#easo

  • Asylum Outsourced : McKinsey’s Secret Role in Europe’s Refugee Crisis

    In 2016 and 2017, US management consultancy giant #McKinsey was at the heart of efforts in Europe to accelerate the processing of asylum applications on over-crowded Greek islands and salvage a controversial deal with Turkey, raising concerns over the outsourcing of public policy on refugees.

    The language was more corporate boardroom than humanitarian crisis – promises of ‘targeted strategies’, ‘maximising productivity’ and a ‘streamlined end-to-end asylum process.’

    But in 2016 this was precisely what the men and women of McKinsey&Company, the elite US management consultancy, were offering the European Union bureaucrats struggling to set in motion a pact with Turkey to stem the flow of asylum seekers to the continent’s shores.

    In March of that year, the EU had agreed to pay Turkey six billion euros if it would take back asylum seekers who had reached Greece – many of them fleeing fighting in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan – and prevent others from trying to cross its borders.

    The pact – which human rights groups said put at risk the very right to seek refuge – was deeply controversial, but so too is the previously unknown extent of McKinsey’s influence over its implementation, and the lengths some EU bodies went to conceal that role.

    According to the findings of this investigation, months of ‘pro bono’ fieldwork by McKinsey fed, sometimes verbatim, into the highest levels of EU policy-making regarding how to make the pact work on the ground, and earned the consultancy a contract – awarded directly, without competition – worth almost one million euros to help enact that very same policy.

    The bloc’s own internal procurement watchdog later deemed the contract “irregular”.

    Questions have already been asked about McKinsey’s input in 2015 into German efforts to speed up its own turnover of asylum applications, with concerns expressed about rights being denied to those applying.

    This investigation, based on documents sought since November 2017, sheds new light on the extent to which private management consultants shaped Europe’s handling of the crisis on the ground, and how bureaucrats tried to keep that role under wraps.

    “If some companies develop programs which then turn into political decisions, this is a political issue of concern that should be examined carefully,” said German MEP Daniel Freund, a member of the European Parliament’s budget committee and a former Head of Advocacy for EU Integrity at Transparency International.

    “Especially if the same companies have afterwards been awarded with follow-up contracts not following due procedures.”

    Deal too important to fail

    The March 2016 deal was the culmination of an epic geopolitical thriller played out in Brussels, Ankara and a host of European capitals after more than 850,000 people – mainly Syrians, Iraqis and Afghans – took to the Aegean by boat and dinghy from Turkey to Greece the previous year.

    Turkey, which hosts some 3.5 million refugees from the nine-year-old war in neighbouring Syria, committed to take back all irregular asylum seekers who travelled across its territory in return for billions of euros in aid, EU visa liberalisation for Turkish citizens and revived negotiations on Turkish accession to the bloc. It also provided for the resettlement in Europe of one Syrian refugee from Turkey for each Syrian returned to Turkey from Greece.

    The EU hailed it as a blueprint, but rights groups said it set a dangerous precedent, resting on the premise that Turkey is a ‘safe third country’ to which asylum seekers can be returned, despite a host of rights that it denies foreigners seeking protection.

    The deal helped cut crossings over the Aegean, but it soon became clear that other parts were not delivering; the centrepiece was an accelerated border procedure for handling asylum applications within 15 days, including appeal. This wasn’t working, while new movement restrictions meant asylum seekers were stuck on Greek islands.

    But for the EU, the deal was too important to be derailed.

    “The directions from the European Commission, and those behind it, was that Greece had to implement the EU-Turkey deal full-stop, no matter the legal arguments or procedural issue you might raise,” said Marianna Tzeferakou, a lawyer who was part of a legal challenge to the notion that Turkey is a safe place to seek refuge.

    “Someone gave an order that this deal will start being implemented. Ambiguity and regulatory arbitrage led to a collapse of procedural guarantees. It was a political decision and could not be allowed to fail.”

    Enter McKinsey.

    Action plans emerge simultaneously

    Fresh from advising Germany on how to speed up the processing of asylum applications, the firm’s consultants were already on the ground doing research in Greece in the summer of 2016, according to two sources working with the Greek asylum service, GAS, at the time but who did not wish to be named.

    Documents seen by BIRN show that the consultancy was already in “initial discussions” with an EU body called the ‘Structural Reform Support Service’, SRSS, which aids member states in designing and implementing structural reforms and was at the time headed by Dutchman Maarten Verwey. Verwey was simultaneously EU coordinator for the EU-Turkey deal and is now the EU’s director general of economic and financial affairs, though he also remains acting head of SRSS.

    Asked for details of these ‘discussions’, Verwey responded that the European Commission – the EU’s executive arm – “does not hold any other documents” concerning the matter.

    Nevertheless, by September 2016, McKinsey had a pro bono proposal on the table for how it could help out, entitled ‘Supporting the European Commission through integrated refugee management.’ Verwey signed off on it in October.

    Minutes of management board meetings of the European Asylum Support Office, EASO – the EU’s asylum agency – show McKinsey was tasked by the Commission to “analyse the situation on the Greek islands and come up with an action plan that would result in an elimination of the backlog” of asylum cases by April 2017.

    A spokesperson for the Commission told BIRN: “McKinsey volunteered to work free of charge to improve the functioning of the Greek asylum and reception system.”

    Over the next 12 weeks, according to other redacted documents, McKinsey worked with all the major actors involved – the SRSS, EASO, the EU border agency Frontex as well as Greek authorities.

    At bi-weekly stakeholder meetings, McKinsey identified “bottlenecks” in the asylum process and began to outline a series of measures to reduce the backlog, some of which were already being tested in a “mini-pilot” on the Greek island of Chios.

    At a first meeting in mid-October, McKinsey consultants told those present that “processing rates” of asylum cases by the EASO and the Greek asylum service, as well as appeals bodies, would need to significantly increase.

    By December, McKinsey’s “action plan” was ready, involving “targeted strategies and recommendations” for each actor involved.

    The same month, on December 8, Verwey released the EU’s own Joint Action Plan for implementing the EU-Turkey deal, which was endorsed by the EU’s heads of government on December 15.

    There was no mention of any McKinsey involvement and when asked about the company’s role the Commission told BIRN the plan was “a document elaborated together between the Commission and the Greek authorities.”

    However, buried in the EASO’s 2017 Annual Report is a reference to European Council endorsement of “the consultancy action plan” to clear the asylum backlog.

    Indeed, the similarities between McKinsey’s plan and the EU’s Joint Action Plan are uncanny, particularly in terms of increasing detention capacity on the islands, “segmentation” of cases, ramping up numbers of EASO and GAS caseworkers and interpreters and Frontex escort officers, limiting the number of appeal steps in the asylum process and changing the way appeals are processed and opinions drafted.

    In several instances, they are almost identical: where McKinsey recommends introducing “overarching segmentation by case types to increase speed and quality”, for example, the EU’s Joint Action Plan calls for “segmentation by case categories to increase speed and quality”.

    Much of what McKinsey did for the SRSS remains redacted.

    In June 2019, the Commission justified the non-disclosure on the basis that the information would pose a “risk” to “public security” as it could allegedly “be exploited by third parties (for example smuggling networks)”.

    Full disclosure, it argued, would risk “seriously undermining the commercial interests” of McKinsey.

    “While I understand that there could indeed be a private and public interest in the subject matter covered by the documents requested, I consider that such a public interest in transparency would not, in this case, outweigh the need to protect the commercial interests of the company concerned,” Martin Selmayr, then secretary-general of the European Commission, wrote.

    SRSS rejected the suggestion that the fact that Verwey refused to fully disclose the McKinsey proposal he had signed off on in October 2016 represented a possible conflict of interest, according to internal documents obtained during this investigation.

    Once Europe’s leaders had endorsed the Joint Action Plan, EASO was asked to “conclude a direct contract with McKinsey” to assist in its implementation, according to EASO management board minutes.

    ‘Political pressure’

    The contract, worth 992,000 euros, came with an attached ‘exception note’ signed on January 20, 2017, by EASO’s Executive Director at the time, Jose Carreira, and Joanna Darmanin, the agency’s then head of operations. The note stated that “due to the time constraints and the political pressure it was deemed necessary to proceed with the contract to be signed without following the necessary procurement procedure”.

    The following year, an audit of EASO yearly accounts by the European Court of Auditors, ECA, which audits EU finances, found that “a single pre-selected economic operator” had been awarded work without the application of “any of the procurement procedures” laid down under EU regulations, designed to encourage transparency and competition.

    “Therefore, the public procurement procedure and all related payments (992,000 euros) were irregular,” it said.

    The auditor’s report does not name McKinsey. But it does specify that the “irregular” contract concerned the EASO’s hiring of a consultancy for implementation of the action plan in Greece; the amount cited by the auditor exactly matches the one in the McKinsey contract, while a spokesman for the EASO indirectly confirmed the contracts concerned were one and the same.

    When asked about the McKinsey contract, the spokesman, Anis Cassar, said: “EASO does not comment on specifics relating to individual contracts, particularly where the ECA is concerned. However, as you note, ECA found that the particular procurement procedure was irregular (not illegal).”

    “The procurement was carried under [sic] exceptional procurement rules in the context of the pressing requests by the relevant EU Institutions and Member States,” said EASO spokesman Anis Cassar.

    McKinsey’s deputy head of Global Media Relations, Graham Ackerman, said the company was unable to provide any further details.

    “In line with our firm’s values and confidentiality policy, we do not publicly discuss our clients or details of our client service,” Ackerman told BIRN.

    ‘Evaluation, feedback, goal-setting’

    It was not the first time questions had been asked of the EASO’s procurement record.

    In October 2017, the EU’s fraud watchdog, OLAF, launched a probe into the agency (https://www.politico.eu/article/jose-carreira-olaf-anti-fraud-office-investigates-eu-asylum-agency-director), chiefly concerning irregularities identified in 2016. It contributed to the resignation in June 2018 of Carreira (https://www.politico.eu/article/jose-carreira-easo-under-investigation-director-of-eu-asylum-agency-steps-d), who co-signed the ‘exception note’ on the McKinsey contract. The investigation eventually uncovered wrongdoings ranging from breaches of procurement rules to staff harassment (https://www.politico.eu/article/watchdog-finds-misconduct-at-european-asylum-support-office-harassment), Politico reported in November 2018.

    According to the EASO, the McKinsey contract was not part of OLAF’s investigation. OLAF said it could not comment.

    McKinsey’s work went ahead, running from January until April 2017, the point by which the EU wanted the backlog of asylum cases “eliminated” and the burden on overcrowded Greek islands lifted.

    Overseeing the project was a steering committee comprised of Verwey, Carreira, McKinsey staff and senior Greek and European Commission officials.

    The details of McKinsey’s operation are contained in a report it submitted in May 2017.

    The EASO initially refused to release the report, citing its “sensitive and restrictive nature”. Its disclosure, the agency said, would “undermine the protection of public security and international relations, as well as the commercial interests and intellectual property of McKinsey & Company.”

    The response was signed by Carreira.

    Only after a reporter on this story complained to the EU Ombudsman, did the EASO agree to disclose several sections of the report.

    Running to over 1,500 pages, the disclosed material provides a unique insight into the role of a major private consultancy in what has traditionally been the realm of public policy – the right to asylum.

    In the jargon of management consultancy, the driving logic of McKinsey’s intervention was “maximising productivity” – getting as many asylum cases processed as quickly as possible, whether they result in transfers to the Greek mainland, in the case of approved applications, or the deportation of “returnable migrants” to Turkey.

    “Performance management systems” were introduced to encourage speed, while mechanisms were created to “monitor” the weekly “output” of committees hearing the appeals of rejected asylum seekers.

    Time spent training caseworkers and interviewers before they were deployed was to be reduced, IT support for the Greek bureaucracy was stepped up and police were instructed to “detain migrants immediately after they are notified of returnable status,” i.e. as soon as their asylum applications were rejected.

    Four employees of the Greek asylum agency at the time told BIRN that McKinsey had access to agency staff, but said the consultancy’s approach jarred with the reality of the situation on the ground.

    Taking part in a “leadership training” course held by McKinsey, one former employee, who spoke on condition of anonymity, told BIRN: “It felt so incompatible with the mentality of a public service operating in a camp for asylum seekers.”

    The official said much of what McKinsey was proposing had already been considered and either implemented or rejected by GAS.

    “The main ideas of how to organise our work had already been initiated by the HQ of GAS,” the official said. “The only thing McKinsey added were corporate methods of evaluation, feedback, setting goals, and initiatives that didn’t add anything meaningful.”

    Indeed, the backlog was proving hard to budge.

    Throughout successive “progress updates”, McKinsey repeatedly warned the steering committee that productivity “levels are insufficient to reach target”. By its own admission, deportations never surpassed 50 a week during the period of its contract. The target was 340.

    In its final May 2017 report, McKinsey touted its success in “reducing total process duration” of the asylum procedure to a mere 11 days, down from an average of 170 days in February 2017.

    Yet thousands of asylum seekers remained trapped in overcrowded island camps for months on end.

    While McKinsey claimed that the population of asylum seekers on the island was cut to 6,000 by April 2017, pending “data verification” by Greek authorities, Greek government figures put the number at 12,822, just around 1,500 fewer than in January when McKinsey got its contract.

    The winter was harsh; organisations working with asylum seekers documented a series of accidents in which a number of people were harmed or killed, with insufficient or no investigation undertaken by Greek authorities (https://www.proasyl.de/en/news/greek-hotspots-deaths-not-to-be-forgotten).

    McKinsey’s final report tallied 40 field visits and more than 200 meetings and workshops on the islands. It also, interestingly, counted 21 weekly steering committee meetings “since October 2016” – connecting McKinsey’s 2016 pro bono work and the 2017 period it worked under contract with the EASO. Indeed, in its “project summary”, McKinsey states it was “invited” to work on both the “development” and “implementation” of the action plan in Greece.

    The Commission, however, in its response to this investigation, insisted it did not “pre-select” McKinsey for the 2017 work or ask EASO to sign a contract with the firm.

    Smarting from military losses in Syria and political setbacks at home, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan tore up the deal with the EU in late February this year, accusing Brussels of failing to fulfil its side of the bargain. But even before the deal’s collapse, 7,000 refugees and migrants reached Greek shores in the first two months of 2020, according to the United Nations refugee agency.

    German link

    This was not the first time that the famed consultancy firm had left its mark on Europe’s handling of the crisis.

    In what became a political scandal (https://www.focus.de/politik/deutschland/bamf-skandal-im-news-ticker-jetzt-muessen-sich-seehofer-und-cordt-den-fragen-d), the German Federal Office for Migration and Refugees, according to reports, paid McKinsey more than €45 million (https://www.augsburger-allgemeine.de/politik/Millionenzahlungen-Was-hat-McKinsey-beim-Bamf-gemacht-id512950) to help clear a backlog of more than 270,000 asylum applications and to shorten the asylum process.

    German media reports said the sum included 3.9 million euros for “Integrated Refugee Management”, the same phrase McKinsey pitched to the EU in September 2016.

    The parallels don’t end there.

    Much like the contract McKinsey clinched with the EASO in January 2017, German media reports have revealed that more than half of the sum paid to the consultancy for its work in Germany was awarded outside of normal public procurement procedures on the grounds of “urgency”. Der Spiegel (https://www.spiegel.de/wirtschaft/unternehmen/fluechtlinge-in-deutschland-mckinsey-erhielt-mehr-als-20-millionen-euro-a-11) reported that the firm also did hundreds of hours of pro bono work prior to clinching the contract. McKinsey denied that it worked for free in order to win future federal contracts.

    Again, the details were classified as confidential.

    Arne Semsrott, director of the German transparency NGO FragdenStaat, which investigated McKinsey’s work in Germany, said the lack of transparency in such cases was costing European taxpayers money and control.

    Asked about German and EU efforts to keep the details of such outsourcing secret, Semsrott told BIRN: “The lack of transparency means the public spending more money on McKinsey and other consulting firms. And this lack of transparency also means that we have a lack of public control over what is actually happening.”

