• Bosnia and Herzegovina opened Negotiations on the Cooperation Agreement with FRONTEX

    By starting the negotiations on the Agreement with the European Border and Coast Guard Agency (FRONTEX), Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Ministry of Security of Bosnia and Herzegovina fulfilled another of their obligations on the European road today.

    Along with the representatives of the BiH team for negotiations on the cooperation agreement with FRONTEX, the meeting that officially started this process was attended by the Minister of Security of Bosnia and Herzegovina Nenad Nešić and the Deputy Director General for Internal Affairs at the European Commission Oliver Onidi.

    After the establishment of operational cooperation with EUROPOL, this agreement is the next important step for BiH in the integration into the common European security area, the Ministry of Security of BiH announced.

    “Today we will start a process that will not mean cooperation with a single European institution for Bosnia and Herzegovina, but a confirmation that we are part of common and collective European security. I want to emphasize that our activities are aimed at eliminating threats and risks, primarily from organized crime that threatens development and economic stability of BiH, and increasing security for the citizens of BiH. FRONTEX will add a new dimension in this regard, strengthening our borders and their impermeability to security threats and organized crime in this dynamic time of migration as a serious source of all kinds of risks,” said Nešić.

    He emphasized that FRONTEX is a confirmation that BiH is a complicated country only when it needs an excuse not to do something, and that it is very functional and possible within its constitutional framework and the framework of the Dayton Agreement when they want to move things forward.

    Nešić wished the negotiating teams to effectively bring this work to an end, so that BiH would cease to be the only country in the Western Balkans that does not cooperate with FRONTEX.

    The Deputy General Director for Internal Affairs at the European Commission, Oliver Onidi, reminded that last year BiH made a big step by establishing full operational cooperation with EUROPOL, and that negotiations on cooperation with FRONTEX are also ahead of us.

    He emphasized that in a situation where there is an exceptional pressure of illegal migration, police cooperation and joint action in guarding and controlling borders is extremely important.

    https://sarajevotimes.com/bosnia-and-herzegovina-opened-negotiations-on-the-cooperation-agreeme

    #Bosnie #Bosnie-Hezégovine #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Frontex #accord #EUROPOL #Balkans #route_des_Balkans #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers

  • #Lampedusa : ’Operational emergency,’ not ’migration crisis’

    Thousands of migrants have arrived on Lampedusa from Africa this week, with the EU at odds over what to do with them. DW reports from the Italian island, where locals are showing compassion as conditions worsen.

    Long lines of migrants and refugees, wearing caps and towels to protect themselves from the blistering September sun, sit flanked on either side of a narrow, rocky lane leading to Contrada Imbriacola, the main migrant reception center on the Italian island of Lampedusa.

    Among them are 16-year-old Abubakar Sheriff and his 10-year old brother, Farde, who fled their home in Sierra Leone and reached Lampedusa by boat from Tunisia.

    “We’ve been on this island for four days, have been sleeping outside and not consumed much food or water. We’ve been living on a couple of biscuits,” Abubakar told DW. “There were 48 people on the boat we arrived in from Tunisia on September 13. It was a scary journey and I saw some other boats capsizing. But we got lucky.”

    Together with thousands of other migrants outside the reception center, they’re waiting to be put into police vans headed to the Italian island’s port. They will then be transferred to Sicily and other parts of Italy for their asylum claims to be processed, as authorities in Lampedusa say they have reached “a tipping point” in migration management.
    Not a ’migration crisis for Italy,’ but an ’operational emergency’

    More than 7,000 migrants arrived in Lampedusa on flimsy boats from Tunisia earlier this week, leading the island’s mayor, Filippo Mannino, to declare a state of emergency and tell local media that while migrants have always been welcomed, this time Lampedusa “is in crisis.”

    In a statement released on Friday, Italian Prime Minister Giorgia Meloni said her government intends to take “immediate extraordinary measures” to deal with the landings. She said this could include a European mission to stop arrivals, “a naval mission if necessary.” But Lampedusa, with a population of just 6,000 and a reception center that has a capacity for only 400 migrants, has more immediate problems.

    Flavio Di Giacomo, spokesperson for the UN’s International Organization for Migration (IOM), told DW that while the new arrivals have been overwhelming for the island, this is not a “migration crisis for Italy.”

    “This is mainly an operational emergency for Lampedusa, because in 2015-2016, at the height of Europe’s migration crisis, only 8% of migrants arrived in Lampedusa. The others were rescued at sea and transported to Sicily to many ports there,” he said. “This year, over 70% of arrivals have been in Lampedusa, with people departing from Tunisia, which is very close to the island.”

    Di Giacomo said the Italian government had failed to prepare Lampedusa over the past few years. “The Italian government had time to increase the reception center’s capacity after it was set up in 2008,” he said. “Migration is nothing new for the country.”
    Why the sudden increase?

    One of Italy’s Pelagie Islands in the Mediterranean, Lampedusa has been the first point of entry to Europe for people fleeing conflict, poverty and war in North Africa and the Middle East for years, due to its geographical proximity to those regions. But the past week’s mass arrival of migrants caught local authorities off guard.

    “We have never seen anything like what we saw on Wednesday,” said a local police officer near the asylum reception center.

    Showing a cellphone video of several small boats crammed with people arriving at the Lampedusa port, he added, “2011 was the last time Lampedusa saw something like this.” When the civil war in Libya broke out in 2011, many people fled to Europe through Italy. At the time, Rome declared a “North Africa emergency.”

    Roberto Forin, regional coordinator for Europe at the Mixed Migration Centre, a research center, said the recent spike in arrivals likely had one main driving factor. “According to our research with refugees and migrants in Tunisia, the interceptions by Tunisian coast guards of boats leaving toward Italy seems to have decreased since the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding in mid-July between the European Union and Tunisia,” he said. “But the commission has not yet disbursed the €100 million ($106.6 million) included in the deal.”

    The EU-Tunisia deal is meant to prevent irregular migration from North Africa and has been welcomed by EU politicians, including Meloni. But rights groups have questioned whether it will protect migrants. Responding to reporters about the delayed disbursement of funds, the European Commission said on Friday that the disbursement was still a “work in progress.”

    IOM’s Giacomo said deals between the EU and North African countries aren’t the answer. “It is a humanitarian emergency right now because migrants are leaving from Tunisia, because many are victims of racial discrimination, assault, and in Libya as well, their rights are being abused,” he said. "Some coming from Tunisia are also saying they are coming to Italy to get medical care because of the economic crisis there.

    “The solution should be to organize more search-and-rescue at sea, to save people and bring them to safety,” he added. “The focus should be on helping Lampedusa save the migrants.”

    A group of young migrants from Mali who were sitting near the migrant reception center, with pink tags on their hands indicating the date of their arrival, had a similar view.

    “We didn’t feel safe in Tunisia,” they told DW. “So we paid around €750 to a smuggler in Sfax, Tunisia, who then gave us a dinghy and told us to control it and cross the sea toward Europe. We got to Italy but we don’t want to stay here. We want to go to France and play football for that country.”
    Are other EU nations helping?

    At a press briefing in Brussels on Wednesday, the European Commission said that 450 staff from Europol, Frontex and the European Union Agency for Asylum have been deployed to the island to assist Italian authorities, and €40 million ($42.6 million) has been provided for transport and other infrastructure needed for to handle the increase in migrant arrivals.

    But Italian authorities have said they’re alone in dealing with the migrants, with Germany restricting Italy from transferring migrants and France tightening its borders with the country.

    Lampedusa Deputy Mayor Attilio Lucia was uncompromising: “The message that has to get through is that Europe has to wake up because the European Union has been absent for 20 years. Today we give this signal: Lampedusa says ’Enough’, the Lampedusians have been suffering for 20 years and we are psychologically destroyed,” he told DW.

    “I understand that this was done mostly for internal politics, whereby governments in France and Germany are afraid of being attacked by far-right parties and therefore preemptively take restrictive measures,” said Forin. “On the other hand, it is a measure of the failure of the EU to mediate a permanent and sustainable mechanism. When solidarity is left to voluntary mechanisms between states there is always a risk that, when the stakes are high, solidarity vanishes.”

    Local help

    As politicians and rights groups argue over the right response, Lampedusa locals like Antonello di Malta and his mother feel helping people should be the heart of any deal.

    On the night more than 7,000 people arrived on the island, di Malta said his mother called him saying some migrants had come to their house begging for food. “I had to go out but I didn’t feel comfortable hearing about them from my mother. So I came home and we started cooking spaghetti for them. There were 10 of them,” he told DW, adding that he was disappointed with how the government was handling the situation.

    “When I saw them I thought about how I would have felt if they were my sons crying and asking for food,” said Antonello’s mother. “So I started cooking for them. We Italians were migrants too. We used to also travel from north to south. So we can’t get scared of people and we need to help.”

    Mohammad still has faith in the Italian locals helping people like him. “I left horrible conditions in Gambia. It is my first time in Europe and local people here have been nice to me, giving me a cracker or sometimes even spaghetti. I don’t know where I will be taken next, but I have not lost hope,” he told DW.

    “I stay strong thinking that one day I will play football for Italy and eventually, my home country Gambia,” he said. “That sport gives me joy through all this hardship.”

    https://www.dw.com/en/lampedusa-operational-emergency-not-migration-crisis/a-66830589

    #débarquements #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Italie #crise #compassion #transferts #urgence_opérationnelle #crise_migratoire #Europol #Frontex #Agence_de_l'Union_européenne_pour_l'asile (#EUEA #EUAA) #solidarité

    ping @isskein @karine4 @_kg_

    • The dance that give life’
      Upon Lampedusa’s rocky shore they came,
      From Sub-Saharan lands, hearts aflame,
      Chasing dreams, fleeing despair,
      In search of a life that’s fair.

      Hunger gnawed, thirst clawed, bodies beat,
      Brutality’s rhythm, a policeman’s merciless feat,
      Yet within their spirits, a melody stirred,
      A refuge in humour where hope’s not deferred.

      Their laughter echoed ’cross the tiny island,
      In music and dance, they made a home,
      In the face of adversity, they sang their songs,
      In unity and rhythm, they proved their wrongs.

      A flood of souls, on Lampedusa’s strand,
      Ignited debates across the land,
      Politicians’ tongues twisted in spite,
      Racist rhetoric veiled as right.

      Yet, the common people, with curious gaze,
      Snared in the web of fear’s daze,
      Chose not to see the human plight,
      But the brainwash of bigotry’s might.

      Yet still, the survivor’s spirit shines bright,
      In the face of inhumanity, they recite,
      Their music, their dance, their undying humour,
      A testament to resilience, amid the rumour and hate.

      For they are not just numbers on a page,
      But humans, life stories, not a stage,
      Their journey not over, their tale still unspun,
      On the horizon, a new day begun.

      Written by @Yambiodavid

      https://twitter.com/RefugeesinLibya/status/1702595772603138331
      #danse #fête

    • L’imbroglio del governo oltre la propaganda

      Le politiche europee e italiane di esternalizzazione dei controlli di frontiera con il coinvolgimento di paesi terzi, ritenuti a torto “sicuri”, sono definitivamente fallite.

      La tragedia umanitaria in corso a Lampedusa, l’ennesima dalle “primavere arabe” del 2011 ad oggi, dimostra che dopo gli accordi di esternalizzazione, con la cessione di motovedette e con il supporto alle attività di intercettazione in mare, in collaborazione con Frontex, come si è fatto con la Tunisia e con la Libia (o con quello che ne rimane come governo di Tripoli), le partenze non diminuiscono affatto, ed anzi, fino a quando il meteo lo permette, sono in continuo aumento.

      Si sono bloccate con i fermi amministrativi le navi umanitarie più grandi, ma questo ha comportato un aumento degli “arrivi autonomi” e l’impossibilità di assegnare porti di sbarco distribuiti nelle città più grandi della Sicilia e della Calabria, come avveniva fino al 2017, prima del Codice di condotta Minniti e dell’attacco politico-giudiziario contro il soccorso civile.

      La caccia “su scala globale” a trafficanti e scafisti si è rivelata l’ennesimo annuncio propagandistico, anche se si dà molta enfasi alla intensificazione dei controlli di polizia e agli arresti di presunti trafficanti ad opera delle autorità di polizia e di guardia costiera degli Stati con i quali l’Italia ha stipulato accordi bilaterali finalizzati al contrasto dell’immigrazione “clandestina”. Se Salvini ha le prove di una guerra contro l’Italia, deve esibirle, altrimenti pensi al processo di Palermo sul caso Open Arms, per difendersi sui fatti contestati, senza sfruttare il momento per ulteriori sparate propagandistiche.

      Mentre si riaccende lo scontro nella maggioranza, è inutile incolpare l’Unione europea, dopo che la Meloni e Piantedosi hanno vantato di avere imposto un “cambio di passo” nelle politiche migratorie dell’Unione, mente invece hanno solo rafforzato accordi bilaterali già esistenti.

      Le politiche europee e italiane di esternalizzazione dei controlli di frontiera con il coinvolgimento di paesi terzi, ritenuti a torto “sicuri”, sono definitivamente fallite, gli arrivi delle persone che fuggono da aree geografiche sempre più instabili, per non parlare delle devastazioni ambientali, non sono diminuiti per effetto degli accordi bilaterali o multilaterali con i quali si è cercato di offrire aiuti economici in cambio di una maggiore collaborazione sulle attività di polizia per la sorveglianza delle frontiere. Dove peraltro la corruzione, i controlli mortali, se non gli abusi sulle persone migranti, si sono diffusi in maniera esponenziale, senza che alcuna autorità statale si dimostrasse in grado di fare rispettare i diritti fondamentali e le garanzie che dovrebbe assicurare a qualsiasi persona uno Stato democratico quando negozia con un paese terzo. Ed è per questa ragione che gli aiuti previsti dal Memorandum Tunisia-Ue non sono ancora arrivati e il Piano Mattei per l’Africa, sul quale Meloni e Piantedosi hanno investito tutte le loro energie, appare già fallito.

      Di fronte al fallimento sul piano internazionale è prevedibile una ulteriore stretta repressiva. Si attende un nuovo pacchetto sicurezza, contro i richiedenti asilo provenienti da paesi terzi “sicuri” per i quali, al termine di un sommario esame delle domande di protezione durante le “procedure accelerate in frontiera”, dovrebbero essere previsti “rimpatri veloci”. Come se non fossero certi i dati sul fallimento delle operazioni di espulsione e di rimpatrio di massa.

      Se si vogliono aiutare i paesi colpiti da terremoti e alluvioni, ma anche quelli dilaniati da guerre civili alimentate dalla caccia alle risorse naturali di cui è ricca l’Africa, occorrono visti umanitari, evacuazione dei richiedenti asilo presenti in Libia e Tunisia, ma anche in Niger, e sospensione immediata di tutti gli accordi stipulati per bloccare i migranti in paesi dove non si garantisce il rispetto dei diritti umani. Occorre una politica estera capace di mediare i conflitti e non di aggravarne gli esiti. Vanno aperti canali legali di ingresso senza delegare a paesi terzi improbabili blocchi navali. Per salvare vite, basta con la propaganda elettorale.

      https://ilmanifesto.it/limbroglio-del-governo-oltre-la-propaganda/r/2aUycOowSerL2VxgLCD9N

    • The fall of the Lampedusa Hotspot, people’s freedom and locals’ solidarity

      https://2196af27df.clvaw-cdnwnd.com/1b76f9dfff36cde79df962be70636288/200000912-464e9464ec/DSC09012.webp?ph=2196af27df

      A few weeks ago, the owner of one of the bars in the old port, was talking about human trafficking and money laundering between institutions and NGOs in relation to what had happened during that day. It was the evening of Thursday 24 August and Lampedusa had been touched by yet another ’exceptional’ event: 64 arrivals in one day. Tonight, in that same bar in the old port, a young Tunisian boy was sitting at a table and together with that same owner, albeit in different languages, exchanging life stories.

      What had been shaken in Lampedusa, in addition to the collapse of the Hotspot , is the collapse of the years long segregation system, which had undermined anypotential encounter with newly arrived people. A segregation that also provided fertile ground for conspiracy theories about migration, reducing people on the move to either victims or perpetrators of an alleged ’migration crisis’.

      Over the past two days, however, without police teams in manhunt mode, Lampedusa streets, public spaces, benches and bars, have been filled with encounters, conversations, pizzas and coffees offered by local inhabitants. Without hotspots and segregation mechanisms, Lampedusa becomes a space for enriching encounters and spontaneus acts of solidarity between locals and newly arrived people. Trays of fish ravioli, arancini, pasta, rice and couscous enter the small room next to the church, where volunteers try to guarantee as many meals as possible to people who, taken to the hotspot after disembarkation, had been unable to access food and water for three days. These scenes were unthinkable only a few days before. Since the beginning of the pandemic, which led to the end of the era of the ’hotspot with a hole’, newly-arrived people could not leave the detention centre, and it became almost impossible to imagine an open hotspot, with people walking freely through the city. Last night, 14 September, on Via Roma, groups of people who would never have met last week danced together with joy and complicity.

      These days, practice precedes all rhetoric, and what is happening shows that Lampedusa can be a beautiful island in the Mediterranean Sea rather than a border, that its streets can be a place of welcoming and encounter without a closed centre that stifles any space for self-managed solidarity.

      The problem is not migration but the mechanism used to manage it.

      The situation for the thousands of people who have arrived in recent days remains worrying and precarious. In Contrada Imbriacola, even tonight, people are sleeping on the ground or on cots next to the buses that will take them to the ships for transfers in the morning. Among the people, besides confusion and misinformation, there is a lot of tiredness and fatigue. There are many teenagers and adolescents and many children and pregnant women. There are no showers or sanitary facilities, and people still complain about the inaccessibility of food and water; the competitiveness during food distributions disheartens many because of the tension involved in queuing. The fights that broke out two days ago are an example of this, and since that event most of the workers of all the associations present in the centre have been prevented from entering for reasons of security and guaranteeing their safety.

      If the Red Cross and the Prefecture do not want to admit their responsibilities, these are blatant before our eyes and it is not only the images of 7000 people that prove this, but the way situations are handled due to an absolute lack of personnel and, above all, confusion at organisational moments.

      https://2196af27df.clvaw-cdnwnd.com/1b76f9dfff36cde79df962be70636288/200000932-250b0250b2/DSC08952-8.webp?ph=2196af27df

      A police commissioner tried unsuccessfully to get only a few people into the bus. The number and determination to leave of the newly arrived people is reformulating the very functioning of the transfers.

      A police commissioner tried unsuccessfully to get only a few people into the bus. The number and determination to leave of the newly arrived people is reformulating the very functioning of the transfers.

      During transfers yesterday morning, the carabinieri charged to move people crowded around a departing bus. The latter, at the cost of moving, performed a manoeuvre that squeezed the crowd against a low wall, creating an extremely dangerous situation ( video). All the people who had been standing in line for hours had to move chaotically, creating a commotion from which a brawl began in which at least one person split his eyebrow. Shortly before, one of the police commissioners had tried something different by creating a human caterpillar - people standing in line with their hands on their shoulders - in order to lead them into a bus, but once the doors were opened, other people pounced into it literally jamming it (photo). In other words, people are trudging along at the cost of others’ psycho-physical health.

      In yesterday evening’s transfer on 14 September (photo series with explanation), 300 people remained at the commercial dock from the morning to enter the Galaxy ship at nine o’clock in the evening. Against these 300 people, just as many arrived from the hotspot to board the ship or at least to try to do so.

      The tension, especially among those in control, was palpable; the marshals who remained on the island - the four patrols of the police force were all engaged for the day’s transfers - ’lined up’ between one group and another with the aim of avoiding any attempt to jump on the ship. In reality, people, including teenagers and families with children, hoped until the end to board the ship. No one told them otherwise until all 300 people passed through the only door left open to access the commercial pier. These people were promised that they would leave the next day. Meanwhile, other people from the hotspot have moved to the commercial pier and are spending the night there.

      People are demanding to leave and move freely. Obstructing rather than supporting this freedom of movement will lead people and territories back to the same impasses they have regularly experienced in recent years. The hotspot has collapsed, but other forms of borders remain that obstruct something as simple as personal self-determination. Forcing is the source of all problems, not freedom.

      Against all forms of borders, for freedom of movement for all.

      https://www.maldusa.org/l/the-fall-of-the-lampedusa-hotspot-people-s-freedom-and-locals-solidarity

      –-
      #Video: Lampedusa on the 14th September

      –-> https://vimeo.com/864806349

      –-

      #Lampedusa #hotspot #soilidarity #Maldusa

    • Lampedusa’s Hotspot System: From Failure to Nonexistence

      After a few days of bad weather, with the return of calm seas, people on the move again started to leave and cross the Mediterranean from Tunisia and Libya.

      During the day of 12 September alone, 110 iron, wooden and rubber boats arrived. 110 small boats, for about 5000 people in twenty-four hours. Well over the ’record’ of 60 that had astonished many a few weeks ago. Numbers not seen for years, and which add up to the approximately 120,000 people who have reached Italy since January 2023 alone: already 15,000 more than the entire year 2022.

      It has been a tense few days at the Favaloro pier, where people have been crowded for dozens of hours under the scorching sun.

      Some, having passed the gates and some rocks, jumped into the water in an attempt to find some coolness, reaching some boats at anchor and asking for water to drink.

      It pains and angers us that the police in riot gear are the only real response that seems to have been given.

      On the other hand, hundreds of people, who have arrived in the last two days on the Lampedusa coast, are walking through the streets of the town, crossing and finally reclaiming public space. The hotspot, which could accommodate 389, in front of 7000 people, has simply blown up. That is, it has opened.

      The square in front of the church was transformed, as it was years ago, into a meeting place where locals organised the distribution of food they had prepared, thanks also to the solidarity of bakers and restaurateurs who provided what they could.

      A strong and fast wave of solidarity: it seems incredible to see people on the move again, sharing space, moments and words with Lampedusians, activists from various organisations and tourists. Of course, there is also no shortage of sad and embarrassing situations, in which some tourists - perhaps secretly eager to meet ’the illegal immigrants’ - took pictures of themselves capturing these normally invisible and segregated chimeras.

      In fact, all these people would normally never meet, kept separate and segregated by the hotspot system.

      But these days a hotspot system seems to no longer exist, or to have completely broken down, in Lampedusa. It has literally been occupied by people on the move, sleeping inside and outside the centre, on the road leading from the entrance gate to the large car park, and in the abandoned huts around, and in every nook and cranny.

      Basic goods, such as water and food, are not enough. Due to the high number of people, there is a structural lack of distribution even of the goods that are present, and tensions seem to mount slowly but steadily.

      The Red Cross and workers from other organisations have been prevented from entering the hotspot centre for ’security reasons’ since yesterday morning. This seems an overwhelming situation for everyone. The pre-identification procedures, of course, are completely blown.

      Breaking out of this stalemate it’s very complex due to the continuous flow of arrivals : for today, as many as 2000 people are expected to be transferred between regular ships and military assets. For tomorrow another 2300 or so. Of course, it remains unpredictable how many people will continue to reach the island at the same time.

      In reaction to all this, we are not surprised, but again disappointed, that the city council is declaring a state of emergency still based on the rhetoric of ’invasion’.

      A day of city mourning has also been declared for the death of a 5-month-old baby, who did not survive the crossing and was found two days ago during a rescue.

      We are comforted, however, that a torchlight procession has been called by Lampedusians for tonight at 8pm. Banners read: ’STOP DEAD AT SEA’, ’LEGAL ENTRANCE CHANNELS NOW’.

      The Red Cross, Questura and Prefecture, on the other hand, oscillate between denying the problem - ’we are handling everything pretty well’ - to shouting at the invasion.

      It is not surprising either, but remains a disgrace, that the French government responds by announcing tighter border controls and that the German government announces in these very days - even though the decision stems from agreements already discussed in August regarding the Dublin Convention - that it will suspend the taking in of any refugee who falls under the so-called ’European solidarity mechanism’.

      We are facing a new level of breaking down the European borders and border regime by people on the move in the central Mediterranean area.

      We stand in full solidarity with them and wish them safe arrival in their destination cities.

      But let us remember: every day they continue to die at sea, which proves to be the deadliest border in the world. And this stems from a political choice, which remains intolerable and unacceptable.

      Freedom of movement must be a right for all!

      https://www.maldusa.org/l/lampedusas-hotspot-system-from-failure-to-nonexistence

    • « L’effet Lampedusa », ou comment se fabriquent des politiques migratoires répressives

      En concentrant les migrants dans des hotspots souvent situés sur de petites îles, les Etats européens installent une gestion inhumaine et inefficace des migrations, contradictoire avec certains de leurs objectifs, soulignent les chercheuses #Marie_Bassi et #Camille_Schmoll.

      Depuis quelques jours, la petite île de Lampedusa en Sicile a vu débarquer sur son territoire plus de migrants que son nombre d’habitants. Et comme à chacun de ces épisodes d’urgence migratoire en Europe, des représentants politiques partent en #croisade : pour accroître leur capital électoral, ils utilisent une #rhétorique_guerrière tandis que les annonces de #fermeture_des_frontières se succèdent. Les #élections_européennes approchent, c’est pour eux l’occasion de doubler par la droite de potentiels concurrents.

      Au-delà du cynisme des #opportunismes_politiques, que nous dit l’épisode Lampedusa ? Une fois de plus, que les #politiques_migratoires mises en place par les Etats européens depuis une trentaine d’années, et de manière accélérée depuis 2015, ont contribué à créer les conditions d’une #tragédie_humanitaire. Nous avons fermé les #voies_légales d’accès au territoire européen, contraignant des millions d’exilés à emprunter la périlleuse route maritime. Nous avons laissé les divers gouvernements italiens criminaliser les ONG qui portent secours aux bateaux en détresse, augmentant le degré de létalité de la traversée maritime. Nous avons collaboré avec des gouvernements irrespectueux des droits des migrants : en premier lieu la Libye, que nous avons armée et financée pour enfermer et violenter les populations migrantes afin de les empêcher de rejoindre l’Europe.

      L’épisode Lampedusa n’est donc pas simplement un drame humain : c’est aussi le symptôme d’une politique migratoire de courte vue, qui ne comprend pas qu’elle contribue à créer les conditions de ce qu’elle souhaite éviter, en renforçant l’instabilité et la violence dans les régions de départ ou de transit, et en enrichissant les réseaux criminels de trafic d’êtres humains qu’elle prétend combattre.

      Crise de l’accueil, et non crise migratoire

      Revenons d’abord sur ce que l’on peut appeler l’effet hotspot. On a assisté ces derniers mois à une augmentation importante des traversées de la Méditerranée centrale vers l’Italie, si bien que l’année 2023 pourrait, si la tendance se confirme, se hisser au niveau des années 2016 et 2017 qui avaient battu des records en termes de traversées dans cette zone. C’est bien entendu cette augmentation des départs qui a provoqué la surcharge actuelle de Lampedusa, et la situation de crise que l’on observe.

      Mais en réalité, les épisodes d’urgence se succèdent à Lampedusa depuis que l’île est devenue, au début des années 2000, le principal lieu de débarquement des migrants dans le canal de Sicile. Leur interception et leur confinement dans le hotspot de cette île exiguë de 20 km² renforce la #visibilité du phénomène, et crée un #effet_d’urgence et d’#invasion qui justifie une gestion inhumaine des arrivées. Ce fut déjà le cas en 2011 au moment des printemps arabes, lorsque plus de 60 000 personnes y avaient débarqué en quelques mois. Le gouvernement italien avait stoppé les transferts vers la Sicile, créant volontairement une situation d’#engorgement et de #crise_humanitaire. Les images du centre surpeuplé, de migrants harassés dormant dans la rue et protestant contre cet accueil indigne avaient largement été diffusées par les médias. Elles avaient permis au gouvernement italien d’instaurer un énième #état_d’urgence et de légitimer de nouvelles #politiques_répressives.

      Si l’on fait le tour des hotspots européens, force est de constater la répétition de ces situations, et donc l’échec de la #concentration dans quelques points stratégiques, le plus souvent des #îles du sud de l’Europe. L’#effet_Lampedusa est le même que l’effet #Chios ou l’effet #Moria#Lesbos) : ces #îles-frontières concentrent à elles seules, parce qu’elles sont exiguës, toutes les caractéristiques d’une gestion inhumaine et inefficace des migrations. Pensée en 2015 au niveau communautaire mais appliquée depuis longtemps dans certains pays, cette politique n’est pas parvenue à une gestion plus rationnelle des flux d’arrivées. Elle a en revanche fait peser sur des espaces périphériques et minuscules une énorme responsabilité humaine et une lourde charge financière. Des personnes traumatisées, des survivants, des enfants de plus en plus jeunes, sont accueillis dans des conditions indignes. Crise de l’accueil et non crise migratoire comme l’ont déjà montré de nombreuses personnes.

      Changer de paradigme

      Autre #myopie européenne : considérer qu’on peut, en collaborant avec les Etats de transit et de départ, endiguer les flux. Cette politique, au-delà de la vulnérabilité qu’elle crée vis-à-vis d’Etats qui peuvent user du chantage migratoire à tout moment – ce dont Kadhafi et Erdogan ne s’étaient pas privés – génère les conditions mêmes du départ des personnes en question. Car l’#externalisation dégrade la situation des migrants dans ces pays, y compris ceux qui voudraient y rester. En renforçant la criminalisation de la migration, l’externalisation renforce leur #désir_de_fuite. Depuis de nombreuses années, migrantes et migrants fuient les prisons et la torture libyennes ; ou depuis quelques mois, la violence d’un pouvoir tunisien en plein tournant autoritaire qui les érige en boucs émissaires. L’accord entre l’UE et la Tunisie, un énième du genre qui conditionne l’aide financière à la lutte contre l’immigration, renforce cette dynamique, avec les épisodes tragiques de cet été, à la frontière tuniso-libyenne.

      Lampedusa nous apprend qu’il est nécessaire de changer de #paradigme, tant les solutions proposées par les Etats européens (externalisation, #dissuasion, #criminalisation_des_migrations et de leurs soutiens) ont révélé au mieux leur #inefficacité, au pire leur caractère létal. Ils contribuent notamment à asseoir des régimes autoritaires et des pratiques violentes vis-à-vis des migrants. Et à transformer des êtres humains en sujets humanitaires.

      https://www.liberation.fr/idees-et-debats/tribunes/leffet-lampedusa-ou-comment-se-fabriquent-des-politiques-migratoires-repr

    • Pour remettre les pendules à l’heure :

      Saluti dal Paese del “fenomeno palesemente fuori controllo”.


      https://twitter.com/emmevilla/status/1703458756728610987

      Et aussi :

      « Les interceptions des migrants aux frontières représentent 1 à 3% des personnes autorisées à entrer avec un visa dans l’espace Schengen »

      Source : Babels, « Méditerranée – Des frontières à la dérive », https://www.lepassagerclandestin.fr/catalogue/bibliotheque-des-frontieres/mediterraneedes-frontieres-a-la-derive

      #statistiques #chiffres #étrangers #Italie

    • Arrivées à Lampedusa - #Solidarité et #résistance face à la crise de l’accueil en Europe.

      Suite à l’arrivée d’un nombre record de personnes migrantes à Lampedusa, la société civile exprime sa profonde inquiétude face à la réponse sécuritaire des Etats européens, la crise de l’accueil et réaffirme sa solidarité avec les personnes qui arrivent en Europe.

      Plus de 5 000 personnes et 112 bateaux : c’est le nombre d’arrivées enregistrées sur l’île italienne de Lampedusa le mardi 12 septembre. Les embarcations, dont la plupart sont arrivées de manière autonome, sont parties de Tunisie ou de Libye. Au total, plus de 118 500 personnes ont atteint les côtes italiennes depuis le début de l’année, soit près du double des 64 529 enregistrées à la même période en 2022 [1]. L’accumulation des chiffres ne nous fait pas oublier que, derrière chaque numéro, il y a un être humain, une histoire individuelle et que des personnes perdent encore la vie en essayant de rejoindre l’Europe.

      Si Lampedusa est depuis longtemps une destination pour les bateaux de centaines de personnes cherchant refuge en Europe, les infrastructures d’accueil de l’île font défaut. Mardi, le sauvetage chaotique d’un bateau a causé la mort d’un bébé de 5 mois. Celui-ci est tombé à l’eau et s’est immédiatement noyé, alors que des dizaines de bateaux continuaient d’accoster dans le port commercial. Pendant plusieurs heures, des centaines de personnes sont restées bloquées sur la jetée, sans eau ni nourriture, avant d’être transférées vers le hotspot de Lampedusa.

      Le hotspot, centre de triage où les personnes nouvellement arrivées sont tenues à l’écart de la population locale et pré-identifiées avant d’être transférées sur le continent, avec ses 389 places, n’a absolument pas la capacité d’accueillir dignement les personnes qui arrivent quotidiennement sur l’île. Depuis mardi, le personnel du centre est complètement débordé par la présence de 6 000 personnes. La Croix-Rouge et le personnel d’autres organisations ont été empêchés d’entrer dans le centre pour des « raisons de sécurité ».

      Jeudi matin, de nombreuses personnes ont commencé à s’échapper du hotspot en sautant les clôtures en raison des conditions inhumaines dans lesquelles elles y étaient détenues. Face à l’incapacité des autorités italiennes à offrir un accueil digne, la solidarité locale a pris le relais. De nombreux habitants et habitantes se sont mobilisés pour organiser des distributions de nourriture aux personnes réfugiées dans la ville [2].

      Différentes organisations dénoncent également la crise politique qui sévit en Tunisie et l’urgence humanitaire dans la ville de Sfax, d’où partent la plupart des bateaux pour l’Italie. Actuellement, environ 500 personnes dorment sur la place Beb Jebli et n’ont pratiquement aucun accès à la nourriture ou à une assistance médicale [3]. La plupart d’entre elles ont été contraintes de fuir le Soudan, l’Éthiopie, la Somalie, le Tchad, l’Érythrée ou le Niger. Depuis les déclarations racistes du président tunisien, Kais Saied, de nombreuses personnes migrantes ont été expulsées de leur domicile et ont perdu leur travail [4]. D’autres ont été déportées dans le désert où certaines sont mortes de soif.

      Alors que ces déportations massives se poursuivent et que la situation à Sfax continue de se détériorer, l’UE a conclu un nouvel accord avec le gouvernement tunisien il y a trois mois afin de coopérer « plus efficacement en matière de migration », de gestion des frontières et de « lutte contre la contrebande », au moyen d’une enveloppe de plus de 100 millions d’euros. L’UE a accepté ce nouvel accord en pleine connaissance des atrocités commises par le gouvernement tunisien ainsi que les attaques perpétrées par les garde-côtes tunisiens sur les bateaux de migrants [5].

      Pendant ce temps, nous observons avec inquiétude comment les différents gouvernements européens ferment leurs frontières et continuent de violer le droit d’asile et les droits humains les plus fondamentaux. Alors que le ministre français de l’Intérieur a annoncé son intention de renforcer les contrôles à la frontière italienne, plusieurs autres États membres de l’UE ont également déclaré qu’ils fermeraient leurs portes. En août, les autorités allemandes ont décidé d’arrêter les processus de relocalisation des demandeurs et demandeuses d’asile arrivant en Allemagne depuis l’Italie dans le cadre du « mécanisme de solidarité volontaire » [6].

      Invitée à Lampedusa dimanche par la première ministre Meloni, la Présidente de la Commission européenne Von der Leyen a annoncé la mise en place d’un plan d’action en 10 points qui vient confirmer cette réponse ultra-sécuritaire [7]. Renforcer les contrôles en mer au détriment de l’obligation de sauvetage, augmenter la cadence des expulsions et accroître le processus d’externalisation des frontières… autant de vieilles recettes que l’Union européenne met en place depuis des dizaines années et qui ont prouvé leur échec, ne faisant qu’aggraver la crise de la solidarité et la situation des personnes migrantes.

      Les organisations soussignées appellent à une Europe ouverte et accueillante et exhortent les États membres de l’UE à fournir des voies d’accès sûres et légales ainsi que des conditions d’accueil dignes. Nous demandons que des mesures urgentes soient prises à Lampedusa et que les lois internationales qui protègent le droit d’asile soient respectées. Nous sommes dévastés par les décès continus en mer causés par les politiques frontalières de l’UE et réaffirmons notre solidarité avec les personnes en mouvement.

      https://migreurop.org/article3203.html?lang_article=fr

    • Che cos’è una crisi migratoria?

      Continuare a considerare il fenomeno migratorio come crisi ci allontana sempre più dalla sua comprensione, mantenendoci ancorati a soluzioni emergenziali che non possono che risultare strumentali e pericolose
      Le immagini della fila di piccole imbarcazioni in attesa di fare ingresso nel porto di Lampedusa resteranno impresse nella nostra memoria collettiva. Oltre cinquemila persone in sole ventiquattrore, che si aggiungono alle oltre centomila giunte in Italia nei mesi precedenti (114.256 al 31 agosto 2023). Nel solo mese di agosto sono sbarcate in Italia più di venticinquemila persone, che si aggiungono alle oltre ventitremila di luglio. Era del resto in previsione di una lunga estate di sbarchi che il Governo aveva in aprile dichiarato lo stato di emergenza, in un momento in cui, secondo i dati forniti dal ministro Piantedosi, nella sola Lampedusa erano concentrate più di tremila persone. Stando alle dichiarazioni ufficiali, l’esigenza era quella di dotarsi degli strumenti tecnici per distribuire più efficacemente chi era in arrivo sul territorio italiano, in strutture gestite dalla Protezione civile, aggirando le ordinarie procedure d’appalto per l’apertura di nuove strutture di accoglienza.

      Tra il 2017 e il 2022, in parallelo con la riduzione del numero di sbarchi, il sistema d’accoglienza per richiedenti protezione internazionale era stato progressivamente contratto, perdendo circa il 240% della sua capacità ricettiva. Gli interventi dei primi mesi del 2023 sembravano tuttavia volerne rivoluzionare la fisionomia. Il cosiddetto “Decreto Cutro” escludeva i richiedenti asilo dalla possibilità di accedere alle strutture di accoglienza che fanno capo alla rete Sai (Sistema accoglienza migrazione), che a fine 2022 vantava una capacità di quasi venticinquemila posti, per riservare loro strutture come i grandi Centri di prima accoglienza o di accoglienza straordinaria, in cui sempre meno servizi alla persona sarebbero stati offerti. Per i richiedenti provenienti dai Paesi considerati “sicuri”, invece, la prospettiva era quella del confinamento in strutture situate nei pressi delle zone di frontiera in attesa dell’esito della procedura d’asilo accelerata e, eventualmente, del rimpatrio immediato.

      L’impennata nel numero di arrivi registrata negli ultimi giorni ha infine indotto il presidente del Consiglio ad annunciare con un videomessaggio trasmesso all’ora di cena nuove misure eccezionali. In particolare, sarà affidato all’Esercito il compito di creare e gestire nuove strutture detentive in cui trattenere “chiunque entri illegalmente in Italia per tutto il tempo necessario alla definizione della sue eventuale richiesta d’asilo e per la sua effettiva espulsione nel caso in cui sia irregolare”, da collocarsi “in località a bassissima densità abitativa e facilmente perimetrabili e sorvegliabili”. Parallelamente, anche i termini massimi di detenzione saranno innalzati fino a diciotto mesi.

      Ciò di cui nessuno sembra dubitare è che l’Italia si trovi a fronteggiare l’ennesima crisi migratoria. Ma esattamente, di cosa si parla quando si usa la parola “crisi” in relazione ai fenomeni migratori?

      Certo c’è la realtà empirica dei movimenti attraverso le frontiere. Oltre centomila arrivi in otto mesi giustificano forse il riferimento al concetto di crisi, ma a ben vedere non sono i numeri il fattore determinante. Alcune situazioni sono state definite come critiche anche in presenza di numeri tutto sommato limitati, per ragioni essenzialmente politico-diplomatiche. Si pensi alla crisi al confine greco-turco nel 2020, o ancora alla crisi ai confini di Polonia e Lituania con la Bielorussia nel 2021. In altri casi il movimento delle persone attraverso i confini non è stato tematizzato come una crisi anche a fronte di numeri molto elevati, si pensi all’accoglienza riservata ai profughi ucraini. Sebbene siano stati attivati strumenti di risposta eccezionali, il loro orientamento è stato prevalentemente umanitario e volto all’accoglienza. L’Italia, ad esempio, ha sì decretato uno stato d’emergenza per implementare un piano di accoglienza straordinaria dei profughi provenienti dall’Ucraina, ma ha offerto accoglienza agli oltre centosettantamila ucraini presenti sul nostro territorio senza pretendere di confinarli in centri chiusi, concedendo inoltre loro un sussidio in denaro.

      Ciò che conta è la rappresentazione del fenomeno migratorio e la risposta politica che di conseguenza segue. Le rappresentazioni e le politiche si alimentano reciprocamente. In breve, non tutti i fenomeni migratori sono interpretati come una crisi, né, quando lo sono, determinano la medesima risposta emergenziale. Ad esempio, all’indomani della tragedia di Lampedusa del 2013 prevalse un paradigma interpretativo chiaramente umanitario, che portò all’intensificazione delle operazioni di ricerca e soccorso nel Mediterraneo. Nel 2014 sbarcarono in Italia oltre centosettantamila migranti, centocinquantamila nel 2015 e ben centottantamila nel 2016. Questo tipo di approccio è stato in seguito definito come un pericoloso fattore di attrazione per le migrazioni non autorizzate e l’area operativa delle missioni di sorveglianza dei confini marittimi progressivamente arretrata, creando quel vuoto nelle attività di ricerca e soccorso che le navi delle Ong hanno cercato negli ultimi anni di colmare.

      Gli arrivi a Lampedusa degli ultimi giorni sono in gran parte l’effetto della riduzione dell’attività di sorveglianza oltre le acque territoriali. Intercettare i migranti in acque internazionali implica l’assunzione di obblighi e ricerca e soccorso che l’attuale governo accetta con una certa riluttanza, ma consente anche di far sbarcare i migranti soccorsi in mare anche in altri porti, evitando eccessive concentrazioni in un unico punto di sbarco.

      I migranti che raggiungono le nostre coste sono rappresentati come invasori, che violando i nostri confini minacciano la nostra integrità territoriale. L’appello insistito all’intervento delle forze armate che abbiamo ascoltato negli ultimi giorni si giustifica proprio attraverso il riferimento alla necessità di proteggere i confini e, in ultima analisi, l’integrità territoriale dell’Italia. Per quanto le immagini di migliaia di persone che sbarcano sulle coste italiane possano impressionare l’opinione pubblica, il riferimento alla necessità di proteggere l’integrità territoriale è frutto di un grave equivoco. Il principio di integrità territoriale è infatti codificato nel diritto internazionale come un corollario del divieto di uso della forza. Da ciò discende che l’integrità territoriale di uno Stato può essere minacciata solo da un’azione militare ostile condotta da forze regolari o irregolari. È dubbio che le migrazioni possano essere considerate una minaccia tale da giustificare, ad esempio, un blocco navale.

      Se i migranti non possono di per sé essere considerati come una minaccia alla integrità territoriale dello Stato, potrebbero però essere utilizzati come strumento da parte di attori politici intenzionati a destabilizzare politicamente i Paesi di destinazione. Non è mancato negli ultimi tempi chi ha occasionalmente evocato l’idea della strumentalizzazione delle migrazioni, fino alla recente, plateale dichiarazione del ministro Salvini. D’altra parte, questo è un tema caro ai Paesi dell’Est Europa, che hanno spinto affinché molte delle misure eccezionali adottate da loro in occasione della crisi del 2021 fossero infine incorporate nel diritto della Ue. Una parte del governo italiano sembra tuttavia più cauta, anche perché si continua a vedere nella collaborazione con i Paesi terzi la chiave di volta per la gestione del fenomeno. Accusare esplicitamente la Tunisia di strumentalizzare le migrazioni avrebbe costi politico-diplomatici troppo elevati.

      Cionondimeno, insistendo sull’elemento del rischio di destabilizzazione interna, plasticamente rappresentato dalle immagini delle migliaia di persone ammassate sul molo o nell’hotspot di Lampedusa, il governo propone una risposta politica molto simile all’approccio utilizzato da Polonia e Lituania nel 2021, centrato su respingimenti di massa e detenzione nelle zone di frontiera. L’obiettivo è quello di disincentivare i potenziali futuri migranti, paventando loro lunghi periodi di detenzione e il ritorno nella loro patria di origine.

      Gran parte di questa strategia dipende dalla collaborazione dei Paesi terzi e dalla loro disponibilità a bloccare le partenze prima che i migranti siano intercettati da autorità Italiane, facendo di conseguenza scattare gli obblighi internazionali di ricerca e soccorso o di asilo. Una strategia simile, definita come del controllo senza contatto, è stata seguita a lungo nella cooperazione con la Guardia costiera libica. Tuttavia, è proprio il tentativo di esternalizzare i controlli migratori a rendere i Paesi della Ue sempre più vulnerabili alla spregiudicata diplomazia delle migrazioni dei Paesi terzi. In definitiva, sono i Paesi europei che offrono loro la possibilità di strumentalizzare le migrazioni a scopi politici.

      Sul piano interno, il successo di una simile strategia dipende dalla capacità di rimpatriare rapidamente i migranti giunti sul territorio italiano. Alla fine del 2021 la percentuale di rimpatri che l’Italia riusciva ad eseguire era del 15% dei provvedimenti di allontanamento adottati. Gran parte delle persone rimpatriate sono tuttavia cittadini tunisini, anche perché in assenza di collaborazione con il Paese d’origine è impossibile rimpatriare. I tunisini rappresentano solo l’8% delle persone sbarcate nel 2023, che vengono in prevalenza da Guinea, Costa d’Avorio, Egitto, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso. L’allungamento dei tempi di detenzione non avrà dunque nessuna incidenza sulla efficacia delle politiche di rimpatrio.

      Uno degli argomenti utilizzati per giustificare l’intervento dell’Esercito è quello della necessità di accrescere la capacità del sistema detentivo, giudicata dal Governo non adeguata a gestire l’attuale crisi migratoria. Stando ai dati inclusi nella relazione sul sistema di accoglienza, alla fine del 2021 il sistema contava 744 posti, a fronte di una capacità ufficiale di 1.395. Come suggerisce la medesima relazione, il sistema funziona da sempre a capacità ridotta, anche perché le strutture sono soggette a ripetuti interventi di manutenzione straordinaria a causa delle devastazioni che seguono alle continue rivolte. Si tratta di strutture ai limiti dell’ingestibilità, che possono essere governate solo esercitando una forma sistemica di violenza istituzionale.

      Il sistema detentivo per stranieri sta tuttavia cambiando pelle progressivamente, ibridandosi con il sistema di accoglienza per richiedenti asilo al fine di contenere i migranti appena giunti via mare in attesa del loro più o meno rapido respingimento. Fino ad oggi, tuttavia, la detenzione ha continuato ad essere utilizzata in maniera più o meno selettiva, riservandola a coloro con ragionevoli prospettive di essere rimpatriati in tempi rapidi. Gli altri sono stati instradati verso il sistema di accoglienza, qualora avessero presentato una domanda d’asilo, o abbandonai al loro destino con in mano un ordine di lasciare l’Italia entro sette giorni.

      Le conseguenze di una politica basata sulla detenzione sistematica e a lungo termine di tutti coloro che giungono alla frontiera sono facili da immaginare. Se l’Italia si limitasse a trattenere per una media di sei mesi (si ricordi che l’intenzione espressa in questi giorni dal Governo italiano è di portare a diciotto mesi i termini massimi di detenzione) anche solo il 50% delle persone che sbarcano, significherebbe approntare un sistema detentivo con una capacità di trentottomila posti. Certo, questo calcolo si basa sulla media mensile degli arrivi registrati nel 2023, un anno di “crisi” appunto. Ma anche tenendo conto della media mensile degli arrivi dei due anni precedenti la prospettiva non sarebbe confortante. Il nostro Paese dovrebbe infatti essere in grado di mantenere una infrastruttura detentiva da ventimila posti. Una simile infrastruttura, dato l’andamento oscillatorio degli arrivi via mare, dovrebbe essere poi potenziata al bisogno per far fronte alle necessità delle fasi in cui il numero di sbarchi cresce.

      Lascio al lettore trarre le conseguenze circa l’impatto materiale e umano che una simile approccio alla gestione degli arrivi avrebbe. Mi limito qui solo ad alcune considerazioni finali sulla maniera in cui sono tematizzate le cosiddette crisi migratorie. Tali crisi continuano ad essere viste come il frutto della carenza di controlli e della incapacità dello Stato di esercitare il suo diritto sovrano di controllare le frontiere. La risposta alle crisi migratorie è dunque sempre identica a sé stessa, alla ricerca di una impossibile chiusura dei confini che riproduce sempre nuove crisi, nuovi morti in mare, nuova violenza di Stato lungo le frontiere fortificate o nelle zone di contenimento militarizzate. Guardare alle migrazioni attraverso la lente del concetto di “crisi” induce tuttavia a pensare le migrazioni come a qualcosa di eccezionale, come a un’anomalia causata da instabilità e catastrofi che si verificano in un altrove geografico e politico. Le migrazioni sono così destoricizzate e decontestualizzate dalle loro cause strutturali e i Paesi di destinazione condannati a replicare politiche destinate a fallire poiché appunto promettono risultati irraggiungibili. Più che insistere ossessivamente sulla rappresentazione delle migrazioni come crisi, si dovrebbe dunque forse cominciare a tematizzare la crisi delle politiche migratorie. Una crisi più profonda e strutturale che non può essere ridotta alle polemiche scatenate dai periodici aumenti nel numero di sbarchi.

      https://www.rivistailmulino.it/a/che-cos-una-crisi-migratoria

    • Spiegazione semplice del perché #Lampedusa va in emergenza.

      2015-2017: 150.000 sbarchi l’anno, di cui 14.000 a Lampedusa (9%).

      Ultimi 12 mesi: 157.000 sbarchi, di cui 104.000 a Lampedusa (66%).

      Soluzione: aumentare soccorsi a #migranti, velocizzare i trasferimenti.
      Fine.

      https://twitter.com/emmevilla/status/1704751278184685635

    • Interview de M. #Gérald_Darmanin, ministre de l’intérieur et des outre-mer, à Europe 1/CNews le 18 septembre 2023, sur la question migratoire et le travail des forces de l’ordre.

      SONIA MABROUK
      Bonjour à vous Gérald DARMANIN.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Bonjour.

      SONIA MABROUK
      Merci de nous accorder cet entretien, avant votre déplacement cet après-midi à Rome. Lampedusa, Monsieur le Ministre, débordé par l’afflux de milliers de migrants. La présidente de la Commission européenne, Ursula VON DER LEYEN, en visite sur place, a appelé les pays européens à accueillir une partie de ces migrants arrivés en Italie. Est-ce que la France s’apprête à le faire, et si oui, pour combien de migrants ?

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Alors, non, la France ne s’apprête pas à le faire, la France, comme l’a dit le président de la République la Première ministre italienne, va aider l’Italie à tenir sa frontière, pour empêcher les gens d’arriver, et pour ceux qui sont arrivés en Italie, à Lampedusa et dans le reste de l’Italie, nous devons appliquer les règles européennes, que nous avons adoptées voilà quelques mois, qui consistent à faire les demandes d’asile à la frontière. Et donc une fois que l’on fait les demandes d’asile à la frontière, on constate qu’une grande partie de ces demandeurs d’asile ne sont pas éligibles à l’asile et doivent repartir immédiatement dans les pays d’origine. S’il y a des demandeurs d’asile, qui sont éligibles à l’asile, qui sont persécutés pour des raisons évidemment politiques, bien sûr, ce sont des réfugiés, et dans ces cas-là, la France comme d’autres pays, comme elle l’a toujours fait, peut accueillir des personnes. Mais ce serait une erreur d’appréciation que de considérer que les migrants parce qu’ils arrivent en Europe, doivent tout de suite être répartis dans tous les pays d’Europe et dont la France, qui prend déjà largement sa part, et donc ce que nous voulons dire à nos amis italiens, qui je crois sont parfaitement d’accord avec nous, nous devons protéger les frontières extérieures de l’Union européenne, les aider à cela, et surtout tout de suite regarder les demandes d’asile, et quand les gens ne sont pas éligibles à l’asile, tout de suite les renvoyer dans leur pays.

      SONIA MABROUK
      Donc, pour être clair ce matin Gérald DARMANIN, vous dites que la politique de relocalisation immédiate, non la France n’en prendra pas sa part.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      S’il s’agit de personnes qui doivent déposer une demande d’asile parce qu’ils sont persécutés dans leur pays, alors ce sont des réfugiés politiques, oui nous avons toujours relocalisé, on a toujours mis dans nos pays si j’ose dire une partie du fardeau qu’avaient les Italiens ou les Grecs. S’il s’agit de prendre les migrants tels qu’ils sont, 60 % d’entre eux viennent de pays comme la Côte d’Ivoire, comme la Guinée, comme la Gambie, il n’y a aucune raison qu’ils viennent…

      SONIA MABROUK
      Ça a été le cas lors de l’Ocean Viking.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Il n’y a aucune raison. Pour d’autres raisons, c’est des raisons humanitaires, là il n’y a pas de question humanitaire, sauf qu’à Lampedusa les choses deviennent très difficiles, c’est pour ça qu’il faut que nous aidions nos amis italiens, mais il ne peut pas y avoir comme message donné aux personnes qui viennent sur notre sol, qu’ils sont quoiqu’il arrive dans nos pays accueillis. Ils ne sont accueillis que s’ils respectent les règles de l’asile, s’ils sont persécutés. Mais si c’est une immigration qui est juste irrégulière, non, la France ne peut pas les accueillir, comme d’autres pays. La France est très ferme, vous savez, j’entends souvent que c’est le pays où il y a le plus de demandeurs d’asile, c’est tout à fait faux, nous sommes le 4e pays, derrière l’Allemagne, derrière l’Espagne, derrière l’Autriche, et notre volonté c’est d’accueillir bien sûr ceux qui doivent l’être, les persécutés politiques, mais nous devons absolument renvoyer chez eux, ceux qui n’ont rien à faire en Europe.

      SONIA MABROUK
      On entend ce message ce matin, qui est un peu différent de celui de la ministre des Affaires étrangères, qui semblait parler d’un accueil inconditionnel. Le président de la République a parlé d’un devoir de solidarité. Vous, vous dites : oui, devoir de solidarité, mais nous n’allons pas avoir une politique de répartition des migrants, ce n’est pas le rôle de la France.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Le rôle de la France, d’abord aider l’Italie.

      SONIA MABROUK
      Comment, concrètement ?

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Eh bien d’abord, nous devons continuer à protéger nos frontières, et ça c’est à l’Europe de le faire.

      SONIA MABROUK
      Ça c’est l’enjeu majeur, les frontières extérieures.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Exactement. Nous devons déployer davantage Frontex en Méditerranée…

      SONIA MABROUK
      Avec une efficacité, Monsieur le Ministre, très discutable.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Avec des messages qu’on doit passer à Frontex effectivement, de meilleures actions, pour empêcher les personnes de traverser pour aller à Lampedusa. Il y a eu à Lampedusa, vous l’avez dit, des milliers de personnes, 5000 même en une seule journée, m’a dit le ministre italien, le 12 septembre. Donc il y a manifestement 300, 400 arrivées de bateaux possibles. Nous devons aussi travailler avec la Tunisie, avec peut-être beaucoup plus encore d’actions que nous faisons jusqu’à présent. La Commission européenne vient de négocier un plan, eh bien il faut le mettre en place désormais, il faut arrêter d’en parler, il faut le faire. Vous savez, les bateaux qui sont produits à Sfax pour venir à Lampedusa, ils sont produits en Tunisie. Donc il faut absolument que nous cassons cet écosystème des passeurs, des trafiquants, parce qu’on ne peut pas continuer comme ça.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Quand vous dites « nous », c’est-à-dire en partenariat avec la Tunisie ? Comment vous expliquez Monsieur le Ministre qu’il y a eu un afflux aussi soudain ? Est-ce que la Tunisie n’a pas pu ou n’a pas voulu contenir ces arrivées ?

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Je ne sais pas. J’imagine que le gouvernement tunisien a fait le maximum…

      SONIA MABROUK
      Vous devez avoir une idée.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      On sait qu’on que tous ces gens sont partis de Sfax, donc d’un endroit extrêmement précis où il y a beaucoup de migrants notamment Africains, Subsahariens qui y sont, donc la Tunisie connaît elle-même une difficulté migratoire très forte. On doit manifestement l’aider, mais on doit aussi très bien coopérer avec elle, je crois que c’est ce que fait en ce moment le gouvernement italien, qui rappelle un certain nombre de choses aux Tunisiens, quoi leur rappelle aussi leurs difficultés. Donc, ce qui est sûr c’est que nous avons désormais beaucoup de plans, on a beaucoup de moyens, on a fait beaucoup de déplacements, maintenant il faut appliquer cela. Vous savez, la France, à la demande du président de la République, c’était d’ailleurs à Tourcoing, a proposé un pacte migratoire, qui consistait très simplement à ce que les demandes d’asile ne se fassent plus dans nos pays, mais à la frontière. Tout le monde l’a adopté, y compris le gouvernement de madame MELONI. C’est extrêmement efficace puisque l’idée c’est qu’on dise que les gens, quand ils rentrent sur le territoire européen, ne sont pas juridiquement sur le territoire européen, que nous regardions leur asile en quelques jours, et nous les renvoyons. Il faut que l’Italie…

      SONIA MABROUK
      Ça c’est le principe.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Il faut que l’Italie anticipe, anticipe la mise en place de ce dispositif. Et pourquoi il n’a pas encore été mis en place ? Parce que des députés européens, ceux du Rassemblement national, ont voté contre. C’est-à-dire que l’on est dans une situation politique un peu étonnante, où la France trouve une solution, la demande d’asile aux frontières, beaucoup plus efficace. Le gouvernement de madame MELONI, dans lequel participe monsieur SALVINI, est d’accord avec cette proposition, simplement ceux qui bloquent ça au Parlement européen, c’est le Rassemblement national, qui après va en Italie pour dire que l’Europe ne fait rien.

      SONIA MABROUK
      Sauf que, Monsieur le Ministre…

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Donc on voit bien qu’il y a du tourisme électoral de la part de madame LE PEN…

      SONIA MABROUK
      Vous le dénoncez.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Il faut désormais être ferme, ce que je vous dis, nous n’accueillerons pas les migrants sur le territoire européen…

      SONIA MABROUK
      Mais un migrant, sur le sol européen aujourd’hui, sait qu’il va y rester. La vocation est d’y rester.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Non, c’est tout à fait faux, nous faisons des retours. Nous avons par exemple dans les demandes d’asile, prévu des Ivoiriens. Bon. Nous avons des personnes qui viennent du Cameroun, nous avons des personnes qui viennent de Gambie. Avec ces pays nous avons d’excellentes relations politiques internationales, et nous renvoyons tous les jours dans ces pays des personnes qui n’ont rien à faire pour demander l’asile en France ou en Europe. Donc c’est tout à fait faux, avec certains pays nous avons plus de difficultés, bien sûr, parce qu’ils sont en guerre, comme la Syrie, comme l’Afghanistan bien sûr, mais avec beaucoup de pays, la Tunisie, la Gambie, la Côte d’Ivoire, le Sénégal, le Cameroun, nous sommes capables d’envoyer très rapidement ces personnes chez elles.

      SONIA MABROUK
      Lorsque le patron du Rassemblement national Jordan BARDELLA, ou encore Eric ZEMMOUR, ou encore Marion MARECHAL sur place, dit : aucun migrant de Lampedusa ne doit arriver en France. Est-ce que vous êtes capable de tenir, si je puis dire cette déclaration ? Vous dites : c’est totalement illusoire.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Non mais monsieur BARDELLA il fait de la politique politicienne, et malheureusement sur le dos de ses amis italiens, sur le dos de femmes et d’hommes, puisqu’il ne faut jamais oublier que ces personnes évidemment connaissent des difficultés extrêmement fortes. Il y a un bébé qui est mort à Lampedusa voilà quelques heures, et évidemment sur le dos de l’intelligence politique que les Français ont. Le Front national vote systématiquement contre toutes les mesures que nous proposons au niveau européen, chacun voit que c’est un sujet européen, c’est pour ça d’ailleurs qu’il se déplace, j’imagine, en Italie…

      SONIA MABROUK
      Ils ne sont pas d’accord avec votre politique, Monsieur le Ministre, ça ne surprend personne.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Non mais monsieur SALVINI madame MELONI, avec le gouvernement français, ont adopté un texte commun qui prévoit une révolution : la demande d’asile aux frontières. Monsieur BARDELLA, lui il parle beaucoup, mais au Parlement européen il vote contre. Pourquoi ? Parce qu’il vit des problèmes. La vérité c’est que monsieur BARDELLA, comme madame Marion MARECHAL LE PEN, on a compris qu’il y a une sorte de concurrence dans la démagogie à l’extrême droite, eux, ce qu’ils veulent c’est vivre des problèmes. Quand on leur propose de résoudre les problèmes, l’Europe avec le président de la République a essayé de leur proposer de les résoudre. Nous avons un accord avec madame MELONI, nous faisons la demande d’asile aux frontières, nous considérons qu’il n’y a plus d’asile en Europe, tant qu’on n’a pas étudié aux frontières cet asile. Quand le Rassemblement national vote contre, qu’est-ce qui se passe ? Eh bien ils ne veulent pas résoudre les problèmes, ils veulent pouvoir avoir une sorte de carburant électoral, pour pouvoir dire n’importe quoi, comme ils l’ont fait ce week-end encore.

