ?

      –-> Message reçu d’Alain Morice via la mailling-list Migreurop.

      Trump Is Poised to Sign a Radical Agreement to Send Future Asylum Seekers to Guatemala

      Early next week, according to a D.H.S. official, the Trump Administration is expected to announce a major immigration deal, known as a safe-third-country agreement, with Guatemala. For weeks, there have been reports that negotiations were under way between the two countries, but, until now, none of the details were official. According to a draft of the agreement obtained by The New Yorker, asylum seekers from any country who either show up at U.S. ports of entry or are apprehended while crossing between ports of entry could be sent to seek asylum in Guatemala instead. During the past year, tens of thousands of migrants, the vast majority of them from Central America, have arrived at the U.S. border seeking asylum each month. By law, the U.S. must give them a chance to bring their claims before authorities, even though there’s currently a backlog in the immigration courts of roughly a million cases. The Trump Administration has tried a number of measures to prevent asylum seekers from entering the country—from “metering” at ports of entry to forcing people to wait in Mexico—but, in every case, international obligations held that the U.S. would eventually have to hear their asylum claims. Under this new arrangement, most of these migrants will no longer have a chance to make an asylum claim in the U.S. at all. “We’re talking about something much bigger than what the term ‘safe third country’ implies,” someone with knowledge of the deal told me. “We’re talking about a kind of transfer agreement where the U.S. can send any asylum seekers, not just Central Americans, to Guatemala.”

      From the start of the Trump Presidency, Administration officials have been fixated on a safe-third-country policy with Mexico—a similar accord already exists with Canada—since it would allow the U.S. government to shift the burden of handling asylum claims farther south. The principle was that migrants wouldn’t have to apply for asylum in the U.S. because they could do so elsewhere along the way. But immigrants-rights advocates and policy experts pointed out that Mexico’s legal system could not credibly take on that responsibility. “If you’re going to pursue a safe-third-country agreement, you have to be able to say ‘safe’ with a straight face,” Doris Meissner, a former commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, told me. Until very recently, the prospect of such an agreement—not just with Mexico but with any other country in Central America—seemed far-fetched. Yet last month, under the threat of steep tariffs on Mexican goods, Trump strong-armed the Mexican government into considering it. Even so, according to a former Mexican official, the government of Andrés Manuel López Obrador is stalling. “They are trying to fight this,” the former official said. What’s so striking about the agreement with Guatemala, however, is that it goes even further than the terms the U.S. sought in its dealings with Mexico. “This is a whole new level,” the person with knowledge of the agreement told me. “In my read, it looks like even those who have never set foot in Guatemala can potentially be sent there.”

      At this point, there are still more questions than answers about what the agreement with Guatemala will mean in practice. A lot will still have to happen before it goes into force, and the terms aren’t final. The draft of the agreement doesn’t provide much clarity on how it will be implemented—another person with knowledge of the agreement said, “This reads like it was drafted by someone’s intern”—but it does offer an exemption for Guatemalan migrants, which might be why the government of Jimmy Morales, a U.S. ally, seems willing to sign on. Guatemala is currently in the midst of Presidential elections; next month, the country will hold a runoff between two candidates, and the current front-runner has been opposed to this type of deal. The Morales government, however, still has six months left in office. A U.N.-backed anti-corruption body called the CICIG, which for years was funded by the U.S. and admired throughout the region, is being dismantled by Morales, whose own family has fallen under investigation for graft and financial improprieties. Signing an immigration deal “would get the Guatemalan government in the U.S.’s good graces,” Stephen McFarland, a former U.S. Ambassador to Guatemala, told me. “The question is, what would they intend to use that status for?” Earlier this week, after Morales announced that he would be meeting with Trump in Washington on Monday, three former foreign ministers of Guatemala petitioned the country’s Constitutional Court to block him from signing the agreement. Doing so, they said, “would allow the current president of the republic to leave the future of our country mortgaged, without any responsibility.”

      The biggest, and most unsettling, question raised by the agreement is how Guatemala could possibly cope with such enormous demands. More people are leaving Guatemala now than any other country in the northern triangle of Central America. Rampant poverty, entrenched political corruption, urban crime, and the effects of climate change have made large swaths of the country virtually uninhabitable. “This is already a country in which the political and economic system can’t provide jobs for all its people,” McFarland said. “There are all these people, their own citizens, that the government and the political and economic system are not taking care of. To get thousands of citizens from other countries to come in there, and to take care of them for an indefinite period of time, would be very difficult.” Although the U.S. would provide additional aid to help the Guatemalan government address the influx of asylum seekers, it isn’t clear whether the country has the administrative capacity to take on the job. According to the person familiar with the safe-third-country agreement, “U.N.H.C.R. [the U.N.’s refugee agency] has not been involved” in the current negotiations. And, for Central Americans transferred to Guatemala under the terms of the deal, there’s an added security risk: many of the gangs Salvadorans and Hondurans are fleeing also operate in Guatemala.

      In recent months, the squalid conditions at borderland detention centers have provoked a broad political outcry in the U.S. At the same time, a worsening asylum crisis has been playing out south of the U.S. border, beyond the immediate notice of concerned Americans. There, the Trump Administration is quietly delivering on its promise to redraw American asylum practice. Since January, under a policy called the Migration Protection Protocols (M.P.P.), the U.S. government has sent more than fifteen thousand asylum seekers to Mexico, where they now must wait indefinitely as their cases inch through the backlogged American immigration courts. Cities in northern Mexico, such as Tijuana and Juarez, are filling up with desperate migrants who are exposed to violent crime, extortion, and kidnappings, all of which are on the rise.This week, as part of the M.P.P., the U.S. began sending migrants to Tamaulipas, one of Mexico’s most violent states and a stronghold for drug cartels that, for years, have brutalized migrants for money and for sport.

      Safe-third-country agreements are notoriously difficult to enforce. The logistics are complex, and the outcomes tend not to change the harried calculations of asylum seekers as they flee their homes. These agreements, according to a recent study by the Migration Policy Institute, are “unlikely to hold the key to solving the crisis unfolding at the U.S. southern border.” The Trump Administration has already cut aid to Central America, and the U.S. asylum system remains in dire need of improvement. But there’s also little question that the agreement with Guatemala will reduce the number of people who reach, and remain in, the U.S. If the President has made the asylum crisis worse, he’ll also be able to say he’s improving it—just as he can claim credit for the decline in the number of apprehensions at the U.S. border last month. That was the result of increased enforcement efforts by the Mexican government acting under U.S. pressure.

      There’s also no reason to expect that the Trump Administration will abandon its efforts to force the Mexicans into a safe-third-country agreement as well. “The Mexican government thought that the possibility of a safe-third-country agreement with Guatemala had fallen apart because of the elections there,” the former Mexican official told me. “The recent news caught top Mexican officials by surprise.” In the next month, the two countries will continue immigration talks, and, again, Mexico will face mounting pressure to accede to American demands. “The U.S. has used the agreement with Guatemala to convince the Mexicans to sign their own safe-third-country agreement,” the former official said. “Its argument is that the number of migrants Mexico will receive will be lower now.”

      https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/trump-poised-to-sign-a-radical-agreement-to-send-future-asylum-seekers-to
      #externalisation

    • After Tariff Threat, Trump Says Guatemala Has Agreed to New Asylum Rules

      President Trump on Friday again sought to block migrants from Central America from seeking asylum, announcing an agreement with Guatemala to require people who travel through that country to seek refuge from persecution there instead of in the United States.

      American officials said the deal could go into effect within weeks, though critics vowed to challenge it in court, saying that Guatemala is itself one of the most dangerous countries in the world — hardly a refuge for those fleeing gangs and government violence.

      Mr. Trump had been pushing for a way to slow the flow of migrants streaming across the Mexican border and into the United States in recent months. This week, the president had threatened to impose tariffs on Guatemala, to tax money that Guatemalan migrants in the United States send back to family members, or to ban all travel from the country if the agreement were not signed.

      Joined in the Oval Office on Friday by Interior Minister Enrique Degenhart of Guatemala, Mr. Trump said the agreement would end what he has described as a crisis at the border, which has been overwhelmed by hundreds of thousands of families fleeing violence and persecution in El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala.
      Sign up for The Interpreter

      Subscribe for original insights, commentary and discussions on the major news stories of the week, from columnists Max Fisher and Amanda Taub.

      “These are bad people,” Mr. Trump told reporters after a previously unannounced signing ceremony. He said the agreement would “end widespread abuse of the system and the crippling crisis on our border.”

      Officials did not release the English text of the agreement or provide many details about how it would be put into practice along the United States border with Mexico. Mr. Trump announced the deal in a Friday afternoon Twitter post that took Guatemalan politicians and leaders at immigration advocacy groups by surprise.

      Kevin K. McAleenan, the acting secretary of homeland security, described the document signed by the two countries as a “safe third” agreement that would make migrants ineligible for protection in the United States if they had traveled through Guatemala and did not first apply for asylum there.

      Instead of being returned home, however, the migrants would be sent back to Guatemala, which under the agreement would be designated as a safe place for them to live.

      “They would be removable, back to Guatemala, if they want to seek an asylum claim,” said Mr. McAleenan, who likened the agreement to similar arrangements in Europe.
      Editors’ Picks
      Buying a Weekend House With Friends: Is It Really a Good Idea?
      Bob Dylan and the Myth of Boomer Idealism
      True Life: I Got Conned by Anna Delvey

      The move was the latest attempt by Mr. Trump to severely limit the ability of refugees to win protection in the United States. A new regulation that would have also banned most asylum seekers was blocked by a judge in San Francisco earlier this week.

      But the Trump administration is determined to do everything it can to stop the flow of migrants at the border, which has infuriated the president. Mr. Trump has frequently told his advisers that he sees the border situation as evidence of a failure to make good on his campaign promise to seal the border from dangerous immigrants.

      More than 144,200 migrants were taken into custody at the southwest border in May, the highest monthly total in 13 years. Arrests at the border declined by 28 percent in June after efforts in Mexico and the United States to stop migrants from Central America.

      Late Friday, the Guatemalan government released the Spanish text of the deal, which is called a “cooperative agreement regarding the examination of protection claims.” In an earlier statement announcing the agreement, the government had referred to an implementation plan for Salvadorans and Hondurans. It does not apply to Guatemalans who request asylum in the United States.

      By avoiding any mention of a “safe third country” agreement, President Jimmy Morales of Guatemala appeared to be trying to sidestep a recent court ruling blocking him from signing a deal with the United States without the approval of his country’s congress.

      Mr. Morales will leave office in January. One of the candidates running to replace him, the conservative Alejandro Giammattei, said that it was “irresponsible” for Mr. Morales to have agreed to an accord without revealing its contents first.

      “It is up to the next government to attend to this negotiation,” Mr. Giammattei wrote on Twitter. His opponent, Sandra Torres, had opposed any safe-third-country agreement when it first appeared that Mr. Morales was preparing to sign one.

      Legal groups in the United States said the immediate effect of the agreement will not be clear until the administration releases more details. But based on the descriptions of the deal, they vowed to ask a judge to block it from going into effect.

      “Guatemala can neither offer a safe nor fair and full process, and nobody could plausibly argue otherwise,” said Lee Gelernt, an American Civil Liberties Union lawyer who argued against other recent efforts to limit asylum. “There’s no way they have the capacity to provide a full and fair procedure, much less a safe one.”

      American asylum laws require that virtually all migrants who arrive at the border must be allowed to seek refuge in the United States, but the law allows the government to quickly deport migrants to a country that has signed a “safe third” agreement.

      But critics said that the law clearly requires the “safe third” country to be a truly safe place where migrants will not be in danger. And it requires that the country have the ability to provide a “full and fair” system of protections that can accommodate asylum seekers who are sent there. Critics insisted that Guatemala meets neither requirement.

      They also noted that the State Department’s own country condition reports on Guatemala warn about rampant gang activity and say that murder is common in the country, which has a police force that is often ineffective at best.

      Asked whether Guatemala is a safe country for refugees, Mr. McAleenan said it was unfair to tar an entire country, noting that there are also places in the United States that are not safe.

      In 2018, the most recent year for which data is available, 116,808 migrants apprehended at the southwest border were from Guatemala, while 77,128 were from Honduras and 31,636 were from El Salvador.

      “It’s legally ludicrous and totally dangerous,” said Eleanor Acer, the senior director for refugee protection at Human Rights First. “The United States is trying to send people back to a country where their lives would be at risk. It sets a terrible example for the rest of the world.”

      Administration officials traveled to Guatemala in recent months, pushing officials there to sign the agreement, according to an administration official. But negotiations broke down in the past two weeks after Guatemala’s Constitutional Court ruled that Mr. Morales needed approval from lawmakers to make the deal with the United States.

      The ruling led Mr. Morales to cancel a planned trip in mid-July to sign the agreement, leaving Mr. Trump fuming.

      “Now we are looking at the BAN, Tariffs, Remittance Fees, or all of the above,” Mr. Trump wrote on Twitter on July 23.

      Friday’s action suggests that the president’s threats, which provoked concern among Guatemala’s business community, were effective.

      https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/26/world/americas/trump-guatemala-asylum.html

    • Este es el acuerdo migratorio firmado entre Guatemala y Estados Unidos

      Prensa Libre obtuvo en primicia el acuerdo que Guatemala firmó con Estados Unidos para detener la migración desde el Triángulo Norte de Centroamérica.

      Estados Unidos y Guatemala firmaron este 26 de julio un “acuerdo de asilo”, después de que esta semana el presidente Donald Trump amenazara a Guatemala con imponer aranceles para presionar por la negociación del convenio.

      Según Trump, el acuerdo “va a dar seguridad a los demandantes de asilo legítimos y a va detener los fraudes y abusos en el sistema de asilo”.

      El acuerdo fue firmado en el Despacho Oval de la Casa Blanca entre Kevin McAleenan, secretario interino de Seguridad Nacional de los Estados Unidos, y Enrique Degenhart, ministro de Gobernación de Guatemala.

      “Hace mucho tiempo que hemos estado trabajando con Guatemala y ahora podemos hacerlo de la manera correcta”, dijo el mandatario estadounidense.