    Sources familiar with the decision-making in Athens identified Solveigh Hieronimus, a McKinsey partner based in Munich, as the coordinator of the company’s team on the EASO contract in Greece. Hieronimus was central in pitching the company’s services to the German government, according to German media reports (https://www.spiegel.de/spiegel/print/d-147594782.html).

    Hieronimus did not respond to BIRN questions submitted by email.

    Freund, the German MEP formerly of Transparency International, said McKinsey’s role in Greece was a cause for concern.

    “It is not ideal if positions adopted by the [European] Council are in any way affected by outside businesses,” he told BIRN. “These decisions should be made by politicians based on legal analysis and competent independent advice.”

    A reporter on this story again complained to the EU Ombudsman in July 2019 regarding the Commission’s refusal to disclose further details of its dealings with McKinsey.

    In November, the Ombudsman told the Commission that “the substance of the funded project, especially the work packages and deliverable of the project[…] should be fully disclosed”, citing the principle that “the public has a right to be informed about the content of projects that are financed by public money.” The Ombudsman rejected the Commission’s argument that partial disclosure would undermine the commercial interests of McKinsey.

    Commission President Ursula von Der Leyen responded that the Commission “respectfully disagrees” with the Ombudsman. The material concerned, she wrote, “contains sensitive information on the business strategies and the commercial relations of the company concerned.”

    The president of the Commission has had dealings with McKinsey before; in February, von der Leyen testified before a special Bundestag committee concerning contracts worth tens of millions of euros that were awarded to external consultants, including McKinsey, during her time as German defence minister in 2013-2019.

    In 2018, Germany’s Federal Audit Office said procedures for the award of some contracts had not been strictly lawful or cost-effective. Von der Leyen acknowledged irregularities had occurred but said that much had been done to fix the shortcomings (https://www.ft.com/content/4634a3ea-4e71-11ea-95a0-43d18ec715f5).

    She was also questioned about her 2014 appointment of Katrin Suder, a McKinsey executive, as state secretary tasked with reforming the Bundeswehr’s system of procurement. Asked if Suder, who left the ministry in 2018, had influenced the process of awarding contracts, von der Leyen said she assumed not. Decisions like that were taken “way below my pay level,” she said.

    In its report, Germany’s governing parties absolved von der Leyen of blame, Politico reported on June 9 (https://www.politico.eu/article/ursula-von-der-leyen-german-governing-parties-contracting-scandal).

    The EU Ombudsman is yet to respond to the Commission’s refusal to grant further access to the McKinsey documents.

    https://balkaninsight.com/2020/06/22/asylum-outsourced-mckinseys-secret-role-in-europes-refugee-crisis
    #accord_UE-Turquie #asile #migrations #réfugiés #externalisation #privatisation #sous-traitance #Turquie #EU #UE #Union_européenne #Grèce #frontières #Allemagne #EASO #Structural_Reform_Support_Service (#SRSS) #Maarten_Verwey #Frontex #Chios #consultancy #Joint_Action_Plan #Martin_Selmayr #chronologie #Jose_Carreira #Joanna_Darmanin #privatisation #management #productivité #leadership_training #îles #Mer_Egée #Integrated_Refugee_Management #pro_bono #transparence #Solveigh_Hieronimus #Katrin_Suder

    ping @_kg_ @karine4 @isskein @rhoumour @reka

  • Monitoring being pitched to fight Covid-19 was tested on refugees

    The pandemic has given a boost to controversial data-driven initiatives to track population movements

    In Italy, social media monitoring companies have been scouring Instagram to see who’s breaking the nationwide lockdown. In Israel, the government has made plans to “sift through geolocation data” collected by the Shin Bet intelligence agency and text people who have been in contact with an infected person. And in the UK, the government has asked mobile operators to share phone users’ aggregate location data to “help to predict broadly how the virus might move”.

    These efforts are just the most visible tip of a rapidly evolving industry combining the exploitation of data from the internet and mobile phones and the increasing number of sensors embedded on Earth and in space. Data scientists are intrigued by the new possibilities for behavioural prediction that such data offers. But they are also coming to terms with the complexity of actually using these data sets, and the ethical and practical problems that lurk within them.

    In the wake of the refugee crisis of 2015, tech companies and research consortiums pushed to develop projects using new data sources to predict movements of migrants into Europe. These ranged from broad efforts to extract intelligence from public social media profiles by hand, to more complex automated manipulation of big data sets through image recognition and machine learning. Two recent efforts have just been shut down, however, and others are yet to produce operational results.

    While IT companies and some areas of the humanitarian sector have applauded new possibilities, critics cite human rights concerns, or point to limitations in what such technological solutions can actually achieve.

    In September last year Frontex, the European border security agency, published a tender for “social media analysis services concerning irregular migration trends and forecasts”. The agency was offering the winning bidder up to €400,000 for “improved risk analysis regarding future irregular migratory movements” and support of Frontex’s anti-immigration operations.

    Frontex “wants to embrace” opportunities arising from the rapid growth of social media platforms, a contracting document outlined. The border agency believes that social media interactions drastically change the way people plan their routes, and thus examining would-be migrants’ online behaviour could help it get ahead of the curve, since these interactions typically occur “well before persons reach the external borders of the EU”.

    Frontex asked bidders to develop lists of key words that could be mined from platforms like Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube. The winning company would produce a monthly report containing “predictive intelligence ... of irregular flows”.

    Early this year, however, Frontex cancelled the opportunity. It followed swiftly on from another shutdown; Frontex’s sister agency, the European Asylum Support Office (EASO), had fallen foul of the European data protection watchdog, the EDPS, for searching social media content from would-be migrants.

    The EASO had been using the data to flag “shifts in asylum and migration routes, smuggling offers and the discourse among social media community users on key issues – flights, human trafficking and asylum systems/processes”. The search covered a broad range of languages, including Arabic, Pashto, Dari, Urdu, Tigrinya, Amharic, Edo, Pidgin English, Russian, Kurmanji Kurdish, Hausa and French.

    Although the EASO’s mission, as its name suggests, is centred around support for the asylum system, its reports were widely circulated, including to organisations that attempt to limit illegal immigration – Europol, Interpol, member states and Frontex itself.

    In shutting down the EASO’s social media monitoring project, the watchdog cited numerous concerns about process, the impact on fundamental rights and the lack of a legal basis for the work.

    “This processing operation concerns a vast number of social media users,” the EDPS pointed out. Because EASO’s reports are read by border security forces, there was a significant risk that data shared by asylum seekers to help others travel safely to Europe could instead be unfairly used against them without their knowledge.

    Social media monitoring “poses high risks to individuals’ rights and freedoms,” the regulator concluded in an assessment it delivered last November. “It involves the use of personal data in a way that goes beyond their initial purpose, their initial context of publication and in ways that individuals could not reasonably anticipate. This may have a chilling effect on people’s ability and willingness to express themselves and form relationships freely.”

    EASO told the Bureau that the ban had “negative consequences” on “the ability of EU member states to adapt the preparedness, and increase the effectiveness, of their asylum systems” and also noted a “potential harmful impact on the safety of migrants and asylum seekers”.

    Frontex said that its social media analysis tender was cancelled after new European border regulations came into force, but added that it was considering modifying the tender in response to these rules.
    Coronavirus

    Drug shortages put worst-hit Covid-19 patients at risk
    European doctors running low on drugs needed to treat Covid-19 patients
    Big Tobacco criticised for ’coronavirus publicity stunt’ after donating ventilators

    The two shutdowns represented a stumbling block for efforts to track population movements via new technologies and sources of data. But the public health crisis precipitated by the Covid-19 virus has brought such efforts abruptly to wider attention. In doing so it has cast a spotlight on a complex knot of issues. What information is personal, and legally protected? How does that protection work? What do concepts like anonymisation, privacy and consent mean in an age of big data?
    The shape of things to come

    International humanitarian organisations have long been interested in whether they can use nontraditional data sources to help plan disaster responses. As they often operate in inaccessible regions with little available or accurate official data about population sizes and movements, they can benefit from using new big data sources to estimate how many people are moving where. In particular, as well as using social media, recent efforts have sought to combine insights from mobile phones – a vital possession for a refugee or disaster survivor – with images generated by “Earth observation” satellites.

    “Mobiles, satellites and social media are the holy trinity of movement prediction,” said Linnet Taylor, professor at the Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology and Society in the Netherlands, who has been studying the privacy implications of such new data sources. “It’s the shape of things to come.”

    As the devastating impact of the Syrian civil war worsened in 2015, Europe saw itself in crisis. Refugee movements dominated the headlines and while some countries, notably Germany, opened up to more arrivals than usual, others shut down. European agencies and tech companies started to team up with a new offering: a migration hotspot predictor.

    Controversially, they were importing a concept drawn from distant catastrophe zones into decision-making on what should happen within the borders of the EU.

    “Here’s the heart of the matter,” said Nathaniel Raymond, a lecturer at the Yale Jackson Institute for Global Affairs who focuses on the security implications of information communication technologies for vulnerable populations. “In ungoverned frontier cases [European data protection law] doesn’t apply. Use of these technologies might be ethically safer there, and in any case it’s the only thing that is available. When you enter governed space, data volume and ease of manipulation go up. Putting this technology to work in the EU is a total inversion.”
    “Mobiles, satellites and social media are the holy trinity of movement prediction”

    Justin Ginnetti, head of data and analysis at the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre in Switzerland, made a similar point. His organisation monitors movements to help humanitarian groups provide food, shelter and aid to those forced from their homes, but he casts a skeptical eye on governments using the same technology in the context of migration.

    “Many governments – within the EU and elsewhere – are very interested in these technologies, for reasons that are not the same as ours,” he told the Bureau. He called such technologies “a nuclear fly swatter,” adding: “The key question is: What problem are you really trying to solve with it? For many governments, it’s not preparing to ‘better respond to inflow of people’ – it’s raising red flags, to identify those en route and prevent them from arriving.”
    Eye in the sky

    A key player in marketing this concept was the European Space Agency (ESA) – an organisation based in Paris, with a major spaceport in French Guiana. The ESA’s pitch was to combine its space assets with other people’s data. “Could you be leveraging space technology and data for the benefit of life on Earth?” a recent presentation from the organisation on “disruptive smart technologies” asked. “We’ll work together to make your idea commercially viable.”

    By 2016, technologists at the ESA had spotted an opportunity. “Europe is being confronted with the most significant influxes of migrants and refugees in its history,” a presentation for their Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems Programme stated. “One burning issue is the lack of timely information on migration trends, flows and rates. Big data applications have been recognised as a potentially powerful tool.” It decided to assess how it could harness such data.

    The ESA reached out to various European agencies, including EASO and Frontex, to offer a stake in what it called “big data applications to boost preparedness and response to migration”. The space agency would fund initial feasibility stages, but wanted any operational work to be jointly funded.

    One such feasibility study was carried out by GMV, a privately owned tech group covering banking, defence, health, telecommunications and satellites. GMV announced in a press release in August 2017 that the study would “assess the added value of big data solutions in the migration sector, namely the reduction of safety risks for migrants, the enhancement of border controls, as well as prevention and response to security issues related with unexpected migration movements”. It would do this by integrating “multiple space assets” with other sources including mobile phones and social media.

    When contacted by the Bureau, a spokeswoman from GMV said that, contrary to the press release, “nothing in the feasibility study related to the enhancement of border controls”.

    In the same year, the technology multinational CGI teamed up with the Dutch Statistics Office to explore similar questions. They started by looking at data around asylum flows from Syria and at how satellite images and social media could indicate changes in migration patterns in Niger, a key route into Europe. Following this experiment, they approached EASO in October 2017. CGI’s presentation of the work noted that at the time EASO was looking for a social media analysis tool that could monitor Facebook groups, predict arrivals of migrants at EU borders, and determine the number of “hotspots” and migrant shelters. CGI pitched a combined project, co-funded by the ESA, to start in 2019 and expand to serve more organisations in 2020.
    The proposal was to identify “hotspot activities”, using phone data to group individuals “according to where they spend the night”

    The idea was called Migration Radar 2.0. The ESA wrote that “analysing social media data allows for better understanding of the behaviour and sentiments of crowds at a particular geographic location and a specific moment in time, which can be indicators of possible migration movements in the immediate future”. Combined with continuous monitoring from space, the result would be an “early warning system” that offered potential future movements and routes, “as well as information about the composition of people in terms of origin, age, gender”.

    Internal notes released by EASO to the Bureau show the sheer range of companies trying to get a slice of the action. The agency had considered offers of services not only from the ESA, GMV, the Dutch Statistics Office and CGI, but also from BIP, a consulting firm, the aerospace group Thales Alenia, the geoinformation specialist EGEOS and Vodafone.

    Some of the pitches were better received than others. An EASO analyst who took notes on the various proposals remarked that “most oversell a bit”. They went on: “Some claimed they could trace GSM [ie mobile networks] but then clarified they could do it for Venezuelans only, and maybe one or two countries in Africa.” Financial implications were not always clearly provided. On the other hand, the official noted, the ESA and its consortium would pay 80% of costs and “we can get collaboration on something we plan to do anyway”.

    The features on offer included automatic alerts, a social media timeline, sentiment analysis, “animated bubbles with asylum applications from countries of origin over time”, the detection and monitoring of smuggling sites, hotspot maps, change detection and border monitoring.

    The document notes a group of services available from Vodafone, for example, in the context of a proposed project to monitor asylum centres in Italy. The proposal was to identify “hotspot activities”, using phone data to group individuals either by nationality or “according to where they spend the night”, and also to test if their movements into the country from abroad could be back-tracked. A tentative estimate for the cost of a pilot project, spread over four municipalities, came to €250,000 – of which an unspecified amount was for “regulatory (privacy) issues”.

    Stumbling blocks

    Elsewhere, efforts to harness social media data for similar purposes were proving problematic. A September 2017 UN study tried to establish whether analysing social media posts, specifically on Twitter, “could provide insights into ... altered routes, or the conversations PoC [“persons of concern”] are having with service providers, including smugglers”. The hypothesis was that this could “better inform the orientation of resource allocations, and advocacy efforts” - but the study was unable to conclude either way, after failing to identify enough relevant data on Twitter.

    The ESA pressed ahead, with four feasibility studies concluding in 2018 and 2019. The Migration Radar project produced a dashboard that showcased the use of satellite imagery for automatically detecting changes in temporary settlement, as well as tools to analyse sentiment on social media. The prototype received positive reviews, its backers wrote, encouraging them to keep developing the product.

    CGI was effusive about the predictive power of its technology, which could automatically detect “groups of people, traces of trucks at unexpected places, tent camps, waste heaps and boats” while offering insight into “the sentiments of migrants at certain moments” and “information that is shared about routes and motives for taking certain routes”. Armed with this data, the company argued that it could create a service which could predict the possible outcomes of migration movements before they happened.

    The ESA’s other “big data applications” study had identified a demand among EU agencies and other potential customers for predictive analyses to ensure “preparedness” and alert systems for migration events. A package of services was proposed, using data drawn from social media and satellites.

    Both projects were slated to evolve into a second, operational phase. But this seems to have never become reality. CGI told the Bureau that “since the completion of the [Migration Radar] project, we have not carried out any extra activities in this domain”.

    The ESA told the Bureau that its studies had “confirmed the usefulness” of combining space technology and big data for monitoring migration movements. The agency added that its corporate partners were working on follow-on projects despite “internal delays”.

    EASO itself told the Bureau that it “took a decision not to get involved” in the various proposals it had received.

    Specialists found a “striking absence” of agreed upon core principles when using the new technologies

    But even as these efforts slowed, others have been pursuing similar goals. The European Commission’s Knowledge Centre on Migration and Demography has proposed a “Big Data for Migration Alliance” to address data access, security and ethics concerns. A new partnership between the ESA and GMV – “Bigmig" – aims to support “migration management and prevention” through a combination of satellite observation and machine-learning techniques (the company emphasised to the Bureau that its focus was humanitarian). And a consortium of universities and private sector partners – GMV among them – has just launched a €3 million EU-funded project, named Hummingbird, to improve predictions of migration patterns, including through analysing phone call records, satellite imagery and social media.