      SONIA MABROUK
      Ce matin, sur les 5 000, 6 000 qui sont arrivés à Lampedusa, combien seront raccompagnés, combien n’ont pas vocation et ne resteront pas sur le sol européen ?

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Alors, c’est difficile. C’est difficile à savoir, parce que moi je ne suis pas les autorités italiennes, c’est pour ça que à la demande, du président je vais à Rome cet après-midi, mais de notre point de vue, de ce que nous en savons des autorités italiennes, beaucoup doivent être accompagnés, puisqu’encore une fois je comprends que sur à peu près 8 000 ou 9 000 personnes qui sont arrivées, il y a beaucoup de gens qui viennent de pays qui ne connaissent pas de persécution politique, ni au Cameroun, ni en Côte d’Ivoire, ni bien sûr en Gambie, ni en Tunisie, et donc ces personnes, bien sûr, doivent repartir dans leur pays et la France doit les aider à repartir.

      SONIA MABROUK
      On note Gérald DARMANIN que vous avez un discours, en tout cas une tonalité très différente à l’égard de madame MELONI, on se souvient tous qu’il y a eu quasiment une crise diplomatique il y a quelques temps, lorsque vous avez dit qu’elle n’était pas capable de gérer ces questions migratoires sur lesquelles elle a été… elle est arrivée au pouvoir avec un discours très ferme, aujourd’hui vous dites « non, je la soutiens madame MELONI », c’est derrière nous toutes ces déclarations, que vous avez tenues ?

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Je ne suis pas là pour soutenir madame MELONI, non, je dis simplement que lorsqu’on vote pour des gouvernements qui vous promettent tout, c’est le cas aussi de ce qui s’est passé avec le Brexit en Grande-Bretagne, les Français doivent comprendre ça. Lorsqu’on vous dit " pas un migrant ne viendra, on fera un blocus naval, vous allez voir avec nous on rase gratis ", on voit bien que la réalité dépasse largement ces engagements.

      SONIA MABROUK
      Elle a réitéré le blocus naval !

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Le fait est qu’aujourd’hui nous devons gérer une situation où l’Italie est en grande difficulté, et on doit aider l’Italie, parce qu’aider l’Italie, d’abord c’est nos frères et nos soeurs les Italiens, mais en plus c’est la continuité, évidemment, de ce qui va se passer en France, donc moi je suis là pour protéger les Français, je suis là pour protéger les Français parce que le président de la République souhaite que nous le faisions dans un cadre européen, et c’est la seule solution qui vaille, parce que l’Europe doit parler d’une seule voix…

      SONIA MABROUK
      C’est la seule solution qui vaille ?

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Oui, c’est la seule solution qui vaille…

      SONIA MABROUK
      Vous savez que l’Allemagne a changé, enfin elle n’en voulait pas, finalement là, sur les migrants, elle change d’avis, la Hongrie, la Pologne, je n’en parle même pas, la situation devient quand même intenable.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      La France a un rôle moteur dans cette situation de ce week-end, vous avez vu les contacts diplomatiques que nous avons eus, on est heureux d’avoir réussi à faire bouger nos amis Allemands sur cette situation. Les Allemands connaissent aussi une difficulté forte, ils ont 1 million de personnes réfugiées ukrainiens, ils ont une situation compliquée par rapport à la nôtre aussi, mais je constate que l’Allemagne et la France parlent une nouvelle fois d’une seule voix.

      SONIA MABROUK
      Mais l’Europe est en ordre dispersé, ça on peut le dire, c’est un constat lucide.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      L’Europe est dispersée parce que l’Europe, malheureusement, a des intérêts divergents, mais l’Europe a réussi à se mettre d’accord sur la proposition française, encore une fois, une révolution migratoire qui consiste à faire des demandes d’asile à la frontière. Nous nous sommes mis d’accord entre tous les pays européens, y compris madame MELONI, ceux qui bloquent c’est le Rassemblement national, et leurs amis, au Parlement européen, donc plutôt que de faire du tourisme migratoire à Lampedusa comme madame Marion MARECHAL LE PEN, ou raconter n’importe quoi comme monsieur BARDELLA, ils feraient mieux de faire leur travail de députés européens, de soutenir la France, d’être un peu patriotes pour une fois, de ne pas faire la politique du pire…

      SONIA MABROUK
      Vous leur reprochez un défaut de patriotisme à ce sujet-là ?

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Quand on ne soutient pas la politique de son gouvernement, lorsque l’on fait l’inverser…

      SONIA MABROUK
      Ça s’appelle être dans l’opposition parfois Monsieur le Ministre.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Oui, mais on ne peut pas le faire sur le dos de femmes et d’hommes qui meurent, et moi je vais vous dire, le Rassemblement national aujourd’hui n’est pas dans la responsabilité politique. Qu’il vote ce pacte migratoire très vite, que nous puissions enfin, concrètement, aider nos amis Italiens, c’est sûr qu’il y aura moins d’images dramatiques, du coup il y aura moins de carburant pour le Rassemblement national, mais ils auront fait quelque chose pour leur pays.

      SONIA MABROUK
      Vous les accusez, je vais employer ce mot puisque la ministre Agnès PANNIER-RUNACHER l’a employé elle-même, de « charognards » là, puisque nous parlons de femmes et d’hommes, de difficultés aussi, c’est ce que vous êtes en train de dire ?

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Moi je ne comprends pas pourquoi on passe son temps à faire des conférences de presse en Italie, à Lampedusa, en direct sur les plateaux de télévision, lorsqu’on n’est pas capable, en tant que parlementaires européens, de voter un texte qui permet concrètement de lutter contre les difficultés migratoires. Encore une fois, la révolution que la France a proposée, et qui a été adoptée, avec le soutien des Italiens, c’est ça qui est paradoxal dans cette situation, peut être résolue si nous mettons en place…

      SONIA MABROUK
      Résolue…

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Bien sûr ; si nous mettons en place les demandes d’asile aux frontières, on n’empêchera jamais les gens de traverser la Méditerranée, par contre on peut très rapidement leur dire qu’ils ne peuvent pas rester sur notre sol, qu’ils ne sont pas des persécutés…

      SONIA MABROUK
      Comment vous appelez ce qui s’est passé, Monsieur le Ministre, est-ce que vous dites c’est un afflux soudain et massif, ou est-ce que vous dites que c’est une submersion migratoire, le diagnostic participe quand même de la résolution des défis et des problèmes ?

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Non, mais sur Lampedusa, qui est une île évidemment tout au sud de la Méditerranée, qui est même au sud de Malte, il y a 6000 habitants, lorsqu’il y a entre 6 et 8 000 personnes qui viennent en quelques jours évidemment c’est une difficulté immense, et chacun le comprend, pour les habitants de Lampedusa.

      SONIA MABROUK
      Comment vous qualifiez cela ?

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Mais là manifestement il y a à Sfax une difficulté extrêmement forte, où on a laissé passer des centaines de bateaux, fabriqués d’ailleurs, malheureusement….

      SONIA MABROUK
      Donc vous avez un gros problème avec les pays du Maghreb, en l’occurrence la Tunisie ?

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Je pense qu’il y a un énorme problème migratoire interne à l’Afrique, encore une fois la Tunisie, parfois même l’Algérie, parfois le Maroc, parfois la Libye, ils subissent eux-mêmes une pression migratoire d’Afrique, on voit bien que la plupart du temps ce sont des nationalités du sud du Sahel, donc les difficultés géopolitiques que nous connaissons ne sont pas pour rien dans cette situation, et nous devons absolument aider l’Afrique à absolument aider les Etats du Maghreb. On peut à la fois les aider, et en même temps être très ferme, on peut à la fois aider ces Etats à lutter contre l’immigration interne à l’Afrique, et en même temps expliquer…

      SONIA MABROUK
      Ça n’empêche pas la fermeté.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Que toute personne qui vient en Europe ne sera pas accueillie chez nous.

      SONIA MABROUK
      Encore une question sur ce sujet. Dans les différents reportages effectués à Lampedusa on a entendu certains migrants mettre en avant le système social français, les aides possibles, est-ce que la France, Gérald DARMANIN, est trop attractive, est-ce que notre modèle social est trop généreux et c’est pour cela qu’il y a ces arrivées aussi ?

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Alors, je ne suis pas sûr qu’on traverse le monde en se disant « chouette, il y a ici une aide sociale particulièrement aidante », mais il se peut…

      SONIA MABROUK
      Mais quand on doit choisir entre différents pays ?

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Mais il se peut qu’une fois arrivées en Europe, effectivement, un certain nombre de personnes, aidées par des passeurs, aidées parfois par des gens qui ont de bonnes intentions, des associations, se disent « allez dans ce pays-là parce qu’il y a plus de chances de », c’est ce pourquoi nous luttons. Quand je suis arrivé au ministère de l’Intérieur nous étions le deuxième pays d’Europe qui accueille le plus de demandeurs d’asile, aujourd’hui on est le quatrième, on doit pouvoir continuer à faire ce travail, nous faisons l’inverse de certains pays autour de nous, par exemple l’Allemagne qui ouvre plutôt plus de critères, nous on a tendance à les réduire, et le président de la République, dans la loi immigration, a proposé beaucoup de discussions pour fermer un certain nombre d’actions d’accueil. Vous avez la droite, LR, qui propose la transformation de l’AME en Aide Médicale d’Urgence, nous sommes favorables à étudier cette proposition des LR, j’ai moi-même proposé un certain nombre de dispositions extrêmement concrètes pour limiter effectivement ce que nous avons en France et qui parfois est différent des pays qui nous entourent et qui peuvent conduire à cela. Et puis enfin je terminerai par dire, c’est très important, il faut lutter contre les passeurs, la loi immigration que je propose passe de délit a crime, avec le garde des Sceaux on a proposé qu’on passe de quelques années de prison à 20 ans de prison pour ceux qui trafiquent des êtres humains, aujourd’hui quand on arrête des passeurs, on en arrête tous les jours grâce à la police française, ils ne sont condamnés qu’à quelques mois de prison, alors que demain, nous l’espérons, ils seront condamnés bien plus.

      SONIA MABROUK
      Bien. Gérald DARMANIN, sur CNews et Europe 1 notre « Grande interview » s’intéresse aussi à un nouveau refus d’obtempérer qui a dégénéré à Stains, je vais raconter en quelques mots ce qui s’est passé pour nos auditeurs et téléspectateurs, des policiers ont pris en chasse un deux-roues, rapidement un véhicule s’est interposé pour venir en aide aux fuyards, un policier a été violemment pris à partie, c’est son collègue qui est venu pour l’aider, qui a dû tirer en l’air pour stopper une scène de grande violence vis-à-vis de ce policier, comment vous réagissez par rapport à cela ?

      GERALD DARMANIN
      D’abord trois choses. Les policiers font leur travail, et partout sur le territoire national, il n’y a pas de territoires perdus de la République, il y a des territoires plus difficiles, mais Stains on sait tous que c’est une ville à la fois populaire et difficile pour la police nationale. La police le samedi soir fait des contrôles, lorsqu’il y a des refus d’obtempérer, je constate que les policiers sont courageux, et effectivement ils ont été violentés, son collègue a été très courageux de venir le secourir, et puis troisièmement force est restée à la loi, il y a eu cinq interpellations, ils sont présentés aujourd’hui…

      SONIA MABROUK
      A quel prix.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Oui, mais c’est le travail…

      SONIA MABROUK
      A quel prix pour le policier.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Malheureusement c’est le travail, dans une société très violente…

      SONIA MABROUK
      D’être tabassé ?

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Dans une société très violente les policiers, les gendarmes, savent la mission qu’ils ont, qui est une mission extrêmement difficile, je suis le premier à les défendre partout sur les plateaux de télévision, je veux dire qu’ils ont réussi, à la fin, à faire entendre raison à la loi, les Français doivent savoir ce matin que cinq personnes ont été interpellées, présentées devant le juge.

      SONIA MABROUK
      Pour quel résultat, Monsieur le Ministre ?

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Eh bien moi je fais confiance en la justice.

      SONIA MABROUK
      Parfois on va les trouver à l’extérieur.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Non non, je fais confiance en la justice, quand on…

      SONIA MABROUK
      Ça c’est le principe. On fait tous, on aimerait tous faire confiance à la justice.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Non, mais quand on moleste un policier, j’espère que les peines seront les plus dures possible.

      SONIA MABROUK
      On va terminer avec une semaine intense et à risques qui s’annonce, la suite de la Coupe du monde de rugby, la visite du roi Charles III, le pape à Marseille. Vous avez appelé les préfets à une très haute vigilance. C’est un dispositif exceptionnel pour relever ces défis, qui sera mis en oeuvre.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Oui, donc cette semaine la France est au coeur du monde par ces événements, la Coupe du monde de rugby qui continue, et qui se passe bien. Vous savez, parfois ça nous fait sourire. La sécurité ne fait pas de bruit, l’insécurité en fait, mais depuis le début de cette Coupe du monde, les policiers, des gendarmes, les pompiers réussissent à accueillir le monde en de très très bonnes conditions, tant mieux, il faut que ça continue bien sûr. Le pape qui vient deux jours à Marseille, comme vous l’avez dit, et le roi Charles pendant trois jours. Il y aura jusqu’à 30 000 policiers samedi, et puis après il y a quelques événements comme PSG - OM dimanche prochain, c’est une semaine…

      SONIA MABROUK
      Important aussi.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      C’est une semaine horribilis pour le ministre de l’Intérieur et pour les policiers et les gendarmes, et nous le travaillons avec beaucoup de concentration, le RAID, le GIGN est tout à fait aujourd’hui prévu pour tous ces événements, et nous sommes capables d’accueillir ces grands événements mondiaux en une semaine, c’est l’honneur de la police nationale et de la gendarmerie nationale.

      SONIA MABROUK
      Merci Gérald DARMANIN.

      GÉRALD DARMANIN
      Merci à vous.

      SONIA MABROUK
      Vous serez donc cet après-midi…

      GÉRALD DARMANIN
      A Rome.

      SONIA MABROUK
      …à Rome avec votre homologue évidemment de l’Intérieur. Merci encore de nous avoir accordé cet entretien.

      GERALD DARMANIN
      Merci à vous.

      SONIA MABROUK
      Et bonne journée sur Cnews et Europe 1

      https://www.vie-publique.fr/discours/291092-gerald-darmanin-18092023-immigration

      #Darmanin #demandes_d'asile_à_la_frontière

    • Darmanin: ’La Francia non accoglierà migranti da Lampedusa’

      Ma con Berlino apre alla missione navale. Il ministro dell’Interno francese a Roma. Tajani: ’Fa fede quello che dice Macron’. Marine Le Pen: ’Dobbianmo riprendere il controllo delle nostre frontiere’

      «La Francia non prenderà nessun migrante da Lampedusa». All’indomani della visita di Ursula von der Leyen e Giorgia Meloni sull’isola a largo della Sicilia, il governo transalpino torna ad alzare la voce sul fronte della solidarietà e lo fa, ancora una volta, con il suo ministro dell’Interno Gerald Darmanin.

      La sortita di Parigi giunge proprio mentre, da Berlino, arriva l’apertura alla richiesta italiana di una missione navale comune per aumentare i controlli nel Mediterraneo, idea sulla quale anche la Francia si dice pronta a collaborare.

      Sullo stesso tenore anche le dichiarazioni Marine Le Pen. «Nessun migrante da Lampedusa deve mettere piede in Francia. Serve assolutamente una moratoria totale sull’immigrazione e dobbiamo riprendere il controllo delle nostre frontiere. Spetta a noi nazioni decidere chi entra e chi resta sul nostro territorio». Lo ha detto questa sera Marine Le Pen, leader dell’estrema destra francese del Rassemblement National, «Quelli che fanno appello all’Unione europea si sbagliano - ha continuato Le Pen - perché è vano e pericoloso. Vano perché l’Unione europea vuole l’immigrazione, pericoloso perché lascia pensare che deleghiamo all’Unione europea la decisione sulla politica di immigrazione che dobbiamo condurre. Spetta al popolo francese decidere e bisogna rispettare la sua decisione».

      La strada per la messa a punto di un’azione Ue, tuttavia, resta tremendamente in salita anche perché è segnata da uno scontro interno alle istituzioni comunitarie sull’intesa con Tunisi: da un lato il Consiglio Ue, per nulla soddisfatto del modus operandi della Commissione, e dall’altro l’esecutivo europeo, che non ha alcuna intenzione di abbandonare la strada tracciata dal Memorandum siglato con Kais Saied. «Sarebbe un errore di giudizio considerare che i migranti, siccome arrivano in Europa, devono essere subito ripartiti in tutta Europa e in Francia, che fa ampiamente la sua parte», sono state le parole con cui Darmamin ha motiva il suo no all’accoglienza. Il ministro lo ha spiegato prima di recarsi a Roma, su richiesta del presidente Emmanuel Macron, per un confronto con il titolare del Viminale Matteo Piantedosi. Ed è proprio a Macron che l’Italia sembra guardare, legando le frasi di Darmanin soprattutto alle vicende politiche interne d’Oltralpe. «Fa fede quello che dice Macron e quello che dice il ministro degli Esteri, mi pare che ci sia voglia di collaborare», ha sottolineato da New York il titolare della Farnesina Antonio Tajani invitando tutti, in Italia e in Ue, a non affrontare il dossier con «slogan da campagna elettorale».

      Eppure la sortita di Darmanin ha innescato l’immediata reazione della maggioranza, soprattutto dalle parti di Matteo Salvini. «Gli italiani si meritano fatti concreti dalla Francia e dall’Europa», ha tuonato la Lega. Nel piano Ue su Lampedusa il punto dell’accoglienza è contenuto nel primo dei dieci punti messi neri su bianco. Ma resta un concetto legato alla volontarietà. Che al di là della Francia, per ora trova anche il no dell’Austria. Il nodo è sempre lo stesso: i Paesi del Nord accusano Roma di non rispettare le regole sui movimenti secondari, mentre l’Italia pretende di non essere l’unico approdo per i migranti in arrivo. Il blocco delle partenze, in questo senso, si presenta come l’unica mediazione politicamente percorribile. Berlino e Parigi si dicono pronte a collaborare su un maggiore controllo aereo e navale delle frontiere esterne. L’Ue sottolinea di essere «disponibile a esplorare l’ipotesi», anche se la «decisione spetta agli Stati».

      Il raggio d’azione di von der Leyen, da qui alle prossime settimane, potrebbe tuttavia restringersi: sull’intesa con Tunisi l’Alto Rappresentante Ue per la Politica Estera Josep Borrell, il servizio giuridico del Consiglio Ue e alcuni Paesi membri - Germania e Lussemburgo in primis - hanno mosso riserve di metodo e di merito. L’accusa è duplice: il Memorandum con Saied non solo non garantisce il rispetto dei diritti dei migranti ma è stato firmato dal cosiddetto ’team Europe’ (von der Leyen, Mark Rutte e Meloni) senza l’adeguata partecipazione del Consiglio. Borrell lo ha messo nero su bianco in una missiva indirizzata al commissario Oliver Varhelyi e a von der Leyen. «Gli Stati membri sono stati informati e c’è stato ampio sostegno», è stata la difesa della Commissione. Invero, al Consiglio europeo di giugno l’intesa incassò l’endorsement dei 27 ma il testo non era stato ancora ultimato. E non è arrivato al tavolo dei rappresentanti permanenti se non dopo essere stato firmato a Cartagine. Ma, spiegano a Palazzo Berlaymont, l’urgenza non permetteva rallentamenti. I fondi per Tunisi, tuttavia, attendono ancora di essere esborsati. La questione - assieme a quella del Patto sulla migrazione e al Piano Lampedusa - è destinata a dominare le prossime riunioni europee: quella dei ministri dell’Interno del 28 settembre e, soprattutto, il vertice informale dei leader previsto a Granada a inizio ottobre.

      https://www.ansa.it/sito/notizie/mondo/2023/09/18/darmanin-la-francia-non-accogliera-migranti-da-lampedusa_2f53eae6-e8f7-4b82-9d7

    • Lampedusa : les contrevérités de Gérald Darmanin sur le profil des migrants et leur droit à l’asile

      Le ministre de l’Intérieur persiste à dire, contre la réalité du droit et des chiffres, que la majorité des migrants arrivés en Italie la semaine dernière ne peuvent prétendre à l’asile.

      A en croire Gérald Darmanin, presque aucune des milliers de personnes débarquées sur les rives de l’île italienne de Lampedusa depuis plus d’une semaine ne mériterait d’être accueillie par la France. La raison ? D’un côté, affirme le ministre de l’Intérieur, il y aurait les « réfugiés » fuyant des persécutions politiques ou religieuses, et que la France se ferait un honneur d’accueillir. « Et puis, il y a les migrants », « des personnes irrégulières » qui devraient être renvoyées dans leur pays d’origine le plus rapidement possible, a-t-il distingué, jeudi 22 septembre sur BFMTV.

      « S’il s’agit de prendre les migrants tels qu’ils sont : 60 % d’entre eux viennent de pays tels que la Côte d’Ivoire, comme la Guinée, comme la Gambie, il n’y a aucune raison [qu’ils viennent] », a-t-il en sus tonné sur CNews, lundi 18 septembre. Une affirmation serinée mardi sur TF1 dans des termes semblables : « 60 % des personnes arrivées à Lampedusa sont francophones. Il y a des Ivoiriens et des Sénégalais, qui n’ont pas à demander l’asile en Europe. »
      Contredit par les données statistiques italiennes

      D’après le ministre – qui a expliqué par la suite tenir ses informations de son homologue italien – « l’essentiel » des migrants de Lampedusa sont originaires du Cameroun, du Sénégal, de Côte-d’Ivoire, de Gambie ou de Tunisie. Selon le ministre, leur nationalité les priverait du droit de demander l’asile. « Il n’y aura pas de répartition de manière générale puisque ce ne sont pas des réfugiés », a-t-il prétendu, en confondant par la même occasion les demandeurs d’asiles et les réfugiés, soit les personnes dont la demande d’asile a été acceptée.

      https://twitter.com/BFMTV/status/1704749840133923089

      Interrogé sur le profil des migrants arrivés à Lampedusa, le ministère de l’Intérieur italien renvoie aux statistiques de l’administration du pays. A rebours des propos définitifs de Gérald Darmanin sur la nationalité des personnes débarquées sur les rives italiennes depuis la semaine dernière, on constate, à l’appui de ces données, qu’une grande majorité des migrants n’a pas encore fait l’objet d’une procédure d’identification. Sur les 16 911 personnes arrivées entre le 11 et le 20 septembre, la nationalité n’est précisée que pour 30 % d’entre elles.

      En tout, 12 223 personnes, soit 72 % des personnes arrivées à Lampedusa, apparaissent dans la catégorie « autres » nationalités, qui mélange des ressortissants de pays peu représentés et des migrants dont l’identification est en cours. A titre de comparaison, au 11 septembre, seulement 30 % des personnes étaient classées dans cette catégorie. Même si la part exacte de migrants non identifiés n’est pas précisée, cette catégorie apparaît être un bon indicateur de l’avancée du travail des autorités italiennes.

      Parmi les nationalités relevées entre le 11 et 20 septembre, le ministère de l’Intérieur italien compte effectivement une grande partie de personnes qui pourraient être francophones : 1 600 Tunisiens, 858 Guinéens, 618 Ivoiriens, 372 Burkinabés, presque autant de Maliens, 253 Camerounais, mais aussi des ressortissants moins susceptibles de connaître la langue (222 Syriens, environ 200 Egyptiens, 128 Bangladais et 74 Pakistanais).

      A noter que selon ces statistiques italiennes partielles, il n’est pas fait état de ressortissants sénégalais et gambiens évoqués par Gérald Darmanin. Les données ne disent rien, par ailleurs, du genre ou de l’âge de ces arrivants. « La plupart sont des hommes mais aussi on a aussi vu arriver des familles, des mères seules ou des pères seuls avec des enfants et beaucoup de mineurs non accompagnés, des adolescents de 16 ou 17 ans », décrivait à CheckNews la responsable des migrations de la Croix-Rouge italienne, Francesca Basile, la semaine dernière.

      Légalement, toutes les personnes arrivées à Lampedusa peuvent déposer une demande d’asile, s’ils courent un danger dans leur pays d’origine. « Il ne s’agit pas seulement d’un principe théorique. En vertu du droit communautaire et international, toute personne – quelle que soit sa nationalité – peut demander une protection internationale, et les États membres de l’UE ont l’obligation de procéder à une évaluation individuelle de chaque demande », a ainsi rappelé à CheckNews l’agence de l’union européenne pour l’asile. L’affirmation de Gérald Darmanin selon laquelle des migrants ne seraient pas éligibles à l’asile en raison de leur nationalité est donc fausse.

      Par ailleurs, selon le règlement de Dublin III, la demande d’asile doit être instruite dans le premier pays où la personne est arrivée au sein de l’Union européenne (à l’exception du Danemark), de la Suisse, de la Norvège, de l’Islande et du Liechtenstein. Ce sont donc aux autorités italiennes d’enregistrer et de traiter les demandes des personnes arrivées à Lampedusa. Dans certains cas, des transferts peuvent être opérés vers un pays signataires de l’accord de Dublin III, ainsi du rapprochement familial. Si les demandes d’asile vont être instruites en Italie, les chiffes de l’asile en France montrent tout de même que des ressortissants des pays cités par Gérald Darmanin obtiennent chaque année une protection dans l’Hexagone.

      Pour rappel, il existe deux formes de protections : le statut de réfugié et la protection subsidiaire. Cette dernière peut être accordée à un demandeur qui, aux yeux de l’administration, ne remplit pas les conditions pour être considéré comme un réfugié, mais qui s’expose à des risques grave dans son pays, tels que la torture, des traitements inhumains ou dégradants, ainsi que des « menaces grave et individuelle contre sa vie ou sa personne en raison d’une violence qui peut s’étendre à des personnes sans considération de leur situation personnelle et résultant d’une situation de conflit armé interne ou international », liste sur son site internet la Cour nationale du droit d’asile (CNDA), qui statue en appel sur les demandes de protection.
      Contredit aussi par la réalité des chiffres en France

      Gérald Darmanin cite à plusieurs reprises le cas des migrants originaires de Côte-d’Ivoire comme exemple de personnes n’ayant selon lui « rien à faire » en France. La jurisprudence de la CNDA montre pourtant des ressortissants ivoiriens dont la demande de protection a été acceptée. En 2021, la Cour a ainsi accordé une protection subsidiaire à une femme qui fuyait un mariage forcé décidé par son oncle, qui l’exploitait depuis des années. La Cour avait estimé que les autorités ivoiriennes étaient défaillantes en ce qui concerne la protection des victimes de mariages forcés, malgré de récentes évolutions législatives plus répressives.

      D’après l’Office de protection des réfugiés et apatrides (Ofrpa), qui rend des décisions en première instance, les demandes d’asile de ressortissants ivoiriens (environ 6 000 en 2022) s’appuient très souvent sur des « problématiques d’ordre sociétal […], en particulier les craintes liées à un risque de mariage forcé ou encore l’exposition des jeunes filles à des mutilations sexuelles ». En 2022, le taux de demandes d’Ivoiriens acceptées par l’Ofrpa (avant recours éventuel devant la CNCDA) était de 27,3 % sur 6 727 décisions contre un taux moyen d’admission de 26,4 % pour le continent africain et de 29,2 % tous pays confondus. Les femmes représentaient la majorité des protections accordées aux ressortissants de Côte-d’Ivoire.

      Pour les personnes originaires de Guinée, citées plusieurs fois par Gérald Darmanin, les demandes sont variées. Certaines sont déposées par des militants politiques. « Les demandeurs se réfèrent à leur parcours personnel et à leur participation à des manifestations contre le pouvoir, qu’il s’agisse du gouvernement d’Alpha Condé ou de la junte militaire », décrit l’Ofpra. D’autre part des femmes qui fuient l’excision et le mariage forcé. En 2022, le taux d’admission par l’Ofpra était de 33,4 % pour 5 554 décisions.
      Jurisprudence abondante

      S’il est vrai que ces nationalités (Guinée et Côte-d’Ivoire) ne figurent pas parmi les taux de protections les plus élevées, elles figurent « parmi les principales nationalités des bénéficiaires de la protection internationale » en 2022, aux côtés des personnes venues d’Afghanistan ou de Syrie, selon l’Ofpra. Les ressortissants tunisiens, qui déposent peu de demandes (439 en 2022), présentent un taux d’admission de seulement 10 %.

      La jurisprudence abondante produite par la CNDA montre que, dans certains cas, le demandeur peut obtenir une protection sur la base de son origine géographique, jugée dangereuse pour sa sécurité voire sa vie. C’est le cas notamment du Mali. En février 2023, la Cour avait ainsi accordé la protection subsidiaire à un Malien originaire de Gao, dans le nord du pays. La Cour avait estimé qu’il s’exposait, « en cas de retour dans sa région d’origine du seul fait de sa présence en tant que civil, [à] un risque réel de subir une menace grave contre sa vie ou sa personne sans être en mesure d’obtenir la protection effective des autorités de son pays ».

      « Cette menace est la conséquence d’une situation de violence, résultant d’un conflit armé interne, susceptible de s’étendre indistinctement aux civils », avait-elle expliqué dans un communiqué. Au mois de juin, à la suite des déclarations d’un demandeur possédant la double nationalité malienne et nigérienne, la Cour avait jugé que les régions de Ménaka au Mali et de Tillaberi au Niger étaient en situation de violence aveugle et d’intensité exceptionnelle, « justifiant l’octroi de la protection subsidiaire prévue par le droit européen ».

      D’après le rapport 2023 de l’agence de l’Union européenne pour l’asile, le taux de reconnaissance en première instance pour les demandeurs guinéens avoisinait les 30 %, et un peu plus de 20 % pour ressortissants ivoiriens à l’échelle de l’UE, avec un octroi en majorité, pour les personnes protégées, du statut de réfugié. Concernant le Mali, le taux de reconnaissance dépassait les 60 %, principalement pour de la protection subsidiaire. Ces données européennes qui confirment qu’il est infondé d’affirmer, comme le suggère le ministre de l’Intérieur, que les nationalités qu’il cite ne sont pas éligibles à l’asile.

      En revanche, dans le cadre du mécanisme « de solidarité », qui prévoit que les pays européens prennent en charge une partie des demandeurs, les Etats « restent souverains dans le choix du nombre et de la nationalité des demandeurs accueillis ». « Comme il s’agit d’un mécanisme volontaire, le choix des personnes à transférer est laissé à l’entière discrétion de l’État membre qui effectue le transfert », explique l’agence de l’union européenne pour l’asile, qui précise que les Etats « tendent souvent à donner la priorité aux nationalités qui ont le plus de chances de bénéficier d’un statut de protection », sans plus de précisions sur l’avancée des négociations en cours.

      https://www.liberation.fr/checknews/lampedusa-les-contreverites-de-gerald-darmanin-sur-le-profil-des-migrants

      #fact-checking

    • #Fanélie_Carrey-Conte sur X :

      Comme une tragédie grecque, l’impression de connaître à l’avance la conclusion d’une histoire qui finit mal.
      A chaque fois que l’actualité remet en lumière les drames migratoires, la même mécanique se met en place. D’abord on parle d’"#appel_d'air", de « #submersion », au mépris de la réalité des chiffres, et du fait que derrière les statistiques, il y a des vies, des personnes.
      Puis l’#extrême_droite monte au créneau, de nombreux responsables politiques lui emboîtent le pas. Alors les institutions européennes mettent en scène des « #plans_d'urgence, » des pactes, censés être « solidaires mais fermes », toujours basés en réalité sur la même logique:chercher au maximum à empêcher en Europe les migrations des « indésirables », augmenter la #sécurisation_des_frontières, prétendre que la focalisation sur les #passeurs se fait dans l’intérêt des personnes migrantes, externaliser de plus en plus les politiques migratoires en faisant fi des droits humains.
      Résultat : les migrations, dont on ne cherche d’ailleurs même plus à comprendre les raisons ni les mécanismes qui les sous-tendent, ne diminuent évidemment pas, au contraire ; les drames et les morts augmentent ; l’extrême -droite a toujours autant de leviers pour déployer ses idées nauséabondes et ses récupérations politiques abjectes.
      Et la spirale mortifère continue ... Ce n’est pas juste absurde, c’est avant tout terriblement dramatique. Pourtant ce n’est pas une fatalité : des politiques migratoires réellement fondées sur l’#accueil et l’#hospitalité, le respect des droits et de la #dignité de tout.e.s, cela peut exister, si tant est que l’on en ait la #volonté_politique, que l’on porte cette orientation dans le débat public national et européen, que l’on se mobilise pour faire advenir cet autre possible. A rebours malheureusement de la voie choisie aujourd’hui par l’Europe comme par la France à travers les pactes et projets de loi immigration en cours...

      https://twitter.com/FCarreyConte/status/1703650891268596111

    • Migranti, Oim: “Soluzione non è chiudere le frontiere”

      Il portavoce per l’Italia, Flavio di Giacomo, a LaPresse: «Organizzare diversamente salvataggi per aiutare Lampedusa»

      Per risolvere l’emergenza migranti, secondo l’Oim (Organizzazione internazionale per le migrazioni), la soluzione non è chiudere le frontiere. Lo ha dichiarato a LaPresse il portavoce per l’Italia dell’organizzazione, Flavio di Giacomo. La visita della presidente della Commissione europea Ursula Von der Leyen a Lampedusa insieme alla premier Giorgia Meloni, ha detto, “è un segnale importante, ma non bisogna scambiare un’emergenza di tipo operativo con ‘bisogna chiudere’, perché non c’è nessuna invasione e la soluzione non è quella di creare deterrenti come trattenere i migranti per 18 mesi. In passato non ha ottenuto nessun effetto pratico e comporta tante spese allo Stato”. Von der Leyen ha proposto un piano d’azione in 10 punti che prevede tra le altre cose di intensificare la cooperazione con l’Unhcr e l’Oim per i rimpatri volontari. “È una cosa che in realtà già facciamo ed è importante che venga implementata ulteriormente“, ha sottolineato Di Giacomo.
      “Organizzare diversamente salvataggi per aiutare Lampedusa”

      “Quest’anno i migranti arrivati in Italia sono circa 127mila rispetto ai 115mila dello stesso periodo del 2015-2016, ma niente di paragonabile agli oltre 850mila giunti in Grecia nel 2015. La differenza rispetto ad allora, quando gli arrivi a Lampedusa erano l’8% mentre quest’anno sono oltre il 70%, è che in questo momento i salvataggi ci sono ma sono fatti con piccole motovedette della Guardia costiera che portano i migranti a Lampedusa, mentre servirebbe un tipo diverso di azione con navi più grandi che vengano distribuite negli altri porti. Per questo l’isola è in difficoltà”, spiega Di Giacomo. “Inoltre, con le partenze in prevalenza dalla Tunisia piuttosto che dalla Libia, i barchini puntano tutti direttamente su Lampedusa”.
      “Priorità stabilizzare situazione in Maghreb”

      Per risolvere la questione, ha aggiunto Di Giacomo, “occorre lavorare per la stabilizzazione e il miglioramento delle condizioni nell’area del Maghreb“. E ha precisato: “La stragrande maggioranza dei flussi migratori africani è interno, ovvero dalla zona sub-sahariana a quella del Maghreb, persone che andavano a vivere in Tunisia e che ora decidono di lasciare il Paese perché vittima di furti, vessazioni e discriminazioni razziali. Questo le porta a imbarcarsi a Sfax con qualsiasi mezzo di fortuna per fare rotta verso Lampedusa”.

      https://www.lapresse.it/cronaca/2023/09/18/migranti-oim-soluzione-non-e-chiudere-le-frontiere

    • Da inizio 2023 in Italia sono sbarcati 133.170 migranti.

      La Ong Humanity1, finanziata anche dal Governo tedesco, ne ha sbarcati 753 (lo 0,6% del totale).
      In totale, Ong battenti bandiera tedesca ne hanno sbarcati 2.720 (il 2% del totale).

      Ma di cosa stiamo parlando?

      https://twitter.com/emmevilla/status/1708121850847309960
      #débarquement #arrivées #ONG #sauvetage

  • Comment l’Europe sous-traite à l’#Afrique le contrôle des #migrations (1/4) : « #Frontex menace la #dignité_humaine et l’#identité_africaine »

    Pour freiner l’immigration, l’Union européenne étend ses pouvoirs aux pays d’origine des migrants à travers des partenariats avec des pays africains, parfois au mépris des droits humains. Exemple au Sénégal, où le journaliste Andrei Popoviciu a enquêté.

    Cette enquête en quatre épisodes, publiée initialement en anglais dans le magazine américain In These Times (https://inthesetimes.com/article/europe-militarize-africa-senegal-borders-anti-migration-surveillance), a été soutenue par une bourse du Leonard C. Goodman Center for Investigative Reporting.

    Par une brûlante journée de février, Cornelia Ernst et sa délégation arrivent au poste-frontière de Rosso. Autour, le marché d’artisanat bouillonne de vie, une épaisse fumée s’élève depuis les camions qui attendent pour passer en Mauritanie, des pirogues hautes en couleur dansent sur le fleuve Sénégal. Mais l’attention se focalise sur une fine mallette noire posée sur une table, face au chef du poste-frontière. Celui-ci l’ouvre fièrement, dévoilant des dizaines de câbles méticuleusement rangés à côté d’une tablette tactile. La délégation en a le souffle coupé.

    Le « Universal Forensics Extraction Device » (UFED) est un outil d’extraction de données capable de récupérer les historiques d’appels, photos, positions GPS et messages WhatsApp de n’importe quel téléphone portable. Fabriqué par la société israélienne Cellebrite, dont il a fait la réputation, l’UFED est commercialisé auprès des services de police du monde entier, notamment du FBI, pour lutter contre le terrorisme et le trafic de drogues. Néanmoins, ces dernières années, le Nigeria et le Bahreïn s’en sont servis pour voler les données de dissidents politiques, de militants des droits humains et de journalistes, suscitant un tollé.

    Toujours est-il qu’aujourd’hui, une de ces machines se trouve au poste-frontière entre Rosso-Sénégal et Rosso-Mauritanie, deux villes du même nom construites de part et d’autre du fleuve qui sépare les deux pays. Rosso est une étape clé sur la route migratoire qui mène jusqu’en Afrique du Nord. Ici, cependant, cette technologie ne sert pas à arrêter les trafiquants de drogue ou les terroristes, mais à suivre les Ouest-Africains qui veulent migrer vers l’Europe. Et cet UFED n’est qu’un outil parmi d’autres du troublant arsenal de technologies de pointe déployé pour contrôler les déplacements dans la région – un arsenal qui est arrivé là, Cornelia Ernst le sait, grâce aux technocrates de l’Union européenne (UE) avec qui elle travaille.

    Cette eurodéputée allemande se trouve ici, avec son homologue néerlandaise Tineke Strik et une équipe d’assistants, pour mener une mission d’enquête en Afrique de l’Ouest. Respectivement membres du Groupe de la gauche (GUE/NGL) et du Groupe des Verts (Verts/ALE) au Parlement européen, les deux femmes font partie d’une petite minorité de députés à s’inquiéter des conséquences de la politique migratoire européenne sur les valeurs fondamentales de l’UE – à savoir les droits humains –, tant à l’intérieur qu’à l’extérieur de l’Europe.

    Le poste-frontière de Rosso fait partie intégrante de la politique migratoire européenne. Il accueille en effet une nouvelle antenne de la Division nationale de lutte contre le trafic de migrants (DNLT), fruit d’un « partenariat opérationnel conjoint » entre le Sénégal et l’UE visant à former et équiper la police des frontières sénégalaise et à dissuader les migrants de gagner l’Europe avant même qu’ils ne s’en approchent. Grâce à l’argent des contribuables européens, le Sénégal a construit depuis 2018 au moins neuf postes-frontières et quatre antennes régionales de la DNLT. Ces sites sont équipés d’un luxe de technologies de surveillance intrusive : outre la petite mallette noire, ce sont des logiciels d’identification biométrique des empreintes digitales et de reconnaissance faciale, des drones, des serveurs numériques, des lunettes de vision nocturne et bien d’autres choses encore…

    Dans un communiqué, un porte-parole de la Commission européenne affirme pourtant que les antennes régionales de la DNLT ont été créées par le Sénégal et que l’UE se borne à financer les équipements et les formations.

    « Frontex militarise la Méditerranée »

    Cornelia Ernst redoute que ces outils ne portent atteinte aux droits fondamentaux des personnes en déplacement. Les responsables sénégalais, note-t-elle, semblent « très enthousiasmés par les équipements qu’ils reçoivent et par leur utilité pour suivre les personnes ». Cornelia Ernst et Tineke Strik s’inquiètent également de la nouvelle politique, controversée, que mène la Commission européenne depuis l’été 2022 : l’Europe a entamé des négociations avec le Sénégal et la Mauritanie pour qu’ils l’autorisent à envoyer du personnel de l’Agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes, Frontex, patrouiller aux frontières terrestres et maritimes des deux pays. Objectif avoué : freiner l’immigration africaine.

    Avec un budget de 754 millions d’euros, Frontex est l’agence la mieux dotée financièrement de toute l’UE. Ces cinq dernières années, un certain nombre d’enquêtes – de l’UE, des Nations unies, de journalistes et d’organisations à but non lucratif – ont montré que Frontex a violé les droits et la sécurité des migrants qui traversent la Méditerranée, notamment en aidant les garde-côtes libyens, financés par l’UE, à renvoyer des centaines de milliers de migrants en Libye, un pays dans lequel certains sont détenus, torturés ou exploités comme esclaves sexuels. En 2022, le directeur de l’agence, Fabrice Leggeri, a même été contraint de démissionner à la suite d’une cascade de scandales. Il lui a notamment été reproché d’avoir dissimulé des « pushbacks » : des refoulements illégaux de migrants avant même qu’ils ne puissent déposer une demande d’asile.

    Cela fait longtemps que Frontex est présente de façon informelle au Sénégal, en Mauritanie et dans six autres pays d’Afrique de l’Ouest, contribuant au transfert de données migratoires de ces pays vers l’UE. Mais jamais auparavant l’agence n’avait déployé de gardes permanents à l’extérieur de l’UE. Or à présent, Bruxelles compte bien étendre les activités de Frontex au-delà de son territoire, sur le sol de pays africains souverains, anciennes colonies européennes qui plus est, et ce en l’absence de tout mécanisme de surveillance. Pour couronner le tout, initialement, l’UE avait même envisagé d’accorder l’immunité au personnel de Frontex posté en Afrique de l’Ouest.

    D’évidence, les programmes européens ne sont pas sans poser problème. La veille de leur arrivée à Rosso, Cornelia Ernst et Tineke Strik séjournent à Dakar, où plusieurs groupes de la société civile les mettent en garde. « Frontex menace la dignité humaine et l’identité africaine », martèle Fatou Faye, de la Fondation Rosa Luxemburg, une ONG allemande. « Frontex militarise la Méditerranée », renchérit Saliou Diouf, fondateur de l’association de défense des migrants Boza Fii. Si Frontex poste ses gardes aux frontières africaines, ajoute-t-il, « c’est la fin ».

    Ces programmes s’inscrivent dans une vaste stratégie d’« externalisation des frontières », selon le jargon européen en vigueur. L’idée ? Sous-traiter de plus en plus le contrôle des frontières européennes en créant des partenariats avec des gouvernements africains – autrement dit, étendre les pouvoirs de l’UE aux pays d’origine des migrants. Concrètement, cette stratégie aux multiples facettes consiste à distribuer des équipements de surveillance de pointe, à former les forces de police et à mettre en place des programmes de développement qui prétendent s’attaquer à la racine des migrations.

    Des cobayes pour l’Europe

    En 2016, l’UE a désigné le Sénégal, qui est à la fois un pays d’origine et de transit des migrants, comme l’un de ses cinq principaux pays partenaires pour gérer les migrations africaines. Mais au total, ce sont pas moins de 26 pays africains qui reçoivent de l’argent des contribuables européens pour endiguer les vagues de migration, dans le cadre de 400 projets distincts. Entre 2015 et 2021, l’UE a investi 5 milliards d’euros dans ces projets, 80 % des fonds étant puisés dans les budgets d’aide humanitaire et au développement. Selon des données de la Fondation Heinrich Böll, rien qu’au Sénégal, l’Europe a investi au moins 200 milliards de francs CFA (environ 305 millions d’euros) depuis 2005.

    Ces investissements présentent des risques considérables. Il s’avère que la Commission européenne omet parfois de procéder à des études d’évaluation d’impact sur les droits humains avant de distribuer ses fonds. Or, comme le souligne Tineke Strik, les pays qu’elle finance manquent souvent de garde-fous pour protéger la démocratie et garantir que les technologies et les stratégies de maintien de l’ordre ne seront pas utilisées à mauvais escient. En réalité, avec ces mesures, l’UE mène de dangereuses expériences technico-politiques : elle équipe des gouvernements autoritaires d’outils répressifs qui peuvent être utilisés contre les migrants, mais contre bien d’autres personnes aussi.

    « Si la police dispose de ces technologies pour tracer les migrants, rien ne garantit qu’elle ne s’en servira pas contre d’autres individus, comme des membres de la société civile et des acteurs politiques », explique Ousmane Diallo, chercheur au bureau d’Afrique de l’Ouest d’Amnesty International.

    En 2022, j’ai voulu mesurer l’impact au Sénégal des investissements réalisés par l’UE dans le cadre de sa politique migratoire. Je me suis rendu dans plusieurs villes frontalières, j’ai discuté avec des dizaines de personnes et j’ai consulté des centaines de documents publics ou qui avaient fuité. Cette enquête a mis au jour un complexe réseau d’initiatives qui ne s’attaquent guère aux problèmes qui poussent les gens à émigrer. En revanche, elles portent un rude coup aux droits fondamentaux, à la souveraineté nationale du Sénégal et d’autres pays d’Afrique, ainsi qu’aux économies locales de ces pays, qui sont devenus des cobayes pour l’Europe.

    Des politiques « copiées-collées »

    Depuis la « crise migratoire » de 2015, l’UE déploie une énergie frénétique pour lutter contre l’immigration. A l’époque, plus d’un million de demandeurs d’asile originaires du Moyen-Orient et d’Afrique – fuyant les conflits, la violence et la pauvreté – ont débarqué sur les côtes européennes. Cette « crise migratoire » a provoqué une droitisation de l’Europe. Les leaders populistes surfant sur la peur des populations et présentant l’immigration comme une menace sécuritaire et identitaire, les partis nationalistes et xénophobes en ont fait leurs choux gras.

    Reste que le pic d’immigration en provenance d’Afrique de l’Ouest s’est produit bien avant 2015 : en 2006, plus de 31 700 migrants sont arrivés par bateau aux îles Canaries, un territoire espagnol situé à une centaine de kilomètres du Maroc. Cette vague a pris au dépourvu le gouvernement espagnol, qui s’est lancé dans une opération conjointe avec Frontex, baptisée « Hera », pour patrouiller le long des côtes africaines et intercepter les bateaux en direction de l’Europe.

    Cette opération « Hera », que l’ONG britannique de défense des libertés Statewatch qualifie d’« opaque », marque le premier déploiement de Frontex à l’extérieur du territoire européen. C’est aussi le premier signe d’externalisation des frontières européennes en Afrique depuis la fin du colonialisme au XXe siècle. En 2018, Frontex a quitté le Sénégal, mais la Guardia Civil espagnole y est restée jusqu’à ce jour : pour lutter contre l’immigration illégale, elle patrouille le long des côtes et effectue même des contrôles de passeports dans les aéroports.

    En 2015, en pleine « crise », les fonctionnaires de Bruxelles ont musclé leur stratégie : ils ont décidé de dédier des fonds à la lutte contre l’immigration à la source. Ils ont alors créé le Fonds fiduciaire d’urgence de l’UE pour l’Afrique (EUTF). Officiellement, il s’agit de favoriser la stabilité et de remédier aux causes des migrations et des déplacements irréguliers des populations en Afrique.

    Malgré son nom prometteur, c’est la faute de l’EUTF si la mallette noire se trouve à présent au poste-frontière de Rosso – sans oublier les drones et les lunettes de vision nocturne. Outre ce matériel, le fonds d’urgence sert à envoyer des fonctionnaires et des consultants européens en Afrique, pour convaincre les gouvernements de mettre en place de nouvelles politiques migratoires – des politiques qui, comme me le confie un consultant anonyme de l’EUTF, sont souvent « copiées-collées d’un pays à l’autre », sans considération aucune des particularités nationales de chaque pays. « L’UE force le Sénégal à adopter des politiques qui n’ont rien à voir avec nous », explique la chercheuse sénégalaise Fatou Faye à Cornelia Ernst et Tineke Strik.

    Une mobilité régionale stigmatisée

    Les aides européennes constituent un puissant levier, note Leonie Jegen, chercheuse à l’université d’Amsterdam et spécialiste de l’influence de l’UE sur la politique migratoire sénégalaise. Ces aides, souligne-t-elle, ont poussé le Sénégal à réformer ses institutions et son cadre législatif en suivant des principes européens et en reproduisant des « catégories politiques eurocentrées » qui stigmatisent, voire criminalisent la mobilité régionale. Et ces réformes sont sous-tendues par l’idée que « le progrès et la modernité » sont des choses « apportées de l’extérieur » – idée qui n’est pas sans faire écho au passé colonial.

    Il y a des siècles, pour se partager l’Afrique et mieux piller ses ressources, les empires européens ont dessiné ces mêmes frontières que l’UE est aujourd’hui en train de fortifier. L’Allemagne a alors jeté son dévolu sur de grandes parties de l’Afrique de l’Ouest et de l’Afrique de l’Est ; les Pays-Bas ont mis la main sur l’Afrique du Sud ; les Britanniques ont décroché une grande bande de terre s’étendant du nord au sud de la partie orientale du continent ; la France a raflé des territoires allant du Maroc au Congo-Brazzaville, notamment l’actuel Sénégal, qui n’est indépendant que depuis soixante-trois ans.

    L’externalisation actuelle des frontières européennes n’est pas un cas totalement unique. Les trois derniers gouvernements américains ont abreuvé le Mexique de millions de dollars pour empêcher les réfugiés d’Amérique centrale et d’Amérique du Sud d’atteindre la frontière américaine, et l’administration Biden a annoncé l’ouverture en Amérique latine de centres régionaux où il sera possible de déposer une demande d’asile, étendant ainsi de facto le contrôle de ses frontières à des milliers de kilomètres au-delà de son territoire.

    Cela dit, au chapitre externalisation des frontières, la politique européenne en Afrique est de loin la plus ambitieuse et la mieux financée au monde.

    https://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2023/09/06/comment-l-europe-sous-traite-a-l-afrique-le-controle-des-migrations-1-4-fron

    #réfugiés #asile #contrôles_frontaliers #frontières #Sénégal #Rosso #fleuve_Sénégal #Mauritanie #Universal_Forensics_Extraction_Device (#UFED) #données #technologie #Cellebrite #complexe_militaro-industriel #Division_nationale_de_lutte_contre_le_trafic_de_migrants (#DNLT) #politique_migratoire_européenne #UE #EU #Union_européenne #partenariat_opérationnel_conjoint #dissuasion #postes-frontières #surveillance #technologie_de_surveillance #biométrie #identification_biométrie #reconnaissance_faciale #empreintes_digitales #drones #droits_fondamentaux #militarisation_des_frontières #Boza_Fii #externalisation #expériences_technico-politiques #Hera #opération_Hera #mobilité_régionale

    • Comment l’Europe sous-traite à l’Afrique le contrôle des migrations (2/4) : « Nous avons besoin d’aide, pas d’outils sécuritaires »

      Au Sénégal, la création et l’équipement de postes-frontières constituent des éléments clés du partenariat avec l’Union européenne. Une stratégie pas toujours efficace, tandis que les services destinés aux migrants manquent cruellement de financements.

      Par une étouffante journée de mars, j’arrive au poste de contrôle poussiéreux du village sénégalais de #Moussala, à la frontière avec le #Mali. Des dizaines de camions et de motos attendent, en ligne, de traverser ce point de transit majeur. Après avoir demandé pendant des mois, en vain, la permission au gouvernement d’accéder au poste-frontière, j’espère que le chef du poste m’expliquera dans quelle mesure les financements européens influencent leurs opérations. Refusant d’entrer dans les détails, il me confirme que son équipe a récemment reçu de l’Union européenne (UE) des formations et des équipements dont elle se sert régulièrement. Pour preuve, un petit diplôme et un trophée, tous deux estampillés du drapeau européen, trônent sur son bureau.

      La création et l’équipement de postes-frontières comme celui de Moussala constituent des éléments clés du partenariat entre l’UE et l’#Organisation_internationale_pour_les_migrations (#OIM). Outre les technologies de surveillance fournies aux antennes de la Division nationale de lutte contre le trafic de migrants (DNLT, fruit d’un partenariat entre le Sénégal et l’UE), chaque poste-frontière est équipé de systèmes d’analyse des données migratoires et de systèmes biométriques de reconnaissance faciale et des empreintes digitales.

      Officiellement, l’objectif est de créer ce que les fonctionnaires européens appellent un système africain d’#IBM, à savoir « #Integrated_Border_Management » (en français, « gestion intégrée des frontières »). Dans un communiqué de 2017, le coordinateur du projet de l’OIM au Sénégal déclarait : « La gestion intégrée des frontières est plus qu’un simple concept, c’est une culture. » Il avait semble-t-il en tête un changement idéologique de toute l’Afrique, qui ne manquerait pas selon lui d’embrasser la vision européenne des migrations.

      Technologies de surveillance

      Concrètement, ce système IBM consiste à fusionner les #bases_de_données sénégalaises (qui contiennent des données biométriques sensibles) avec les données d’agences de police internationales (comme #Interpol et #Europol). Le but : permettre aux gouvernements de savoir qui franchit quelle frontière et quand. Un tel système, avertissent les experts, peut vite faciliter les expulsions illégales et autres abus.

      Le risque est tout sauf hypothétique. En 2022, un ancien agent des services espagnols de renseignement déclarait au journal El Confidencial que les autorités de plusieurs pays d’Afrique « utilisent les technologies fournies par l’Espagne pour persécuter et réprimer des groupes d’opposition, des militants et des citoyens critiques envers le pouvoir ». Et d’ajouter que le gouvernement espagnol en avait parfaitement conscience.

      D’après un porte-parole de la Commission européenne, « tous les projets qui touchent à la sécurité et sont financés par l’UE comportent un volet de formation et de renforcement des capacités en matière de droits humains ». Selon cette même personne, l’UE effectue des études d’impact sur les droits humains avant et pendant la mise en œuvre de ces projets. Mais lorsque, il y a quelques mois, l’eurodéputée néerlandaise Tineke Strik a demandé à voir ces études d’impact, trois différents services de la Commission lui ont envoyé des réponses officielles disant qu’ils ne les avaient pas. En outre, selon un de ces services, « il n’existe pas d’obligation réglementaire d’en faire ».

      Au Sénégal, les libertés civiles sont de plus en plus menacées et ces technologies de surveillance risquent d’autant plus d’être utilisées à mauvais escient. Rappelons qu’en 2021, les forces de sécurité sénégalaises ont tué quatorze personnes qui manifestaient contre le gouvernement ; au cours des deux dernières années, plusieurs figures de l’opposition et journalistes sénégalais ont été emprisonnés pour avoir critiqué le gouvernement, abordé des questions politiques sensibles ou avoir « diffusé des fausses nouvelles ». En juin, après qu’Ousmane Sonko, principal opposant au président Macky Sall, a été condamné à deux ans d’emprisonnement pour « corruption de la jeunesse », de vives protestations ont fait 23 morts.

      « Si je n’étais pas policier, je partirais aussi »

      Alors que j’allais renoncer à discuter avec la police locale, à Tambacounda, autre grand point de transit non loin des frontières avec le Mali et la Guinée, un policier de l’immigration en civil a accepté de me parler sous couvert d’anonymat. C’est de la région de #Tambacounda, qui compte parmi les plus pauvres du Sénégal, que proviennent la plupart des candidats à l’immigration. Là-bas, tout le monde, y compris le policier, connaît au moins une personne qui a tenté de mettre les voiles pour l’Europe.

      « Si je n’étais pas policier, je partirais aussi », me confie-t-il par l’entremise d’un interprète, après s’être éloigné à la hâte du poste-frontière. Les investissements de l’UE « n’ont rien changé du tout », poursuit-il, notant qu’il voit régulièrement des personnes en provenance de Guinée passer par le Sénégal et entrer au Mali dans le but de gagner l’Europe.

      Depuis son indépendance en 1960, le Sénégal est salué comme un modèle de démocratie et de stabilité, tandis que nombre de ses voisins sont en proie aux dissensions politiques et aux coups d’Etat. Quoi qu’il en soit, plus d’un tiers de la population vit sous le seuil de pauvreté et l’absence de perspectives pousse la population à migrer, notamment vers la France et l’Espagne. Aujourd’hui, les envois de fonds de la diaspora représentent près de 10 % du PIB sénégalais. A noter par ailleurs que, le Sénégal étant le pays le plus à l’ouest de l’Afrique, de nombreux Ouest-Africains s’y retrouvent lorsqu’ils fuient les problèmes économiques et les violences des ramifications régionales d’Al-Qaida et de l’Etat islamique (EI), qui ont jusqu’à présent contraint près de 4 millions de personnes à partir de chez elles.

      « L’UE ne peut pas résoudre les problèmes en construisant des murs et en distribuant de l’argent, me dit le policier. Elle pourra financer tout ce qu’elle veut, ce n’est pas comme ça qu’elle mettra fin à l’immigration. » Les sommes qu’elle dépense pour renforcer la police et les frontières, dit-il, ne servent guère plus qu’à acheter des voitures climatisées aux policiers des villes frontalières.

      Pendant ce temps, les services destinés aux personnes expulsées – comme les centres de protection et d’accueil – manquent cruellement de financements. Au poste-frontière de Rosso, des centaines de personnes sont expulsées chaque semaine de Mauritanie. Mbaye Diop travaille avec une poignée de bénévoles du centre que la Croix-Rouge a installé du côté sénégalais pour accueillir ces personnes expulsées : des hommes, des femmes et des enfants qui présentent parfois des blessures aux poignets, causées par des menottes, et ailleurs sur le corps, laissées par les coups de la police mauritanienne. Mais Mbaye Diop n’a pas de ressources pour les aider. L’approche n’est pas du tout la bonne, souffle-t-il : « Nous avons besoin d’aide humanitaire, pas d’outils sécuritaires. »

      La méthode de la carotte

      Pour freiner l’immigration, l’UE teste également la méthode de la carotte : elle propose des subventions aux entreprises locales et des formations professionnelles à ceux qui restent ou rentrent chez eux. La route qui mène à Tambacounda est ponctuée de dizaines et de dizaines de panneaux publicitaires vantant les projets européens.

      Dans la réalité, les offres ne sont pas aussi belles que l’annonce l’UE. Binta Ly, 40 ans, en sait quelque chose. A Tambacounda, elle tient une petite boutique de jus de fruits locaux et d’articles de toilette. Elle a fait une année de droit à l’université, mais le coût de la vie à Dakar l’a contrainte à abandonner ses études et à partir chercher du travail au Maroc. Après avoir vécu sept ans à Casablanca et Marrakech, elle est rentrée au Sénégal, où elle a récemment inauguré son magasin.

      En 2022, Binta Ly a déposé une demande de subvention au Bureau d’accueil, d’orientation et de suivi (BAOS) qui avait ouvert la même année à Tambacounda, au sein de l’antenne locale de l’Agence régionale de développement (ARD). Financés par l’UE, les BAOS proposent des subventions aux petites entreprises sénégalaises dans le but de dissuader la population d’émigrer. Binta Ly ambitionnait d’ouvrir un service d’impression, de copie et de plastification dans sa boutique, idéalement située à côté d’une école primaire. Elle a obtenu une subvention de 500 000 francs CFA (762 euros) – soit un quart du budget qu’elle avait demandé –, mais peu importe, elle était très enthousiaste. Sauf qu’un an plus tard, elle n’avait toujours pas touché un seul franc.