      Este es el contenido íntegro del acuerdo:

      ACUERDO ENTRE EL GOBIERNO DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS DE AMÉRICA Y EL GOBIERNO DE LA REPÚBLICA DE GUATEMALA RELATIVO A LA COOPERACIÓN RESPECTO AL EXAMEN DE SOLICITUDES DE PROTECCIÓN

      EL GOBIERNO DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS DE AMÉRICA Y EL GOBIERNO DE LA REPÚBLICA DE GUATEMALA, en lo sucesivo de forma individual una “Parte” o colectivamente “las Partes”,

      CONSIDERANDO que Guatemala norma sus relaciones con otros países de conformidad con principios, reglas y prácticas internacionales con el propósito de contribuir al mantenimiento de la paz y la libertad, al respeto y defensa de los derechos humanos, y al fortalecimiento de los procesos democráticos e instituciones internacionales que garanticen el beneficio mutuo y equitativo entre los Estados; considerando por otro lado, que Guatemala mantendrá relaciones de amistad, solidaridad y cooperación con aquellos Estados cuyo desarrollo económico, social y cultural sea análogo al de Guatemala, como el derecho de las personas a migrar y su necesidad de protección;

      CONSIDERANDO que en la actualidad Guatemala incorpora en su legislación interna leyes migratorias dinámicas que obligan a Guatemala a reconocer el derecho de toda persona a emigrar o inmigrar, por lo que cualquier migrante puede entrar, permanecer, transitar, salir y retornar a su territorio nacional conforme a su legislación nacional; considerando, asimismo, que en situaciones no previstas por la legislación interna se debe aplicar la norma que más favorezca al migrante, siendo que por analogía se le debería dar abrigo y cuidado temporal a las personas que deseen ingresar de manera legal al territorio nacional; considerando que por estos motivos es necesario promover acuerdos de cooperación con otros Estados que respeten los mismos principios descritos en la política migratoria de Guatemala, reglamentada por la Autoridad Migratoria Nacional;

      CONSIDERANDO que Guatemala es parte de la Convención sobre el Estatuto de los Refugiados de 1951, celebrada en Ginebra el 28 de julio de 1951 (la “Convención de 1951″) y del Protocolo sobre el Estatuto de los Refugiados, firmado en Nueva York el 31 de enero de 1967 (el “Protocolo de 1967′), del cual los Estados Unidos son parte, y reafirmando la obligación de las partes de proporcionar protección a refugiados que cumplen con los requisitos y que se encuentran físicamente en sus respectivos territorios, de conformidad con sus obligaciones según esos instrumentos y sujetos . a las respectivas leyes, tratados y declaraciones de las Partes;

      RECONOCIENDO especialmente la obligación de las Partes respecto a cumplir el principio de non-refoulement de no devolución, tal como se desprende de la Convención de 1951 y del Protocolo de 1967, así como la Convención contra la Tortura y Otros Tratos o Penas Crueles, Inhumanos o Degradantes, firmada en Nueva York el 10 de diciembre de 1984 (la “Convención contra la Tortura”), con sujeción a las respectivas reservas, entendimientos y declaraciones de las Partes y reafirmando sus respectivas obligaciones de fomentar y proteger los derechos humanos y las libertades fundamentales en consonancia con sus obligaciones en el ámbito internacional;

      RECONOCIENDO y respetando las obligaciones de cada Parte de conformidad con sus leyes y políticas nacionales y acuerdos y arreglos internacionales;

      DESTACANDO que los Estados Unidos de América y Guatemala ofrecen sistemas de protección de refugiados que son coherentes con sus obligaciones conforme a la Convención de 1951 y/o el Protocolo de 1967;

      DECIDIDOS a mantener el estatuto de refugio o de protección temporal equivalente, como medida esencial en la protección de los refugiados o asilados, y al mismo tiempo deseando impedir el fraude en el proceso de solicitud de refugio o asilo, acción que socava su legitimo propósito; y decididos a fortalecer la integridad del proceso oficial para solicitar el estatuto de refugio o asilo, así como el respaldo público a dicho proceso;

      CONSCIENTES de que la distribución de la responsabilidad relacionada con solicitudes de protección debe garantizar en la práctica que se identifique a las personas que necesitan protección y que se eviten las violaciones del principio básico de no devolución; y, por lo tanto, comprometidos con salvaguardar para cada solicitante del estatuto de refugio o asilo que reúna las condiciones necesarias el acceso a un procedimiento completo e imparcial para determinar la solicitud;

      ACUERDAN lo siguiente:

      ARTÍCULO 1

      A efectos del presente Acuerdo:

      1. “Solicitud de protección” significa la solicitud de una persona de cualquier nacionalidad, al gobierno de una de las Partes para recibir protección conforme a sus respectivas obligaciones institucionales derivadas de la Convención de 1951, del Protocolo de 1967 o de la Convención contra la Tortura, y de conformidad con las leyes y políticas respectivas de las Partes que dan cumplimiento a esas obligaciones internacionales, así como para recibir cualquier otro tipo de protección temporal equivalente disponible conforme al derecho migratorio de la parte receptora.

      2. “Solicitante de protección” significa cualquier persona que presenta una solicitud de protección en el territorio de una de las partes.

      3. “Sistema para determinar la protección” significa el conjunto de políticas, leyes, prácticas administrativas y judiciales que el gobierno de cada parte emplea para decidir respecto de las solicitudes de protección.

      4. “Menor no acompañado” significa un solicitante de protección que no ha cumplido los dieciocho (18) años de edad y cuyo padre, madre o tutor legal no está presente ni disponible para proporcionar atención y custodia presencial en los Estados Unidos de América o en Guatemala, donde se encuentre el menor no acompañado.

      5. En el caso de la inmigración a Guatemala, las políticas respecto de leyes y migración abordan el derecho de las personas a entrar, permanecer, transitar y salir de su territorio de conformidad con sus leyes internas y los acuerdos y arreglos internacionales, y permanencia migratoria significa permanencia por un plazo de tiempo autorizado de acuerdo al estatuto migratorio otorgado a las personas.

      ARTÍCULO 2

      El presente Acuerdo no aplica a los solicitantes de protección que son ciudadanos o nacionales de Guatemala; o quienes, siendo apátridas, residen habitualmente en Guatemala.

      ARTÍCULO 3

      1. Para garantizar que los solicitantes de protección trasladados a Guatemala por los Estados Unidos tengan acceso a un sistema para determinar la protección, Guatemala no retornará ni expulsará a solicitantes de protección en Guatemala, a menos que el solicitante abandone la ‘solicitud o que esta sea denegada a través de una decisión administrativa.

      2. Durante el proceso de traslado, las personas sujetas al presente Acuerdo serán responsabilidad de los Estados Unidos hasta que finalice el proceso de traslado.

      ARTÍCULO 4

      1. La responsabilidad de determinar y concluir en su territorio solicitudes de protección recaerá en los Estados Unidos, cuando los Estados Unidos establezcan que esa persona:

      a. es un menor no acompañado; o

      b. llegó al territorio de los Estados Unidos:

      i. con una visa emitida de forma válida u otro documento de admisión válido, que no sea de tránsito, emitido por los Estados Unidos; o

      ii. sin que los Estados Unidos de América le exigiera obtener una visa.

      2. No obstante el párrafo 1 de este artículo, Guatemala evaluará las solicitudes de protección una por una, de acuerdo a lo establecido y autorizado por la autoridad competente en materia migratoria en sus políticas y leyes migratorias y en su territorio, de las personas que cumplen los requisitos necesarios conforme al presente Acuerdo, y que llegan a los Estados Unidos a un puerto de entrada o entre puertos de entrada, en la fecha efectiva del presente Acuerdo o posterior a ella. Guatemala evaluará la solicitud de protección, conforme al plan de implementación inicial y los procedimientos operativos estándar a los que se hace referencia en el artículo 7, apartados 1 y 5.

      3. Las Partes aplicarán el presente Acuerdo respecto a menores no acompañados de conformidad con sus respectivas leyes nacionales,

      4. Las Partes contarán con procedimientos para garantizar que los traslados de los Estados Unidos a Guatemala de las personas objeto del presente Acuerdo sean compatibles con sus obligaciones, leyes nacionales e internacionales y políticas migratorias respectivas.

      5. Los Estados Unidos tomarán la decisión final de que una persona satisface los requisitos para una excepción en virtud de los artículos 4 y 5 del presente Acuerdo.

      ARTÍCULO 5

      No obstante cualquier disposición del presente Acuerdo, cualquier parte podrá, según su propio criterio, examinar cualquier solicitud de protección que se haya presentado a esa Parte cuando decida que es de su interés público hacerlo.

      ARTÍCULO 6

      Las Partes podrán:

      1. Intercambiar información cuando sea necesario para la implementación efectiva del presente Acuerdo con sujeción a las leyes y reglamentación nacionales. Dicha información no será divulgada por el país receptor excepto de conformidad con sus leyes y reglamentación nacionales.

      2. Las Partes podrán intercambiar de forma habitual información respecto á leyes, reglamentación y prácticas relacionadas con sus respectivos sistemas para determinar la protección migratoria.

      ARTÍCULO 7

      1. Las Partes elaborarán procedimientos operativos estándar para asistir en la implementación del presente Acuerdo. Estos procedimientos incorporarán disposiciones para notificar por adelantado, a Guatemala, el traslado de cualquier persona conforme al presente Acuerdo. Los Estados Unidos colaborarán con Guatemala para identificar a las personas idóneas para ser trasladadas al territorio de Guatemala.

      2. Los procedimientos operativos incorporarán mecanismos para solucionar controversias que respeten la interpretación e implementación de los términos del presente Acuerdo. Los casos no previstos que no puedan solucionarse a través de estos mecanismos serán resueltos a través de la vía diplomática.

      3. Los Estados Unidos prevén cooperar para fortalecer las capacidades institucionales de Guatemala.

      4. Las Partes acuerdan evaluar regularmente el presente Acuerdo y su implementación, para subsanar las deficiencias encontradas. Las Partes realizarán las evaluaciones conjuntamente, siendo la primera dentro de un plazo máximo de tres (3) meses a partir de la fecha de entrada en operación del Acuerdo y las siguientes evaluaciones dentro de los mismos plazos. Las Partes podrán invitar, de común acuerdo, a otras organizaciones pertinentes con conocimientos especializados sobre el tema a participar en la evaluación inicial y/o cooperar para el cumplimiento del presente Acuerdo.

      5. Las Partes prevén completar un plan de implementación inicial, que incorporará gradualmente, y abordará, entre otros: a) los procedimientos necesarios para llevar a cabo el traslado de personas conforme al presente Acuerdo; b) la cantidad o número de personas a ser trasladadas; y c) las necesidades de capacidad institucional. Las Partes planean hacer operativo el presente Acuerdo al finalizarse un plan de implementación gradual.

      ARTÍCULO 8

      1. El presente Acuerdo entrará en vigor por medio de un canje de notas entre las partes en el que se indique que cada parte ha cumplido con los procedimientos jurídicos nacionales necesarios para que el Acuerdo entre en vigor. El presente Acuerdo tendrá una vigencia de dos (2) años y podrá renovarse antes de su vencimiento a través de un canje de notas.

      2. Cualquier Parte podrá dar por terminado el presente Acuerdo por medio de una notificación por escrito a la otra Parte con tres (3) meses de antelación.

      3. Cualquier parte podrá, inmediatamente después de notificar a la otra parte por escrito, suspender por un periodo inicial de hasta tres (3) meses la implementación del presente Acuerdo. Esta suspensión podrá extenderse por periodos adicionales de hasta tres (3) meses por medio de una notificación por escrito a la otra parte. Cualquier parte podrá, con el consentimiento por escrito de la otra, suspender cualquier parte del presente Acuerdo.

      4. Las Partes podrán, por escrito y de mutuo acuerdo, realizar cualquier modificación o adición al presente Acuerdo. Estas entrarán en vigor de conformidad con los procedimientos jurídicos pertinentes de cada Parte y la modificación o adición constituirá parte integral del presente Acuerdo.

      5. Ninguna disposición del presente Acuerdo deberá interpretarse de manera que obligue a las Partes a erogar o comprometer fondos.

      EN FE DE LO CUAL, los abajo firmantes, debidamente autorizados por sus respectivos gobiernos, firman el presente Acuerdo.

      HECHO el 26 de julio de 2019, por duplicado en los idiomas inglés y español, siendo ambos textos auténticos.

      POR EL GOBIERNO DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS DE AMÉRICA: Kevin K. McAleenan, Secretario Interino de Seguridad Nacional.

      POR EL GOBIERNO DE LA REPÚBLICA DE GUATEMALA: Enrique A. Degenhart Asturias, Ministro de Gobernación.

      https://www.prensalibre.com/guatemala/migrantes/este-es-el-acuerdo-migratorio-firmado-entre-guatemala-y-estados-unidos

    • Washington signe un accord sur le droit d’asile avec le Guatemala

      Sous la pression du président américain, le Guatemala devient un « pays tiers sûr », où les migrants de passage vers les Etats-Unis doivent déposer leurs demandes d’asile.

      Sous la pression de Donald Trump qui menaçait de lui infliger des sanctions commerciales, le Guatemala a accepté vendredi 26 juillet de devenir un « pays tiers sûr » pour contribuer à réduire le nombre de demandes d’asile aux Etats-Unis. L’accord, qui a été signé en grande pompe dans le bureau ovale de la Maison blanche, en préfigure d’autres, a assuré le président américain, qui a notamment cité le Mexique.

      Faute d’avoir obtenu du Congrès le financement du mur qu’il souhaitait construire le long de la frontière avec le Mexique, Donald Trump a changé de stratégie en faisant pression sur les pays d’Amérique centrale pour qu’ils l’aident à réduire le flux de migrants arrivant aux Etats-Unis, qui a atteint un niveau record sous sa présidence.

      Une personne qui traverse un « pays tiers sûr » doit déposer sa demande d’asile dans ce pays et non dans son pays de destination. Sans employer le terme « pays tiers sûr », le gouvernement guatémaltèque a précisé dans un communiqué que l’accord conclu avec les Etats-Unis s’appliquerait aux réfugiés originaires du Honduras et du Salvador.

      Contreparties pour les travailleurs agricoles

      S’adressant à la presse devant la Maison blanche, le président américain a indiqué que les ouvriers agricoles guatémaltèques auraient en contrepartie un accès privilégié aux fermes aux Etats-Unis.

      Le président guatémaltèque Jimmy Morales devait signer l’accord de « pays tiers sûr » la semaine dernière mais il avait été contraint de reculer après que la Cour constitutionnelle avait jugé qu’il ne pouvait pas prendre un tel engagement sans l’accord du Parlement, ce qui avait provoqué la fureur de Donald Trump.

      Invoquant la nécessité d’éviter des « répercussions sociales et économiques », le gouvernement guatémaltèque a indiqué qu’un accord serait signé dans les prochains jours avec Washington pour faciliter l’octroi de visas de travail agricole temporaires aux ressortissants guatémaltèques. Il a dit espérer que cette mesure serait ultérieurement étendue aux secteurs de la construction et des services.

      Les Etats-Unis sont confrontés à une flambée du nombre de migrants qui cherchent à franchir sa frontière sud, celle qui les séparent du Mexique. En juin, les services de police aux frontières ont arrêté 104 000 personnes qui cherchaient à entrer illégalement aux Etats-Unis. Ils avaient été 144 000 le mois précédent.

      https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2019/07/27/washington-signe-un-accord-sur-le-droit-d-asile-avec-le-guatemala_5493979_32
      #agriculture #ouvriers_agricoles #travail #fermes

    • Migrants, pressions sur le Mexique

      Sous la pression des États-Unis, le Mexique fait la chasse aux migrants sur son territoire, et les empêche d’avancer vers le nord. Au mois de juin, les autorités ont arrêté près de 24 000 personnes sans papiers.

      Debout sur son radeau, Edwin maugrée en regardant du coin de l’œil la vingtaine de militaires de la Garde Nationale mexicaine postés sous les arbres, côté mexicain. « C’est à cause d’eux si les affaires vont mal », bougonne le jeune Guatémaltèque en poussant son radeau à l’aide d’une perche. « Depuis qu’ils sont là, plus personne ne peut passer au Mexique ».

      Les eaux du fleuve Suchiate, qui sépare le Mexique du Guatemala, sont étrangement calmes depuis le mois de juin. Fini le ballet incessant des petits radeaux de fortune, où s’entassaient, pêle-mêle, villageois, commerçants et migrants qui se rendaient au Mexique. « Mais ça ne change rien, les migrants traversent plus loin », sourit le jeune homme.

      La stratégie du président américain Donald Trump pour contraindre son voisin du sud à réduire les flux migratoires en direction des États-Unis a mis le gouvernement mexicain aux abois : pour éviter une nouvelle fois la menace de l’instauration de frais de douanes de 5 % sur les importations mexicaines, le gouvernement d’Andrés Manuel López Obrador a déployé dans l’urgence 6 500 éléments de la Garde Nationale à la frontière sud du Mexique.
      Des pots-de-vin lors des contrôles

      Sur les routes, les opérations de contrôle sont partout. « Nous avons été arrêtés à deux reprises par l’armée », explique Natalia, entourée de ses garçons de 11 ans, 8 ans et 3 ans. Cette Guatémaltèque s’est enfuie de son village avec son mari et ses enfants, il y a dix jours. Son époux, témoin protégé dans le procès d’un groupe criminel, a été menacé de mort. « Au premier contrôle, nous leur avons donné 1 500 pesos (NDLR, 70 €), au deuxième 2 500 pesos (118 €), pour qu’ils nous laissent partir », explique la mère de famille, assise sous le préau de l’auberge du Père César Augusto Cañaveral, l’une des deux auberges qui accueillent les migrants à Tapachula.