    At a conference in Berlin in October 2019, dozens of specialists from academia, government and the humanitarian sector debated the use of these new technologies for “forecasting human mobility in contexts of crises”. Their conclusions raised numerous red flags. They found a “striking absence” of agreed upon core principles. It was hard to balance the potential good with ethical concerns, because the most useful data tended to be more specific, leading to greater risks of misuse and even, in the worst case scenario, weaponisation of the data. Partnerships with corporations introduced transparency complications. Communication of predictive findings to decision makers, and particularly the “miscommunication of the scope and limitations associated with such findings”, was identified as a particular problem.

    The full consequences of relying on artificial intelligence and “employing large scale, automated, and combined analysis of datasets of different sources” to predict movements in a crisis could not be foreseen, the workshop report concluded. “Humanitarian and political actors who base their decisions on such analytics must therefore carefully reflect on the potential risks.”

    A fresh crisis

    Until recently, discussion of such risks remained mostly confined to scientific papers and NGO workshops. The Covid-19 pandemic has brought it crashing into the mainstream.

    Some see critical advantages to using call data records to trace movements and map the spread of the virus. “Using our mobile technology, we have the potential to build models that help to predict broadly how the virus might move,” an O2 spokesperson said in March. But others believe that it is too late for this to be useful. The UK’s chief scientific officer, Patrick Vallance, told a press conference in March that using this type of data “would have been a good idea in January”.

    Like the 2015 refugee crisis, the global emergency offers an opportunity for industry to get ahead of the curve with innovative uses of big data. At a summit in Downing Street on 11 March, Dominic Cummings asked tech firms “what [they] could bring to the table” to help the fight against Covid-19.

    Human rights advocates worry about the longer term effects of such efforts, however. “Right now, we’re seeing states around the world roll out powerful new surveillance measures and strike up hasty partnerships with tech companies,” Anna Bacciarelli, a technology researcher at Amnesty International, told the Bureau. “While states must act to protect people in this pandemic, it is vital that we ensure that invasive surveillance measures do not become normalised and permanent, beyond their emergency status.”

    More creative methods of surveillance and prediction are not necessarily answering the right question, others warn.

    “The single largest determinant of Covid-19 mortality is healthcare system capacity,” said Sean McDonald, a senior fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation, who studied the use of phone data in the west African Ebola outbreak of 2014-5. “But governments are focusing on the pandemic as a problem of people management rather than a problem of building response capacity. More broadly, there is nowhere near enough proof that the science or math underlying the technologies being deployed meaningfully contribute to controlling the virus at all.”

    Legally, this type of data processing raises complicated questions. While European data protection law - the GDPR - generally prohibits processing of “special categories of personal data”, including ethnicity, beliefs, sexual orientation, biometrics and health, it allows such processing in a number of instances (among them public health emergencies). In the case of refugee movement prediction, there are signs that the law is cracking at the seams.
    “There is nowhere near enough proof that the science or math underlying the technologies being deployed meaningfully contribute to controlling the virus at all.”

    Under GDPR, researchers are supposed to make “impact assessments” of how their data processing can affect fundamental rights. If they find potential for concern they should consult their national information commissioner. There is no simple way to know whether such assessments have been produced, however, or whether they were thoroughly carried out.

    Researchers engaged with crunching mobile phone data point to anonymisation and aggregation as effective tools for ensuring privacy is maintained. But the solution is not straightforward, either technically or legally.

    “If telcos are using individual call records or location data to provide intel on the whereabouts, movements or activities of migrants and refugees, they still need a legal basis to use that data for that purpose in the first place – even if the final intelligence report itself does not contain any personal data,” said Ben Hayes, director of AWO, a data rights law firm and consultancy. “The more likely it is that the people concerned may be identified or affected, the more serious this matter becomes.”

    More broadly, experts worry that, faced with the potential of big data technology to illuminate movements of groups of people, the law’s provisions on privacy begin to seem outdated.

    “We’re paying more attention now to privacy under its traditional definition,” Nathaniel Raymond said. “But privacy is not the same as group legibility.” Simply put, while issues around the sensitivity of personal data can be obvious, the combinations of seemingly unrelated data that offer insights about what small groups of people are doing can be hard to foresee, and hard to mitigate. Raymond argues that the concept of privacy as enshrined in the newly minted data protection law is anachronistic. As he puts it, “GDPR is already dead, stuffed and mounted. We’re increasing vulnerability under the colour of law.”

    https://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/stories/2020-04-28/monitoring-being-pitched-to-fight-covid-19-was-first-tested-o
    #cobaye #surveillance #réfugiés #covid-19 #coronavirus #test #smartphone #téléphones_portables #Frontex #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #Shin_Bet #internet #big_data #droits_humains #réseaux_sociaux #intelligence_prédictive #European_Asylum_Support_Office (#EASO) #EDPS #protection_des_données #humanitaire #images_satellites #technologie #European_Space_Agency (#ESA) #GMV #CGI #Niger #Facebook #Migration_Radar_2.0 #early_warning_system #BIP #Thales_Alenia #EGEOS #complexe_militaro-industriel #Vodafone #GSM #Italie #twitter #détection #routes_migratoires #systèmes_d'alerte #satellites #Knowledge_Centre_on_Migration_and_Demography #Big_Data for_Migration_Alliance #Bigmig #machine-learning #Hummingbird #weaponisation_of_the_data #IA #intelligence_artificielle #données_personnelles

    ping @etraces @isskein @karine4 @reka

    signalé ici par @sinehebdo :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/849167

    • Greece quarantines Ritsona migrant camp after finding 20 corona cases

      A migrant camp north of the Greek capital Athens has been placed under quarantine after 20 asylum seekers there tested positive for the novel coronavirus.

      The developments occurred after a 19-year-old female migrant from the camp gave birth in hospital in Athens, where she was found to be infected. Authorities then conducted tests on a total of 63 people also staying at the government-run Ritsona camp outside Athens, deciding to place the facility under quarantine after nearly a third of the tests came back positive. Meanwhile, health officials will continue to conduct tests on residents of the camp.

      The infections observed at Ritsona camp are now the first known cases among thousands of asylum seekers living across Greece, with most staying in overcrowded camps mainly on the Aegean islands. The Ritsona camp, however, is located on the Greek mainland, roughly 75 kilometers northeast of Athens, housing about 3,000 migrants.

      Quarantine and isolation at Ritsona

      The Greek migration ministry said that none of the confirmed cases at Ritsona had showed any symptoms thus far. However, in a bid to protect others, movement in and out of the Ritsona camp, will be restricted for at least 14 days; police forces will monitor the implementation of the measures.

      According to the Reuters news agency, the camp has also created an isolation area for those coronavirus patients who might still develop symptoms.

      ’Ticking health bomb’

      Greece recorded its first coronavirus case in late February, reporting more than 1,400 cases so far and 50 deaths. The country’s official population is 11 million. Compared to other EU countries at the forefront of the migration trend into Europe such as Italy and Spain, Greece has thus far kept its corona case numbers relatively low.

      However, with more than 40,000 refugees and migrant presently stuck in refugee camps on the Greek islands alone, the Greek government has described the current situation as a “ticking health bomb.”

      Aid organisations stress that conditions in the overcrowded camps are inhumane, calling for migrants to be evacuated from the Greek islands. Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis that Greece was ready to “protect” its islands, where no case has been recorded so far, while adding that he expects the EU to do more to help improve overall conditions in migrant camps and to assist relocate people to other EU countries.

      “Thank God, we haven’t had a single case of Covid-19 on the island of Lesbos or any other island,” Mitsotakis told CNN. “The conditions are far from being ideal but I should also point out that Greece is dealing with this problem basically on its own. (…) We haven’t had as much support from the European Union as we want.”

      https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/23826/greece-quarantines-ritsona-migrant-camp-after-finding-20-corona-cases

      #camp_de_réfugiés #asile #migrations #Athènes #coronavirus

    • Greece quarantines camp after migrants test coronavirus positive

      Greece has quarantined a migrant camp after 23 asylum seekers tested positive for the coronavirus, authorities said on Thursday, its first such facility to be hit since the outbreak of the disease.

      Tests were conducted after a 19-year-old female migrant living in the camp in central Greece was found infected after giving birth at an Athens hospital last week. She was the first recorded case among thousands of asylum seekers living in overcrowded camps across Greece.

      None of the confirmed cases showed any symptoms, the ministry said, adding that it was continuing its tests.

      Authorities said 119 of 380 people on board a ferry which authorities said had been prevented from docking in Turkey and was now anchored off Athens, had tested positive for the virus.

      Greece recorded its first coronavirus case at the end of February. It has reported 1,425 cases and 53 deaths, excluding the cases on the ferry.

      It is the gateway to Europe for people fleeing conflicts and poverty in the Middle East and beyond, with more than a million passing through Greece during the migrant crisis of 2015-2016.

      Any movement in and out of the once-open Ritsona camp, which is 75 km (45 miles) northeast of Athens and hosts hundreds of people, will be restricted for 14 days, the ministry said. Police would monitor movements.

      The camp has an isolation area for coronavirus patients should the need arise, sources have said.

      Aid agencies renewed their call for more concerted action at the European level to tackle the migration crisis.

      “It is urgently needed to evacuate migrants out of the Greek islands to EU countries,” said Leila Bodeux, policy and advocacy officer for Caritas Europa, an aid agency.

      EU Home Affairs Commissioner Ylva Johansson said it was a stark “warning signal” of what might happen if the virus spilled over into less organised facilities on the Greek islands.

      “(This) may result in a massive humanitarian crisis. This is a danger both for refugees hosted in certain countries outside the EU and for those living in unbearable conditions on the Greek islands,” she said during a European Parliament debate conducted by video link.

      More than 40,000 asylum-seekers are stuck in overcrowded refugee camps on the Greek islands, in conditions which the government itself has described as a “ticking health bomb”.

      Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis has said Greece is ready to protect its islands, where no case has been recorded so far, but urged the EU to provide more help.

      “The conditions are far from ideal but I should also point out that Greece is dealing with this problem basically on its own... We haven’t had as much support from the European Union as we wanted,” he told CNN.

      https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-greece-camp/greece-quarantines-camp-after-migrants-test-coronavirus-positive-idUSKBN21K

    • EU : Athens can handle Covid outbreak at Greek camp

      The European Commission says Greece will be able to manage a Covid-19 outbreak at a refugee camp near Athens.

      “I think they can manage,” Ylva Johansson, the European Commissioner for home affairs, told MEPs on Thursday (2 April).

      The outbreak is linked to the Ritsona camp of some 2,700 people who are all now under quarantine.

      At least 23 have been tested positive without showing any symptoms. Greek authorities had identified the first case after a woman from the camp gave birth at a hospital earlier this week.

      “This development confirms the fact that this fast-moving virus does not discriminate and can affect both migrant and local communities,” Gianluca Rocco, who heads the International Organization for Migration (IOM) in Greece, said in a statement.

      Another six cases linked to local residents have also been identified on the Greek islands.

      Notis Mitarachi, Greece’s minister of migration and asylum, said there are no confirmed cases of the disease in any of the island refugee camps.

      “We have only one affected camp, that is on the mainland, very close to Athens where 20 people have tested positive,” he said.

      Over 40,000 migrants, refugees and asylum seekers are stuck on the islands. Of those, some 20,000 are in Moria, a camp on Lesbos island that is designed to house only 3,000.

      It is unlikely conditions will improve any time soon with Mitarachi noting major changes will only take place before the year’s end. He said the construction of new camps on the mainland first have to be completed.

      “We do not have rooms in the mainland,” he said, when pressed on why there have been no mass evacuations from the islands.

      He placed some of the blame on the EU-Turkey deal, noting anyone transferred to the mainland cannot be returned to Turkey. Turkey has since the start of March refused to accept any returns given the coronavirus pandemic.

      Despite the deal, Mitarachi noted 10,000 people had still been transferred to the mainland so far this year. He also insisted all measures are being taken to ensure the safety of the Greek island camp refugees.

      In reality, Moria has one functioning faucet per 1,300 people. A lockdown also has been imposed, making any notions of social distancing impossible.

      He said all new arrivals from Turkey are separated and kept away from the camps. Special health units will also be dispatched into the camps to test for cases, he said.

      Mitarachi is demanding other EU states help take in people, to ease the pressure.

      Eight EU states had in early March pledged to take in 1,600 unaccompanied minors. The Commission says it expects the first relocations to take place before Easter at the latest.
      The money

      Greece has also been earmarked some €700m of EU funds to help in the efforts.

      The first €350m has already been divided up.

      Around €190m will go to paying rental accommodation for 25,000 beds on the mainland and provide cash assistance to 90,000 people under the aegis of the UN refugee agency (UNHCR).

      Another €100m will go to 31 camps run by the International Organization for Migration. Approximately €25m will go to help families and kids on the islands through the UNHCR.

      And €35m is set to help relocate others out of the camps and into hotels.

      The remaining €350m will go to building five new migrant centres (€220m), help pay for returns (€10m), support the Greek asylum service (€50m), enforce borders (€50m), and give an additional €10m each to Frontex and the EU’s asylum agency, Easo.

      https://euobserver.com/coronavirus/147973

      –-----

      Avec ce commentaire de Marie Martin, reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 03.04.2020 :

      Des informations intéressantes issues de l’article de Nikolak Nielsen, paru dans EuObserver aujourd’hui sur les fonds de l’UE dédiés à l’accueil et aux transferts depuis les hotspots.

      C’est assez paradoxal de voir la #Commissaire_européenne affirmer que le Grèce pourra gérer un éruption du Covid19, laissant presque penser à un esseulement de la Grèce.

      En vérité, l’article indique, chiffres à l’appui, que plusieurs actions sont financées (700M euros dédiés dont 190M pour le UNHCR afin de payer des hébergements à hauteur de 25 000 lits sur la péninsule et de l’assistance financières à 90 000 personnes réfugiées).
      Ces #financements s’ajoutent aux engagements début mars membres de relocaliser des mineurs isolés dans d’autres pays de l’UE (8 Etats membres).

      Toutefois, si l’UE ne fait donc pas « rien », les limites habituelles au processus peuvent être invoquées avec raison : #aide_d'urgence qui va essentiellement au #HCR et à l’#OIM (100M pour l’OIM et les 31 camps qu’elle gère et 25M d’aide pour les familles et les enfants dispatchés sur les îles, via le UNHCR), 35M serviront à soutenir la relocalisation hors des camps dans des #hôtels.

      Le reste des financements octroyés s’intègrent dans la logique de gestion des #hotspots :

      350M euros serviront à construire 5 nouveaux centres
      10M pour financer les retours
      50M pour soutenir l’administration grecque dédiée à l’asile (sans précision s’il s’agit de soutien à l’aide juridique pour les demandeurs d’asile, d’aide en ressources humaines pour l’administration et l’examen des demandes, ou du soutien matériel dû dans le cadre de l’accueil des demandeurs d’asile)
      10M pour #Frontex
      10M pour #EASO

      #retour #aide_au_retour #renvois #expulsions #argent #aide_financière #IOM

  • Irregular migration into EU at lowest level since 2013

    The number of irregular border crossings detected on the European Union’s external borders last year fell to the lowest level since 2013 due to a drop in the number of people reaching European shores via the Central and Western Mediterranean routes.

    Preliminary 2019 data collected by Frontex, the European Border and Coast Guard Agency, showed a 6% fall in illegal border crossings along the EU’s external borders to just over 139 000. This is 92% below the record number set in 2015.

    The number of irregular migrants crossing the Central Mediterranean fell roughly 41% to around 14 000. Nationals of Tunisia and Sudan accounted for the largest share of detections on this route.

    The total number of irregular migrants detected in the Western Mediterranean dropped approximately 58% to around 24 000, with Moroccans and Algerians making up the largest percentage.

    Eeastern Mediterranean and Western Balkans

    Despite the general downward trend, the Eastern Mediterranean saw growing migratory pressure starting in the spring. It peaked in September and then started falling in accordance with the seasonal trend. In all of 2019, there were more than 82 000 irregular migrants detected on this route, roughly 46% more than in the previous year.

    In the second half of 2019, irregular arrivals in the region were at the highest since the implementation of the EU-Turkey Statement in March 2016, although still well below the figures recorded in 2015 and early 2016 with the situation before the Statement.