      Dans l’ensemble du Sénégal, les BAOS ont obtenu une enveloppe totale de 1 milliard de francs CFA (1,5 million d’euros) de l’UE pour financer ces subventions. Mais l’antenne de Tambacounda n’a perçu que 60 millions de francs CFA (91 470 euros), explique Abdoul Aziz Tandia, directeur du bureau local de l’ARD. A peine de quoi financer 84 entreprises dans une région de plus d’un demi-million d’habitants. Selon un porte-parole de la Commission européenne, la distribution des subventions a effectivement commencé en avril. Le fait est que Binta Ly a reçu une imprimante et une plastifieuse, mais pas d’ordinateur pour aller avec. « Je suis contente d’avoir ces aides, dit-elle. Le problème, c’est qu’elles mettent très longtemps à venir et que ces retards chamboulent tout mon business plan. »

      Retour « volontaire »

      Abdoul Aziz Tandia admet que les BAOS ne répondent pas à la demande. C’est en partie la faute de la bureaucratie, poursuit-il : Dakar doit approuver l’ensemble des projets et les intermédiaires sont des ONG et des agences étrangères, ce qui signifie que les autorités locales et les bénéficiaires n’exercent aucun contrôle sur ces fonds, alors qu’ils sont les mieux placés pour savoir comment les utiliser. Par ailleurs, reconnaît-il, de nombreuses régions du pays n’ayant accès ni à l’eau propre, ni à l’électricité ni aux soins médicaux, ces microsubventions ne suffisent pas à empêcher les populations d’émigrer. « Sur le moyen et le long termes, ces investissements n’ont pas de sens », juge Abdoul Aziz Tandia.

      Autre exemple : aujourd’hui âgé de 30 ans, Omar Diaw a passé au moins cinq années de sa vie à tenter de rejoindre l’Europe. Traversant les impitoyables déserts du Mali et du Niger, il est parvenu jusqu’en Algérie. Là, à son arrivée, il s’est aussitôt fait expulser vers le Niger, où il n’existe aucun service d’accueil. Il est alors resté coincé des semaines entières dans le désert. Finalement, l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) l’a renvoyé en avion au Sénégal, qualifiant son retour de « volontaire ».

      Lorsqu’il est rentré chez lui, à Tambacounda, l’OIM l’a inscrit à une formation de marketing numérique qui devait durer plusieurs semaines et s’accompagner d’une allocation de 30 000 francs CFA (46 euros). Mais il n’a jamais touché l’allocation et la formation qu’il a suivie est quasiment inutile dans sa situation : à Tambacounda, la demande en marketing numérique n’est pas au rendez-vous. Résultat : il a recommencé à mettre de l’argent de côté pour tenter de nouveau de gagner l’Europe.

      https://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2023/09/07/comment-l-europe-sous-traite-a-l-afrique-le-controle-des-migrations-2-4-nous
      #OIM #retour_volontaire

    • Comment l’Europe sous-traite à l’Afrique le contrôle des migrations (3/4) : « Il est presque impossible de comprendre à quoi sert l’argent »

      A coups de centaines de millions d’euros, l’UE finance des projets dans des pays africains pour réduire les migrations. Mais leur impact est difficile à mesurer et leurs effets pervers rarement pris en considération.

      Vous pouvez partager un article en cliquant sur les icônes de partage en haut à droite de celui-ci.
      La reproduction totale ou partielle d’un article, sans l’autorisation écrite et préalable du Monde, est strictement interdite.

      Au chapitre migrations, rares sont les projets de l’Union européenne (UE) qui semblent adaptés aux réalités africaines. Mais il n’est pas sans risques de le dire tout haut. C’est ce que Boubacar Sèye, chercheur dans le domaine, a appris à ses dépens.

      Né au Sénégal, il vit aujourd’hui en Espagne. Ce migrant a quitté la Côte d’Ivoire, où il travaillait comme professeur de mathématiques, quand les violences ont ravagé le pays au lendemain de l’élection présidentielle de 2000. Après de brefs séjours en France et en Italie, Boubacar Sèye s’est établi en Espagne, où il a fini par obtenir la citoyenneté et fondé une famille avec son épouse espagnole. Choqué par le bilan de la vague de migration aux Canaries en 2006, il a créé l’ONG Horizons sans frontières pour aider les migrants africains en Espagne. Aujourd’hui, il mène des recherches et défend les droits des personnes en déplacement, notamment celles en provenance d’Afrique et plus particulièrement du Sénégal.

      En 2019, Boubacar Sèye s’est procuré un document détaillant comment les fonds des politiques migratoires de l’UE sont dépensés au Sénégal. Il a été sidéré par le montant vertigineux des sommes investies pour juguler l’immigration, alors que des milliers de candidats à l’asile se noient chaque année sur certaines des routes migratoires les plus meurtrières au monde. Lors d’entretiens publiés dans la presse et d’événements publics, il a ouvertement demandé aux autorités sénégalaises d’être plus transparentes sur ce qu’elles avaient fait des centaines de millions d’euros de l’Europe, qualifiant ces projets de véritable échec.

      Puis, au début de l’année 2021, il a été arrêté à l’aéroport de Dakar pour « diffusion de fausses informations ». Il a ensuite passé deux semaines en prison. Sa santé se dégradant rapidement sous l’effet du stress, il a fait une crise cardiaque. « Ce séjour en prison était inhumain, humiliant, et il m’a causé des problèmes de santé qui durent jusqu’à aujourd’hui, s’indigne le chercheur. J’ai juste posé une question : “Où est passé l’argent ?” »

      Ses intuitions n’étaient pas mauvaises. Les financements de la politique anti-immigration de l’UE sont notoirement opaques et difficiles à tracer. Les demandes déposées dans le cadre de la liberté d’information mettent des mois, voire des années à être traitées, alors que la délégation de l’UE au Sénégal, la Commission européenne et les autorités sénégalaises ignorent ou déclinent les demandes d’interviews.

      La Division nationale de lutte contre le trafic de migrants (DNLT, fruit d’un partenariat entre le Sénégal et l’UE), la police des frontières, le ministère de l’intérieur et le ministère des affaires étrangères – lesquels ont tous bénéficié des fonds migratoires européens – n’ont pas répondu aux demandes répétées d’entretien pour réaliser cette enquête.
      « Nos rapports doivent être positifs »

      Les rapports d’évaluation de l’UE ne donnent pas de vision complète de l’impact des programmes. A dessein ? Plusieurs consultants qui ont travaillé sur des rapports d’évaluation d’impact non publiés de projets du #Fonds_fiduciaire_d’urgence_de_l’UE_pour_l’Afrique (#EUTF), et qui s’expriment anonymement en raison de leur obligation de confidentialité, tirent la sonnette d’alarme : les effets pervers de plusieurs projets du fonds sont peu pris en considération.

      Au #Niger, par exemple, l’UE a contribué à élaborer une loi qui criminalise presque tous les déplacements, rendant de fait illégale la mobilité dans la région. Alors que le nombre de migrants irréguliers qui empruntent certaines routes migratoires a reculé, les politiques européennes rendent les routes plus dangereuses, augmentent les prix qu’exigent les trafiquants et criminalisent les chauffeurs de bus et les sociétés de transport locales. Conséquence : de nombreuses personnes ont perdu leur travail du jour au lendemain.

      La difficulté à évaluer l’impact de ces projets tient notamment à des problèmes de méthode et à un manque de ressources, mais aussi au simple fait que l’UE ne semble guère s’intéresser à la question. Un consultant d’une société de contrôle et d’évaluation financée par l’UE confie : « Quel est l’impact de ces projets ? Leurs effets pervers ? Nous n’avons pas les moyens de répondre à ces questions. Nous évaluons les projets uniquement à partir des informations fournies par des organisations chargées de leur mise en œuvre. Notre cabinet de conseil ne réalise pas d’évaluation véritablement indépendante. »

      Selon un document interne que j’ai pu me procurer, « rares sont les projets qui nous ont fourni les données nécessaires pour évaluer les progrès accomplis en direction des objectifs généraux de l’EUTF (promouvoir la stabilité et limiter les déplacements forcés et les migrations illégales) ». Selon un autre consultant, seuls les rapports positifs semblent les bienvenus : « Il est implicite que nos rapports doivent être positifs si nous voulons à l’avenir obtenir d’autres projets. »

      En 2018, la Cour des comptes européenne, institution indépendante, a émis des critiques sur l’EUTF : ses procédures de sélection de projets manquent de cohérence et de clarté. De même, une étude commanditée par le Parlement européen qualifie ses procédures d’« opaques ». « Le contrôle du Parlement est malheureusement très limité, ce qui constitue un problème majeur pour contraindre la Commission à rendre des comptes, regrette l’eurodéputée allemande Cornelia Ernst. Même pour une personne très au fait des politiques de l’UE, il est presque impossible de comprendre où va l’argent et à quoi il sert. »

      Le #fonds_d’urgence pour l’Afrique a notamment financé la création d’unités de police des frontières d’élite dans six pays d’Afrique de l’Ouest, et ce dans le but de lutter contre les groupes de djihadistes et les trafics en tous genres. Or ce projet, qui aurait permis de détourner au moins 12 millions d’euros, fait actuellement l’objet d’une enquête pour fraude.
      Aucune étude d’impact sur les droits humains

      En 2020, deux projets de modernisation des #registres_civils du Sénégal et de la Côte d’Ivoire ont suscité de vives inquiétudes des populations. Selon certaines sources, ces projets financés par l’EUTF auraient en effet eu pour objectif de créer des bases de #données_biométriques nationales. Les défenseurs des libertés redoutaient qu’on collecte et stocke les empreintes digitales et images faciales des citoyens des deux pays.

      Quand Ilia Siatitsa, de l’ONG britannique Privacy International, a demandé à la Commission européenne de lui fournir des documents sur ces projets, elle a découvert que celle-ci n’avait réalisé aucune étude d’impact sur les droits humains. En Europe, aucun pays ne possède de base de données comprenant autant d’informations biométriques.

      D’après un porte-parole de la Commission, jamais le fonds d’urgence n’a financé de registre biométrique, et ces deux projets consistent exclusivement à numériser des documents et prévenir les fraudes. Or la dimension biométrique des registres apparaît clairement dans les documents de l’EUTF qu’Ilia Siatitsa s’est procurés : il y est écrit noir sur blanc que le but est de créer « une base de données d’identification biométrique pour la population, connectée à un système d’état civil fiable ».

      Ilia Siatitsa en a déduit que le véritable objectif des deux projets était vraisemblablement de faciliter l’expulsion des migrants africains d’Europe. D’ailleurs, certains documents indiquent explicitement que la base de données ivoirienne doit servir à identifier et expulser les Ivoiriens qui résident illégalement sur le sol européen. L’un d’eux explique même que l’objectif du projet est de « faciliter l’identification des personnes qui sont véritablement de nationalité ivoirienne et l’organisation de leur retour ».

      Quand Cheikh Fall, militant sénégalais pour le droit à la vie privée, a appris l’existence de cette base de données, il s’est tourné vers la Commission de protection des données personnelles (CDP), qui, légalement, aurait dû donner son aval à un tel projet. Mais l’institution sénégalaise n’a été informée de l’existence du projet qu’après que le gouvernement l’a approuvé.

      En novembre 2021, Ilia Siatitsa a déposé une plainte auprès du médiateur de l’UE. En décembre 2022, après une enquête indépendante, le médiateur a rendu ses conclusions : la Commission n’a pas pris en considération l’impact sur la vie privée des populations africaines de ce projet et d’autres projets que finance l’UE dans le cadre de sa politique migratoire.

      Selon plusieurs sources avec lesquelles j’ai discuté, ainsi que la présentation interne du comité de direction du projet – que j’ai pu me procurer –, il apparaît que depuis, le projet a perdu sa composante biométrique. Cela dit, selon Ilia Siatitsa, cette affaire illustre bien le fait que l’UE effectue en Afrique des expériences sur des technologies interdites chez elle.

      https://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2023/09/08/comment-l-europe-sous-traite-a-l-afrique-le-controle-des-migrations-3-4-il-e

  • Conference on innovative technologies for strengthening the Schengen area

    On 28 March 2023, the European Commission (DG HOME), Frontex and Europol will jointly hold a conference on innovative technologies for strengthening the Schengen area.


    The conference will provide a platform for dialogue between policy decision-makers, senior technology project managers, and strategic industry leaders, essential actors who contribute to making the Schengen area more secure and resilient. The conference will include discussions on the current situation and needs in Member States, selected innovative technology solutions that could strengthen Schengen as well as selected technology use cases relevant for police cooperation within Schengen.

    The conference target participants are ‘chief technology officers’ and lead managers from each Member State’s law enforcement and border guard authorities responsible for border management, security of border regions and internal security related activities, senior policy-makers and EU agencies. With regards to the presentation of innovative technological solutions, a dedicated call for industry participation will be published soon.

    https://www.europol.europa.eu/publications-events/events/conference-innovative-technologies-for-strengthening-schengen-area

    Le rapport est téléchargeable ici:
    Report from the conference on innovative technologies for strengthening the Schengen area

    In March 2023, the European Commission (DG HOME), Frontex and Europol jointly hosted a conference on innovative technologies for strengthening the Schengen area. The event brought together policy makers, senior technology project managers, and strategic industry leaders, essential actors who contribute to making the Schengen area more secure and resilient. The conference included discussions on the current situation and needs in Member States, selected innovative technology solutions that could strengthen Schengen as well as selected technology use cases relevant for police cooperation within Schengen.

    https://frontex.europa.eu/innovation/announcements/report-from-the-conference-on-innovative-technologies-for-strengtheni
    Lien pour télécharger le pdf:
    https://frontex.europa.eu/assets/EUresearchprojects/2023/Conference_on_innovative_technologies_for_Schengen_-_Report.pdf

    #technologie #frontières #Frontex #Europol #conférence #Schengen #UE #EU #commission_européenne #droits #droits_fondamentaux #biométrie #complexe_militaro-industriel #frontières_intérieures #contrôles_frontaliers #interopérabilité #acceptabilité #libre-circulation #Advanced_Passenger_Information (#API) #One-stop-shop_solutions #données #EU_Innovation_Hub_for_Internal_Security #Personal_Identification_system (#PerIS) #migrations #asile #réfugiés #vidéosurveillance #ePolicist_system #IDEMIA #Grant_Detection #OptoPrecision #Airbus_Defense_and_Space #Airbus #border_management #PNR #eu-LISA #European_Innovation_Hub_for_Internal_Security

  • #Frontex #risk_analyses based on unreliable information, EU watchdog says

    The EU border management agency Frontex produces untrustworthy risk analyses on migration due to the ‘low reliability of the data collected’, an investigation conducted by the #European_Data_Protection_Supervisor (#EDPS) found on Wednesday (31 May).

    The supervisor, which oversees the data processing of EU bodies, questioned the methodology used to integrate interviews collected on the field into risk analyses and denounced the “absence of a clear mapping and exhaustive overview of the processing of personal data” which the authority assessed as not sufficiently protected.

    The voluntary nature of interviews themselves is also not guaranteed, the report has found, as they “are conducted in a situation of deprivation (or limitation) of liberty” and aim at “identifying suspects on the basis of the interviewee’s testimony”.

    The concerns regard “the use of information of low reliability for the production of risk analyses and its implications for certain groups who may be unduly targeted or represented in the output of risk analysis products”.

    “Such undue representation could have negative impacts on individuals and groups through operational actions as well as the policy decision-making process,” the EU watchdog said.

    The new investigation results from fieldwork occurred in late 2022 at the Frontex headquarters in Warsaw.

    It is not the first time that the body has raised serious concerns about the data processing practices of an EU agency. In 2020, the supervisor initiated an investigation on Europol, the EU’s law enforcement agency, that resulted in the European Commission revising the agency’s mandate.

    Lack of protection

    The report explains that Frontex uses as its “main source of personal data collection” interviews that it conducts jointly with the member state they are operating in. Interviews are carried out on an ad hoc basis with people intercepted while trying to cross a border “without authorisation”.

    The EU agency collects information about their journey, the causes of the departure and any other information that can be relevant to the agency’s risk analysis.

    Despite Frontex carrying out interviews without putting the name of individuals, the information the exchanges contain “would allow for the identification of the interviewee and thus constitutes personal data within the meaning of data protection law”, the report argued.

    Among others, the EU agency collects personal data about individuals suspected to be involved in cross-border crimes, such as human smuggling, whose data are shared with Europol.

    According to the report, the EU agency may not “systematically” collect information about cross-border crimes since it “must be strictly limited to” Europol, Eurojust, and the member states’ “identified needs”.

    However, evidence shown by the EDPS indicates “that Frontex is automatically exchanging the debriefing reports with Europol without assessing the strict necessity of such exchange”.

    Since the latter constitutes a breach of Frontex rules themselves, the authority said that it would open an investigation on the matter.

    The authority also considers the arrangements that should be put in place when data are collected jointly between Frontex and member states to be “incomplete”.

    According to the EDPS, there are “no arrangements between the joint controllers for the allocation of their respective data protection obligations regarding the processing of personal data of interviewees”.

    “The audit report challenges the fundamental legality of risk analysis systems used against migrant people, and it highlights the serious harms that derive from their use,” Caterina Rodelli, EU Policy Analyst at the NGO Access Now told EURACTIV.

    Rodelli sees the EDPS report as an “important step” to set a limit to Frontex’s “disproportionate power” and it comes in a pivotal moment of risk assessment of data collecting tools regarding migratory flows.

    The authority sent Frontex 32 recommendations, of which 24 must to be implemented by the end of 2023.

    https://www.euractiv.com/section/data-privacy/news/frontex-risk-analyses-based-on-unreliable-information-eu-watchdog-says
    #chiffres #statistiques #méthodologie #fiabilité #europol #données_personnelles #frontières #migrations #réfugiés

    –—

    voir aussi ce fil de discussion auquel cet article a été ajouté :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/705957

  • Bulgaria and Romania speed up asylum and deportation procedures with EU support

    #Pilot_projects” intended to beef up border controls, accelerate asylum and deportation proceedings, and reinforce the role of EU agencies in Bulgaria and Romania have just begun - yet EU legislation intended to do the same is yet to be approved.

    Pilot projects

    In February the European Council confirmed its support for Commission-funded “border management pilot projects,” and two such projects have been launched in recent months, in Bulgaria (€45 million) and Romania (€10.8 million).

    As revealed by Statewatch in March, “the key border between Bulgaria and Turkiye,” was to be the first target of €600 million being made available to reinforce border controls and speed up removals.

    Of that funding, the Commission recently announced that it will make €140 million available “for the development of electronic surveillance systems at land external borders” and €120 million to “support reception and asylum systems,” in particular for the reception of unaccompanied minors and “reception capacity at the border”.

    Both Bulgaria and Romania have recently circulated notes within the Council to update other member states on the projects, and the Commission also trumpeted the “progress made” in a press release.

    Bulgaria

    According to the Bulgarian note, (pdf) the project “foresees the implementation by Bulgaria of targeted tools for border management and screening of third country nationals, conduct of an accelerated asylum and return procedure and cooperation in the fight against migrant smuggling.”

    The project is being implemented “with the operational and technical support of the relevant JHA agencies (EUAA, Europol and Frontex). It builds on Bulgaria’s good practices and experience, including its excellent cooperation with its neighboring countries and the EU agencies present in Bulgaria. The duration of the pilot is 6 months.”

    The country is “improving the digitalization of the asylum and return systems,” while:

    “Work is ongoing on legislative amendments for issuing of a return decision at the same time with a negative decision for international protection. Bulgaria is also working on drawing up a list with designated safe countries of origin in line with the Asylum Procedure Directive. Negotiations are ongoing with EUAA on an updated Operational plan in the field of asylum.”

    A “Roadmap for strengthened cooperation” with Frontex is “pending finalization”, which will allow for “provision of technical equipment and increased deployment of personnel.”

    However, Frontex presence in the country has already been stepped up, according to the Commission’s press release, with the agency providing “additional support to Bulgaria through return counsellors and interpreters.”

    The note also states an intention to a sign a Joint Action Plan on Return “in the margins of JHA Council,” presumably the meeting on 8 and 9 June, but the Council’s press release makes no mention of this.

    Romania

    While the Bulgarian note is not particularly detailed, it offers more information than the one circulated by Romania (pdf).

    The Romanian note states that agreement with the European Commission on launching the pilot project was reached on 17 March, and that it aims to implement “key operational actions in the area of border protection, asylum and return. One of the targeted operational actions foresees setting up pilot projects in interested Member States for fast asylum and return procedures.”

    While the Bulgarian note mentions the need for legal reforms to accelerate asylum and removal proceedings, the Romanian note says that this “showcase” of “Romania’s best practices in the areas of asylum, return, border management and international cooperation.. is based on EU and applicable Romanian legislation, as well as on Romania’s very good cooperation with neighbouring countries and EU agencies.”

    According to the Commission, however, Romania has changed national law in two respects: “to allow for the participation of EUAA [EU Asylum Agency] experts in the registration and assessment of asylum applications,” and - as in Bulgaria - “to allow for the issuing of a negative decision on international protection together with a return decision.”

    The country has also been cooperating with Frontex on align its national IT systems for deportations with the agency’s own, and “Romanian authorities will host and use the first Frontex Mobile Surveillance Vehicles at Romanian - Serbian border section of the Terra 2023 operational area.”

    Terra 2023 is presumably a continuation of the Frontex operation Terra 2022.

    Documentation

    - European Commission press release: Migration management: Update on progress made on the Pilot Projects for asylum and return procedures and new financial support for Bulgaria and Romania: https://www.statewatch.org/media/3932/eu-com-pilot-projects-bulgaria-romania-pr-7-6-23.pdf
    - Bulgarian delegation: Pilot project at the Bulgarian-Turkish border. Council doc. 9992/23, LIMITE, 5 June 2023, pdf: https://www.statewatch.org/media/3930/eu-council-bulgaria-pilot-project-migration-asylum-9992-23.pdf
    - Romanian delegation: Pilot project in the area of asylum, returns, border management and international cooperation, Council doc. 9991/23, LIMITE, 5 June 2023: https://www.statewatch.org/media/3931/eu-council-romania-pilot-project-migration-asylum-09991-23.pdf

    https://www.statewatch.org/news/2023/june/bulgaria-and-romania-speed-up-asylum-and-deportation-procedures-with-eu-
    #Bulgarie #Roumanie #renvois #expulsions #contrôles_frontaliers #financement #EU #UE #aide_financière #JHA #Europol #Frontex #EUAA #externalisation #externalisation_des_contrôles_frontaliers #digitalisation #directive_procédure #pays_sûrs #militarisation_des_frontières #Joint_Action_Plan_on_Return #Frontex_Mobile_Surveillance_Vehicles #Mobile_Surveillance_Vehicles #Terra_2023 #frontières

  • Sorvegliare in nome della sicurezza: le Agenzie Ue vogliono carta bianca

    Il nuovo regolamento di #Europol mette a rischio la #privacy di milioni di persone mentre #Frontex, chiamata a controllare le frontiere, punta sull’intelligenza artificiale e la biometria per fermare i migranti. Provando a eludere la legge.

    C’è una lotta interna nel cuore delle istituzioni europee il cui esito toccherà da vicino il destino di milioni di persone. Lo scontro è sul nuovo regolamento di Europol, l’Agenzia europea di contrasto al crimine, entrato in vigore a fine giugno 2022 con la “benedizione” del Consiglio europeo ma che il Garante per la protezione dei dati (Gepd) definisce un “colpo allo Stato di diritto”. “La principale controversia riguarda la possibilità per l’Agenzia di aggirare le proprie regole quando ha ‘bisogno’ di trattare categorie di dati al di fuori di quelli che può raccogliere -spiega Chloé Berthélémy, policy advisor dell’European digital rights (Edri), un’organizzazione che difende i diritti digitali nel continente-. Uno scandalo pari a quanto rivelato, quasi un decennio fa, da Edward Snowden sulle agenzie statunitensi che dimostra una tendenza generale, a livello europeo, verso un modello di sorveglianza indiscriminata”.

    Con l’obiettivo di porre un freno a questa tendenza, il 22 settembre di quest’anno il presidente del Gepd, Wojciech Wiewiórowski, ha comunicato di aver intentato un’azione legale di fronte alla Corte di giustizia dell’Unione europea per contestare la legittimità dei nuovi poteri attribuiti a Europol. Un momento chiave di questa vicenda è il gennaio 2022 quando l’ufficio del Gepd scopre che proprio l’Agenzia aveva conservato illegalmente un vasto archivio di dati sensibili di oltre 250mila persone, tra cui presunti terroristi o autori di reati, ma soprattutto di persone che erano entrate in contatto con loro. Secondo quanto ricostruito dal Guardian esisteva un’area di memoria (cache) detenuta dall’Agenzia contenente “almeno quattro petabyte, equivalenti a tre milioni di cd-rom” con dati raccolti nei sei anni precedenti dalle singole autorità di polizia nazionali. Il Garante ordina così di cancellare, entro un anno, tutti i dati più “vecchi” di sei mesi ma con un “colpo di mano” questa previsione viene spazzata via proprio con l’entrata in vigore del nuovo regolamento. “In particolare, due disposizioni della riforma rendono retroattivamente legali attività illegali svolte dall’Agenzia in passato -continua Berthélémy-. Ma se Europol può essere semplicemente esentata dai legislatori ogni volta che viene colta in flagrante, il sistema di controlli ed equilibri è intrinsecamente compromesso”.

    L’azione legale del Gepd ha però un ulteriore obiettivo. In gioco c’è infatti anche il “modello” che l’Europa adotterà in merito alla protezione dei dati: da un lato quello americano, basato sulla sorveglianza pressoché senza limiti, dall’altro il diritto alla protezione dei dati che può essere limitato solo per legge e con misure proporzionate, compatibili con una società democratica. Ma proprio su questo aspetto le istituzioni europee vacillano. “Il nuovo regolamento esplicita l’obiettivo generale della comunità delle forze dell’ordine: quello di poter utilizzare metodi di ‘polizia predittiva’ che hanno come finalità l’identificazione di individui che potranno potenzialmente essere coinvolti nella commissione di reati”, sottolinea ancora la ricercatrice. Significa, in altri termini, l’analisi di grandi quantità di dati predeterminati (come sesso e nazionalità) mediante algoritmi e tecniche basate sull’intelligenza artificiale che permetterebbero, secondo i promotori del modello, di stabilire preventivamente la pericolosità sociale di un individuo.

    “Questo approccio di polizia predittiva si sviluppa negli Stati Uniti a seguito degli attentati del 2001 -spiega Emilio De Capitani, già segretario della Commissione libertà civili (Libe) del Parlamento europeo dal 1998 al 2011 che da tempo si occupa dei temi legati alla raccolta dei dati-. Parallelamente, in quegli anni, inizia la pressione da parte della Commissione europea per sviluppare strumenti di raccolta dati e costruzione di database”.

    “Il nuovo regolamento esplicita l’obiettivo generale della comunità delle forze dell’ordine: quello di poter utilizzare metodi di ‘polizia predittiva’” – Chloé Berthélémy

    Fra i primi testi legislativi europei che si fondano sulla raccolta pressoché indiscriminata di informazioni c’è la Direttiva 681 del 2016 sulla raccolta dei dati dei passeggeri aerei (Pnr) come strumento “predittivo” per prevenire i reati di terrorismo e altri reati definiti come gravi. “Quando ognuno di noi prende un aereo alimenta due archivi: l’Advanced passenger information (Api), che raccoglie i dati risultanti dai documenti ufficiali come la carta di identità o il passaporto permettendo così di costruire la lista dei passeggeri imbarcati, e un secondo database in cui vengono versate anche tutte le informazioni raccolte dalla compagnia aerea per il contratto di trasporto (carta di credito, e-mail, esigenze alimentari, tipologia dei cibi, annotazioni relative a esigenze personali, etc.) -spiega De Capitani-. Su questi dati legati al contratto di trasporto viene fatto un controllo indiretto di sicurezza filtrando le informazioni in relazione a indicatori che potrebbero essere indizi di pericolosità e che permetterebbero di ‘sventare’ attacchi terroristici, possibili dirottamenti ma anche reati minori come la frode o la stessa violazione delle regole in materia di migrazione. Questo perché il testo della Direttiva ha formulazioni a dir poco ambigue e permette una raccolta spropositata di informazioni”. Tanto da costringere la Corte di giustizia dell’Ue, con una sentenza del giugno 2022 a reinterpretare in modo particolarmente restrittivo il testo legislativo specificando che “l’utilizzo di tali dati è permesso esclusivamente per lo stretto necessario”.

    L’esempio della raccolta dati legata ai Pnr è esemplificativo di un meccanismo che sempre di più caratterizza l’operato delle Agenzie europee: raccogliere un elevato numero di dati per finalità genericamente collegate alla sicurezza e con scarse informazioni sulla reale utilità di queste misure indiscriminatamente intrusive. “Alle nostre richieste parlamentari in cui chiedevamo quanti terroristi o criminali fossero stati intercettati grazie a questo sistema, che raccoglie miliardi di dati personali, la risposta è sempre stata evasiva -continua De Capitani-. È come aggiungere paglia mentre si cerca un ago. Il cittadino ci rimette due volte: non ha maggior sicurezza ma perde in termini di rispetto dei suoi diritti. E a perderci sono soprattutto le categorie meno protette, e gli stessi stranieri che vengono o transitano sul territorio europeo”.

    “Il cittadino ci rimette due volte: non ha maggior sicurezza ma perde in termini di rispetto dei suoi diritti. Soprattutto le categorie meno protette” – Emilio De Capitani

    I migranti in particolare diventano sempre più il “banco di prova” delle misure distopiche di sorveglianza messe in atto dalle istituzioni europee europee attraverso anche altri sistemi che si appoggiano anch’essi sempre più su algoritmi intesi a individuare comportamenti e caratteristiche “pericolose”. E in questo quadro Frontex, l’Agenzia che sorveglia le frontiere esterne europee gioca un ruolo di primo piano. Nel giugno 2022 ancora il Garante europeo ha emesso nei suoi confronti due pareri di vigilanza che sottolineano la presenza di regole “non sufficientemente chiare” sul trattamento dei dati personali dei soggetti interessati dalla sua attività e soprattutto “norme interne che sembrano ampliare il ruolo e la portata dell’Agenzia come autorità di contrasto”.

    Il Garante si riferisce a quelle categorie speciali come “i dati sanitari delle persone, i dati che rivelano l’origine razziale o etnica, i dati genetici” che vengono raccolti in seguito all’identificazione di persone potenzialmente coinvolte in reati transfrontalieri. Ma quel tipo di attività di contrasto non rientra nel mandato di Frontex come guardia di frontiera ma ricade eventualmente nelle competenze di un corpo di polizia i cui possibili abusi sarebbero comunque impugnabili davanti a un giudice nazionale o europeo. Quindi, conclude il Garante, il trattamento di questi dati dovrebbe essere protetto con “specifiche garanzie per evitare pratiche discriminatorie”.

    Ma secondo Chris Jones, direttore esecutivo del gruppo di ricerca indipendente Statewatch, il problema è a monte. Sono le stesse istituzioni europee a incaricare queste due agenzie di svolgere attività di sorveglianza. “Frontex ed Europol hanno sempre più poteri e maggior peso nella definizione delle priorità per lo sviluppo di nuove tecnologie di sicurezza e sorveglianza”, spiega. Un peso che ha portato, per esempio, a finanziare all’interno del piano strategico Horizon Europe 2020, che delinea il programma dell’Ue per la ricerca e l’innovazione dal 2021 al 2024, il progetto “Secure societies”. Grazie a un portafoglio di quasi 1,7 miliardi di euro è stata commissionata, tra gli altri, la ricerca “ITFlows” che ha come obiettivo quello di prevedere, attraverso l’utilizzo di strumenti di intelligenza artificiale, i flussi migratori. Il sistema predittivo, simile a quello descritto da Berthélémy, è basato su un modello per il quale, con una serie di informazioni storiche raccolte su un certo fenomeno, sarebbe possibile anticipare sugli eventi futuri.

    “Se i dati sono cattivi, la decisione sarà cattiva. Se la raccolta dei dati è viziata dal pregiudizio e dal razzismo, lo sarà anche il risultato finale” – Chris Jones

    “Se le mie previsioni mi dicono che arriveranno molte persone in un determinato confine, concentrerò maggiormente la mia sorveglianza su quella frontiera e potrò più facilmente respingerli”, osserva Yasha Maccanico, ricercatore di Statewatch. Sempre nell’ambito di “Secure societies” il progetto “iBorderCtrl” riguarda invece famigerati “rilevatori di bugie” pseudoscientifici che dedurrebbe lo stato emotivo, le intenzioni o lo stato mentale di una persona in base ai suoi dati biometrici. L’obiettivo è utilizzare questi strumenti per valutare la credibilità dei racconti dei richiedenti asilo nelle procedure di valutazione delle loro richieste di protezione. E in questo quadro sono fondamentali i dati su cui si basano queste predizioni: “Se i dati sono cattivi, la decisione sarà cattiva -continua Jones-. Se la raccolta dei dati è viziata dal pregiudizio e dal razzismo, lo sarà anche il risultato finale”. Per questi motivi AccessNow, che si occupa di tutela dei diritti umani nella sfera digitale, ha scritto una lettera (firmata anche da Edri e Statewatch) a fine settembre 2022 ai membri del consorzio ITFlows per chiedere di terminare lo sviluppo di questi sistemi.

    Anche sul tema dei migranti il legislatore europeo tenta di creare, come per Europol, una scappatoia per attuare politiche di per sé illegali. Nell’aprile 2021 la Commissione europea ha proposto un testo per regolamentare l’utilizzo dell’intelligenza artificiale e degli strumenti basati su di essa (sistemi di videosorveglianza, identificazione biometrica e così via) escludendo però l’applicazione delle tutele previste nei confronti dei cittadini che provengono da Paesi terzi. “Rispetto ai sistemi di intelligenza artificiale quello che conta è il contesto e il fine con cui vengono utilizzati. Individuare la presenza di un essere umano al buio può essere positivo ma se questo sistema è applicato a un confine per ‘respingere’ la persona diventa uno strumento che favorisce la lesione di un diritto fondamentale -spiega Caterina Rodelli analista politica di AccessNow-. Si punta a creare due regimi differenti in cui i diritti dei cittadini di Paesi terzi non sono tutelati come quelli degli europei: non per motivi ‘tecnici’ ma politici”. Gli effetti di scarse tutele per gli uni, i migranti, ricadono però su tutti. “Per un motivo molto semplice. L’Ue, a differenza degli Usa, prevede espressamente il diritto alla tutela della vita privata nelle sue Carte fondamentali -conclude De Capitani-. Protezione che nasce dalle più o meno recenti dittature che hanno vissuto gli Stati membri: l’assunto è che chi è o si ‘sente’ controllato non è libero. Basta questo per capire perché sottende l’adozione di politiche ‘predittive’ e la riforma di Europol o lo strapotere di Frontex, stiano diventando un problema di tutti perché rischiano di violare la Carta dei diritti fondamentali”.

    https://altreconomia.it/sorvegliare-in-nome-della-sicurezza-le-agenzie-ue-vogliono-carta-bianca
    #surveillance #biométrie #AI #intelligence_artificielle #migrations #réfugiés #Etat_de_droit #données #protection_des_données #règlement #identification #police_prédictive #algorythme #base_de_données #Advanced_passenger_information (#Api) #avion #transport_aérien #Secure_societies #ITFlows #iBorderCtrl #asile #

    • New Europol rules massively expand police powers and reduce rights protections

      The new rules governing Europol, which came into force at the end of June, massively expand the tasks and powers of the EU’s policing agency whilst reducing external scrutiny of its data processing operations and rights protections for individuals, says a report published today by Statewatch.

      Given Europol’s role as a ‘hub’ for information processing and exchange between EU member states and other entities, the new rules thus increase the powers of all police forces and other agencies that cooperate with Europol, argues the report, Empowering the police, removing protections (https://www.statewatch.org/publications/reports-and-books/empowering-the-police-removing-protections-the-new-europol-regulation).

      New tasks granted to Europol include supporting the EU’s network of police “special intervention units” and managing a cooperation platform for coordinating joint police operations, known as EMPACT. However, it is the rules governing the processing and exchange of data that have seen the most significant changes.

      Europol is now allowed to process vast quantities of data transferred to it by member states on people who may be entirely innocent and have no link whatsoever to any criminal activity, a move that legalises a previously-illegal activity for which Europol was admonished by the European Data Protection Supervisor.

      The agency can now process “investigative data” which, as long it relates to “a specific criminal investigation”, could cover anyone, anywhere, and has been granted the power to conduct “research and innovation” projects. These will be geared towards the use of big data, machine learning and ‘artificial intelligence’ techniques, for which it can process sensitive data such as genetic data or ethnic background.

      Europol can now also use data received from non-EU states to enter “information alerts” in the Schengen Information System database and provide “third-country sourced biometric data” to national police forces, increasing the likelihood of data obtained in violation of human rights being ‘laundered’ in European policing and raising the possibility of third states using Europol as a conduit to harass political opponents and dissidents.

      The new rules substantially loosen restrictions on international data transfers, allowing the agency’s management board to authorise transfers of personal data to third states and international organisations without a legal agreement in place – whilst priority states for international cooperation include dictatorships and authoritarian states such as Algeria, Egypt, Turkey and Morocco.

      At the same time, independent external oversight of the agency’s data processing has been substantially reduced. The threshold for referring new data processing activities to the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) for external scrutiny has been raised, and if Europol decides that new data processing operations “are particularly urgent and necessary to prevent and combat an immediate threat,” it can simply consult the EDPS and then start processing data without waiting for a response.

      The agency is now required to employ a Fundamental Rights Officer (FRO), but the role clearly lacks independence: the FRO will be appointed by the Management Board “upon a proposal of the Executive Director,” and “shall report directly to the Executive Director”.

      Chris Jones, Director of Statewatch, said:

      “The proposals to increase Europol’s powers were published six months after the Black Lives Matter movement erupted across the world, calling for new ways to ensure public safety that looked beyond the failed, traditional model of policing.

      With the new rules agreed in June, the EU has decided to reinforce that model, encouraging Europol and the member states to hoover up vast quantities of data, develop ‘artificial intelligence’ technologies to examine it, and increase cooperation with states with appalling human rights records.”

      Yasha Maccanico, a Researcher at Statewatch, said:

      “Europol has landed itself in hot water with the European Data Protection Supervisor three times in the last year for breaking data protection rules – yet the EU’s legislators have decided to reduce the EDPS’ supervisory powers. Independent, critical scrutiny and oversight of the EU’s policing agency has never been more needed.”

      The report (https://www.statewatch.org/publications/reports-and-books/empowering-the-police-removing-protections-the-new-europol-regulation) has been published alongside an interactive ’map’ of EU agencies and ’interoperable’ policing and migration databases (https://www.statewatch.org/eu-agencies-and-interoperable-databases), designed to aid understanding and further research on the data architecture in the EU’s area of freedom, security and justice.

      https://www.statewatch.org/news/2022/november/new-europol-rules-massively-expand-police-powers-and-reduce-rights-prote
      #interopérabilité #carte #visualisation

    • EU agencies and interoperable databases

      This map provides a visual representation of, and information on, the data architecture in the European Union’s “area of freedom, security and justice”. It shows the EU’s large-scale databases, networked information systems (those that are part of the ’Prüm’ network), EU agencies, national authorities and international organisations (namely Interpol) that have a role in that architecture. It is intended to facilitate understanding and further investigation into that architecture and the agencies and activities associated with it.

      https://www.statewatch.org/eu-agencies-and-interoperable-databases
      #réseau #prüm_II

  • EU’s Frontex Tripped in Its Plan for ‘Intrusive’ Surveillance of Migrants

    Frontex and the European Commission sidelined their own data protection watchdogs in pursuing a much-criticised expansion of “intrusive” data collection from migrants and refugees to feed into Europol’s vast criminal databases, BIRN can reveal.

    On November 17 last year, when Hervé Yves Caniard entered the 14-floor conference room of the European Union border agency Frontex in Warsaw, European newspapers were flooded with stories of refugees a few hundreds kilometres away, braving the cold at the Belarusian border with Poland.

    A 14-year-old Kurd had died from hypothermia a few days earlier; Polish security forces were firing teargas and water cannon to push people back.

    The unfolding crisis was likely a topic of discussion at the Frontex Management Board meeting, but so too was a longer-term policy goal concerning migrants and refugees: the expansion of a mass surveillance programme at Europe’s external borders.

    PeDRA, or ‘Processing of Personal Data for Risk Analysis,’ had begun in 2016 as a way for Frontex and the EU police body Europol to exchange data in the wake of the November 2015 Paris attacks by Islamist militants that French authorities had linked to Europe’s then snowballing refugee crisis.

    At the November 2021 meeting, Caniard and his boss, Frontex’s then executive director, Fabrice Leggeri, were proposing to ramp it up dramatically, allowing Frontex border guards to collect what some legal experts have called ‘intrusive’ personal data from migrants and asylum seekers, including genetic data and sexual orientation; to store, analyse and share that data with Europol and security agencies of member states; and to scrape social media profiles, all on the premise of cracking down on ‘illegal’ migration and terrorism.

    The expanded PeDRA programme would target not just individuals suspected of cross-border crimes such as human trafficking but also the witnesses and victims.

    Caniard, the veteran head of the Frontex Legal Unit, had been appointed that August by fellow Frenchman Leggeri to lead the drafting of the new set of internal PeDRA rules. Caniard was also interim director of the agency’s Governance Support Centre, which reported directly to Leggeri, and as such was in a position to control internal vetting of the new PeDRA plan.

    That vetting was seriously undermined, according minutes of board meetings leaked by insiders and internal documents obtained via Freedom of Information requests submitted by BIRN.

    The evidence gathered by BIRN point to an effort by the Frontex leadership under Leggeri, backed by the European Commission, to sideline EU data protection watchdogs in order to push through the plan, regardless of warnings of institutional overreach, threats to privacy and the criminalisation of migrants.

    Nayra Perez, Frontex’s own Data Protection Officer, DPO, warned repeatedly that the PeDRA expansion “cannot be achieved by breaching compliance with EU legislation” and that the programme posed “a serious risk of function creep in relation to the Agency’s mandate.” But her input was largely ignored, documents reveal.

    The DPO warned of the possibility of Frontex data being transmitted in bulk, “carte blanche”, to Europol, a body which this year was ordered to delete much of a vast store of personal data that it was found to have amassed unlawfully by the EU’s top data protection watchdog, the European Data Protection Supervisor, EDPS.

    Backed by the Commission, Frontex ignored a DPO recommendation that it consult the EDPS, currently led by Polish Wojciech Wiewiórowski, over the new PeDRA rules. In a response for this story, the EDPS warned of the possibility of “unlawful” processing of data by Frontex.

    Having initially told BIRN that the DPO’s “advisory and auditing role” had been respected throughout the process, shortly before publication of this story Frontex conceded that Perez’s office “could have been involved more closely to the drafting and entrusted with the role of the chair of the Board”, an ad hoc body tasked with drafting the PeDRA rules.

    In June, the EDPS asked Frontex to make multiple amendments to the expanded surveillance programme in order to bring it into line with EU data protection standards; Frontex told BIRN it had now entrusted the DPO to redraft “relevant MB [Management Board] decisions in line with the EDPS recommendations and lessons learned.”

    Dr Niovi Vavoula, an expert in EU privacy and criminal law at Queen Mary University of London, said that the expanded PeDRA programme risked the “discriminatory criminalisation” of innocent people, prejudicing the outcomes of criminal proceedings against those flagged as “suspects” by Frontex border guards.

    As written, the revamped PeDRA “is another piece of the puzzle of the emerging surveillance and criminalisation of migrants and refugees,” she said.

    Religious beliefs, sexual orientation

    Leggeri had long held a vision of Frontex as more than simply a ‘border management’ body, one that would see it working in tandem with Europol in matters of law enforcement; to this end, both agencies have been keen to loosen restrictions on the exchange of personal data between them.

    Almost six years to the day before the Warsaw PeDRA meeting, a gun and bomb attack by Islamist militants killed 130 people in Paris. It was November 13, 2015, at the height of the refugee crisis in the Mediterranean and Aegean Seas.

    The following month, Leggeri signed a deal with the then head of Europol, Briton Richard Wainwright, which opened the door to the exchange of personal data between the two agencies. Addressing the UK parliament, Wainwright described a “symbiotic” relationship between the agencies in protecting the EU’s borders. In early 2016, a PeDRA pilot project launched in Italy, quickly followed by Greece and Spain.

    At the same time, Europol launched its own parallel programme of so-called Secondary Security Checks on migrants and refugees in often cramped, squalid camps in Italy and Greece using facial recognition technology. The checks, most recently expanded to refugees from Ukraine in Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovakia and Moldova, were introduced “in order to identify suspected terrorists and criminals” but Europol is tight-lipped about the criteria determining who gets checked and what happens with the data obtained.

    Since the launch of PeDRA, Frontex officers have been gathering information from newly-arrived migrants concerning individuals suspected of involvement in smuggling, trafficking or terrorism and transmitting the data to Europol in the form of “personal data packages,” which are then cross-checked against and stored within its criminal databases.

    According to its figures, under the PeDRA programme, Frontex has shared the personal data – e.g. names, personal descriptions and phone numbers – of 11,254 people with Europol between 2016 and 2021.

    But the 2015 version of the PEDRA programme was only its first incarnation.

    Until 2019, rules governing Frontex meant that its capacity to collect and exchange the personal data of migrants had been strictly limited.

    In December 2021, after years of acrimonious legal wrangling, the Frontex Management Board – comprising representatives of the 27 EU member states and the European Commission – gave the green light to the expansion of PeDRA.

    Under the new rules, which have yet to enter into force, Frontex border guards will be able to collect a much wider range of sensitive personal data from all migrants, including genetic and biometric data, such as DNA, fingerprints or photographs, information on their political and religious beliefs, and sexual orientation.

    The agency told BIRN it had not yet started processing personal data “related to sexual orientation” but that the collection of such information may be necessary to “determine whether suspects who appear to be similar are in fact the same.”

    In terms of social media monitoring, Frontex said it had not decided yet whether to take advantage of such a tool; minutes of a joint meeting in April, however, show that Frontex and Europol agreed on “strengthening cooperation on social media monitoring”.

    Indeed, in 2019, Frontex published plans to pay a surveillance company 400,000 euros to track people on social media, including “civil society and diaspora communities” within the EU, but abandoned it in November of that year after Privacy International questioned the legality of the plan.

    Yet, under the expanded PeDRA, Vavoula, of Queen Mary University, said Frontex officers could be tasked without scraping social media profiles “without restrictions”.

    Commenting on the entire programme, she added that PeDRA “could not have been drafted by someone with a deep knowledge of data protection law”. She cited numerous violations of elementary data protection safeguards, especially for children, the elderly and other vulnerable individuals, who should generally be treated differently from other subjects.

    “Sufficient procedural safeguards should be introduced to ensure the protection of fundamental rights of children to the fullest possible extent including the requirement of justified reasons of such a processing of personal data,” Vavoula said. “Genetic data is much more sensitive than biometric data,” and therefore requires “specific safeguards” not present in the text.

    Vavoula also noted the absence of a “maximum retention period,” warning, “Frontex may retain the data forever.”
    Internal dissent swept aside

    Internal documents seen by BIRN show that the man tasked by Leggeri to oversee the drafting of the new PeDRA rules, Caniard, ignored objections raised by the agency’s own data protection watchdog.

    Perez, a Spanish lawyer and Frontex’s DPO, has the task of monitoring the agency’s compliance with EU data protection laws not only concerning the thousands of migrants whose data will be stored in its databases but also of the agency’s rapidly expanding staff base, currently numbering more than 1,900 but soon to include a ‘standing corps’ of up to 10,000 border guards.

    She had also been working on earlier drafts of the new PeDRA rules since 2018, only to be leapfrogged by Caniard when he was appointed by Leggeri in August 2021.

    When she was shown an advanced draft of the new PeDRA rules in October 2021, Perez did not mince her words. “The process of drafting the new rules de facto encroaches on the tasks legally assigned to the DPO,” she said in an internal Frontex document obtained by BIRN. “When the DPO issues an opinion, such advice cannot be overruled or amended.”

    The DPO proposed more than a hundred changes to the draft; she warned that, under the proposed rules, Frontex “seems to arrogate the capacity to police the internet” through monitoring of social media and that victims and witnesses of crime whose data is shared with Europol face “undesirable consequences” of being part of a “pan-European criminal database.”

    During intense internal discussions in late 2021, as the deadline for approving the new rules was fast approaching, the DPO said that Frontex had failed to make a compelling case for the collection of sensitive data such as ethnicity or sexual orientation.

    “…the legal threshold to be met is not a ‘nice to have’ but a strict necessity,” Perez wrote.

    When the final draft landed on the desk of the Frontex Management Board in November 2021, it was clear that many of the DPO’s recommendations had been disregarded.

    At this point, Frontex was already the target of a probe by the European Anti-Fraud Office into its role in so-called ‘pushbacks’ in which migrants are illegally turned away at the EU’s borders, the findings of which would eventually force Leggeri’s resignation in April this year.

    In an initial written response for this story, Frontex said that the DPO “had an active, pivotal role in the deliberations” concerning the new rules and that the watchdog’s “advisory and auditing role was respected” throughout the process.

    Minutes of the November board meeting appeared to contradict this, however. Written in English and partially disclosed following an ‘access to documents request’, they cite Caniard conceding that the DPO was “consulted twice with a very short notice” and that, since Perez issued her opinion only the day before the meeting, there “was no possibility to take stock of it”. Perez submitted her opinion on November 16 and the board meeting was held on November 17 and 18.

    The DPO, for its part, urged the management board to “work on the current draft to eliminate inconsistencies” and, though not legally obliged, “to consult the EDPS prior to adoption”.

    Prior to publication of this story, BIRN asked Frontex again whether the DPO’s mandate had been respected during the drafting of the new PeDRA rules. The agency backtracked, saying it should have involved Perez’s office more closely and that the DPO would rewrite the programme.

    Dissent was not confined to the DPO. Danish and Dutch representatives in the meeting urged the board to delay voting on the rules given that the DPO’s opinions had not been taken on board and to “do its utmost to avoid any situation where it is necessary to amend rules just adopted just because an EDPS’ conflicting opinion is issued.”

    According to the minutes of the November meeting, the Commission representative, however, dismissed this, declaring that it considered the text “more than mature for adoption” and that there was no need to consult the EDPS because “it is not mandatory”.

    Email exchanges between the Commission and Frontex reveal the urgency with which the Commission wanted the new rules adopted, even at the cost of foregoing EDPS participation.

    One, from the Commission to Frontex on November 14, 2021, just days before the Board meeting said that, “while it would have been good to consult the EDPS on everything, it is more important now to get at least the two first decisions adopted.” An earlier mail, from July 2021 and sent directly to Leggeri, said it was “an absolute political priority to put in place the data protection framework of the Agency without any further delays.” That framework included the processing of personal data under PeDRA.

    Asked why it supported the expansion of the Frontex surveillance programme without first having the proposal checked by EDPS, the Commission told BIRN it would not comment on “discussion held in the management board or other internal meetings.”

    The EDPS, the EU’s top data protection authority, was only shown a copy of the new rules in late January 2022.

    Asked for its opinion, the EDPS told BIRN it is “concerned that the rules adopted do not specify with sufficient clarity how the intended processing will be carried out, nor define precisely how safeguards on data protection will be implemented.”

    The processing of highly vulnerable categories of individuals, including asylum seekers, could pose “severe risks for fundamental rights and freedoms,” such as the right to asylum, it said. It further stressed that “routine”, i.e. systematic, exchange of personal data between Frontex and Europol is not permitted and that such exchange can only take place “on a case-by-case basis.”
    Collecting data with ‘religious’ fervour

    Experts question the effectiveness of such extensive data collection in combating serious crime.

    Douwe Korff, Emeritus Professor of international law at London Metropolitan University, decried the apparent lack of results and accountability.

    “There isn’t even the absolute minimum requirement for law enforcement authorities to provide serious proof that the expansion of surveillance powers will be effective and proportionate,” said Korff, who has contributed to research on mass surveillance for EU institutions for years.

    “If you ask how many people have you arrested using this data that are completely innocent, they don’t even want to know about this. They pursue this policy of mass data collection with a religious belief.”

    Indeed, when the EDPS ordered Europol in January to delete data amassed unlawfully concerning individuals with no link to criminal activity, member states and the Commission came to the rescue with legal amendments enabling the agency to sidestep the order.

    In May, Frontex and Europol put forward a proposal, drafted by a joint working group named ‘The Future Group’, for a new surveillance programme at the bloc’s external borders that would implement large-scale profiling of EU and third-country nationals using Artificial Intelligence.

    https://balkaninsight.com/2022/07/07/eus-frontex-tripped-in-plan-for-intrusive-surveillance-of-migrants
    #surveillance #migrations #asile #réfugiés #frontières #Frontex #données #Europol #PeDRA #Processing_of_Personal_Data_for_Risk_Analysis #Caniard #Hervé_Yves_Caniard #Leggeri #Fabrice_Leggeri #Nayra_Perez #Italie #Grèce #Espagne #Secondary_Security_Checks #données_personnelles

  • Schengen : de nouvelles règles pour rendre l’espace sans contrôles aux #frontières_intérieures plus résilient

    La Commission propose aujourd’hui des règles actualisées pour renforcer la gouvernance de l’espace Schengen. Les modifications ciblées renforceront la coordination au niveau de l’UE et offriront aux États membres des outils améliorés pour faire face aux difficultés qui surviennent dans la gestion tant des frontières extérieures communes de l’UE que des frontières intérieures au sein de l’espace Schengen. L’actualisation des règles vise à faire en sorte que la réintroduction des #contrôles_aux_frontières_intérieures demeure une mesure de dernier recours. Les nouvelles règles créent également des outils communs pour gérer plus efficacement les frontières extérieures en cas de crise de santé publique, grâce aux enseignements tirés de la pandémie de COVID-19. L’#instrumentalisation des migrants est également prise en compte dans cette mise à jour des règles de Schengen, ainsi que dans une proposition parallèle portant sur les mesures que les États membres pourront prendre dans les domaines de l’asile et du retour dans une telle situation.

    Margaritis Schinas, vice-président chargé de la promotion de notre mode de vie européen, s’est exprimé en ces termes : « La crise des réfugiés de 2015, la vague d’attentats terroristes sur le sol européen et la pandémie de COVID-19 ont mis l’espace Schengen à rude épreuve. Il est de notre responsabilité de renforcer la gouvernance de Schengen et de faire en sorte que les États membres soient équipés pour offrir une réaction rapide, coordonnée et européenne en cas de crise, y compris lorsque des migrants sont instrumentalisés. Grâce aux propositions présentées aujourd’hui, nous fortifierons ce “joyau” si emblématique de notre mode de vie européen. »

    Ylva Johansson, commissaire aux affaires intérieures, a quant à elle déclaré : « La pandémie a montré très clairement que l’espace Schengen est essentiel pour nos économies et nos sociétés. Grâce aux propositions présentées aujourd’hui, nous ferons en sorte que les contrôles aux frontières ne soient rétablis qu’en dernier recours, sur la base d’une évaluation commune et uniquement pour la durée nécessaire. Nous dotons les États membres des outils leur permettant de relever les défis auxquels ils sont confrontés. Et nous veillons également à gérer ensemble les frontières extérieures de l’UE, y compris dans les situations où les migrants sont instrumentalisés à des fins politiques. »

    Réaction coordonnée aux menaces communes

    La proposition de modification du code frontières Schengen vise à tirer les leçons de la pandémie de COVID-19 et à garantir la mise en place de mécanismes de coordination solides pour faire face aux menaces sanitaires. Les règles actualisées permettront au Conseil d’adopter rapidement des règles contraignantes fixant des restrictions temporaires des déplacements aux frontières extérieures en cas de menace pour la santé publique. Des dérogations seront prévues, y compris pour les voyageurs essentiels ainsi que pour les citoyens et résidents de l’Union. L’application uniforme des restrictions en matière de déplacements sera ainsi garantie, en s’appuyant sur l’expérience acquise ces dernières années.

    Les règles comprennent également un nouveau mécanisme de sauvegarde de Schengen destiné à générer une réaction commune aux frontières intérieures en cas de menaces touchant la majorité des États membres, par exemple des menaces sanitaires ou d’autres menaces pour la sécurité intérieure et l’ordre public. Grâce à ce mécanisme, qui complète le mécanisme applicable en cas de manquements aux frontières extérieures, les vérifications aux frontières intérieures dans la majorité des États membres pourraient être autorisées par une décision du Conseil en cas de menace commune. Une telle décision devrait également définir des mesures atténuant les effets négatifs des contrôles.

    De nouvelles règles visant à promouvoir des alternatives effectives aux vérifications aux frontières intérieures

    La proposition vise à promouvoir le recours à d’autres mesures que les contrôles aux frontières intérieures et à faire en sorte que, lorsqu’ils sont nécessaires, les contrôles aux frontières intérieures restent une mesure de dernier recours. Ces mesures sont les suivantes :

    - Une procédure plus structurée pour toute réintroduction des contrôles aux frontières intérieures, comportant davantage de garanties : Actuellement, tout État membre qui décide de réintroduire des contrôles doit évaluer le caractère adéquat de cette réintroduction et son incidence probable sur la libre circulation des personnes. En application des nouvelles règles, il devra en outre évaluer l’impact sur les régions frontalières. Par ailleurs, tout État membre envisageant de prolonger les contrôles en réaction à des menaces prévisibles devrait d’abord évaluer si d’autres mesures, telles que des contrôles de police ciblés et une coopération policière renforcée, pourraient être plus adéquates. Une évaluation des risques devrait être fournie pour ce qui concerne les prolongations de plus de 6 mois. Lorsque des contrôles intérieurs auront été rétablis depuis 18 mois, la Commission devra émettre un avis sur leur caractère proportionné et sur leur nécessité. Dans tous les cas, les contrôles temporaires aux frontières ne devraient pas excéder une durée totale de 2 ans, sauf dans des circonstances très particulières. Il sera ainsi fait en sorte que les contrôles aux frontières intérieures restent une mesure de dernier recours et ne durent que le temps strictement nécessaire.
    – Promouvoir le recours à d’autres mesures : Conformément au nouveau code de coopération policière de l’UE, proposé par la Commission le 8 décembre 2021, les nouvelles règles de Schengen encouragent le recours à des alternatives effectives aux contrôles aux frontières intérieures, sous la forme de contrôles de police renforcés et plus opérationnels dans les régions frontalières, en précisant qu’elles ne sont pas équivalentes aux contrôles aux frontières.
    - Limiter les répercussions des contrôles aux frontières intérieures sur les régions frontalières : Eu égard aux enseignements tirés de la pandémie, qui a grippé les chaînes d’approvisionnement, les États membres rétablissant des contrôles devraient prendre des mesures pour limiter les répercussions négatives sur les régions frontalières et le marché intérieur. Il pourra s’agir notamment de faciliter le franchissement d’une frontière pour les travailleurs frontaliers et d’établir des voies réservées pour garantir un transit fluide des marchandises essentielles.
    - Lutter contre les déplacements non autorisés au sein de l’espace Schengen : Afin de lutter contre le phénomène de faible ampleur mais constant des déplacements non autorisés, les nouvelles règles créeront une nouvelle procédure pour contrer ce phénomène au moyen d’opérations de police conjointes et permettre aux États membres de réviser ou de conclure de nouveaux accords bilatéraux de réadmission entre eux. Ces mesures complètent celles proposées dans le cadre du nouveau pacte sur la migration et l’asile, en particulier le cadre de solidarité contraignant, et doivent être envisagées en liaison avec elles.

    Aider les États membres à gérer les situations d’instrumentalisation des flux migratoires

    Les règles de Schengen révisées reconnaissent l’importance du rôle que jouent les États membres aux frontières extérieures pour le compte de tous les États membres et de l’Union dans son ensemble. Elles prévoient de nouvelles mesures que les États membres pourront prendre pour gérer efficacement les frontières extérieures de l’UE en cas d’instrumentalisation de migrants à des fins politiques. Ces mesures consistent notamment à limiter le nombre de points de passage frontaliers et à intensifier la surveillance des frontières.

    La Commission propose en outre des mesures supplémentaires dans le cadre des règles de l’UE en matière d’asile et de retour afin de préciser les modalités de réaction des États membres en pareilles situations, dans le strict respect des droits fondamentaux. Ces mesures comprennent notamment la possibilité de prolonger le délai d’enregistrement des demandes d’asile jusqu’à 4 semaines et d’examiner toutes les demandes d’asile à la frontière, sauf en ce qui concerne les cas médicaux. Il convient de continuer à garantir un accès effectif à la procédure d’asile, et les États membres devraient permettre l’accès des organisations humanitaires qui fournissent une aide. Les États membres auront également la possibilité de mettre en place une procédure d’urgence pour la gestion des retours. Enfin, sur demande, les agences de l’UE (Agence de l’UE pour l’asile, Frontex, Europol) devraient apporter en priorité un soutien opérationnel à l’État membre concerné.

    Prochaines étapes

    Il appartient à présent au Parlement européen et au Conseil d’examiner et d’adopter les deux propositions.