      Conçu pour 120 personnes, l’établissement héberge actuellement plus de 300 personnes, dont une centaine d’enfants en bas âge. « On est face à une politique anti-migratoire de plus en plus violente et militarisée, se désole le Père Cañaveral. C’est devenu une véritable chasse à l’homme dehors, alors je leur dis de sortir le moins possible pour éviter les arrestations ». Celles-ci ont en effet explosé depuis l’ultimatum du président des États-Unis : du 1er au 24 juin, l’Institut National de Migration (INM) a arrêté près de 24 000 personnes en situation irrégulière, soit 1 000 personnes détenues par jour en moyenne, et en a expulsé plus de 17 000, essentiellement des Centraméricains. Du jamais vu.
      Des conditions de détention « indignes »

      À Tapachula, les migrants arrêtés sont entassés dans le centre de rétention Siglo XXI. À quelques mètres de l’entrée de cette forteresse de béton, Yannick a le regard vide et fatigué. « Il y avait tellement de monde là-dedans que ma fille y est tombée malade », raconte cet Angolais âgé de 33 ans, sa fille de 3 ans somnolant dans ses bras. « Ils viennent de nous relâcher car ils ne vont pas nous renvoyer en Afrique, ajoute-il. Heureusement, car à l’intérieur on dort par terre ». « Les conditions dans ce centre sont indignes », dénonce Claudia León Aug, coordinatrice du Service jésuite des réfugiés pour l’Amérique latine, qui a visité à plusieurs reprises le centre de rétention Siglo XXI. « La nourriture est souvent avariée, les enfants tombent malades, les bébés n’ont droit qu’à une seule couche par jour, et on a même recensé des cas de tortures et d’agressions ».

      Tapachula est devenu un cul-de-sac pour des milliers de migrants. Ils errent dans les rues de la ville, d’hôtel en d’hôtel, ou louent chez l’habitant, faute de pouvoir avancer vers le nord. Les compagnies de bus, sommées de participer à l’effort national, demandent systématiquement une pièce d’identité en règle. « On ne m’a pas laissé monter dans le bus en direction de Tijuana », se désole Elvis, un Camerounais de 34 ans qui rêve de se rendre au Canada.

      Il sort de sa poche un papier tamponné par les autorités mexicaines, le fameux laissez-passer que délivrait l’Institut National de Migration aux migrants extra-continentaux, pour qu’ils traversent le Mexique en 20 jours afin de gagner la frontière avec les États-Unis. « Regardez, ils ont modifié le texte, maintenant il est écrit que je ne peux pas sortir de Tapachula », accuse le jeune homme, dépité, avant de se rasseoir sur le banc de la petite cour de son hôtel décati dans la périphérie de Tapachula. « La situation est chaotique, les gens sont bloqués ici et les autorités ne leur donnent aucune information, pour les décourager encore un peu plus », dénonce Salvador Lacruz, coordinateur au Centre des Droits humains Centro Fray Matías de Córdova.
      Explosion du nombre des demandes d’asile au Mexique

      Face à la menace des arrestations et des expulsions, de plus en plus de migrants choisissent de demander l’asile au Mexique. Dans le centre-ville de Tapachula, la Commission mexicaine d’aide aux réfugiés (COMAR), est prise d’assaut dès 4 heures du matin par les demandeurs d’asile. « On m’a dit de venir avec tous les documents qui prouvent que je suis en danger de mort dans mon pays », explique Javier, un Hondurien de 34 ans qui a fait la queue une partie de la nuit pour ne pas rater son rendez-vous.

      Son fils de 9 ans est assis sur ses genoux. « J’ai le certificat de décès de mon père et celui de mon frère. Ils ont été assassinés pour avoir refusé de donner de l’argent aux maras », explique-t-il, une pochette en plastique dans les mains. « Le prochain sur la liste, c’est moi, c’est pour ça que je suis parti pour les États-Unis, mais je vois que c’est devenu très difficile, alors je me pose ici, ensuite, on verra ».

      Les demandes d’asile au Mexique ont littéralement explosé : 31 000 pour les six premiers mois de 2019, c’est trois fois plus qu’en 2018 à la même période, et juin a été particulièrement élevé, avec 70 % de demandes en plus par rapport à janvier. La tendance devrait se poursuivre du fait de la décision prise le 15 juillet dernier par le président américain, que toute personne « entrant par la frontière sud des États-Unis » et souhaitant demander l’asile aux États-Unis le fasse, au préalable, dans un autre pays, transformant ainsi le Mexique, de facto, en « pays tiers sûr ».

      « Si les migrants savent que la seule possibilité de demander l’asile aux États-Unis, c’est de l’avoir obtenu au Mexique, ils le feront », observe Salvador Lacruz. Mais si certains s’accrochent à Tapachula, d’autres abandonnent. Jesús Roque, un Hondurien de 21 ans, « vient de signer » comme disent les migrants centraméricains en référence au programme de retour volontaire mis en place par le gouvernement mexicain. « C’est impossible d’aller plus au nord, je rentre chez moi », lâche-t-il.

      Comme lui, plus de 35 000 personnes sont rentrées dans leur pays, essentiellement des Honduriens et des Salvadoriens. À quelques mètres, deux femmes pressent le pas, agacées par la foule qui se presse devant les bureaux de la COMAR. « Qu’ils partent d’ici, vite ! », grogne l’une. Le mur tant désiré par Donald Trump s’est finalement érigé au Mexique en quelques semaines. Dans les esprits aussi.

      https://www.la-croix.com/Monde/Ameriques/Le-Mexique-verrouille-frontiere-sud-2019-08-01-1201038809

    • US Move Puts More Asylum Seekers at Risk. Expanded ‘#Remain_in_Mexico’ Program Undermines Due Process

      The Trump administration has drastically expanded its “Remain in Mexico” program while undercutting the rights of asylum seekers at the United States southern border, Human Rights Watch said today. Under the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP) – known as the “Remain in Mexico” program – asylum seekers in the US are returned to cities in Mexico where there is a shortage of shelter and high crime rates while awaiting asylum hearings in US immigration court.

      Human Rights Watch found that asylum seekers face new or increased barriers to obtaining and communicating with legal counsel; increased closure of MPP court hearings to the public; and threats of kidnapping, extortion, and other violence while in Mexico.

      “The inherently inhumane ‘Remain in Mexico’ program is getting more abusive by the day,” said Ariana Sawyer, assistant US Program researcher at Human Rights Watch. “The program’s rapid growth in recent months has put even more people and families in danger in Mexico while they await an increasingly unfair legal process in the US.”

      The United States will begin sending all Central American asylum-seeking families to Mexico beginning the week of September 29, 2019 as part of the most recent expansion of the “Remain in Mexico” program, the Department of Homeland Security acting secretary, Kevin McAleenan, announced on September 23.

      Human Rights Watch concluded in a July 2019 report that the MPP program has had serious rights consequences for asylum seekers, including high – if not insurmountable – barriers to due process on their asylum claims in the United States and threats and physical violence in Mexico. Human Rights Watch recently spoke to seven asylum seekers, as well as 26 attorneys, migrant shelter operators, Mexican government officials, immigration court workers, journalists, and advocates. Human Rights Watch also observed court hearings for 71 asylum seekers in August and analyzed court filings, declarations, photographs, and media reports.

      “The [MPP] rules, which are never published, are constantly changing without advance notice,” said John Moore, an asylum attorney. “And so far, every change has had the effect of further restricting the already limited access we attorneys have with our clients.”

      Beyond the expanded program, which began in January, the US State Department has also begun funding a “voluntary return” program carried out by the United Nations-affiliated International Organization for Migration (IOM). The organization facilitates the transportation of asylum seekers forced to wait in Mexico back to their country of origin but does not notify US immigration judges. This most likely results in negative judgments against asylum seekers for not appearing in court, possibly resulting in a ban of up to 10 years on entering the US again, when they could have withdrawn their cases without penalty.

      Since July, the number of people being placed in the MPP program has almost tripled, from 15,079 as of June 24, to 40,033 as of September 7, according to the Mexican National Institute of Migration. The Trump administration has increased the number of asylum seekers it places in the program at ports of entry near San Diego and Calexico, California and El Paso, Texas, where the program had already been in place. The administration has also expanded the program to Laredo and Brownsville, Texas, even as the overall number of border apprehensions has declined.

      As of early August, more than 26,000 additional asylum seekers were waiting in Mexican border cities on unofficial lists to be processed by US Customs and Border Protection as part the US practice of “metering,” or of limiting the number of people who can apply for asylum each day by turning them back from ports of entry in violation of international law.

      In total, more than 66,000 asylum seekers are now in Mexico, forced to wait months or years for their cases to be decided in the US. Some have given up waiting and have attempted to cross illicitly in more remote and dangerous parts of the border, at times with deadly results.

      As problematic as the MPP program is, seeking asylum will likely soon become even more limited. On September 11, the Supreme Court temporarily allowed the Trump administration to carry out an asylum ban against anyone entering the country by land after July 16 who transited through a third country without applying for asylum there. This could affect at least 46,000 asylum seekers, placed in the MPP program or on a metering list after mid-July, according to calculations based on data from the Mexican National Institute of Migration. Asylum seekers may still be eligible for other forms of protection, but they carry much higher eligibility standards and do not provide the same level of relief.

      Human Rights Watch contacted the Department of Homeland Security and the US Justice Department’s Executive Office for Immigration Review with its findings and questions regarding the policy changes and developments but have not to date received a response. The US government should immediately cease returning asylum seekers to Mexico and instead ensure them meaningful access to full and fair asylum proceedings in US immigration courts, Human Rights Watch said. Congress should urgently act to cease funding the MPP program. The US should manage asylum-seeker arrivals through a genuine humanitarian response that includes fair determinations of an asylum seeker’s eligibility to remain in the US. The US should simultaneously pursue longer-term efforts to address the root causes of forced displacement in Central America.

      “The Trump administration seems intent on making the bad situation for asylum seekers even worse by further depriving them of due process rights,” Sawyer said. “The US Congress should step in and put an end to these mean-spirited attempts to undermine and destroy the US asylum system.”

      New Concerns over the MPP Program

      Increased Barriers to Legal Representation

      Everyone in the MPP has the right to an attorney at their own cost, but it has been nearly impossible for asylum seekers forced to remain in Mexico to get legal representation. Only about 1.3 percent of participants have legal representation, according to the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse at Syracuse University, a research center that examined US immigration court records through June 2019. In recent months, the US government has raised new barriers to obtaining representation and accessing counsel.

      When the Department of Homeland Security created the program, it issued guidance that:

      in order to facilitate access to counsel for aliens subject to return to Mexico under the MPP who will be transported to their immigration court hearings, [agents] will depart from the [port of entry] with the alien at a time sufficient to ensure arrival at the immigration court not later than one hour before his or her scheduled hearing time in order to afford the alien the opportunity to meet in-person with his or her legal representative.

      However, according to several attorneys Human Rights Watch interviewed in El Paso, Texas, and as Human Rights Watch observed on August 12 to 15 in El Paso Immigration Court, the Department of Homeland Security and the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR), which manages the immigration court, have effectively barred attorneys from meeting with clients for the full hour before their client’s hearing begins. Rather than having free access to their clients, attorneys are now required to wait in the building lobby on a different level than the immigration court until the court administrator notifies security guards that attorneys may enter.

      As Human Rights Watch has previously noted, one hour is insufficient for adequate attorney consultation and preparation. Still, several attorneys said that this time in court was crucial. Immigration court is often the only place where asylum seekers forced to wait in Mexico can meet with attorneys since lawyers capable of representing them typically work in the US. Attorneys cannot easily travel to Mexico because of security and logistical issues. For MPP participants without attorneys, there are now also new barriers to getting basic information and assistance about the asylum application process.

      Human Rights Watch observed in May a coordinated effort by local nongovernmental organizations and attorneys in El Paso to perform know-your-rights presentations for asylum seekers without an attorney and to serve as “Friend of the Court,” at the judge’s discretion. The Executive Office for Immigration Review has recognized in the context of unaccompanied minors that a Friend of the Court “has a useful role to play in assisting the court and enhancing a respondent’s comprehension of proceedings.”

      The agency’s memos also say that, “Immigration Judges and court administrators remain encouraged to facilitate pro bono representation” because pro bono attorneys provide “respondents with welcome legal assistance and the judge with efficiencies that can only be realized when the respondent is represented.”

      To that end, immigration courts are encouraged to support “legal orientations and group rights presentations” by nonprofit organizations and attorneys.

      One of the attorneys involved in coordinating the various outreach programs at the El Paso Immigration Court said, however, that on June 24 the agency began barring all contact between third parties and asylum seekers without legal representation in both the courtroom and the lobby outside. This effectively ended all know-your-rights presentations and pro bono case screenings, though no new memo was issued. Armed guards now prevent attorneys in the US from interacting with MPP participants unless the attorneys have already filed official notices that they are representing specific participants.

      On July 8, the agency also began barring attorneys from serving as “Friend of the Court,” several attorneys told Human Rights Watch. No new memo has been issued on “Friend of the Court” either.

      In a July 16 email to an attorney obtained by Human Rights Watch, an agency spokesman, Rob Barnes, said that the agency shut down “Friend of the Court” and know-your-rights presentations to protect asylum seekers from misinformation after it “became aware that persons from organizations not officially recognized by EOIR...were entering EOIR space in El Paso.

      However, most of the attorneys and organizations now barred from performing know-your-rights presentations or serving as “Friend of the Court” in El Paso are listed on a form given to asylum seekers by the court of legal service providers, according to a copy of the form given to Human Rights Watch and attorneys and organizations coordinating those services.

      Closure of Immigration Court Hearings to the Public

      When Human Rights Watch observed court hearings in El Paso on May 8 to 10, the number of asylum seekers who had been placed in the MPP program and scheduled to appear in court was between 20 and 24 each day, with one judge hearing all of these cases in a single mass hearing. At the time, those numbers were considered high, and there was chaos and confusion as judges navigated a system that was never designed to provide hearings for people being kept outside the US.

      When Human Rights Watch returned to observe hearings just over three months later, four judges were hearing a total of about 250 cases a day, an average of over 60 cases for each judge. Asylum seekers in the program, who would previously have been allowed into the US to pursue their claims at immigration courts dispersed around the country, have been primarily funneled through courts in just two border cities, causing tremendous pressures on these courts and errors in the system. Some asylum seekers who appeared in court found their cases were not in the system or received conflicting instructions about where or when to appear.

      One US immigration official said the MPP program had “broken the courts,” Reuters reported.

      The Executive Office for Immigration Review has stated that immigration court hearings are generally supposed to be open to the public. The regulations indicate that immigration judges may make exceptions and limit or close hearings if physical facilities are inadequate; if there is a need to protect witnesses, parties, or the public interest; if an abused spouse or abused child is to appear; or if information under seal is to be presented.

      In recent weeks, however, journalists, attorneys, and other public observers have been barred from these courtrooms in El Paso by court administrators, security guards, and in at least one case, by a Department of Homeland Security attorney, who said that a courtroom was too full to allow a Human Rights Watch researcher entry.

      Would-be observers are now frequently told by the court administrator or security guards that there is “no room,” and that dockets are all “too full.”

      El Paso Immigration Court Administrator Rodney Buckmire told Human Rights Watch that hundreds of people receive hearings each day because asylum seekers “deserve their day in court,” but the chaos and errors in mass hearings, the lack of access to attorneys and legal advice, and the lack of transparency make clear that the MPP program is severely undermining due process.

      During the week of September 9, the Trump administration began conducting hearings for asylum seekers returned to Mexico in makeshift tent courts in Laredo and Brownsville, where judges are expected to preside via videoconference. At a September 11 news conference, DHS would not commit to allowing observers for those hearings, citing “heightened security measures” since the courts are located near the border. Both attorneys and journalists have since been denied entry to these port courts.