    Some persons transferred from the Greek islands to the mainland appear to have continued on the Western Balkan migratory route. There has been an increase in detections on the Greek-Albanian border after the start of the Frontex joint operation in May. In the second half of the year, a significant number of detections was reported on the EU borders with Serbia.

    In total, around 14 000 irregular crossings were detected at the EU’s borders on the Western Balkan route last year – more than double the 2018 figure.

    On the Eastern Mediterranean route and the related Western Balkan route, nationals of Afghanistan and Syria accounted for over half of all registered irregular arrivals.

    Top nationality

    Overall, Afghans were the main nationality of newly arrived irregular migrants in 2019, representing almost a quarter of all arrivals. The number of Afghan migrants was nearly three times (+167%) the figure from the previous year. Roughly four out of five were registered on the Eastern Mediterranean route, while nearly all the rest on the Western Balkan route.

    The most recent available data also suggest a higher percentage of women among the newly arrived migrants in 2019. In the first ten months of last year, around 23% of migrants were women compared with 19% in 2018. EU countries counted approximately 14 600 migrant children younger than 14 in the January-October period, almost one thousand more than in all of 2018.

    https://frontex.europa.eu/media-centre/news-release/flash-report-irregular-migration-into-eu-at-lowest-level-since-2013-n

    ......

    Et comme dit Catherine Teule via la mailing-list Migreurop, qui a signalé cette info :

    Bravo Frontex !!!! ( et ses partenaires des pays tiers).
    Enfin, pas tout à fait puisque certaines « routes » ont enregistré des augmentations de flux à la fin de l’année 2019...

    #statistiques #chiffres #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Europe #2019 #frontières_extérieures #Frontex #Méditerranée #Balkans #route_des_Balkans #réfugiés_afghans

    • Parallèlement...
      Migrants : l’Europe va doubler ses opérations d’aide en matière d’asile

      Le bureau européen d’appui en matière d’asile « va voir ses déploiements opérationnels doubler en 2020 » pour atteindre 2000 personnes sur le terrain.

      L’agence européenne de l’asile a annoncé ce mardi le doublement de ses opérations en 2020, en particulier pour renforcer sa présence en #Grèce, à #Chypre et à #Malte, où l’afflux de migrants a explosé en 2019.

      Le #bureau_européen_d'appui_en_matière_d'asile (#EASO) « va voir ses déploiements opérationnels doubler en 2020 » pour atteindre 2000 personnes sur le terrain, fruit d’un #accord signé en décembre avec ces pays ainsi que l’#Italie, a souligné l’agence dans un communiqué.

      « Chypre, la Grèce et Malte verront un doublement du #personnel_EASO tandis que les déploiements en Italie seront réduits à la lumière des changements de besoins de la part des autorités » de ce pays où, à l’inverse, les arrivées par la Méditerranée ont été divisées par deux entre 2018 et 2019.

      Très loin des flux migratoires au plus fort de la crise en 2015, 110 669 migrants et réfugiés ont rallié l’Europe après avoir traversé la mer en 2019 selon les chiffres publiés par l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) de l’ONU. Soit dix fois moins que le million de personnes arrivées en 2015.

      L’an dernier, la Grèce a accueilli 62 445 de ces exilés, contre 32 742 l’année précédente. Le petit État insulaire de Malte a vu débarquer 3405 personnes, soit deux fois plus que les 1445 de 2018, tandis que 7647 migrants sont arrivés à Chypre (4307 en 2018).

      Avec quelque 550 agents en Grèce, EASO prévoit donc « trois fois plus d’assistants sociaux » et une aide plus ciblée « pour aider à la réception dans les #hotspots » comme celui de #Lesbos, où plus de 37 000 personnes s’entassent dans des conditions souvent indignes. À Chypre, les 120 personnels européens auront surtout pour mission d’aider les autorités à enregistrer et traiter les demandes d’asile.

      « Le corridor le plus meurtrier »

      La réduction du soutien européen en Italie s’explique par la chute des arrivées dans ce pays (11 471 en 2019, 23 370 en 2018, 181 000 en 2016) qui avait un temps fermé ses ports aux bateaux secourant les migrants en mer en 2019.

      Cette route de Méditerranée centrale entre l’Afrique du Nord et l’Italie « reste le corridor le plus meurtrier », a encore précisé l’OIM, qui a recensé 1283 décès connus en Méditerranée (centrale, orientale et occidentale) l’an dernier, contre près de 2.300 l’année précédente. « Comme pour Malte, EASO restera fortement impliqué dans (le processus de) #débarquement ad hoc » des bateaux portant secours aux migrants sur cette route, a ajouté le bureau européen.

      https://www.lexpress.fr/actualite/monde/europe/migrants-l-europe-va-doubler-ses-operations-d-aide-en-matiere-d-asile_21136

  • EU-Asylbehörde beschattete Flüchtende in sozialen Medien

    Die EU-Agentur EASO überwachte jahrelang soziale Netzwerke, um Flüchtende auf dem Weg nach Europa zu stoppen. Der oberste Datenschützer der EU setzte dem Projekt nun ein Ende.

    Das EU-Asylunterstützungsbüro EASO hat jahrelang in sozialen Medien Informationen über Flüchtende, Migrationsrouten und Schleuser gesammelt. Ihre Erkenntnisse meldete die Behörde mit Sitz in Malta an EU-Staaten, die Kommission und andere EU-Agenturen. Die Ermittlungen auf eigene Faust sorgen nun für Ärger mit EU-Datenschützern.

    Mitarbeiter von EASO durchforsteten soziale Medien seit Januar 2017. Ihr Hauptziel waren Hinweise auf neue Migrationsbewegungen nach Europa. Die EU-Behörde übernahm das Projekt von der UN-Organisation UNHCR, berichtete EASO damals in einem Newsletter.

    Die Agentur durchsuchte einschlägige Seiten, Kanäle und Gruppen mit der Hilfe von Stichwortlisten. Im Fokus standen Fluchtrouten, aber auch die Angebote von Schleusern, gefälschte Dokumente und die Stimmung unter den Geflüchteten, schrieb ein EASO-Sprecher an netzpolitik.org.

    Das Vorläuferprojekt untersuchte ab März 2016 Falschinformationen, mit denen Schleuser Menschen nach Europa locken. Es entstand als Folge der Flüchtlingsbewegung 2015, im Fokus der UN-Mitarbeiter standen Geflüchtete aus Syrien, dem Irak und Afghanistan.

    Flüchtende informierten sich auf dem Weg nach Europa über soziale Netzwerke, heißt es im Abschlussbericht des UNHCR. In Facebook-Gruppen und Youtube-Kanälen bewerben demnach Schleuser offen ihr Angebot. Sie veröffentlichten auf Facebook-Seiten sogar Rezensionen von zufriedenen „Kunden“, sagten Projektmitarbeiter damals den Medien.
    Fluchtrouten und Fälschungen

    Die wöchentlichen Berichte von EASO landeten bei den EU-Staaten und Institutionen, außerdem bei UNHCR und der Weltpolizeiorganisation Interpol. Die EU-Staaten forderten EASO bereits 2018 auf, Hinweise auf Schleuser an Europol zu übermitteln.

    Die EU-Agentur überwachte Menschen aus zahlreichen Ländern. Beobachtet wurden Sprecher des Arabischen und von afghanischen Sprachen wie Paschtunisch und Dari, aber auch von in Äthiopien und Eritrea verbreiteten Sprachen wie Tigrinya und Amharisch, das in Nigeria gesprochene Edo sowie etwa des Türkischen und Kurdischen.

    „Das Ziel der Aktivitäten war es, die Mitgliedsstaaten zu informieren und den Missbrauch von Schutzbedürftigen zu verhindern“, schrieb der EASO-Sprecher Anis Cassar.
    Als Beispiel nannte der Sprecher den „Konvoi der Hoffnung“. So nannte sich eine Gruppe von hunderte Menschen aus Afghanistan, Iran und Pakistan, die im Frühjahr 2019 an der griechisch-bulgarischen Grenze auf Weiterreise nach Europa hofften.

    Die griechische Polizei hinderte den „Konvoi“ mit Tränengasgranaten am Grenzübertritt. Die „sehr frühe Entdeckung“ der Gruppe sei ein Erfolg des Einsatzes, sagte der EASO-Sprecher.
    Kein Schutzschirm gegen Gräueltaten

    Gräueltaten gegen Flüchtende standen hingegen nicht im Fokus von EASO. In Libyen werden tausende Flüchtende unter „KZ-ähnlichen Zuständen“ in Lagern festgehalten, befand ein interner Bericht der Auswärtigen Amtes bereits Ende 2017.

    Über die Lage in Libyen dringen über soziale Medien und Messengerdienste immer wieder erschreckende Details nach außen.

    Die EU-Agentur antwortete ausweichend auf unsere Frage, ob ihre Mitarbeiter bei ihrem Monitoring Hinweise auf Menschenrechtsverletzungen gefunden hätten.

    „Ich bin nicht in der Lage, Details über die Inhalte der tatsächlichen Berichte zu geben“, schrieb der EASO-Sprecher. „Die Berichte haben aber sicherlich dazu beigetragen, den zuständigen nationalen Behörden zu helfen, Schleuser ins Visier zu nehmen und Menschen zu retten.“

    Der Sprecher betonte, das EU-Asylunterstützungsbüro sei keine Strafverfolgungsbehörde oder Küstenwache. Der Einsatz habe bloß zur Information der Partnerbehörden gedient.
    Datenschützer: Rechtsgrundlage fehlt

    Der oberste EU-Datenschützer übte heftige Kritik an dem Projekt. Die Behörde kritisiert, die EU-Agentur habe sensible persönliche Daten von Flüchtenden gesammelt, etwa über deren Religion, ohne dass diese informiert worden seien oder zugestimmt hätten.

    Die Asylbehörde habe für solche Datensammelei keinerlei Rechtsgrundlage, urteilte der EU-Datenschutzbeauftragte Wojciech Wiewiórowski in einem Brief an EASO im November.

    Die Datenschutzbehörde prüfte die Asylagentur nach neuen, strengeren Regeln für die EU-Institutionen, die etwa zeitgleich mit der Datenschutzgrundverordnung zu gelten begannen.

    In dem Schreiben warnt der EU-Datenschutzbeauftragte, einzelne Sprachen und Schlüsselwörter zu überwachen, könne zu falschen Annahmen über Gruppen führen. Dies wirke unter Umständen diskriminierend.

    Die Datenschutzbehörde ordnete die sofortigen Suspendierung des Projektes an. Es gebe vorerst keine Pläne, die Überwachung sozialer Medien wieder aufzunehmen, schrieb der EASO-Sprecher an netzpolitik.org.

    Die Asylbehörde widersprach indes den Vorwürfen. EASO habe großen Aufwand betrieben, damit keinerlei persönliche Daten in ihren Berichten landeten, schrieb der Sprecher.

    Anders sieht das der EU-Datenschutzbeauftragte. In einem einzigen Bericht, der den Datenschützern als Beispiel übermittelt wurde, fanden sie mehrere E-Mailadressen und die Telefonnummer eines Betroffenen, schrieben sie in dem Brief an EASO.

    EASO klagte indes gegenüber netzpolitik.org über die „negativen Konsequenzen“ des Projekt-Stopps. Dies schade den EU-Staaten in der Effektivität ihrer Asylsysteme und habe womöglich schädliche Auswirkungen auf die Sicherheit von Migranten und Asylsuchenden.
    Frontex stoppte Monitoring-Projekt

    Die EU-Asylagentur geriet bereits zuvor mit Aufsehern in Konflikt. Im Vorjahr ermittelte die Antikorruptionsbehörde OLAF wegen Mobbing-Vorwürfen, Verfehlungen bei Großeinkäufen und Datenschutzverstößen.

    Auf Anfrage von netzpolitik.org bestätigte OLAF, dass „Unregelmäßigkeiten“ in den genannten Bereichen gefunden wurden. Die Behörde wollte aber keine näheren Details nennen.

    EASO ist nicht die einzige EU-Behörde, die soziale Netzwerke überwachen möchte. Die Grenzagentur Frontex schrieb im September einen Auftrag über 400.000 Euro aus. Ziel sei die Überwachung von sozialen Netzwerken auf „irreguläre Migrationsbewegungen“.

    Kritische Nachfragen bremsten das Projekt aber schon vor dem Start. Nach kritischen Nachfragen der NGO Privacy International blies Frontex das Projekt ab. Frontex habe nicht erklären können, wie sich die Überwachung mit dem Datenschutz und dem rechtlichen Mandat der Organisation vereinen lässt, kritisierte die NGO.

    https://netzpolitik.org/2019/eu-asylbehoerde-beschattete-fluechtende-in-sozialen-medien#spendenleist
    #EASO #asile #migrations #réfugiés #surveillance #réseaux_sociaux #protection_des_données #Frontex #données

    –->

    « Les rapports hebdomadaires de l’EASO ont été envoyés aux pays et institutions de l’UE, au #HCR et à l’Organisation mondiale de la police d’#Interpol. Les États de l’UE ont demandé à l’EASO en 2018 de fournir à #Europol des informations sur les passeurs »

    ping @etraces

  • The Role of EASO Operations in National Asylum Systems: ECRE Report

    In a comparative report published today, ECRE analyses the operations of the European Asylum Support Office (EASO) involving deployment of experts in the asylum procedures of Italy, Greece, Cyprus and Malta.

    The Agency currently has ongoing operations and over 900 staff members present in the four countries. The aims of the operations are agreed in Operating Plans with the respective Member States.

    The report gives an overview of the different areas of the asylum procedure in which the Agency supports Member State authorities, namely the registration of asylum applications, the implementation of the Dublin Regulation, the examination of asylum applications at first instance, and appeals. It also provides observations on the effectiveness of EASO operations in meeting their objectives and the impact of the Agency’s presence on the efficiency and quality of asylum procedures in the host Member States, particularly as regards the enhancement of staff capacity, the quality of decisions and the contribution to compliance with the EU asylum acquis.

    The report follows a series of fact-finding missions in Cyprus, Italy, Greece and Malta in 2018 and 2019, discussions with authorities and relevant stakeholders, as well as analysis of a small sample of decisions in selected countries.

    https://www.ecre.org/the-role-of-easo-operations-in-national-asylum-systems-ecre-report
    #EASO #Italie #Chypre #Malte #Grèce #asile #migrations #réfugiés #procédure_d'asile

    ping @isskein

  • EASO | La situation de l’asile dans l’UE en 2018
    https://asile.ch/2019/06/25/easo-la-situation-de-lasile-dans-lue-en-2018

    Le rapport annuel de l’EASO sur la situation en matière d’asile dans l’Union européenne en 2018 offre une vue d’ensemble complète des évolutions dans le domaine de la protection internationale à l’échelle européenne et au niveau des régimes d’asile nationaux. À partir d’un large éventail de sources, le rapport examine les principales tendances statistiques et […]

  • Quand l’#Union_europeénne se met au #fact-checking... et que du coup, elle véhicule elle-même des #préjugés...
    Et les mythes sont pensés à la fois pour les personnes qui portent un discours anti-migrants ("L’UE ne protège pas ses frontières"), comme pour ceux qui portent des discours pro-migrants ("L’UE veut créer une #forteresse_Europe")...
    Le résultat ne peut être que mauvais, surtout vu les pratiques de l’UE...

    Je copie-colle ici les mythes et les réponses de l’UE à ce mythe...