    Contexte

    L’espace Schengen compte plus de 420 millions de personnes dans 26 pays. La suppression des contrôles aux frontières intérieures entre les États Schengen fait partie intégrante du mode de vie européen : près de 1,7 million de personnes résident dans un État Schengen et travaillent dans un autre. Les personnes ont bâti leur vie autour des libertés offertes par l’espace Schengen, et 3,5 millions d’entre elles se déplacent chaque jour entre des États Schengen.

    Afin de renforcer la résilience de l’espace Schengen face aux menaces graves et d’adapter les règles de Schengen aux défis en constante évolution, la Commission a annoncé, dans son nouveau pacte sur la migration et l’asile présenté en septembre 2020, ainsi que dans la stratégie de juin 2021 pour un espace Schengen pleinement opérationnel et résilient, qu’elle proposerait une révision du code frontières Schengen. Dans son discours sur l’état de l’Union de 2021, la présidente von der Leyen a également annoncé de nouvelles mesures pour contrer l’instrumentalisation des migrants à des fins politiques et pour assurer l’unité dans la gestion des frontières extérieures de l’UE.

    Les propositions présentées ce jour viennent s’ajouter aux travaux en cours visant à améliorer le fonctionnement global et la gouvernance de Schengen dans le cadre de la stratégie pour un espace Schengen plus fort et plus résilient. Afin de favoriser le dialogue politique visant à relever les défis communs, la Commission organise régulièrement des forums Schengen réunissant des membres du Parlement européen et les ministres de l’intérieur. À l’appui de ces discussions, la Commission présentera chaque année un rapport sur l’état de Schengen résumant la situation en ce qui concerne l’absence de contrôles aux frontières intérieures, les résultats des évaluations de Schengen et l’état d’avancement de la mise en œuvre des recommandations. Cela contribuera également à aider les États membres à relever tous les défis auxquels ils pourraient être confrontés. La proposition de révision du mécanisme d’évaluation et de contrôle de Schengen, actuellement en cours d’examen au Parlement européen et au Conseil, contribuera à renforcer la confiance commune dans la mise en œuvre des règles de Schengen. Le 8 décembre, la Commission a également proposé un code de coopération policière de l’UE destiné à renforcer la coopération des services répressifs entre les États membres, qui constitue un moyen efficace de faire face aux menaces pesant sur la sécurité dans l’espace Schengen et contribuera à la préservation d’un espace sans contrôles aux frontières intérieures.

    La proposition de révision du code frontières Schengen qui est présentée ce jour fait suite à des consultations étroites auprès des membres du Parlement européen et des ministres de l’intérieur réunis au sein du forum Schengen.

    Pour en savoir plus

    Documents législatifs :

    – Proposition de règlement modifiant le régime de franchissement des frontières par les personnes : https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/proposal-regulation-rules-governing-movement-persons-across-borders-com-20

    – Proposition de règlement visant à faire face aux situations d’instrumentalisation dans le domaine de la migration et de l’asile : https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/proposal-regulation-situations-instrumentalisation-field-migration-and-asy

    – Questions-réponses : https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/qanda_21_6822

    – Fiche d’information : https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/fs_21_6838

    https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/fr/ip_21_6821

    #Schengen #Espace_Schengen #frontières #frontières_internes #résilience #contrôles_frontaliers #migrations #réfugiés #asile #crise #pandémie #covid-19 #coronavirus #crise_sanitaire #code_Schengen #code_frontières_Schengen #menace_sanitaire #frontières_extérieures #mobilité #restrictions #déplacements #ordre_public #sécurité #sécurité_intérieure #menace_commune #vérifications #coopération_policière #contrôles_temporaires #temporaire #dernier_recours #régions_frontalières #marchandises #voies_réservées #déplacements_non_autorisés #opérations_de_police_conjointes #pacte #surveillance #surveillance_frontalière #points_de_passage #Frontex #Europol #soutien_opérationnel

    –—

    Ajouté dans la métaliste sur les #patrouilles_mixtes ce paragraphe :

    « Lutter contre les déplacements non autorisés au sein de l’espace Schengen : Afin de lutter contre le phénomène de faible ampleur mais constant des déplacements non autorisés, les nouvelles règles créeront une nouvelle procédure pour contrer ce phénomène au moyen d’opérations de police conjointes et permettre aux États membres de réviser ou de conclure de nouveaux accords bilatéraux de réadmission entre eux. Ces mesures complètent celles proposées dans le cadre du nouveau pacte sur la migration et l’asile, en particulier le cadre de solidarité contraignant, et doivent être envisagées en liaison avec elles. »

    https://seenthis.net/messages/910352

    • La Commission européenne propose de réformer les règles de Schengen pour préserver la #libre_circulation

      Elle veut favoriser la coordination entre États membres et adapter le code Schengen aux nouveaux défis que sont les crise sanitaires et l’instrumentalisation de la migration par des pays tiers.

      Ces dernières années, les attaques terroristes, les mouvements migratoires et la pandémie de Covid-19 ont ébranlé le principe de libre circulation en vigueur au sein de l’espace Schengen. Pour faire face à ces événements et phénomènes, les pays Schengen (vingt-deux pays de l’Union européenne et la Suisse, le Liechtenstein, la Norvège et l’Islande) ont réintroduit plus souvent qu’à leur tour des contrôles aux frontières internes de la zone, en ordre dispersé, souvent, et, dans le cas de l’Allemagne, de l’Autriche, de la France, du Danemark, de la Norvège et de la Suède, de manière « provisoirement permanente ».
      Consciente des risques qui pèsent sur le principe de libre circulation, grâce à laquelle 3,5 millions de personnes passent quotidiennement d’un État membre à l’autre, sans contrôle, la Commission européenne a proposé mardi de revoir les règles du Code Schengen pour les adapter aux nouveaux défis. « Nous devons faire en sorte que la fermeture des frontières intérieures soit un ultime recours », a déclaré le vice-président de la Commission en charge de la Promotion du mode de vie européen, Margaritis Schinas.
      Plus de coordination entre États membres

      Pour éviter le chaos connu au début de la pandémie, la Commission propose de revoir la procédure en vertu de laquelle un État membre peut réintroduire des contrôles aux frontières internes de Schengen. Pour les événements « imprévisibles », les contrôles aux frontières pourraient être instaurés pour une période de trente jours, extensibles jusqu’à trois mois (contre dix jours et deux mois actuellement) ; pour les événements prévisibles, elle propose des périodes renouvelables de six mois jusqu’à un maximum de deux ans… ou plus si les circonstances l’exigent. Les États membres devraient évaluer l’impact de ces mesures sur les régions frontalières et tenter de le minimiser - pour les travailleurs frontaliers, au nombre de 1,7 million dans l’Union, et le transit de marchandises essentielle, par exemple - et et envisager des mesures alternatives, comme des contrôles de police ciblés ou une coopération policière transfrontalières.
      Au bout de dix-huit mois, la Commission émettrait un avis sur la nécessité et la proportionnalité de ces mesures.
      De nouvelles règles pour empêcher les migrations secondaires

      L’exécutif européen propose aussi d’établir un cadre légal, actuellement inexistant, pour lutter contre les « migrations secondaires ». L’objectif est de faire en sorte qu’une personne en situation irrégulière dans l’UE qui traverse une frontière interne puisse être renvoyée dans l’État d’où elle vient. Une mesure de nature à satisfaire les pays du Nord, dont la Belgique, qui se plaignent de voir arriver ou transiter sur leur territoire des migrants n’ayant pas déposé de demandes d’asile dans leur pays de « première entrée », souvent situé au sud de l’Europe. La procédure réclame des opérations de police conjointes et des accords de réadmission entre États membres. « Notre réponse la plus systémique serait un accord sur le paquet migratoire », proposé par la Commission en septembre 2020, a cependant insisté le vice-président Schengen. Mais les États membres ne sont pas en mesure de trouver de compromis, en raison de positions trop divergentes.
      L’Europe doit se préparer à de nouvelles instrumentalisations de la migration

      La Commission veut aussi apporter une réponse à l’instrumentalisation de la migration telle que celle pratiquée par la Biélorussie, qui a fait venir des migrants sur son sol pour les envoyer vers la Pologne et les États baltes afin de faire pression sur les Vingt-sept. La Commission veut définir la façon dont les États membres peuvent renforcer la surveillance de leur frontière, limiter les points d’accès à leur territoire, faire appel à la solidarité européenne, tout en respectant les droits fondamentaux des migrants.
      Actuellement, « la Commission peut seulement faire des recommandations qui, si elles sont adoptées par le Conseil, ne sont pas toujours suivies d’effet », constate la commissaire aux Affaires intérieures Ylva Johansson.
      Pour faire face à l’afflux migratoire venu de Biélorussie, la Pologne avait notamment pratiqué le refoulement, contraire aux règles européennes en matière d’asile, sans que l’on donne l’impression de s’en émouvoir à Bruxelles et dans les autres capitales de l’Union. Pour éviter que cela se reproduise, la Commission propose des mesures garantissant la possibilité de demander l’asile, notamment en étendant à quatre semaines la période pour qu’une demande soit enregistrée et traitée. Les demandes pourront être examinée à la frontière, ce qui implique que l’État membre concerné devrait donner l’accès aux zones frontalières aux organisations humanitaires.

      La présidence française du Conseil, qui a fait de la réforme de Schengen une de ses priorités, va essayer de faire progresser le paquet législatif dans les six mois qui viennent. « Ces mesures constituent une ensemble nécessaire et robuste, qui devrait permettre de préserver Schengen intact », a assuré le vice-président Schinas. Non sans souligner que la solution systémique et permanente pour assurer un traitement harmonisé de l’asile et de la migration réside dans le pacte migratoire déposé en 2020 par la Commission et sur lequel les États membres sont actuellement incapables de trouver un compromis, en raison de leurs profondes divergences sur ces questions.

      https://www.lalibre.be/international/europe/2021/12/14/face-aux-risques-qui-pesent-sur-la-libre-circulation-la-commission-europeenn
      #réforme

  • Les #GSM des victimes permettront de débusquer les trafiquants d’êtres humains

    Une nouvelle équipe de police va se pencher systématiquement sur le contenu des téléphones portables des victimes de #trafic_d'êtres_humains, rapportent jeudi Het Laatste Nieuws et De Morgen.

    « Lorsque des victimes de la traite d’êtres humains sont prises en charge, leur GSM n’est souvent pas exploité, alors que c’est pourtant une source importante d’information », selon le ministre de la Justice Vincent Van Quickenborne (Open VLD). Ces données peuvent en effet permettre de mettre au jour les réseaux criminels. « Dorénavant, la police va procéder à une #lecture_systématique des GSM concernés, de sorte à avoir une meilleure idée de ces organisations criminelles », poursuit-il.

    Une nouvelle équipe de police en Flandre-Occidentale, baptisée #Transit_Team, pour #Transmigration_Intelligence_Team, y est dédiée. Huit personnes sont spécialisées, dont des enquêteurs, des analystes stratégiques et des analystes criminologues. Ils sont aussi appuyés par un collaborateur des services de l’immigration et d’un expert d’#Europol, chargé de l’#échange_international_des_données.

    Si la victime refuse, une saisie peut être ordonnée

    Quand des transmigrants sont interceptés à la côte belge, et suspectés d’être des victimes de trafiquants, la nouvelle équipe policière est habilitée à consulter le GSM de chacun d’entre eux. Ces personnes récupèrent leur téléphone portable car c’est le seul moyen de communication avec leurs proches. Les victimes peuvent refuser de collaborer avec la police, mais un officier de la police judiciaire ou le parquet peuvent alors ordonner la saisie de leur portable.

    Cette nouvelle équipe a déjà été à l’œuvre avec les appareils des 24 migrants qui ont été secourus mercredi à Zeebruges.

    https://www.7sur7.be/belgique/les-gsm-des-victimes-permettront-de-debusquer-les-trafiquants-d-etres-humains~
    #surveillance #téléphone_portable #smartphone
    #données #Belgique

    ping @etraces @karine4 @isskein

  • #Frontex and #Europol: How refugees are tracked digitally


    Image: Border guards in Croatia „punish“ refugees by destroying their mobile phones. Europol and Frontex, on the other hand, want their forensic evaluation (Jack Sapoch).

    EU agencies advise increased confiscation and extraction of asylum seekers‘ mobile phones and now provide a manual on how to do so. Apps to encrypt or disguise locations are disliked in the report as „countermeasures“ to surveillance.

    Often the mobile phones they carry are the only connection between refugees and their relatives and friends in their country of origin or elsewhere. They contain contacts, personal communication as well as photos and videos as a memory of the home countries. Only within the European Union is it possible to apply for asylum in its member states. Therefore, the phones are also an indispensable aid for navigating to receiving countries and finding out about conditions and support there.

    Asylum seekers‘ mobile phones are also of increasing interest to authorities. As punishment for irregular entry, border guards in Greece and Croatia, and most recently at the EU’s external border with Belarus, destroy them before abandoning their owners at sea or forcibly push them back. Police forces, on the other hand, confiscate the phones in order to gain information about routes used and people helping to flee.

    Phones used to „lock, conceal and disguise“

    Frontex is actually responsible for preventing irregular migration. „migrant smuggling“ is considered cross-border, organised crime, so its prosecution also falls under Europol’s jurisdiction. Five years ago, Europol opened an #Anti-Migrant_Smuggling_Centre (#EMSC) in The Hague. Europol has also set up two analysis projects, „#Phoenix“ and „#Migrant_Smuggling“, where all interested and involved member states can store and access information.

    Both agencies monitor the #internet and social media, looking for any indications of „migrant smuggling“ there. Intelligence also comes from a „#Joint_Operational_Office“ in Vienna, in which Europol and the German Federal Police are also involved. An „#Internet_Referral_Unit“ (#EU_IRU) at Europol reports online presence of unwanted support for the transportation of refugees to the Internet service providers for removal.

    Frontex and Europol have now published a report on the „#Digitalisation of people smuggling“. However, it is less about the tools of „smugglers“ and more about the phones of refugees. In the guide, the two EU agencies give handouts on the most commonly used messengers and how the authorities can access the content stored there.

    No apps for „smuggling of migrants“ discovered

    Over several pages, the report presents various apps and services, including Facebook, Instagram, Signal, Skvpe, Telegram, Viber, WhatsApp. Also included are popular VPN services or apps for encryption. They are described as „countermeasures“ to police surveillance. Frontex and Europol also list tools that can be used to disguise #GPS positions or phone numbers, calling them apps to „lock, conceal and disguise“.

    Also listed are various mapping applications and open geographic data sources, including Maps.me and Google Maps, which can be used to share coordinates, routes and other information. This concerns, for example, immigration possibilities via the Eastern Mediterranean and the so-called Balkan routes. According to the report, these applications are used to a much lesser extent for routes from Russia and Ukraine or via Poland. Its contents were primarily aimed at asylum seekers from the Middle East, North Africa and Southeast Asian countries.

    Frontex repeatedly claimed in recent years that there were apps specifically developed for „migrant smuggling“. The German government also claims to have heard „that so-called apps by smugglers exist, with which offers of boats and information about conditions in various destination countries can be retrieved“. According now to Frontex and Europol, however, such digital tools have not been discovered so far.

    „Special tactics“ to obtain password or pin code

    At the end of the report, the agencies give tips on how to seize and read mobile communication devices. According to the report, they come from „specialists“ and „experts“ from the #Centre_for_Cybercrime and the #Centre_for_Combating_Migrant_Smuggling at Europol. Recommendations from „other sources“ were also taken into account.

    According to the „#checklist_for_facilitating_forensic_extraction“, the devices should be connected to a power bank and kept in a Faraday bag so that they do not connect to the internet. In this way, the authorities want to avoid their owners deleting content remotely. If the police have the PIN, the phone should be put into flight mode.

    The authorities should „ideally“ also confiscate charging cables, memory cards and other SIM cards in the possession of the refugees. All items should be sealed and marked with the personal data of their owners. To facilitate their analysis, a device password or PIN code for forensic analysis should be provided „whenever possible“. According to the agencies, this can be done either by „addressing this matter to the user“ or by using „special tactics“.

    The report leaves open whether this also includes exerting pressure or coercion on the asylum seekers or rather technical measures.

    https://digit.site36.net/2021/10/25/frontex-and-europol-how-refugees-are-tracked-digitally

    #réfugiés #migrations #asile #surveillance #surveillance_numérique #suveillance_digitale #smartphones #téléphones_portables #destruction #frontières #apps #confiscation #données

    ping @isskein @karine4 @etraces

    • EU: Joint Europol-Frontex report on “digitalisation of migrant smuggling”

      Europol and Frontex have produced a joint report on the “digitalisation of migrant smuggling”, intended to provide state officials with in the EU and Western Balkans “with a comprehensive intelligence picture on the use of digital tools and services’ [sic] in migrant smuggling and related document fraud, in order to raise awareness, consolidate existing knowledge and enforce opportunities to take appropriate measures to tackle emerging threats.”

      Contents of the report

      Key points

      Introduction, background and scope

      Migrant smuggling in the digital era

      Advertisement and recruitment

      Communication and instructions

      Guidance via mapping apps

      Money transfer

      Countermeasures

      Supporting criminal services: Document fraud

      Digital leads into migrant smuggling

      Impact of migrant smuggling digitalisation

      Challenges and intelligence gaps

      Annex I: Overview of applications and platforms identified in connection to migrant smuggling

      Annex II: Recommendations for handling seized mobile communication devices

      https://www.statewatch.org/news/2021/october/eu-joint-europol-frontex-report-on-digitalisation-of-migrant-smuggling
      #rapport

  • Greece, ABR: The Greek government are building walls around the five mainland refugee camps

    The Greek government are building walls around the five mainland refugee camps, #Ritsona, #Polykastro, #Diavata, #Makakasa and #Nea_Kavala. Why this is necessary, and for what purpose, when the camps already are fenced in with barbed wire fences, is difficult to understand.
    “Closed controlled camps" ensuring that asylum seekers are cut off from the outside communities and services. A very dark period in Greece and in EU refugee Policy.
    Three meter high concrete walls, outside the already existing barbed wire fences, would makes this no different than a prison. Who are they claiming to protect with these extreme measures, refugees living inside from Greek right wing extremists, or people living outside from these “dangerous” men, women and children? We must remember that this is supposed to be a refugee camps, not high security prisons.
    EU agreed on financing these camps, on the condition that they should be open facilities, same goes for the new camps that are being constructed on the island. In reality people will be locked up in these prisons most of the day, only allowed to go out on specific times, under strict control, between 07.00-19.00. Remember that we are talking about families with children, and not criminals, so why are they being treated as such?
    While Greece are opening up, welcoming tourists from all over the world, they are locking up men, women and children seeking safety in Europe, in prisons behind barbed wire fences and concrete walls, out of sight, out of mind. When these new camps on the islands, financed by Europe are finished, they will also be fenced in by high concrete walls. Mark my words: nothing good will come of this!
    “From Malakasa, Nea Kavala, Polycastro and Diavata camps to the world!!
    “if you have find us silent against the walls,it doesn’t mean that we agree to live like prisoners,but in fact we are all afraid to be threaten,if we speak out and raise our voices!!”

    (https://twitter.com/parwana_amiri/status/1395593312460025858)

    https://www.facebook.com/AegeanBoatReport/posts/1088971624959274

    #murs #asile #migrations #réfugiés #camps_de_réfugiés #Grèce #camps_fermés #barbelés

    • "Ø double military-grade walls
      Ø restricted entrance and exit times (8am-8pm: itself a questionable suggestion: why should people be banned from going outside at any time of day or night? Under what possible justification?)
      Ø a CCTV system and video monitors
      Ø drone flights over the ‘camps’
      Ø camera-monitored perimeter alarms
      Ø control gates with metal detectors and x-ray devices
      Ø a system to broadcast announcements from loudspeakers
      Ø a control centre for the camps at the ministry’s HQ
      And this will be paid for – a total bill of €33m – by the EU.
      As this cash is on top of the €250m the EU has already promised to build these camps – described, we must stress, as ‘closed’ repeatedly in the Greek governments’ ‘deliverability document’ even though the EU, and specifically its Commissioner for Home Affairs Ylva Johansson who confirmed the €250m payment on her visit to the Aegean islands in March this year, promised the EU would not fund closed camps - it is absolutely vital that the Union is not misled into handing over millions of Euros for a programme designed to break international law and strip men, women and children of their fundamental human rights and protections.
      We must stress: these men, women and children have committed no crime. Even if they were suspected of having done so, they would be entitled to a trial before a jury before having their freedom taken away from them for – based on the current advised waiting period for asylum cases to be processed in Greece – up to five years.»

      ( text by Koraki : https://www.facebook.com/koraki.org)
      source : https://www.facebook.com/yorgos.konstantinou/posts/10223644448395917


      source : https://www.facebook.com/yorgos.konstantinou/posts/10223644448395917

      –—


      source : https://www.facebook.com/yorgos.konstantinou/posts/10223657767448885

      #caricature #dessin_de_presse by #Yorgos_Konstantinou

    • Pétition:

      EU: Build Schools, Not Walls

      We strongly stand against allocating European funds to build walls around Greek refugee camps.

      The ongoing fencing work at the Ritsona, Polykastro, Diavata, Malakasa and Nea Kavala camps must stop immediately.

      Greece, with the full support of the European Union, is turning refugee camps into de-facto prisons.

      Millions of euros allocated for building walls should be spent on education, psychological support and the improvement of hygienic conditions in the refugee camps.

      What happened?

      In January and February 2021, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) published two invitations to bid for the construction of fences in refugee camps in mainland Greece.

      However, the fences became concrete walls. In March the Greek Ministry of Migration and Asylum commissioned to build NATO type fences and introduce additional security measures.

      Nobody - including camp residents - was informed about it.

      The walls are a jeopardy for integration, safety and mental health

      Residents of refugee camps fled their country in search for safety. In Europe their (mental) health is worsening because of the horrific conditions in the camps.

      Building the walls after a year of strict lockdown will lead to a further deterioration in their mental state.

      Moreover, it will:
      – deepen divisions between people: it will make the interaction between refugees and the local community even more difficult, if not impossible.
      – make it even harder for journalists and NGO’s to monitor the situation in the camp
      – put the residents of the camps in danger in case of fire.

      As EU citizens we cannot allow that innocent people are being locked behind the walls, in the middle of nowhere. Being a refugee is not a crime.

      Seeking asylum is a human right.

      Democracy and freedom cannot be built with concrete walls.

      Building walls was always the beginning of dark periods in history.

      Crushing walls - is the source of hope, reconciliation and (what is a foundation of European idea) solidarity.

      No more walls in the EU!

      https://secure.avaaz.org/community_petitions/en/notis_mitarachi_the_minister_of_migration_of_greec_eu_build_schools_no

    • La Grèce construit des camps barricadés pour isoler les réfugiés

      L’Union européenne a investi cette année 276 millions d’euros pour la construction de camps de réfugiés sur cinq îles grecques. À #Leros, où un camp de 1 800 places ouvrira bientôt, habitants et ONG s’indignent contre cet édifice barricadé. Le gouvernement assume.

      L’Union européenne a investi cette année 276 millions d’euros pour la construction de camps de réfugiés sur cinq îles grecques. À Leros, où un camp de 1 800 places ouvrira bientôt, habitants et ONG s’indignent contre cet édifice barricadé. Le gouvernement assume.

      Le champ de #conteneurs blancs s’étale sur 63 000 mètres carrés sur une colline inhabitée. Depuis les bateaux de plaisance qui pénètrent dans la baie de Lakki, dans le sud de Leros, on ne voit qu’eux. Ils forment le tout nouveau camp de réfugiés de 1 860 places, interdit d’accès au public, qui doit ouvrir ses portes d’ici à la rentrée sur cette île grecque de 8 000 habitants, qui compte aujourd’hui 75 demandeurs d’asile.

      « Il sera doté de mini-supermarchés, restaurants, laveries, écoles, distributeurs d’argent, terrains de basket », détaille #Filio_Kyprizoglou, sa future directrice. Soit un « village, avec tous les services compris pour les demandeurs d’asile ! », s’emballe-t-elle.

      Mais le « village » sera cerné de hauts murs, puis d’une route périphérique destinée aux patrouilles de police, elle aussi entourée d’un mur surplombé de #barbelés. Depuis sa taverne sur le port de Lakki, Theodoros Kosmopoulou observe avec amertume cette « #nouvelle_prison », dont la construction a démarré en février, sur des terres appartenant à l’État grec.

      Ce nouveau centre barricadé est l’un des cinq camps de réfugiés grecs en construction sur les îles à proximité de la Turquie et ayant connu des arrivées ces dernières années. Ces structures sont financées à hauteur de 276 millions d’euros par l’Union européenne (UE). Si celui de Leros est bien visible dans la baie de Lakki, les centres qui s’élèveront à #Kos, #Samos, #Chios et #Lesbos seront, eux, souvent isolés des villes.

      Ces camps dits éphémères pourront héberger au total 15 000 demandeurs d’asile ou des personnes déboutées. Ils seront tous opérationnels à la fin de l’année, espère la Commission européenne. Celui de Samos, 3 600 places, sera ouvert cet été, suivi de Kos, 2 000 places, et Leros. L’appel d’offres pour la construction des camps de Chios (de 1 800 à 3 000 places) et Lesbos (5 000 places) a été publié en mai.

      Si l’Europe les qualifie de « #centres_de_premier_accueil_multifonctionnels », le ministère grec de l’immigration parle, lui, de « #structures_contrôlées_fermées ». Elles doivent remplacer les anciens camps dits « #hotspots », déjà présents sur ces îles, qui abritent maintenant 9 000 migrants. Souvent surpeuplés depuis leur création en 2016, ils sont décriés pour leurs conditions de vie indignes. Le traitement des demandes d’asile peut y prendre des mois.

      Des compagnies privées pour gérer les camps ?

      Dans ces nouveaux camps, les réfugiés auront une réponse à leur demande dans les cinq jours, assure le ministère grec de l’immigration. Les personnes déboutées seront détenues dans des parties fermées – seulement les hommes seuls - dans l’attente de leur renvoi.

      Un membre d’une organisation d’aide internationale, qui s’exprime anonymement, craint que les procédures de demande d’asile ne soient « expédiées plus rapidement et qu’il y ait plus de rejets ». « Le gouvernement de droite est de plus en plus dur avec les réfugiés », estime-t-il. Athènes, qui compte aujourd’hui quelque 100 000 demandeurs d’asile (chiffre de mai 2021 donné par l’UNHCR), a en effet durci sa politique migratoire durant la pandémie.

      La Grèce vient aussi d’élargir la liste des nationalités pouvant être renvoyées vers le pays voisin. La Turquie est désormais considérée comme un « pays sûr » pour les Syriens, Bangladais, Afghans, Somaliens et Pakistanais.

      (—> voir https://seenthis.net/messages/919682)

      Pour la mise en œuvre de cette #procédure_d’asile, le gouvernement compte sur l’organisation et surtout la #surveillance de ces camps, au regard des plans détaillés que Manos Logothetis, secrétaire général du ministère de l’immigration, déplie fièrement dans son bureau d’Athènes. Chaque centre, cerné de murs, sera divisé en #zones compartimentées pour les mineurs non accompagnés, les familles, etc. Les demandeurs d’asile ne pourront circuler entre ces #espaces_séparés qu’avec une #carte_magnétique « d’identité ».

      "Je doute qu’une organisation de défense des droits humains ou de la société civile soit autorisée à témoigner de ce qui se passe dans ce nouveau camp." (Catharina Kahane, cofondatrice de l’ONG autrichienne Echo100Plus)

      Celle-ci leur permettra également de sortir du camp, en journée uniquement, avertit Manos Logothetis : « S’ils reviennent après la tombée de la #nuit, les réfugiés resteront à l’extérieur jusqu’au lendemain, dans un lieu prévu à cet effet. Ils devront justifier leur retard auprès des autorités du centre. » Les « autorités » présentes à l’ouverture seront l’#UNHCR, les services de santé et de l’asile grec, #Europol, l’#OIM, #Frontex et quelques ONG « bienvenues », affirme le secrétaire général - ce que réfutent les ONG, visiblement sous pression.

      Le gouvernement souhaite néanmoins un changement dans la gestion des camps. « Dans d’autres États, cette fonction est à la charge de compagnies privées […]. Nous y songeons aussi. Dans certains camps grecs, tout a été sous le contrôle de l’OIM et de l’UNHCR […], critique Manos Logothetis. Nous pensons qu’il est temps qu’elles fassent un pas en arrière. Nous devrions diriger ces camps via une compagnie privée, sous l’égide du gouvernement. »

      « Qui va venir dans ces centres ? »

      À Leros, à des centaines de kilomètres au nord-ouest d’Athènes, ces propos inquiètent. « Je doute qu’une organisation de défense des droits humains ou de la société civile soit autorisée à témoigner de ce qui se passe dans ce nouveau camp, dit Catharina Kahane, cofondatrice de l’ONG autrichienne Echo100Plus. Nous n’avons jamais été invités à le visiter. Toutes les ONG enregistrées auprès du gouvernement précédent [de la gauche Syriza jusqu’en 2019 – ndlr] ont dû s’inscrire à nouveau auprès de la nouvelle administration [il y a deux ans - ndlr]. Très peu d’organisations ont réussi, beaucoup ont été rejetées. »

      La municipalité de Leros s’interroge, pour sa part, sur la finalité de ce camp. #Michael_Kolias, maire sans étiquette de l’île, ne croit pas à son caractère « éphémère » vendu aux insulaires. « Les autorités détruisent la nature pour le construire ! », argumente celui-ci. La municipalité a déposé un recours auprès du Conseil d’État pour empêcher son ouverture.

      Ce camp aux allures de centre de détention ravive également de douloureux souvenirs pour les riverains. Leros porte, en effet, le surnom de l’île des damnés. La profonde baie de Lakki a longtemps caché ceux que la Grèce ne voulait pas voir. Sous la junte (1967-1974), ses bâtiments d’architecture italienne sont devenus des prisons pour des milliers de communistes. D’autres édifices néoclassiques ont également été transformés en hôpital psychiatrique, critiqué pour ses mauvais traitements jusque dans les années 1980.

      C’est d’ailleurs dans l’enceinte même de l’hôpital psychiatrique, qui compte toujours quelques patients, qu’a été construit un premier « hotspot » de réfugiés de 860 places, en 2016. Aujourd’hui, 75 demandeurs d’asile syriens et irakiens y sont parqués. Ils s’expriment peu, sous la surveillance permanente des policiers.

      Il n’y a presque plus d’arrivées de migrants de la Turquie depuis deux ans. « Mais qui va donc venir occuper les 1 800 places du nouveau camp ?, interpelle le maire de Leros. Est-ce que les personnes dublinées rejetées d’autres pays de l’UE vont être placées ici ? » Le ministère de l’immigration assure que le nouveau camp n’abritera que les primo-arrivants des côtes turques. Il n’y aura aucun transfert d’une autre région ou pays dans ces centres des îles, dit-il.

      La Turquie, voisin « ennemi »

      Le gouvernement maintient que la capacité importante de ces nouveaux camps se justifie par la « #menace_permanente » d’arrivées massives de migrants de la #Turquie, voisin « ennemi », comme le souligne le secrétaire général Manos Logothetis. « En Grèce, nous avons souffert, elle nous a attaqués en mars 2020 ! », lâche le responsable, en référence à l’annonce de l’ouverture de la frontière gréco-turque par le président turc Erdogan, qui avait alors entraîné l’arrivée de milliers de demandeurs d’asile aux portes de la Grèce.

      Selon l’accord controversé UE-Turquie de 2016, Ankara doit, en échange de 6 milliards d’euros, réintégrer les déboutés de l’asile - pour lesquels la Turquie est jugée « pays sûr »- et empêcher les départs de migrants de ses côtes. « Elle ne collabore pas […]. Il faut utiliser tous les moyens possibles et légaux pour protéger le territoire national ! »,avance Manos Logothetis.

      Pour le gouvernement, cela passe apparemment par la #fortification de sa frontière en vue de dissuader la venue de migrants, notamment dans le nord-est du pays. Deux canons sonores viennent d’être installés sur un nouveau mur en acier, le long de cette lisière terrestre gréco-turque.

      De l’autre côté de cette barrière, la Turquie, qui compte près de quatre millions de réfugiés, n’accepte plus de retours de migrants de Grèce depuis le début de la pandémie. Elle aura « l’obligation de les reprendre », répète fermement Manos Logothetis. Auquel cas de nombreux réfugiés déboutés pourraient rester longtemps prisonniers des nouveaux « villages » de l’UE.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/240621/la-grece-construit-des-camps-barricades-pour-isoler-les-refugies
      #business #HCR #privatisation

    • Grèce : sur l’île de Samos, les migrants découvrent leur nouveau centre aux allures de « prison »

      Sur l’île grecque de Samos, proche de la Turquie, un nouveau camp de réfugiés dit « fermé », isolé et doté d’une structure ultra-sécuritaire vient d’entrer en service. Les quelque 500 demandeurs d’asile qui se trouvaient encore dans l’ancien camp de Vathy ont commencé à y être transférés. Reportage.

      « Camp fermé ? On ne sait pas ce que c’est un camp fermé. C’est une prison ou bien c’est pour les immigrés ? Parce qu’on m’a dit que c’était conçu comme une prison. » Comme ce jeune Malien, assis à côté de ses sacs, les demandeurs d’asile s’interrogent et s’inquiètent, eux qui s’apprêtent à quitter le camp de Vathy et ses airs de bidonville pour le nouveau camp de l’île de Samos et sa réputation de prison.

      Au Cameroun, Paulette tenait un commerce de pièces détachées qui l’amenait à voyager à Dubaï voire en Chine. Ce nouveau camp, elle s’y résigne à contrecœur. « Ça me fend le cœur, dit-elle. Moi je n’ai pas le choix. Si j’avais le choix, je ne pourrais pas accepter d’aller là-bas. C’est parce que je n’ai pas le choix, je suis obligée de partir. »

      Comme elle s’est sentie obligée aussi de quitter le Cameroun. « À Buea, il y a la guerre, la guerre politique, on tue les gens, on kidnappe les gens. Moi, j’ai perdu ma mère, j’ai perdu mon père, j’ai perdu mon enfant, j’ai perdu ma petite sœur, mon grand frère… Donc je me suis retrouvée seule. Et moi je ne savais pas. S’il fallait le refaire, moi je préfèrerais mourir dans mon pays que de venir ici. Oui. Parce que ces gens-ci, ils n’ont pas de cœur. »

      Alors que les transferts entre les deux camps démarrent tout juste, la pelleteuse est déjà prête. La destruction de l’ancien camp de Vathy est prévue pour la fin de semaine.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/35176/grece--sur-lile-de-samos-les-migrants-decouvrent-leur-nouveau-centre-a

    • Grèce : ouverture de deux nouveaux camps fermés pour migrants

      La Grèce a ouvert samedi deux nouveaux camps fermés pour demandeurs d’asile dans les îles de #Leros et de #Kos, un modèle critiqué par des défenseurs des droits humains pour les contrôle stricts qui y sont imposés.

      La Grèce a ouvert samedi deux nouveaux camps fermés pour demandeurs d’asile dans les îles de Leros et de Kos, un modèle critiqué par des défenseurs des droits humains pour les contrôle stricts qui y sont imposés.

      « Une nouvelle ère commence », a déclaré le ministre des Migrations Notis Mitarachi en annonçant l’ouverture de ces deux nouveaux camps.

      Les nouveaux camps sécurisés, entourés de barbelés, pourvus de caméras de surveillance et de portails magnétiques où les demandeurs d’asile doivent présenter des badges électroniques et leurs empreintes digitales pour pouvoir entrer, sont fermés la nuit.

      Les demandeurs d’asile peuvent sortir dans la journée mais doivent impérativement rentrer le soir.

      Ces nouvelles installations que la Grèce s’est engagée à mettre en place grâce des fonds de l’Union européennes, sont appelées à remplacer les anciens camps sordides où s’entassaient des milliers de migrants dans des conditions insalubres.

      « Nous libérons nos îles du problème des migrants et de ses conséquences », a ajouté le ministre. « Les images des années 2015-2019 appartiennent désormais au passé ».

      Le premier camp sécurisé de ce type a été ouvert en septembre sur l’île de Samos, après le démantèlement du vieux camp, véritable bidonville, qui avait abrité près de 7.000 demandeurs d’asile au plus fort de la crise migratoire entre 2015 et 1016.

      La Grèce avait été la principale porte d’entrée par laquelle plus d’un million de demandeurs d’asile, principalement des Syriens, des Irakiens et des Afghans, étaient arrivés en Europe en 2015.

      Le situation en Afghanistan a fait redouter l’arrivée d’une nouvelle vague de migrants.

      Les nouveaux camps à accès contrôlé sont dotés de commodités comme l’eau courante, les toilettes et de meilleures conditions de sécurité qui étaient absentes dans les anciens camps.

      La Grèce a prévu d’ouvrir deux autres nouveaux camps sécurisés sur les îles de Lesbos et de Chios.

      La contribution de l’UE pour la mise en place de ces nouvelles installations s’élève à 276 millions d’euros (326 millions de dollars).

      Des ONG se sont toutefois inquiétées de l’isolement des personnes qui y sont hebergées, estimant que leur liberté de mouvement ne devrait pas être soumise à des restrictions aussi sévères.

      Selon des estimations de l’ONU, quelque 96.000 réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile se trouvent sur le territoire grec.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/fil-dactualites/271121/grece-ouverture-de-deux-nouveaux-camps-fermes-pour-migrants

  • Friends of the Traffickers Italy’s Anti-Mafia Directorate and the “Dirty Campaign” to Criminalize Migration

    Afana Dieudonne often says that he is not a superhero. That’s Dieudonne’s way of saying he’s done things he’s not proud of — just like anyone in his situation would, he says, in order to survive. From his home in Cameroon to Tunisia by air, then by car and foot into the desert, across the border into Libya, and onto a rubber boat in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, Dieudonne has done a lot of surviving.

    In Libya, Dieudonne remembers when the smugglers managing the safe house would ask him for favors. Dieudonne spoke a little English and didn’t want trouble. He said the smugglers were often high and always armed. Sometimes, when asked, Dieudonne would distribute food and water among the other migrants. Other times, he would inform on those who didn’t follow orders. He remembers the traffickers forcing him to inflict violence on his peers. It was either them or him, he reasoned.

    On September 30, 2014, the smugglers pushed Dieudonne and 91 others out to sea aboard a rubber boat. Buzzing through the pitch-black night, the group watched lights on the Libyan coast fade into darkness. After a day at sea, the overcrowded dinghy began taking on water. Its passengers were rescued by an NGO vessel and transferred to an Italian coast guard ship, where officers picked Dieudonne out of a crowd and led him into a room for questioning.

    At first, Dieudonne remembers the questioning to be quick, almost routine. His name, his age, his nationality. And then the questions turned: The officers said they wanted to know how the trafficking worked in Libya so they could arrest the people involved. They wanted to know who had driven the rubber boat and who had held the navigation compass.

    “So I explained everything to them, and I also showed who the ‘captain’ was — captain in quotes, because there is no captain,” said Dieudonne. The real traffickers stay in Libya, he added. “Even those who find themselves to be captains, they don’t do it by choice.”

    For the smugglers, Dieudonne explained, “we are the customers, and we are the goods.”

    For years, efforts by the Italian government and the European Union to address migration in the central Mediterranean have focused on the people in Libya — interchangeably called facilitators, smugglers, traffickers, or militia members, depending on which agency you’re speaking to — whose livelihoods come from helping others cross irregularly into Europe. People pay them a fare to organize a journey so dangerous it has taken tens of thousands of lives.

    The European effort to dismantle these smuggling networks has been driven by an unlikely actor: the Italian anti-mafia and anti-terrorism directorate, a niche police office in Rome that gained respect in the 1990s and early 2000s for dismantling large parts of the Mafia in Sicily and elsewhere in Italy. According to previously unpublished internal documents, the office — called the Direzione nazionale antimafia e antiterrorismo, or DNAA, in Italian — took a front-and-center role in the management of Europe’s southern sea borders, in direct coordination with the EU border agency Frontex and European military missions operating off the Libyan coast.

    In 2013, under the leadership of a longtime anti-mafia prosecutor named Franco Roberti, the directorate pioneered a strategy that was unique — or at least new for the border officers involved. They would start handling irregular migration to Europe like they had handled the mob. The approach would allow Italian and European police, coast guard agencies, and navies, obliged by international law to rescue stranded refugees at sea, to at least get some arrests and convictions along the way.

    The idea was to arrest low-level operators and use coercion and plea deals to get them to flip on their superiors. That way, the reasoning went, police investigators could work their way up the food chain and eventually dismantle the smuggling rings in Libya. With every boat that disembarked in Italy, police would make a handful of arrests. Anybody found to have played an active role during the crossing, from piloting to holding a compass to distributing water or bailing out a leak, could be arrested under a new legal directive written by Roberti’s anti-mafia directorate. Charges ranged from simple smuggling to transnational criminal conspiracy and — if people asphyxiated below deck or drowned when a boat capsized — even murder. Judicial sources estimate the number of people arrested since 2013 to be in the thousands.

    For the police, prosecutors, and politicians involved, the arrests were an important domestic political win. At the time, public opinion in Italy was turning against migration, and the mugshots of alleged smugglers regularly held space on front pages throughout the country.

    But according to the minutes of closed-door conversations among some of the very same actors directing these cases, which were obtained by The Intercept under Italy’s freedom of information law, most anti-mafia prosecutions only focused on low-level boat drivers, often migrants who had themselves paid for the trip across. Few, if any, smuggling bosses were ever convicted. Documents of over a dozen trials reviewed by The Intercept show prosecutions built on hasty investigations and coercive interrogations.

    In the years that followed, the anti-mafia directorate went to great lengths to keep the arrests coming. According to the internal documents, the office coordinated a series of criminal investigations into the civilian rescue NGOs working to save lives in the Mediterranean, accusing them of hampering police work. It also oversaw efforts to create and train a new coast guard in Libya, with full knowledge that some coast guard officers were colluding with the same smuggling networks that Italian and European leaders were supposed to be fighting.

    Since its inception, the anti-mafia directorate has wielded unparalleled investigative tools and served as a bridge between politicians and the courts. The documents reveal in meticulous detail how the agency, alongside Italian and European officials, capitalized on those powers to crack down on alleged smugglers, most of whom they knew to be desperate people fleeing poverty and violence with limited resources to defend themselves in court.

    Tragedy and Opportunity

    The anti-mafia directorate was born in the early 1990s after a decade of escalating Mafia violence. By then, hundreds of prosecutors, politicians, journalists, and police officers had been shot, blown up, or kidnapped, and many more extorted by organized crime families operating in Italy and beyond.

    In Palermo, the Sicilian capital, prosecutor Giovanni Falcone was a rising star in the Italian judiciary. Falcone had won unprecedented success with an approach to organized crime based on tracking financial flows, seizing assets, and centralizing evidence gathered by prosecutor’s offices across the island.

    But as the Mafia expanded its reach into the rest of Europe, Falcone’s work proved insufficient.

    In September 1990, a Mafia commando drove from Germany to Sicily to gun down a 37-year-old judge. Weeks later, at a police checkpoint in Naples, the Sicilian driver of a truck loaded with weapons, explosives, and drugs was found to be a resident of Germany. A month after the arrests, Falcone traveled to Germany to establish an information-sharing mechanism with authorities there. He brought along a younger colleague from Naples, Franco Roberti.

    “We faced a stone wall,” recalled Roberti, still bitter three decades later. He spoke to us outside a cafe in a plum neighborhood in Naples. Seventy-three years old and speaking with the rasp of a lifelong smoker, Roberti described Italy’s Mafia problem in blunt language. He bemoaned a lack of international cooperation that, he said, continues to this day. “They claimed that there was no need to investigate there,” Roberti said, “that it was up to us to investigate Italians in Germany who were occasional mafiosi.”

    As the prosecutors traveled back to Italy empty-handed, Roberti remembers Falcone telling him that they needed “a centralized national organ able to speak directly to foreign judicial authorities and coordinate investigations in Italy.”

    “That is how the idea of the anti-mafia directorate was born,” Roberti said. The two began building what would become Italy’s first national anti-mafia force.

    At the time, there was tough resistance to the project. Critics argued that Falcone and Roberti were creating “super-prosecutors” who would wield outsize powers over the courts, while also being subject to political pressures from the government in Rome. It was, they argued, a marriage of police and the judiciary, political interests and supposedly apolitical courts — convenient for getting Mafia convictions but dangerous for Italian democracy.

    Still, in January 1992, the project was approved in Parliament. But Falcone would never get to lead it: Months later, a bomb set by the Mafia killed him, his wife, and the three agents escorting them. The attack put to rest any remaining criticism of Falcone’s plan.

    The anti-mafia directorate went on to become one of Italy’s most important institutions, the national authority over all matters concerning organized crime and the agency responsible for partially freeing the country from its century-old crucible. In the decades after Falcone’s death, the directorate did what many in Italy thought impossible, dismantling large parts of the five main Italian crime families and almost halving the Mafia-related murder rate.

    And yet, by the time Roberti took control in 2013, it had been years since the last high-profile Mafia prosecution, and the organization’s influence was waning. At the same time, Italy was facing unprecedented numbers of migrants arriving by boat. Roberti had an idea: The anti-mafia directorate would start working on what he saw as a different kind of mafia. The organization set its sights on Libya.

    “We thought we had to do something more coordinated to combat this trafficking,” Roberti remembered, “so I put everyone around a table.”

    “The main objective was to save lives, seize ships, and capture smugglers,” Roberti said. “Which we did.”

    Our Sea

    Dieudonne made it to the Libyan port city of Zuwara in August 2014. One more step across the Mediterranean, and he’d be in Europe. The smugglers he paid to get him across the sea took all of his possessions and put him in an abandoned building that served as a safe house to wait for his turn.

    Dieudonne told his story from a small office in Bari, Italy, where he runs a cooperative that helps recent arrivals access local education. Dieudonne is fiery and charismatic. He is constantly moving: speaking, texting, calling, gesticulating. Every time he makes a point, he raps his knuckles on the table in a one-two pattern. Dieudonne insisted that we publish his real name. Others who made the journey more recently — still pending decisions on their residence permits or refugee status — were less willing to speak openly.

    Dieudonne remembers the safe house in Zuwara as a string of constant violence. The smugglers would come once a day to leave food. Every day, they would ask who hadn’t followed their orders. Those inside the abandoned building knew they were less likely to be discovered by police or rival smugglers, but at the same time, they were not free to leave.

    “They’ve put a guy in the refrigerator in front of all of us, to show how the next one who misbehaves will be treated,” Dieudonne remembered, indignant. He witnessed torture, shootings, rape. “The first time you see it, it hurts you. The second time it hurts you less. The third time,” he said with a shrug, “it becomes normal. Because that’s the only way to survive.”

    “That’s why arresting the person who pilots a boat and treating them like a trafficker makes me laugh,” Dieudonne said. Others who have made the journey to Italy report having been forced to drive at gunpoint. “You only do it to be sure you don’t die there,” he said.

    Two years after the fall of Muammar Gaddafi’s government, much of Libya’s northwest coast had become a staging ground for smugglers who organized sea crossings to Europe in large wooden fishing boats. When those ships — overcrowded, underpowered, and piloted by amateurs — inevitably capsized, the deaths were counted by the hundreds.

    In October 2013, two shipwrecks off the coast of the Italian island of Lampedusa took over 400 lives, sparking public outcry across Europe. In response, the Italian state mobilized two plans, one public and the other private.

    “There was a big shock when the Lampedusa tragedy happened,” remembered Italian Sen. Emma Bonino, then the country’s foreign minister. The prime minister “called an emergency meeting, and we decided to immediately launch this rescue program,” Bonino said. “Someone wanted to call the program ‘safe seas.’ I said no, not safe, because it’s sure we’ll have other tragedies. So let’s call it Mare Nostrum.”

    Mare Nostrum — “our sea” in Latin — was a rescue mission in international waters off the coast of Libya that ran for one year and rescued more than 150,000 people. The operation also brought Italian ships, airplanes, and submarines closer than ever to Libyan shores. Roberti, just two months into his job as head of the anti-mafia directorate, saw an opportunity to extend the country’s judicial reach and inflict a lethal blow to smuggling rings in Libya.

    Five days after the start of Mare Nostrum, Roberti launched the private plan: a series of coordination meetings among the highest echelons of the Italian police, navy, coast guard, and judiciary. Under Roberti, these meetings would run for four years and eventually involve representatives from Frontex, Europol, an EU military operation, and even Libya.

    The minutes of five of these meetings, which were presented by Roberti in a committee of the Italian Parliament and obtained by The Intercept, give an unprecedented behind-the-scenes look at the events on Europe’s southern borders since the Lampedusa shipwrecks.

    In the first meeting, held in October 2013, Roberti told participants that the anti-mafia offices in the Sicilian city of Catania had developed an innovative way to deal with migrant smuggling. By treating Libyan smugglers like they had treated the Italian Mafia, prosecutors could claim jurisdiction over international waters far beyond Italy’s borders. That, Roberti said, meant they could lawfully board and seize vessels on the high seas, conduct investigations there, and use the evidence in court.

    The Italian authorities have long recognized that, per international maritime law, they are obligated to rescue people fleeing Libya on overcrowded boats and transport them to a place of safety. As the number of people attempting the crossing increased, many Italian prosecutors and coast guard officials came to believe that smugglers were relying on these rescues to make their business model work; therefore, the anti-mafia reasoning went, anyone who acted as crew or made a distress call on a boat carrying migrants could be considered complicit in Libyan trafficking and subject to Italian jurisdiction. This new approach drew heavily from legal doctrines developed in the United States during the 1980s aimed at stopping drug smuggling.

    European leaders were scrambling to find a solution to what they saw as a looming migration crisis. Italian officials thought they had the answer and publicly justified their decisions as a way to prevent future drownings.

    But according to the minutes of the 2013 anti-mafia meeting, the new strategy predated the Lampedusa shipwrecks by at least a week. Sicilian prosecutors had already written the plan to crack down on migration across the Mediterranean but lacked both the tools and public will to put it into action. Following the Lampedusa tragedy and the creation of Mare Nostrum, they suddenly had both.

    State of Necessity

    In the international waters off the coast of Libya, Dieudonne and 91 others were rescued by a European NGO called Migrant Offshore Aid Station. They spent two days aboard MOAS’s ship before being transferred to an Italian coast guard ship, Nave Dattilo, to be taken to Europe.

    Aboard the Dattilo, coast guard officers asked Dieudonne why he had left his home in Cameroon. He remembers them showing him a photograph of the rubber boat taken from the air. “They asked me who was driving, the roles and everything,” he remembered. “Then they asked me if I could tell him how the trafficking in Libya works, and then, they said, they would give me residence documents.”

    Dieudonne said that he was reluctant to cooperate at first. He didn’t want to accuse any of his peers, but he was also concerned that he could become a suspect. After all, he had helped the driver at points throughout the voyage.

    “I thought that if I didn’t cooperate, they might hurt me,” Dieudonne said. “Not physically hurt, but they could consider me dishonest, like someone who was part of the trafficking.”

    To this day, Dieudonne says he can’t understand why Italy would punish people for fleeing poverty and political violence in West Africa. He rattled off a list of events from the last year alone: draught, famine, corruption, armed gunmen, attacks on schools. “And you try to convict someone for managing to escape that situation?”

    The coast guard ship disembarked in Vibo Valentia, a city in the Italian region of Calabria. During disembarkation, a local police officer explained to a journalist that they had arrested five people. The journalist asked how the police had identified the accused.

    “A lot has been done by the coast guard, who picked [the migrants] up two days ago and managed to spot [the alleged smugglers],” the officer explained. “Then we have witness statements and videos.”

    Cases like these, where arrests are made on the basis of photo or video evidence and statements by witnesses like Dieudonne, are common, said Gigi Modica, a judge in Sicily who has heard many immigration and asylum cases. “It’s usually the same story. They take three or four people, no more. They ask them two questions: who was driving the boat, and who was holding the compass,” Modica explained. “That’s it — they get the names and don’t care about the rest.”

    Modica was one of the first judges in Italy to acquit people charged for driving rubber boats — known as “scafisti,” or boat drivers, in Italian — on the grounds that they had been forced to do so. These “state of necessity” rulings have since become increasingly common. Modica rattled off a list of irregularities he’s seen in such cases: systemic racism, witness statements that migrants later say they didn’t make, interrogations with no translator or lawyer, and in some cases, people who report being encouraged by police to sign documents renouncing their right to apply for asylum.

    “So often these alleged smugglers — scafisti — are normal people who were compelled to pilot a boat by smugglers in Libya,” Modica said.

    Documents of over a dozen trials reviewed by The Intercept show prosecutions largely built on testimony from migrants who are promised a residence permit in exchange for their collaboration. At sea, witnesses are interviewed by the police hours after their rescue, often still in a state of shock after surviving a shipwreck.

    In many cases, identical statements, typos included, are attributed to several witnesses and copied and pasted across different police reports. Sometimes, these reports have been enough to secure decadeslong sentences. Other times, under cross-examination in court, witnesses have contradicted the statements recorded by police or denied giving any testimony at all.

    As early as 2015, attendees of the anti-mafia meetings were discussing problems with these prosecutions. In a meeting that February, Giovanni Salvi, then the prosecutor of Catania, acknowledged that smugglers often abandoned migrant boats in international waters. Still, Italian police were steaming ahead with the prosecutions of those left on board.

    These prosecutions were so important that in some cases, the Italian coast guard decided to delay rescue when boats were in distress in order to “allow for the arrival of institutional ships that can conduct arrests,” a coast guard commander explained at the meeting.

    When asked about the commander’s comments, the Italian coast guard said that “on no occasion” has the agency ever delayed a rescue operation. Delaying rescue for any reason goes against international and Italian law, and according to various human rights lawyers in Europe, could give rise to criminal liability.

    NGOs in the Crosshairs

    Italy canceled Mare Nostrum after one year, citing budget constraints and a lack of European collaboration. In its wake, the EU set up two new operations, one via Frontex and the other a military effort called Operation Sophia. These operations focused not on humanitarian rescue but on border security and people smuggling from Libya. Beginning in 2015, representatives from Frontex and Operation Sophia were included in the anti-mafia directorate meetings, where Italian prosecutors ensured that both abided by the new investigative strategy.

    Key to these investigations were photos from the rescues, like the aerial image that Dieudonne remembers the Italian coast guard showing him, which gave police another way to identify who piloted the boats and helped navigate.

    In the absence of government rescue ships, a fleet of civilian NGO vessels began taking on a large number of rescues in the international waters off the coast of Libya. These ships, while coordinated by the Italian coast guard rescue center in Rome, made evidence-gathering difficult for prosecutors and judicial police. According to the anti-mafia meeting minutes, some NGOs, including MOAS, routinely gave photos to Italian police and Frontex. Others refused, arguing that providing evidence for investigations into the people they saved would undermine their efficacy and neutrality.

    In the years following Mare Nostrum, the NGO fleet would come to account for more than one-third of all rescues in the central Mediterranean, according to estimates by Operation Sophia. A leaked status report from the operation noted that because NGOs did not collect information from rescued migrants for police, “information essential to enhance the understanding of the smuggling business model is not acquired.”

    In a subsequent anti-mafia meeting, six prosecutors echoed this concern. NGO rescues meant that police couldn’t interview migrants at sea, they said, and cases were getting thrown out for lack of evidence. A coast guard admiral explained the importance of conducting interviews just after a rescue, when “a moment of empathy has been established.”

    “It is not possible to carry out this task if the rescue intervention is carried out by ships of the NGOs,” the admiral told the group.

    The NGOs were causing problems for the DNAA strategy. At the meetings, Italian prosecutors and representatives from the coast guard, navy, and Interior Ministry discussed what they could do to rein in the humanitarian organizations. At the same time, various prosecutors were separately fixing their investigative sights on the NGOs themselves.

    In late 2016, an internal report from Frontex — later published in full by The Intercept — accused an NGO vessel of directly receiving migrants from Libyan smugglers, attributing the information to “Italian authorities.” The claim was contradicted by video evidence and the ship’s crew.

    Months later, Carmelo Zuccaro, the prosecutor of Catania, made public that he was investigating rescue NGOs. “Together with Frontex and the navy, we are trying to monitor all these NGOs that have shown that they have great financial resources,” Zuccaro told an Italian newspaper. The claim went viral in Italian and European media. “Friends of the traffickers” and “migrant taxi service” became common slurs used toward humanitarian NGOs by anti-immigration politicians and the Italian far right.

    Zuccaro would eventually walk back his claims, telling a parliamentary committee that he was working off a hypothesis at the time and had no evidence to back it up.

    In an interview with a German newspaper in February 2017, the director of Frontex, Fabrice Leggeri, refrained from explicitly criticizing the work of rescue NGOs but did say they were hampering police investigations in the Mediterranean. As aid organizations assumed a larger percentage of rescues, Leggeri said, “it is becoming more difficult for the European security authorities to find out more about the smuggling networks through interviews with migrants.”

    “That smear campaign was very, very deep,” remembered Bonino, the former foreign minister. Referring to Marco Minniti, Italy’s interior minister at the time, she added, “I was trying to push Minniti not to be so obsessed with people coming, but to make a policy of integration in Italy. But he only focused on Libya and smuggling and criminalizing NGOs with the help of prosecutors.”

    Bonino explained that the action against NGOs was part of a larger plan to change European policy in the central Mediterranean. The first step was the shift away from humanitarian rescue and toward border security and smuggling. The second step “was blaming the NGOs or arresting them, a sort of dirty campaign against them,” she said. “The results of which after so many years have been no convictions, no penalties, no trials.”

    Finally, the third step was to build a new coast guard in Libya to do what the Europeans couldn’t, per international law: intercept people at sea and bring them back to Libya, the country from which they had just fled.

    At first, leaders at Frontex were cautious. “From Frontex’s point of view, we look at Libya with concern; there is no stable state there,” Leggeri said in the 2017 interview. “We are now helping to train 60 officers for a possible future Libyan coast guard. But this is at best a beginning.”

    Bonino saw this effort differently. “They started providing support for their so-called coast guard,” she said, “which were the same traffickers changing coats.”
    Rescued migrants disembarking from a Libyan coast guard ship in the town of Khoms, a town 120 kilometres (75 miles) east of the capital on October 1, 2019.

    Same Uniforms, Same Ships

    Safe on land in Italy, Dieudonne was never called to testify in court. He hopes that none of his peers ended up in prison but said he would gladly testify against the traffickers if called. Aboard the coast guard ship, he remembers, “I gave the police contact information for the traffickers, I gave them names.”

    The smuggling operations in Libya happened out in the open, but Italian police could only go as far as international waters. Leaked documents from Operation Sophia describe years of efforts by European officials to get Libyan police to arrest smugglers. Behind closed doors, top Italian and EU officials admitted that these same smugglers were intertwined with the new Libyan coast guard that Europe was creating and that working with them would likely go against international law.

    As early as 2015, multiple officials at the anti-mafia meetings noted that some smugglers were uncomfortably close to members of the Libyan government. “Militias use the same uniforms and the same ships as the Libyan coast guard that the Italian navy itself is training,” Rear Adm. Enrico Credendino, then in charge of Operation Sophia, said in 2017. The head of the Libyan coast guard and the Libyan minister of defense, both allies of the Italian government, Credendino added, “have close relationships with some militia bosses.”

    One of the Libyan coast guard officers playing both sides was Abd al-Rahman Milad, also known as Bija. In 2019, the Italian newspaper Avvenire revealed that Bija participated in a May 2017 meeting in Sicily, alongside Italian border police and intelligence officials, that was aimed at stemming migration from Libya. A month later, he was condemned by the U.N. Security Council for his role as a top member of a powerful trafficking militia in the coastal town of Zawiya, and for, as the U.N. put it, “sinking migrant boats using firearms.”

    According to leaked documents from Operation Sophia, coast guard officers under Bija’s command were trained by the EU between 2016 and 2018.

    While the Italian government was prosecuting supposed smugglers in Italy, they were also working with people they knew to be smugglers in Libya. Minniti, Italy’s then-interior minister, justified the deals his government was making in Libya by saying that the prospect of mass migration from Africa made him “fear for the well-being of Italian democracy.”

    In one of the 2017 anti-mafia meetings, a representative of the Interior Ministry, Vittorio Pisani, outlined in clear terms a plan that provided for the direct coordination of the new Libyan coast guard. They would create “an operation room in Libya for the exchange of information with the Interior Ministry,” Pisani explained, “mainly on the position of NGO ships and their rescue operations, in order to employ the Libyan coast guard in its national waters.”

    And with that, the third step of the plan was set in motion. At the end of the meeting, Roberti suggested that the group invite representatives from the Libyan police to their next meeting. In an interview with The Intercept, Roberti confirmed that Libyan representatives attended at least two anti-mafia meetings and that he himself met Bija at a meeting in Libya, one month after the U.N. Security Council report was published. The following year, the Security Council committee on Libya sanctioned Bija, freezing his assets and banning him from international travel.