      Asylum Seekers Describe Risk of Kidnapping, Other Crimes

      As the MPP has expanded, increasing numbers of asylum seekers have been placed at risk of kidnapping and other crimes in Mexico.

      Two of the northern Mexican states to which asylum seekers were initially being returned under the program, Baja California and Chihuahua, are among those with the most homicides and other crimes in the country. Recent media reports have documented ongoing harm to asylum seekers there, including rape, kidnapping, sexual exploitation, assault, and other violent crimes.

      The program has also been expanded to Nuevo Laredo and Matamoros, both in the Mexican state of Tamaulipas, which is on the US State Department’s “do not travel” list. The media and aid workers have also reported that migrants there have experienced physical violence, sexual assault, kidnapping, and other abuses. There have been multiple reports in 2019 alone of migrants being kidnapped as they attempt to reach the border by bus.

      Jennifer Harbury, a human rights attorney and activist doing volunteer work with asylum-seekers on both sides of the border, collected sworn declarations that they had been victims of abuse from three asylum seekers who had been placed in the MPP program and bused by Mexican immigration authorities to Monterrey, Mexico, two and a half hours from the border. Human Rights Watch examined these declarations, in which asylum seekers reported robbery, extortion, and kidnapping, including by Mexican police.

      Expansion to Mexican Cities with Even Fewer Protections

      Harbury, who recently interviewed hundreds of migrants in Mexico, described asylum seekers sent to Nuevo Laredo as “fish in a barrel” because of their vulnerability to criminal organizations. She said that many of the asylum seekers she interviewed said they had been kidnapped or subjected to an armed assault at least once since they reached the border.

      Because Mexican officials are in many cases reportedly themselves involved in crimes against migrants, and because nearly 98 percent of crimes in Mexico go unsolved, crimes committed against migrants routinely go unpunished.

      In Matamoros, asylum seekers have no meaningful shelter access, said attorneys with Lawyers for Good Government (L4GG) who were last there from August 22 to 26. Instead, more than 500 asylum seekers were placed in an encampment in a plaza near the port of entry to the US, where they were sleeping out in the open, despite temperatures of over 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Henriette Vinet-Martin, a lawyer with the group, said she saw a “nursing mother sleeping on cardboard with her baby” and that attorneys also spoke to a woman in the MPP program there who said she had recently miscarried in a US hospital while in Customs and Border Protection custody. The attorneys said some asylum seekers had tents, but many did not.

      Vinet-Martin and Claire Noone, another lawyer there as part of the L4GG project, said they found children with disabilities who had been placed in the MPP program, including two children with Down Syndrome, one of them eight months old.

      Human Rights Watch also found that Customs and Border Protection continues to return asylum seekers with disabilities or other chronic health conditions to Mexico, despite the Department of Homeland Security’s initial guidance that no one with “known physical/mental health issues” would be placed in the program. In Ciudad Juárez, Human Rights Watch documented six such cases, four of them children. In one case, a 14-year-old boy had been placed in the program along with his mother and little brother, who both have intellectual disabilities, although the boy said they have family in the US. He appeared to be confused and distraught by his situation.

      The Mexican government has taken some steps to protect migrants in Ciudad Juárez, including opening a large government-operated shelter. The shelter, which Human Rights Watch visited on August 22, has a capacity of 3,000 migrants and is well-stocked with food, blankets, sleeping pads, personal hygiene kits, and more. At the time of the visit, the shelter held 555 migrants, including 230 children, primarily asylum seekers in the MPP program.

      One Mexican government official said the government will soon open two more shelters – one in Tijuana with a capacity of 3,000 and another in Mexicali with a capacity of 1,500.

      Problems Affecting the ‘Assisted Voluntary Return’ Program

      In October 2018, the International Organization for Migration began operating a $1.65 million US State Department-funded “Assisted Voluntary Return” program to assist migrants who have decided or felt compelled to return home. The return program originally targeted Central Americans traveling in large groups through the interior of Mexico. However, in July, the program began setting up offices in Ciudad Juárez, Tijuana, and Mexicali focusing on asylum seekers forced to wait in those cities after being placed in the MPP program. Alex Rigol Ploettner, who heads the International Organization for Migration office in Ciudad Juárez, said that the organization also provides material support such as bunk beds and personal hygiene kits to shelters, which the organization asks to refer interested asylum seekers to the Assisted Voluntary Return program. Four shelter operators in Ciudad Juárez confirmed these activities.

      As of late August, Rigol Ploettner said approximately 500 asylum seekers in the MPP program had been referred to Assisted Voluntary Return. Of those 500, he said, about 95 percent were found to be eligible for the program.

      He said the organization warns asylum seekers that returning to their home country may cause them to receive deportation orders from the US in absentia, meaning they will most likely face a ban on entering the US of up to 10 years.

      The organization does not inform US immigration courts that they have returned asylum seekers, nor are asylum seekers assisted in withdrawing their petition for asylum, which would avoid future penalties in the US.

      “For now, as the IOM, we don’t have a direct mechanism for withdrawal,” Rigol Ploettner said. Human Rights Watch is deeply concerned about the failure to notify the asylum courts when people who are on US immigration court dockets return home and the negative legal consequences for asylum seekers. These concerns are heightened by the environment in which the Assisted Voluntary Return Program is operating. Asylum seekers in the MPP are in such a vulnerable situation that it cannot be assumed that decisions to return home are based on informed consent.

      https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/09/25/us-move-puts-more-asylum-seekers-risk

      via @pascaline

    • Sweeping Language in Asylum Agreement Foists U.S. Responsibilities onto El Salvador

      Amid a tightening embrace of Trump administration policies, last week El Salvador agreed to begin taking asylum-seekers sent back from the United States. The agreement was announced on Friday but details were not made public at the time. The text of the agreement — which The Intercept requested and obtained from the Department of Homeland Security — purports to uphold international and domestic obligations “to provide protection for eligible refugees,” but immigration experts see the move as the very abandonment of the principle of asylum. Aaron Reichlin-Melnick, policy analyst at American Immigration Council, called the agreement a “deeply cynical” move.

      The agreement, which closely resembles one that the U.S. signed with Guatemala in July, implies that any asylum-seeker who is not from El Salvador could be sent back to that country and forced to seek asylum there. Although officials have said that the agreements would apply to people who passed through El Salvador or Guatemala en route, the text of the agreements does not explicitly make that clear.

      “This agreement is so potentially sweeping that it could be used to send an asylum-seeker who never transited El Salvador to El Salvador,” said Eleanor Acer, senior director of refugee protection at the nonprofit organization Human Rights First.

      DHS did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

      The Guatemalan deal has yet to take effect, as Guatemala’s Congress claims to need to ratify it first. DHS officials are currently seeking a similar arrangement with Honduras and have been pressuring Mexico — under threats of tariffs — to crack down on U.S.-bound migration.

      The agreement with El Salvador comes after the Supreme Court recently upheld the Trump administration’s most recent asylum ban, which requires anyone who has transited through another country before reaching the border to seek asylum there first, and be denied in that country, in order to be eligible for asylum in the U.S. Meanwhile, since January, more than 42,000 asylum-seekers who filed their claims in the U.S. before the ban took effect have been pushed back into Mexico and forced to wait there — where they have been subjected to kidnapping, rape, and extortion, among other hazards — as the courts slowly weigh their eligibility.

      Reichlin-Melnick called the U.S.-El Salvador deal “yet another sustained attack at our system of asylum protections.” It begins by invoking the international Refugee Convention and the principle of non-refoulement, which is the crux of asylum law — the guarantee not to return asylum-seekers to a country where they would be subjected to persecution or death. Karen Musalo, law professor at U.C. Hastings Center for Gender and Refugee Studies, called that invocation “Orwellian.”

      “The idea that El Salvador is a safe country for asylum-seekers when it is one of the major countries sending asylum-seekers to the U.S., a country with one of the highest homicide and femicide rates in the world, a place in which gangs have control over large swathes of the country, and the violence is causing people to flee in record numbers … is another absurdity that is beyond the pale,” Musalo said.

      “El Salvador is not a country that is known for having any kind of protection for its own citizens’ human rights,” Musalo added. “If they can’t protect their own citizens, it’s absolutely absurd to think that they can protect people that are not their citizens.”

      “They’ve looked at all of the facts,” Reichlin-Melnick said. “And they’ve decided to create their own reality.”

      Last week, the Salvadoran newspaper El Faro reported that the country’s agency that reviews asylum claims only has a single officer. Meanwhile, though homicide rates have gone down in recent months — since outsider president Nayib Bukele took office in June — September has already seen an increase in homicides. Bukele’s calculus in accepting the agreement is still opaque to Salvadoran observers (Guatemala’s version was deeply unpopular in that country), but he has courted U.S. investment and support. The legal status of nearly 200,000 Salvadorans with temporary protected status in the U.S. is also under threat from the administration. This month also saw the symbolic launch of El Salvador’s Border Patrol — with U.S. funding and support. This week, Bukele, who has both sidled up to Trump and employed Trumpian tactics, will meet with the U.S. president in New York to discuss immigration.

      Reichlin-Melnick noted that the Guatemalan and Salvadoran agreements, as written, could bar people not only from seeking asylum, but also from two other protections meant to fulfill the non-refoulement principle: withholding of removal (a stay on deportation) and the Convention Against Torture, which prevents people from being returned to situations where they may face torture. That would mean that these Central American cooperation agreements go further than the recent asylum ban, which still allows people to apply for those other protections.

      Another major difference between the asylum ban and these agreements is that with the asylum ban, people would be deported to their home countries. If these agreements go into effect, the U.S. will start sending people to Guatemala or El Salvador, regardless of where they may be from. In the 1980s, the ACLU documented over 100 cases of Salvadorans who were harmed or killed after they were deported from the U.S. After this agreement goes into effect, it will no longer be just Salvadorans who the U.S. will be sending into danger.

      https://theintercept.com/2019/09/23/el-salvador-asylum-agreement

    • La forteresse Trump ou le pari du mur

      Plus que sur le mur promis pendant sa campagne, Donald Trump semble fonder sa #politique_migratoire sur une #pression_commerciale sur ses voisins du sud, remettant en cause les #échanges économiques mais aussi culturels avec le Mexique. Ce mur ne serait-il donc que symbolique ?
      Alors que l’administration américaine le menaçait de #taxes_douanières et de #guerre_commerciale, le Mexique d’Andres Lopez Obrador a finalement concédé de freiner les flux migratoires.

      Après avoir accepté un #accord imposé par Washington, Mexico a considérablement réduit les flux migratoires et accru les #expulsions. En effet, plus de 100 000 ressortissants centre-américains ont été expulsés du Mexique vers le #Guatemala dans les huit premiers mois de l’année, soit une hausse de 63% par rapport à l’année précédente selon les chiffres du Guatemala.

      Par ailleurs, cet été le Guatemala a conclu un accord de droit d’asile avec Washington, faisant de son territoire un « #pays_sûr » auprès duquel les demandeurs d’asiles ont l’obligation d’effectuer les premières démarches. Le Salvador et le #Honduras ont suivi la voie depuis.

      Et c’est ainsi que, alors qu’il rencontrait les plus grandes difficultés à obtenir les financements pour le mur à la frontière mexicaine, Donald Trump mise désormais sur ses voisins pour externaliser sa politique migratoire.

      Alors le locataire de la Maison Blanche a-t-il oublié ses ambitions de poursuivre la construction de cette frontière de fer et de béton ? Ce mur n’était-il qu’un symbole destiné à montrer à son électorat son volontarisme en matière de lutte contre l’immigration ? Le retour de la campagne est-il susceptible d’accélérer les efforts dans le domaine ?

      D’autre part, qu’en est-il de la situation des migrants sur le terrain ? Comment s’adaptent-ils à cette nouvelle donne ? Quelles conséquences sur les parcours migratoires des hommes, des femmes et des enfants qui cherchent à gagner les Etats-Unis ?

      On se souvient de cette terrible photo des cadavres encore enlacés d’un père et de sa petite fille de 2 ans, Oscar et Valeria Alberto, originaires du Salvador, morts noyés dans les eaux tumultueuses du Rio Bravo en juin dernier alors qu’ils cherchaient à passer aux Etats-Unis.

      Ce destin tragique annonce-t-il d’autres drames pour nombre de candidats à l’exil qui, quelques soient les politiques migratoires des Etats, iront au bout de leur vie avec l’espoir de l’embellir un peu ?

      https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/cultures-monde/les-frontieres-de-la-colere-14-la-forteresse-trump-ou-le-pari-du-mur

      #Mexique #symbole #barrières_frontalières #USA #Etats-Unis #renvois #push-back #refoulements

    • Mexico sends asylum seekers south — with no easy way to return for U.S. court dates

      The exhausted passengers emerge from a sleek convoy of silver and red-streaked buses, looking confused and disoriented as they are deposited ignominiously in this tropical backwater in southernmost Mexico.

      There is no greeter here to provide guidance on their pending immigration cases in the United States or on where to seek shelter in a teeming international frontier town packed with marooned, U.S.-bound migrants from across the globe.

      The bus riders had made a long and perilous overland trek north to the Rio Grande only to be dispatched back south to Mexico’s border with Central America — close to where many of them had begun their perilous journeys weeks and months earlier. At this point, some said, both their resources and sense of hope had been drained.

      “We don’t know what we’re going to do next,” said Maria de Los Angeles Flores Reyes, 39, a Honduran accompanied by her daughter, Cataren, 9, who appeared petrified after disembarking from one of the long-distance buses. “There’s no information, nothing.”

      The two are among more than 50,000 migrants, mostly Central Americans, whom U.S. immigration authorities have sent back to Mexico this year to await court hearings in the United States under the Trump administration’s Remain in Mexico program.

      Immigration advocates have assailed the program as punitive, while the White House says it has worked effectively — discouraging many migrants from following up on asylum cases and helping to curb what President Trump has decried as a “catch and release” system in which apprehended migrants have been freed in U.S. territory pending court proceeding that can drag on for months or years.

      The ever-expanding ranks pose a growing dilemma for Mexican authorities, who, under intense pressure from the White House, had agreed to accept the returnees and provide them with humanitarian assistance.

      As the numbers rise, Mexico, in many cases, has opted for a controversial solution: Ship as many asylum seekers as possible more than 1,000 miles back here in the apparent hope that they will opt to return to Central America — even if that implies endangering or foregoing prospective political asylum claims in U.S. immigration courts.

      Mexican officials, sensitive to criticism that they are facilitating Trump’s hard-line deportation agenda, have been tight-lipped about the shadowy busing program, under which thousands of asylum-seekers have been returned here since August. (Mexican authorities declined to provide statistics on just how many migrants have been sent back under the initiative.)

      In a statement, Mexico’s immigration agency called the 40-hour bus rides a “free, voluntary and secure” alternative for migrants who don’t want to spend months waiting in the country’s notoriously dangerous northern border towns.

      Advocates counter that the program amounts to a barely disguised scheme for encouraging ill-informed migrants to abandon their ongoing petitions in U.S. immigration court and return to Central America. Doing so leaves them to face the same conditions that they say forced them to flee toward the United States, and, at the same time, would undermine the claims that they face persecution at home.

      “Busing someone back to your southern border doesn’t exactly send them a message that you want them to stay in your country,” said Maureen Meyer, who heads the Mexico program for the Washington Office on Latin America, a research and advocacy group. “And it isn’t always clear that the people on the buses understand what this could mean for their cases in the United States.”

      Passengers interviewed on both ends of the bus pipeline — along the northern Mexican border and here on the southern frontier with Guatemala — say that no Mexican official briefed them on the potential legal jeopardy of returning home.

      “No one told us anything,” Flores Reyes asked after she got off the bus here, bewildered about how to proceed. “Is there a safe place to stay here until our appointment in December?”

      The date is specified on a notice to appear that U.S. Border Patrol agents handed her before she and her daughter were sent back to Mexico last month after having been detained as illegal border-crossers in south Texas. They are due Dec. 16 in a U.S. immigration court in Harlingen, Texas, for a deportation hearing, according to the notice, stamped with the capital red letters MPP — for Migrant Protection Protocols, the official designation of Remain in Mexico.