    #crise_migratoire


    #frontières #protection_des_frontières


    #Libye #IOM #OIM #évacuation #détention #détention_arbitraire #centres #retours_volontaires #retour_volontaire #droits_humains


    #push-back #refoulement #Libye


    #aide_financière #Espagne #Grèce #Italie #Frontex #gardes-frontière #EASO


    #Forteresse_européenne


    #global_compact


    #frontières_intérieures #Schengen #Espace_Schengen


    #ONG #sauvetage #mer #Méditerranée


    #maladies #contamination


    #criminels #criminalité


    #économie #coût #bénéfice


    #externalisation #externalisation_des_frontières


    #Fonds_fiduciaire #dictature #dictatures #régimes_autoritaires

    https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/sites/homeaffairs/files/what-we-do/policies/european-agenda-migration/20190306_managing-migration-factsheet-debunking-myths-about-migration_en.p
    #préjugés #mythes #migrations #asile #réfugiés
    #hypocrisie #on_n'est_pas_sorti_de_l'auberge
    ping @reka @isskein

  • EASO Annual Report on the Situation of Asylum in the EU and latest asylum figures


    https://www.easo.europa.eu/sites/default/files/Annual-Report-2017-Final.pdf
    #EASO #rapport #apatridie #statistiques #chiffres #loterie_de_l'asile #taux_de_reconnaissance #EU #UE #Europe #2017 #arrivées #MNA #mineurs_non_accompagnés

    Concernant #Dublin:

    In 2017, the 26 repor ting countries implemented just over 25 000 transfers ( 174 ) , an increase of a third compared to 2016. Three quarters of all transfers in 2017 stemmed from five EU+ countries: Germany, Greece, Austria, France, and the Netherlands. More than half of the transf erees were received by Germany and Italy. The remainder were spread among the remaining Dublin MSs, with the highest shares occupied by Sweden, France, and Poland ( 175 ) . Generally, those Dublin MSs which implemented the most transfers also had a wider range of recipients. Just under half of all transfers were conducted between contiguous countries, i.e. with a common land border ( 176 ) . This means that the remaining half of the transfers pertained to individuals who had crossed at least one intra - Schengen border . A narrow majority of the transfers were conducted on the basis of take - back requests (53 % of the transfers with reported legal basis) ( 177 ) .

    (p.60)

  • Croatian media report new ‘Balkan route’

    Croatian media have reported the emergence of a new ’Balkan route’ used by migrants to reach western Europe without passing through Macedonia and Serbia.

    Middle Eastern migrants have opened up a new ’Balkan route’ in their attempt to find a better life in western Europe after the traditional route through Macedonia and Serbia was closed. This is according to a report by Zagreb newspaper Jutarnji list.

    From Greece, the new route takes them through Albania, Montenegro, Bosnia Herzegovina, Croatia and Slovenia.

    http://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/7522/croatian-media-report-new-balkan-route?ref=tw
    #parcours_migratoires #route_migratoire #Balkans #ex-Yougoslavie #route_des_balkans #Albanie #Monténégro #Bosnie #Croatie #Slovénie #migrations #asile #réfugiés

    • Bosnia and the new Balkan Route: increased arrivals strain the country’s resources

      Over the past few months, the number of refugees and asylum seekers arriving to Bosnia has steadily increased. Border closures – both political and physical – in other Balkan states have pushed greater numbers of people to travel through Bosnia, in their attempt to reach the European Union.

      In 2017, authorities registered 755 people; this year, in January and February alone, 520 people arrived. The trend has continued into March; and in the coming weeks another 1000 people are expected to arrive from Serbia and Montenegro. Resources are already strained, as the small country struggles to meet the needs of the new arrivals.

      https://helprefugees.org/bosnia-new-balkan-route

    • Le Monténégro, nouveau pays de transit sur la route des migrants et des réfugiés

      Ils arrivent d’#Albanie et veulent passer en #Bosnie-Herzégovine, étape suivante sur la longue route menant vers l’Europe occidentale, mais des milliers de réfugiés sont ballotés, rejetés d’une frontière à l’autre. Parmi eux, de nombreuses familles, des femmes et des enfants. Au Monténégro, la solidarité des citoyens supplée les carences de l’État. Reportage.

      Au mois de février, Sabina Talović a vu un groupe de jeunes hommes arriver à la gare routière de Pljevlja, dans le nord du Monténégro. En s’approchant, elle a vite compris qu’il s’agissait de réfugiés syriens qui, après avoir traversé la Turquie, la Grèce et l’Albanie, se dirigeaient vers la Bosnie-Herzégovine en espérant rejoindre l’Europe occidentale. Elle les a conduits au local de son organisation féministe, Bona Fide, pour leur donner à manger, des vêtements, des chaussures, un endroit pour se reposer, des soins médicaux. Depuis la fin du mois d’avril, 389 personnes ont trouvé un refuge temporaire auprès de Bona Fide. L’organisation travaille d’une manière indépendante, mais qu’après quatre mois de bénévolat, Sabina veut faire appel aux dons pour pouvoir nourrir ces migrants. Elle ajoute que le nombre de migrants au Monténégro est en augmentation constante et qu’il faut s’attendre à un été difficile.

      Au cours des trois premiers mois de l’année 2018, 458 demandes d’asiles ont été enregistrées au Monténégro, plus que la totalité des demandes pour l’année 2016 et plus de la moitié des 849 demandes enregistrées pour toute l’année 2017. Il est peu vraisemblable que ceux qui demandent l’asile au Monténégro veuillent y rester, parce le pays offre rarement une telle protection. En 2017, sur 800 demandes, seules sept personnes ont reçu un statut de protection et une seule a obtenu le statut de réfugié. Cette année, personne n’a encore reçu de réponse positive. Il suffit néanmoins de déposer une demande pour avoir le droit de séjourner à titre provisoire dans le pays. C’est un rude défi pour le Monténégro de loger tous ces gens arrivés depuis le mois d’août 2017, explique Milanka Baković, cadre du ministère de l’Intérieur. Les capacités d’accueil du pays sont largement dépassées. Selon les sources du ministère, un camp d’accueil devrait bientôt ouvrir à la frontière avec l’Albanie.

      “Nous prenons un taxi pour passer les frontières. Ensuite, nous marchons. Quand nous arrivons dans un nouveau pays, nous demandons de l’aide à la Croix Rouge.”

      Ali a quitté la Syrie il y a trois mois avec sa femme et ses enfants mineurs. Ils vivent maintenant à Spuž, dans un centre pour demandeurs d’asile établi en 2015. Avant d’arriver au Monténégro, la famille a traversé quatre pays et elle est bien décidée à poursuivre sa route jusqu’en Allemagne, pour rejoindre d’autres membres de leur famille. « Nous prenons un taxi pour passer les frontières. Ensuite, nous marchons. Quand nous arrivons dans un nouveau pays, nous demandons de l’aide à la Croix Rouge ou à qui peut pour trouver un endroit où nous pouvons rester quelques jours… Nous avons peur de ce qui peut nous arriver sur la route mais nous sommes optimistes et, si Dieu le veut, nous atteindrons notre but. »

      Comme tant d’autres avant eux, Ali et sa famille ont traversé la Grèce. Certains ont franchi la frontière entre l’Albanie et le Monténégro en camionnette en payant 250 euros des passeurs. Les autres ont emprunté une route de montagnes sinueuse et des chemins de traverse difficiles avant de traverser la frontière et de redescendre jusqu’à la route de Tuzi, sur les bords du lac de Skadar. Là, il y a une mosquée où les voyageurs peuvent passer la nuit. Certains poursuivent leur route et tentent de traverser les frontières de la Bosnie-Herzégovine, en évitant de se faire enregistrer.

      S’ils sont appréhendés par la police, les migrants et réfugiés peuvent demander l’asile et le Monténégro, comme n’importe quel autre pays, est obligé d’accueillir dans des conditions correctes et en sécurité tous les demandeurs jusqu’à ce qu’une décision finale soit prise sur leur requête. Dejan Andrić, chef du service des migrations illégales auprès de la police des frontières, pense que la police monténégrine a réussi à enregistrer toutes les personnes entrées sur le territoire. « Ils restent ici quelques jours, font une demande d’asile et peuvent circuler librement dans le pays », précise-t-il. Toutefois des experts contestent que tous les migrants traversant le pays puissent être enregistrés, ce qui veut dire qu’il est difficile d’établir le nombre exact de personnes traversant le Monténégro. La mission locale du Haut commissariat des Nations Unies aux réfugiés (UNHCR) se méfie également des chiffres officiels, et souligne « qu’on peut s’attendre à ce qu’un certain nombre de personnes traversent le Monténégro sans aucun enregistrement ».

      Repoussés d’un pays à l’autre

      Z. vient du Moyen-Orient, et il a entamé son voyage voici cinq ans. Il a passé beaucoup de temps en Grèce, mais il a décidé de poursuivre sa route vers l’Europe du nord. Pour le moment, il vit au centre d’hébergement de Spuž, qui peut recevoir 80 personnes, ce qui est bien insuffisant pour accueillir tous les demandeurs d’asile. Z. a essayé de passer du Monténégro en Bosnie-Herzégovine et en Croatie mais, comme beaucoup, il a été repoussé par la police. Selon la Déclaration universelle des droits humains, chaque individu a pourtant le droit de demander l’asile dans un autre pays. Chaque pays doit mettre en place des instruments pour garantir ce droit d’asile, les procédures étant laissées à la discrétion de chaque Etat. Cependant, les accords de réadmission signés entre Etats voisins donnent la possibilité de renvoyer les gens d’un pays à l’autre.

      Dejan Andrić affirme néanmoins que beaucoup de migrants arrivent au Monténégro sans document prouvant qu’ils proviennent d’Albanie. « Dans quelques cas, nous avons des preuves mais la plupart du temps, nous ne pouvons pas les renvoyer en Albanie, et même quand nous avons des preuves de leur passage en Albanie, les autorités de ce pays ne répondent pas de manière positive à nos demandes. » Ceux qui sont repoussés en tentant de traverser la frontière de Bosnie-Herzégovine finissent par échouer à Spuž, mais plus souvent dans la prison de la ville qu’au centre d’accueil. « Si les réfugiés sont pris à traverser la frontière, ils sont ramenés au Monténégro selon l’accord de réadmission. Nous notifions alors au Bureau pour l’asile que cette personne a illégalement essayé de quitter le territoire du Monténégro », explique Dejan Andrić.

      Selon la loi, en tel cas, les autorités monténégrines sont dans l’obligation de verbaliser les personnes pour franchissement illégal de la frontière. Cela se termine devant le Tribunal, qui inflige une amende d’au moins 200 euros. Comme les gens n’ont pas d’argent pour payer l’amende, ils sont expédiés pour trois ou quatre jours dans la prison de Spuž, où les conditions sont très mauvaises. Des Algériens qui se sont retrouvés en prison affirment qu’on ne leur a donné ni lit, ni draps. En dépit de ces accusations portées par plusieurs demandeurs d’asile, le bureau monténégrin du HCR réfute toutes les accusations de mauvais traitements. « Le HCR rend visite à ces gens et les invite à déposer une demande d’asile pour obtenir de l’aide, jamais nous n’avons eu de plainte concernant la façon dont ils étaient traités. »

      Néanmoins, un grand nombre de personnes qui veulent poursuivre leur route parviennent à gagner la Bosnie-Herzégovine. La route la plus fréquentée passe entre les villes de Nikšić et Trebinje. Du 1er janvier au 31 mars, la police a intercepté 92 personnes qui avaient pénétré dans la zone frontalière orientale en provenant du Monténégro, alors que 595 personnes ont été empêchées d’entrer en Bosnie par la frontière sud du pays. Des Monténégrins affirment avoir vu des gens qui marchaient vers la frontière durant les mois d’hiver, cherchant à se protéger du froid dans des maisons abandonnées. La police des frontières de Bosnie-Herzégovine explique que depuis le début de l’année 2018, les familles, les femmes et les enfants sont de plus en plus nombreux à pénétrer dans le pays, alors qu’auparavant, il s’agissait principalement de jeunes hommes célibataires.

      Violences sur les frontières croates

      Farbut Farmani vient d’Iran, il que son ami a tenté à cinq ou six reprises de franchir la frontière de la Bosnie-Herzégovine, et lui-même deux fois. « Une fois en Bosnie, j’ai contacté le bureau du HCR. Ils m’ont dit qu’ils allaient m’aider. J’étais épuisé parce que j’avais marché 55 kms dans les bois et la neige, c’était très dur. Le HCR de Sarajevo a promis qu’il allait s’occuper de nous et nous emmener à Sarajevo. Au lieu de cela, la police est venue et nous a renvoyé au Monténégro ». Parmi les personnes interpelées, beaucoup viennent du Moyen Orient et de zones touchées par la guerre, mais aussi d’Albanie, du Kosovo ou encore de Turquie.

      La police des frontières de Croatie affirme qu’elle fait son devoir conformément à l’accord avec l’accord passé entre les gouvernements de Croatie et du Monténégro. Pourtant, depuis l’été dernier, les frontières monténégrino-croates ont été le théâtre de scènes de violences. Des volontaires ont rapporté, documents à l’appui, des scènes similaires à celles que l’on observe aux frontières serbo-croates ou serbo-hongroises, alors que personne n’a encore fait état de violences à la frontière serbo-monténégrine.

      La frontière croate n’est d’ailleurs pas la seule à se fermer. En février, l’Albanie a signé un accord avec Frontex, l’agence européenne pour la protection des frontières, qui doit entrer en vigueur au mois de juin. L’accord prévoit l’arrivée de policiers européens, des formation et de l’équipement supplémentaire pour la police locale, afin de mieux protéger les frontières. Pour sa part, le gouvernement hongrois a annoncé qu’il allait offrir au Monténégro des fils de fer barbelés afin de protéger 25 kilomètres de frontière – on ne sait pas encore quel segment de la frontière sera ainsi renforcé. Selon le contrat, le fil de fer sera considéré comme un don, exempté de frais de douanes et de taxes, et la Hongrie enverra des experts pour l’installer.

      Pratiquement aucun migrant n’imagine son avenir dans les Balkans, mais si les frontières se ferment, ils risquent d’être bloqués, et pourraient connaître le même sort que les réfugiés du Kosovo qui sont venus au Monténégro pendant les bombardements de l’OTAN en 1999. D’ailleurs, beaucoup de Roms, d’Egyptiens ou d’Ashkali du Kosovo vivent toujours à Podgorica, souvent dans des conditions abominables comme à Vrela Ribnička, près de la décharge de la ville. L’été risque de voir beaucoup de réfugiés affluer dans les Balkans. Il est donc urgent de créer des moyens d’accueil dignes de ce nom.

      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Migrants-le-trou-noir-des-Balkans

    • Cittadini di Bosnia Erzegovina: solidali coi migranti

      La nuova ondata di migranti che passano dalla Bosnia Erzegovina per poter raggiungere l’UE ha trovato riluttanti e impreparate le autorità ma non la gente. I bosniaco-erzegovesi, memori del loro calvario, si sono subito prodigati in gesti di aiuto


      https://www.balcanicaucaso.org/aree/Bosnia-Erzegovina/Cittadini-di-Bosnia-Erzegovina-solidali-coi-migranti-188155
      #solidarité

    • La Bosnie-Herzégovine s’indigne des réfugiés iraniens qui arrivent de Serbie

      Les autorités de Sarajevo ne cachent pas leur colère. Depuis que Belgrade autorise l’entrée des Iraniens sur son sol sans visas, ceux-ci sont de plus en plus nombreux à passer illégalement par la Bosnie-Herzégovine pour tenter de rejoindre l’Union européenne.

      Par la rédaction

      (Avec Radio Slobodna Evropa) - Selon le Commissaire serbe aux migrations, Vladimir Cucić, à peine quelques centaines de réfugiés en provenance d’Iran auraient « abusé » du régime sans visa introduit en août 2017 pour quitter la Serbie et tenter de rejoindre l’Europe occidentale. « Environ 9000 Iraniens sont entrés légalement en Serbie depuis le début de l’année 2018. Il n’agit donc que d’un petit pourcentage », explique-t-il à Radio Slobodna Evropa.

      Pourtant, selon le ministre bosnien de la Sécurité, le nombre d’Iraniens arrivant en Bosnie-Herzégovine a considérablement grimpé après l’abolition par Belgrade du régime des visas avec Téhéran. Le 31 mai, Dragan Mektić a mis en garde contre un nombre croissant d’arrivées clandestines d’Iraniens en Bosnie-Herzégovine via la frontière serbe, dans la région de Zvornik et de Višegrad.