    “We needed to have the participation of Libyan institutions. But they did nothing, because they were taking money from the traffickers,” Roberti told us from the cafe in Naples. “They themselves were the traffickers.”
    A Place of Safety

    Roberti retired from the anti-mafia directorate in 2017. He said that under his leadership, the organization was able to create a basis for handling migration throughout Europe. Still, Roberti admits that his expansion of the DNAA into migration issues has had mixed results. Like his trip to Germany in the ’90s with Giovanni Falcone, Roberti said the anti-mafia strategy faltered because of a lack of collaboration: with the NGOs, with other European governments, and with Libya.

    “On a European level, the cooperation does not work,” Roberti said. Regarding Libya, he added, “We tried — I believe it was right, the agreements [the government] made. But it turned out to be a failure in the end.”

    The DNAA has since expanded its operations. Between 2017 and 2019, the Italian government passed two bills that put the anti-mafia directorate in charge of virtually all illegal immigration matters. Since 2017, five Sicilian prosecutors, all of whom attended at least one anti-mafia coordination meeting, have initiated 15 separate legal proceedings against humanitarian NGO workers. So far there have been no convictions: Three cases have been thrown out in court, and the rest are ongoing.

    Earlier this month, news broke that Sicilian prosecutors had wiretapped journalists and human rights lawyers as part of one of these investigations, listening in on legally protected conversations with sources and clients. The Italian justice ministry has opened an investigation into the incident, which could amount to criminal behavior, according to Italian legal experts. The prosecutor who approved the wiretaps attended at least one DNAA coordination meeting, where investigations against NGOs were discussed at length.

    As the DNAA has extended its reach, key actors from the anti-mafia coordination meetings have risen through the ranks of Italian and European institutions. One prosecutor, Federico Cafiero de Raho, now runs the anti-mafia directorate. Salvi, the former prosecutor of Catania, is the equivalent of Italy’s attorney general. Pisani, the former Interior Ministry representative, is deputy head of the Italian intelligence services. And Roberti is a member of the European Parliament.

    Cafiero de Raho stands by the investigations and arrests that the anti-mafia directorate has made over the years. He said the coordination meetings were an essential tool for prosecutors and police during difficult times.

    When asked about his specific comments during the meetings — particularly statements that humanitarian NGOs needed to be regulated and multiple admissions that members of the new Libyan coast guard were involved in smuggling activities — Cafiero de Raho said that his remarks should be placed in context, a time when Italy and the EU were working to build a coast guard in a part of Libya that was largely ruled by local militias. He said his ultimate goal was what, in the DNAA coordination meetings, he called the “extrajudicial solution”: attempts to prove the existence of crimes against humanity in Libya so that “the United Nation sends troops to Libya to dismantle migrants camps set up by traffickers … and retake control of that territory.”

    A spokesperson for the EU’s foreign policy arm, which ran Operation Sophia, refused to directly address evidence that leaders of the European military operation knew that parts of the new Libyan coast guard were also involved in smuggling activities, only noting that Bija himself wasn’t trained by the EU. A Frontex spokesperson stated that the agency “was not involved in the selection of officers to be trained.”

    In 2019, the European migration strategy changed again. Now, the vast majority of departures are intercepted by the Libyan coast guard and brought back to Libya. In March of that year, Operation Sophia removed all of its ships from the rescue area and has since focused on using aerial patrols to direct and coordinate the Libyan coast guard. Human rights lawyers in Europe have filed six legal actions against Italy and the EU as a result, calling the practice refoulement by proxy: facilitating the return of migrants to dangerous circumstances in violation of international law.

    Indeed, throughout four years of coordination meetings, Italy and the EU were admitting privately that returning people to Libya would be illegal. “Fundamental human rights violations in Libya make it impossible to push migrants back to the Libyan coast,” Pisani explained in 2015. Two years later, he outlined the beginnings of a plan that would do exactly that.

    The Result of Mere Chance

    Dieudonne knows he was lucky. The line that separates suspect and victim can be entirely up to police officers’ first impressions in the minutes or hours following a rescue. According to police reports used in prosecutions, physical attributes like having “a clearer skin tone” or behavior aboard the ship, including scrutinizing police movements “with strange interest,” were enough to rouse suspicion.

    In a 2019 ruling that acquitted seven alleged smugglers after three years of pretrial detention, judges wrote that “the selection of the suspects on one side, and the witnesses on the other, with the only exception of the driver, has almost been the result of mere chance.”

    Carrying out work for their Libyan captors has cost other migrants in Italy lengthy prison sentences. In September 2019, a 22-year-old Guinean nicknamed Suarez was arrested upon his arrival to Italy. Four witnesses told police he had collaborated with prison guards in Zawiya, at the immigrant detention center managed by the infamous Bija.

    “Suarez was also a prisoner, who then took on a job,” one of the witnesses told the court. Handing out meals or taking care of security is what those who can’t afford to pay their ransom often do in order to get out, explained another. “Unfortunately, you would have to be there to understand the situation,” the first witness said. Suarez was sentenced to 20 years in prison, recently reduced to 12 years on appeal.

    Dieudonne remembered his journey at sea vividly, but with surprising cool. When the boat began taking on water, he tried to help. “One must give help where it is needed.” At his office in Bari, Dieudonne bent over and moved his arms in a low scooping motion, like he was bailing water out of a boat.

    “Should they condemn me too?” he asked. He finds it ironic that it was the Libyans who eventually arrested Bija on human trafficking charges this past October. The Italians and Europeans, he said with a laugh, were too busy working with the corrupt coast guard commander. (In April, Bija was released from prison after a Libyan court absolved him of all charges. He was promoted within the coast guard and put back on the job.)

    Dieudonne thinks often about the people he identified aboard the coast guard ship in the middle of the sea. “I told the police the truth. But if that collaboration ends with the conviction of an innocent person, it’s not good,” he said. “Because I know that person did nothing. On the contrary, he saved our lives by driving that raft.”

    https://theintercept.com/2021/04/30/italy-anti-mafia-migrant-rescue-smuggling

    #Méditerranée #Italie #Libye #ONG #criminalisation_de_la_solidarité #solidarité #secours #mer_Méditerranée #asile #migrations #réfugiés #violence #passeurs #Méditerranée_centrale #anti-mafia #anti-terrorisme #Direzione_nazionale_antimafia_e_antiterrorismo #DNAA #Frontex #Franco_Roberti #justice #politique #Zuwara #torture #viol #Mare_Nostrum #Europol #eaux_internationales #droit_de_la_mer #droit_maritime #juridiction_italienne #arrestations #Gigi_Modica #scafista #scafisti #état_de_nécessité #Giovanni_Salvi #NGO #Operation_Sophia #MOAS #DNA #Carmelo_Zuccaro #Zuccaro #Fabrice_Leggeri #Leggeri #Marco_Minniti #Minniti #campagne #gardes-côtes_libyens #milices #Enrico_Credendino #Abd_al-Rahman_Milad #Bija ##Abdurhaman_al-Milad #Al_Bija #Zawiya #Vittorio_Pisani #Federico_Cafiero_de_Raho #solution_extrajudiciaire #pull-back #refoulement_by_proxy #refoulement #push-back #Suarez

    ping @karine4 @isskein @rhoumour

  • EU : One step closer to the establishment of the ’#permission-to-travel' scheme

    The Council and Parliament have reached provisional agreement on rules governing how the forthcoming #European_Travel_Information_and_Authorisation System (#ETIAS) will ’talk’ to other migration and policing databases, with the purpose of conducting automated searches on would-be travellers to the EU.

    The ETIAS will mirror systems such as the #ESTA scheme in the USA, and will require that citizens of countries who do not need a #visa to travel to the EU instead apply for a “travel authorisation”.

    As with visas, travel companies will be required to check an individual’s travel authorisation before they board a plane, coach or train, effectively creating a new ’permission-to-travel’ scheme.

    The ETIAS also includes a controversial #profiling and ’watchlist’ system, an aspect not mentioned in the Council’s press release (full-text below).

    The rules on which the Council and Parliament have reached provisional agreement - and which will thus almost certainly be the final text of the legislation - concern how and when the ETIAS can ’talk’ to other EU databases such as #Eurodac (asylum applications), the #Visa_Information_System, or the #Schengen_Information_System.

    Applicants will also be checked against #Europol and #Interpol databases.

    As the press release notes, the ETIAS will also serve as one of the key components of the “interoperability” scheme, which will interconnect numerous EU databases and lead to the creation of a new, biometric ’#Common_Identity_Repository' on up to 300 million non-EU nationals.

    You can find out more about the ETIAS, related changes to the Visa Information System, and the interoperability plans in the Statewatch report Automated Suspicion: https://www.statewatch.org/automated-suspicion-the-eu-s-new-travel-surveillance-initiatives

    –------

    The text below is a press release published by the Council of the EU on 18 March 2020: https://www.consilium.europa.eu/en/press/press-releases/2021/03/18/european-travel-information-and-authorisation-system-etias-council-

    European travel information and authorisation system (ETIAS): Council Presidency and European Parliament provisionally agree on rules for accessing relevant databases

    The Council presidency and European Parliament representatives today reached a provisional agreement on the rules connecting the ETIAS central system to the relevant EU databases. The agreed texts will next be submitted to the relevant bodies of the Council and the Parliament for political endorsement and, following this, for their formal adoption.

    The adoption of these rules will be the final legislative step required for the setting up of ETIAS, which is expected to be operational by 2022.

    The introduction of ETIAS aims to improve internal security, prevent illegal immigration, protect public health and reduce delays at the borders by identifying persons who may pose a risk in one of these areas before they arrive at the external borders. ETIAS is also a building bloc of the interoperability between JHA databases, an important political objective of the EU in this area, which is foreseen to be operational by the end of 2023.

    The provisionally agreed rules will allow the ETIAS central system to perform checks against the Schengen Information System (SIS), the Visa Information System (VIS), the Entry/Exit System (EES), Eurodac and the database on criminal records of third country nationals (ECRIS-TCN), as well as on Europol and Interpol data.

    They allow for the connection of the ETIAS central system to these databases and set out the data to be accessed for ETIAS purposes, as well as the conditions and access rights for the ETIAS central unit and the ETIAS national units. Access to the relevant data in these systems will allow authorities to assess the security or immigration risk of applicants and decide whether to issue or refuse a travel authorisation.
    Background

    ETIAS is the new EU travel information and authorisation system. It will apply to visa-exempt third country nationals, who will need to obtain a travel authorisation before their trip, via an online application.

    The information submitted in each application will be automatically processed against EU and relevant Interpol databases to determine whether there are grounds to refuse a travel authorisation. If no hits or elements requiring further analysis are identified, the travel authorisation will be issued automatically and quickly. This is expected to be the case for most applications. If there is a hit or an element requiring analysis, the application will be handled manually by the competent authorities.

    A travel authorisation will be valid for three years or until the end of validity of the travel document registered during application, whichever comes first. For each application, the applicant will be required to pay a travel authorisation fee of 7 euros.

    https://www.statewatch.org/news/2021/march/eu-one-step-closer-to-the-establishment-of-the-permission-to-travel-sche

    #interopérabilité #base_de_données #database #données_personnelles #migrations #mobilité #autorisations #visas #compagnies_de_voyage #VIS #SIS #EU #UE #union_européenne #biométrie

    ping @etraces @isskein @karine4

    • L’UE précise son futur système de contrôle des voyageurs exemptés de visas

      Les modalités du futur système de #contrôle_préalable, auquel devront se soumettre d’ici fin 2022 les ressortissants de pays tiers pouvant se rendre dans l’Union #sans_visa, a fait l’objet d’un #accord annoncé vendredi par l’exécutif européen.

      Ce dispositif, baptisé ETIAS et inspiré du système utilisé par les Etats-Unis, concernera les ressortissants de plus de 60 pays qui sont exemptés de visas pour leurs courts séjours dans l’Union, comme les ressortissants des Etats-Unis, du Brésil, ou encore de l’Albanie et des Emirats arabes unis.

      Ce système dit « d’information et d’autorisation », qui vise à repérer avant leur entrée dans l’#espace_Schengen des personnes jugées à #risques, doit permettre un contrôle de sécurité avant leur départ via une demande d’autorisation sur internet.

      Dans le cadre de l’ETIAS, les demandes en ligne coûteront 7 euros et chaque autorisation sera valable trois ans pour des entrées multiples, a indiqué un porte-parole de la Commission.

      Selon les prévisions, « probablement plus de 95% » des demandes « donneront lieu à une #autorisation_automatique », a-t-il ajouté.

      Le Parlement européen avait adopté dès juillet 2018 une législation établissant le système ETIAS, mais dans les négociations pour finaliser ses modalités opérationnelles, les eurodéputés réclamaient des garde-fous, en le rendant interopérable avec les autres systèmes d’information de l’UE.

      Eurodéputés et représentants des Etats, de concert avec la Commission, ont approuvé jeudi des modifications qui permettront la consultation de différentes #bases_de_données, dont celles d’#Europol et d’#Interpol, pour identifier les « menaces sécuritaires potentielles, dangers de migration illégale ou risques épidémiologiques élevés ».

      Il contribuera ainsi à « la mise en oeuvre du nouveau Pacte (européen) sur la migration et l’asile », a estimé le porte-parole.

      « Nous devons savoir qui franchit nos #frontières_extérieures. (ETIAS) fournira des #informations_préalables sur les voyageurs avant qu’ils n’atteignent les frontières de l’UE afin d’identifier les risques en matière de #sécurité ou de #santé », a souligné Ylva Johansson, commissaire aux affaires intérieures, citée dans un communiqué.

      Hors restrictions dues à la pandémie, « au moins 30 millions de voyageurs se rendent chaque année dans l’UE sans visa, et on ne sait pas grand chose à leur sujet. L’ETIAS comblera cette lacune, car il exigera un "#background_check" », selon l’eurodéputé Jeroen Lenaers (PPE, droite pro-UE), rapporteur du texte.

      L’accord doit recevoir un ultime feu vert du Parlement et des Vingt-Sept pour permettre au système d’entrer en vigueur.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/fil-dactualites/190321/l-ue-precise-son-futur-systeme-de-controle-des-voyageurs-exemptes-de-visas
      #smart_borders #frontières_intelligentes

    • Eurodac, la “sorveglianza di massa” per fermare le persone ai confini Ue

      Oggi il database conserva le impronte digitali di richiedenti asilo e stranieri “irregolari”. La proposta di riforma della Commissione Ue vuole inserire più dati biometrici, compresi quelli dei minori. Mettendo a rischio privacy e diritti

      Da più di vent’anni i richiedenti asilo che presentano domanda di protezione in un Paese europeo, così come i cittadini stranieri che attraversano “irregolarmente” i confini dell’Unione, sono registrati con le impronte digitali all’interno del sistema “Eurodac”. L’acronimo sta per “European asylum dactyloscopy database” e al 31 dicembre 2019 contava oltre 5,69 milioni di set di impronte cui se ne sono aggiunti oltre 644mila nel corso del 2020. Le finalità di Eurodac sono strettamente legate al Regolamento Dublino: il database, infatti, era stato istituito nel 2000 per individuare il Paese europeo di primo ingresso dei richiedenti asilo, che avrebbe dovuto valutare la domanda di protezione, ed evitare che la stessa persona presentasse domanda di protezione in più Paesi europei (il cosiddetto asylum shopping). 

      Nei prossimi anni, però, Eurodac potrebbe diventare uno strumento completamente diverso. Il 23 settembre 2020 la “nuova” Commissione europea guidata da Ursula von der Leyen, infatti, ha presentato una proposta di riforma che ricalca un testo presentato nel 2016 e si inserisce all’interno del Patto sull’immigrazione e l’asilo, ampliando gli obiettivi del database: “Eurodac, che era stato creato per stabilire quale sia il Paese europeo competente a esaminare la domanda di asilo, vede affiancarsi alla sua funzione originaria il controllo delle migrazioni irregolari e dei flussi secondari all’interno dell’Unione -commenta Valeria Ferraris, ricercatrice presso il dipartimento di Giurisprudenza dell’Università di Torino (unito.it)-. Viene messa in atto un’estensione del controllo sui richiedenti asilo visti sempre più come migranti irregolari e non come persone bisognose di protezione”.

      “Oggi Eurodac registra solo le impronte digitali. La proposta di riforma prevede di aggiungere i dati biometrici del volto, che possono essere utilizzati per il riconoscimento facciale tramite apposite tecnologie -spiega ad Altreconomia Chloé Berthélémy, policy advisor dell’European digital rights-. Inoltre si prevede di raccogliere anche le generalità dei migranti, informazioni relative a data e luogo di nascita-nazionalità. Sia per gli adulti sia per i minori a partire dai sei anni di età, mentre oggi vengono registrati solo gli adolescenti dai 14 anni in su”. Per Bruxelles l’esigenza di aggiungere nuovi dati biometrici al database è motivata dalle difficoltà di alcuni Stati membri nel raccogliere le impronte digitali a causa del rifiuto da parte dei richiedenti asilo o perché questi si procurano tagli, lesioni o scottature per non essere identificati. La stima dei costi per l’espansione di Eurodac è di 29,8 milioni di euro, necessari per “l’aggiornamento tecnico, l’aumento dell’archiviazione e della capacità del sistema centrale” si legge nella proposta di legge. 

      Le preoccupazioni per possibili violazioni dei diritti di migranti hanno spinto Edri, il principale network europeo di Ong impegnate nella tutela dei diritti e delle libertà digitali, e altre trenta associazioni (tra cui Amnesty International, Statewatch, Terre des Hommes) a scrivere lo scorso settembre una lettera aperta alla Commissione Libe del Parlamento europeo per chiedere di ritardare il processo legislativo di modifica di Eurodac e “concedere il tempo necessario a un’analisi significativa delle implicazioni sui diritti fondamentali della proposta di riforma”. 

      “Lungi dall’essere meramente tecnico, il dossier Eurodac è di natura altamente politica e strategica”, scrivono le associazioni firmatarie nella lettera. Che avvertono: se le modifiche proposte verranno adottate potrebbe venire compromesso “il dovere dell’Unione europea di rispettare il diritto e gli standard internazionali in materia di asilo e migrazione”. Eurodac rischia così di trasformarsi in “un potente strumento per la sorveglianza di massa” dei cittadini stranieri. Inoltre “le modifiche proposte sulla banca dati, che implicano il trattamento di più categorie di dati per una serie più ampia di finalità, sono in palese contraddizione con il principio di limitazione delle finalità, un principio chiave Ue sulla protezione dei dati”.

      “Si rischia di estendere il controllo sui richiedenti asilo visti sempre più come migranti ‘irregolari’ e non come persone bisognose di protezione” – Valeria Ferraris

      Le critiche delle associazioni firmatarie si concentrano soprattutto sul possibile uso del riconoscimento facciale per l’identificazione biometrica che viene definito “sproporzionato e invasivo della privacy” si legge nella lettera. “Le leggi fondamentali sulla protezione dei dati personali in Europa stabiliscono che l’interferenza con il diritto alla privacy deve essere proporzionata e rispondere a un interesse generale -spiega Chloé Berthélémy-. Nel caso di Eurodac, l’utilizzo delle impronte digitali è sufficiente a garantire l’identificazione della persona garantendo così il principio di limitazione dello scopo, che è centrale per la protezione dei dati in Europa”. 

      “Noi siamo contrari all’uso di tecnologie di riconoscimento facciale e siamo particolarmente radicali su questo -aggiungono Davide Del Monte e Laura Carrer dell’Hermes Center, una delle associazioni firmatarie della lettera-. Una tecnologia può anche avere un utilizzo corretto, ad esempio per combattere il terrorismo, ma la potenza di questi strumenti è tale che, a nostro avviso, i rischi e i pericoli sono molto superiori ai potenziali benefici che possono portare. Inoltre è molto difficile fare un passo indietro una volta che le infrastrutture necessarie a implementare queste tecnologie vengono ‘posate’ e messe in funzione: non si torna mai indietro e il loro utilizzo viene sempre ampliato. Per noi sono equiparabili ad armi e per questo la loro circolazione deve essere limitata”. Anche in virtù di queste posizioni, Hermes Center è promotore in Italia della campagna “Reclaim your face” con cui si chiede alle istituzioni di vietare il riconoscimento facciale negli spazi pubblici.

      “La potenza di questi strumenti è tale che, a nostro avviso, i rischi e i pericoli sono molto superiori ai potenziali benefici che possono portare” – Laura Carrer

      Ma non è finita. Se la riforma verrà adottata, all’interno del database europeo finiranno non solo i richiedenti asilo e le persone intercettate mentre attraversano “irregolarmente” le frontiere esterne dell’Unione europea ma anche tutti gli stranieri privi di titolo di soggiorno che venissero fermati all’interno di un Paese europeo e verrebbe anche creata una categoria ad hoc per i migranti soccorsi in mare durante un’operazione di search and rescue. Verranno inoltre raccolti i dati relativi ai bambini a partire dai sei anni di età: ufficialmente, questa (radicale) modifica al funzionamento del database europeo è stata introdotta con l’obiettivo di tutelare i minori stranieri. 

      Ma le associazioni evidenziano come raccogliere e conservare i dati biometrici dei bambini per scopi non legati alla loro protezione rappresenti “una violazione gravemente invasiva e ingiustificata del diritto alla privacy, che lede i principi di proporzionalità e necessità”. Dati e informazioni che verranno conservati più a lungo di quanto non accade oggi: per i “migranti irregolari” si passa dai 18 mesi attuali a cinque anni.

      A complicare ulteriormente la situazione c’è anche l’entrata in vigore nel 2018 del nuovo “Regolamento interoperatività”, che permette di mettere in connessione Eurodac con altri database come il Sistema informativo Schengen (Sis) e il sistema informativo Visti (Vis), il Sistema europeo di informazione e autorizzazione ai viaggi (Etias) e il Sistema di ingressi/uscite (Ees). 

      “In precedenza, questi erano tutti sistemi autonomi, ora si sta andando verso un merging, garantendo una connessione che contraddice la base giuridica iniziale per cui ciascuno di questi sistemi aveva un suo obiettivo -spiega Ferraris-. Nel corso degli anni gli obiettivi attribuiti a ciascun sistema si sono moltiplicati, violando i principi in materia di protezione dei dati personali e diventando progressivamente sempre più focalizzati sul controllo della migrazione”. Inoltre le modifiche normative hanno esteso l’accesso a questi database sempre più integrati tra loro a un numero sempre maggiore di autorità.

      “Quello che chiediamo al Parlamento europeo è di fare un passo indietro e di ripensare l’intero quadro normativo -conclude Berthélémy-. La nostra principale raccomandazione è quella di realizzare e pubblicare una valutazione di impatto sull’estensione dell’applicazione di Eurodac per delineare le conseguenze sui diritti fondamentali o su quelli dei minori causati dalle significative modifiche proposte. Si sta estendendo in maniera enorme l’ambito di applicazione di un database, e questo avrà conseguenze per decine di migliaia di persone”.

      https://altreconomia.it/eurodac-la-sorveglianza-di-massa-per-fermare-le-persone-ai-confini-ue

  • Palantir is not our friend
    https://aboutintel.eu/palantir-eu-independence

    In recent years, controversial US big data analytics company Palantir has gained ground in European agencies and their data infrastructure. This reflects a larger naiveté within European politics towards foreign tech companies and an imbalance in EU-US relations. Not only should Palantir be kept out of our institutions and security fabric, it is high time for the EU to gain more strategic technological independence, so that it may defend and assert its status as the last bastion of privacy. (...)

    #contactTracing #CapGemini #Europol #anti-terrorisme #In-Q-Tel #Paypal #Palantir #BigData #lobbying #COVID-19 #santé (...)

    ##santé ##[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données__RGPD_[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_

  • Fil de discussion sur le nouveau #pacte_européen_sur_la_migration_et_l’asile

    –—

    Migrants : le règlement de Dublin va être supprimé

    La Commission européenne doit présenter le 23 septembre sa proposition de réforme de sa politique migratoire, très attendue et plusieurs fois repoussée.

    Cinq ans après le début de la crise migratoire, l’Union européenne veut changer de stratégie. La Commission européenne veut “abolir” le règlement de Dublin qui fracture les Etats-membres et qui confie la responsabilité du traitement des demandes d’asile au pays de première entrée des migrants dans l’UE, a annoncé ce mercredi 16 septembre la cheffe de l’exécutif européen Ursula von der Leyen dans son discours sur l’Etat de l’Union.

    La Commission doit présenter le 23 septembre sa proposition de réforme de la politique migratoire européenne, très attendue et plusieurs fois repoussée, alors que le débat sur le manque de solidarité entre pays Européens a été relancé par l’incendie du camp de Moria sur lîle grecque de Lesbos.

    “Au coeur (de la réforme) il y a un engagement pour un système plus européen”, a déclaré Ursula von der Leyen devant le Parlement européen. “Je peux annoncer que nous allons abolir le règlement de Dublin et le remplacer par un nouveau système européen de gouvernance de la migration”, a-t-elle poursuivi.
    Nouveau mécanisme de solidarité

    “Il y aura des structures communes pour l’asile et le retour. Et il y aura un nouveau mécanisme fort de solidarité”, a-t-elle dit, alors que les pays qui sont en première ligne d’arrivée des migrants (Grèce, Malte, Italie notamment) se plaignent de devoir faire face à une charge disproportionnée.

    La proposition de réforme de la Commission devra encore être acceptée par les Etats. Ce qui n’est pas gagné d’avance. Cinq ans après la crise migratoire de 2015, la question de l’accueil des migrants est un sujet qui reste source de profondes divisions en Europe, certains pays de l’Est refusant d’accueillir des demandeurs d’asile.

    Sous la pression, le système d’asile européen organisé par le règlement de Dublin a explosé après avoir pesé lourdement sur la Grèce ou l’Italie.

    Le nouveau plan pourrait notamment prévoir davantage de sélection des demandeurs d’asile aux frontières extérieures et un retour des déboutés dans leur pays assuré par Frontex. Egalement à l’étude pour les Etats volontaires : un mécanisme de relocalisation des migrants sauvés en Méditerranée, parfois contraints d’errer en mer pendant des semaines en attente d’un pays d’accueil.

    Ce plan ne résoudrait toutefois pas toutes les failles. Pour le patron de l’Office français de l’immigration et de l’intégration, Didier Leschi, “il ne peut pas y avoir de politique européenne commune sans critères communs pour accepter les demandes d’asile.”

    https://www.huffingtonpost.fr/entry/migrants-le-reglement-de-dublin-tres-controverse-va-etre-supprime_fr_

    #migrations #asile #réfugiés #Dublin #règlement_dublin #fin #fin_de_Dublin #suppression #pacte #Pacte_européen_sur_la_migration #new_pact #nouveau_pacte #pacte_sur_la_migration_et_l'asile

    –---

    Documents officiels en lien avec le pacte :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/879881

    –-

    ajouté à la métaliste sur le pacte :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/1019088

    ping @reka @karine4 @_kg_ @isskein

    • Immigration : le règlement de Dublin, l’impossible #réforme ?

      En voulant abroger le règlement de Dublin, qui impose la responsabilité des demandeurs d’asile au premier pays d’entrée dans l’Union européenne, Bruxelles reconnaît des dysfonctionnements dans l’accueil des migrants. Mais les Vingt-Sept, plus que jamais divisés sur cette question, sont-ils prêts à une refonte du texte ? Éléments de réponses.

      Ursula Von der Leyen en a fait une des priorités de son mandat : réformer le règlement de Dublin, qui impose au premier pays de l’UE dans lequel le migrant est arrivé de traiter sa demande d’asile. « Je peux annoncer que nous allons [l’]abolir et le remplacer par un nouveau système européen de gouvernance de la migration », a déclaré la présidente de la Commission européenne mercredi 16 septembre, devant le Parlement.

      Les États dotés de frontières extérieures comme la Grèce, l’Italie ou Malte se sont réjouis de cette annonce. Ils s’estiment lésés par ce règlement en raison de leur situation géographique qui les place en première ligne.

      La présidente de la Commission européenne doit présenter, le 23 septembre, une nouvelle version de la politique migratoire, jusqu’ici maintes fois repoussée. « Il y aura des structures communes pour l’asile et le retour. Et il y aura un nouveau mécanisme fort de solidarité », a-t-elle poursuivi. Un terme fort à l’heure où l’incendie du camp de Moria sur l’île grecque de Lesbos, plus de 8 000 adultes et 4 000 enfants à la rue, a révélé le manque d’entraide entre pays européens.

      Pour mieux comprendre l’enjeu de cette nouvelle réforme européenne de la politique migratoire, France 24 décrypte le règlement de Dublin qui divise tant les Vingt-Sept, en particulier depuis la crise migratoire de 2015.

      Pourquoi le règlement de Dublin dysfonctionne ?

      Les failles ont toujours existé mais ont été révélées par la crise migratoire de 2015, estiment les experts de politique migratoire. Ce texte signé en 2013 et qu’on appelle « Dublin III » repose sur un accord entre les membres de l’Union européenne ainsi que la Suisse, l’Islande, la Norvège et le Liechtenstein. Il prévoit que l’examen de la demande d’asile d’un exilé incombe au premier pays d’entrée en Europe. Si un migrant passé par l’Italie arrive par exemple en France, les autorités françaises ne sont, en théorie, pas tenu d’enregistrer la demande du Dubliné.
      © Union européenne | Les pays signataires du règlement de Dublin.

      Face à l’afflux de réfugiés ces dernières années, les pays dotés de frontières extérieures, comme la Grèce et l’Italie, se sont estimés abandonnés par le reste de l’Europe. « La charge est trop importante pour ce bloc méditerranéen », estime Matthieu Tardis, chercheur au Centre migrations et citoyennetés de l’Ifri (Institut français des relations internationales). Le texte est pensé « comme un mécanisme de responsabilité des États et non de solidarité », estime-t-il.

      Sa mise en application est aussi difficile à mettre en place. La France et l’Allemagne, qui concentrent la majorité des demandes d’asile depuis le début des années 2000, peinent à renvoyer les Dublinés. Dans l’Hexagone, seulement 11,5 % ont été transférés dans le pays d’entrée. Outre-Rhin, le taux ne dépasse pas les 15 %. Conséquence : nombre d’entre eux restent « bloqués » dans les camps de migrants à Calais ou dans le nord de Paris.

      Le délai d’attente pour les demandeurs d’asile est aussi jugé trop long. Un réfugié passé par l’Italie, qui vient déposer une demande d’asile en France, peut attendre jusqu’à 18 mois avant d’avoir un retour. « Durant cette période, il se retrouve dans une situation d’incertitude très dommageable pour lui mais aussi pour l’Union européenne. C’est un système perdant-perdant », commente Matthieu Tardis.

      Ce règlement n’est pas adapté aux demandeurs d’asile, surenchérit-on à la Cimade (Comité inter-mouvements auprès des évacués). Dans un rapport, l’organisation qualifie ce système de « machine infernale de l’asile européen ». « Il ne tient pas compte des liens familiaux ni des langues parlées par les réfugiés », précise le responsable asile de l’association, Gérard Sadik.

      Sept ans après avoir vu le jour, le règlement s’est vu porter le coup de grâce par le confinement lié aux conditions sanitaires pour lutter contre le Covid-19. « Durant cette période, aucun transfert n’a eu lieu », assure-t-on à la Cimade.

      Le mécanisme de solidarité peut-il le remplacer ?

      « Il y aura un nouveau mécanisme fort de solidarité », a promis Ursula von der Leyen, sans donné plus de précision. Sur ce point, on sait déjà que les positions divergent, voire s’opposent, entre les Vingt-Sept.

      Le bloc du nord-ouest (Allemagne, France, Autriche, Benelux) reste ancré sur le principe actuel de responsabilité, mais accepte de l’accompagner d’un mécanisme de solidarité. Sur quels critères se base la répartition du nombre de demandeurs d’asile ? Comment les sélectionner ? Aucune décision n’est encore actée. « Ils sont prêts à des compromis car ils veulent montrer que l’Union européenne peut avancer et agir sur la question migratoire », assure Matthieu Tardis.

      En revanche, le groupe dit de Visegrad (Hongrie, Pologne, République tchèque, Slovaquie), peu enclin à l’accueil, rejette catégoriquement tout principe de solidarité. « Ils se disent prêts à envoyer des moyens financiers, du personnel pour le contrôle aux frontières mais refusent de recevoir les demandeurs d’asile », détaille le chercheur de l’Ifri.

      Quant au bloc Méditerranée (Grèce, Italie, Malte , Chypre, Espagne), des questions subsistent sur la proposition du bloc nord-ouest : le mécanisme de solidarité sera-t-il activé de façon permanente ou exceptionnelle ? Quelles populations sont éligibles au droit d’asile ? Et qui est responsable du retour ? « Depuis le retrait de la Ligue du Nord de la coalition dans le gouvernement italien, le dialogue est à nouveau possible », avance Matthieu Tardis.

      Un accord semble toutefois indispensable pour montrer que l’Union européenne n’est pas totalement en faillite sur ce dossier. « Mais le bloc de Visegrad n’a pas forcément en tête cet enjeu », nuance-t-il. Seule la situation sanitaire liée au Covid-19, qui place les pays de l’Est dans une situation économique fragile, pourrait faire évoluer leur position, note le chercheur.

      Et le mécanisme par répartition ?

      Le mécanisme par répartition, dans les tuyaux depuis 2016, revient régulièrement sur la table des négociations. Son principe : la capacité d’accueil du pays dépend de ses poids démographique et économique. Elle serait de 30 % pour l’Allemagne, contre un tiers des demandes aujourd’hui, et 20 % pour la France, qui en recense 18 %. « Ce serait une option gagnante pour ces deux pays, mais pas pour le bloc du Visegrad qui s’y oppose », décrypte Gérard Sadik, le responsable asile de la Cimade.

      Cette doctrine reposerait sur un système informatisé, qui recenserait dans une seule base toutes les données des demandeurs d’asile. Mais l’usage de l’intelligence artificielle au profit de la procédure administrative ne présente pas que des avantages, aux yeux de la Cimade : « L’algorithme ne sera pas en mesure de tenir compte des liens familiaux des demandeurs d’asile », juge Gérard Sadik.

      Quelles chances pour une refonte ?

      L’Union européenne a déjà tenté plusieurs fois de réformer ce serpent de mer. Un texte dit « Dublin IV » était déjà dans les tuyaux depuis 2016, en proposant par exemple que la responsabilité du premier État d’accueil soit définitive, mais il a été enterré face aux dissensions internes.

      Reste à savoir quel est le contenu exact de la nouvelle version qui sera présentée le 23 septembre par Ursula Van der Leyen. À la Cimade, on craint un durcissement de la politique migratoire, et notamment un renforcement du contrôle aux frontières.

      Quoi qu’il en soit, les négociations s’annoncent « compliquées et difficiles » car « les intérêts des pays membres ne sont pas les mêmes », a rappelé le ministre grec adjoint des Migrations, Giorgos Koumoutsakos, jeudi 17 septembre. Et surtout, la nouvelle mouture devra obtenir l’accord du Parlement, mais aussi celui des États. La refonte est encore loin.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/27376/immigration-le-reglement-de-dublin-l-impossible-reforme

      #gouvernance #Ursula_Von_der_Leyen #mécanisme_de_solidarité #responsabilité #groupe_de_Visegrad #solidarité #répartition #mécanisme_par_répartition #capacité_d'accueil #intelligence_artificielle #algorithme #Dublin_IV

    • Germany’s #Seehofer cautiously optimistic on EU asylum reform

      For the first time during the German Presidency, EU interior ministers exchanged views on reforms of the EU asylum system. German Interior Minister Horst Seehofer (CSU) expressed “justified confidence” that a deal can be found. EURACTIV Germany reports.

      The focus of Tuesday’s (7 July) informal video conference of interior ministers was on the expansion of police cooperation and sea rescue, which, according to Seehofer, is one of the “Big Four” topics of the German Council Presidency, integrated into a reform of the #Common_European_Asylum_System (#CEAS).

      Following the meeting, the EU Commissioner for Home Affairs, Ylva Johansson, spoke of an “excellent start to the Presidency,” and Seehofer also praised the “constructive discussions.” In the field of asylum policy, she said that it had become clear that all member states were “highly interested in positive solutions.”

      The interior ministers were unanimous in their desire to further strengthen police cooperation and expand both the mandates and the financial resources of Europol and Frontex.

      Regarding the question of the distribution of refugees, Seehofer said that he had “heard statements that [he] had not heard in years prior.” He said that almost all member states were “prepared to show solidarity in different ways.”

      While about a dozen member states would like to participate in the distribution of those rescued from distress at the EU’s external borders in the event of a “disproportionate burden” on the states, other states signalled that they wanted to make control vessels, financial means or personnel available to prevent smuggling activities and stem migration across the Mediterranean.

      Seehofer’s final act

      It will probably be Seehofer’s last attempt to initiate CEAS reform. He announced in May that he would withdraw completely from politics after the end of the legislative period in autumn 2021.

      Now it seems that he considers CEAS reform as his last great mission, Seehofer said that he intends to address the migration issue from late summer onwards “with all I have at my disposal.” adding that Tuesday’s (7 July) talks had “once again kindled a real fire” in him. To this end, he plans to leave the official business of the Interior Ministry “in day-to-day matters” largely to the State Secretaries.

      Seehofer’s shift of priorities to the European stage comes at a time when he is being sharply criticised in Germany.

      While his initial handling of a controversial newspaper column about the police published in Berlin’s tageszeitung prompted criticism, Seehofer now faces accusations of concealing structural racism in the police. Seehofer had announced over the weekend that, contrary to the recommendation of the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance (ECRI), he would not commission a study on racial profiling in the police force after all.

      Seehofer: “One step is not enough”

      In recent months, Seehofer has made several attempts to set up a distribution mechanism for rescued persons in distress. On several occasions he accused the Commission of letting member states down by not solving the asylum question.

      “I have the ambition to make a great leap. One step would be too little in our presidency,” said Seehofer during Tuesday’s press conference. However, much depends on when the Commission will present its long-awaited migration pact, as its proposals are intended to serve as a basis for negotiations on CEAS reform.

      As Johansson said on Tuesday, this is planned for September. Seehofer thus only has just under four months to get the first Council conclusions through. “There will not be enough time for legislation,” he said.

      Until a permanent solution is found, ad hoc solutions will continue. A “sustainable solution” should include better cooperation with the countries of origin and transit, as the member states agreed on Tuesday.

      To this end, “agreements on the repatriation of refugees” are now to be reached with North African countries. A first step towards this will be taken next Monday (13 July), at a joint conference with North African leaders.

      https://www.euractiv.com/section/justice-home-affairs/news/germany-eyes-breakthrough-in-eu-migration-dispute-this-year

      #Europol #Frontex

    • Relocation, solidarity mandatory for EU migration policy: #Johansson

      In an interview with ANSA and other European media outlets, EU Commissioner for Home Affairs #Ylva_Johansson explained the new migration and asylum pact due to be unveiled on September 23, stressing that nobody will find ideal solutions but rather a well-balanced compromise that will ’’improve the situation’’.

      European Home Affairs Commissioner Ylva Johansson has explained in an interview with a group of European journalists, including ANSA, a new pact on asylum and migration to be presented on September 23. She touched on rules for countries of first entry, a new mechanism of mandatory solidarity, fast repatriations and refugee relocation.

      The Swedish commissioner said that no one will find ideal solutions in the European Commission’s new asylum and migration proposal but rather a good compromise that “will improve the situation”.

      She said the debate to change the asylum regulation known as Dublin needs to be played down in order to find an agreement. Johansson said an earlier 2016 reform plan would be withdrawn as it ’’caused the majority’’ of conflicts among countries.

      A new proposal that will replace the current one and amend the existing Dublin regulation will be presented, she explained.

      The current regulation will not be completely abolished but rules regarding frontline countries will change. Under the new proposal, migrants can still be sent back to the country responsible for their asylum request, explained the commissioner, adding that amendments will be made but the country of first entry will ’’remain important’’.

      ’’Voluntary solidarity is not enough," there has to be a “mandatory solidarity mechanism,” Johansson noted.

      Countries will need to help according to their size and possibilities. A member state needs to show solidarity ’’in accordance with the capacity and size’’ of its economy. There will be no easy way out with the possibility of ’’just sending some blankets’’ - efforts must be proportional to the size and capabilities of member states, she said.
      Relocations are a divisive theme

      Relocations will be made in a way that ’’can be possible to accept for all member states’’, the commissioner explained. The issue of mandatory quotas is extremely divisive, she went on to say. ’’The sentence of the European Court of Justice has established that they can be made’’.

      However, the theme is extremely divisive. Many of those who arrive in Europe are not eligible for international protection and must be repatriated, she said, wondering if it is a good idea to relocate those who need to be repatriated.

      “We are looking for a way to bring the necessary aid to countries under pressure.”

      “Relocation is an important part, but also” it must be done “in a way that can be possible to accept for all member states,” she noted.

      Moreover, Johansson said the system will not be too rigid as the union should prepare for different scenarios.
      Faster repatriations

      Repatriations will be a key part of the plan, with faster bureaucratic procedures, she said. The 2016 reform proposal was made following the 2015 migration crisis, when two million people, 90% of whom were refugees, reached the EU irregularly. For this reason, the plan focused on relocations, she explained.

      Now the situation is completely different: last year 2.4 million stay permits were issued, the majority for reasons connected to family, work or education. Just 140,000 people migrated irregularly and only one-third were refugees while two-thirds will need to be repatriated.

      For this reason, stressed the commissioner, the new plan will focus on repatriation. Faster procedures are necessary, she noted. When people stay in a country for years it is very hard to organize repatriations, especially voluntary ones. So the objective is for a negative asylum decision “to come together with a return decision.”

      Also, the permanence in hosting centers should be of short duration. Speaking about a fire at the Moria camp on the Greek island of Lesbos where more than 12,000 asylum seekers have been stranded for years, the commissioner said the situation was the ’’result of lack of European policy on asylum and migration."

      “We shall have no more Morias’’, she noted, calling for well-managed hosting centers along with limits to permanence.

      A win-win collaboration will instead be planned with third countries, she said. ’’The external aspect is very important. We have to work on good partnerships with third countries, supporting them and finding win-win solutions for readmissions and for the fight against traffickers. We have to develop legal pathways to come to the EU, in particular with resettlements, a policy that needs to be strengthened.”

      The commissioner then rejected the idea of opening hosting centers in third countries, an idea for example proposed by Denmark.

      “It is not the direction I intend to take. We will not export the right to asylum.”

      The commissioner said she was very concerned by reports of refoulements. Her objective, she concluded, is to “include in the pact a monitoring mechanism. The right to asylum must be defended.”

      https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/27447/relocation-solidarity-mandatory-for-eu-migration-policy-johansson

      #relocalisation #solidarité_obligatoire #solidarité_volontaire #pays_de_première_entrée #renvois #expulsions #réinstallations #voies_légales

    • Droit d’asile : Bruxelles rate son « #pacte »

      La Commission européenne, assurant vouloir « abolir » le règlement de Dublin et son principe du premier pays d’entrée, doit présenter ce mercredi un « pacte sur l’immigration et l’asile ». Qui ne bouleverserait rien.

      C’est une belle victoire pour Viktor Orbán, le Premier ministre hongrois, et ses partenaires d’Europe centrale et orientale aussi peu enclins que lui à accueillir des étrangers sur leur sol. La Commission européenne renonce définitivement à leur imposer d’accueillir des demandeurs d’asile en cas d’afflux dans un pays de la « ligne de front » (Grèce, Italie, Malte, Espagne). Certes, le volumineux paquet de textes qu’elle propose ce mercredi (10 projets de règlements et trois recommandations, soit plusieurs centaines de pages), pompeusement baptisé « pacte sur l’immigration et l’asile », prévoit qu’ils devront, par « solidarité », assurer les refoulements vers les pays d’origine des déboutés du droit d’asile, mais cela ne devrait pas les gêner outre mesure. Car, sur le fond, la Commission prend acte de la volonté des Vingt-Sept de transformer l’Europe en forteresse.
      Sale boulot

      La crise de 2015 les a durablement traumatisés. A l’époque, la Turquie, par lassitude d’accueillir sur son sol plusieurs millions de réfugiés syriens et des centaines de milliers de migrants économiques dans l’indifférence de la communauté internationale, ouvre ses frontières. La Grèce est vite submergée et plusieurs centaines de milliers de personnes traversent les Balkans afin de trouver refuge, notamment en Allemagne et en Suède, parmi les pays les plus généreux en matière d’asile.

      Passé les premiers moments de panique, les Européens réagissent de plusieurs manières. La Hongrie fait le sale boulot en fermant brutalement sa frontière. L’Allemagne, elle, accepte d’accueillir un million de demandeurs d’asile, mais négocie avec Ankara un accord pour qu’il referme ses frontières, accord ensuite endossé par l’UE qui lui verse en échange 6 milliards d’euros destinés aux camps de réfugiés. Enfin, l’Union adopte un règlement destiné à relocaliser sur une base obligatoire une partie des migrants dans les autres pays européens afin qu’ils instruisent les demandes d’asile, dans le but de soulager la Grèce et l’Italie, pays de premier accueil. Ce dernier volet est un échec, les pays d’Europe de l’Est, qui ont voté contre, refusent d’accueillir le moindre migrant, et leurs partenaires de l’Ouest ne font guère mieux : sur 160 000 personnes qui auraient dû être relocalisées, un objectif rapidement revu à 98 000, moins de 35 000 l’ont été à la fin 2017, date de la fin de ce dispositif.

      Depuis, l’Union a considérablement durci les contrôles, notamment en créant un corps de 10 000 gardes-frontières européens et en renforçant les moyens de Frontex, l’agence chargée de gérer ses frontières extérieures. En février-mars, la tentative d’Ankara de faire pression sur les Européens dans le conflit syrien en rouvrant partiellement ses frontières a fait long feu : la Grèce a employé les grands moyens, y compris violents, pour stopper ce flux sous les applaudissements de ses partenaires… Autant dire que l’ambiance n’est pas à l’ouverture des frontières et à l’accueil des persécutés.
      « Usine à gaz »

      Mais la crise migratoire de 2015 a laissé des « divisions nombreuses et profondes entre les Etats membres - certaines des cicatrices qu’elle a laissées sont toujours visibles aujourd’hui », comme l’a reconnu Ursula von der Leyen, la présidente de la Commission, dans son discours sur l’état de l’Union du 16 septembre. Afin de tourner la page, la Commission propose donc de laisser tomber la réforme de 2016 (dite de Dublin IV) prévoyant de pérenniser la relocalisation autoritaire des migrants, désormais jugée par une haute fonctionnaire de l’exécutif « totalement irréaliste ».

      Mais la réforme qu’elle propose, une véritable « usine à gaz », n’est qu’un « rapiéçage » de l’existant, comme l’explique Yves Pascouau, spécialiste de l’immigration et responsable des programmes européens de l’association Res Publica. Ainsi, alors que Von der Leyen a annoncé sa volonté « d’abolir » le règlement de Dublin III, il n’en est rien : le pays responsable du traitement d’une demande d’asile reste, par principe, comme c’est le cas depuis 1990, le pays de première entrée.

      S’il y a une crise, la Commission pourra déclencher un « mécanisme de solidarité » afin de soulager un pays de la ligne de front : dans ce cas, les Vingt-Sept devront accueillir un certain nombre de migrants (en fonction de leur richesse et de leur population), sauf s’ils préfèrent « parrainer un retour ». En clair, prendre en charge le refoulement des déboutés de l’asile (avec l’aide financière et logistique de l’Union) en sachant que ces personnes resteront à leur charge jusqu’à ce qu’ils y parviennent. Ça, c’est pour faire simple, car il y a plusieurs niveaux de crise, des exceptions, des sanctions, des délais et l’on en passe…

      Autre nouveauté : les demandes d’asile devront être traitées par principe à la frontière, dans des camps de rétention, pour les nationalités dont le taux de reconnaissance du statut de réfugié est inférieur à 20% dans l’Union, et ce, en moins de trois mois, avec refoulement à la clé en cas de refus. « Cette réforme pose un principe clair, explique un eurocrate. Personne ne sera obligé d’accueillir un étranger dont il ne veut pas. »

      Dans cet ensemble très sévère, une bonne nouvelle : les sauvetages en mer ne devraient plus être criminalisés. On peut craindre qu’une fois passés à la moulinette des Etats, qui doivent adopter ce paquet à la majorité qualifiée (55% des Etats représentant 65% de la population), il ne reste que les aspects les plus répressifs. On ne se refait pas.


      https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2020/09/22/droit-d-asile-bruxelles-rate-son-pacte_1800264

      –—

      Graphique ajouté au fil de discussion sur les statistiques de la #relocalisation :
      https://seenthis.net/messages/605713

    • Le pacte européen sur l’asile et les migrations ne tire aucune leçon de la « crise migratoire »

      Ce 23 septembre 2020, la nouvelle Commission européenne a présenté les grandes lignes d’orientation de sa politique migratoire à venir. Alors que cinq ans plutôt, en 2015, se déroulait la mal nommée « crise migratoire » aux frontières européennes, le nouveau Pacte Asile et Migration de l’UE ne tire aucune leçon du passé. Le nouveau pacte de l’Union Européenne nous propose inlassablement les mêmes recettes alors que les preuves de leur inefficacité, leur coût et des violences qu’elles procurent sont nombreuses et irréfutables. Le CNCD-11.11.11, son homologue néerlandophone et les membres du groupe de travail pour la justice migratoire appellent le parlement européen et le gouvernement belge à un changement de cap.

      Le nouveau Pacte repose sur des propositions législatives et des recommandations non contraignantes. Ses priorités sont claires mais pas neuves. Freiner les arrivées, limiter l’accueil par le « tri » des personnes et augmenter les retours. Cette stratégie pourtant maintes fois décriée par les ONG et le milieu académique a certes réussi à diminuer les arrivées en Europe, mais n’a offert aucune solution durable pour les personnes migrantes. Depuis les années 2000, l’externalisation de la gestion des questions migratoires a montré son inefficacité (situation humanitaires dans les hotspots, plus de 20.000 décès en Méditerranée depuis 2014 et processus d’encampement aux frontières de l’UE) et son coût exponentiel (coût élevé du contrôle, de la détention-expulsion et de l’aide au développement détournée). Elle a augmenté le taux de violences sur les routes de l’exil et a enfreint le droit international en toute impunité (non accès au droit d’asile notamment via les refoulements).

      "ll est important que tous les États membres développent des systèmes d’accueil de qualité et que l’UE s’oriente vers une protection plus unifiée"

      La proposition de mettre en place un mécanisme solidaire européen contraignant est à saluer, mais celui-ci doit être au service de l’accueil et non couplé au retour. La possibilité pour les États européens de choisir à la carte soit la relocalisation, le « parrainage » du retour des déboutés ou autre contribution financière n’est pas équitable. La répartition solidaire de l’accueil doit être permanente et ne pas être actionnée uniquement en cas « d’afflux massif » aux frontières d’un État membre comme le recommande la Commission. Il est important que tous les États membres développent des systèmes d’accueil de qualité et que l’UE s’oriente vers une protection plus unifiée. Le changement annoncé du Règlement de Dublin l’est juste de nom, car les premiers pays d’entrée resteront responsables des nouveaux arrivés.

      Le focus doit être mis sur les alternatives à la détention et non sur l’usage systématique de l’enfermement aux frontières, comme le veut la Commission. Le droit de demander l’asile et d’avoir accès à une procédure de qualité doit être accessible à tous et toutes et rester un droit individuel. Or, la proposition de la Commission de détenir (12 semaines maximum) en vue de screener (5 jours de tests divers et de recoupement de données via EURODAC) puis trier les personnes migrantes à la frontière en fonction du taux de reconnaissance de protection accordé en moyenne à leur pays d’origine (en dessous de 20%) ou de leur niveau de vulnérabilité est contraire à la Convention de Genève.

      "La priorité pour les personnes migrantes en situation irrégulière doit être la recherche de solutions durables (comme l’est la régularisation) plutôt que le retour forcé, à tous prix."

      La priorité pour les personnes migrantes en situation irrégulière doit être la recherche de solutions durables (comme l’est la régularisation) plutôt que le retour forcé, à tous prix, comme le préconise la Commission.

      La meilleure façon de lutter contre les violences sur les routes de l’exil reste la mise en place de plus de voies légales et sûres de migration (réinstallation, visas de travail, d’études, le regroupement familial…). Les ONG regrettent que la Commission reporte à 2021 les propositions sur la migration légale. Le pacte s’intéresse à juste titre à la criminalisation des ONG de sauvetage et des citoyens qui fournissent une aide humanitaire aux migrants. Toutefois, les propositions visant à y mettre fin sont insuffisantes. Les ONG se réjouissent de l’annonce par la Commission d’un mécanisme de surveillance des droits humains aux frontières extérieures. Au cours de l’année écoulée, on a signalé de plus en plus souvent des retours violents par la Croatie, la Grèce, Malte et Chypre. Toutefois, il n’est pas encore suffisamment clair si les propositions de la Commission peuvent effectivement traiter et sanctionner les refoulements.

      Au lendemain de l’incendie du hotspot à Moria, symbole par excellence de l’échec des politiques migratoires européennes, l’UE s’enfonce dans un déni total, meurtrier, en vue de concilier les divergences entre ses États membres. Les futures discussions autour du Pacte au sein du parlement UE et du Conseil UE seront cruciales. Les ONG membres du groupe de travail pour la justice migratoire appellent le Parlement européen et le gouvernement belge à promouvoir des ajustements fermes allant vers plus de justice migratoire.

      https://www.cncd.be/Le-pacte-europeen-sur-l-asile-et

    • The New Pact on Migration and Asylum. A Critical ‘First Look’ Analysis

      Where does it come from?

      The New Migration Pact was built on the ashes of the mandatory relocation scheme that the Commission tried to push in 2016. And the least that one can say, is that it shows! The whole migration plan has been decisively shaped by this initial failure. Though the Pact has some merits, the very fact that it takes as its starting point the radical demands made by the most nationalist governments in Europe leads to sacrificing migrants’ rights on the altar of a cohesive and integrated European migration policy.

      Back in 2016, the vigorous manoeuvring of the Commission to find a way out of the European asylum dead-end resulted in a bittersweet victory for the European institution. Though the Commission was able to find a qualified majority of member states willing to support a fair distribution of the asylum seekers among member states through a relocation scheme, this new regulation remained dead letter. Several eastern European states flatly refused to implement the plan, other member states seized this opportunity to defect on their obligations and the whole migration policy quickly unravelled. Since then, Europe is left with a dysfunctional Dublin agreement exacerbating the tensions between member states and 27 loosely connected national asylum regimes. On the latter point, at least, there is a consensus. Everyone agrees that the EU’s migration regime is broken and urgently needs to be fixed.

      Obviously, the Commission was not keen to go through a new round of political humiliation. Having been accused of “bureaucratic hubris” the first time around, the commissioners Schinas and Johansson decided not to repeat the same mistake. They toured the European capitals and listened to every side of the entrenched migration debate before drafting their Migration Pact. The intention is in the right place and it reflects the complexity of having to accommodate 27 distinct democratic debates in one single political space. Nevertheless, if one peers a bit more extensively through the content of the New Plan, it is complicated not to get the feelings that the Visegrad countries are currently the key players shaping the European migration and asylum policies. After all, their staunch opposition to a collective reception scheme sparked the political process and provided the starting point to the general discussion. As a result, it is no surprise that the New Pact tilts firmly towards an ever more restrictive approach to migration, beefs up the coercive powers of both member states and European agencies and raises many concerns with regards to the respect of the migrants’ fundamental rights.
      What is in this New Pact on Migration and Asylum?

      Does the Pact concede too much ground to the demands of the most xenophobic European governments? To answer that question, let us go back to the bizarre metaphor used by the commissioner Schinas. During his press conference, he insisted on comparing the New Pact on Migration and Asylum to a house built on solid foundations (i.e. the lengthy and inclusive consultation process) and made of 3 floors: first, some renewed partnerships with the sending and transit states, second, some more effective border procedures, and third, a revamped mandatory – but flexible ! – solidarity scheme. It is tempting to carry on with the metaphor and to say that this house may appear comfortable from the inside but that it remains tightly shut to anyone knocking on its door from the outside. For, a careful examination reveals that each of the three “floors” (policy packages, actually) lays the emphasis on a repressive approach to migration aimed at deterring would-be asylum seekers from attempting to reach the European shores.
      The “new partnerships” with sending and transit countries, a “change in paradigm”?

      Let us add that there is little that is actually “new” in this New Migration Pact. For instance, the first policy package, that is, the suggestion that the EU should renew its partnerships with sending and transit countries is, as a matter of fact, an old tune in the Brussels bubble. The Commission may boast that it marks a “change of paradigm”, one fails to see how this would be any different from the previous European diplomatic efforts. Since migration and asylum are increasingly considered as toxic topics (for, they would be the main factors behind the rise of nationalism and its corollary, Euroscepticism), the European Union is willing to externalize this issue, seemingly at all costs. The results, however, have been mixed in the past. To the Commission’s own admission, only a third of the migrants whose asylum claims have been rejected are effectively returned. Besides the facts that returns are costly, extremely coercive, and administratively complicated to organize, the main reason for this low rate of successful returns is that sending countries refuse to cooperate in the readmission procedures. Neighbouring countries have excellent reasons not to respond positively to the Union’s demands. For some, remittances sent by their diaspora are an economic lifeline. Others just do not want to appear complicit of repressive European practices on their domestic political scene. Furthermore, many African countries are growing discontent with the forceful way the European Union uses its asymmetrical relation of power in bilateral negotiations to dictate to those sovereign states the migration policies they should adopt, making for instance its development aid conditional on the implementation of stricter border controls. The Commission may rhetorically claim to foster “mutually beneficial” international relation with its neighbouring countries, the emphasis on the externalization of migration control in the EU’s diplomatic agenda nevertheless bears some of the hallmarks of neo-colonialism. As such, it is a source of deep resentment in sending and transit states. It would therefore be a grave mistake for the EU to overlook the fact that some short-term gains in terms of migration management may result in long-term losses with regards to Europe’s image across the world.

      Furthermore, considering the current political situation, one should not primarily be worried about the failed partnerships with neighbouring countries, it is rather the successful ones that ought to give us pause and raise concerns. For, based on the existing evidence, the EU will sign a deal with any state as long as it effectively restrains and contains migration flows towards the European shores. Being an authoritarian state with a documented history of human right violations (Turkey) or an embattled government fighting a civil war (Lybia) does not disqualify you as a partner of the European Union in its effort to manage migration flows. It is not only morally debatable for the EU to delegate its asylum responsibilities to unreliable third countries, it is also doubtful that an increase in diplomatic pressure on neighbouring countries will bring major political results. It will further damage the perception of the EU in neighbouring countries without bringing significant restriction to migration flows.
      Streamlining border procedures? Or eroding migrants’ rights?

      The second policy package is no more inviting. It tackles the issue of the migrants who, in spite of those partnerships and the hurdles thrown their way by sending and transit countries, would nevertheless reach Europe irregularly. On this issue, the Commission faced the daunting task of having to square a political circle, since it had to find some common ground in a debate bitterly divided between conflicting worldviews (roughly, between liberal and nationalist perspectives on the individual freedom of movement) and competing interests (between overburdened Mediterranean member states and Eastern member states adamant that asylum seekers would endanger their national cohesion). The Commission thus looked for the lowest common denominator in terms of migration management preferences amongst the distinct member states. The result is a two-tier border procedure aiming to fast-track and streamline the processing of asylum claims, allowing for more expeditious returns of irregular migrants. The goal is to prevent any bottleneck in the processing of the claims and to avoid the (currently near constant) overcrowding of reception facilities in the frontline states. Once again, there is little that is actually new in this proposal. It amounts to a generalization of the process currently in place in the infamous hotspots scattered on the Greek isles. According to the Pact, screening procedures would be carried out in reception centres created across Europe. A far cry from the slogan “no more Moria” since one may legitimately suspect that those reception centres will, at the first hiccup in the procedure, turn into tomorrow’s asylum camps.