      The free bus rides to the Guatemalan border are strictly a one-way affair: Mexico does not offer return rides back to the northern border for migrants due in a U.S. immigration court, typically several months later.

      Beti Suyapa Ortega, 36, and son Robinson Javier Melara, 17, in a Mexican immigration agency waiting room in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico.

      “At this point, I’m so frightened I just want to go home,” said Beti Suyapa Ortega, 36, from Honduras, who crossed the border into Texas intending to seek political asylum and surrendered to the Border Patrol.

      She, along with her son, 17, were among two dozen or so Remain in Mexico returnees waiting recently for a southbound bus in a spartan office space at the Mexican immigration agency compound in Nuevo Laredo, across the Rio Grande from Laredo, Texas.

      Ortega and others said they were terrified of venturing onto the treacherous streets of Nuevo Laredo — where criminal gangs control not only drug trafficking but also the lucrative enterprise of abducting and extorting from migrants.

      “We can’t get out of here soon enough. It has been a nightmare,” said Ortega, who explained that she and her son had been kidnapped and held for two weeks and only released when a brother in Atlanta paid $8,000 in ransom. “I can never come back to this place.”

      The Ortegas, along with a dozen or so other Remain in Mexico returnees, left later that evening on a bus to southern Mexico. She said she would skip her date in U.S. immigration court, in Laredo — an appointment that would require her to pass through Nuevo Laredo and expose herself anew to its highly organized kidnapping and extortion gangs.

      The Mexican government bus service operates solely from the northern border towns of Nuevo Laredo and Matamoros, officials say. Both are situated in hyper-dangerous Tamaulipas state, a cartel hub on the Gulf of Mexico that regularly ranks high nationwide in homicides, “disappearances” and the discovery of clandestine graves.

      The long-haul Mexican busing initiative began in July, after U.S. immigration authorities began shipping migrants with court cases to Tamaulipas. Earlier, Remain in Mexico had been limited to sending migrants with U.S. court dates back to the northern border towns of Tijuana, Mexicali and Ciudad Juarez.

      At first, the buses left migrants departing from Tamaulipas state in the city of Monterrey, a relatively safe industrial center four hours south of the U.S. border. But officials there, including the state governor, complained about the sudden influx of hundreds of mostly destitute Central Americans. That’s when Mexican authorities appear to have begun busing all the way back to Ciudad Hidalgo, along Mexico’s border with Guatemala.

      A separate, United Nations-linked program has also returned thousands of migrants south from two large cities on the U.S. border, Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez.

      The packed buses arrive here two or three times a week, with no apparent set schedule.

      On a recent morning, half a dozen, each ferrying more than 40 migrants, came to a stop a block from the Rodolfo Robles international bridge that spans the Suchiate River, the dividing line between Mexico and Guatemala. Part of the fleet of the Omnibus Cristobal Colon long-distance transport company, the buses displayed windshield signs explaining they were “in the service” of Mexico’s national immigration agency.

      The migrants on board had begun the return journey south in Matamoros, across from Brownsville, Texas, after having been sent back there by U.S. immigration authorities.

      Many clutched folders with notices to appear in U.S. immigration court in Texas in December.

      But some, including Flores Reyes, said they were terrified of returning to Matamoros, where they had been subjected to robbery or kidnapping. Nor did they want to return across the Rio Grande to Texas, if it required travel back through Matamoros.

      Flores Reyes said kidnappers held her and her daughter for a week in Matamoros before they managed to escape with the aid of a fellow Honduran.

      The pair later crossed into Texas, she said, and they surrendered to the U.S. Border Patrol. On Sept. 11, they were sent back to Matamoros with a notice to appear Dec. 16 in immigration court in Harlingen.

      “When they told us they were sending us back to Matamoros I became very upset,” Flores Reyes said. “I can’t sleep. I’m still so scared because of what happened to us there.”

      Fearing a second kidnapping, she said, she quickly agreed to take the transport back to southern Mexico.

      Christian Gonzalez, 23, a native of El Salvador who was also among those recently returned here, said he had been mugged in Matamoros and robbed of his cash, his ID and his documents, among them the government notice to appear in U.S. immigration court in Texas in December.

      “Without the paperwork, what can I do?” said an exasperated Gonzalez, a laborer back in Usulutan province in southeastern El Salvador. “I don’t have any money to stay here.”

      He planned to abandon his U.S. immigration case and return to El Salvador, where he said he faced threats from gangs and an uncertain future.

      Standing nearby was Nuvia Carolina Meza Romero, 37, accompanied by her daughter, Jessi, 8, who clutched a stuffed sheep. Both had also returned on the buses from Matamoros. Meza Romero, too, was in a quandary about what do, but seemed resigned to return to Honduras.

      “I can’t stay here. I don’t know anyone and I don’t have any money,” said Meza Romero, who explained that she spent a week in U.S. custody in Texas after crossing the Rio Grande and being apprehended on Sept. 2.

      Her U.S. notice to appear advised her to show up on Dec. 3 in U.S. immigration court in Brownsville.

      “I don’t know how I would even get back there at this point,” said Meza Romero, who was near tears as she stood with her daughter near the border bridge.

      Approaching the migrants were aggressive bicycle taxi drivers who, for a fee of the equivalent of about $2, offered to smuggle them back across the river to Guatemala on rafts made of planks and inner tubes, thus avoiding Mexican and Guatemalan border inspections.

      Opting to cross the river were many bus returnees from Matamoros, including Meza Romero, her daughter and Gonzalez, the Salvadoran.

      But Flores Reyes was hesitant to return to Central America and forfeit her long-sought dream of resettling in the United States, even if she had to make her way back to Matamoros on her own.

      “Right now, we just need to find some shelter,” Flores Reyes said as she ambled off in search of some kind of lodging, her daughter holding her mother’s arm. “We have an appointment on Dec. 16 on the other side. I plan to make it. I’m not ready to give up yet.”

      https://www.latimes.com/world-nation/story/2019-10-15/buses-to-nowhere-mexico-transports-migrants-with-u-s-court-dates-to-its-far

      –---------

      Commentaire de @pascaline via la mailing-list Migreurop :

      Outre le dispositif d’expulsion par charter de l’OIM (https://seenthis.net/messages/730601) mis en place à la frontière nord du Mexique pour les MPPs, le transfert et l’abandon des demandeurs d’asile MPPS à la frontière avec le Guatemala, par les autorités mexicaines est présentée comme une façon de leur permettre d’échapper à la dangerosité des villes frontalières du Nord tout en espérant qu’ils choississent de retourner par eux-mêmes « chez eux »...

    • In a first, U.S. starts pushing Central American families seeking asylum to Guatemala

      U.S. officials have started to send families seeking asylum to Guatemala, even if they are not from the Central American country and had sought protection in the United States, the Los Angeles Times has learned.

      In July, the Trump administration announced a new rule to effectively end asylum at the southern U.S. border by requiring asylum seekers to claim protection elsewhere. Under that rule — which currently faces legal challenges — virtually any migrant who passes through another country before reaching the U.S. border and does not seek asylum there will be deemed ineligible for protection in the United States.

      A few days later, the administration reached an agreement with Guatemala to take asylum seekers arriving at the U.S. border who were not Guatemalan. Although Guatemala’s highest court initially said the country’s president couldn’t unilaterally enter into such an agreement, since late November, U.S. officials have forcibly returned individuals to Guatemala under the deal.

      At first, U.S. officials said they would return only single adults. But starting Tuesday, they began applying the policy to non-Guatemalan parents and children, according to communications obtained by The Times and several U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services officials.

      One family of three from Honduras, as well as a separate Honduran parent and child, were served with notices on Tuesday that they’d soon be deported to Guatemala.

      The Trump administration has reached similar agreements with Guatemala’s Northern Triangle neighbors, El Salvador and Honduras, in each case obligating those countries to take other Central Americans who reach the U.S. border. Those agreements, however, have yet to be implemented.

      The administration describes the agreements as an “effort to share the distribution of hundreds of thousands of asylum claims.”

      The deals — also referred to as “safe third country” agreements — “are formed between the United States and foreign countries where aliens removed to those countries would have access to a full and fair procedure for determining a claim to asylum or equivalent temporary protection,” according to the federal notice.

      Guatemala has virtually no asylum system of its own, but the Trump administration and Guatemalan government both said the returns would roll out slowly and selectively.

      The expansion of the policy to families could mean many more asylum seekers being forcibly removed to Guatemala.

      Experts, advocates, the United Nations and Guatemalan officials say the country doesn’t have the capacity to handle any sizable influx, much less process potential protection claims. Guatemala’s own struggles with corruption, violence and poverty helped push more than 270,000 Guatemalans to the U.S. border in fiscal 2019.

      Citizenship and Immigration Services and Homeland Security officials did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

      https://www.latimes.com/politics/story/2019-12-10/u-s-starts-pushing-asylum-seeking-families-back-to-guatemala-for-first-time

    • U.S. implements plan to send Mexican asylum seekers to Guatemala

      Mexicans seeking asylum in the United States could be sent to Guatemala under a bilateral agreement signed by the Central American nation last year, according to documents sent to U.S. asylum officers in recent days and seen by Reuters.

      In a Jan. 4 email, field office staff at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) were told Mexican nationals will be included in the populations “amenable” to the agreement with Guatemala.

      The agreement, brokered last July between the administration of Republican President Donald Trump and the outgoing Guatemalan government, allows U.S. immigration officials to send migrants requesting asylum at the U.S.-Mexican border to apply for protection in Guatemala instead.

      Mexico objects to the plan, its foreign ministry said in a statement late on Monday, adding that it would be working with authorities to find “better options” for those that could be affected.

      Trump has made clamping down on unlawful migration a top priority of his presidency and a major theme of his 2020 re-election campaign. His administration penned similar deals with Honduras and El Salvador last year.

      U.S. Democrats and pro-migrant groups have opposed the move and contend asylum seekers will face danger in Guatemala, where the murder rate is five times that of the United States, according to 2017 data compiled by the World Bank. The country’s asylum office is tiny and thinly staffed and critics have argued it lacks the capacity to properly vet a significant increase in cases.

      Guatemalan President-elect Alejandro Giammattei, who takes office this month, has said he will review the agreement.

      Acting Deputy U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Ken Cuccinelli said in a tweet in December that Mexicans were being considered for inclusion under the agreement.

      USCIS referred questions to DHS, which referred to Cuccinelli’s tweet. Mexico’s foreign ministry did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

      Alejandra Mena, a spokeswoman for Guatemala’s immigration institute, said that since the agreement was implemented in November, the United States has sent 52 migrants to the country. Only six have applied for asylum in Guatemala, Mena said.

      On Monday, an additional 33 Central American migrants arrived on a flight to Guatemala City, she said.

      Unaccompanied minors cannot be sent to Guatemala under the agreement, which now applies only to migrants from Honduras, El Salvador and Mexico, according to the guidance documents. Exceptions are made if the migrants can establish that they are “more likely than not” to be persecuted or tortured in Guatemala based on their race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion.

      Numbers of Central American migrants apprehended at the border fell sharply in the second part of 2019 after Mexico deployed National Guard troops to stem the flow, under pressure from Trump.

      Overall, border arrests are expected to drop again in December for the seventh straight month, a Homeland Security official told Reuters last week, citing preliminary data.

      The U.S. government says another reason for the reduction in border crossings is a separate program, known as the Migrant Protection Protocols, that has forced more than 56,000 non-Mexican migrants to wait in Mexico for their U.S. immigration court hearings.

      With fewer Central Americans at the border, U.S. attention has turned to Mexicans crossing illegally or requesting asylum. About 150,000 Mexican single adults were apprehended at the border in fiscal 2019, down sharply from previous decades but still enough to bother U.S. immigration hawks.

      https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-immigration/us-implements-plan-to-send-mexican-asylum-seekers-to-guatemala-idUSKBN1Z51S
      #Guatemala

    • Mexico begins flying, busing migrants back to #Honduras

      Hundreds of Central American migrants who entered southern Mexico in recent days have either been pushed back into Guatemala by Mexican troops, shipped to detention centers or returned to Honduras, officials said Tuesday. An unknown number slipped past Mexican authorities and continued north.

      The latest migrant caravan provided a public platform for Mexico to show the U.S. government and migrants thinking of making the trip that it has refined its strategy and produced its desired result: This caravan will not advance past its southern border.

      What remained unclear was the treatment of the migrants who already find themselves on their way back to the countries they fled last week.

      “Mexico doesn’t have the capacity to process so many people in such a simple way in a couple of days,” said Guadalupe Correa Cabrera, a professor at George Mason University studying how the caravans form.

      The caravan of thousands had set out from Honduras in hopes Mexico would grant them passage, posing a fresh test of U.S. President Donald Trump’s effort to reduce the flow of migrants arriving at the U.S. border by pressuring other governments to stop them.

      Mexican Foreign Secretary Marcelo Ebrard said 2,400 migrants entered Mexico legally over the weekend. About 1,000 of them requested Mexico’s help in returning to their countries. The rest were being held in immigration centers while they start legal processes that would allow them to seek refuge in Mexico or obtain temporary work permits that would confine them to southern Mexico.

      On Tuesday afternoon, Jesus, a young father from Honduras who offered only his first name, rested in a shelter in Tecun Uman, Guatemala, with his wife and their baby, unsure of what to do next.

      “No country’s policy sustains us,” he said in response to hearing Ebrard’s comments about the situation. “If we don’t work, we don’t eat. (He) doesn’t feed us, doesn’t care for our children.”

      Honduran officials said more than 600 of its citizens were expected to arrive in that country Tuesday by plane and bus and more would follow in the coming days.

      Of an additional 1,000 who tried to enter Mexico illegally Monday by wading across the Suchiate river, most were either forced back or detained later by immigration agents, according to Mexican officials.

      Most of the hundreds stranded in the no-man’s land on the Mexican side of the river Monday night returned to Guatemala in search of water, food and a place to sleep. Late Tuesday, the first buses carrying Hondurans left Tecun Uman with approximately 150 migrants heading back to their home country.

      Mexican authorities distributed no water or food to those who entered illegally, in what appeared to be an attempt by the government to wear out the migrants.

      Alejandro Rendón, an official from Mexico’s social welfare department, said his colleagues were giving water to those who turned themselves in or were caught by immigration agents, but were not doing the same along the river because it was not safe for workers to do so.

      “It isn’t prudent to come here because we can’t put the safety of the colleagues at risk,” he said.

      Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador said Tuesday that the government is trying to protect the migrants from harm by preventing them from traveling illegally through the country. He said they need to respect Mexican laws.

      “If we don’t take care of them, if we don’t know who they are, if we don’t have a register, they pass and get to the north, and the criminal gangs grab them and assault them, because that’s how it was before,” he said. “They disappeared them.”

      Mexican Interior Minister Olga Sánchez Cordero commended the National Guard for its restraint, saying: “In no way has there been an act that we could call repression and not even annoyance.”

      But Honduras’ ambassador to Mexico said there had been instances of excessive force on the part of the National Guard. “We made a complaint before the Mexican government,” Alden Rivera said in an interview with HCH Noticias without offering details. He also conceded migrants had thrown rocks at Mexican authorities.

      An Associated Press photograph of a Mexican National Guardsman holding a migrant in a headlock was sent via Twitter by acting U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Ken Cuccinelli with the message: “We appreciate Mexico doing more than they did last year to interdict caravans attempting to move illegally north to our southern border.”

      “They absolutely must be satisfied with (Mexico’s) actions because in reality it’s their (the United States’) plan,” said Correa Cabrera, the George Mason professor. “They’re congratulating themselves, because in reality it wasn’t López Obrador’s plan.”

      She said it is an complicated issue for Mexico, but the National Guard had no business being placed at the border to handle immigration because they weren’t trained for it. The government “is sending a group that doesn’t know how to and can’t protect human rights because they’re trained to do other kinds of things,” she said.