      Depuis le mois de mars 2018, quatre vol hebdomadaires directs relient Téhéran et Belgrade. Pour Vladimir Cucić, la plupart des visiteurs iraniens sont des touristes à la découverte de la Serbie. « Les Iraniens figurent à la septième place des nationalités représentées dans les centres d’accueils serbes », ajoute-t-il, où sont hébergées 3270 personnes. « Nous comptons actuellement un peu moins de 400 réfugiés iraniens dans les camps d’accueil. Rien de dramatique ».

      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Bosnie-Herzegovine-de-plus-en-plus-de-refugies-iraniens-en-proven
      #Iran #réfugiés_iraniens

    • Bosnie : à Sarajevo, des migrants épuisés face à des bénévoles impuissants (1/4)

      Depuis plusieurs mois, des dizaines de migrants affluent chaque jour en Bosnie, petit État pauvre des Balkans. En traversant le pays, les exilés entendent gagner la Croatie tout proche, et ainsi rejoindre l’Union européenne. L’État bosnien se dit dépassé et peu armé pour répondre à ce défi migratoire. Les ONG et la société civile craignent une imminente « crise humanitaire ». InfoMigrants a rencontré de jeunes bénévoles à Sarajevo, devant la gare centrale, unique lieu de distribution de repas pour les migrants de passage dans la capitale bosnienne.


      http://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/10148/bosnie-a-sarajevo-des-migrants-epuises-face-a-des-benevoles-impuissant

    • Réfugiés : bientôt des centres d’accueil en Bosnie-Herzégovine ?

      Au moins 5000 réfugiés sont présents en Bosnie-Herzégovine, principalement à Bihać et Velika Kladuša, dans l’ouest du pays, et leur nombre ne cesse d’augmenter. Débordés, les autorités se renvoient la patate chaude, tandis que l’Union européenne songe à financer des camps d’accueil dans le pays.

      La Fédération de Bosnie-Herzégovine possède à ce jour trois centres d’accueils, à Sarajevo, Delijaš, près de Trnovo, et Salakovac, près de Mostar, mais leur capacité d’accueil est bien insuffisante pour répondre aux besoins. Pour sa part, la Republika Sprska a catégoriquement affirmé qu’elle s’opposait à l’ouverture du moindre centre sur son territoire.

      Les réfugiés se concentrent principalement dans le canton d’Una-Sava, près des frontières (fermées) de la Croatie, où rien n’est prévu pour les accueillir. Jeudi, le ministre de la Sécurité de l’État, le Serbe Dragan Mektić (SDS), a rencontré à Bihać le Premier ministre du canton, Husein Rošić, ainsi que les maires de Bihać et de Cazin, tandis que celui de Velika Kladuša a boycotté le rencontre. Aucun accord n’a pu être trouvé.

      La mairie de Velika Kladuša, où 2000 réfugiés au moins séjournent dans des conditions extrêmement précaires, s’oppose en effet à l’édification d’un centre d’accueil sur son territoire. Pour leur part, les autorités centrales envisageaient d’utiliser à cette fin les anciens bâtiments industriels du groupe Agrokomerc, mais l’Union européenne refuse également de financer un tel projet, car ce centre d’accueil se trouverait à moins de cinq kilomètres des frontières de l’Union.

      « Nous allons quand même ouvrir ce centre », a déclaré aux journalistes le ministre Mektić. « Et ce sera à l’Union européenne de décider si elle veut laisser mourir de faim les gens qui s’y trouveront ». Pour Dragan Mektić, l’objectif est que la Bosnie-Herzégovine demeure un pays de transit. « Nous ne voulons pas que la Bosnie devienne un hot spot, et les routes des migrants sont telles qu’il faut que les centres d’accueil soient près des frontières, car c’est là que les migrants se dirigent », explique-t-il.

      “Nous ne voulons pas que la Bosnie devienne un hot spot, et les routes des migrants sont telles qu’il faut que les centres d’accueil soient près des frontières.”

      Une autre option serait de loger les familles avec enfants dans l’hôtel Sedra de Cazin, mais les autorités locales s’y opposent, estimant que cela nuirait au tourisme dans la commune. Une manifestation hostile à ce projet, prévue vendredi, n’a toutefois rassemblé qu’une poignée de personnes. Les autorités municipales et cantonales de Bihać demandent l’évacuation du pensionnat où quelques 700 personnes ont trouvé un refuge provisoire, dans des conditions totalement insalubres, mais avec un repas chaud quotidien servi par la Croix-Rouge du canton. Elles réclament également la fermeture des frontières de la Bosnie-Herzégovine, qui serait, selon elles, la seule manière de dissuader les réfugiés de se diriger vers le canton dans l’espoir de passer en Croatie.

      Le président du Conseil des ministres de Bosnie-Herzégovine, Denis Zvizdić (SDA), a lui aussi mis en garde contre tout projet « de l’Union européenne, notamment de la Croatie », de faire de la Bosnie-Herzégovine « une impasse pour les migrants ». Les réfugiés continuent néanmoins à affluer vers ce pays depuis la Serbie, et surtout depuis le Monténégro. Pour sa part, le gouvernement autrichien a annoncé l’envoi de 56 tentes en Bosnie-Herzégovine.

      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Crise-des-migrants-bientot-des-centres-d-accueil-en-Bosnie-Herzeg

    • Migrants : la Bosnie refuse de devenir la sentinelle de l’Europe

      La Bosnie refuse de devenir la sentinelle de l’Union européenne, qui ferme ses frontières aux milliers de migrants bloqués sur son territoire.

      Le ministre de la Sécurité de ce pays pauvre et fragile Dragan Mektic, a du mal à cacher son agacement face à Bruxelles.

      « Nous ne pouvons pas transformer la Bosnie en +hotspot+. Nous pouvons être uniquement un territoire de transit », a-t-il averti lors d’une visite la semaine dernière à Bihac (ouest).

      La majorité des migrants bloqués en Bosnie se regroupent dans cette commune de 65.000 habitants, proche de la Croatie, pays membre de l’UE.

      Le ministre a récemment regretté le refus de Bruxelles de financer un centre d’accueil dans une autre commune de l’ouest bosnien, Velika Kladusa. Selon lui, l’UE le juge trop proche de sa frontière et souhaite des centres plus éloignés, comme celui prévu près de Sarajevo.

      Le Premier ministre Denis Zvizdic a lui mis en garde contre tout projet « de l’Union européenne, notamment de la Croatie », de faire de la Bosnie « une impasse pour les migrants ».

      Ceux-ci « pourront entrer en Bosnie proportionnellement au nombre de sorties dans la direction de l’Europe », a-t-il encore prévenu.

      – ’Finir le voyage’ -

      Malgré des conditions de vie « très mauvaises » dans le campement de fortune où il s’est installé à Velika Kladusa, Malik, Irakien de 19 ans qui a quitté Bagdad il y a huit mois avec sa famille, n’ira pas dans un camp l’éloignant de la frontière : « Les gens ne veulent pas rester ici, ils veulent finir leur voyage. »

      Dans ce camp, chaque jour des tentes sont ajoutées sur l’ancien marché aux bestiaux où plus de 300 personnes survivent au bord d’une route poussiéreuse, à trois kilomètres d’une frontière que Malik et sa famille ont déjà tenté deux fois de franchir.

      La municipalité a installé l’eau courante, quelques robinets, mis en place un éclairage nocturne et posé quelques toilettes mobiles.

      Pour le reste, les gens se débrouillent, explique Zehida Bihorac, directrice d’une école primaire qui, avec plusieurs enseignants bénévoles, organise des ateliers pour les enfants, aide les femmes à préparer à manger.

      « C’est une situation vraiment désespérée. Personne ne mérite de vivre dans de telles conditions. Il y a maintenant beaucoup de familles avec des enfants, entre 50 et 60 enfants, dont des bébés qui ont besoin de lait, de nourriture appropriée », dit-elle.

      « Ces gens sont nourris par les habitants, mais les habitants ne pourront pas tenir encore longtemps parce qu’ils sont de plus en plus nombreux », met-elle en garde, déplorant l’absence de l’État.

      Selon le ministère de la Sécurité, plus de 7.700 migrants ont été enregistrés en Bosnie depuis le début de l’année. Plus de 3.000 seraient toujours dans le pays, la majorité à Bihac, où l’un d’eux s’est noyé dans l’Una la semaine dernière.

      Dans cette ville, 800 à 900 déjeuners sont désormais servis chaque jour dans la cité universitaire désaffectée investie par les migrants depuis plusieurs mois, selon le responsable local de la Croix Rouge Selam Midzic.

      Le bâtiment étant désormais trop petit, des tentes sont plantées dans un bosquet proche. D’autres squats sont apparus. « Le nombre de migrants augmente chaque jour », dit Selam Midzic.

      – Motif supplémentaire de zizanie -

      Le maire, Suhret Fazlic, accuse le gouvernement de l’abandonner. « Nous ne voulons pas être xénophobes, nous souhaitons aider les gens, et c’est ce qu’on fait au quotidien. Mais cette situation dépasse nos capacités », dit-il.

      La question s’est invitée dans la campagne des élections générales d’octobre, dans un pays divisé aux institutions fragiles. Le chef politique des Serbes de Bosnie, Milorad Dodik, a plusieurs fois prévenu que son entité n’accueillerait pas de migrants.

      Il a même accusé des dirigeants Bosniaques (musulmans) de vouloir modifier l’équilibre démographique du pays en y faisant venir 150.000 migrants pour la plupart musulmans.

      La Bosnie est peuplée pour moitié de Bosniaques musulmans, pour un tiers de Serbes orthodoxes et pour environ 15% de Croates catholiques.

      http://www.liberation.fr/planete/2018/07/09/migrants-la-bosnie-refuse-de-devenir-la-sentinelle-de-l-europe_1665144

    • Migrants : en Bosnie, la peur de « devenir Calais »

      De plus en plus de #réfugiés_pakistanais, afghans et syriens tentent de rejoindre l’Europe en passant par la frontière bosno-croate. Alors que les structures d’accueil manquent, cet afflux ravive des tensions dans un pays divisé en deux sur des bases ethniques.

      Le soir tombé, ils sont des dizaines à arriver par bus ou taxi. Samir Alicic, le tenancier du café Cazablanka à Izacic, un petit village situé à la frontière entre la Bosnie et la Croatie, les observe depuis trois mois faire et refaire des tentatives pour passer côté croate dans l’espoir de rejoindre l’Europe de l’Ouest. En 2017, ces voyageurs clandestins en provenance du Pakistan, de la Syrie et de l’Afghanistan étaient seulement 755 en Bosnie-Herzégovine, selon les chiffres officiels. Ils sont plus de 8 000 à la mi-juillet 2018 et leur nombre va sans doute exploser : d’après les autorités, ils pourraient être plus de 50 000 à tenter de transiter par le pays dans les prochains mois.

      Depuis le début de l’année, un nouvel itinéraire les a menés en Bosnie, un pays pauvre au relief accidenté qu’ils évitaient jusqu’ici et qui ne dispose que de deux centres d’accueil officiels, saturés, près de Sarajevo et de Mostar. Désormais, ils arrivent - chose inédite - par l’Albanie et le Monténégro. La route des Balkans par laquelle plus d’un million de migrants sont passés en 2015 et 2016 est fermée depuis mars 2016. Et les frontières entre la Serbie et la Hongrie et la Serbie et la Croatie sont devenues infranchissables.

      Catastrophe humanitaire

      Le nouvel itinéraire est ardu. D’abord, il faudrait franchir la frontière bosno-croate. Elle s’étale sur plus de 1 000 kilomètres, mais on y est facilement repérable. Plusieurs centaines de migrants auraient été renvoyés de Croatie vers la Bosnie sans même avoir pu déposer une demande d’asile. « On les voit revenir le visage tuméfié. Ils nous racontent qu’ils ont été tabassés et volés par les flics croates », raconte Alija Halilagic, un paysan dont la maison se trouve à quelques encablures de la frontière. Ici, ils essaient de passer par les champs, la forêt, la rivière ou même par une ancienne douane éloignée seulement d’une cinquantaine de mètres de l’actuelle. Pour qu’ils ne tombent pas sur les champs de mines, encore nombreux en Bosnie, la Croix-Rouge leur distribue un plan.

      Entre la Croatie et la Slovénie, la frontière est une bande étroite : la franchir sans être repéré est quasi impossible. Ce qui fait le jeu des passeurs qui demandent jusqu’à 5 000 euros pour faire l’itinéraire depuis la Bosnie, selon des sources rencontrées à Sarajevo. Parmi ces migrants bloqués en Bosnie, seuls 684 ont demandé l’asile politique depuis le début de l’année. Les Etats balkaniques restent perçus comme des pays de transit.

      La majorité s’est massée dans le nord-ouest du pays. Surtout à Bihac, une ville de 60 000 habitants à une dizaine de kilomètres d’Izacic, où sont concentrés 4 000 migrants. Ils sont rejoints par une cinquantaine de nouveaux arrivants chaque jour.

      Sur les hauteurs de la ville, ce jour-là à 13 heures passées, des centaines de personnes patientent sous un soleil de plomb. La distribution du repas durera deux heures et demie. Ils sont plus d’un millier à être hébergés dans cet ancien internat sans toit ni fenêtre. Le sol boueux, jonché de détritus, est inondé par endroits par l’eau de pluie. Le bâtiment désaffecté sent l’urine. Entre 15 et 40 personnes dorment dans chaque pièce, sur des matelas, des couvertures, quelques lits superposés. De grandes tentes sont installées dans un champ boisé, à côté du bâtiment. « Cet endroit n’est pas safe la nuit, raconte un migrant kurde. Il y a des bagarres, des couteaux qui circulent. La police refuse d’intervenir. » Une centaine d’enfants et une cinquantaine de femmes sont hébergés ici. Le lendemain, huit familles seront relogées dans un hôtel de la région.

      « Nous manquons de tout : de vêtements, de chaussures, de couvertures, de sacs de couchage, de tentes, de lits de camp. Chaque jour, nous courons pour aller chercher et rendre aux pompiers de la ville le camion qu’ils nous prêtent pour qu’on puisse livrer les repas », raconte le responsable de la Croix-Rouge locale, Selam Midzic. Les ONG craignent que le prochain hiver ne tourne à la catastrophe humanitaire. Pour tenter de l’éviter, le bâtiment devrait être rénové à l’automne. Les migrants pourraient être déplacés vers un centre d’accueil qui serait monté dans la région. Mais aucune ville des alentours n’en veut pour l’instant.

      L’afflux de migrants, souvent en provenance de pays musulmans, ravive des tensions. Depuis la fin de la guerre, la Bosnie est divisée sur des bases ethniques en deux entités : la République serbe de Bosnie (la Republika Srpska, RS) et la Fédération croato-musulmane. Elle est composée de trois peuples constituants : les Bosniaques musulmans (50 % de la population), les Serbes orthodoxes (30 %) et les Croates catholiques (15 %). Des migrants, le président de l’entité serbe, qui parle d’« invasion », n’en veut pas. « En Republika Srpska, nous n’avons pas d’espace pour créer des centres pour les migrants. Mais nous sommes obligés de subir leur transit. Nos organes de sécurité font leur travail de surveillance », a déclaré Milorad Dodik dans une interview au journal de référence serbe, Politika.

      Vols par effraction

      « La police de la République serbe expulse vers la Fédération tous ces gens dès qu’ils arrivent. Il y a des villes de la RS qui sont aussi frontalières avec la Croatie. Et pourtant, tout le monde vient à Bihac », s’indigne le maire de la ville, Suhret Fazlic. L’élu local estime que les institutions centrales sont trop faibles pour faire face à l’afflux de migrants. En outre, le gouvernement, via son ministère de la Sécurité, « se défausse sur les autorités locales. Et les laisse tous venir à Bihac en espérant qu’ils vont réussir à passer en Croatie. Nous avons peur de devenir Calais, d’être submergés ».