      According to this procedure, newly arrived migrants would be submitted within 5 days to a pre-screening procedure and subsequently triaged into two categories. Migrants with a low chance of seeing their asylum claim recognized (because they would come from a country with a low recognition rate or a country belonging to the list of the safe third countries, for instance) would be redirected towards an accelerated procedure. The end goal would be to return them, if applicable, within twelve weeks. The other migrants would be subjected to the standard assessment of their asylum claim. It goes without saying that this proposal has been swiftly and unanimously condemned by all human rights organizations. It does not take a specialized lawyer to see that this two-tiered procedure could have devastating consequences for the “fast-tracked” asylum seekers left with no legal recourse against the initial decision to submit them to this sped up procedure (rather than the standard one) as well as reduced opportunities to defend their asylum claim or, if need be, to contest their return. No matter how often the Commission repeats that it will preserve all the legal safeguards required to protect migrants’ rights, it remains wildly unconvincing. Furthermore, the Pact may confuse speed and haste. The schedule is tight on paper (five days for the pre-screening, twelve weeks for the assessment of the asylum claim), it may well prove unrealistic to meet those deadlines in real-life conditions. The Commission also overlooks the fact that accelerated procedures tend to be sloppy, thus leading to juridical appeals and further legal wrangling and eventually amounting to processes far longer than expected.
      Integrating the returns, not the reception

      The Commission talked up the new Pact as being “balanced” and “humane”. Since the two first policy packages focus, first, on preventing would-be migrants from leaving their countries and, second, on facilitating and accelerating their returns, one would expect the third policy package to move away from the restriction of movement and to complement those measures with a reception plan tailored to the needs of refugees. And here comes the major disappointment with the New Pact and, perhaps, the clearest indication that the Pact is first and foremost designed to please the migration hardliners. It does include a solidarity scheme meant to alleviate the burden of frontline countries, to distribute more fairly the responsibilities amongst member states and to ensure that refugees are properly hosted. But this solidarity scheme is far from being robust enough to deliver on those promises. Let us unpack it briefly to understand why it is likely to fail. The solidarity scheme is mandatory. All member states will be under the obligation to take part. But there is a catch! Member states’ contribution to this collective effort can take many shapes and forms and it will be up to the member states to decide how they want to participate. They get to choose whether they want to relocate some refugees on their national soil, to provide some financial and/or logistical assistance, or to “sponsor” (it is the actual term used by the Commission) some returns.

      No one expected the Commission to reintroduce a compulsory relocation scheme in its Pact. Eastern European countries had drawn an obvious red line and it would have been either naïve or foolish to taunt them with that kind of policy proposal. But this so-called “flexible mandatory solidarity” relies on such a watered-down understanding of the solidarity principle that it results in a weak and misguided political instrument unsuited to solve the problem at hand. First, the flexible solidarity mechanism is too indeterminate to prove efficient. According to the current proposal, member states would have to shoulder a fair share of the reception burden (calculated on their respective population and GDP) but would be left to decide for themselves which form this contribution would take. The obvious flaw with the policy proposal is that, if all member states decline to relocate some refugees (which is a plausible scenario), Mediterranean states would still be left alone when it comes to dealing with the most immediate consequences of migration flows. They would receive much more financial, operational, and logistical support than it currently is the case – but they would be managing on their own the overcrowded reception centres. The Commission suggests that it would oversee the national pledges in terms of relocation and that it would impose some corrections if the collective pledges fall short of a predefined target. But it remains to be seen whether the Commission will have the political clout to impose some relocations to member states refusing them. One could not be blamed for being highly sceptical.

      Second, it is noteworthy that the Commission fails to integrate the reception of refugees since member states are de facto granted an opt-out on hosting refugees. What is integrated is rather the return policy, once more a repressive instrument. And it is the member states with the worst record in terms of migrants’ rights violations that are the most likely to be tasked with the delicate mission of returning them home. As a commentator was quipping on Twitter, it would be like asking a bully to walk his victim home (what could possibly go wrong?). The attempt to build an intra-European consensus is obviously pursued at the expense of the refugees. The incentive structure built into the flexible solidarity scheme offers an excellent illustration of this. If a member state declines to relocate any refugee and offers instead to ‘sponsor’ some returns, it has to honour that pledge within a limited period of time (the Pact suggests a six month timeframe). If it fails to do so, it becomes responsible for the relocation and the return of those migrants, leading to a situation in which some migrants may end up in a country where they do not want to be and that does not want them to be there. Hardly an optimal outcome…
      Conclusion

      The Pact represents a genuine attempt to design a multi-faceted and comprehensive migration policy, covering most aspects of a complex issue. The dysfunctions of the Schengen area and the question of the legal pathways to Europe have been relegated to a later discussion and one may wonder whether they should not have been included in the Pact to balance out its restrictive inclination. And, in all fairness, the Pact does throw a few bones to the more cosmopolitan-minded European citizens. For instance, it reminds the member states that maritime search and rescue operations are legal and should not be impeded, or it shortens (from five to three years) the waiting period for refugees to benefit from the freedom of movement. But those few welcome additions are vastly outweighed by the fact that migration hardliners dominated the agenda-setting in the early stage of the policy-making exercise and have thus been able to frame decisively the political discussion. The end result is a policy package leaning heavily towards some repressive instruments and particularly careless when it comes to safeguarding migrants’ rights.

      The New Pact was first drafted on the ashes of the mandatory relocation scheme. Back then, the Commission publicly made amends and revised its approach to the issue. Sadly, the New Pact was presented to the European public when the ashes of the Moria camp were still lukewarm. One can only hope that the member states will learn from that mistake too.

      https://blog.novamigra.eu/2020/09/24/the-new-pact-on-migration-and-asylum-a-critical-first-look-analysis

    • #Pacte_européen_sur_la_migration : un “nouveau départ” pour violer les droits humains

      La Commission européenne a publié aujourd’hui son « Nouveau Pacte sur l’Asile et la Migration » qui propose un nouveau cadre règlementaire et législatif. Avec ce plan, l’UE devient de facto un « leader du voyage retour » pour les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s en Méditerranée. EuroMed Droits craint que ce pacte ne détériore encore davantage la situation actuelle pour au moins trois raisons.

      Le pacte se concentre de manière obsessionnelle sur la politique de retours à travers un système de « sponsoring » : des pays européens tels que l’Autriche, la Pologne, la Hongrie ou la République tchèque – qui refusent d’accueillir des réfugié.e.s – pourront « sponsoriser » et organiser la déportation vers les pays de départ de ces réfugié.e.s. Au lieu de favoriser l’intégration, le pacte adopte une politique de retour à tout prix, même lorsque les demandeurs.ses d’asile peuvent être victimes de discrimination, persécution ou torture dans leur pays de retour. A ce jour, il n’existe aucun mécanisme permettant de surveiller ce qui arrive aux migrant.e.s et réfugié.e.s une fois déporté.e.s.

      Le pacte proposé renforce la sous-traitance de la gestion des frontières. En termes concrets, l’UE renforce la coopération avec les pays non-européens afin qu’ils ferment leurs frontières et empêchent les personnes de partir. Cette coopération est sujette à l’imposition de conditions par l’UE. Une telle décision européenne se traduit par une hausse du nombre de refoulements dans la région méditerranéenne et une coopération renforcée avec des pays qui ont un piètre bilan en matière de droits humains et qui ne possèdent pas de cadre efficace pour la protection des droits des personnes migrantes et réfugiées.

      Le pacte vise enfin à étendre les mécanismes de tri des demandeurs.ses d’asile et des migrant.e.s dans les pays d’arrivée. Ce modèle de tri – similaire à celui utilisé dans les zones de transit aéroportuaires – accentue les difficultés de pays tels que l’Espagne, l’Italie, Malte, la Grèce ou Chypre qui accueillent déjà la majorité des migrant.e.s et réfugié.e.s. Placer ces personnes dans des camps revient à mettre en place un système illégal d’incarcération automatique dès l’arrivée. Cela accroîtra la violence psychologique à laquelle les migrant.e.s et réfugié.e.s sont déjà soumis. Selon ce nouveau système, ces personnes seront identifié.e.s sous cinq jours et toute demande d’asile devra être traitée en douze semaines. Cette accélération de la procédure risque d’intensifier la détention et de diviser les arrivant.e.s entre demandeurs.ses d’asile et migrant.e.s économiques. Cela s’effectuerait de manière discriminatoire, sans analyse détaillée de chaque demande d’asile ni possibilité réelle de faire appel. Celles et ceux qui seront éligibles à la protection internationale seront relocalisé.e.s au sein des États membres qui acceptent de les recevoir. Les autres risqueront d’être déportés immédiatement.

      « En choisissant de sous-traiter davantage encore la gestion des frontières et d’accentuer la politique de retours, ce nouveau pacte conclut la transformation de la politique européenne en une approche pleinement sécuritaire. Pire encore, le pacte assimile la politique de “retour sponsorisé” à une forme de solidarité. Au-delà des déclarations officielles, cela démontre la volonté de l’Union européenne de criminaliser et de déshumaniser les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s », a déclaré Wadih Al-Asmar, Président d’EuroMed Droits.

      https://euromedrights.org/fr/publication/pacte-europeen-sur-la-migration-nouveau-depart-pour-violer-les-droits

    • Whose Pact? The Cognitive Dimensions of the New EU Pact on Migration and Asylum

      This Policy Insight examines the new Pact on Migration and Asylum in light of the principles and commitments enshrined in the United Nations Global Compact on Refugees (UN GCR) and the EU Treaties. It finds that from a legal viewpoint the ‘Pact’ is not really a Pact at all, if understood as an agreement concluded between relevant EU institutional parties. Rather, it is the European Commission’s policy guide for the duration of the current 9th legislature.

      The analysis shows that the Pact has intergovernmental aspects, in both name and fundamentals. It does not pursue a genuine Migration and Asylum Union. The Pact encourages an artificial need for consensus building or de facto unanimity among all EU member states’ governments in fields where the EU Treaties call for qualified majority voting (QMV) with the European Parliament as co-legislator. The Pact does not abolish the first irregular entry rule characterising the EU Dublin Regulation. It adopts a notion of interstate solidarity that leads to asymmetric responsibilities, where member states are given the flexibility to evade participating in the relocation of asylum seekers. The Pact also runs the risk of catapulting some contested member states practices’ and priorities about localisation, speed and de-territorialisation into EU policy.

      This Policy Insight argues that the Pact’s priority of setting up an independent monitoring mechanism of border procedures’ compliance with fundamental rights is a welcome step towards the better safeguarding of the rule of law. The EU inter-institutional negotiations on the Pact’s initiatives should be timely and robust in enforcing member states’ obligations under the current EU legal standards relating to asylum and borders, namely the prevention of detention and expedited expulsions, and the effective access by all individuals to dignified treatment and effective remedies. Trust and legitimacy of EU asylum and migration policy can only follow if international (human rights and refugee protection) commitments and EU Treaty principles are put first.

      https://www.ceps.eu/ceps-publications/whose-pact

    • First analysis of the EU’s new asylum proposals

      This week the EU Commission published its new package of proposals on asylum and (non-EU) migration – consisting of proposals for legislation, some ‘soft law’, attempts to relaunch talks on stalled proposals and plans for future measures. The following is an explanation of the new proposals (not attempting to cover every detail) with some first thoughts. Overall, while it is possible that the new package will lead to agreement on revised asylum laws, this will come at the cost of risking reduced human rights standards.

      Background

      Since 1999, the EU has aimed to create a ‘Common European Asylum System’. A first phase of legislation was passed between 2003 and 2005, followed by a second phase between 2010 and 2013. Currently the legislation consists of: a) the Qualification Directive, which defines when people are entitled to refugee status (based on the UN Refugee Convention) or subsidiary protection status, and what rights they have; b) the Dublin III Regulation, which allocates responsibility for an asylum seeker between Member States; c) the Eurodac Regulation, which facilitates the Dublin system by setting up a database of fingerprints of asylum seekers and people who cross the external border without authorisation; d) the Asylum Procedures Directive, which sets out the procedural rules governing asylum applications, such as personal interviews and appeals; e) the Reception Conditions Directive, which sets out standards on the living conditions of asylum-seekers, such as rules on housing and welfare; and f) the Asylum Agency Regulation, which set up an EU agency (EASO) to support Member States’ processing of asylum applications.

      The EU also has legislation on other aspects of migration: (short-term) visas, border controls, irregular migration, and legal migration – much of which has connections with the asylum legislation, and all of which is covered by this week’s package. For visas, the main legislation is the visa list Regulation (setting out which non-EU countries’ citizens are subject to a short-term visa requirement, or exempt from it) and the visa code (defining the criteria to obtain a short-term Schengen visa, allowing travel between all Schengen states). The visa code was amended last year, as discussed here.

      For border controls, the main legislation is the Schengen Borders Code, setting out the rules on crossing external borders and the circumstances in which Schengen states can reinstate controls on internal borders, along with the Frontex Regulation, setting up an EU border agency to assist Member States. On the most recent version of the Frontex Regulation, see discussion here and here.

      For irregular migration, the main legislation is the Return Directive. The Commission proposed to amend it in 2018 – on which, see analysis here and here.

      For legal migration, the main legislation on admission of non-EU workers is the single permit Directive (setting out a common process and rights for workers, but not regulating admission); the Blue Card Directive (on highly paid migrants, discussed here); the seasonal workers’ Directive (discussed here); and the Directive on intra-corporate transferees (discussed here). The EU also has legislation on: non-EU students, researchers and trainees (overview here); non-EU family reunion (see summary of the legislation and case law here) and on long-term resident non-EU citizens (overview – in the context of UK citizens after Brexit – here). In 2016, the Commission proposed to revise the Blue Card Directive (see discussion here).

      The UK, Ireland and Denmark have opted out of most of these laws, except some asylum law applies to the UK and Ireland, and Denmark is covered by the Schengen and Dublin rules. So are the non-EU countries associated with Schengen and Dublin (Norway, Iceland, Switzerland and Liechtenstein). There are also a number of further databases of non-EU citizens as well as Eurodac: the EU has never met a non-EU migrant who personal data it didn’t want to store and process.

      The Refugee ‘Crisis’

      The EU’s response to the perceived refugee ‘crisis’ was both short-term and long-term. In the short term, in 2015 the EU adopted temporary laws (discussed here) relocating some asylum seekers in principle from Italy and Greece to other Member States. A legal challenge to one of these laws failed (as discussed here), but in practice Member States accepted few relocations anyway. Earlier this year, the CJEU ruled that several Member States had breached their obligations under the laws (discussed here), but by then it was a moot point.

      Longer term, the Commission proposed overhauls of the law in 2016: a) a Qualification Regulation further harmonising the law on refugee and subsidiary protection status; b) a revised Dublin Regulation, which would have set up a system of relocation of asylum seekers for future crises; c) a revised Eurodac Regulation, to take much more data from asylum seekers and other migrants; d) an Asylum Procedures Regulation, further harmonising the procedural law on asylum applications; e) a revised Reception Conditions Directive; f) a revised Asylum Agency Regulation, giving the agency more powers; and g) a new Resettlement Regulation, setting out a framework of admitting refugees directly from non-EU countries. (See my comments on some of these proposals, from back in 2016)

      However, these proposals proved unsuccessful – which is the main reason for this week’s attempt to relaunch the process. In particular, an EU Council note from February 2019 summarises the diverse problems that befell each proposal. While the EU Council Presidency and the European Parliament reached agreement on the proposals on qualification, reception conditions and resettlement in June 2018, Member States refused to support the Presidency’s deal and the European Parliament refused to renegotiate (see, for instance, the Council documents on the proposals on qualification and resettlement; see also my comments on an earlier stage of the talks, when the Council had agreed its negotiation position on the qualification regulation).

      On the asylum agency, the EP and Council agreed on the revised law in 2017, but the Commission proposed an amendment in 2018 to give the agency more powers; the Council could not agree on this. On Eurodac, the EP and Council only partly agreed on a text. On the procedures Regulation, the Council largely agreed its position, except on border procedures; on Dublin there was never much prospect of agreement because of the controversy over relocating asylum seekers. (For either proposal, a difficult negotiation with the European Parliament lay ahead).

      In other areas too, the legislative process was difficult: the Council and EP gave up negotiating amendments to the Blue Card Directive (see the last attempt at a compromise here, and the Council negotiation mandate here), and the EP has not yet agreed a position on the Returns Directive (the Council has a negotiating position, but again it leaves out the difficult issue of border procedures; there is a draft EP position from February). Having said that, the EU has been able to agree legislation giving more powers to Frontex, as well as new laws on EU migration databases, in the last few years.

      The attempted relaunch

      The Commission’s new Pact on asylum and immigration (see also the roadmap on its implementation, the Q and As, and the staff working paper) does not restart the whole process from scratch. On qualification, reception conditions, resettlement, the asylum agency, the returns Directive and the Blue Card Directive, it invites the Council and Parliament to resume negotiations. But it tries to unblock the talks as a whole by tabling two amended legislative proposals and three new legislative proposals, focussing on the issues of border procedures and relocation of asylum seekers.

      Screening at the border

      This revised proposals start with a new proposal for screening asylum seekers at the border, which would apply to all non-EU citizens who cross an external border without authorisation, who apply for asylum while being checked at the border (without meeting the conditions for legal entry), or who are disembarked after a search and rescue operation. During the screening, these non-EU citizens are not allowed to enter the territory of a Member State, unless it becomes clear that they meet the criteria for entry. The screening at the border should take no longer than 5 days, with an extra 5 days in the event of a huge influx. (It would also be possible to apply the proposed law to those on the territory who evaded border checks; for them the deadline to complete the screening is 3 days).

      Screening has six elements, as further detailed in the proposal: a health check, an identity check, registration in a database, a security check, filling out a debriefing form, and deciding on what happens next. At the end of the screening, the migrant is channelled either into the expulsion process (if no asylum claim has been made, and if the migrant does not meet the conditions for entry) or, if an asylum claim is made, into the asylum process – with an indication of whether the claim should be fast-tracked or not. It’s also possible that an asylum seeker would be relocated to another Member State. The screening is carried out by national officials, possibly with support from EU agencies.

      To ensure human rights protection, there must be independent monitoring to address allegations of non-compliance with human rights. These allegations might concern breaches of EU or international law, national law on detention, access to the asylum procedure, or non-refoulement (the ban on sending people to an unsafe country). Migrants must be informed about the process and relevant EU immigration and data protection law. There is no provision for judicial review of the outcome of the screening process, although there would be review as part of the next step (asylum or return).

      Asylum procedures

      The revised proposal for an asylum procedures Regulation would leave in place most of the Commission’s 2016 proposal to amend the law, adding some specific further proposed amendments, which either link back to the screening proposal or aim to fast-track decisions and expulsions more generally.

      On the first point, the usual rules on informing asylum applicants and registering their application would not apply until after the end of the screening. A border procedure may apply following the screening process, but Member States must apply the border procedure in cases where an asylum seeker used false documents, is a perceived national security threat, or falls within the new ground for fast-tracking cases (on which, see below). The latter obligation is subject to exceptions where a Member State has reported that a non-EU country is not cooperating on readmission; the process for dealing with that issue set out under the 2019 amendments to the visa code will then apply. Also, the border process cannot apply to unaccompanied minors or children under 12, unless they are a supposed national security risk. Further exceptions apply where the asylum seeker is vulnerable or has medical needs, the application is not inadmissible or cannot be fast-tracked, or detention conditions cannot be guaranteed. A Member State might apply the Dublin process to determine which Member State is responsible for the asylum claim during the border process. The whole border process (including any appeal) must last no more than 12 weeks, and can only be used to declare applications inadmissible or apply the new ground for fast-tracking them.

      There would also be a new border expulsion procedure, where an asylum application covered by the border procedure was rejected. This is subject to its own 12-week deadline, starting from the point when the migrant is no longer allowed to remain. Much of the Return Directive would apply – but not the provisions on the time period for voluntary departure, remedies and the grounds for detention. Instead, the border expulsion procedure would have its own stricter rules on these issues.

      As regards general fast-tracking, in order to speed up the expulsion process for unsuccessful applications, a rejection of an asylum application would have to either incorporate an expulsion decision or entail a simultaneous separate expulsion decision. Appeals against expulsion decisions would then be subject to the same rules as appeals against asylum decisions. If the asylum seeker comes from a country with a refugee recognition rate below 20%, his or her application must be fast-tracked (this would even apply to unaccompanied minors) – unless circumstances in that country have changed, or the asylum seeker comes from a group for whom the low recognition rate is not representative (for instance, the recognition rate might be higher for LGBT asylum-seekers from that country). Many more appeals would be subject to a one-week time limit for the rejected asylum seeker to appeal, and there could be only one level of appeal against decisions taken within a border procedure.

      Eurodac

      The revised proposal for Eurodac would build upon the 2016 proposal, which was already far-reaching: extending Eurodac to include not only fingerprints, but also photos and other personal data; reducing the age of those covered by Eurodac from 14 to 6; removing the time limits and the limits on use of the fingerprints taken from persons who had crossed the border irregularly; and creating a new obligation to collect data of all irregular migrants over age 6 (currently fingerprint data for this group cannot be stored, but can simply be checked, as an option, against the data on asylum seekers and irregular border crossers). The 2020 proposal additionally provides for interoperability with other EU migration databases, taking of personal data during the screening process, including more data on the migration status of each person, and expressly applying the law to those disembarked after a search and rescue operation.

      Dublin rules on asylum responsibility

      A new proposal for asylum management would replace the Dublin regulation (meaning that the Commission has withdrawn its 2016 proposal to replace that Regulation). The 2016 proposal would have created a ‘bottleneck’ in the Member State of entry, requiring that State to examine first whether many of the grounds for removing an asylum-seeker to a non-EU country apply before considering whether another Member State might be responsible for the application (because the asylum seeker’s family live there, for instance). It would also have imposed obligations directly on asylum-seekers to cooperate with the process, rather than only regulate relations between Member States. These obligations would have been enforced by punishing asylum seekers who disobeyed: removing their reception conditions (apart from emergency health care); fast-tracking their substantive asylum applications; refusing to consider new evidence from them; and continuing the asylum application process in their absence.

      It would no longer be possible for asylum seekers to provide additional evidence of family links, with a view to being in the same country as a family member. Overturning a CJEU judgment (see further discussion here), unaccompanied minors would no longer have been able to make applications in multiple Member States (in the absence of a family member in any of them). However, the definition of family members would have been widened, to include siblings and families formed in a transit country. Responsibility for an asylum seeker based on the first Member State of irregular entry (a commonly applied criterion) would have applied indefinitely, rather than expire one year after entry as it does under the current rules. The ‘Sangatte clause’ (responsibility after five months of living in a second Member State, if the ‘irregular entry’ criterion no longer applies) would be dropped. The ‘sovereignty clause’, which played a key part in the 2015-16 refugee ‘crisis’ (it lets a Member State take responsibility for any application even if the Dublin rules do not require it, cf Germany accepting responsibility for Syrian asylum seekers) would have been sharply curtailed. Time limits for detention during the transfer process would be reduced. Remedies for asylum seekers would have been curtailed: they would only have seven days to appeal against a transfer; courts would have fifteen days to decide (although they could have stayed on the territory throughout); and the grounds of review would have been curtailed.

      Finally, the 2016 proposal would have tackled the vexed issue of disproportionate allocation of responsibility for asylum seekers by setting up an automated system determining how many asylum seekers each Member State ‘should’ have based on their size and GDP. If a Member State were responsible for excessive numbers of applicants, Member States which were receiving fewer numbers would have to take more to help out. If they refused, they would have to pay €250,000 per applicant.

      The 2020 proposal drops some of the controversial proposals from 2016, including the ‘bottleneck’ in the Member State of entry (the current rule, giving Member States an option to decide if a non-EU country is responsible for the application on narrower grounds than in the 2016 proposal, would still apply). Also, the sovereignty clause would now remain unchanged.

      However, the 2020 proposal also retains parts of the 2016 proposal: the redefinition of ‘family member’ (which could be more significant now that the bottleneck is removed, unless Member States choose to apply the relevant rules on non-EU countries’ responsibility during the border procedure already); obligations for asylum seekers (redrafted slightly); some of the punishments for non-compliant asylum-seekers (the cut-off for considering evidence would stay, as would the loss of benefits except for those necessary to ensure a basic standard of living: see the CJEU case law in CIMADE and Haqbin); dropping the provision on evidence of family links; changing the rules on responsibility for unaccompanied minors; retaining part of the changes to the irregular entry criterion (it would now cease to apply after three years; the Sangatte clause would still be dropped; it would apply after search and rescue but not apply in the event of relocation); curtailing judicial review (the grounds would still be limited; the time limit to appeal would be 14 days; courts would not have a strict deadline to decide; suspensive effect would not apply in all cases); and the reduced time limits for detention.

      The wholly new features of the 2020 proposal are: some vague provisions about crisis management; responsibility for an asylum application for the Member State which issued a visa or residence document which expired in the last three years (the current rule is responsibility if the visa expired less than six months ago, and the residence permit expired less than a year ago); responsibility for an asylum application for a Member State in which a non-EU citizen obtained a diploma; and the possibility for refugees or persons with subsidiary protection status to obtain EU long-term resident status after three years, rather than five.

      However, the most significant feature of the new proposal is likely to be its attempt to solve the underlying issue of disproportionate allocation of asylum seekers. Rather than a mechanical approach to reallocating responsibility, the 2020 proposal now provides for a menu of ‘solidarity contributions’: relocation of asylum seekers; relocation of refugees; ‘return sponsorship’; or support for ‘capacity building’ in the Member State (or a non-EU country) facing migratory pressure. There are separate rules for search and rescue disembarkations, on the one hand, and more general migratory pressures on the other. Once the Commission determines that the latter situation exists, other Member States have to choose from the menu to offer some assistance. Ultimately the Commission will adopt a decision deciding what the contributions will be. Note that ‘return sponsorship’ comes with a ticking clock: if the persons concerned are not expelled within eight months, the sponsoring Member State must accept them on its territory.

      Crisis management

      The issue of managing asylum issues in a crisis has been carved out of the Dublin proposal into a separate proposal, which would repeal an EU law from 2001 that set up a framework for offering ‘temporary protection’ in a crisis. Note that Member States have never used the 2001 law in practice.

      Compared to the 2001 law, the new proposal is integrated into the EU asylum legislation that has been adopted or proposed in the meantime. It similarly applies in the event of a ‘mass influx’ that prevents the effective functioning of the asylum system. It would apply the ‘solidarity’ process set out in the proposal to replace the Dublin rules (ie relocation of asylum seekers and other measures), with certain exceptions and shorter time limits to apply that process.

      The proposal focusses on providing for possible exceptions to the usual asylum rules. In particular, during a crisis, the Commission could authorise a Member State to apply temporary derogations from the rules on border asylum procedures (extending the time limit, using the procedure to fast-track more cases), border return procedures (again extending the time limit, more easily justifying detention), or the time limit to register asylum applicants. Member States could also determine that due to force majeure, it was not possible to observe the normal time limits for registering asylum applications, applying the Dublin process for responsibility for asylum applications, or offering ‘solidarity’ to other Member States.

      Finally, the new proposal, like the 2001 law, would create a potential for a form of separate ‘temporary protection’ status for the persons concerned. A Member State could suspend the consideration of asylum applications from people coming from the country facing a crisis for up to a year, in the meantime giving them status equivalent to ‘subsidiary protection’ status in the EU qualification law. After that point it would have to resume consideration of the applications. It would need the Commission’s approval, whereas the 2001 law left it to the Council to determine a situation of ‘mass influx’ and provided for the possible extension of the special rules for up to three years.

      Other measures

      The Commission has also adopted four soft law measures. These comprise: a Recommendation on asylum crisis management; a Recommendation on resettlement and humanitarian admission; a Recommendation on cooperation between Member States on private search and rescue operations; and guidance on the applicability of EU law on smuggling of migrants – notably concluding that it cannot apply where (as in the case of law of the sea) there is an obligation to rescue.

      On other issues, the Commission plan is to use current legislation – in particular the recent amendment to the visa code, which provides for sticks to make visas more difficult to get for citizens of countries which don’t cooperate on readmission of people, and carrots to make visas easier to get for citizens of countries which do cooperate on readmission. In some areas, such as the Schengen system, there will be further strategies and plans in the near future; it is not clear if this will lead to more proposed legislation.

      However, on legal migration, the plan is to go further than relaunching the amendment of the Blue Card Directive, as the Commission is also planning to propose amendments to the single permit and long-term residence laws referred to above – leading respectively to more harmonisation of the law on admission of non-EU workers and enhanced possibilities for long-term resident non-EU citizens to move between Member States (nb the latter plan is separate from this week’s proposal to amend this law as regards refugees and people with subsidiary protection already). Both these plans are relevant to British citizens moving to the EU after the post-Brexit transition period – and the latter is also relevant to British citizens covered by the withdrawal agreement.

      Comments

      This week’s plan is less a complete restart of EU law in this area than an attempt to relaunch discussions on a blocked set of amendments to that law, which moreover focusses on a limited set of issues. Will it ‘work’? There are two different ways to answer that question.

      First, will it unlock the institutional blockage? Here it should be kept in mind that the European Parliament and the Council had largely agreed on several of the 2016 proposals already; they would have been adopted in 2018 already had not the Council treated all the proposals as a package, and not gone back on agreements which the Council Presidency reached with the European Parliament. It is always open to the Council to get at least some of these proposals adopted quickly by reversing these approaches.

      On the blocked proposals, the Commission has targeted the key issues of border procedures and allocation of asylum-seekers. If the former leads to more quick removals of unsuccessful applicants, the latter issue is no longer so pressing. But it is not clear if the Member States will agree to anything on border procedures, or whether such an agreement will result in more expulsions anyway – because the latter depends on the willingness of non-EU countries, which the EU cannot legislate for (and does not even address in this most recent package). And because it is uncertain whether they will result in more expulsions, Member States will be wary of agreeing to anything which either results in more obligations to accept asylum-seekers on their territory, or leaves them with the same number as before.

      The idea of ‘return sponsorship’ – which reads like a grotesque parody of individuals sponsoring children in developing countries via charities – may not be appealing except to those countries like France, which have the capacity to twist arms in developing countries to accept returns. Member States might be able to agree on a replacement for the temporary protection Directive on the basis that they will never use that replacement either. And Commission threats to use infringement proceedings to enforce the law might not worry Member States who recall that the CJEU ruled on their failure to relocate asylum-seekers after the relocation law had already expired, and that the Court will soon rule on Hungary’s expulsion of the Central European University after it has already left.

      As to whether the proposals will ‘work’ in terms of managing asylum flows fairly and compatibly with human rights, it is striking how much they depend upon curtailing appeal rights, even though appeals are often successful. The proposed limitation of appeal rights will also be maintained in the Dublin system; and while the proposed ‘bottleneck’ of deciding on removals to non-EU countries before applying the Dublin system has been removed, a variation on this process may well apply in the border procedures process instead. There is no new review of the assessment of the safety of non-EU countries – which is questionable in light of the many reports of abuse in Libya. While the EU is not proposing, as the wildest headbangers would want, to turn people back or refuse applications without consideration, the question is whether the fast-track consideration of applications and then appeals will constitute merely a Potemkin village of procedural rights that mean nothing in practice.

      Increased detention is already a feature of the amendments proposed earlier: the reception conditions proposal would add a new ground for detention; the return Directive proposal would inevitably increase detention due to curtailing voluntary departure (as discussed here). Unfortunately the Commission’s claim in its new communication that its 2018 proposal is ‘promoting’ voluntary return is therefore simply false. Trump-style falsehoods have no place in the discussion of EU immigration or asylum law.

      The latest Eurodac proposal would not do much compared to the 2016 proposal – but then, the 2016 proposal would already constitute an enormous increase in the amount of data collected and shared by that system.

      Some elements of the package are more positive. The possibility for refugees and people with subsidiary protection to get EU long-term residence status earlier would be an important step toward making asylum ‘valid throughout the Union’, as referred to in the Treaties. The wider definition of family members, and the retention of the full sovereignty clause, may lead to some fairer results under the Dublin system. Future plans to improve the long-term residents’ Directive are long overdue. The Commission’s sound legal assessment that no one should be prosecuted for acting on their obligations to rescue people in distress at sea is welcome. The quasi-agreed text of the reception conditions Directive explicitly rules out Trump-style separate detention of children.

      No proposals from the EU can solve the underlying political issue: a chunk of public opinion is hostile to more migration, whether in frontline Member States, other Member States, or transit countries outside the EU. The politics is bound to affect what Member States and non-EU countries alike are willing to agree to. And for the same reason, even if a set of amendments to the system is ultimately agreed, there will likely be continuing issues of implementation, especially illegal pushbacks and refusals to accept relocation.

      https://eulawanalysis.blogspot.com/2020/09/first-analysis-of-eus-new-asylum.html?spref=fb

    • Pacte européen sur les migrations et l’asile : Le rendez-vous manqué de l’UE

      Le nouveau pacte européen migrations et asile présenté par la Commission ce 23 septembre, loin de tirer les leçons de l’échec et du coût humain intolérable des politiques menées depuis 30 ans, s’inscrit dans la continuité des logiques déjà largement éprouvées, fondées sur une approche répressive et sécuritaire au service de l’endiguement et des expulsions et au détriment d’une politique d’accueil qui s’attache à garantir et à protéger la dignité et les droits fondamentaux.

      Des « nouveaux » camps européens aux frontières pour filtrer les personnes arrivées sur le territoire européen et expulser le plus grand nombre

      En réaction au drame des incendies qui ont ravagé le camp de Moria sur l’île grecque de Lesbos, la commissaire européenne aux affaires intérieures, Ylva Johansson, affirmait le 17 septembre devant les députés européens qu’« il n’y aurait pas d’autres Moria » mais de « véritables centres d’accueil » aux frontières européennes.

      Si le nouveau pacte prévoie effectivement la création de « nouveaux » camps conjuguée à une « nouvelle » procédure accélérée aux frontières, ces derniers s’apparentent largement à l’approche hotspot mise en œuvre par l’Union européenne (UE) depuis 2015 afin d’organiser la sélection des personnes qu’elle souhaite accueillir et l’expulsion, depuis la frontière, de tous celles qu’elle considère « indésirables ».

      Le pacte prévoie ainsi la mise en place « d’un contrôle préalable à l’entrée sur le territoire pour toutes les personnes qui se présentent aux frontières extérieures ou après un débarquement, à la suite d’une opération de recherche et de sauvetage ». Il s’agira, pour les pays situés à la frontière extérieure de l’UE, de procéder – dans un délai de 5 jours et avec l’appui des agences européennes (l’agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes – Frontex et le Bureau européen d’appui en matière d’asile – EASO) – à des contrôles d’identité (prise d’empreintes et enregistrement dans les bases de données européennes) doublés de contrôles sécuritaires et sanitaires afin de procéder à un tri préalable à l’entrée sur le territoire, permettant d’orienter ensuite les personne vers :

      Une procédure d’asile accélérée à la frontière pour celles possédant une nationalité pour laquelle le taux de reconnaissance d’une protection internationale, à l’échelle de l’UE, est inférieure à 20%
      Une procédure d’asile normale pour celles considérées comme éligibles à une protection.
      Une procédure d’expulsion immédiate, depuis la frontière, pour toute celles qui auront été rejetées par ce dispositif de tri, dans un délai de 12 semaines.

      Pendant cette procédure de filtrage à la frontière, les personnes seraient considérées comme n’étant pas encore entrées sur le territoire européen ce qui permettrait aux Etats de déroger aux conventions de droit international qui s’y appliquent.

      Un premier projet pilote est notamment prévu à Lesbos, conjointement avec les autorités grecques, pour installer un nouveau camp sur l’île avec l’appui d’une Task Force européenne, directement placée sous le contrôle de la direction générale des affaires intérieure de la Commission européenne (DG HOME).

      Difficile de voir où se trouve l’innovation dans la proposition présentée par la Commission. Si ce n’est que les États européens souhaitent pousser encore plus loin à la fois la logique de filtrage à ces frontières ainsi que la sous-traitance de leur contrôle. Depuis l’été 2018, l’Union européenne défend la création de « centres contrôlés au sein de l’UE » d’une part et de « plateformes de débarquement dans les pays tiers » d’autre part. L’UE, à travers ce nouveau mécanisme, vise à organiser l’expulsion rapide des migrants qui sont parvenus, souvent au péril de leur vie, à pénétrer sur son territoire. Pour ce faire, la coopération accrue avec les gardes-frontières des États non européens et l’appui opérationnel de l’agence Frontex sont encore et toujours privilégiés.
      Un « nouvel écosystème en matière de retour »

      L’obsession européenne pour l’amélioration du « taux de retour » se retrouve au cœur de ce nouveau pacte, en repoussant toujours plus les limites en matière de coopération extérieure et d’enfermement des personnes étrangères jugées indésirables et en augmentant de façon inédite ses moyens opérationnels.

      Selon l’expression de Margaritis Schinas, commissaire grec en charge de la « promotion du mode de vie européen », la nouvelle procédure accélérée aux frontières s’accompagnera d’« un nouvel écosystème européen en matière de retour ». Il sera piloté par un « nouveau coordinateur de l’UE chargé des retours » ainsi qu’un « réseau de haut niveau coordonnant les actions nationales » avec le soutien de l’agence Frontex, qui devrait devenir « le bras opérationnel de la politique de retour européenne ».

      Rappelons que Frontex a vu ses moyens décuplés ces dernières années, notamment en vue d’expulser plus de personnes migrantes. Celle-ci a encore vu ses moyens renforcés depuis l’entrée en vigueur de son nouveau règlement le 4 décembre 2019 dont la Commission souhaite accélérer la mise en œuvre effective. Au-delà d’une augmentation de ses effectifs et de la possibilité d’acquérir son propre matériel, l’agence bénéficie désormais de pouvoirs étendus pour identifier les personnes « expulsables » du territoire européen, obtenir les documents de voyage nécessaires à la mise en œuvre de leurs expulsions ainsi que pour coordonner des opérations d’expulsion au service des Etats membres.

      La Commission souhaite également faire aboutir, d’ici le second trimestre 2021, le projet de révision de la directive européenne « Retour », qui constitue un recul sans précédent du cadre de protection des droits fondamentaux des personnes migrantes. Voir notre précédente actualité sur le sujet : L’expulsion au cœur des politiques migratoires européennes, 22 mai 2019
      Des « partenariats sur-mesure » avec les pays d’origine et de transit

      La Commission étend encore redoubler d’efforts afin d’inciter les Etats non européens à participer activement à empêcher les départs vers l’Europe ainsi qu’à collaborer davantage en matière de retour et de réadmission en utilisant l’ensemble des instruments politiques à sa disposition. Ces dernières années ont vu se multiplier les instruments européens de coopération formelle (à travers la signature, entre autres, d’accords de réadmission bilatéraux ou multilatéraux) et informelle (à l’instar de la tristement célèbre déclaration entre l’UE et la Turquie de mars 2016) à tel point qu’il est devenu impossible, pour les États ciblés, de coopérer avec l’UE dans un domaine spécifique sans que les objectifs européens en matière migratoire ne soient aussi imposés.

      L’exécutif européen a enfin souligné sa volonté de d’exploiter les possibilités offertes par le nouveau règlement sur les visas Schengen, entré en vigueur en février 2020. Celui-ci prévoie d’évaluer, chaque année, le degré de coopération des Etats non européens en matière de réadmission. Le résultat de cette évaluation permettra d’adopter une décision de facilitation de visa pour les « bon élèves » ou à l’inverse, d’imposer des mesures de restrictions de visas aux « mauvais élèves ». Voir notre précédente actualité sur le sujet : Expulsions contre visas : le droit à la mobilité marchandé, 2 février 2020.

      Conduite au seul prisme des intérêts européens, cette politique renforce le caractère historiquement déséquilibré des relations de « coopération » et entraîne en outre des conséquences désastreuses sur les droits des personnes migrantes, notamment celui de quitter tout pays, y compris le leur. Sous couvert d’aider ces pays à « se développer », les mesures « incitatives » européennes ne restent qu’un moyen de poursuivre ses objectifs et d’imposer sa vision des migrations. En coopérant davantage avec les pays d’origine et de transit, parmi lesquelles des dictatures et autres régimes autoritaires, l’UE renforce l’externalisation de ses politiques migratoires, sous-traitant la gestion des exilées aux Etats extérieurs à l’UE, tout en se déresponsabilisant des violations des droits perpétrées hors de ses frontières.
      Solidarité à la carte, entre relocalisation et expulsion

      Le constat d’échec du système Dublin – machine infernale de l’asile européen – conjugué à la volonté de parvenir à trouver un consensus suite aux profonds désaccords qui avaient mené les négociations sur Dublin IV dans l’impasse, la Commission souhaite remplacer l’actuel règlement de Dublin par un nouveau règlement sur la gestion de l’asile et de l’immigration, liant étroitement les procédures d’asile aux procédures d’expulsion.

      Les quotas de relocalisation contraignants utilisés par le passé, à l’instar du mécanisme de relocalisation mis en place entre 2015 et 2017 qui fut un échec tant du point de vue du nombre de relocalisations (seulement 25 000 relocalisations sur les 160 000 prévues) que du refus de plusieurs Etats d’y participer, semblent être abandonnés.

      Le nouveau pacte propose donc un nouveau mécanisme de solidarité, certes obligatoire mais flexible dans ses modalités. Ainsi les Etats membres devront choisir, selon une clé de répartition définie :

      Soit de participer à l’effort de relocalisation des personnes identifiées comme éligibles à la protection internationale depuis les frontières extérieures pour prendre en charge l’examen de leur demande d’asile.
      Soit de participer au nouveau concept de « parrainage des retours » inventé par la Commission européenne. Concrètement, il s’agit d’être « solidaire autrement », en s’engageant activement dans la politique de retour européenne par la mise en œuvre des expulsions des personnes que l’UE et ses Etats membres souhaitent éloigner du territoire, avec la possibilité de concentrer leurs efforts sur les nationalités pour lesquelles leurs perspectives de faire aboutir l’expulsion est la plus élevée.

      De nouvelles règles pour les « situations de crise et de force majeure »

      Le pacte prévoie d’abroger la directive européenne relative à des normes minimales pour l’octroi d’une protection temporaire en cas d’afflux massif de personnes déplacées, au profit d’un nouveau règlement européen relatif aux « situations de crise et de force majeure ». L’UE et ses Etats membres ont régulièrement essuyé les critiques des acteurs de la société civile pour n’avoir jamais activé la procédure prévue par la directive de 2001, notamment dans le cadre de situation exceptionnelle telle que la crise de l’accueil des personnes arrivées aux frontières sud de l’UE en 2015.

      Le nouveau règlement prévoie notamment qu’en cas de « situation de crise ou de force majeure » les Etats membres pourraient déroger aux règles qui s’appliquent en matière d’asile, en suspendant notamment l’enregistrement des demandes d’asile pendant un durée d’un mois maximum. Cette mesure entérine des pratiques contraires au droit international et européen, à l’instar de ce qu’a fait la Grèce début mars 2020 afin de refouler toutes les personnes qui tenteraient de pénétrer le territoire européen depuis la Turquie voisine. Voir notre précédente actualité sur le sujet : Frontière Grèce-Turquie : de l’approche hotspot au scandale de la guerre aux migrant·e ·s, 3 mars 2020

      Cette proposition représente un recul sans précédent du droit d’asile aux frontières et fait craindre de multiples violations du principe de non refoulement consacré par la Convention de Genève.

      Bien loin d’engager un changement de cap des politiques migratoires européennes, le nouveau pacte européen migrations et asile ne semble n’être qu’un nouveau cadre de plus pour poursuivre une approche des mouvements migratoires qui, de longue date, s’est construite autour de la volonté d’empêcher les arrivées aux frontières et d’organiser un tri parmi les personnes qui auraient réussi à braver les obstacles pour atteindre le territoire européen, entre celles considérées éligibles à la demande d’asile et toutes les autres qui devraient être expulsées.

      De notre point de vue, cela signifie surtout que des milliers de personnes continueront à être privées de liberté et à subir les dispositifs répressifs des Etats membres de l’Union européenne. Les conséquences néfastes sur la dignité humaine et les droits fondamentaux de cette approche sont flagrantes, les personnes exilées et leurs soutiens y sont confrontées tous les jours.

      Encore une fois, des moyens très importants sont consacrés à financer l’érection de barrières physiques, juridiques et technologiques ainsi que la construction de camps sur les routes migratoires tandis qu’ils pourraient utilement être redéployés pour accueillir dignement et permettre un accès inconditionnel au territoire européen pour les personnes bloquées à ses frontières extérieures afin d’examiner avec attention et impartialité leurs situations et assurer le respect effectif des droits de tou∙te∙s.

      Nous appelons à un changement radical des politiques migratoires, pour une Europe qui encourage les solidarités, fondée sur la protection des droits humains et la dignité humaine afin d’assurer la protection des personnes et non pas leur exclusion.

      https://www.lacimade.org/pacte-europeen-sur-les-migrations-et-lasile-le-rendez-vous-manque-de-lue

    • EU’s new migrant ‘pact’ is as squalid as its refugee camps

      Governments need to share responsibility for asylum seekers, beyond merely ejecting the unwanted

      One month after fires swept through Europe’s largest, most squalid refugee camp, the EU’s migration policies present a picture as desolate as the blackened ruins of Moria on the Greek island of Lesbos. The latest effort at overhauling these policies is a European Commission “pact on asylum and migration”, which is not a pact at all. Its proposals sharply divide the EU’s 27 governments.

      In an attempt to appease central and eastern European countries hostile to admitting asylum-seekers, the commission suggests, in an Orwellian turn of phrase, that they should operate “relocation and return sponsorships”, dispatching people refused entry to their places of origin. This sort of task is normally reserved for nightclub bouncers.

      The grim irony is that Hungary and Poland, two countries that would presumably be asked to take charge of such expulsions, are the subject of EU disciplinary proceedings due to alleged violations of the rule of law. It remains a mystery how, if the commission proposal moves forward, the EU will succeed in binding Hungary and Poland into a common asylum policy and bend them into accepting EU definitions of the rule of law.

      Perhaps the best thing to be said of the commission’s plan is that, unlike the UK government, EU policymakers are not toying with hare-brained schemes of sending asylum-seekers to Ascension Island in the south Atlantic. Such options are the imagined privilege of a former imperial power not divested of all its far-flung possessions.

      Yet the commission’s initiative still reeks of wishful thinking. It foresees a process in which authorities swiftly check the identities, security status and health of irregular migrants, before returning them home, placing them in the asylum system or putting them in temporary facilities. This will supposedly decongest EU border zones, as governments will agree how to relocate new arrivals. But it is precisely the lack of such agreement since 2015 that led to Moria’s disgraceful conditions.

      The commission should not be held responsible for governments failing to shoulder their responsibilities. It is also justified in emphasising the need for a strong EU frontier. This is a precondition for free movement inside the bloc, vital for a flourishing single market.

      True, the Schengen system of border-free internal travel is curtailed at present because of the pandemic, not to mention restrictions introduced in some countries after the 2015 refugee and migrant crisis. But no government wants to abandon Schengen. Where they fall out with each other is over the housing of refugees and migrants.

      Europe’s overcrowded, unhygienic refugee camps, and the paralysis that grips EU policies, are all the more shameful in that governments no longer face a border emergency. Some 60,800 irregular migrants crossed into the EU between January and August, 14 per cent less than the same period in 2019, according to the EU border agency.

      By contrast, there were 1.8m illegal border crossings in 2015, a different order of magnitude. Refugees from conflicts in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria made desperate voyages across the Mediterranean, with thousands drowning in ramshackle boats. Some countries, led by Germany and Sweden, were extremely generous in opening their doors to refugees. Others were not.

      The roots of today’s problems lie in the measures devised to address that crisis, above all a 2016 accord with Turkey. Irregular migrants were kept on Moria and other Greek islands, designated “hotspots”, in the expectation that failed asylum applicants would be smoothly returned to Turkey, its coffers replenished by billions of euros in EU assistance. In practice, few went back to Turkey and the understaffed, underfunded “hotspots” became places of tension between refugees and locals.

      Unable to agree on a relocation scheme among themselves, EU governments lapsed into a de facto policy of deterrence of irregular migrants. The pandemic provided an excuse for Italy and Malta to close their ports to people rescued at sea. Visiting the Greek-Turkish border in March, Ursula von der Leyen, the commission president, declared: “I thank Greece for being our European aspida [shield].”

      The legitimacy of EU refugee policies depends on adherence to international law, as well the bloc’s own rules. Its practical success requires all governments to share a responsibility for asylum-seekers that goes beyond ejecting unwanted individuals. Otherwise the EU will fall into the familiar trap of cobbling together unsatisfactory half-measures that guarantee more trouble in the future.

      https://www.ft.com/content/c50c6b9c-75a8-40b1-900d-a228faa382dc?segmentid=acee4131-99c2-09d3-a635-873e61754

    • The EU’s pact against migration, Part One

      The EU Commission’s proposal for a ‘New Pact for Migration and Asylum’ offers no prospect of ending the enduring mobility conflict, opposing the movements of illegalised migrants to the EU’s restrictive migration policies.

      The ’New Pact for Migration and Asylum’, announced by the European Commission in July 2019, was finally presented on September 23, 2020. The Pact was eagerly anticipated as it was described as a “fresh start on migration in Europe”, acknowledging not only that Dublin had failed, but also that the negotiations between European member states as to what system might replace it had reached a standstill.

      The fire in Moria that left more than 13.000 people stranded in the streets of Lesvos island offered a glaring symbol of the failure of the current EU policy. The public outcry it caused and expressions of solidarity it crystallised across Europe pressured the Commission to respond through the publication of its Pact.

      Considering the trajectory of EU migration policies over the last decades, the particular position of the Commission within the European power structure and the current political conjuncture of strong anti-migration positions in Europe, we did not expect the Commission’s proposal to address the mobility conflict underlying its migration policy crisis in a constructive way. And indeed, the Pact’s main promise is to manage the diverging positions of member states through a new mechanism of “flexible solidarity” between member states in sharing the “burden” of migrants who have arrived on European territory. Perpetuating the trajectory of the last decades, it however remains premised on keeping most migrants from the global South out at all cost. The “New Pact” then is effectively a pact between European states against migrants. The Pact, which will be examined and possibly adopted by the European Parliament and Council in the coming months, confirms the impasse to which three decades of European migration and asylum policy have led, and an absence of any political imagination worthy of the name.
      The EU’s migration regime’s failed architecture

      The current architecture of the European border regime is based on two main and intertwined pillars: the Schengen Implementing Convention (SIC, or Schengen II) and the Dublin Convention, both signed in 1990, and gradually enforced in the following years.[1]

      Created outside the EC/EU context, they became the central rationalities of the emerging European border and migration regime after their incorporation into EU law through the Treaty of Amsterdam (1997/99). Schengen instituted the EU’s territory as an area of free movement for its citizens and, as a direct consequence, reinforced the exclusion of citizens of the global South and pushed control towards its external borders.

      However this profound transformation of European borders left unchanged the unbalanced systemic relations between Europe and the Global South, within which migrants’ movements are embedded. As a result, this policy shift did not stop migrants from reaching the EU but rather illegalised their mobility, forcing them to resort to precarious migration strategies and generating an easily exploitable labour force that has become a large-scale and permanent feature of EU economies.

      The more than 40,000 migrant deaths recorded at the EU’s borders by NGOs since the end of the 1980s are the lethal outcomes of this enduring mobility conflict opposing the movements of illegalised migrants to the EU’s restrictive migration policies.

      The second pillar of the EU’s migration architecture, the Dublin Convention, addressed asylum seekers and their allocation between member-states. To prevent them from filing applications in several EU countries – derogatively referred to as “asylum shopping” – the 2003 Dublin regulation states that the asylum seekers’ first country of entry into the EU is responsible for processing their claims. Dublin thus created an uneven European geography of (ir)responsibility that allowed the member states not directly situated at the intersection of European borders and routes of migration to abnegate their responsibility to provide shelter and protection, and placed a heavier “burden” on the shoulders of states located at the EU’s external borders.

      This unbalanced architecture, around which the entire Common European Asylum System (CEAS) was constructed, would begin to wobble as soon as the number of people arriving on the EU’s shores rose, leading to crisis-driven policy responses to prevent the migration regime from collapsing under the pressure of migrants’ refusal to be assigned to a country that was not of their choosing, and conflicts between member states.

      As a result, the development of a European border, migration and asylum policy has been driven by crisis and is inherently reactive. This pattern particularly holds for the last decade, when the large-scale movements of migrants to Europe in the wake of the Arab Uprisings in 2011 put the EU migration regime into permanent crisis mode and prompted hasty reforms. As of 2011, Italy allowed Tunisians to move on, leading to the re-introduction of border controls by states such as France, while the same year the 2011 European Court of Human Rights’ judgement brought Dublin deportations to Greece to a halt because of the appalling reception and living conditions there. The increasing refusal by asylum seekers to surrender their fingerprints – the core means of implementing Dublin – as of 2013 further destabilized the migration regime.

      The instability only grew when in April 2015, more then 1,200 people died in two consecutive shipwrecks, forcing the Commission to publish its ‘European Agenda for Migration’ in May 2015. The 2015 agenda announced the creation of the hotspot system in the hope of re-stabilising the European migration regime through a targeted intervention of European agencies at Europe’s borders. Essentially, the hotspot approach offered a deal to EU member states: comprehensive registration in Europeanised structures (the hotspots) by so-called “front-line states” – thus re-imposing Dublin – in exchange for relocation of part of the registered migrants to other EU countries – thereby alleviating front-line states of part of their “burden”.

      This plan however collapsed before it could ever work, as it was immediately followed by the large-scale summer arrivals of 2015 as migrants trekked across Europe’s borders. It was simultaneously boycotted by several member states who refused relocations and continue to lead the charge in fomenting an explicit anti-migration agenda in the EU. While border controls were soon reintroduced, relocations never materialised in a meaningful manner in the years that followed.

      With the Dublin regime effectively paralysed and the EU unable to agree on a new mechanism for the distribution of asylum seekers within Europe, the EU resorted to the decades-old policies that had shaped the European border and migration regime since its inception: keeping migrants out at all cost through border control implemented by member states, European agencies or outsourced to third countries.

      Considering the profound crisis the turbulent movements of migrants had plunged the EU into in the summer of 2015, no measure was deemed excessive in achieving this exclusionary end: neither the tacit acceptance of violent expulsions and push-backs by Spain and Greece, nor the outsourcing of border control to Libyan torturers, nor the shameless collaboration with dictatorial regimes such as Turkey.

      Under the guise of “tackling the root causes of migration”, development aid was diverted and used to impose border externalisation and deportation agreements. But the external dimension of the EU’s migration regime has proven just as unstable as its internal one – as the re-opening of borders by Turkey in March 2020 demonstrates. The movements of illegalised migrants towards the EU could never be entirely contained and those who reached the shores of Europe were increasingly relegated to infrastructures of detention. Even if keeping thousands of migrants stranded in the hell of Moria may not have been part of the initial hotspot plan, it certainly has been the outcome of the EU’s internal blockages and ultimately effective in shoring up the EU’s strategy of deterrence.

      The “New Pact” perpetuating the EU’s failed policy of closure

      Today the “New Pact”, promised for Spring 2020 and apparently forgotten at the height of the Covid-19 pandemic, has been revived in a hurry to address the destruction of Moria hotspot. While detailed analysis of the regulations that it proposes are beyond the scope of this article,[2] the broad intentions of the Pact’s rationale are clear.

      Despite all its humane and humanitarian rhetoric and some language critically addressing the manifest absence of the rule of law at the border of Europe, the Commission’s pact is a pact against migration. Taking stock of the continued impasse in terms of internal distribution of migrants, it re-affirms the EU’s central objective of reducing, massively the number of asylum seekers to be admitted to Europe. It promises to do so by continuing to erect chains of externalised border control along migrants’ entire trajectories (what it refers to as the “whole-of-route approach”).

      Those who do arrive should be swiftly screened and sorted in an infrastructure of detention along the borders of Europe. The lucky few who will succeed in fitting their lives into the shrinking boxes of asylum law are to be relocated to other EU countries in function of a mechanism of distribution based on population size and wealth of member states.

      Whether this will indeed undo the imbalances of the Dublin regime remains an open question[3], nevertheless, this relocation key is one of the few positive steps offered by the Pact since it comes closer to migrants’ own “relocation key” but still falls short of granting asylum seekers the freedom to choose their country of protection and residence.[4] The majority of rejected asylum seekers – which may be determined on the basis of an extended understanding of the “safe third country” notion – is to be funnelled towards deportations operated by the EU states refusing relocation. The Commission hopes deportations will be made smoother after a newly appointed “EU Return Coordinator” will have bullied countries of origin into accepting their nationals using the carrot of development aid and the stick of visa sanctions. The Commission seems to believe that with fewer expected arrivals and fewer migrants ending up staying in Europe, and with its mechanism of “flexible solidarity” allowing for a selective participation in relocations or returns depending on the taste of its member states, it can both bridge the gap between member states’ interests and push for a deeper Europeanisation of the policy field in which its own role will become more central.

      Thus, the EU Commission’s attempt to square the circle of member states’ conflicting interests has resulted in a European pact against migration, which perpetuates the promises of the EU’s (anti-)migration policy over the last three decades: externalisation, enhanced borders, accelerated asylum procedures, detention and deportations to prevent and deter migrants from the global South. It seeks to strike yet another deal between European member states, without consulting – and at the expense of – migrants themselves. Because most of the policy means contained in the pact are not new, and have always failed to durably end illegalised migration – instead they have created a large precaritised population at the heart of Europe – we do not see how they would work today. Migrants will continue to arrive, and many will remain stranded in front-line states or other EU states as they await deportation. As such, the outcome of the pact (if it is agreed upon) is likely a perpetuation and generalisation of the hotspot system, the very system whose untenability – glaringly demonstrated by Moria’s fire – prompted the presentation of the New Pact in the first place. Even if the Commission’s “no more Morias” rhetoric would like to persuade us of the opposite,[5] the ruins of Moria point to the past as well as the potential future of the CEAS if the Commission has its way.

      We are dismayed at the loss of yet another opportunity for Europe to fundamentally re-orient its policy of closure, one which is profoundly at odds with the reality of large-scale displacement in an unequal and interconnected world. We are dismayed at the prospect of more suffering and more political crises that can only be the outcome of this continued policy failure. Clearly, an entirely different approach to how Europe engages with the movements of migration is called for. One which actually aims to de-escalate and transform the enduring mobility conflict. One which starts from the reality of the movements of migrants and offers a frame for it to unfold rather than seeks to suppress and deny it.

      Notes and references

      [1] We have offered an extensive analysis of the following argument in previous articles. See in particular : Bernd Kasparek. 2016. “Complementing Schengen: The Dublin System and the European Border and Migration Regime”. In Migration Policy and Practice, edited by Harald Bauder and Christian Matheis, 59–78. Migration, Diasporas and Citizenship. Houndmills & New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Charles Heller and Lorenzo Pezzani. 2016. “Ebbing and Flowing: The EU’s Shifting Practices of (Non-)Assistance and Bordering in a Time of Crisis”. Near Futures Online. No 1. Available here.

      [2] For first analyses see Steve Peers. 2020. “First analysis of the EU’s new asylum proposals”, EU Law Analysis, 25 September 2020; Sergio Carrera. 2020. “Whose Pact? The Cognitive Dimensions of the New EU Pact on Migration and Asylum”, CEPS, September 2020.

      [3] Carrera, ibid.

      [4] For a discussion of migration of migrants’ own relocation key, see Philipp Lutz, David Kaufmann and Anna Stütz. 2020. “Humanitarian Protection as a European Public Good: The Strategic Role of States and Refugees”, Journal of Common Market Studies 2020 Volume 58. Number 3. pp. 757–775. To compare the actual asylum applications across Europe over the last years with different relocations keys, see the tool developed by Etienne Piguet.

      https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/can-europe-make-it/the-eus-pact-against-migration-part-one

      #whole-of-route_approach #relocalisation #clé_de_relocalisation #relocation_key #pays-tiers_sûrs #EU_Return_Coordinator #solidarité_flexible #externalisation #new_pact

    • Towards a European pact with migrants, Part Two

      We call for a new Pact that addresses the reality of migrants’ movements, the systemic conditions leading people to flee their homes as well as the root causes of Europe’s racism.

      In Part One, we analysed the EU’s new Pact against migration. Here, we call for an entirely different approach to how Europe engages with migration, one which offers a legal frame for migration to unfold, and addresses the systemic conditions leading people to flee their homes as well as the root causes of Europe’s racism.Let us imagine for a moment that the EU Commission truly wanted, and was in a position, to reorient the EU’s migration policy in a direction that might actually de-escalate and transform the enduring mobility conflict: what might its pact with migrants look like?