      Mexico announced last June that it was deploying the newly formed National Guard to assist in immigration enforcement to avoid tariffs that Trump threatened on Mexican imports.

      Darlin René Romero and his wife were among the few who spent the night pinned between the river and Mexican authorities.

      Rumors had circulated through the night that “anything could happen, that being there was very dangerous,” Romero said. But the couple from Copan, Honduras, spread a blanket on the ground and passed the night 20 yards from a line of National Guard troops forming a wall with their riot shields.

      They remained confident that Mexico would allow them to pass through and were trying to make it to the northern Mexican city of Monterrey, where his sister lives.

      They said a return home to impoverished and gang-plagued Honduras, where most of the migrants are from, was unthinkable.

      https://apnews.com/4d685100193f6a2c521267fe614356df

  • EASO | La situation de l’asile dans l’UE en 2018
    https://asile.ch/2019/06/25/easo-la-situation-de-lasile-dans-lue-en-2018

    Le rapport annuel de l’EASO sur la situation en matière d’asile dans l’Union européenne en 2018 offre une vue d’ensemble complète des évolutions dans le domaine de la protection internationale à l’échelle européenne et au niveau des régimes d’asile nationaux. À partir d’un large éventail de sources, le rapport examine les principales tendances statistiques et […]

  • I migranti rispediti in Italia dalla Svizzera: “Legati e picchiati, volevano toglierci la bimba”

    Non hanno nessuna intenzione di dimenticare, né paura di denunciare. E allora eccoli qui #Joelson e #Tatiana, mano nella mano, la piccola #Leora in braccio, nel centro di accoglienza di Napoli gestito dalla Ong Laici Terzo Mondo, a raccontare il loro ritorno in Italia da «dublinanti», l’agghiacciante brutalità con la quale sono stati rispediti in Italia dalla Svizzera, il Paese con il quale proprio ieri, in visita presso il centro federale d’asilo di Chiasso, il ...


    https://rep.repubblica.it/pwa/generale/2019/06/21/news/_legati_e_picchiati_volevano_anche_toglierci_la_bimba_-229346010
    #dublinés #Italie #Suisse #asile #migrations #réfugiés #violence #Dublin #règlement_dublin #renvois_Dublin
    #paywall

    • Famiglia del Camerun denuncia il trattamento della polizia

      Manette e catene. Cappuccio e casco. Il ricordo di quei momenti ancora li terrorizza. Joelson e Tatiana, 25 anni lui originario del Camerun, 23 lei originaria della Costa d’Avorio, non dimenticheranno mai quelle ore di qualche mese, quando sono stati prelevati dal loro appartamento di #Albinen e, via Zurigo, riportati in Italia, a Napoli. L’hanno raccontato alla Repubblica, che li ha incontrati nel centro di accoglienza di Napoli durante una serie di servizi sui migranti che da Berlino vengono rimandati in Italia. «Ci hanno messo le manette alle mani e le catene ai piedi». E lo ripete al Caffè la responsabile del centro di accoglienza di Napoli gestito da una Ong, Renata Molino, che più volte ha sentito la loro testimonianza. «Sapevano di non poter restare in Svizzera, sapevano del regolamento di Dublino, avevano già firmato le carte per il trasferimento. Erano pronti, insomma. Perché quindi tanta violenza, continuano a chiedersi». Una violenza che coglie di sorpresa la polizia vallesana: «Non ci risulta un rimpatrio da Albinen a Zurigo di una famiglia di origine africana - dice al Caffè il portavoce Markus Rieder -. Questo è un piccolissimo villaggio. Solitamente bisogna prendere queste dichiarazioni con le pinze. Approfondiremo comunque il caso e nei prossimi giorni daremo maggiori dettagli sulla vicenda. Vogliamo anche noi capire come sono andati i fatti».
      Fatti che, stando alle parole di Joelson e Tatiana, fanno rabbrividire. E che riaccendono le polemiche attorno ai rimpatri forzati. «Sono qui da noi da qualche mese e sin dal primo giorno hanno raccontato questa storia, le stesse parole ogni volta - sottolinea Renata Molino -. Abbiamo un mediatore culturale che viene dal Camerun, il Paese del marito, quindi è difficile che le loro parole siano state distorte». Resta il dubbio che, forse, non si tratti di Albinen, ma di un altro paese, magari lì vicino, sempre nella Svizzera francese, vista la loro origine e la lingua comune. Ma poco importa.
      E Tatiana racconta: «Quel giorno ero casa da sola con la piccola Leora, nata in Svizzera, all’epoca aveva pochi mesi. Mio marito era fuori. Suona il campanello, sono dei poliziotti mi dicono che c’è un aereo pronto per noi. Cerco di andare verso mia figlia. Me lo impediscono, mi afferrano per le braccia, mi ammanettano e mi incatenano. E mi picchiano, perché grido».
      Ad un certo punto le avrebbero chiesto di spogliarsi per una perquisizione corporale. «Mi strappano gli abiti, mi toccano ovunque». Nel frattempo rientra Joelson. «Picchiano e strattonano anche lui. Ma lo saprò solo dopo, quando ci rivedremo all’aeroporto. Senza nostra figlia, che non sappiamo dov’è». Tatiana si ribella. La situazione precipita. «Mi mettono - ha raccontato la donna - un casco nero sul cappuccio, un nastro sulla bocca, poi ci fanno salire sull’aereo e ci legano al sedile». Poi la piccola arriva in braccio a una poliziotta. «Li supplico di darmela. ‘No è nata in Svizzera e qui resta’, dicono le guardie». Si scatena l’inferno. Marito e moglie si rivoltano, gridano, protestano. Sino a quando il pilota esce dalla cabina e dice che così non parte. La piccola, sempre nella versione dei profughi, viene portata a bordo e messa in fondo all’aereo, dove resterà sino alla fine del viaggio. A Napoli la coppia viene slegata, la bimba riconsegnata. «Mai avremmo pensato di subire tanta violenza anche in Europa, già l’abbiamo patita nei nostri Paesi».

      http://www.caffe.ch/stories/Attualit%C3%A0/63300_ci_hanno_rimpatriati_legati_e_bendati
      #Naples

    • "Schiacciata nel casco cercavo la mia Leora"

      «Proprio così! Sì, come su questa foto. Ci hanno legati al sedile dell’aereo e poi ci hanno messo in testa quello, sì, una specie di casco. Tanto che mi è rimasta la bocca aperta e non riuscivo più a chiuderla, le mie guance erano completamente schiacciate dentro». Non cambia versione neanche di una virgola Tatiana, rispetto a quanto abbiamo pubblicato la scorsa domenica. Anzi. Via WhatsApp, con un audio in francese, in settimana ha risposto al cronista del Caffè che le ha fatto avere le immagini sulle modalità di un rinvio forzato, fasce, ferma braccia e casco da pugile. E ribadisce, immagine dopo immagine, la violenza con cui, dice, è avvenuto il loro rimpatrio.
      Tatiana, 23 anni, originaria della Costa d’Avorio, il marito Joelson, 25 anni, del Camerun, e la piccola Leora, nata in Svizzera, qualche mese fa sono stati prelevati dall’appartamento dove vivevano da circa un anno e portati all’aeroporto. «Ci hanno rispediti legati e bendati da Zurigo a Napoli», aveva raccontato la coppia a Repubblica, che per prima ha pubblicato la loro storia, e le loro parole le aveva confermate al Caffè Renata Molino, la responsabile del centro profughi di Napoli, dove sono tuttora ospitati, e che sin dal primo giorno ha ascoltato la drammatica testimonianza della loro partenza.
      La famiglia di profughi viveva ad #Arwangen, non ad Albinen, come erroneamente scritto. Nel piccolo comune del canton Berna, nella regione dell’Emmental-Alta Argovia, esiste infatti un centro migranti gestito dall’Esercito della Salvezza. «Probabilmente si sono confusi, oppure non si sono capiti con il mediatore culturale che sin dal primo giorno ha raccolto le loro voci», spiega Renata Molino. Ma tutto ciò, ovviamente, che siano stati prelevati da Albinen o da Aarwangen, non cambia la sostanza del loro racconto.
      Joelson e Tatiana hanno raccontato di essere stati portati via dal loro alloggio di Arwangen in manette e catene. «Non era necessario perché sapevamo di non poter restare in Svizzera, ci avevano spiegato del regolamento di Dublino, avevamo già firmato anche le carte per il trasferimento», ha più volte ripetuto Tatiana che ancora oggi si continua a chiedere il motivo di tanta violenza. «Ad un certo punto ci hanno messo in testa una specie di casco - riprende nel suo audio WhatsApp -. Improvvisamente mi sono trovata il viso schiacciato, riuscivo a vedere solo da un buco. Ero molto spaventata». A contribuire alla disperazione, la figlia che continuava a piangeva in fondo all’aereo, dove è stata lasciata per tutto il viaggio. Mentre Tatiana si ribellava, voleva andare da lei". Ad un certo punto la donna inizia a dimenarsi, vuole sua figlia, è preoccupata perché non riesce a vederla. «Sbattevo i piedi per terra e muovevo la testa. Allora mi hanno bloccato con la forza, mi tenevano il collo e mi tiravano i capelli. Ma cosa potevo fare? Ero fissata con le fasce al sedile e non potevo quasi muovermi».

      http://caffe.ch/stories/cronaca/63308_schiacciata_nel_casco_cercavo_la_mia_leora

    • "Ci hanno rimpatriati...legati e bendati"

      Manette e catene. Cappuccio e casco. Il ricordo di quei momenti ancora li terrorizza. Joelson e Tatiana, 25 anni lui originario del Camerun, 23 lei originaria della Costa d’Avorio, non dimenticheranno mai quelle ore di qualche mese, quando sono stati prelevati dal loro appartamento di Albinen e, via Zurigo, riportati in Italia, a Napoli. L’hanno raccontato alla Repubblica, che li ha incontrati nel centro di accoglienza di Napoli durante una serie di servizi sui migranti che da Berlino vengono rimandati in Italia. «Ci hanno messo le manette alle mani e le catene ai piedi». E lo ripete al Caffè la responsabile del centro di accoglienza di Napoli gestito da una Ong, Renata Molino, che più volte ha sentito la loro testimonianza. «Sapevano di non poter restare in Svizzera, sapevano del regolamento di Dublino, avevano già firmato le carte per il trasferimento. Erano pronti, insomma. Perché quindi tanta violenza, continuano a chiedersi». Una violenza che coglie di sorpresa la polizia vallesana: «Non ci risulta un rimpatrio da Albinen a Zurigo di una famiglia di origine africana - dice al Caffè il portavoce Markus Rieder -. Questo è un piccolissimo villaggio. Solitamente bisogna prendere queste dichiarazioni con le pinze. Approfondiremo comunque il caso e nei prossimi giorni daremo maggiori dettagli sulla vicenda. Vogliamo anche noi capire come sono andati i fatti».
      Fatti che, stando alle parole di Joelson e Tatiana, fanno rabbrividire. E che riaccendono le polemiche attorno ai rimpatri forzati. «Sono qui da noi da qualche mese e sin dal primo giorno hanno raccontato questa storia, le stesse parole ogni volta - sottolinea Renata Molino -. Abbiamo un mediatore culturale che viene dal Camerun, il Paese del marito, quindi è difficile che le loro parole siano state distorte». Resta il dubbio che, forse, non si tratti di Albinen, ma di un altro paese, magari lì vicino, sempre nella Svizzera francese, vista la loro origine e la lingua comune. Ma poco importa.
      E Tatiana racconta: «Quel giorno ero casa da sola con la piccola Leora, nata in Svizzera, all’epoca aveva pochi mesi. Mio marito era fuori. Suona il campanello, sono dei poliziotti mi dicono che c’è un aereo pronto per noi. Cerco di andare verso mia figlia. Me lo impediscono, mi afferrano per le braccia, mi ammanettano e mi incatenano. E mi picchiano, perché grido».
      Ad un certo punto le avrebbero chiesto di spogliarsi per una perquisizione corporale. «Mi strappano gli abiti, mi toccano ovunque». Nel frattempo rientra Joelson. «Picchiano e strattonano anche lui. Ma lo saprò solo dopo, quando ci rivedremo all’aeroporto. Senza nostra figlia, che non sappiamo dov’è». Tatiana si ribella. La situazione precipita. «Mi mettono - ha raccontato la donna - un casco nero sul cappuccio, un nastro sulla bocca, poi ci fanno salire sull’aereo e ci legano al sedile». Poi la piccola arriva in braccio a una poliziotta. «Li supplico di darmela. ‘No è nata in Svizzera e qui resta’, dicono le guardie». Si scatena l’inferno. Marito e moglie si rivoltano, gridano, protestano. Sino a quando il pilota esce dalla cabina e dice che così non parte. La piccola, sempre nella versione dei profughi, viene portata a bordo e messa in fondo all’aereo, dove resterà sino alla fine del viaggio. A Napoli la coppia viene slegata, la bimba riconsegnata. «Mai avremmo pensato di subire tanta violenza anche in Europa, già l’abbiamo patita nei nostri Paesi».

      http://www.caffe.ch/stories/cronaca/63300_ci_hanno_rimpatriati_legati_e_bendati

  • La guerre de l’État contre les étrangers. Un extrait du livre de Karine Parrot
    https://www.contretemps.eu/guerre-etat-migrants

    À la rubrique des mécanismes déloyaux déployés contre les pauvres qui arrivent jusqu’en Europe, le «  système #Dublin  » est sans doute un des plus féroces et des plus élaborés. Il montre jusqu’où peut aller le fantasme gestionnaire des gouvernants, cette idée qu’il serait possible de traiter certaines personnes exactement comme des flux, alimentant des stocks à transférer, à se répartir, à tarir. À aucun moment dans le mécanisme Dublin, les personnes ne sont véritablement prises en considération, si ce n’est au prisme de leur volonté présumée de contourner les règles.

    #migration #Union_européenne

    • Carte blanche. L’Etat contre les étrangers

      L’actualité la plus récente a donné à voir une #fracture au sein de la gauche et des forces d’émancipation : on parle d’un côté des « no border », accusés d’angélisme face à la « pression migratoire », et d’un autre côté il y a les « souverainistes », attachés aux #frontières et partisans d’une « gestion humaine des flux migratoires ». Ce débat se résume bien souvent à des principes humanistes d’une part (avec pour argument qu’il n’y a pas de crise migratoire mais une crise de l’accueil des migrants) opposés à un principe de « réalité » (qui se prévaut d’une légitimité soi-disant « populaire », selon laquelle l’accueil ne peut que détériorer le niveau de vie, les salaires, les lieux de vie des habitants du pays). Dans ce cinglant essai, Karine Parrot, juriste et membre du GISTI (Groupe d’information et de soutien des immigrés), met en lumière un aspect souvent ignoré de ce débat : à quoi servent au juste les frontières ? qu’est-ce que la nationalité ? Sur la base du droit, Karine Parrot montre que la frontière et la restriction des circulations humaines, sont indissociables d’une #hiérarchie_sociale des peuples à l’échelle mondiale. La #frontière signifie aux plus aisés que, pour eux, aucune frontière n’est infranchissable, tandis qu’elle dit aux autres que, pauvres, hommes, femmes, enfants devront voyager au péril de leur vie, de leur santé, de leur dignité. De l’invention de la #nationalité comme mode de gestion et de #criminalisation des populations (et notamment des pauvres, des « indigents », des vagabonds) jusqu’à la facilitation de la #rétention, en passant par le durcissement des conditions d’#asile et de séjour, ou encore les noyades de masse orchestrées par les gouvernements, l’Union européenne et leur officine semi-privée et militarisée (#Frontex), Karine Parrot révèle qu’il n’y a aucune raison vertueuse ou conforme au « #bien_commun » qui justifie les frontières actuelles des États. Le droit de l’immigration ne vise qu’à entériner la loi du plus fort entre le Nord et le Sud ; il n’a d’autre fin que conditionner, incarcérer, asservir et mettre à mort les populations surnuméraires que la « #mondialisation_armée » n’a de cesse reproduire à l’échelle du monde.


      https://lafabrique.fr/carte-blanche
      #Karine_Parrot #livre #migrations #frontières_nationales
      ping @karine4

  • Application du règlement Dublin en #France en #2018

    Plus de 45 000 saisines

    Selon les statistiques d’Eurostat, 45 358 saisines d’un autre Etat ont été effectuées par la France en 2018 contre 41 620 en 2017, 25 963 en 2016 et 11 657 en 2015.