      A Izacic, les esprits sont échauffés. On reproche à des migrants de s’être introduits par effraction dans plusieurs maisons, appartenant souvent à des émigrés bosniens installés en Allemagne ou en Autriche. Ils y auraient pris des douches et volé des vêtements. Quelques dizaines d’hommes se sont organisés pour patrouiller la nuit. Des migrants auraient également menacé les chauffeurs de taxi qui les conduisaient jusqu’au village et tabassé un groupe qui descendait du bus, la semaine dernière. « Moi, ils ne m’embêtent pas. Mais ce qui me dérange, c’est qu’ils détruisent nos champs de maïs, de pommes de terre, de haricots quand ils les traversent à trente ou à cinquante. On en a besoin pour vivre. Ma mère âgée de 76 ans, elle les a plantés, ces légumes », se désole Alija Halilagic, attablé au Cazablanka. Certains habitants, comme Samir Alicic, aimeraient voir leurs voisins relativiser. « Les années précédentes, les récoltes étaient détruites par la sécheresse et la grêle. A qui pourrait-on le faire payer ? » fait mine de s’interroger le patron du bar.

      http://www.liberation.fr/planete/2018/07/29/migrants-en-bosnie-la-peur-de-devenir-calais_1669607
      #réfugiés_afghans #réfugiés_syriens

    • A contre-courant, #Sarajevo affiche sa solidarité

      Quelque 600 migrants parmi les 8 000 entrés dans le pays depuis le début de l’année sont actuellement en transit dans la capitale.

      La scène est devenue familière. Sur le parking de la gare de Sarajevo, ils sont environ 300 à former une longue file en cette soirée chaude de juillet. S’y garera bientôt une camionnette blanche d’où jailliront des portions des incontournables cevapcici bosniens, quelques rouleaux de viande grillée servis dans du pain rond, accompagnés d’un yaourt. Une poignée de femmes et quelques enfants se mêlent à ces jeunes hommes, venus de Syrie, d’Irak, du Pakistan ou d’Afghanistan et de passage en Bosnie sur la route vers l’Europe de l’Ouest. Environ 600 des 8 000 migrants entrés dans le pays depuis le début de l’année sont actuellement en transit dans la capitale. La majorité est bloquée dans le nord-ouest, en tentant de passer en Croatie.

      « Ici, l’accueil est différent de tous les pays par lesquels nous sommes passés. Les gens nous aident. Ils essaient de nous trouver un endroit où prendre une douche, dormir. Les flics sont corrects aussi. Ils ne nous tabassent pas », raconte un Syrien sur les routes depuis un an. Plus qu’ailleurs, dans la capitale bosnienne, les habitants tentent de redonner à ces voyageurs clandestins un peu de dignité humaine, de chaleur. « Les Sarajéviens n’ont pas oublié que certains ont été eux-mêmes des réfugiés pendant la guerre en Bosnie[1992-1995, ndlr]. Les pouvoirs publics ont mis du temps à réagir face à l’arrivée des migrants, contrairement aux habitants de Sarajevo qui ont d’emblée affiché une solidarité fantastique. Grâce à eux, une crise humanitaire a été évitée au printemps », affirme Neven Crvenkovic, porte-parole pour l’Europe du Sud-Est du Haut Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés.

      En avril, 250 migrants avaient mis en place un campement de fortune, quelques dizaines de tentes, dans un parc du centre touristique de Sarajevo. L’Etat qui paraissait démuni face à cette situation inédite ne leur fournissait rien. « Dès que nous avons vu venir des familles, nous nous sommes organisés. Des gens ont proposé des chambres chez eux, ont payé des locations », raconte une bénévole de Pomozi.ba, la plus importante association humanitaire de Sarajevo. L’organisation, qui ne vit que des dons des particuliers en argent ou en nature, sert actuellement un millier de repas par jour dans la capitale bosnienne et distribue vêtements et couvertures. Lors du ramadan en mai, 700 dîners avaient été servis. Des nappes blanches avaient été disposées sur le bitume du parking de la gare de Sarajevo.

      Non loin de la gare, un petit restaurant de grillades, « le Broadway », est tenu par Mirsad Suceska. Bientôt la soixantaine, cet homme discret apporte souvent des repas aux migrants. Ses clients leur en offrent aussi. Il y a quelques semaines, ils étaient quelques-uns à camper devant son établissement. Un groupe d’habitués, des cadres qui travaillent dans le quartier, en sont restés sidérés. L’un d’eux a demandé à Mirsad de donner aux migrants toute la nourriture qui restait dans sa cuisine. « Quand je les vois, je pense aux nôtres qui sont passés par là et je prends soin de ne pas les heurter, les blesser en lançant une remarque maladroite ou un mauvais regard », explique Mirsad. Dans le reste du pays, la population réserve un accueil plus mitigé à ces voyageurs.

      http://www.liberation.fr/planete/2018/07/29/a-contre-courant-sarajevo-affiche-sa-solidarite_1669608

    • La région de #Bihać attend une réponse des autorités de Bosnie-Herzégovine

      10 août - 17h30 : Le Premier ministre du canton d’#Una-Sava et les représentants de communes de Bihać et #Velika_Kladuša ont fixé à ce jour un ultimatum au Conseil des ministres de Bosnie-Herzégovine, pour qu’il trouve une solution pour le logement des réfugiés qui s’entassent dans l’ouest de la Bosnie. « Nous ne pouvons plus tolérer que la situation se poursuive au-delà de vendredi. Nous avions décidé que les réfugiés qui squattent le Pensionnat devaient être relogés dans un camp de tentes à Donja Vidovska, mais rien n’a été fait », dénonce le Premier ministre cantonal Husein Rošić.

      A ce jour, 5500 migrants et réfugiés se trouveraient dans l’ouest de la Bosnie-Herzégovine, dont 4000 dans la seule commune de Bihać, et leur nombre ne cesse de croître.


      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Bosnie-police-renforts-frontieres
      #Bihac ##Velika_Kladusa

    • EASO assesses potential support to Bosnia Herzegovina on registration, access to procedure, identification of persons with special needs and reception

      Due to an increased number of mixed migration flows in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the European Commission has been in contact with #EASO and the project partners 1 of the IPA funded Regional Programme “Regional Support to Protection-Sensitive Migration Management in the Western Balkans and Turkey” on how to best support the Bosnian ‘Action Plan to Combat Illegal Migration’ 2 within the scope of the project and possibly beyond.

      Within that framework, an assessment mission with six EASO staff from the Department for Asylum Support and Operations took place from 30 July to 3 August in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The objective of the mission was to further assess the situation in the country and discuss the scope and modalities of EASO’s support, in cooperation with #Frontex, #IOM, #UNHCR and EU Delegation.
      #OIM

      After a meeting with the Bosnian authorities, UNHCR and IOM in Sarajevo, the EASO reception team travelled throughout Bosnia to visit current and future reception facilities in #Delijas and #Usivak (Sarajevo Canton), #Salakovac (Herzegovina-Neretva Canton), #Bihac and #Velika_Kladusa (Una-Sana Canton, at the country`s western border with Croatia). The aim of the visit was to assess the conditions on the ground, the feasibility of an increase of reception capacity in Bosnia and Herzegovina and the potential for dedicated support to the Bosnian authorities by EASO on the topic of reception conditions. EASO experts met with Bosnian officials, mobile teams from IOM, field coordinators from UNHCR and various NGO partners active in reception centres.

      The reception mission visited #Hotel_Sedra near Bihac, which since the end of July has started to host families with children relocated from informal settlements (an abandoned dormitory in Bihac and an open field in Velika Kladusa) within the Una-Sana Canton. It will soon reach a capacity of 400, while the overall capacity in the country is expected to reach 3500 before winter. A former military camp in Usivak (near Sarajevo) will also start to host families with children from September onward after the necessary work and rehabilitation is completed by IOM.

      The EASO reception team is currently assessing the modalities of its intervention, which will focus on expert support based on EASO standards and indicators for reception for the capacity building and operational running of the reception facilities in Bihac (Hotel Sedra) and Ušivak.

      In parallel, the EASO experts participating in the mission focusing on registration, access to asylum procedure and identification or persons with special needs visited reception facilities in Delijas and Salakovac as well as two terrain centres of the Service for Foreigners’ Affairs, namely in Sarajevo and Pale. Meetings with the Ministry of Security’s asylum sector allowed for discussions on possible upcoming actions and capacity building support. The aim would be to increase registration and build staff capacity and expertise in these areas.

      Currently, the support provided by EASO within the current IPA project is limited to participation to regional activities on asylum and the roll-out of national training module sessions on Inclusion and Interview Techniques. This assessment mission would allow EASO to deliver more operational and tailor made capacity building and technical support to Bosnia and Herzegovina in managing migration flows. These potential additional actions would have an impact on the capacity of the country for registration, reception and referral of third-country nationals crossing the border and will complement the special measure adopted by the European Commission in August 2018. The scope and modalities of the actions are now under discussions with the relevant stakeholders and will be implemented swiftly, once agreed by the Bosnian authorities and the EU Delegation.

      https://www.easo.europa.eu/easo-assessment-potential-support-bosnia-herzegovina

      Avec cette image postée sur le compte twitter de EASO:


      https://twitter.com/EASO/status/1038804225642438656

    • No man’s land. Un reportage sulla nuova rotta balcanica

      Nel 2018 sono state circa 100.000 le persone che hanno attraversato i Balcani nel tentativo di raggiungere lo spazio Schengen. Esaurite le rotte migratorie che nel 2015 erano raccontate da tutti mass media i profughi hanno aperto nuove vie, sempre più pericolose e precarie. Il cuore nevralgico della rotta è ora la Bosnia Erzegovina. No man’s land il reportage di William Bonapace e Maria Perino lo racconta.

      Dopo la chiusura di frontiere e l’innalzamento di muri e recinti il flusso migratorio da unico e compatto si è disciolto in una serie di vie parallele e trasversali che, partendo dalla Grecia puntano in parte ancora verso la Serbia (nel tentativo questa volta di passare attraverso la Croazia), in parte verso la Bulgaria e, in altri casi, direttamente dalla Turchia imbarcandosi sul mar Nero per raggiungere la Romania. Ma oggi la via più rilevante passa attraverso l’Albania e il Montenegro per giungere in Bosnia Erzegovina e, quindi, puntare verso nord-ovest, nel cantone bosniaco di Una Sana, dove il tratto croato da dover superare, oltre il confine bosniaco, per raggiungere la Slovenia è più breve.

      In Bosnia Erzegovina nel corso del 2018 secondo l’UNHCR sono transitati circa 22.400 migranti, 20 volte in più rispetto a quelli che transitarono nel 2017 (circa 1.166). Questi numeri, nonostante non facciano la stessa impressione di quelli del 2015, vanno rapportati alla situazione che vive il piccolo paese balcanico che “si è trovato coinvolto in una vicenda di proporzioni internazionali senza reali capacità di reagire a una tale emergenza, a causa della sua disastrata situazione economica e di una politica lacerata da contrapposizioni etnico-nazionali gestite in modo spregiudicato da parte di gruppi di potere che stanno spingendo il paese in un vortice di povertà e di disperazione, sempre più ai margini dell’Europa stessa.”

      La risposta europea è stata quella di inviare soldi (in aiuti umanitari), in una misura talmente ridotta che le tensioni interne stanno aumentando e molti profughi hanno deciso di rientrare nei campi serbi per passare l’inverno viste le precarie e drammatiche condizioni delle strutture di fortuna allestite in Bosnia Erzegovina.

      http://viedifuga.org/no-mans-land-un-reportage-sulla-nuova-rotta-balcanica

      –-> Per approfondire e leggere integralmente il reportage No man’s land si può consultare il sito (http://www.dossierimmigrazione.it/comunicati.php?tipo=schede&qc=179) di Dossier Statistico Immigrazione (IDOS).

    • People on the Move in Bosnia and Herzegovina in 2018: Stuck in the corridors to the EU

      Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) has been part of the “Balkan route” for smuggling people, arms and drugs for decades, but also a migrant route for people who have been trying to reach Western Europe and the countries of the EU in order to save their lives and secure a future for themselves. While in 2015, when millions of people arrived in Europe over a short period of time, BiH was bypassed by mass movements, the situation started changing after the closure of the EU borders in 2016, and later on, in 2017, with the increase of violence and push backs in Croatia, and other countries at the EU borders. This report offers insight into the situation on the field: is there a system responsible for protection, security, and upholding fundamental human rights? What has the state response been like? What is the role of the international community?


      https://ba.boell.org/en/2019/02/21/people-move-bosnia-and-herzegovina-2018-stuck-corridors-eu
      #rapport #limbe #attente

  • Greece: Europe’s laboratory. An idea for Europe

    report “Greece: Europe’s laboratory. An idea for Europe” written after a field research made by legal operators and lawyers from ASGI (Associazione per gli Studi Giuridici sull’Immigrazione - Association for Juridical Studies on Migration) conducted in march 2017.

    The research aims to analyze the juridical effects that the Eu-Turkey deal had on the Greek asylum system after one year from its approval. Through this observation and the contemporary study on the European ongoing reforms of the European asylum system we can say that Greece can be considered as a laboratory for the newest European immigration governmental policies which clearly focuses on stopping the fluxes also despite the respect of fundamental principles of the European rule of law.

    http://www.statewatch.org/news/2017/aug/greece-an-idea-for-europe.pdf

    #Grèce #accord_UE-Turquie #asile #migrations #réfugiés #laboratoire #rapport #EASO

  • I circuiti dell’umanitario-finanziario tra il filo spinato di Moria

    In particolare, la Grecia è diventato il primo paese UE in cui si sta sperimentando un progetto europeo di finanziarizzazione delle misure di supporto ai richiedenti asilo in cooperazione con UNHCR. #Refugee_cash_assistance programme è il nome della piattaforma unica con cui vengono distribuite carte di debito ai richiedenti asilo dallo scorso aprile; progetto in cui sono state incluse tutte le ONG che operano nei campi di rifugiati o negli hotspot in Grecia. Per parlarne parto dalle gabbie di Moria, l’hotspot più narrato dai media europei e anche quello maggiormente sotto accusa per il sovraffollamento costante e la permanenza forzata di migranti al suo interno, in attesa che le domande di asilo vengano processate. L’ hotspot di Moria, in cui al momento sono bloccate circa 3200 persone, costituisce punto nevralgico delle politiche migratorie europee e, al contempo, lente attraverso cui guardare l’ Europa, è un luogo di confinamento noto per i livelli concentrici di filo spinato, ben visibili anche dall’esterno, che dividono in modo gerarchico i migranti all’interno, in base alla nazionalità. Dall’esterno tuttavia non si riesce a cogliere molto più che questo, oltre ad osservare la complessa economia del campo, che sconfina rispetto al muro esterno dell’hotspot, in particolare da quando ai migranti è stato concesso di uscire durante il giorno.

    L’hotspot, luogo ad accesso ristretto per eccellenza, ha tuttavia i suoi canali di ingresso possibili, in particolare quando si riesce a vestire una casacca di una ONG, che ho indossato per un giorno, con l’obiettivo di assistere alla distribuzione mensile delle #debit_cards ai migranti effettuata dall’organizzazione americana #Mercy_Corps. Appena varcato il cancello principale, l’economia spaziale dell’hotspot è visibilmente scandita dalle gabbie concentriche e dal filo spinato che avvolge ogni settore del campo. Le zone A, B e C, sono destinate ai “soggetti vulnerabili” in maggioranza famiglie siriane, e a donne sole. L’etichetta “vulnerabili” comporta che al cancello di ognuna di queste gabbie-settori vi sia un volontario, dell’ONG #Eurorelief che impedisce ai rifugiati degli altri settori del campo di entrare, e, in nome della protezione, respinge con forza all’interno un minore che prova ad uscire nel cortile antistante. Vulnerabilità che tuttavia, come spiegano gli operatori di MSF, spesso non viene riconosciuta da UNHCR quando resta non-visibile, come nel caso di torture e violenze sessuali subite dalle e dai migranti.