      The EU’s pact with migrants might start from three fundamental premises. First, it would recognize that any policy that is entirely at odds with social practices is bound to generate conflict, and ultimately fail. A migration policy must start from the social reality of migration and provide a frame for it to unfold. Second, the pact would acknowledge that no conflict can be brought to an end unilaterally. Any process of conflict transformation must bring together the conflicting parties, and seek to address their needs, interests and values so that they no longer clash with each other. In particular, migrants from the global South must be included in the definition of the policies that concern them. Third, it would recognise, as Tendayi Achiume has put it, that migrants from the global South are no strangers to Europe.[1] They have long been included in the expansive webs of empire. Migration and borders are embedded in these unequal relations, and no end to the mobility conflict can be achieved without fundamentally transforming them. Based on these premises, the EU’s pact with migrants might contain the following four core measures:
      Global justice and conflict prevention

      Instead of claiming to tackle the “root causes” of migration by diverting and instrumentalising development aid towards border control, the EU’s pact with migrants would end all European political and economic relations that contribute to the crises leading to mass displacement. The EU would end all support to dictatorial regimes, would ban all weapon exports, terminate all destabilising military interventions. It would cancel unfair trade agreements and the debts of countries of the global South. It would end its massive carbon emissions that contribute to the climate crisis. Through these means, the EU would not claim to end migration perceived as a “problem” for Europe, but it would contribute to allowing more people to live a dignified life wherever they are and decrease forced migration, which certainly is a problem for migrants. A true commitment to global justice and conflict prevention and resolution is necessary if Europe wishes to limit the factors that lead too many people onto the harsh paths of exile in their countries and regions, a small proportion of whom reach European shores.
      Tackling the “root causes” of European racism

      While the EU’s so-called “global approach” to migration has in fact been one-sided, focused exclusively on migration as “the problem” rather then the processes that drive the EU’s policies of exclusion, the EU’s pact with migrants would boldly tackle the “root causes” of racism and xenophobia in Europe. Bold policies designed to address the EU’s colonial past and present and the racial imaginaries it has unleashed would be proposed, a positive vision for living in common in diverse societies affirmed, and a more inclusive and fair economic system would be established in Europe to decrease the resentment of European populations which has been skilfully channelled against migrants and racialised people.
      Universal freedom of movement

      By tackling the causes of large-scale displacement and of exclusionary migration policies, the EU would be able to de-escalate the mobility conflict, and could thus propose a policy granting all migrants legal pathways to access and stay in Europe. As an immediate outcome of the institution of right to international mobility, migrants would no longer resort to smugglers and risk their lives crossing the sea – and thus no longer be in need of being rescued. Using safe and legal means of travel would also, in the time of Covid-19 pandemic, allow migrants to adopt all sanitary measures that are necessary to protect migrants and those they encounter. No longer policed through military means, migration could appear as a normal process that does not generate fear. Frontex, the European border agency, would be defunded, and concentrate its limited activities on detecting actual threats to the EU rather then constructing vulnerable populations as “risks”. In a world that would be less unequal and in which people would have the possibly to lead a dignified life wherever they are, universal freedom of movement would not lead to an “invasion” of Europe. Circulatory movement rather then permanent settlement would be frequent. Migrants’ legal status would no longer allow employers to push working conditions down. A European asylum system would continue to exist, to grant protection and support to those in need. The vestiges of the EU’s hotspots and detention centres might be turned into ministries of welcome, which would register and redirect people to the place of their choice. Registration would thus be a mere certification of having taken the first step towards European citizenship, transforming the latter into a truly post-national institution, a far horizon which current EU treaties only hint at.
      Democratizing borders

      Considering that all European migration policies to date have been fundamentally undemocratic – in that they were imposed on a group of people – migrants – who had no say in the legislative and political process defining the laws that govern their movement – the pact would instead be the outcome of considerable consultative process with migrants and the organisations that support them, as well the states of the global South. The pact, following from Étienne Balibar’s suggestion, would in turn propose to permanently democratise borders by instituting “a multilateral, negotiated control of their working by the populations themselves (including, of course, migrant populations),” within “new representative institutions” that “are not merely ‘territorial’ and certainly not purely national.”[2] In such a pact, the original promise of Europe as a post-national project would finally be revived.

      Such a policy orientation may of course appear as nothing more then a fantasy. And yet it appears evident to us that the direction we suggest is the only realistic one. European citizens and policy makers alike must realise that the question is not whether migrants will exercise their freedom to cross borders, but at what human and political cost. As a result, it is far more realistic to address the processes within which the mobility conflict is embedded, than seeking to ban human mobility. As the Black Lives Matter’s slogan “No justice no peace!” resonating in the streets of the world over recent months reminds us, without mobility justice, [3] their can be no end to mobility conflict.
      The challenges ahead for migrant solidarity movements

      Our policy proposals are perfectly realistic in relation to migrants’ movements and the processes shaping them, yet we are well aware that they are not on the agenda of neoliberal and nationalist Europe. If the EU Commission has squandered yet another opportunity to reorient the EU’s migration policy, it is simply that this Europe, governed by these member states and politicians, has lost the capacity to offer bold visions of democracy, freedom and justice for itself and the world. As such, we have little hope for a fundamental reorientation of the EU’s policies. The bleak prospect is of the perpetuation of the mobility conflict, and the human suffering and political crises it generates.

      What are those who seek to support migrants to do in this context?

      We must start by a sobering note addressed to the movement we are part of: the fire of Moria is not only a symptom and symbol of the failures of the EU’s migration policies and member states, but also of our own strategies. After all, since the hotspots were proposed in 2015 we have tirelessly denounced them, and documented the horrendous living conditions they have created. NGOs have litigated against them, but efforts have been turned down by a European Court of Human Rights that appears increasingly reluctant to position itself on migration-related issues and is thereby contributing to the perpetuation of grave violations by states.

      And despite the extraordinary mobilisation of civil society in alliance with municipalities across Europe who have declared themselves ready to welcome migrants, relocations never materialised on any significant scale. After five years of tireless mobilization, the hotspots still stand, with thousands of asylum seekers trapped in them.

      While the conditions leading to the fire are still being clarified, it appears that the migrants held hostage in Moria took it into their own hands to try to get rid of the camp through the desperate act of burning it to the ground. As such, while we denounce the EU’s policies, our movements are urgently in need of re-evaluating their own modes of action, and re-imagining them more effectively.

      We have no lessons to give, as we share these shortcomings. But we believe that some of the directions we have suggested in our utopian Pact with migrants can guide migrant solidarity movements as well , as they may be implemented from the bottom-up in the present and help reopen our political imagination.

      The freedom to move is not, or not only, a distant utopia, that may be instituted by states in some distant future. It can also be seen as a right and freedom that illegalised migrants seize on a day-to-day basis as they cross borders without authorisation, and persist in living where they choose.

      Freedom of movement can serve as a useful compass to direct and evaluate our practices of contestation and support. Litigation remains an important tool to counter the multiple forms of violence and violations that migrants face along their trajectories, even as we acknowledge that national and international courts are far from immune to the anti-migrant atmosphere within states. Forging infrastructures of support for migrants in the course of their mobility (such as the WatchTheMed Alarm Phone and the civilian rescue fleet) – and their stay (such as the many citizen platforms for housing )– is and will continue to be essential.

      While states seek to implement what they call an “integrated border management” that seeks to manage migrants’ unruly mobilities before, at, and after borders, we can think of our own networks as forming a fragmented yet interconnected “integrated border solidarity” along the migrants’ entire trajectory. The criminalisation of our acts of solidarity by states is proof that we are effective in disrupting the violence of borders.

      Solidarity cities have formed important nodes in these chains, as municipalities do have the capacity to enable migrants to live in dignity in urban spaces, and limit the reach of their security forces for example. Their dissonant voices of welcome have been important in demonstrating that segments of the European population, which are far from negligible, refuse to be complicit with the EU’s policies of closure and are ready to embody an open relation of solidarity with migrants and beyond. However we must also acknowledge that the prerogative of granting access to European states remains in the hands of central administrations, not in those of municipalities, and thus the readiness to welcome migrants has not allowed the latter to actually seek sanctuary.

      While humanitarian and humanist calls for welcome are important, we too need to locate migration and borders in a broader political and economic context – that of the past and present of empire – so that they can be understood as questions of (in)justice. Echoing the words of the late Edouard Glissant, as activists focusing on illegalised migration we should never forget that “to have to force one’s way across borders as a result of one’s misery is as scandalous as what founds that misery”.[4] As a result of this framing, many more alliances can be forged today between migrant solidarity movements and the global justice and climate justice movements, as well as anti-racist, anti-fascist, feminist and decolonial movements. Through such alliances, we may be better equipped to support migrants throughout their entire trajectories, and transform the conditions that constrain them today.

      Ultimately, to navigate its way out of its own impasses, it seems to us that migrant solidarity movements must address four major questions.

      First, what migration policy do we want? The predictable limits of the EU’s pact against migration may be an opportunity to forge our own alternative agenda.

      Second, how can we not only oppose the implementation of restrictive policies but shape the policy process itself so as to transform the field on which we struggle? Opposing the EU’s anti-migrant pact over the coming months may allow us to conduct new experiments.

      Third, as long as policies that deny basic principles of equality, freedom, justice, and our very common humanity, are still in place, how can we lead actions that disrupt them effectively? For example, what are the forms of nongovernmental evacuations that might support migrants in accessing Europe, and moving across its internal borders?

      Fourth, how can struggles around migration and borders be part of the forging of a more equal, free, just and sustainable world for all?

      The next months during which the EU’s Pact against migration will be discussed in front of the European Parliament and Council will see an uphill battle for all those who still believe in the possibility of a Europe of openness and solidarity. While we have no illusions as to the policy outcome, this is an opportunity we must seize, not only to claim that another Europe and another world is possible, but to start building them from below.

      Notes and references

      [1] Tendayi Achiume. 2019, “The Postcolonial Case for Rethinking Borders.” Dissent 66.3: pp.27-32.

      [2] Etienne Balibar. 2004. We, the People of Europe? Reflections on Transnational Citizenship. Princeton: University Press, p. 108 and 117.

      [3] Mimi Sheller. 2018. Mobility Justice: The Politics of Movement in an Age of Extremes. London: Verso.

      [4] Edouard Glissant. 2006. “Il n’est frontière qu’on n’outrepasse”. Le Monde diplomatique, October 2006.

      https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/can-europe-make-it/towards-pact-migrants-part-two

    • Pacte européen sur la migration et l’asile : Afin de garantir un nouveau départ et d’éviter de reproduire les erreurs passées, certains éléments à risque doivent être reconsidérés et les aspects positifs étendus.

      L’engagement en faveur d’une approche plus humaine de la protection et l’accent mis sur les aspects positifs et bénéfiques de la migration avec lesquels la Commission européenne a lancé le Pacte sur la migration et l’asile sont les bienvenus. Cependant, les propositions formulées reflètent très peu cette rhétorique et ces ambitions. Au lieu de rompre avec les erreurs de la précédente approche de l’Union européenne (UE) et d’offrir un nouveau départ, le Pacte continue de se focaliser sur l’externalisation, la dissuasion, la rétention et le retour.

      Cette première analyse des propositions, réalisée par la société civile, a été guidée par les questions suivantes :

      Les propositions formulées sont-elles en mesure de garantir, en droit et en pratique, le respect des normes internationales et européennes ?
      Participeront-elles à un partage plus juste des responsabilités en matière d’asile au niveau de l’UE et de l’international ?
      Seront-elles susceptibles de fonctionner en pratique ?

      Au lieu d’un partage automatique des responsabilités, le Pacte introduit un système de Dublin, qui n’en porte pas le nom, plus complexe et un mécanisme de « parrainage au retour »

      Le Pacte sur la migration et l’asile a manqué l’occasion de réformer en profondeur le système de Dublin : le principe de responsabilité du premier pays d’arrivée pour examiner les demandes d’asile est, en pratique, maintenu. De plus, le Pacte propose un système complexe introduisant diverses formes de solidarité.

      Certains ajouts positifs dans les critères de détermination de l’Etat membre responsable de la demande d’asile sont à relever, par exemple, l’élargissement de la définition des membres de famille afin d’inclure les frères et sœurs, ainsi qu’un large éventail de membres de famille dans le cas des mineurs non accompagnés et la délivrance d’un diplôme ou d’une autre qualification par un Etat membre. Cependant, au regard de la pratique actuelle des Etats membres, il sera difficile de s’éloigner du principe du premier pays d’entrée comme l’option de départ en faveur des nouvelles considérations prioritaires, notamment le regroupement familial.

      Dans le cas d’un nombre élevé de personnes arrivées sur le territoire (« pression migratoire ») ou débarquées suite à des opérations de recherche et de sauvetage, la solidarité entre Etats membres est requise. Les processus qui en découlent comprennent une série d’évaluations, d’engagements et de rapports devant être rédigés par les États membres. Si la réponse collective est insuffisante, la Commission européenne peut prendre des mesures correctives. Au lieu de promouvoir un mécanisme de soutien pour un partage prévisible des responsabilités, ces dispositions tendent plutôt à créer des formes de négociations entre États membres qui nous sont toutes devenues trop familières. La complexité des propositions soulève des doutes quant à leur application réelle en pratique.

      Les États membres sont autorisés à choisir le « parrainage de retour » à la place de la relocalisation de personnes sur leur territoire, ce qui indique une attention égale portée au retour et à la protection. Au lieu d’apporter un soutien aux Etats membres en charge d’un plus grand nombre de demandes de protection, cette proposition soulève de nombreuses préoccupations juridiques et relatives au respect des droits de l’homme, en particulier si le transfert vers l’Etat dit « parrain » se fait après l’expiration du délai de 8 mois. Qui sera en charge de veiller au traitement des demandeurs d’asile déboutés à leur arrivée dans des Etats qui n’acceptent pas la relocalisation ?

      Le Pacte propose d’étendre l’utilisation de la procédure à la frontière, y compris un recours accru à la rétention

      A défaut de rééquilibrer la responsabilité entre les États membres de l’UE, la proposition de règlement sur les procédures communes exacerbe la pression sur les États situés aux frontières extérieures de l’UE et sur les pays des Balkans occidentaux. La Commission propose de rendre, dans certains cas, les procédures d’asile et de retour à la frontière obligatoires. Cela s’appliquerait notamment aux ressortissants de pays dont le taux moyen de protection de l’UE est inférieur à 20%. Ces procédures seraient facultatives lorsque les Etats membres appliquent les concepts de pays tiers sûr ou pays d’origine sûr. Toutefois, la Commission a précédemment proposé que ceux-ci deviennent obligatoires pour l’ensemble des Etats membres. Les associations réitèrent leurs inquiétudes quant à l’utilisation de ces deux concepts qui ont été largement débattus entre 2016 et 2019. Leur application obligatoire ne doit plus être proposée.

      La proposition de procédure à la frontière repose sur deux hypothèses erronées – notamment sur le fait que la majorité des personnes arrivant en Europe n’est pas éligible à un statut de protection et que l’examen des demandes de protection peut être effectué facilement et rapidement. Ni l’une ni l’autre ne sont correctes. En effet, en prenant en considération à la fois les décisions de première et de seconde instance dans toute l’UE il apparaît que la plupart des demandeurs d’asile dans l’UE au cours des trois dernières années ont obtenu un statut de protection. En outre, le Pacte ne doit pas persévérer dans cette approche erronée selon laquelle les procédures d’asile peuvent être conduites rapidement à travers la réduction de garanties et l’introduction d’un système de tri. La durée moyenne de la procédure d’asile aux Pays-Bas, souvent qualifiée d’ « élève modèle » pour cette pratique, dépasse un an et peut atteindre deux années jusqu’à ce qu’une décision soit prise.

      La proposition engendrerait deux niveaux de standards dans les procédures d’asile, largement déterminés par le pays d’origine de la personne concernée. Cela porte atteinte au droit individuel à l’asile et signifierait qu’un nombre accru de personnes seront soumises à une procédure de deuxième catégorie. Proposer aux Etats membres d’émettre une décision d’asile et d’éloignement de manière simultanée, sans introduire de garanties visant à ce que les principes de non-refoulement, d’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant, et de protection de la vie privée et familiale ne soient examinés, porte atteinte aux obligations qui découlent du droit international. La proposition formulée par la Commission supprime également l’effet suspensif automatique du recours, c’est-à-dire le droit de rester sur le territoire dans l’attente d’une décision finale rendue dans le cadre d’une procédure à la frontière.

      L’idée selon laquelle les personnes soumises à des procédures à la frontière sont considérées comme n’étant pas formellement entrées sur le territoire de l’État membre est trompeuse et contredit la récente jurisprudence de l’UE, sans pour autant modifier les droits de l’individu en vertu du droit européen et international.

      La proposition prive également les personnes de la possibilité d’accéder à des permis de séjour pour des motifs autres que l’asile et impliquera très probablement une privation de liberté pouvant atteindre jusqu’à 6 mois aux frontières de l’UE, c’est-à-dire un maximum de douze semaines dans le cadre de la procédure d’asile à la frontière et douze semaines supplémentaires en cas de procédure de retour à la frontière. En outre, les réformes suppriment le principe selon lequel la rétention ne doit être appliquée qu’en dernier recours dans le cadre des procédures aux frontières. En s’appuyant sur des restrictions plus systématiques des mouvements dans le cadre des procédures à la frontière, la proposition restreindra l’accès de l’individu aux services de base fournis par des acteurs qui ne pourront peut-être pas opérer à la frontière, y compris pour l’assistance et la représentation juridiques. Avec cette approche, on peut s’attendre aux mêmes échecs rencontrés dans la mise en œuvre des « hotspot » sur les îles grecques.

      La reconnaissance de l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant comme élément primordial dans toutes les procédures pour les États membres est positive. Cependant, la Commission diminue les garanties de protection des enfants en n’exemptant que les mineurs non accompagnés ou âgés de moins de douze ans des procédures aux frontières. Ceci est en contradiction avec la définition internationale de l’enfant qui concerne toutes les personnes jusqu’à l’âge de dix-huit ans, telle qu’inscrite dans la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant ratifiée par tous les États membres de l’UE.

      Dans les situations de crise, les États membres sont autorisés à déroger à d’importantes garanties qui soumettront davantage de personnes à des procédures d’asile de qualité inférieure

      La crainte d’iniquité procédurale est d’autant plus visible dans les situations où un État membre peut prétendre être confronté à une « situation exceptionnelle d’afflux massif » ou au risque d’une telle situation.

      Dans ces cas, le champ d’application de la procédure obligatoire aux frontières est considérablement étendu à toutes les personnes en provenance de pays dont le taux moyen de protection de l’UE est inférieur à 75%. La procédure d’asile à la frontière et la procédure de retour à la frontière peuvent être prolongées de huit semaines supplémentaires, soit cinq mois chacune, ce qui porte à dix mois la durée maximale de privation de liberté. En outre, les États membres peuvent suspendre l’enregistrement des demandes d’asile pendant quatre semaines et jusqu’à un maximum de trois mois. Par conséquent, si aucune demande n’est enregistrée pendant plusieurs semaines, les personnes sont susceptibles d’être exposées à un risque accru de rétention et de refoulement, et leurs droits relatifs à un accueil digne et à des services de base peuvent être gravement affectés.

      Cette mesure permet aux États membres de déroger à leur responsabilité de garantir un accès à l’asile et un examen efficace et équitable de l’ensemble des demandes d’asile, ce qui augmente ainsi le risque de refoulement. Dans certains cas extrêmes, notamment lorsque les États membres agissent en violation flagrante et persistante des obligations du droit de l’UE, le processus de demande d’autorisation à la Commission européenne pourrait être considéré comme une amélioration, étant donné qu’actuellement la loi est ignorée, sans consultation et ce malgré les critiques de la Commission européenne. Toutefois, cela ne peut être le point de départ de l’évaluation de cette proposition de la législation européenne. L’impact à grande échelle de cette dérogation offre la possibilité à ce qu’une grande majorité des personnes arrivant dans l’UE soient soumises à une procédure de second ordre.

      Pré-filtrage à la frontière : risques et opportunités

      La Commission propose un processus de « pré-filtrage à l’entrée » pour toutes les personnes qui arrivent de manière irrégulière aux frontières de l’UE, y compris à la suite d’un débarquement dans le cadre des opérations de recherche et de sauvetage. Le processus de pré-filtrage comprend des contrôles de sécurité, de santé et de vulnérabilité, ainsi que l’enregistrement des empreintes digitales, mais il conduit également à des décisions impactant l’accès à l’asile, notamment en déterminant si une personne doit être sujette à une procédure d’asile accélérée à la frontière, de relocalisation ou de retour. Ce processus peut durer jusqu’à 10 jours et doit être effectué au plus près possible de la frontière. Le lieu où les personnes seront placées et l’accès aux conditions matérielles d’accueil demeurent flous. Le filtrage peut également être appliqué aux personnes se trouvant sur le territoire d’un État membre, ce qui pourrait conduire à une augmentation de pratiques discriminatoires. Des questions se posent également concernant les droits des personnes soumises au filtrage, tels que l’accès à l’information, , l’accès à un avocat et au droit de contester la décision prise dans ce contexte ; les motifs de refus d’entrée ; la confidentialité et la protection des données collectées. Etant donné que les États membres peuvent facilement se décharger de leurs responsabilités en matière de dépistage médical et de vulnérabilité, il n’est pas certain que certains besoins seront effectivement détectés et pris en considération.

      Une initiative à saluer est la proposition d’instaurer un mécanisme indépendant des droits fondamentaux à la frontière. Afin qu’il garantisse une véritable responsabilité face aux violations des droits à la frontière, y compris contre les éloignements et les refoulements récurrents dans un grand nombre d’États membres, ce mécanisme doit être étendu au-delà de la procédure de pré-filtrage, être indépendant des autorités nationales et impliquer des organisations telles que les associations non gouvernementales.

      La proposition fait de la question du retour et de l’expulsion une priorité

      L’objectif principal du Pacte est clair : augmenter de façon significative le nombre de personnes renvoyées ou expulsées de l’UE. La création du poste de Coordinateur en charge des retours au sein de la Commission européenne et d’un directeur exécutif adjoint aux retours au sein de Frontex en sont la preuve, tandis qu’aucune nomination n’est prévue au sujet de la protection de garanties ou de la relocalisation. Le retour est considéré comme un élément admis dans la politique migratoire et le soutien pour des retours dignes, en privilégiant les retours volontaires, l’accès à une assistance au retour et l’aide à la réintégration, sont essentiels. Cependant, l’investissement dans le retour n’est pas une réponse adaptée au non-respect systématique des normes d’asile dans les États membres de l’UE.

      Rien de nouveau sur l’action extérieure : des propositions irréalistes qui risquent de continuer d’affaiblir les droits de l’homme

      La tension entre l’engagement rhétorique pour des partenariats mutuellement bénéfiques et la focalisation visant à placer la migration au cœur des relations entre l’UE et les pays tiers se poursuit. Les tentatives d’externaliser la responsabilité de l’asile et de détourner l’aide au développement, les mécanismes de visa et d’autres outils pour inciter les pays tiers à coopérer sur la gestion migratoire et les accords de réadmission sont maintenues. Cela ne représente pas seulement un risque allant à l’encontre de l’engagement de l’UE pour ses principes de développement, mais cela affaiblit également sa posture internationale en générant de la méfiance et de l’hostilité depuis et à l’encontre des pays tiers. De plus, l’usage d’accords informels et la coopération sécuritaire sur la gestion migratoire avec des pays tels que la Libye ou la Turquie risquent de favoriser les violations des droits de l’homme, d’encourager les gouvernements répressifs et de créer une plus grande instabilité.

      Un manque d’ambition pour des voies légales et sûres vers l’Europe

      L’opportunité pour l’UE d’indiquer qu’elle est prête à contribuer au partage des responsabilités pour la protection au niveau international dans un esprit de partenariat avec les pays qui accueillent la plus grande majorité des réfugiés est manquée. Au lieu de proposer un objectif ambitieux de réinstallation de réfugiés, la Commission européenne a seulement invité les Etats membres à faire plus et a converti les engagements de 2020 en un mécanisme biennal, ce qui résulte en la perte d’une année de réinstallation européenne.

      La reconnaissance du besoin de faciliter la migration de main-d’œuvre à travers différents niveaux de compétences est à saluer, mais l’importance de cette migration dans les économies et les sociétés européennes ne se reflète pas dans les ressources, les propositions et les actions allouées.

      Le soutien aux activités de recherche et de sauvetage et aux actions de solidarité doit être renforcé

      La tragédie humanitaire dans la mer Méditerranée nécessite encore une réponse y compris à travers un soutien financier et des capacités de recherches et de sauvetage. Cet enjeu ainsi que celui du débarquement sont pris en compte dans toutes les propositions, reconnaissant ainsi la crise humanitaire actuelle. Cependant, au lieu de répondre aux comportements et aux dispositions règlementaires des gouvernements qui obstruent les activités de secours et le travail des défendeurs des droits, la Commission européenne suggère que les standards de sécurité sur les navires et les niveaux de communication avec les acteurs privés doivent être surveillés. Les acteurs privés sont également requis d’adhérer non seulement aux régimes légaux, mais aussi aux politiques et pratiques relatives à « la gestion migratoire » qui peuvent potentiellement interférer avec les obligations de recherches et de sauvetage.

      Bien que la publication de lignes directrices pour prévenir la criminalisation de l’action humanitaire soit la bienvenue, celles-ci se limitent aux actes mandatés par la loi avec une attention spécifique aux opérations de sauvetage et de secours. Cette approche risque d’omettre les activités humanitaires telles que la distribution de nourriture, d’abris, ou d’information sur le territoire ou assurés par des organisations non mandatées par le cadre légal qui sont également sujettes à ladite criminalisation et à des restrictions.

      Des signes encourageants pour l’inclusion

      Les changements proposés pour permettre aux réfugiés d’accéder à une résidence de long-terme après trois ans et le renforcement du droit de se déplacer et de travailler dans d’autres Etats membres sont positifs. De plus, la révision du Plan d’action pour l’inclusion et l’intégration et la mise en place d’un groupe d’experts pour collecter l’avis des migrants afin de façonner la politique européenne sont les bienvenues.

      La voie à suivre

      La présentation des propositions de la Commission est le commencement de ce qui promet d’être une autre longue période conflictuelle de négociations sur les politiques européennes d’asile et de migration. Alors que ces négociations sont en cours, il est important de rappeler qu’il existe déjà un régime d’asile européen et que les Etats membres ont des obligations dans le cadre du droit européen et international.

      Cela requiert une action immédiate de la part des décideurs politiques européens, y compris de la part des Etats membres, de :

      Mettre en œuvre les standards existants en lien avec les conditions matérielles d’accueil et les procédures d’asile, d’enquêter sur leur non-respect et de prendre les mesures disciplinaires nécessaires ;
      Sauver des vies en mer, et de garantir des capacités de sauvetage et de secours, permettant un débarquement et une relocalisation rapide ;
      Continuer de s’accorder sur des arrangements ad-hoc de solidarité pour alléger la pression sur les Etats membres aux frontières extérieures de l’UE et encourager les Etats membres à avoir recours à la relocalisation.

      Concernant les prochaines négociations sur le Pacte, nous recommandons aux co-législateurs de :

      Rejeter l’application obligatoire de la procédure d’asile ou de retour à la frontière : ces procédures aux standards abaissés réduisent les garanties des demandeurs d’asile et augmentent le recours à la rétention. Elles exacerbent le manque de solidarité actuel sur l’asile dans l’UE en plaçant plus de responsabilité sur les Etats membres aux frontières extérieures. L’expérience des hotspots et d’autres initiatives similaires démontrent que l’ajout de procédures ou d’étapes dans l’asile peut créer des charges administratives et des coûts significatifs, et entraîner une plus grande inefficacité ;
      Se diriger vers la fin de la privation de liberté de migrants, et interdire la rétention de mineurs conformément à la Convention internationale des droits de l’enfant, et de dédier suffisamment de ressources pour des solutions non privatives de libertés appropriées pour les mineurs et leurs familles ;
      Réajuster les propositions de réforme afin de se concentrer sur le maintien et l’amélioration des standards des droits de l’homme et de l’asile en Europe, plutôt que sur le retour ;
      Œuvrer à ce que les propositions réforment fondamentalement la façon dont la responsabilité des demandeurs d’asile en UE est organisée, en adressant les problèmes liés au principe de pays de première entrée, afin de créer un véritable mécanisme de solidarité ;
      Limiter les possibilités pour les Etats membres de déroger à leurs responsabilités d’enregistrer les demandes d’asile ou d’examiner les demandes, afin d’éviter de créer des incitations à opérer en mode gestion de crise et à diminuer les standards de l’asile ;
      Augmenter les garanties pendant la procédure de pré-filtrage pour assurer le droit à l’information, l’accès à une aide et une représentation juridique, la détection et la prise en charge des vulnérabilités et des besoins de santé, et une réponse aux préoccupations liées à l’enregistrement et à la protection des données ;
      Garantir que le mécanisme de suivi des droits fondamentaux aux frontières dispose d’une portée large afin de couvrir toutes les violations des droits fondamentaux à la frontière, qu’il soit véritablement indépendant des autorités nationales et dispose de ressources adéquates et qu’il contribue à la responsabilisation ;
      S’opposer aux tentatives d’utiliser l’aide au développement, au commerce, aux investissements, aux mécanismes de visas, à la coopération sécuritaire et autres politiques et financements pour faire pression sur les pays tiers dans leur coopération étroitement définie par des objectifs européens de contrôle migratoire ;
      Evaluer l’impact à long-terme des politiques migratoires d’externalisation sur la paix, le respect des droits et le développement durable et garantir que la politique extérieure migratoire ne contribue pas à la violation de droits de l’homme et prenne en compte les enjeux de conflits ;
      Développer significativement les voies légales et sûres vers l’UE en mettant en œuvre rapidement les engagements actuels de réinstallation, en proposant de nouveaux objectifs ambitieux et en augmentant les opportunités de voies d’accès à la protection ainsi qu’à la migration de main-d’œuvre et universitaire en UE ;
      Renforcer les exceptions à la criminalisation lorsqu’il s’agit d’actions humanitaires et autres activités indépendantes de la société civile et enlever les obstacles auxquels font face les acteurs de la société civile fournissant une assistance vitale et humanitaire sur terre et en mer ;
      Mettre en place une opération de recherche et de sauvetage en mer Méditerranée financée et coordonnée par l’UE ;
      S’appuyer sur les propositions prometteuses pour soutenir l’inclusion à travers l’accès à la résidence à long-terme et les droits associés et la mise en œuvre du Plan d’action sur l’intégration et l’inclusion au niveau européen, national et local.

      https://www.forumrefugies.org/s-informer/positions/europe/774-pacte-europeen-sur-la-migration-et-l-asile-afin-de-garantir-un-no

    • Nouveau Pacte européen  : les migrant.e.s et réfugié.e.s traité.e.s comme des « # colis à trier  »

      Le jour même de la Conférence des Ministres européens de l’Intérieur, EuroMed Droits présente son analyse détaillée du nouveau Pacte européen sur l’asile et la migration, publié le 23 septembre dernier (https://euromedrights.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Analysis-of-Asylum-and-Migration-Pact_Final_Clickable.pdf).

      On peut résumer les plus de 500 pages de documents comme suit  : le nouveau Pacte européen sur l’asile et la migration déshumanise les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s, les traitant comme des «  #colis à trier  » et les empêchant de se déplacer en Europe. Ce Pacte soulève de nombreuses questions en matière de respect des droits humains, dont certaines sont à souligner en particulier  :

      L’UE détourne le concept de solidarité. Le Pacte vise clairement à «  rétablir la confiance mutuelle entre les États membres  », donnant ainsi la priorité à la #cohésion:interne de l’UE au détriment des droits des migrant.e.s et des réfugié.e.s. La proposition laisse le choix aux États membres de contribuer – en les mettant sur un pied d’égalité – à la #réinstallation, au #rapatriement, au soutien à l’accueil ou à l’#externalisation des frontières. La #solidarité envers les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s et leurs droits fondamentaux sont totalement ignorés.

      Le pacte promeut une gestion «  sécuritaire  » de la migration. Selon la nouvelle proposition, les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s seront placé.e.s en #détention et privé.e.s de liberté à leur arrivée. La procédure envisagée pour accélérer la procédure de demande d’asile ne pourra se faire qu’au détriment des lois sur l’asile et des droits des demandeur.se.s. Il est fort probable que la #procédure se déroulera de manière arbitraire et discriminatoire, en fonction de la nationalité du/de la demandeur.se, de son taux de reconnaissance et du fait que le pays dont il/elle provient est «  sûr  », ce qui est un concept douteux.

      L’idée clé qui sous-tend cette vision est simple  : externaliser autant que possible la gestion des frontières en coopérant avec des pays tiers. L’objectif est de faciliter le retour et la réadmission des migrant.e.s dans le pays d’où ils/elles sont parti.es. Pour ce faire, l’Agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes (Frontex) verrait ses pouvoirs renforcés et un poste de coordinateur.trice européen.ne pour les retours serait créé. Le pacte risque de facto de fournir un cadre juridique aux pratiques illégales telles que les refoulements, les détentions arbitraires et les mesures visant à réduire davantage la capacité en matière d’asile. Des pratiques déjà en place dans certains États membres.

      Le Pacte présente quelques aspects «  positifs  », par exemple en matière de protection des enfants ou de regroupement familial, qui serait facilité. Mais ces bonnes intentions, qui doivent être mises en pratique, sont noyées dans un océan de mesures répressives et sécuritaires.

      EuroMed Droits appelle les Etats membres de l’UE à réfléchir en termes de mise en œuvre pratique (ou non) de ces mesures. Non seulement elles violent les droits humains, mais elles sont impraticables sur le terrain  : la responsabilité de l’évaluation des demandes d’asile reste au premier pays d’arrivée, sans vraiment remettre en cause le Règlement de Dublin. Cela signifie que des pays comme l’Italie, Malte, l’Espagne, la Grèce et Chypre continueront à subir une «  pression  » excessive, ce qui les encouragera à poursuivre leurs politiques de refoulement et d’expulsion. Enfin, le Pacte ne répond pas à la problématique urgente des «  hotspots  » et des camps de réfugié.e.s comme en Italie ou en Grèce et dans les zones de transit à l’instar de la Hongrie. Au contraire, cela renforce ce modèle dangereux en le présentant comme un exemple à exporter dans toute l’Europe, alors que des exemples récents ont démontré l’impossibilité de gérer ces camps de manière humaine.

      https://euromedrights.org/fr/publication/nouveau-pacte-europeen%e2%80%af-les-migrant-e-s-et-refugie-e-s-traite

      #paquets_de_la_poste #paquets #poste #tri #pays_sûrs

    • A “Fresh Start” or One More Clunker? Dublin and Solidarity in the New Pact

      In ongoing discussions on the reform of the CEAS, solidarity is a key theme. It stands front and center in the New Pact on Migration and Asylum: after reassuring us of the “human and humane approach” taken, the opening quote stresses that Member States must be able to “rely on the solidarity of our whole European Union”.

      In describing the need for reform, the Commission does not mince its words: “[t]here is currently no effective solidarity mechanism in place, and no efficient rule on responsibility”. It’s a remarkable statement: barely one year ago, the Commission maintained that “[t]he EU [had] shown tangible and rapid support to Member States under most pressure” throughout the crisis. Be that as it may, we are promised a “fresh start”. Thus, President Von der Leyen has announced on the occasion of the 2020 State of the Union Address that “we will abolish the Dublin Regulation”, the 2016 Dublin IV Proposal (examined here) has been withdrawn, and the Pact proposes a “new solidarity mechanism” connected to “robust and fair management of the external borders” and capped by a new “governance framework”.

      Before you buy the shiny new package, you are advised to consult the fine print however. Yes, the Commission proposes to abolish the Dublin III Regulation and withdraws the Dublin IV Proposal. But the Proposal for an Asylum and Migration Management Regulation (hereafter “the Migration Management Proposal”) reproduces word-for-word the Dublin III Regulation, subject to amendments drawn … from the Dublin IV Proposal! As for the “governance framework” outlined in Articles 3-7 of the Migration Management Proposal, it’s a hodgepodge of purely declamatory provisions (e.g. Art. 3-4), of restatements of pre-existing obligations (Art. 5), of legal bases authorizing procedures that require none (Art. 7). The one new item is a yearly monitoring exercise centered on an “European Asylum and Migration Management Strategy” (Art. 6), which seems as likely to make a difference as the “Mechanism for Early Warning, Preparedness and Crisis Management”, introduced with much fanfare with the Dublin III Regulation and then left in the drawer before, during and after the 2015/16 crisis.

      Leaving the provisions just mentioned for future commentaries – fearless interpreters might still find legal substance in there – this contribution focuses on four points: the proposed amendments to Dublin, the interface between Dublin and procedures at the border, the new solidarity mechanism, and proposals concerning force majeure. Caveat emptor! It is a jungle of extremely detailed and sometimes obscure provisions. While this post is longer than usual – warm thanks to the lenient editors! – do not expect an exhaustive summary, nor firm conclusions on every point.
      Dublin, the Undying

      To borrow from Mark Twain, reports of the death of the Dublin system have been once more greatly exaggerated. As noted, Part III of the Migration Management Proposal (Articles 8-44) is for all intents and purposes an amended version of the Dublin III Regulation, and most of the amendments are lifted from the 2016 Dublin IV Proposal.

      A first group of amendments concerns the responsibility criteria. Some expand the possibilities to allocate applicants based on their “meaningful links” with Member States: Article 2(g) expands the family definition to include siblings, opening new possibilities for reunification; Article 19(4) enlarges the criterion based on previous legal abode (i.e. expired residence documents); in a tip of the hat to the Wikstroem Report, commented here, Article 20 introduces a new criterion based on prior education in a Member State.

      These are welcome changes, but all that glitters is not gold. The Commission advertises “streamlined” evidentiary requirements to facilitate family reunification. These would be necessary indeed: evidentiary issues have long undermined the application of the family criteria. Unfortunately, the Commission is not proposing anything new: Article 30(6) of the Migration Management Proposal corresponds in essence to Article 22(5) of the Dublin III Regulation.

      Besides, while the Commission proposes to expand the general definition of family, the opposite is true of the specific definition of family applicable to “dependent persons”. Under Article 16 of the Dublin III Regulation, applicants who e.g. suffer from severe disabilities are to be kept or brought together with a care-giving parent, child or sibling residing in a Member State. Due to fears of sham marriages, spouses have been excluded and this is legally untenable and inhumane, but instead of tackling the problem the Commission proposes in Article 24 to worsen it by excluding siblings. The end result is paradoxical: persons needing family support the most will be deprived – for no apparent reason other than imaginary fears of “abuses” – of the benefits of enlarged reunification possibilities. “[H]uman and humane”, indeed.

      The fight against secondary movements inspires most of the other amendments to the criteria. In particular, Article 21 of the Proposal maintains and extends the much-contested criterion of irregular entry while clarifying that it applies also to persons disembarked after a search and rescue (SAR) operation. The Commission also proposes that unaccompanied children be transferred to the first Member State where they applied if no family criterion is applicable (Article 15(5)). This would overturn the MA judgment of the ECJ whereby in such cases the asylum claim must be examined in the State where the child last applied and is present. It’s not a technical fine point: while the case-law of the ECJ is calculated to spare children the trauma of a transfer, the proposed amendment would subject them again to the rigours of Dublin.

      Again to discourage secondary movements, the Commission proposes – as in 2016 – a second group of amendments: new obligations for the applicants (Articles 9-10). Applicants must in principle apply in the Member State of first entry, remain in that State for the duration of the Dublin procedure and, post-transfer, remain in the State responsible. Moving to the “wrong” State entails losing the benefits of the Reception Conditions Directive, subject to “the need to ensure a standard of living in accordance with” the Charter. It is debatable whether this is a much lesser standard of reception. More importantly: as reception conditions in line with the Directive are seldom guaranteed in several frontline Member States, the prospect of being treated “in accordance with the Charter” elsewhere will hardly dissuade applicants from moving on.

      The 2016 Proposal foresaw, as further punishment, the mandatory application of accelerated procedures to “secondary movers”. This rule disappears from the Migration Management Proposal, but as Daniel Thym points out in his forthcoming contribution on secondary movements, it remains in Article 40(1)(g) of the 2016 Proposal for an Asylum Procedures Regulation. Furthermore, the Commission proposes deleting Article 18(2) of the Dublin III Regulation, i.e. the guarantee that persons transferred back to a State that has meanwhile discontinued or rejected their application will have their case reopened, or a remedy available. This is a dangerous invitation to Member States to reintroduce “discontinuation” practices that the Commission itself once condemned as incompatible with effective access to status determination.

      To facilitate responsibility-determination, the Proposal further obliges applicants to submit relevant information before or at the Dublin interview. Late submissions are not to be considered. Fairness would demand that justified delays be excused. Besides, it is also proposed to repeal Article 7(3) of the Dublin III Regulation, whereby authorities must take into account evidence of family ties even if produced late in the process. All in all, then, the Proposal would make proof of family ties harder, not easier as the Commission claims.

      A final group of amendments concern the details of the Dublin procedure, and might prove the most important in practice.

      Some “streamline” the process, e.g. with shorter deadlines (e.g. Article 29(1)) and a simplified take back procedure (Article 31). Controversially, the Commission proposes again to reduce the scope of appeals against transfers to issues of ill-treatment and misapplication of the family criteria (Article 33). This may perhaps prove acceptable to the ECJ in light of its old Abdullahi case-law. However, it contravenes Article 13 ECHR, which demands an effective remedy for the violation of any Convention right.
      Other procedural amendments aim to make it harder for applicants to evade transfers. At present, if a transferee absconds for 18 months, the transfer is cancelled and the transferring State becomes responsible. Article 35(2) of the Proposal allows the transferring State to “stop the clock” if the applicant absconds, and to resume the transfer as soon as he reappears.
      A number of amendments make responsibility more “stable” once assigned, although not as “permanent” as the 2016 Proposal would have made it. Under Article 27 of the Proposal, the responsibility of a State will only cease if the applicant has left the Dublin area in compliance with a return decision. More importantly, under Article 26 the responsible State will have to take back even persons to whom it has granted protection. This would be a significant extension of the scope of the Dublin system, and would “lock” applicants in the responsible State even more firmly and more durably. Perhaps by way of compensation, the Commission proposes that beneficiaries of international protection obtain “long-term status” – and thus mobility rights – after three years of residence instead of five. However, given that it is “very difficult in practice” to exercise such rights, the compensation seems more theoretical than effective and a far cry from a system of free movement capable of offsetting the rigidities of Dublin.

      These are, in short, the key amendments foreseen. While it’s easy enough to comment on each individually, it is more difficult to forecast their aggregate impact. Will they – to paraphrase the Commission – “improv[e] the chances of integration” and reduce “unauthorised movements” (recital 13), and help closing “the existing implementation gap”? Probably not, as none of them is a game-changer.

      Taken together, however, they might well aggravate current distributive imbalances. Dublin “locks in” the responsibilities of the States that receive most applications – traditional destinations such as Germany or border States such as Italy – leaving the other Member States undisturbed. Apart from possible distributive impacts of the revised criteria and of the now obligations imposed on applicants, first application States will certainly be disadvantaged combination by shortened deadlines, security screenings (see below), streamlined take backs, and “stable” responsibility extending to beneficiaries of protection. Under the “new Dublin rules” – sorry for the oxymoron! – effective solidarity will become more necessary than ever.
      Border procedures and Dublin

      Building on the current hotspot approach, the Proposals for a Screening Regulation and for an Asylum Procedures Regulation outline a new(ish) “pre-entry” phase. This will be examined in a forthcoming post by Lyra Jakuleviciene, but the interface with infra-EU allocation deserves mention here.

      In a nutshell, persons irregularly crossing the border will be screened for the purpose of identification, health and security checks, and registration in Eurodac. Protection applicants may then be channelled to “border procedures” in a broad range of situations. This will be mandatory if the applicant: (a) attempts to mislead the authorities; (b) can be considered, based on “serious reasons”, “a danger to the national security or public order of the Member States”; (c) comes from a State whose nationals have a low Union-wide recognition rate (Article 41(3) of the Asylum Procedure Proposal).

      The purpose of the border procedure is to assess applications “without authorising the applicant’s entry into the Member State’s territory” (here, p.4). Therefore, it might have seemed logical that applicants subjected to it be excluded from the Dublin system – as is the case, ordinarily, for relocations (see below). Not so: under Article 41(7) of the Proposal, Member States may apply Dublin in the context of border procedures. This weakens the idea of “seamless procedures at the border” somewhat but – from the standpoint of both applicants and border States – it is better than a watertight exclusion: applicants may still benefit from “meaningful link” criteria, and border States are not “stuck with the caseload”. I would normally have qualms about giving Member States discretion in choosing whether Dublin rules apply. But as it happens, Member States who receive an asylum application already enjoy that discretion under the so-called “sovereignty clause”. Nota bene: in exercising that discretion, Member States apply EU Law and must observe the Charter, and the same principle must certainly apply under the proposed Article 41(7).

      The only true exclusion from the Dublin system is set out in Article 8(4) of the Migration Management Proposal. Under this provision, Member States must carry out a security check of all applicants as part of the pre-entry screening and/or after the application is filed. If “there are reasonable grounds to consider the applicant a danger to national security or public order” of the determining State, the other criteria are bypassed and that State becomes responsible. Attentive readers will note that the wording of Article 8(4) differs from that of Article 41(3) of the Asylum Procedure Proposal (e.g. “serious grounds” vs “reasonable grounds”). It is therefore unclear whether the security grounds to “screen out” an applicant from Dublin are coextensive with the security grounds making a border procedure mandatory. Be that as it may, a broad application of Article 8(4) would be undesirable, as it would entail a large-scale exclusion from the guarantees that applicants derive from the Dublin system. The risk is moderate however: by applying Article 8(4) widely, Member States would be increasing their own share of responsibilities under the system. As twenty-five years of Dublin practice indicate, this is unlikely to happen.
      “Mandatory” and “flexible” solidarity under the new mechanism

      So far, the Migration Management Proposal does not look significantly different from the 2016 Dublin IV Proposal, which did not itself fundamentally alter existing rules, and which went down in flames in inter- and intra-institutional negotiations. Any hopes of a “fresh start”, then, are left for the new solidarity mechanism.

      Unfortunately, solidarity is a difficult subject for the EU: financial support has hitherto been a mere fraction of Member State expenditure in the field; operational cooperation has proved useful but cannot tackle all the relevant aspects of the unequal distribution of responsibilities among Member States; relocations have proved extremely beneficial for thousands of applicants, but are intrinsically complex operations and have also proven politically divisive – an aspect which has severely undermined their application and further condemned them to be small scale affairs relative to the needs on the ground. The same goes a fortiori for ad hoc initiatives – such as those that followed SAR operations over the last two years– which furthermore lack the predictability that is necessary for sharing responsibilities effectively. To reiterate what the Commission stated, there is currently “no effective solidarity mechanism in place”.

      Perhaps most importantly, the EU has hitherto been incapable of accurately gauging the distributive asymmetries on the ground, to articulate a clear doctrine guiding the key determinations of “how much solidarity” and “what kind(s) of solidarity”, and to define commensurate redistributive targets on this basis (see here, p.34 and 116).

      Alas, the opportunity to elaborate a solidarity doctrine for the EU has been completely missed. Conceptually, the New Pact does not go much farther than platitudes such as “[s]olidarity implies that all Member States should contribute”. As Daniel Thym aptly observed, “pragmatism” is the driving force behind the Proposal: the Commission starts from a familiar basis – relocations – and tweaks it in ways designed to convince stakeholders that solidarity becomes both “compulsory” and “flexible”. It’s a complicated arrangement and I will only describe it in broad strokes, leaving the crucial dimensions of financial solidarity and operational cooperation to forthcoming posts by Iris Goldner Lang and Lilian Tsourdi.

      The mechanism operates according to three “modes”. In its basic mode, it is to replace ad hoc solidarity initiatives following SAR disembarkations (Articles 47-49 of the Migration Management Proposal):

      The Commission determines, in its yearly Migration Management Report, whether a State is faced with “recurring arrivals” following SAR operations and determines the needs in terms of relocations and other contributions (capacity building, operational support proper, cooperation with third States).
      The Member States are “invited” to notify the “contributions they intend to make”. If offers are sufficient, the Commission combines them and formally adopts a “solidarity pool”. If not, it adopts an implementing act summarizing relocation targets for each Member State and other contributions as offered by them. Member States may react by offering other contributions instead of relocations, provided that this is “proportional” – one wonders how the Commission will tally e.g. training programs for Libyan coastguards with relocation places.
      If the relocations offered fall 30% short of the target indicated by the Commission, a “critical mass correction mechanism” will apply: each Member States will be obliged to meet at least 50% of the quota of relocations indicated by the Commission. However, and this is the new idea offered by the Commission to bring relocation-skeptics onboard, Member States may discharge their duties by offering “return sponsorships” instead of relocations: the “sponsor” Member State commits to support the benefitting Member State to return a person and, if the return is not carried out within eight months, to accept her on its territory.

      If I understand correctly the fuzzy provision I have just summarized – Article 48(2) – it all boils down to “half-compulsory” solidarity: Member States are obliged to cover at least 50% of the relocation needs set by the Commission through relocations or sponsorships, and the rest with other contributions.

      After the “solidarity pool” is established and the benefitting Member State requests its activation, relocations can start:

      The eligible persons are those who applied for protection in the benefitting State, with the exclusion of those that are subject to border procedures (Article 45(1)(a)).Also excluded are those whom Dublin criteria based on “meaningful links” – family, abode, diplomas – assign to the benefitting State (Article 57(3)). These rules suggest that the benefitting State must carry out identification, screening for border procedures and a first (reduced?) Dublin procedure before it can declare an applicant eligible for relocation.
      Persons eligible for return sponsorship are “illegally staying third-country nationals” (Article 45(1)(b)).
      The eligible persons are identified, placed on a list, and matched to Member States based on “meaningful links”. The transfer can only be refused by the State of relocation on security grounds (Article 57(2)(6) and (7)), and otherwise follows the modalities of Dublin transfers in almost all respects (e.g. deadlines, notification, appeals). However, contrary to what happens under Dublin, missing the deadline for transfer does not entail that the relocation is cancelled it (see Article 57(10)).
      After the transfer, applicants will be directly admitted to the asylum procedure in the State of relocation only if it has been previously established that the benefitting State would have been responsible under criteria other than those based on “meaningful links” (Article 58(3)). In all the other cases, the State of relocation will run a Dublin procedure and, if necessary, transfer again the applicant to the State responsible (see Article 58(2)). As for persons subjected to return sponsorship, the State of relocation will pick up the application of the Return Directive where the benefitting State left off (or so I read Article 58(5)!).

      If the Commission concludes that a Member State is under “migratory pressure”, at the request of the concerned State or of its own motion (Article 50), the mechanism operates as described above except for one main point: beneficiaries of protection also become eligible for relocation (Article 51(3)). Thankfully, they must consent thereto and are automatically granted the same status in the relocation State (see Articles 57(3) and 58(4)).

      If the Commission concludes that a Member State is confronted to a “crisis”, rules change further (see Article 2 of the Proposal for a Migration and Asylum Crisis Regulation):

      Applicants subject to the border procedure and persons “having entered irregularly” also become eligible for relocation. These persons may then undergo a border procedure post-relocation (see Article 41(1) and (8) of the Proposal for an Asylum Procedures Regulation).
      Persons subject to return sponsorship are transferred to the sponsor State if their removal does not occur within four – instead of eight – months.
      Other contributions are excluded from the palette of contributions available to the other Member States (Article 2(1)): it has to be relocation or return sponsorship.
      The procedure is faster, with shorter deadlines.

      It is an understatement to say that the mechanism is complex, and your faithful scribe still has much to digest. For the time being, I would make four general comments.

      First, it is not self-evident that this is a good “insurance scheme” for its intended beneficiaries. As noted, the system only guarantees that 50% of the relocation needs of a State will be met. Furthermore, there are hidden costs: in “SAR” and “pressure” modes, the benefitting State has to screen the applicant, register the application, and assess whether border procedures or (some) Dublin criteria apply before it can channel the applicant to relocation. It is unclear whether a 500 lump sum is enough to offset the costs (see Article 79 of the Migration Management Proposal). Besides, in a crisis situation, these preliminary steps might make relocation impractical – think of the Greek registration backlog in 2015/6. Perhaps, extending relocation to persons “having entered irregularly” when the mechanism is in “crisis mode” is meant precisely to take care of this. Similar observations apply to return sponsorship. Under Article 55(4) of the Migration Management Proposal, the support offered by the sponsor to the benefitting State can be rather low key (e.g. “counselling”) and there seems to be no guarantee that the benefitting State will be effectively relieved of the political, administrative and financial costs associated to return. Moving from costs to risks, it is clear that the benefitting State bears all the risks of non implementation – in other words, if the system grinds to a halt or breaks down, it will be Moria all over again. In light of past experience, one can only agree with Thomas Gammelthoft-Hansen that it’s a “big gamble”. Other aspects examined below – the vast margins of discretion left to the Commission, and the easy backdoor opened by the force majeure provisions – do not help either to create predictability.
      Second, as just noted the mechanism gives the Commission practically unlimited discretion at all critical junctures. The Commission will determine whether a Member States is confronted to “recurring arrivals”, “pressure” or a “crisis”. It will do so under definitions so open-textured, and criteria so numerous, that it will be basically the master of its determinations (Article 50 of the Migration Management Proposal). The Commission will determine unilaterally relocation and operational solidarity needs. Finally, the Commission will determine – we do not know how – if “other contributions” are proportional to relocation needs. Other than in the most clear-cut situations, there is no way that anyone can predict how the system will be applied.
      Third: the mechanism reflects a powerful fixation with and unshakable faith in heavy bureaucracy. Protection applicants may undergo up to three “responsibility determination” procedures and two transfers before finally landing in an asylum procedure: Dublin “screening” in the first State, matching, relocation, full Dublin procedure in the relocation State, then transfer. And this is a system that should not “compromise the objective of the rapid processing of applications”(recital 34)! Decidedly, the idea that in order to improve the CEAS it is above all necessary to suppress unnecessary delays and coercion (see here, p.9) has not made a strong impression on the minds of the drafters. The same remark applies mutatis mutandis to return sponsorships: whatever the benefits in terms of solidarity, one wonders if it is very cost-effective or humane to drag a person from State to State so that they can each try their hand at expelling her.
      Lastly and relatedly, applicants and other persons otherwise concerned by the relocation system are given no voice. They can be “matched”, transferred, re-transferred, but subject to few exceptions their aspirations and intentions remain legally irrelevant. In this regard, the “New Pact” is as old school as it gets: it sticks strictly to the “no choice” taboo on which Dublin is built. What little recognition of applicants’ actorness had been made in the Wikstroem Report is gone. Objectifying migrants is not only incompatible with the claim that the approach taken is “human and humane”. It might prove fatal to the administrative efficiency so cherished by the Commission. Indeed, failure to engage applicants is arguably the key factor in the dismal performance of the Dublin system (here, p.112). Why should it be any different under this solidarity mechanism?

      Framing Force Majeure (or inviting defection?)

      In addition to addressing “crisis” situations, the Proposal for a Migration and Asylum Crisis Regulation includes separate provisions on force majeure.

      Thereunder, any Member State may unilaterally declare that it is faced with a situation making it “impossible” to comply with selected CEAS rules, and thus obtain the right – subject to a mere notification – to derogate from them. Member States may obtain in this way longer Dublin deadlines, or even be exempted from the obligation to accept transfers and be liberated from responsibilities if the suspension goes on more than a year (Article 8). Furthermore, States may obtain a six-months suspension of their duties under the solidarity mechanism (Article 9).

      The inclusion of this proposal in the Pact – possibly an attempt to further placate Member States averse to European solidarity? – beggars belief. Legally speaking, the whole idea is redundant: under the case-law of the ECJ, Member States may derogate from any rule of EU Law if confronted to force majeure. However, putting this black on white amounts to inviting (and legalizing) defection. The only conceivable object of rules of this kind would have been to subject force majeure derogations to prior authorization by the Commission – but there is nothing of the kind in the Proposal. The end result is paradoxical: while Member States are (in theory!) subject to Commission supervision when they conclude arrangements facilitating the implementation of Dublin rules, a mere notification will be enough to authorize them to unilaterally tear a hole in the fabric of “solidarity” and “responsibility” so painstakingly – if not felicitously – woven in the Pact.
      Concluding comments

      We should have taken Commissioner Ylva Johansson at her word when she said that there would be no “Hoorays” for the new proposals. Past the avalanche of adjectives, promises and fancy administrative monikers hurled at the reader – “faster, seamless migration processes”; “prevent the recurrence of events such as those seen in Moria”; “critical mass correction mechanism” – one cannot fail to see that the “fresh start” is essentially an exercise in repackaging.

      On responsibility-allocation and solidarity, the basic idea is one that the Commission incessantly returns to since 2007 (here, p. 10): keep Dublin and “correct” it through solidarity schemes. I do sympathize to an extent: realizing a fair balance of responsibilities by “sharing people” has always seemed to me impracticable and undesirable. Still, one would have expected that the abject failure of the Dublin system, the collapse of mutual trust in the CEAS, the meagre results obtained in the field of solidarity – per the Commission’s own appraisal – would have pushed it to bring something new to the table.

      Instead, what we have is a slightly milder version of the Dublin IV Proposal – the ultimate “clunker” in the history of Commission proposals – and an ultra-bureaucratic mechanism for relocation, with the dubious addition of return sponsorships and force majeure provisions. The basic tenets of infra-EU allocation remain the same – “no choice”, first entry – and none of the structural flaws that doomed current schemes to failure is fundamentally tackled (here, p.107): solidarity is beefed-up but appears too unreliable and fuzzy to generate trust; there are interesting steps on “genuine links”, but otherwise no sustained attempt to positively engage applicants; administrative complexity and coercive transfers reign on.

      Pragmatism, to quote again Daniel Thym’s excellent introductory post, is no sin. It is even expected of the Commission. This, however, is a study in path-dependency. By defending the status quo, wrapping it in shiny new paper, and making limited concessions to key policy actors, the Commission may perhaps carry its proposals through. However, without substantial corrections, the “new” Pact is unlikely to save the CEAS or even to prevent new Morias.

      http://eumigrationlawblog.eu/a-fresh-start-or-one-more-clunker-dublin-and-solidarity-in-the-ne

      #Francesco_Maiani

      #force_majeure

    • European Refugee Policy: What’s Gone Wrong and How to Make It Better

      In 2015 and 2016, more than 1 million refugees made their way to the European Union, the largest number of them originating from Syria. Since that time, refugee arrivals have continued, although at a much slower pace and involving people from a wider range of countries in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East.

      The EU’s response to these developments has had five main characteristics.

      First, a serious lack of preparedness and long-term planning. Despite the massive material and intelligence resources at its disposal, the EU was caught completely unaware by the mass influx of refugees five years ago and has been playing catch-up ever since. While the emergency is now well and truly over, EU member states continue to talk as if still in the grip of an unmanageable “refugee crisis.”

      Second, the EU’s refugee policy has become progressively based on a strategy known as “externalization,” whereby responsibility for migration control is shifted to unstable states outside Europe. This has been epitomized by the deals that the EU has done with countries such as Libya, Niger, Sudan, and Turkey, all of which have agreed to halt the onward movement of refugees in exchange for aid and other rewards, including support to the security services.

      Third, asylum has become increasingly criminalized, as demonstrated by the growing number of EU citizens and civil society groups that have been prosecuted for their roles in aiding refugees. At the same time, some frontline member states have engaged in a systematic attempt to delegitimize the NGO search-and-rescue organizations operating in the Mediterranean and to obstruct their life-saving activities.

      The fourth characteristic of EU countries’ recent policies has been a readiness to inflict or be complicit in a range of abuses that challenge the principles of both human rights and international refugee law. This can be seen in the violence perpetrated against asylum seekers by the military and militia groups in Croatia and Hungary, the terrible conditions found in Greek refugee camps such as Moria on the island of Lesvos, and, most egregiously of all, EU support to the Libyan Coastguard that enables it to intercept refugees at sea and to return them to abusive detention centers on land.

      Fifth and finally, the past five years have witnessed a serious absence of solidarity within the EU. Frontline states such as Greece and Italy have been left to bear a disproportionate share of the responsibility for new refugee arrivals. Efforts to relocate asylum seekers and resettle refugees throughout the EU have had disappointing results. And countries in the eastern part of the EU have consistently fought against the European Commission in its efforts to forge a more cooperative and coordinated approach to the refugee issue.

      The most recent attempt to formulate such an approach is to be found in the EU Pact on Migration and Asylum, which the Commission proposed in September 2020.

      It would be wrong to entirely dismiss the Pact, as it contains some positive elements. These include, for example, a commitment to establish legal pathways to asylum in Europe for people who are in need of protection, and EU support for member states that wish to establish community-sponsored refugee resettlement programs.

      In other respects, however, the Pact has a number of important, serious flaws. It has already been questioned by those countries that are least willing to admit refugees and continue to resist the role of Brussels in this policy domain. The Pact also makes hardly any reference to the Global Compacts on Refugees and Migration—a strange omission given the enormous amount of time and effort that the UN has devoted to those initiatives, both of which were triggered by the European emergency of 2015-16.

      At an operational level, the Pact endorses and reinforces the EU’s externalization agenda and envisages a much more aggressive role for Frontex, the EU’s border control agency. At the same time, it empowers member states to refuse entry to asylum seekers on the basis of very vague criteria. As a result, individuals may be more vulnerable to human smugglers and traffickers. There is also a strong likelihood that new refugee camps will spring up on the fringes of Europe, with their residents living in substandard conditions.

      Finally, the Pact places enormous emphasis on the involuntary return of asylum seekers to their countries of origin. It even envisages that a hardline state such as Hungary could contribute to the implementation of the Pact by organizing and funding such deportations. This constitutes an extremely dangerous new twist on the notions of solidarity and responsibility sharing, which form the basis of the international refugee regime.

      If the proposed Pact is not fit for purpose, then what might a more constructive EU refugee policy look like?

      It would in the first instance focus on the restoration of both EU and NGO search-and-rescue efforts in the Mediterranean and establish more predictable disembarkation and refugee distribution mechanisms. It would also mean the withdrawal of EU support for the Libyan Coastguard, the closure of that country’s detention centers, and a substantial improvement of the living conditions experienced by refugees in Europe’s frontline states—changes that should take place with or without a Pact.