    Les procédures de reprises en charge représentent 74% des saisines soit quatre points supplémentaires par rapport à 2017. La majorité d’entre elles visent des demandeurs qui ont une demande en cours dans un autre État-membre. L’Italie est de loin le premier pays saisi avec15 428 saisines avec un changement notable puisque 71% sont des reprises en charge. L’Allemagne est le deuxième pays saisi avec 8694 saisines (8688s en 2017) dont 93% sont des reprises en charge. A noter que près de 21% des saisines vers ce pays sont faites sur le fondement d’une demande d’asile rejetée. Ce chiffre est en légère hausse mais il bat en brèche le discours du ministre de l’intérieur qui indique que la majorité des personnes Dublinées en provenance d’Allemagne sont déboutées. Troisième pays l’Espagne avec 5 309 saisines dont 81% de prise en charge en raison d’un visa, d’une entrée irrégulière (à Ceuta et à Mellila) ou d’un séjour régulier. La Suède et l’Autriche suivent avec un nombre très inférieur (1 807 et 1 805 saisines).

    29 000 accords des Etats-membres

    29 259 réponses favorables ont été obtenues (29 713 en 2017) soit 65% d’accords. Pour certains pays, le taux de refus est anormalement élevé comme pour la Hongrie (90%) ou la Bulgarie (76%).

    3 500 #transferts

    3 533 transferts ont été effectués en 2018 (2 633 en 2017 contre 1 293 transferts en 2016 et 525 en 2015). Cela représente 12% des accords et 8% des saisines,

    L’Italie est de nouveau le premier pays concerné avec 1 6 47 transferts (soit 13% des accords (implicites pour la plupart et 11% des saisines), suivie de l’Allemagne (783 contre 869 en 2017, 9% des accords) puis vient l’Espagne avec 262 transferts (8% des accords). La grande majorité des transferts s’effectue dans un délai de six mois.

    L’expiration du délai de transfert est la principale raison qui conduit la France à se déclarer responsable avec 6 744 décisions (ce qui ne correspond aux statistiques du ministère (23 650). L’application de la clause discrétionnaire ou celle des défaillances d’un Etat représente 2 000 demandes.

    A l’inverse, des personnes sont transférées vers la France (on parle de transfert entrants) . En 2018, il était au nombre de 1 837 contre 1 636 en 2017 principalement en provenance d’Allemagne, du Benelux, de Suisse, d’Autriche et de Suède.

    Au niveau européen, environ 22 000 personnes ont été transférées vers un autre Etat-membre soit 13% des saisines. A noter qu’après l’Allemagne, c’est la Grèce qui est le pays qui transfère le plus (principalement en Allemagne)

    https://www.lacimade.org/application-du-reglement-dublin-en-france-en-2018
    #Dublin #règlement_dublin #asile #migrations #réfugiés #chiffres #statistiques #renvois #renvois_dublin

  • Info sur la refonte de la #Directive_Retour et les futurs projets de réforme du #régime_d'asile_européen_commun

    info sur la prochaine étape européenne en matière de politique migratoire. Plus précisément sur la refonte de la Directive Retour qui va passer au vote en #LIBE et aussi des infos sur l’évolution du Régime d’Asile Européen Commun (#RAEC), histoire d’informer de ce vers quoi l’on tend probablement pour la prochaine législature (donc le prochain mandat).

    Dans un effort pour réformer le Régime d’Asile Européen Commun (RAEC) et tendre vers une #uniformisation du droit d’asile au niveau européen, les directives sont revues une à une depuis quelques années (Directive Accueil, Procédure, Qualification et Retour + le règlement Dublin qui est au point mort depuis 2017 à cause du Conseil Européen).
    Ces #révisions rentrent dans le cadre de l’#agenda_européen_pour_les_migrations qui a été élaboré en 2015 par la Commission sous ordre du Conseil Européen.

    Le package est en état d’avancement prochain et l’étape la plus proche semble concerner la refonte de la Directive Retour.
    Néanmoins, il y a également un nombre assez important de dispositifs prévus dont il est peut-être pas inintéressant d’évoquer dans le sillage de l’analyse sur cette Directive.

    Il y a donc deux parties dans ce mail d’info : la première sur le Régime d’Asile Européen Commun (RAEC) et ce qu’il préfigure ; la seconde sur le texte de la Directive Retour plus précisément.

    Le Régime d’Asile Européen Commun :

    Il y a de nombreux discours actuellement autour de la mise en place d’un droit d’asile "harmonisé" au niveau européen.

    C’est une obsession de Macron depuis son élection. Il a réaffirmé, lors de la restitution du Grand Débat, sa volonté d’une Europe au régime d’asile commun : "c’est aussi une Europe qui tient ses frontières, qui les protège. C’est une Europe qui a un droit d’asile refondé et commun et où la #responsabilité va avec la #solidarité."
    https://www.elysee.fr/emmanuel-macron/2019/04/25/conference-de-presse-grand-debat-national

    La confusion est telle que les journalistes ne semblent pas toujours comprendre si ce régime d’asile commun existe ou non.

    Sur france inter par exemple :
    "Cela fait plusieurs années que l’on parle de la mise en place d’un régime d’asile européen commun. Nous en sommes encore très loin mais plusieurs textes sont actuellement en discussion, sur les procédures, sur l’accueil, les qualifications, les réinstallations, la création d’une agence européenne pour l’asile "
    https://www.franceinter.fr/emissions/cafe-europe/cafe-europe-24-fevrier-2018

    Et non... ça ne fait pas plusieurs années qu’on en parle... ça fait plusieurs années qu’il existe !

    Historique :

    En vérité, cette tentative d’harmonisation des législations est ancienne et date à peu près du Conseil Européen de #Tampere en 1999 qui donna les premières impulsions pour la mise en place du Régime d’Asile Européen Commun avec tout ce que l’on connait maintenant à savoir par exemple, le #règlement_Dublin.
    Ici le résumé des orientations du Conseil sont claires :
    "il faut, pour les domaines distincts, mais étroitement liés, de l’#asile et des #migrations, élaborer une politique européenne commune (...) Il est convenu de travailler à la mise en place d’un régime d’asile européen commun, fondé sur l’application intégrale et globale de la Convention de Genève. (...) Ce régime devrait comporter, à court terme, une méthode claire et opérationnelle pour déterminer l’Etat responsable de l’examen d’une demande d’asile, des normes communes pour une procédure d’asile équitable et efficace, des conditions communes minimales d’#accueil des demandeurs d’asile, et le rapprochement des règles sur la reconnaissance et le contenu du statut de réfugié."
    http://www.europarl.europa.eu/summits/tam_fr.htm#a

    Vous avez ici les bases du RAEC et notamment du règlement Dublin qui vise justement à la détermination de l’#Etat_responsable de l’asile afin de lutter contre le "#shopping_de_l'asile", un """"fléau""""" qui avait déjà touché l’Europe durant les années 90 avec la crise des Balkans (en 1992, 700 000 personnes environ ont demandé l’asile en Europe, ce qui signifie par ailleurs que non... 2015 n’est pas une situation si inédite. La situation s’est stabilisée après 1993 où 500 000 personnes ont demandé l’asile, puis 300 000 dans les années qui ont suivi, mais pas au point de ne pas "forcer" les pays à réagir au niveau européen).
    https://www.persee.fr/doc/homig_1142-852x_1996_num_1198_1_2686

    Cet acte fondateur du #Conseil_de_Tampere est corroboré par plusieurs documents et on peut en trouver aussi confirmation par exemple dans le rapport sur la #politique_européenne_de_Retour (rédigé tous les trois ans) qui commence par :
    "L’Union européenne s’efforce depuis 1999 de mettre au point une approche globale sur la question des migrations, qui couvre l’#harmonisation des conditions d’admission, les droits des ressortissants de pays tiers en séjour régulier ainsi que l’élaboration de mesures juridiques et le renforcement d’une coopération pratique en matière de prévention des flux migratoires irréguliers."
    https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/FR/TXT/?uri=celex:52014DC0199

    Bref, à partir de 1999 et donc du Conseil de Tampere, la direction est prise de mener une politique migratoire à l’échelle européenne pour renforcer le contrôle des frontières extérieures.

    Les Textes du RAEC, l’échec de l’harmonisation et les règlements qui nous attendent en conséquence :

    Le Conseil (donc les États) ordonné à Tampere et donc la Commission exécute en proposant plusieurs textes qui vont dessiner le paysage actuel du droit d’asile européen commun.

    Un ensemble de textes est donc créé et adopté :

    Le règlement Dublin succède donc à la convention de Dublin en 2003
    https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/R%C3%A8glement_Dublin_II
    Avec son frère le règlement #Eurodac qui permet la mise en oeuvre de #Dublin aussi en 2003 (logique) :
    https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurodac

    #Frontex est lancé en 2004 :
    https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agence_europ%C3%A9enne_pour_la_gestion_de_la_coop%C3%A9ration_op%C3%A9

    Et les directives qui constituent le coeur du Régime d’Asile Européen Commun avec le règlement Dublin sont lancées dans la foulée :

    La #Directive_Accueil en 2003 (puis réformée en 2013)
    https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/FR/TXT/?uri=celex%3A32013L0033

    La #Directive_Procédure en 2005 (réformée aussi en 2013)
    https://www.easo.europa.eu/sites/default/files/public/Procedures-FR.pdf

    La #Directive_Qualification en 2004 (réformée en 2011)
    https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/FR/TXT/?uri=CELEX%3A32011L0095

    La Directive Retour en 2008 (qui va être réformée maintenant)
    https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/FR/TXT/?uri=LEGISSUM%3Ajl0014

    L’ensemble de ces textes avait pour but d’harmoniser les législations nationales européennes (pour le meilleur et pour le pire d’ailleurs).
    Le problème concerne donc, non pas l’absence de législations européennes communes, mais plutôt les marges de manoeuvres des Etats dans l’interprétation des Directives et leur transposition dans les législations nationales. Cette marge de manoeuvre est telle qu’elle permet aux Etats de retenir ce qui les arrange dans tel ou tel texte, de sorte que toute tentative d’harmonisation est impossible.

    Dès lors, la diversité des procédures est toujours la norme d’un pays à l’autre ; un pays comme les Pays-Bas donne 4 ans de protection subsidiaire, tandis que la France avant la loi Asile n’en donnait qu’une ; la liste des pays sûrs n’est pas la même selon les Etats .... etc etc etc

    Les Etats ont tellement la main que finalement, on peut assez facilement conclure à l’#échec total des tentatives d’harmonisation et donc du RAEC, tant les Etats ont, du début à la fin, fait un peu près ce qu’ils voulaient avec les textes.
    (voir également Sarah Lamort : https://www.amazon.fr/Europe-terre-dasile-Sarah-Lamort/dp/2130734669)

    La Commission a elle-même très bien compris ces faiblesses.

    Exaspérée elle déclare en 2016 que malgré ses efforts pour la mise en place effective du RAEC : " il existe encore des différences notables entre les États membres dans les types de procédures utilisés, les conditions d’accueil offertes aux demandeurs, les #taux_de_reconnaissance et le type de protection octroyé aux bénéficiaires d’une protection internationale. Ces #divergences contribuent à des #mouvements_secondaires et à une course à l’asile (« #asylum_shopping »), créent des facteurs d’attraction et conduisent en définitive à une répartition inégale entre les États membres de la responsabilité d’offrir une protection à ceux qui en ont besoin.(...) Ces #disparités résultent en partie des dispositions souvent discrétionnaires qui figurent dans la version actuelle de la directive relative aux procédures d’asile et de celle relative aux conditions d’accueil." et de toutes les autres en vérité pouvons-nous ajouter...
    L’objectif est donc de "renforcer et harmoniser davantage les règles du régime d’asile européen commun, de façon à assurer une plus grande égalité de traitement dans l’ensemble de l’Union et à réduire les facteurs d’attraction injustifiés qui encouragent les départs vers l’UE" (les facteurs d’attraction étant le "shopping de l’asile")

    Et pour cela la Commission propose de transformer quasiment toutes les Directives citées plus haut en Règlement... :
    " la Commission proposera un nouveau règlement instituant une procédure d’asile commune unique dans l’Union et remplaçant la directive relative aux procédures d’asile ; un nouveau règlement relatif aux conditions que doivent remplir les demandeurs d’asile remplaçant l’actuelle directive du même nom, et des modifications ciblées de la directive relative aux conditions d’accueil."
    https://ec.europa.eu/transparency/regdoc/rep/1/2016/FR/1-2016-197-FR-F1-1.PDF

    La différence entre la Directive et le Règlement étant que justement la Directive est soumise à une interprétation des Etats dans la transposition au sein des législations nationales de la dite Directive (dont on voit qu’elle est large), tandis qu’un Règlement est contraignant et s’applique sans interprétation, ni marge de manoeuvre whatsoever à tous les Etats (comme le règlement Dublin).
    Ici par exemple, la Commission propose de changer la Directive Procédure en un Règlement, histoire par exemple, que tous les pays aient la même liste de pays d’origine sûrs une bonne fois pour toute : https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/FR/TXT/?uri=CELEX:52016PC0467

    Ce processus d’abrogation des #directives pour en faire des #règlements est en cours et il est très important puisque cela signifie qu’il va falloir surveiller de très près les dispositions qui vont apparaitre dans ces nouveaux textes qui vont TOUS s’appliquer stricto sensu.
    Ce n’est pas forcément une bonne nouvelle.

    Reste que les Etats pourraient s’opposer à l’imposition de textes aussi coercitifs et d’ailleurs, ils ont eux-mêmes bloqué la révision du règlement Dublin. Cela pose la question de l’Etat d’avancement.

    Etat d’avancement :
    Depuis l’annonce de la transformation des Directives en Règlements en 2016, les dossiers ne semblent pas avoir tant avancés que cela pour autant que je sache sauf concernant quelques dossiers majeurs, notamment la Directive Retour.

    Concernant la mise en place des règlements, la Commission est très vague dans sa dernière communication sur l’état d’avancement de l’agenda européen matière de migrations de mars 2019 : https://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=COM:2019:0126:FIN:FR:PDF
    En décembre 2017, elle disait :
    "Présentées il y a un an et demi, ces propositions en sont à des stades d’avancement différents dans le processus législatif. Certaines, comme la proposition concernant l’Agence de l’Union européenne pour l’asile et la réforme d’Eurodac, sont sur le point d’être adoptées. D’autres, à savoir le cadre de l’Union pour la réinstallation, le règlement relatif aux conditions que doivent remplir les demandeurs d’asile et la directive relative aux conditions d’accueil, progressent. En revanche, la proposition de règlement sur les procédures d’asile et, comme pierre angulaire, la proposition de révision du règlement de Dublin, nécessitent encore un travail considérable. Dans ce contexte, il convient aussi de progresser dans les travaux sur la notion de pays tiers sûr au sens de l’UE, en tenant compte des conclusions du Conseil européen de juin"
    https://ec.europa.eu/transparency/regdoc/rep/1/2017/FR/COM-2017-820-F1-FR-MAIN-PART-1.PDF

    Il y a donc fort à parier qu’en à peine 1 an et demi, les choses n’aient pas beaucoup avancées concernant les règlements.
    Bref, comme il était assez attendu, ce qui ne contraint pas totalement les Etats avancent et le reste piétine pour le moment.