    Oltre ai settori “protetti” anche le altre zone dell’hotspot sono ad accesso limitato: per accedervi, ogni residente dell’hotspot deve mostrare un braccialetto che accerta la propria apparenza a quell’area di tende o containers. I nomi di queste zone del campo – “#Pakistani_sector” e “#African_compound” e “#North_African_sector” – indicano di fatto i criteri di diniego, ovvero di chi, tra gli abitanti di Moria, ha quasi la certezza di non ricevere lo status di rifugiato. Come si può evincere, a giocare un ruolo determinante nelle “selezioni” effettuate dallo European Asylum Support Office (EASO), sono le nazionalità: i cittadini di nazionalità pakistana sono tra i più soggetti alle deportazioni verso la Turchia, e l’aumento visibile di migranti algerini a Lesvos ha significato per loro un tasso diniego pressoché totale Il filo spinato avvolge anche l’ area in cui si trovano i containers di EASO e UNHCR: un filo di protezione, lo definisce il poliziotto che sorveglia la lunga fila di migranti fuori dall’ufficio di #EASO, in seguito alle numerose rivolte avvenute nell’hotspot a fronte delle attese infinite prima che le domande di asilo vengano processate, o addirittura per depositare la domanda di asilo.

    Con l’implementazione dello EU-Turkey Deal, chi viene dichiarato “inammissibile”, e dunque preventivamente escluso dai canali dell’asilo, così come chi riceve il diniego della protezione internazionale, viene trasferito nel #pre-removal_center interno a #Moria, in attesa di essere deportato in Turchia. Una prigione nella prigione, dove si perdono le tracce di chi entra: non ci sono numeri ufficiali sulle persone detenute: richiedenti asilo che venivano seguiti per assistenza medica o che ricevevano la ricarica mensile della carta di debito, improvvisamente spariscono.

    Tuttavia, in parallelo ai circuiti di filo spinato che delimitano i gradi di esclusione differenziale dai canali dell’asilo, vi sono altri circuiti non-visibili e immateriali che convergono negli hotspots e nei centri di accoglienza in Grecia. Questi sono circuiti di dati e informazioni che prendono forma a partire da una presa umanitario-finanziaria sulle vite dei e delle migranti, e in particolare su ciò che UNHCR stesso definisce le “popolazioni transnazionali in transito”. Gli stessi migranti che sono bloccati a Moria da un anno o più e a cui sarà molto probabilmente negata la protezione internazionale e dunque il diritto di restare in Europa, sono al contempo oggetto di misure di estrazione di valore dal loro stesso permanere in quel luogo. Non mi riferisco qui a ciò che in letteratura è stata definita la “migration industry”, ovvero l’economia che ruota attorno alla gestione dei centri di detenzione e di accoglienza, né al profitto ricavato dalle grandi corporation che producono nuove tecnologie per rafforzare i confini o identificare i migranti. I circuiti di cui parlo sono piuttosto l’esito dell’introduzione di nuovi modi di digitalizzazione e finanziarizzazione delle forme di intervento umanitario e di supporto monetario nei confronti dei richiedenti asilo. Questo si concretizza nell’erogazione di carte di debito Mastercard, con il logo di UNHCR e di ECHO, a tutti coloro che all’interno degli hotspots e dei campi greci vengono dichiarati da UNHCR “people of concern”. L’attore finanziario coinvolto è #Pre-Paid_Financial_Services con sede a Londra. Per ogni carta rilasciata, UNHCR paga una commissione di 6 euro a Pre-Paid Financial Services, e una tassa è prevista anche ogni transazione effettuata da ciascun richiedente asilo, cosi come per ogni ricarica mensile. Solo sulle isole, ogni mese vengono rilasciate circa 500 nuove carte, e a Lesvos si ricaricano circa 2500 carte ogni volta.

    90 euro a persona, 340 per nucleo familiare: queste sono le cifre fissate da UNHCR in accordo con le autorità greche, della ricarica mensile delle carte di debito. La cifra sale da 90 a 150 in alcuni campi di rifugiati o centri di accoglienza dove, a differenza di Moria, non viene fornito cibo. Tuttavia, anche nell’hotspot di Moria questa sembra essere la prossima tappa: interrompere la distribuzione di cibo e vestiti e far si che i richiedenti asilo cucinino autonomamente.

    All’interno di Moria una signora siriana mostra la sua asylum card, per ottenere la ricarica mensile della carta di debito: sul suo documento non compare, per sua fortuna, il timbro rosso, che indica le restrizioni geografiche (“geographical restrictions” ) imposte dallo EU-Turkey Deal, secondo cui tutta la procedura di asilo deve essere svolta sulle isole. Per la maggioranza delle persone bloccate da mesi a Moria, quel timbro significa non solo immobilità ma anche alto rischio di trasferimento forzato in Turchia. Mentre procede la registrazione mensile delle carte, tra tende e containers, nella prigione interna all’hotspot 35 dei migranti accusati di aver partecipato alle proteste del 18 luglio contro la lentezza nell’esame delle domande di asilo scompaiono dalla lista di Mercy Corps. La #Fast_Track_Procedure, concepita per espellere più velocemente i migranti dalle isole greche, si scontra e si articola con altri confini temporali che producono contenimento a oltranza, sulle isole.

    http://www.euronomade.info/?p=6338
    #Moria #asile #migrations #hotspots #réfugiés #business #Lesbos #Grèce #camps_de_réfugiés #économie #vulnérabilité #accord_UE-Turquie #expulsions #renvois #migration_industry #argent #cartes_de_crédit #financial_inclusion #nourriture #geographical_restrictions #liberté_de_mouvement #liberté_de_circulation #restrictions_géographiques #confinement #îles

    cc @albertocampiphoto

  • Thousands of refugees on Greek islands risk losing vital services as charities prepare to withdraw

    ’Who’s going to do child protection services on the island? Who’s going to do education? Who’s going to do the food?’

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/refugees-latest-greek-islands-government-unhcr-humanitarian-crisis-fe
    #île #Grèce #asile #migrations #réfugiés #accueil #hotspots #financement #sous-financement #bénévolat #aide

  • ’Serious Fundamental Rights Violations’ at Hotspots in Italy and Greece

    Current EU policies and practices regarding refugees “has led to instances of serious fundamental rights violations in both Italy and Greece,” a new study by the EP concluded. It points out that countries failed to meet their commitments under the relocation scheme, threatening the rule of law in the EU. On hotspots, it notes, “they have not helped in alleviating pressure on the Italian and Greek systems. On the contrary, they increase burdens, because of structural shortcomings in their design and implementation and due to continuing applications, exacerbating the flaws of the Dublin system.”

    https://www.liberties.eu/en/short-news/18068
    #rapport #migrations #asile #réfugiés #hotspots #Dublin #Italie #Grèce #Dublin_IV #relocalisation #Frontex #EASO

    Lien vers le rapport:
    http://www.statewatch.org/news/2017/mar/ep-study-implementation-of-refugee-relocation-schemes-3-17.pdf

  • New Security on Greek Islands Reduces Access

    European migration commentator Apostolis Fotiadis probes the legality of the European Asylum Support Office’s decision to limit access to asylum proceedings as part of new security measures on the Greek islands.

    On June 9, the Lawyers Association of Mitilini (Lesvos) sued the European Asylum Support Office (EASO) for obstructing access to asylum proceedings by its members. The lawyers claim that #EASO officials and private security guards are prohibiting access to specific areas of the holding centers, also called hotspots, that host the EASO offices and the asylum proceedings.


    https://www.newsdeeply.com/refugees/op-eds/2016/06/15/new-security-on-greek-islands-reduces-access
    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #procédure_d'asile #Grèce #île #sécurité #mesures_de_sécurité #accès_à_la_procédure_d'asile

    cc @reka

  • #Lampedusa, «Mandateci via da questa prigione»

    Scesi in piazza ieri, nel centro di Lampedusa, per chiedere di poter lasciare l’isola, dove sono bloccati da mesi, più di 70 rifugiati sono in sciopero della fame e della sete contro le identificazioni e il “sistema hotspot”. Altri 400 persone sono sbarcati sull’isola in 24 ore

    http://www.repubblica.it/solidarieta/immigrazione/2016/05/07/news/lampedusa-139305423
    #hotspots #asile #migrations #réfugiés #grève_de_la_faim #résistance #manifestation #Italie

    • Mais l’agence #EASO en parle comme si c’était le plus beau endroit du monde... #hypocrisie

      The Cultural Mediators of Lampedusa

      Every EASO Asylum Support Team is made up by national experts coming from the European Member States and cultural mediators to interpret several languages. In the small island of Lampedusa, Italy, migrants can disembark at any time, even at night or during the weekend. EASO’s Asylum Support Team is always ready to receive them, providing not only information on the EU Relocation and family reunification procedures, but also the first assistance and care they need after their long journey.

      https://www.easo.europa.eu/stories-hotspot-lampeduss

  • In tre mesi fotosegnalati all’#hotspot di #Trapani #Milo 2492 migranti

    I profughi, quasi tutti provenienti dall’Africa sub-sahariana, sono stati informati, accompagnati e assistiti e poi accolti nei Cas locali o di altre parti d’Italia, avviando la pratica per la richiesta d’asilo. C’e’, quindi, un lavoro sinergico tra le organizzazioni internazionali presenti nell’ampia struttura (#Unhcr ed #Easo) e le forze dell’ordine nazionali e internazionali (#Frontex). Di questo ne e’ soddisfatto il prefetto di Trapani Leopoldo Falco che dice: “Il sistema sta reggendo molto bene e c’e’ un buon lavoro di squadra”.

    http://www.tp24.it/resizer/resize.php?url=http://www.tp24.it/immagini_articoli/28-03-2016/1459175247-0-in-tre-mesi-fotosegnalati-all-hotspot-di-trapani-milo-2492-migrant
    http://www.tp24.it/2016/03/31/immigrazione/in-tre-mesi-fotosegnalati-all-hotspot-di-trapani-milo-2492-migranti/99110

  • #réfugiés : à #Lesbos, des solidarités contre la honte européenne
    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/020316/refugies-lesbos-des-solidarites-contre-la-honte-europeenne

    Chaque jour, les gilets de sauvetage abandonnés sur les plages sont ramassés et déversés dans une décharge de l’île. © Amélie Poinssot Ils sont plus de 500 000 à être passés par cette île grecque en 2015, déjà plus de 70 000 depuis le début de l’année et de plus en plus de femmes et de jeunes enfants. Lesbos, en mer Égée, est le principal point d’arrivée des #migrants qui quittent la #turquie sur de pauvres embarcations. Sur l’île s’invente toutes toutes sortes de solidarités qui contrastent avec l’égoïsme européen.

    #International #asile #EASO #europe #Frontex #Grèce #mer_Egée #Prix_Nobel_de_la_Paix #relocalisation #union_européenne

  • Explanatory note on the “#Hotspot” approach

    The aim of the Hotspot approach is to provide a platform for the agencies to intervene, rapidly and in an integrated manner, in frontline Member States when there is a crisis due to specific and disproportionate migratory pressure at their external borders, consisting of mixed migratory flows and the Member State concerned might request support and assistance to better cope with that pressure. The support offered and the duration of assistance to the Member State concerned would depend on its needsand the development of the situation. This is intended to be a flexible tool that can be applied in a tailored manner.

    http://www.statewatch.org/news/2015/jul/eu-com-hotsposts.pdf
    #migration #asile #réfugiés #Politique_d'asile #UE #Europe #Frontex #EASO #Europol #Eurojust

    Est-ce la nouvelle configuration des #RABIT ?
    cc @reka

    • Avec les « hotspots », l’UE renforce sa politique de refoulement des boat people

      Depuis le printemps dernier, devant la médiatisation des milliers de naufrages de migrants en Méditerranée, l’Union européenne (UE) a tenté d’apporter des réponses qui masquent ses responsabilités en matière de non sauvetage en mer et de non respect du droit à demander l’asile. Elle use pour cela d’un jargon spécifique qui vient de s’enrichir d’un nouveau terme : les hotspots.La novlangue européenne, riche d’un lexique conçu pour suggérer que le « problème migratoire » est pris en compte dans le respect des « principes fondamentaux » dont l’UE se gargarise, s’est ainsi enrichie d’un nouveau terme : les hotspots. La signification de cette expression n’étant pas évidente, la Commission européenne en a même proposé une explication dans un des glossaires rédigés afin d’aider au décryptage de son jargon. De fait, ce lexique obscurcit plus qu’il n’éclaircit (« The proposal would allow establishing dedicated hotspot teams from all the Agencies concerned to provide comprehensive support in dealing with mixed migratory flows ») et tel est sans doute son véritable objectif. Comprendre ce que recouvre un tel mot-valise implique à la fois de rappeler le contexte de son apparition et de pointer quelles significations et quels usages ont conduit à ce nouveau signifié. Il s’agit surtout de replacer ce qui est présenté comme une innovation (pas seulement sémantique) dans la longue durée des politiques européennes de contrôle des frontières externes (dans le glossaire précédemment cité, l’expression hotspots est présentée dans la section « Save lives and secure the external borders »).

      http://blogs.mediapart.fr/blog/migreurop/210715/avec-les-hotspots-l-ue-renforce-sa-politique-de-refoulement-des-boat

    • International Meeting “Hotspots” and “processing centres” : The new forms of the European policy of externalisation, encampment and sorting of exiles, #Calais (12/12/2015)

      In spring 2015, after the arrival and shipwrecks of thousands peoples on its coasts, the European Union (EU) adopted the “hotspot approach” and “processing centres”,“new” tools and terminology supposedly able to address the poorly named “migration crisis”.

      http://www.migreurop.org/article2759.html?lang=en

      #Emmanuel_Blanchard #Philippe_Wannesson #Agadez #Amadou_M’Bow #Nazli_Bilgekay #Turquie #Efi_Latsoudi #Grèce #Sara_Prestianni #Italie

    • Migrants : Agadez sous pression des hotspots de Macron

      « #Hotspots », « #missions_de_protection », voilà deux mots avec lesquels il va falloir s’habituer à chaque fois qu’il sera question de parler des migrants notamment africains. Dans le dessein d’éviter que ceux-ci arrivent en Europe en prenant des risques inconsidérés dans le désert du Sahara, mais aussi en mer Méditerranée, le président français, Emmanuel Macron, a émis l’idée de recevoir les candidats à une migration vers l’Europe dans des centres installés en Afrique. Autrement dit, faire en sorte que la décision de recevoir un migrant au titre de l’asile soit prise dans ces centres appelés « hotspots » par les uns et « missions de protection » par les autres. Ville située au nord du Niger, aux portes du désert, Agadez est devenue au fil des ans un carrefour de migrants. Autant dire donc qu’elle est en première ligne dans le dispositif que la France veut mettre en place pour contenir les migrants en terre africaine. Il n’y a bien sûr pas qu’Agadez qui est concernée. Nombre d’autres villes au Tchad et ailleurs ne manqueront pas de servir de hotspots. Sur place, au-delà de la question de souveraineté qui est posée avec une sorte de police des frontières françaises et Européennes installées au cœur de pays africains, il y a la crainte des conséquences économiques, sociales et politiques qu’ils ne manqueront pas d’entraîner. Le président français s’est engagé à accueillir 3 000 personnes parmi celles identifiées comme pouvant bénéficier de l’asile d’ici 2019. À Agadez, on sait que beaucoup de migrants ne seront pas acceptés à ce titre. De quoi alimenter bien des interrogations sur ce qui va advenir demain.

      http://afrique.lepoint.fr/actualites/migrants-agadez-sous-pression-des-hotspots-de-macron-18-10-2017-2165

  • Asylum applications from the Western Balkans. Comparative analysis of trends, push-pull factors and responses

    EASO has today published a comparative analysis of trends, push-pull factors and responses to the flow of asylum-seekers from Western Balkan countries to EU Member States and Associated Countries, which has consistently represented the largest proportion of asylum-seekers dealt with in the EU in recent years. This analysis provides decision - and policy-makers - with tools for understanding and better managing situations in which they are confronted with large numbers of applications for international protection from Western Balkans citizens and other flows with similar characteristics. It also attempts to identify the measures which have proved to be the most effective in reducing the impact of some of the pull factors and in processing large numbers of applications for international protection where many may be unfounded, while ensuring full consideration of each individual claim and ensuring protection for those who need it.

    http://easo.europa.eu/wp-content/uploads/EASO-Report-Western-Balkans.pdf

    #asile #réfugié #migration #Balkans #route_migratoire #EASO