    Par contre, elles avancent concernant la politique des retours et donc la Directive Retour !

    Politique des retours et externalisation de l’asile :

    Après le Conseil de Tampere en 1999, vient la "crise des migrants" en 2015, qui ne fera qu’accélérer les constatations de l’échec du RAEC.

    Le Conseil européen lance donc une réunion spéciale en avril 2015 qui annonce un changement de stratégie vers l’extérieur avec notamment un renforcement de la coopération avec les pays tiers pour le "contrôle de l’immigration". Ordre est donné à la Commission de mobiliser tous les moyens nécessaires pour mettre cette nouvelle stratégie en oeuvre.
    Ce n’est pas le lancement officiel de l’externalisation de l’Asile puisque le processus de Khartoum et de Rabat sont antérieurs et déjà lancés.
    Néanmoins, il me parait assez évident personnellement qu’un coup d’accélérateur à la stratégie d’externalisation sera donné à partir de ce Conseil qui sera entièrement tourné vers la coopération internationale :
    https://www.consilium.europa.eu/en/press/press-releases/2015/04/23/special-euco-statement

    Dans le prolongement logique des décisions prises lors du Conseil d’avril 2015 et de l’orientation stratégique vers l’extérieur, le Conseil Européen lancera le Sommet de la Valette en novembre où il invitera un nombre conséquent de pays africains.
    Ainsi le Sommet de la Valette, "fut l’occasion de reconnaître que la gestion des migrations relève de la responsabilité commune des pays d’origine, de transit et de destination. L’UE et l’Afrique ont travaillé dans un esprit de partenariat afin de trouver des solutions communes aux défis d’intérêt commun."
    https://www.consilium.europa.eu/fr/meetings/international-summit/2015/11/11-12

    C’est après ce Sommet que seront initiés le Fond Fiduciaire, les accords avec la Turquie, la Libye, les garde-côtes, la transformation de Frontex etc
    Bien que tout cela ait été préparé en amont.

    Après les ordres du Conseil, la Commission s’exécute avec l’Agenda Européen en Matière de Migrations et la focale sur les retours :
    Devant la stratégie d’orientation du Conseil qui demande des réformes fortes et des actions pour transformer la politique européenne d’asile, la Commission s’exécute en mai 2015 avec l’Agenda Européen des migrations :https://ec.europa.eu/france/node/859_fr

    Cet agenda met l’emphase sur un nombre impressionnant de points, mais une large part est également réservée aux retours page 11 et 12 (puisqu’il faudrait s’assurer que les retours soient efficaces et effectifs d’après la Commission).
    https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/sites/homeaffairs/files/what-we-do/policies/european-agenda-migration/background-information/docs/communication_on_the_european_agenda_on_migration_fr.pdf

    Dans la foulée la Commission lance donc une réflexion sur la politique des retours qui culminera la même année en 2015 avec The Action Plan of Return.
    L’action plan partira d’un principe assez simple, si les migrants viennent, c’est parce qu’on ne les renvoie pas...
    "The European Agenda on Migration, adopted by the European Commission on 13 May 2015, highlighted that one of the incentives for irregular migration is the knowledge that the EU’s system to return irregular migrants is not sufficiently effective"
    https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX%3A52015DC0453

    Ce plan est censé résoudre ce problème.
    Mais il sera aussi un relatif échec, ce qui n’empêchera pas la Commission d’insister en lançant un nouveau plan en 2017, The Renewed Action Plan on return :
    "Despite this, the overall impact on the return track record across the European Union remained limited, showing that more resolute action is needed to bring measurable results in returning irregular migrants. "
    https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/sites/homeaffairs/files/what-we-do/policies/european-agenda-migration/20170302_a_more_effective_return_policy_in_the_european_union_-_a_renewed_

    Toujours dans la foulée d’une politique d’expulsion efficace, il sera discuté plus tard (en mars 2019 sur l’évaluation de l’application de l’agenda européen) de la meilleure façon d’exécuter les retours en Europe. C’est là où nous en sommes.
    Pour la mise en place d’une politique de retour efficace, il y a donc deux stratégies :

    1) renforcer les accords de réadmission avec des accords bilatéraux ou par le biais des accords de Cotonou (qui vont être révisés et qui ont beaucoup tourné autour des migrations justement...on en reparlera un jour).
    "Concernant donc "les retours et la réadmission, l’UE continue d’œuvrer à la conclusion d’accords et d’arrangements en matière de réadmission avec les pays partenaires, 23 accords et arrangements ayant été conclus jusqu’à présent. Les États membres doivent maintenant tirer pleinement parti des accords existants."
    http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-19-1496_fr.htm

    2) renforcer les procédures de retour depuis l’Europe.
    La Commission espère en conséquence que "le Parlement européen et le Conseil devraient adopter rapidement la proposition de la Commission en matière de retour, qui vise à limiter les abus et la fuite des personnes faisant l’objet d’un retour au sein de l’Union"
    http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-19-1496_fr.htm

    C’est pourquoi la Commission propose de revoir la Directive Retour.

    La Directive Retour :
    La directive retour est donc la prochaine directive sur la liste des refontes.
    Ce sera un gros sujet a priori puisque la prochaine étape c’est le vote en Commission LIBE avant donc le vote en plénière.
    L’échéance est donc proche et les discussions bien avancées.

    Un texte problématique :

    Article 6 et 16
    En gros, les problèmes qui se posent avec ce texte ont surtout à voir avec l’article 6 qui décrit une liste de 16 critères de "risque de fuites", les derniers étant particulièrement dangereux puisqu’il semblerait que "résister aux procédures de retour" ou "refuser de donner ses empreintes" peuvent représenter des risques de fuites....
    Cet élargissement des critères est à mettre en lien avec l’article 18 qui permet la détention de toutes les personnes qui représentent un risque de fuite. Avec un élargissement pareil des critères de "fuites", je crains que l’on ne se donne le droit d’enfermer tout le monde.

    Article 7
    L’article 7 oblige les Etats tiers à coopérer dans les procédures de retour.
    L’application de cet article me semblait complexe mais le Brief du Parlement sur la Directive au paragraphe "Council" (donc sur les discussions au Conseil) ajoute que les Etats réfléchissent à la possibilité de sanctions pour les pays tiers en cas de non-respect de cette obligation de coopération.
    Et à ce moment-là j’ai compris.... Ma théorie c’est qu’un chantage quelconque pourra être mis en place pour établir une pression forçant les Etats tiers à coopérer.
    Tout le problème tient sur l’amplitude des sanctions possibles. Je n’en vois pas beaucoup, sauf à menacer de rompre des accords commerciaux ou de développement.

    C’est déjà plus ou moins le cas via le Fond Fiduciaire ou les fonds d’aide au dvp puisque l’on voit parfois que l’aide au dvp dépend de la mise en place d’accords de réadmission.
    Par exemple : l’UE et l’Afghanistan ont signé un accord de réadmission en Octobre 2016 : https://eeas.europa.eu/sites/eeas/files/eu_afghanistan_joint_way_forward_on_migration_issues.pdf
    Et dans la foulée d’octobre, 5 milliards d’aide au dvp étaient débloqués pour la période 2016-2020 à la conférence de Bruxelles (https://eeas.europa.eu/sites/eeas/files/eu-afghanistan_march_2019.pdf).

    Avec une opération pareille, des soupçons de chantage à l’aide au dvp me paraissent tout à fait légitime.
    Cependant, ils existaient une séparation dans la forme. C’est-à-dire que même si les liens peuvent sembler évidents, les accords de réadmission n’établissaient pas directement de chantage entre l’un et l’autre. Il n’était pas écrit que des "sanctions" étaient possibles (du moins pas dans l’exemple de l’Afghanistan ni même dans l’accord de Cotonou - exception faite de ce qui concerne l’article 96 et le respect des droits—et dans aucun autre texte à ma connaissance).
    Ici le Conseil veut faire un pas de plus dans la direction d’une politique assumée de pressions via des sanctions et donc, indirectement semble-t-il, de chantage.

    Les Pays Tiers-Sûrs
    Un autre élément dangereux dans ce paragraphe sur le Conseil dans le Brief du Parlement : c’est que les Etats de leur côté réfléchissent aussi à la possibilité de renvoyer une personne dans un pays tiers considéré comme sûr qui ne soit pas le pays d’origine.
    En d’autres termes, renvoyer les soudanais par exemple, en Egypte par exemple légalement.

    Cela rejoint a priori les discussions sur la notion de pays tiers sûrs que la Commission et le Conseil continuent de vouloir développer depuis très longtemps malgré les oppositions franches des ONG (http://www.forumrefugies.org/s-informer/actualites/le-concept-de-pays-tiers-sur-une-remise-en-cause-profonde-de-l-acces-) ou même l’avis défavorable de la Commission Nationale Consultative des Droits de l’Homme en 2017 (https://www.cncdh.fr/sites/default/files/171219_avis_concept_pays_tiers_sur_5.pdf)
    On ferait ici un pas de plus au sein du creuset initié par la politique des "pays d’origine sûrs" et on s’offrirait le droit de renvoyer des personnes dans des pays qui n’auraient pas les conditions pour les accueillir dignement (tant matériellement que du point de vue du respect des droits...).

    Article 22
    L’article 22 est aussi très problématique puisque les dispositions aux frontières devraient changer :
    Les migrants en zone d’attente devraient recevoir une décision de retour simplifiée plutôt qu’une explication motivée.
    Il ne devrait plus y avoir aucune chance de départ volontaire, sauf si le migrant possède un document de voyage en cours de validité (remis aux autorités) et coopère pleinement (car s’il ne coopère pas, on l’a vu, il peut être déclaré en "tentative de fuite" ou en "fuite").
    Concernant les recours, les migrants ne disposeront que de 48 heures pour faire appel d’une décision de retour fondée sur un rejet de l’asile à la frontière, et l’effet suspensif ne s’appliquera qu’à la présentation de nouvelles conclusions importantes (type CNDA) ou qu’il n’y a pas déjà eu de contrôle juridictionnel effectif.

    Article 16
    D’ailleurs, les recours peuvent subir un changement relativement dramatique à cause de l’article 16. Selon le brief de la Commission :
    " Proposed Article 16(4) imposes a general obligation on Member States to establish ‘reasonable’ time limits. In relation to appeals lodged against return decisions adopted as a consequence of a decision rejecting an application for international protection, Member States would have to establish a time limit for lodging an appeal of a maximum of five days, but would be free to fix a shorter period."
    http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/BRIE/2019/637901/EPRS_BRI(2019)637901_EN.pdf
    Une manière de réduire encore plus les possibilités de recours.

    Article 13
    L’article 13 apporte aussi des changements aux refus d’entrée : " the proposal would allow Member States to impose an isolated entry ban, not accompanied by a corresponding return decision, if the irregularity of a stay is detected when the third-country national is exiting the territory of a Member State"
    http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/BRIE/2019/637901/EPRS_BRI(2019)637901_EN.pdf

    Néanmoins, j’ai pour le moment du mal à évaluer l’étendue de cette proposition à l’article 13 et il faudrait peut-être en discuter avec l’anafé par exemple.

    #procédure_d'asile #réforme

    Reçu par email via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 06.06.2019

    • New EU deportation law breaches fundamental rights standards and should be rejected

      A proposed new EU law governing standards and procedures for deportations would breach fundamental rights standards, massively expand the use of detention, limit appeal rights and undermine ’voluntary’ return initiatives. It should be rejected by the European Parliament and the Council, argues a new analysis published today by Statewatch. [1]

      The original Returns Directive was agreed in 2008, but a proposal for a ’recast’ version was published by the European Commission in September 2018 as one a number of measures aiming to crack down on “illegally staying third-country nationals” in the EU. [2]

      The proposal aims to increase the number of deportations from the EU by reducing or eliminating existing safeguards for those facing deportation proceedings - but even if such a method could be considered legitimate, there is no evidence to suggest that the proposed measures will have the intended effect.

      For example, the proposal introduces numerous new grounds for placing migrants in detention and would introduce a new ’minimum maximum’ period of detention of at least three months. [3]

      However, in 2017, Spain (with a maximum detention period of 60 days) had a ’return rate’ of 37%, while the return rate from countries with a detention limit of 18 months (the maximum period permitted under the current Returns Directive) differed significantly: 11% in the Czech Republic, 18% in Belgium, 40% in Greece and 46% in Germany. [4]

      The report urges EU lawmakers to discard the proposal and focus on alternative measures that would be less harmful to individuals. It includes an article-by-article analysis of the Commission’s proposal and the positions of the European Parliament and the Council, as they were prior to the EU institutions’ summer break.

      The European Parliament and the Council of the EU will begin discussing the proposal again in the coming weeks.

      Quotes

      Statewatch researcher Jane Kilpatrick said:

      “The proposed recast prioritises detention for more people and for longer durations - the physical and mental harms of which are well-known, especially for people with prior traumatic experiences - over any collaborative measures. The recast would remove the option for states to adopt measures more respectful of human rights and health. The fact that it hasn’t relied on any evidence that these will even work suggests it is a political exercise to appease anti-migrant rhetoric.”

      Chris Jones, a researcher at Statewatch, added:

      “The EU cannot claim to be a bastion of human rights at the same time as trying to undermine or eliminate existing safeguards for third-country nationals subject to deportation proceedings. Given that there is no evidence to suggest the proposed measures would actually work, it seems that lawmakers are dealing with a proposal that would be both harmful and ineffective. The previous MEP responsible for the proposal did a good job of trying to improve it - but it would be better to reject it altogether.”

      http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/sep/eu-returns-directive.htm

    • New EU deportation law breaches fundamental rights standards and should be rejected

      A proposed new EU law governing standards and procedures for deportations would breach fundamental rights standards, massively expand the use of detention, limit appeal rights and undermine ’voluntary’ return initiatives. It should be rejected by the European Parliament and the Council, argues a new analysis published today by Statewatch. [1]

      The original Returns Directive was agreed in 2008, but a proposal for a ’recast’ version was published by the European Commission in September 2018 as one a number of measures aiming to crack down on “illegally staying third-country nationals” in the EU. [2]

      The proposal aims to increase the number of deportations from the EU by reducing or eliminating existing safeguards for those facing deportation proceedings - but even if such a method could be considered legitimate, there is no evidence to suggest that the proposed measures will have the intended effect.

      For example, the proposal introduces numerous new grounds for placing migrants in detention and would introduce a new ’minimum maximum’ period of detention of at least three months. [3]

      However, in 2017, Spain (with a maximum detention period of 60 days) had a ’return rate’ of 37%, while the return rate from countries with a detention limit of 18 months (the maximum period permitted under the current Returns Directive) differed significantly: 11% in the Czech Republic, 18% in Belgium, 40% in Greece and 46% in Germany. [4]

      The report urges EU lawmakers to discard the proposal and focus on alternative measures that would be less harmful to individuals. It includes an article-by-article analysis of the Commission’s proposal and the positions of the European Parliament and the Council, as they were prior to the EU institutions’ summer break.

      The European Parliament and the Council of the EU will begin discussing the proposal again in the coming weeks.

      Quotes

      Statewatch researcher Jane Kilpatrick said:

      “The proposed recast prioritises detention for more people and for longer durations - the physical and mental harms of which are well-known, especially for people with prior traumatic experiences - over any collaborative measures. The recast would remove the option for states to adopt measures more respectful of human rights and health. The fact that it hasn’t relied on any evidence that these will even work suggests it is a political exercise to appease anti-migrant rhetoric.”

      Chris Jones, a researcher at Statewatch, added:

      “The EU cannot claim to be a bastion of human rights at the same time as trying to undermine or eliminate existing safeguards for third-country nationals subject to deportation proceedings. Given that there is no evidence to suggest the proposed measures would actually work, it seems that lawmakers are dealing with a proposal that would be both harmful and ineffective. The previous MEP responsible for the proposal did a good job of trying to improve it - but it would be better to reject it altogether.”

      http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/sep/eu-returns-directive.htm