      Indeed, the EU should redeploy the massive amount of resources that it currently devotes to the externalization process, so as to strengthen the protection capacity of asylum and transit countries on the periphery of Europe. A progressive approach on the part of the EU would involve the establishment of not only faster but also fair asylum procedures, with appropriate long-term solutions being found for new arrivals, whether or not they qualify for refugee status.

      These changes would help to ensure that those searching for safety have timely and adequate opportunities to access their most basic rights.

      https://www.refugeesinternational.org/reports/2020/11/5/european-refugee-policy-whats-gone-wrong-and-how-to-make-it-b

    • The New Pact on Migration and Asylum: Turning European Union Territory into a non-Territory

      Externalization policies in 2020: where is the European Union territory?

      In spite of the Commission’s rhetoric stressing the novel elements of the Pact on Migration and Asylum (hereinafter: the Pact – summarized and discussed in general here), there are good reasons to argue that the Pact develops and consolidates, among others, the existing trends on externalization policies of migration control (see Guild et al). Furthermore, it tries to create new avenues for a ‘smarter’ system of management of immigration, by additionally controlling access to the European Union territory for third country nationals (TCNs), and by creating different categories of migrants, which are then subject to different legal regimes which find application in the European Union territory.

      The consolidation of existing trends concerns the externalization of migration management practices, resort to technologies in developing migration control systems (further development of Eurodac, completion of the path toward full interoperability between IT systems), and also the strengthening of the role of the European Union executive level, via increased joint management involving European Union agencies: these are all policies that find in the Pact’s consolidation.

      This brief will focus on externalization (practices), a concept which is finding a new declination in the Pact: indeed, the Pact and several of the measures proposed, read together, are aiming at ‘disentangling’ the territory of the EU, from a set of rights which are related with the presence of the migrant or of the asylum seeker on the territory of a Member State of the EU, and from the relation between territory and access to a jurisdiction, which is necessary to enforce rights which otherwise remain on paper.

      Interestingly, this process of separation, of splitting between territory-law/rights-jurisdiction takes place not outside, but within the EU, and this is the new declination of externalization which one can find in the measures proposed in the Pact, namely with the proposal for a Screening Regulation and the amended proposal for a Procedure Regulation. It is no accident that other commentators have interpreted it as a consolidation of ‘fortress Europe’. In other words, this externalization process takes place within the EU and aims at making the external borders more effective also for the TCNs who are already in the territory of the EU.

      The proposal for a pre-entry screening regulation

      A first instrument which has a pivotal role in the consolidation of the externalization trend is the proposed Regulation for a screening of third country nationals (hereinafter: Proposal Screening Regulation), which will be applicable to migrants crossing the external borders without authorization. The aim of the screening, according to the Commission, is to ‘accelerate the process of determining the status of a person and what type of procedure should apply’. More precisely, the screening ‘should help ensure that the third country nationals concerned are referred to the appropriate procedures at the earliest stage possible’ and also to avoid absconding after entrance in the territory in order to reach a different state than the one of arrival (recital 8, preamble of proposal). The screening should contribute as well to curb secondary movements, which is a policy target highly relevant for many northern and central European Union states.

      In the new design, the screening procedure becomes the ‘standard’ for all TCNs who crossed the border in irregular manner, and also for persons who are disembarked following a search and rescue (SAR) operation, and for those who apply for international protection at the external border crossing points or in transit zones. With the screening Regulation, all these categories of persons shall not be allowed to enter the territory of the State during the screening (Arts 3 and 4 of the proposal).

      Consequently, different categories of migrants, including asylum seekers which are by definition vulnerable persons, are to be kept in locations situated at or in proximity to the external borders, for a time (up to 5 days, which can become 10 at maximum), defined in the Regulation, but which must be respected by national administrations. There is here an implicit equation between all these categories, and the common denominator of this operation is that all these persons have crossed the border in an unauthorized manner.

      It is yet unclear how the situation of migrants during the screening is to be organized in practical terms, transit zones, hotspot or others, and if this can qualify as detention, in legal terms. The Court of Justice has ruled recently on Hungarian transit zones (see analysis by Luisa Marin), by deciding that Röszke transit zone qualified as ‘detention’, and it can be argued that the parameters clarified in that decision could find application also to the case of migrants during the screening phase. If the situation of TCNs during the screening can be considered detention, which is then the legal basis? The Reception Conditions Directive or the Return Directive? If the national administrations struggle to meet the tight deadlines provided for the screening system, these questions will become more urgent, next to the very practical issue of the actual accommodation for this procedure, which in general does not allow for access to the territory.

      On the one side, Article 14(7) of the proposal provides a guarantee, indicating that the screening should end also if the checks are not completed within the deadlines; on the other side, the remaining question is: to which procedure is the applicant sent and how is the next phase then determined? The relevant procedure following the screening here seems to be determined in a very approximate way, and this begs the question on the extent to which rights can be protected in this context. Furthermore, the right to have access to a lawyer is not provided for in the screening phase. Given the relevance of this screening phase, also fundamental rights should be monitored, and the mechanism put in place at Article 7, leaves much to the discretion of the Member States, and the involvement of the Fundamental Rights Agency, with guidance and support upon request of the MS can be too little to ensure fundamental rights are not jeopardized by national administrations.

      This screening phase, which has the purpose to make sure, among other things, that states ‘do their job’ as to collecting information and consequently feeding the EU information systems, might therefore have important effects on the merits of the individual case, since border procedures are to be seen as fast-track, time is limited and procedural guarantees are also sacrificed in this context. In the case the screening ends with a refusal of entry, there is a substantive effect of the screening, which is conducted without legal assistance and without access to a legal remedy. And if this is not a decision in itself, but it ends up in a de-briefing form, this form might give substance to the next stage of the procedure, which, in the case of asylum, should be an individualized and accurate assessment of one’s individual circumstances.

      Overall, it should be stressed that the screening itself does not end up in a formal decision, it nevertheless represents an important phase since it defines what comes after, i.e., the type of procedure following the screening. It must be observed therefore, that the respect of some procedural rights is of paramount importance. At the same time, it is important that communication in a language TCNs can understand is effective, since the screening might end in a de-briefing form, where one or more nationalities are indicated. Considering that one of the options is the refusal of entry (Art. 14(1) screening proposal; confirmed by the recital 40 of the Proposal Procedure Regulation, as amended in 2020), and the others are either access to asylum or expulsion, one should require that the screening provides for procedural guarantees.

      Furthermore, the screening should point to any element which might be relevant to refer the TCNs into the accelerated examination procedure or the border procedure. In other words, the screening must indicate in the de-briefing form the options that protect asylum applicants less than others (Article 14(3) of the proposal). It does not operate in the other way: a TCN who has applied for asylum and comes from a country with a high recognition rate is not excluded from the screening (see blog post by Jakuleviciene).

      The legislation creates therefore avenues for disentangling, splitting the relation between physical presence of an asylum applicant on a territory and the set of laws and fundamental rights associated to it, namely a protective legal order, access to rights and to a jurisdiction enforcing those rights. It creates a sort of ‘lighter’ legal order, a lower density system, which facilitates the exit of the applicant from the territory of the EU, creating a sort of shift from a Europe of rights to the Europe of borders, confinement and expulsions.

      The proposal for new border procedures: an attempt to create a lower density territory?

      Another crucial piece in this process of establishing a stronger border fence and streamline procedures at the border, creating a ‘seamless link between asylum and return’, in the words of the Commission, is constituted by the reform of the border procedures, with an amendment of the 2016 proposal for the Regulation procedure (hereinafter: Amended Proposal Procedure Regulation).

      Though border procedures are already present in the current Regulation of 2013, they are now developed into a “border procedure for asylum and return”, and a more developed accelerated procedure, which, next to the normal asylum procedure, comes after the screening phase.

      The new border procedure becomes obligatory (according to Art. 41(3) of the Amended Proposal Procedure Regulation) for applicants who arrive irregularly at the external border or after disembarkation and another of these grounds apply:

      – they represent a risk to national security or public order;

      – the applicant has provided false information or documents or by withholding relevant information or document;

      – the applicant comes from a non-EU country for which the share of positive decisions in the total number of asylum decisions is below 20 percent.

      This last criterion is especially problematic, since it transcends the criterion of the safe third country and it undermines the principle that every asylum application requires a complex and individualized assessment of the particular personal circumstances of the applicant, by introducing presumptive elements in a procedure which gives fewer guarantees.

      During the border procedure, the TCN is not granted access to the EU. The expansion of the new border procedures poses also the problem of the organization of the facilities necessary for the new procedures, which must be a location at or close to the external borders, in other words, where migrants are apprehended or disembarked.

      Tellingly enough, the Commission’s explanatory memorandum describes as guarantees in the asylum border procedure all the situations in which the border procedure shall not be applied, for example, because the necessary support cannot be provided or for medical reasons, or where the ‘conditions for detention (…) cannot be met and the border procedure cannot be applied without detention’.

      Also here the question remains on how to qualify their stay during the procedure, because the Commission aims at limiting resort to detention. The situation could be considered de facto a detention, and its compatibility with the criteria laid down by the Court of Justice in the Hungarian transit zones case is questionable.

      Another aspect which must be analyzed is the system of guarantees after the decision in a border procedure. If an application is rejected in an asylum border procedure, the “return procedure” applies immediately. Member States must limit to one instance the right to effective remedy against the decision, as posited in Article 53(9). The right to an effective remedy is therefore limited, according to Art. 53 of the Proposed Regulation, and the right to remain, a ‘light’ right to remain one could say, is also narrowly constructed, in the case of border procedures, to the first remedy against the negative decision (Art. 54(3) read together with Art. 54(4) and 54(5)). Furthermore, EU law allows Member States to limit the right to remain in case of subsequent applications and provides that there is no right to remain in the case of subsequent appeals (Art. 54(6) and (7)). More in general, this proposal extends the circumstances where the applicant does not have an automatic right to remain and this represents an aspect which affects significantly and in a factual manner the capacity to challenge a negative decision in a border procedure.

      Overall, it can be argued that the asylum border procedure is a procedure where guarantees are limited, because the access to the jurisdiction is taking place in fast-track procedures, access to legal remedies is also reduced to the very minimum. Access to the territory of the Member State is therefore deprived of its typical meaning, in the sense that it does not imply access to a system which is protecting rights with procedures which offer guarantees and are therefore also time-consuming. Here, efficiency should govern a process where the access to a jurisdiction is lighter, is ‘less dense’ than otherwise. To conclude, this externalization of migration control policies takes place ‘inside’ the European Union territory, and it aims at prolonging the effects of containment policies because they make access to the EU territory less meaningful, in legal terms: the presence of the person in the territory of the EU does not entail full access to the rights related to the presence on the territory.

      Solidarity in cooperating with third countries? The “return sponsorship” and its territorial puzzle

      Chapter 6 of the New Pact on Migration and Asylum proposes, among other things, to create a conditionality between cooperation on readmission with third countries and the issuance of visas to their nationals. This conditionality was legally established in the 2019 revision of the Visa Code Regulation. The revision (discussed here) states that, given their “politically sensitive nature and their horizontal implications for the Member States and the Union”, such provisions will be triggered once implementing powers are conferred to the Council (following a proposal from the Commission).

      What do these measures entail? We know that they can be applied in bulk or separately. Firstly, EU consulates in third countries will not have the usual leeway to waive some documents required to apply for visas (Art. 14(6), visa code). Secondly, visa applicants from uncooperative third countries will pay higher visa fees (Art. 16(1) visa code). Thirdly, visa fees to diplomatic and service passports will not be waived (Art. 16(5)b visa code). Fourthly, time to take a decision on the visa application will be longer than 15 days (Art. 23(1) visa code). Fifthly, the issuance of multi-entry visas (MEVs) from 6 months to 5 years is suspended (Art. 24(2) visa code). In other words, these coercive measures are not aimed at suspending visas. They are designed to make the procedure for obtaining a visa more lengthy, more costly, and limited in terms of access to MEVs.

      Moreover, it is important to stress that the revision of the Visa Code Regulation mentions that the Union will strike a balance between “migration and security concerns, economic considerations and general external relations”. Consequently, measures (be they restrictive or not) will result from an assessment that goes well beyond migration management issues. The assessment will not be based exclusively on the so-called “return rate” that has been presented as a compass used to reward or blame third countries’ cooperation on readmission. Other indicators or criteria, based on data provided by the Member States, will be equally examined by the Commission. These other indicators pertain to “the overall relations” between the Union and its Member States, on the one hand, and a given third country, on the other. This broad category is not defined in the 2019 revision of the Visa Code, nor do we know what it precisely refers to.

      What do we know about this linkage? The idea of linking cooperation on readmission with visa policy is not new. It was first introduced at a bilateral level by some member states. For example, fifteen years ago, cooperation on redocumentation, including the swift delivery of laissez-passers by the consular authorities of countries of origin, was at the centre of bilateral talks between France and North African countries. In September 2005, the French Ministry of the Interior proposed to “sanction uncooperative countries [especially Morocco, Tunisia and Algeria] by limiting the number of short-term visas that France delivers to their nationals.” Sanctions turned out to be unsuccessful not only because of the diplomatic tensions they generated – they were met with strong criticisms and reaction on the part of North African countries – but also because the ratio between the number of laissez-passers requested by the French authorities and the number of laissez-passers delivered by North African countries’ authorities remained unchanged.

      At the EU level, the idea to link readmission with visa policy has been in the pipeline for many years. Let’s remember that, in October 2002, in its Community Return Policy, the European Commission reflected on the positive incentives that could be used in order to ensure third countries’ constant cooperation on readmission. The Commission observed in its communication that, actually, “there is little that can be offered in return. In particular visa concessions or the lifting of visa requirements can be a realistic option in exceptional cases only; in most cases it is not.” Therefore, the Commission set out to propose additional incentives (e.g. trade expansion, technical/financial assistance, additional development aid).

      In a similar vein, in September 2015, after years of negotiations and failed attempt to cooperate on readmission with Southern countries, the Commission remarked that the possibility to use Visa Facilitation Agreements as an incentive to cooperate on readmission is limited in the South “as the EU is unlikely to offer visa facilitation to certain third countries which generate many irregular migrants and thus pose a migratory risk. And even when the EU does offer the parallel negotiation of a visa facilitation agreement, this may not be sufficient if the facilitations offered are not sufficiently attractive.”

      More recently, in March 2018, in its Impact Assessment accompanying the proposal for an amendment of the Common Visa Code, the Commission itself recognised that “better cooperation on readmission with reluctant third countries cannot be obtained through visa policy measures alone.” It also added that “there is no hard evidence on how visa leverage can translate into better cooperation of third countries on readmission.”

      Against this backdrop, why has so much emphasis been put on the link between cooperation on readmission and visa policy in the revised Visa Code Regulation and later in the New Pact? The Commission itself recognised that this conditionality might not constitute a sufficient incentive to ensure the cooperation on readmission.

      To reply to this question, we need first to question the oft-cited reference to third countries’ “reluctance”[n1] to cooperate on readmission in order to understand that, cooperation on readmission is inextricably based on unbalanced reciprocities. Moreover, migration, be it regular or irregular, continues to be viewed as a safety valve to relieve pressure on unemployment and poverty in countries of origin. Readmission has asymmetric costs and benefits having economic social and political implications for countries of origin. Apart from being unpopular in Southern countries, readmission is humiliating, stigmatizing, violent and traumatic for migrants,[n2] making their process of reintegration extremely difficult, if not impossible, especially when countries of origin have often no interest in promoting reintegration programmes addressed to their nationals expelled from Europe.

      Importantly, the conclusion of a bilateral agreement does not automatically lead to its full implementation in the field of readmission, for the latter is contingent on an array of factors that codify the bilateral interactions between two contracting parties. Today, more than 320 bilateral agreements linked to readmission have been concluded between the 27 EU Member States and third countries at a global level. Using an oxymoron, it is possible to argue that, over the past decades, various EU member states have learned that, if bilateral cooperation on readmission constitutes a central priority in their external relations (this is the official rhetoric), readmission remains peripheral to other strategic issue-areas which are detailed below. Finally, unlike some third countries in the Balkans or Eastern Europe, Southern third countries have no prospect of acceding to the EU bloc, let alone having a visa-free regime, at least in the foreseeable future. This basic difference makes any attempt to compare the responsiveness of the Balkan countries to cooperation on readmission with Southern non-EU countries’ impossible, if not spurious.

      Today, patterns of interdependence between the North and the South of the Mediterranean are very much consolidated. Over the last decades, Member States, especially Spain, France, Italy and Greece, have learned that bringing pressure to bear on uncooperative third countries needs to be evaluated cautiously lest other issues of high politics be jeopardized. Readmission cannot be isolated from a broader framework of interactions including other strategic, if not more crucial, issue-areas, such as police cooperation on the fight against international terrorism, border control, energy security and other diplomatic and geopolitical concerns. Nor can bilateral cooperation on readmission be viewed as an end in itself, for it has often been grafted onto a broader framework of interactions.

      This point leads to a final remark regarding “return sponsorship” which is detailed in Art. 55 of the proposal for a regulation on asylum and migration management. In a nutshell, the idea of the European Commission consists in a commitment from a “sponsoring Member State” to assist another Member State (the benefitting Member State) in the readmission of a third-country national. This mechanism foresees that each Member State is expected to indicate the nationalities for which they are willing to provide support in the field of readmission. The sponsoring Member State offers an assistance by mobilizing its network of bilateral cooperation on readmission, or by opening a dialogue with the authorities of a given third country where the third-country national will be deported. If, after eight months, attempts are unsuccessful, the third-country national is transferred to the sponsoring Member State. Note that, in application of Council Directive 2001/40 on mutual recognition of expulsion decisions, the sponsoring Member State may or may not recognize the expulsion decision of the benefitting Member State, just because Member States continue to interpret the Geneva Convention in different ways and also because they have different grounds for subsidiary protection.

      Viewed from a non-EU perspective, namely from the point of view of third countries, this mechanism might raise some questions of competence and relevance. Which consular authorities will undertake the identification process of the third country national with a view to eventually delivering a travel document? Are we talking about the third country’s consular authorities located in the territory of the benefitting Member State or in the sponsoring Member State’s? In a similar vein, why would a bilateral agreement linked to readmission – concluded with a given ‘sponsoring’ Member State – be applicable to a ‘benefitting’ Member State (with which no bilateral agreement or arrangement has been signed)? Such territorially bounded contingencies will invariably be problematic, at a certain stage, from the viewpoint of third countries. Additionally, in acting as a sponsoring Member State, one is entitled to wonder why an EU Member State might decide to expose itself to increased tensions with a given third country while putting at risk a broader framework of interactions.

      As the graph shows, not all the EU Member States are equally engaged in bilateral cooperation on readmission with third countries. Moreover, a geographical distribution of available data demonstrates that more than 70 per cent of the total number of bilateral agreements linked to readmission (be they formal or informal[n3]) concluded with African countries are covered by France, Italy and Spain. Over the last decades, these three Member States have developed their respective networks of cooperation on readmission with a number of countries in Africa and in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region.

      Given the existence of these consolidated networks, the extent to which the “return sponsorship” proposed in the Pact will add value to their current undertakings is objectively questionable. Rather, if the “return sponsorship” mechanism is adopted, these three Member States might be deemed to act as sponsoring Member States when it comes to the expulsion of irregular migrants (located in other EU Member States) to Africa and the MENA region. More concretely, the propensity of, for example, Austria to sponsor Italy in expelling from Italy a foreign national coming from the MENA region or from Africa is predictably low. Austria’s current networks of cooperation on readmission with MENA and African countries would never add value to Italy’s consolidated networks of cooperation on readmission with these third countries. Moreover, it is unlikely that Italy will be proactively “sponsoring” other Member States’ expulsion decisions, without jeopardising its bilateral relations with other strategic third countries located in the MENA region or in Africa, to use the same example. These considerations concretely demonstrate that the European Commission’s call for “solidarity and fair sharing of responsibility”, on which its “return sponsorship” mechanism is premised, is contingent on the existence of a federative Union able to act as a unitary supranational body in domestic and foreign affairs. This federation does not exist in political terms.

      Beyond these practical aspects, it is important to realise that the cobweb of bilateral agreements linked to readmission has expanded as a result of tremendously complex bilateral dynamics that go well beyond the mere management of international migration. These remarks are crucial to understanding that we need to reflect properly on the conditionality pattern that has driven the external action of the EU, especially in a regional context where patterns of interdependence among state actors have gained so much relevance over the last two decades. Moreover, given the clear consensus on the weak correlation between cooperation on readmission and visa policy (the European Commission being no exception to this consensus), linking the two might not be the adequate response to ensure third countries’ cooperation on readmission, especially when the latter are in position to capitalize on their strategic position with regard to some EU Member States.

      Conclusions

      This brief reflection has highlighted a trend which is taking shape in the Pact and in some of the measures proposed by the Commission in its 2020 package of reforms. It has been shown that the proposals for a pre-entry screening and the 2020 amended proposal for enhanced border procedures are creating something we could label as a ‘lower density’ European Union territory, because the new procedures and arrangements have the purpose of restricting and limiting access to rights and to jurisdiction. This would happen on the territory of a Member State, but in a place at or close to the external borders, with a view to confining migration and third country nationals to an area where the territory of a state, and therefore, the European territory, is less … ‘territorial’ than it should be: legally speaking, it is a ‘lower density’ territory.

      The “seamless link between asylum and return” the Commission aims to create with the new border procedures can be described as sliding doors through which the third country national can enter or leave immediately, depending on how the established fast-track system qualifies her situation.

      However, the paradox highlighted with the “return sponsorship” mechanism shows that readmission agreements or arrangements are no panacea, for the vested interests of third countries must also be taken into consideration when it comes to cooperation on readmission. In this respect, it is telling that the Commission never consulted third states on the new return sponsorship mechanism, as if their territories were not concerned by this mechanism, which is far from being the case. For this reason, it is legitimate to imagine that the main rationale for the return sponsorship mechanism may be another one, and it may be merely domestic. In other words, the return sponsorship, which transforms itself into a form of relocation after eight months if the third country national is not expelled from the EU territory, subtly takes non-frontline European Union states out of their comfort-zone and engage them in cooperating on expulsions. If they fail to do so, namely if the third-country national is not expelled after eight months, non-frontline European Union states are as it were ‘forcibly’ engaged in a ‘solidarity practice’ that is conducive to relocation.

      Given the disappointing past experience of the 2015 relocations, it is impossible to predict whether this mechanism will work or not. However, once one enters sliding doors, the danger is to remain stuck in uncertainty, in a European Union ‘no man’s land’ which is nothing but another by-product of the fortress Europe machinery.

      http://eulawanalysis.blogspot.com/2020/11/the-new-pact-on-migration-and-asylum.html

    • Le nouveau Pacte européen sur la migration et l’asile

      Ce 23 septembre 2020, la Commission européenne a présenté son très attendu nouveau Pacte sur la migration et l’asile.

      Alors que l’Union européenne (UE) traverse une crise politique majeure depuis 2015 et que les solutions apportées ont démontré leur insuffisance en matière de solidarité entre États membres, leur violence à l’égard des exilés et leur coût exorbitant, la Commission européenne ne semble pas tirer les leçons du passé.

      Au menu du Pacte : un renforcement toujours accru des contrôles aux frontières, des procédures expéditives aux frontières de l’UE avec, à la clé, la détention généralisée pour les nouveaux arrivants, la poursuite de l’externalisation et un focus sur les expulsions. Il n’y a donc pas de changement de stratégie.

      Le Règlement Dublin, injuste et inefficace, est loin d’être aboli. Le nouveau système mis en place changera certes de nom, mais reprendra le critère tant décrié du “premier pays d’entrée” dans l’UE pour déterminer le pays responsable du traitement de la demande d’asile. Quant à un mécanisme permanent de solidarité pour les États davantage confrontés à l’arrivée des exilés, à l’instar des quotas de relocalisations de 2015-2017 – relocalisations qui furent un échec complet -, la Commission propose une solidarité permanente et obligatoire mais… à la carte, où les États qui ne veulent pas accueillir de migrants peuvent choisir à la place de “parrainer” leur retour, ou de fournir un soutien opérationnel aux États en difficulté. La solidarité n’est donc cyniquement pas envisagée pour l’accueil, mais bien pour le renvoi des migrants.

      Pourtant, l’UE fait face à beaucoup moins d’arrivées de migrants sur son territoire qu’en 2015 (1,5 million d’arrivées en 2015, 140.00 en 2019)

      Fin 2019, l’UE accueillait 2,6 millions de réfugiés, soit l’équivalent de 0,6% de sa population. À défaut de voies légales et sûres, les personnes exilées continuent de fuir la guerre, la violence, ou de rechercher une vie meilleure et doivent emprunter des routes périlleuses pour rejoindre le territoire de l’UE : on dénombre plus de 20.000 décès depuis 2014. Une fois arrivées ici, elles peuvent encore être détenues et subir des mauvais traitements, comme c’était le cas dans le camp qui a brûlé à Moria. Lorsqu’elles poursuivent leur route migratoire au sein de l’UE, elles ne peuvent choisir le pays où elles demanderont l’asile et elles font face à la loterie de l’asile…

      Loin d’un “nouveau départ” avec ce nouveau Pacte, la Commission propose les mêmes recettes et rate une opportunité de mettre en œuvre une tout autre politique, qui soit réellement solidaire, équitable pour les États membres et respectueuse des droits fondamentaux des personnes migrantes, avec l’établissement de voies légales et sûres, des procédures d’asile harmonisées et un accueil de qualité, ou encore la recherche de solutions durables pour les personnes en situation irrégulière.

      Dans cette brève analyse, nous revenons sur certaines des mesures phares telles qu’elles ont été présentées par la Commission européenne et qui feront l’objet de discussions dans les prochains mois avec le Parlement européen et le Conseil européen. Nous expliquerons également en quoi ces mesures n’ont rien d’innovant, sont un échec de la politique migratoire européenne, et pourquoi elles sont dangereuses pour les personnes migrantes.

      https://www.cire.be/publication/le-nouveau-pacte-europeen-sur-la-migration-et-lasile

      Pour télécharger l’analyse :
      https://www.cire.be/wp-admin/admin-ajax.php?juwpfisadmin=false&action=wpfd&task=file.download&wpfd_category_

    • New pact on migration and asylum. Perspective on the ’other side’ of the EU border

      At the end of September 2020, and after camp Moria on Lesvos burned down leaving over 13,000 people in an even more precarious situation than they were before, the European Commission (EC) introduced a proposal for the New Pact on Migration and Asylum. So far, the proposal has not been met with enthusiasm by neither member states or human rights organisations.

      Based on first-hand field research interviews with civil society and other experts in the Balkan region, this report provides a unique perspective of the New Pact on Migration and Asylum from ‘the other side’ of the EU’s borders.

      #Balkans #route_des_Balkans #rapport #Refugee_rights #militarisation

    • Impakter | Un « nouveau » pacte sur l’asile et les migrations ?

      Le média en ligne Impakter propose un article d’analyse du Pacte sur l’asile et les migrations de l’Union européenne. Publié le 23 septembre 2020, le pacte a été annoncé comme un “nouveau départ”. En réalité, le pacte n’est pas du tout un nouveau départ, mais la même politique avec un ensemble de nouvelles propositions. L’article pointe l’aspect critique du projet, et notamment des concepts clés tels que : « processus de pré-selection », « le processus accélérée » et le « pacte de retour ». L’article donne la parole à plusieurs expertises et offre ainsi une meilleure compréhension de ce que concrètement ce pacte implique pour les personnes migrantes.

      L’article de #Charlie_Westbrook “A “New” Pact on Migration and Asylum ?” a été publié le 11 février dans le magazine en ligne Impakter (sous licence Creative Commons). Nous vous en proposons un court résumé traduisant les lignes directrices de l’argumentaire, en français ci-dessous. Pour lire l’intégralité du texte en anglais, vous pouvez vous rendre sur le site de Impakter.

      –---

      Le “Nouveau pacte sur la migration et l’asile”, a été publié le 23 septembre, faisant suite à l’incendie du camp surpeuplé de Moria. Le pacte a été annoncé comme un “nouveau départ”. En réalité, le pacte n’est pas du tout un nouveau départ, mais la même politique avec un ensemble de nouvelles propositions sur lesquelles les États membres de l’UE devront maintenant se mettre d’accord – une entreprise qui a déjà connu des difficultés.

      Les universitaires, les militants et les organisations de défense des droits de l’homme de l’UE soulignent les préoccupations éthiques et pratiques que suscitent nombre des propositions suggérées par la Commission, ainsi que la rhétorique axée sur le retour qui les anime. Charlie Westbrook la journaliste, a contacté Kirsty Evans, coordinatrice de terrain et des campagnes pour Europe Must Act, qui m’a fait part de ses réactions au nouveau Pacte.

      Cet essai vise à présenter le plus clairement possible les problèmes liés à ce nouveau pacte, en mettant en évidence les principales préoccupations des experts et des ONG. Ces préoccupations concernent les problèmes potentiels liés au processus de présélection, au processus accéléré (ou “fast-track”) et au mécanisme de parrainage des retours.

      Le processus de présélection

      La nouvelle proposition est d’instaurer une procédure de contrôle préalable à l’entrée sur le territoire européen. L’ONG Human Rights Watch, dénonce la suggestion trompeuse du pacte selon laquelle les personnes soumises à la procédure frontalière ne sont pas considérées comme ayant formellement pénétré sur le territoire. Ce processus concerne toute personne extra-européenne qui franchirait la frontière de manière irrégulière. Ce manque de différenciation du type de besoin inquiète l’affirme l’avocate et professeur Lyra Jakulevičienė, car cela signifie que la politique d’externalisation sera plus forte que jamais. Ce nouveau règlement brouille la distinction entre les personnes demandant une protection internationale et les autres migrants “en plaçant les deux groupes de personnes sous le même régime juridique au lieu de les différencier clairement, car leurs chances de rester dans l’UE sont très différentes”. Ce processus d’externalisation, cependant, “se déroule “à l’intérieur” du territoire de l’Union européenne, et vise à prolonger les effets des politiques d’endiguement parce qu’elles rendent l’accès au territoire de l’UE moins significatif”, comme l’expliquent Jean-Pierre Cassarino, chercheur principal à la chaire de la politique européenne de voisinage du Collège d’Europe, et Luisa Marin, professeur adjoint de droit européen. En d’autres termes, les personnes en quête de protection n’auront pas pleinement accès aux droits européens en arrivant sur le territoire de l’UE. Il faudra d’abord déterminer ce qu’elles “sont”. En outre, les recherches universitaires montrent que les processus d’externalisation “entraînent le contournement des normes fondamentales, vont à l’encontre de la bonne gouvernance, créent l’immobilité et contribuent à la crise du régime mondial des réfugiés, qui ne parvient pas à assurer la protection”. Les principales inquiétudes de ces deux expert·es sont les suivantes : la rapidité de prise de décision (pas plus de 5 jours), l’absence d’assistance juridique, Etat membre est le seul garant du respect des droits fondamentaux et si cette période de pré-sélection sera mise en œuvre comme une détention.

      Selon Jakulevičienė, la proposition apporte “un grand potentiel” pour créer davantage de camps de style “Moria”. Il est difficile de voir en quoi cela profiterait à qui que ce soit.

      Procédure accélérée

      Si un demandeur est orienté vers le système accéléré, une décision sera prise dans un délai de 12 semaines – une durée qui fait craindre que le système accéléré n’aboutisse à un retour injuste des demandeurs. En 2010, Human Rights Watch a publié un rapport de fond détaillant comment les procédures d’asile accélérées étaient inadaptées aux demandes complexes et comment elles affectaient négativement les femmes demandeurs d’asile en particulier.
      Les personnes seront dirigées vers la procédure accélérée si : l’identité a été cachée ou que de faux documents ont été utilisés, si elle représente un danger pour la sécurité nationale, ou si elle est ressortissante d’un pays pour lesquels moins de 20% des demandes ont abouti à l’octroi d’une protection internationale.

      Comme l’exprime le rapport de Human Rights Watch (HRW), “la procédure à la frontière proposée repose sur deux hypothèses erronées – que la majorité des personnes arrivant en Europe n’ont pas besoin de protection et que l’évaluation des demandes d’asile peut être faite facilement et rapidement”.

      Essentiellement, comme l’écrivent Cassarino et Marin, “elle porte atteinte au principe selon lequel toute demande d’asile nécessite une évaluation complexe et individualisée de la situation personnelle particulière du demandeur”.

      Tout comme Jakulevičienė, Kirsty Evans s’inquiète de la manière dont le pacte va alimenter une rhétorique préjudiciable, en faisant valoir que “le langage de l’accélération fait appel à la “protection” de la rhétorique nationale évidente dans la politique et les médias en se concentrant sur le retour des personnes sur leur propre territoire”.

      Un pacte pour le retour

      Désormais, lorsqu’une demande d’asile est rejetée, la décision de retour sera rendue en même temps.

      Le raisonnement présenté par la Commission pour proposer des procédures plus rapides et plus intégrées est que des procédures inefficaces causent des difficultés excessives – y compris pour ceux qui ont obtenu le droit de rester.

      Les procédures restructurées peuvent en effet profiter à certains. Cependant, il existe un risque sérieux qu’elles aient un impact négatif sur le droit d’asile des personnes soumises à la procédure accélérée – sachant qu’en cas de rejet, il n’existe qu’un seul droit de recours.

      La proposition selon laquelle l’UE traitera désormais les retours dans leur ensemble, et non plus seulement dans un seul État membre, illustre bien l’importance que l’UE accorde aux retours. À cette fin, l’UE propose la création d’un nouveau poste de coordinateur européen des retours qui s’occupera des retours et des réadmissions.

      Décrite comme “la plus sinistre des nouvelles propositions”, et assimilée à “une grotesque parodie de personnes parrainant des enfants dans les pays en développement par l’intermédiaire d’organisations caritatives”, l’option du parrainage de retour est également un signe fort de l’approche par concession de la Commission.

      Pour M. Evans, le fait d’autoriser les pays à opter pour le “retour” comme moyen de “gérer la migration” semble être une validation du comportement illégal des États membres, comme les récentes expulsions massives en Grèce. Alors, qu’est-ce que le parrainage de retour ? Eh bien, selon les termes de l’UE, le parrainage du retour est une option de solidarité dans laquelle l’État membre “s’engage à renvoyer les migrants en situation irrégulière sans droit de séjour au nom d’un autre État membre, en le faisant directement à partir du territoire de l’État membre bénéficiaire”.

      Les États membres préciseront les nationalités qu’ils “parraineront” en fonction, vraisemblablement, des relations préexistantes de l’État membre de l’UE avec un État non membre de l’UE. Lorsque la demande d’un individu est rejetée, l’État membre qui en est responsable s’appuiera sur ses relations avec le pays tiers pour négocier le retour du demandeur.

      En outre, en supposant que les réadmissions soient réussies, le parrainage des retours fonctionne sur la base de l’hypothèse qu’il existe un pays tiers sûr. C’est sur cette base que les demandes sont rejetées. La manière dont cela affectera le principe de non-refoulement est la principale préoccupation des organisations des droits de l’homme et des experts politiques, et c’est une préoccupation qui découle d’expériences antérieures. Après tout, la coopération avec des pays tiers jusqu’à présent – à savoir l’accord Turquie-UE et l’accord Espagne-Maroc – a suscité de nombreuses critiques sur le coût des droits de l’homme.

      Mais en plus des préoccupations relatives aux droits de l’homme, des questions sont soulevées sur les implications ou même les aspects pratiques de l’”incitation” des pays tiers à se conformer, l’image de l’UE en tant que champion des droits de l’homme étant déjà corrodée aux yeux de la communauté internationale.

      Il s’agira notamment d’utiliser la délivrance du code des visas comme méthode d’incitation. Pour les pays qui ne coopèrent pas à la réadmission, les visas seront plus difficiles à obtenir. La proposition visant à pénaliser les pays qui appliquent des restrictions en matière de visas n’est pas nouvelle et n’a pas conduit à une amélioration des relations diplomatiques. Guild fait valoir que cette approche est injuste pour les demandeurs de visa des pays “non coopérants” et qu’elle risque également de susciter des sentiments d’injustice chez les voisins du pays tiers.

      L’analyse de Guild est que le nouveau pacte est diplomatiquement faible. Au-delà du financement, il offre “peu d’attention aux intérêts des pays tiers”. Il faut reconnaître, après tout, que la réadmission a des coûts et des avantages asymétriques pour les pays qui les acceptent, surtout si l’on considère que la migration, comme le soulignent Cassarino et Marin, “continue d’être considérée comme une soupape de sécurité pour soulager la pression sur le chômage et la pauvreté dans les pays d’origine”.

      https://asile.ch/2021/03/02/impakter-un-nouveau-pacte-sur-lasile-et-les-migrations

      L’article original :
      A “New” Pact on Migration and Asylum ?
      https://impakter.com/a-new-pact-on-migration-and-asylum

    • The EU Pact on Migration and Asylum in light of the United Nations Global Compact on Refugees. International Experiences on Containment and Mobility and their Impacts on Trust and Rights

      In September 2020, the European Commission published what it described as a New Pact on Migration and Asylum (emphasis added) that lays down a multi-annual policy agenda on issues that have been central to debate about the future of European integration. This book critically examines the new Pact as part of a Forum organized by the Horizon 2020 project ASILE – Global Asylum Governance and the EU’s Role.

      ASILE studies interactions between emerging international protection systems and the United Nations Global Compact for Refugees (UN GCR), with particular focus on the European Union’s role and the UN GCR’s implementation dynamics. It brings together a new international network of scholars from 13 institutions examining the characteristics of international and country specific asylum governance instruments and arrangements applicable to people seeking international protection. It studies the compatibility of these governance instruments’ with international protection and human rights, and the UN GCR’s call for global solidarity and responsibility sharing.

      https://www.asileproject.eu/the-eu-pact-on-migration-and-asylum-in-light-of-the-united-nations-glob

  • Reconnaissance faciale : officiellement interdite, elle se met peu à peu en place
    https://www.franceinter.fr/reconnaissance-faciale-officiellement-interdite-elle-se-met-peu-a-peu-en

    Nice, Metz, Marseille... Toutes ces villes tentent d’expérimenter des dispositifs qui s’apparentent à de la reconnaissance faciale, toujours interdite en France. La Cnil veille au grain, mais n’exclut pas de rendre un avis favorable pour les Jeux olympiques de Paris en 2024. Imaginez : le 26 juillet 2024. Les Jeux olympiques de Paris débutent. Une foule compacte se presse devant les grilles d’entrée du Stade de France. À l’entrée sud, une file semble avancer plus vite que les autres. En effet, (...)

    #Atos #CapGemini #Cisco #Dassault #Datakalab #Europol #Idemia #RATP #Two-I #algorithme #Alicem #capteur #CCTV #QRcode #SmartCity #smartphone #biométrie #racisme #consentement #émotions #facial #reconnaissance #son (...)

    ##[fr]Règlement_Général_sur_la_Protection_des_Données__RGPD_[en]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_[nl]General_Data_Protection_Regulation__GDPR_ ##biais ##comportement ##discrimination ##enseignement ##masque ##sport ##TAJ ##bug ##CNIL ##LaQuadratureduNet

  • Les deux visages de la censure, par Félix Tréguer
    https://www.monde-diplomatique.fr/2020/07/TREGUER/61980

    En France, le Conseil constitutionnel a invalidé le 7 juin 2020 l’essentiel de la loi Avia, un texte qui organisait la censure extrajudiciaire d’Internet sous l’égide du gouvernement et des grandes plates-formes numériques. Cette décision n’est cependant pas de nature à remettre en cause la relation multiséculaire entre l’État et le capitalisme informationnel. En ce 12 novembre 2018 se tient, dans la grande salle de conférences de l’Organisation des Nations unies pour l’éducation, la science et la (...)

    #Europol #Google #Microsoft #Amazon #bot #censure #législation #CloudAct #CloudComputing #LoiAvia (...)

    ##surveillance

  • Quand Europol s’inquiète des "Incels", du terrorisme d’extrême droite et des anti-féministes
    https://www.rtbf.be/info/societe/detail_quand-europol-s-inquiete-des-incels-du-terrorisme-d-extreme-droite-et-de


    La convergence des « ismes ».

    En réalité, l’#antiféminisme semble être une composante au sein de certaines idéologies d’extrême droite qu’elles soient violentes ou non. Mais c’est une composante qui peut être fédératrice. L’antiféminisme dans les idéologies d’#extrême_droite s’opposerait ainsi « au féminisme qui ferait la promotion d’une société mondialisée, multiculturelle et métissée dont la victime serait la race blanche en danger, ’en péril grave et imminent », analyse Michaël Dantinne, professeur de criminologie à l’Université de Liège.

    Ainsi, l’antiféminisme extrémiste s’insère dans les « théories du grand remplacement ». « Le féminisme aurait été inventé pour distraire les femmes de leur rôle ’naturel’ de mères, et est par conséquent blâmé pour la chute des taux de natalités dans les pays de l’Europe occidentale, ce qui a finalement permis l’immigration », souligne le rapport d’Europol.

    Et d’ajouter, « la frustration sexuelle et la misogynie ont été clairement explicitée par les auteurs des attaques de Christchurch (Nouvelle Zélande) et Halle (Allemagne), en 2019 et en 2020 ».

    La composante misogyne chez les auteurs d’attaques empreintes d’idéologies d’extrême droite n’est pas nouvelle. Dans son manifeste, le terroriste norvégien Anders Breivik indiquait : « il faut parfois tuer des femmes, même si elles peuvent être très attirantes ».

    #racisme

    • #The_Handmaid's_Tale #La_Servante_Écarlate

      Je crois que ça a démarré en Argentine, il y a 2 ans,…
      Why are protesters dressing like The Handmaid’s Tale in Argentina ? – explainer - YouTube (août 2018)
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Idw6LY4AGM

      et actuellement aux É.-U.
      Women Wear ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Outfits to Protest Abortion Bill - YouTube
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ySslUJlicOc

      légende de la photo ci-dessus :
      Il existe des « ponts » entre les idéologies d’extrême droite et les « antiféministes ».
      © 2019 Getty Images

    • Oui, mais justement : pourquoi la photo, sans explication, de trois manifestants féministes, alors que l’article est consacré au danger que représente « des "Incels", du terrorisme d’extrême droite et des anti-féministes » ?

    • LA VIRILITÉ, AU CŒUR DE LA SENSIBILITÉ (ET DU PROBLÈME) FASCISTE
      https://lundi.am/La-virilite-au-coeur-de-la-sensibilite-et-du-probleme-fasciste

      Le sociologue Francis Dupuy-Déri explique la chose suivante, à propos des hommes qui pensent avoir droit, notamment, aux faveurs des femmes : « Aujourd’hui, ces hommes blancs réagissent comme des aristocrates qui voient leur échapper des privilèges qui leurs seraient dus à titre de mâles. Ne pas pouvoir jouir de ces privilèges – emploi, épouse, amante, etc. – apparaît comme un véritable scandale, d’où ces deux émotions souvent évoquées : la colère et le ressentiment. Même si objectivement, l’inégalité persiste entre les sexes, ces hommes blancs se prétendent victimes d’une très grave injustice en faveur des femmes et des populations racisées et migrantes »

      #femmes #virilisme

    • Et #incels pour finir en admettant qu’ils sont assez isolés mais c’était bien de les mettre dans le titre.

      Mais il est vrai que des « ponts » existent entre avec les idéologies d’extrême droite et les Incels. Europol observe en effet dans son rapport que « la communauté misogyne, principalement composée de jeunes hommes, se rencontrent sur le web, dans des espaces semblables à ceux fréquentés par les suprémacistes blancs et ils blâment les féministes, pour leur incapacité à trouver une partenaire sexuelle ».

      Il est très difficile d’analyser l’ampleur de ce phénomène. Néanmoins, les mouvements d’extrême droite violents, de même que les incels semblent être dans le collimateur des services de sécurité. Ou du moins sous observation. Michaël Dantinne rappelle toutefois que « tous les incels ne sont pas violents, c’est d’ailleurs davantage l’affaire de minorité isolée ».

  • La Commission européenne sommée de s’expliquer sur ses liens avec Palantir
    https://www.euractiv.fr/section/economie/news/eu-commission-pressed-on-controversial-links-to-palantir

    L’entreprise américaine Palantir collabore avec Europol par le biais de la société française CapGemini, notamment pour l’analyse de données liées au terrorisme. Une situation qui inquiète des eurodéputés. L’intervention des députés européens fait suite à une enquête récente menée par Euractiv. Celle-ci a révélé que la présidente de la Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, a encontré le PDG de Palantir à Davos en janvier dernier, mais que l’exécutif n’a pas conservé de notes sur le détail de leurs échanges. Palantir (...)

    #CambridgeAnalytica/Emerdata #CapGemini #Europol #Palantir #anti-terrorisme #BigData (...)

    ##CambridgeAnalytica/Emerdata ##santé

  • Vers l’automatisation de la censure politique - Félix Tréguer
    https://lundi.am/Vers-l-automatisation-de-la-censure-politique-Felix-Treguer

    « L’urgence, c’est de rompre l’alliance des appareils policiers et des grands marchands d’infrastructures numériques » Nous publions ici un article généreusement transmis par nos confrères de La Quadrature du Net sur les nouvelles formes de censure politique dans l’espace virtuel : grâce à l’intelligence artificielle, des milliers de contenus soi-disant « terroristes » postés sur facebook ou youtube sont automatiquement supprimés chaque jour. Pour cela, les États, loin d’être concurrencés par les géants de (...)

    #LaQuadratureduNet #surveillance #GAFAM #copyright #modération #FAI #censure #pornographie #pédophilie #anti-terrorisme #bot #Robocopyright #ContentID #algorithme #YouTube #Facebook #Interpol #Google (...)

    ##Europol

  • EU-Asylbehörde beschattete Flüchtende in sozialen Medien

    Die EU-Agentur EASO überwachte jahrelang soziale Netzwerke, um Flüchtende auf dem Weg nach Europa zu stoppen. Der oberste Datenschützer der EU setzte dem Projekt nun ein Ende.

    Das EU-Asylunterstützungsbüro EASO hat jahrelang in sozialen Medien Informationen über Flüchtende, Migrationsrouten und Schleuser gesammelt. Ihre Erkenntnisse meldete die Behörde mit Sitz in Malta an EU-Staaten, die Kommission und andere EU-Agenturen. Die Ermittlungen auf eigene Faust sorgen nun für Ärger mit EU-Datenschützern.

    Mitarbeiter von EASO durchforsteten soziale Medien seit Januar 2017. Ihr Hauptziel waren Hinweise auf neue Migrationsbewegungen nach Europa. Die EU-Behörde übernahm das Projekt von der UN-Organisation UNHCR, berichtete EASO damals in einem Newsletter.

    Die Agentur durchsuchte einschlägige Seiten, Kanäle und Gruppen mit der Hilfe von Stichwortlisten. Im Fokus standen Fluchtrouten, aber auch die Angebote von Schleusern, gefälschte Dokumente und die Stimmung unter den Geflüchteten, schrieb ein EASO-Sprecher an netzpolitik.org.

    Das Vorläuferprojekt untersuchte ab März 2016 Falschinformationen, mit denen Schleuser Menschen nach Europa locken. Es entstand als Folge der Flüchtlingsbewegung 2015, im Fokus der UN-Mitarbeiter standen Geflüchtete aus Syrien, dem Irak und Afghanistan.

    Flüchtende informierten sich auf dem Weg nach Europa über soziale Netzwerke, heißt es im Abschlussbericht des UNHCR. In Facebook-Gruppen und Youtube-Kanälen bewerben demnach Schleuser offen ihr Angebot. Sie veröffentlichten auf Facebook-Seiten sogar Rezensionen von zufriedenen „Kunden“, sagten Projektmitarbeiter damals den Medien.
    Fluchtrouten und Fälschungen

    Die wöchentlichen Berichte von EASO landeten bei den EU-Staaten und Institutionen, außerdem bei UNHCR und der Weltpolizeiorganisation Interpol. Die EU-Staaten forderten EASO bereits 2018 auf, Hinweise auf Schleuser an Europol zu übermitteln.

    Die EU-Agentur überwachte Menschen aus zahlreichen Ländern. Beobachtet wurden Sprecher des Arabischen und von afghanischen Sprachen wie Paschtunisch und Dari, aber auch von in Äthiopien und Eritrea verbreiteten Sprachen wie Tigrinya und Amharisch, das in Nigeria gesprochene Edo sowie etwa des Türkischen und Kurdischen.

    „Das Ziel der Aktivitäten war es, die Mitgliedsstaaten zu informieren und den Missbrauch von Schutzbedürftigen zu verhindern“, schrieb der EASO-Sprecher Anis Cassar.
    Als Beispiel nannte der Sprecher den „Konvoi der Hoffnung“. So nannte sich eine Gruppe von hunderte Menschen aus Afghanistan, Iran und Pakistan, die im Frühjahr 2019 an der griechisch-bulgarischen Grenze auf Weiterreise nach Europa hofften.

    Die griechische Polizei hinderte den „Konvoi“ mit Tränengasgranaten am Grenzübertritt. Die „sehr frühe Entdeckung“ der Gruppe sei ein Erfolg des Einsatzes, sagte der EASO-Sprecher.
    Kein Schutzschirm gegen Gräueltaten

    Gräueltaten gegen Flüchtende standen hingegen nicht im Fokus von EASO. In Libyen werden tausende Flüchtende unter „KZ-ähnlichen Zuständen“ in Lagern festgehalten, befand ein interner Bericht der Auswärtigen Amtes bereits Ende 2017.

    Über die Lage in Libyen dringen über soziale Medien und Messengerdienste immer wieder erschreckende Details nach außen.

    Die EU-Agentur antwortete ausweichend auf unsere Frage, ob ihre Mitarbeiter bei ihrem Monitoring Hinweise auf Menschenrechtsverletzungen gefunden hätten.

    „Ich bin nicht in der Lage, Details über die Inhalte der tatsächlichen Berichte zu geben“, schrieb der EASO-Sprecher. „Die Berichte haben aber sicherlich dazu beigetragen, den zuständigen nationalen Behörden zu helfen, Schleuser ins Visier zu nehmen und Menschen zu retten.“

    Der Sprecher betonte, das EU-Asylunterstützungsbüro sei keine Strafverfolgungsbehörde oder Küstenwache. Der Einsatz habe bloß zur Information der Partnerbehörden gedient.
    Datenschützer: Rechtsgrundlage fehlt

    Der oberste EU-Datenschützer übte heftige Kritik an dem Projekt. Die Behörde kritisiert, die EU-Agentur habe sensible persönliche Daten von Flüchtenden gesammelt, etwa über deren Religion, ohne dass diese informiert worden seien oder zugestimmt hätten.

    Die Asylbehörde habe für solche Datensammelei keinerlei Rechtsgrundlage, urteilte der EU-Datenschutzbeauftragte Wojciech Wiewiórowski in einem Brief an EASO im November.

    Die Datenschutzbehörde prüfte die Asylagentur nach neuen, strengeren Regeln für die EU-Institutionen, die etwa zeitgleich mit der Datenschutzgrundverordnung zu gelten begannen.

    In dem Schreiben warnt der EU-Datenschutzbeauftragte, einzelne Sprachen und Schlüsselwörter zu überwachen, könne zu falschen Annahmen über Gruppen führen. Dies wirke unter Umständen diskriminierend.

    Die Datenschutzbehörde ordnete die sofortigen Suspendierung des Projektes an. Es gebe vorerst keine Pläne, die Überwachung sozialer Medien wieder aufzunehmen, schrieb der EASO-Sprecher an netzpolitik.org.

    Die Asylbehörde widersprach indes den Vorwürfen. EASO habe großen Aufwand betrieben, damit keinerlei persönliche Daten in ihren Berichten landeten, schrieb der Sprecher.

    Anders sieht das der EU-Datenschutzbeauftragte. In einem einzigen Bericht, der den Datenschützern als Beispiel übermittelt wurde, fanden sie mehrere E-Mailadressen und die Telefonnummer eines Betroffenen, schrieben sie in dem Brief an EASO.

    EASO klagte indes gegenüber netzpolitik.org über die „negativen Konsequenzen“ des Projekt-Stopps. Dies schade den EU-Staaten in der Effektivität ihrer Asylsysteme und habe womöglich schädliche Auswirkungen auf die Sicherheit von Migranten und Asylsuchenden.
    Frontex stoppte Monitoring-Projekt

    Die EU-Asylagentur geriet bereits zuvor mit Aufsehern in Konflikt. Im Vorjahr ermittelte die Antikorruptionsbehörde OLAF wegen Mobbing-Vorwürfen, Verfehlungen bei Großeinkäufen und Datenschutzverstößen.

    Auf Anfrage von netzpolitik.org bestätigte OLAF, dass „Unregelmäßigkeiten“ in den genannten Bereichen gefunden wurden. Die Behörde wollte aber keine näheren Details nennen.

    EASO ist nicht die einzige EU-Behörde, die soziale Netzwerke überwachen möchte. Die Grenzagentur Frontex schrieb im September einen Auftrag über 400.000 Euro aus. Ziel sei die Überwachung von sozialen Netzwerken auf „irreguläre Migrationsbewegungen“.

    Kritische Nachfragen bremsten das Projekt aber schon vor dem Start. Nach kritischen Nachfragen der NGO Privacy International blies Frontex das Projekt ab. Frontex habe nicht erklären können, wie sich die Überwachung mit dem Datenschutz und dem rechtlichen Mandat der Organisation vereinen lässt, kritisierte die NGO.

    https://netzpolitik.org/2019/eu-asylbehoerde-beschattete-fluechtende-in-sozialen-medien#spendenleist
    #EASO #asile #migrations #réfugiés #surveillance #réseaux_sociaux #protection_des_données #Frontex #données

    –->

    « Les rapports hebdomadaires de l’EASO ont été envoyés aux pays et institutions de l’UE, au #HCR et à l’Organisation mondiale de la police d’#Interpol. Les États de l’UE ont demandé à l’EASO en 2018 de fournir à #Europol des informations sur les passeurs »

    ping @etraces

  • Le fichage. Note d’analyse ANAFE
    Un outil sans limites au service du contrôle des frontières ?

    La traversée des frontières par des personnes étrangères est un « outil » politique et médiatique, utilisé pour faire accepter à la population toutes les mesures toujours plus attentatoires aux libertés individuelles, au nom par exemple de la lutte contre le terrorisme. Le prétexte sécuritaire est érigé en étendard et il est systématiquement brandi dans les discours politiques, assimilant ainsi migration et criminalité, non seulement pour des effets d’annonce mais de plus en plus dans les législations.
    Les personnes étrangères font depuis longtemps l’objet de mesures de contrôle et de surveillance. Pourtant, un changement de perspective s’est opéré pour s’adapter aux grands changements des politiques européennes vers une criminalisation croissante de ces personnes, en lien avec le développement constant des nouvelles technologies. L’utilisation exponentielle des fichiers est destinée à identifier, catégoriser, contrôler, éloigner et exclure. Et si le fichage est utilisé pour bloquer les personnes sur leurs parcours migratoires, il est aussi de plus en plus utilisé pour entraver les déplacements à l’intérieur de l’Union et l’action de militants européens qui entendent apporter leur soutien aux personnes exilées.
    Quelles sont les limites à ce développement ? Les possibilités techniques et numériques semblent illimitées et favorisent alors un véritable « business » du fichage.

    Concrètement, il existe pléthore de fichiers. Leur complexité tient au fait qu’ils sont nombreux, mais également à leur superposition. De ce maillage opaque naît une certaine insécurité juridique pour les personnes visées.
    Parallèlement à la multiplication des fichiers de tout type et de toute nature, ce sont désormais des questions liées à leur interconnexion[1], à leurs failles qui sont soulevées et aux abus dans leur utilisation, notamment aux risques d’atteintes aux droits fondamentaux et aux libertés publiques.

    Le 5 février 2019, un accord provisoire a été signé entre la présidence du Conseil européen et le Parlement européen sur l’interopérabilité[2] des systèmes d’information au niveau du continent pour renforcer les contrôles aux frontières de l’Union.

    http://www.anafe.org/IMG/pdf/note_-_le_fichage_un_outil_sans_limites_au_service_du_controle_des_frontieres

    #frontières #contrôle #surveillance #migration #réfugiés #fichage #interconnexion #interopérabilité

  • L’agenda européen en matière de migration : l’UE doit poursuivre les progrès accomplis au cours des quatre dernières années

    Dans la perspective du Conseil européen de mars, la Commission dresse aujourd’hui le bilan des progrès accomplis au cours des quatre dernières années et décrit les mesures qui sont encore nécessaires pour relever les défis actuels et futurs en matière de migration.

    Face à la crise des réfugiés la plus grave qu’ait connu le monde depuis la Seconde Guerre mondiale, l’UE est parvenue à susciter un changement radical en matière de gestion des migrations et de protection des frontières. L’UE a offert une protection et un soutien à des millions de personnes, a sauvé des vies, a démantelé des réseaux de passeurs et a permis de réduire le nombre d’arrivées irrégulières en Europe à son niveau le plus bas enregistré en cinq ans. Néanmoins, des efforts supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour assurer la pérennité de la politique migratoire de l’UE, compte tenu d’un contexte géopolitique en constante évolution et de l’augmentation régulière de la pression migratoire à l’échelle mondiale (voir fiche d’information).

    Frans Timmermans, premier vice-président, a déclaré : « Au cours des quatre dernières années, l’UE a accompli des progrès considérables et obtenu des résultats tangibles dans l’action menée pour relever le défi de la migration. Dans des circonstances très difficiles, nous avons agi ensemble. L’Europe n’est plus en proie à la crise migratoire que nous avons traversée en 2015, mais des problèmes structurels subsistent. Les États membres ont le devoir de protéger les personnes qu’ils abritent et de veiller à leur bien-être. Continuer à coopérer solidairement dans le cadre d’une approche globale et d’un partage équitable des responsabilités est la seule voie à suivre si l’UE veut être à la hauteur du défi de la migration. »

    Federica Mogherini, haute représentante et vice-présidente, a affirmé : « Notre collaboration avec l’Union africaine et les Nations unies porte ses fruits. Nous portons assistance à des milliers de personnes en détresse, nous en aidons beaucoup à retourner chez elles en toute sécurité pour y démarrer une activité, nous sauvons des vies, nous luttons contre les trafiquants. Les flux ont diminué, mais ceux qui risquent leur vie sont encore trop nombreux et chaque vie perdue est une victime de trop. C’est pourquoi nous continuerons à coopérer avec nos partenaires internationaux et avec les pays concernés pour fournir une protection aux personnes qui en ont le plus besoin, remédier aux causes profondes de la migration, démanteler les réseaux de trafiquants, mettre en place des voies d’accès à une migration sûre, ordonnée et légale. La migration constitue un défi mondial que l’on peut relever, ainsi que nous avons choisi de le faire en tant qu’Union, avec des efforts communs et des partenariats solides. »

    Dimitris Avramopoulos, commissaire pour la migration, les affaires intérieures et la citoyenneté, a déclaré : « Les résultats de notre approche européenne commune en matière de migration parlent d’eux-mêmes : les arrivées irrégulières sont désormais moins nombreuses qu’avant la crise, le corps européen de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes a porté la protection commune des frontières de l’UE à un niveau inédit et, en collaboration avec nos partenaires, nous travaillons à garantir des voies d’entrée légales tout en multipliant les retours. À l’avenir, il est essentiel de poursuivre notre approche commune, mais aussi de mener à bien la réforme en cours du régime d’asile de l’UE. En outre, il convient, à titre prioritaire, de mettre en place des accords temporaires en matière de débarquement. »

    Depuis trois ans, les chiffres des arrivées n’ont cessé de diminuer et les niveaux actuels ne représentent que 10 % du niveau record atteint en 2015. En 2018, environ 150 000 franchissements irréguliers des frontières extérieures de l’UE ont été détectés. Toutefois, le fait que le nombre d’arrivées irrégulières ait diminué ne constitue nullement une garantie pour l’avenir, eu égard à la poursuite probable de la pression migratoire. Il est donc indispensable d’adopter une approche globale de la gestion des migrations et de la protection des frontières.

    Des #mesures immédiates s’imposent

    Les problèmes les plus urgents nécessitant des efforts supplémentaires sont les suivants :

    Route de la #Méditerranée_occidentale : l’aide au #Maroc doit encore être intensifiée, compte tenu de l’augmentation importante des arrivées par la route de la Méditerranée occidentale. Elle doit comprendre la poursuite de la mise en œuvre du programme de 140 millions d’euros visant à soutenir la gestion des frontières ainsi que la reprise des négociations avec le Maroc sur la réadmission et l’assouplissement du régime de délivrance des visas.
    #accords_de_réadmission #visas

    Route de la #Méditerranée_centrale : améliorer les conditions d’accueil déplorables en #Libye : les efforts déployés par l’intermédiaire du groupe de travail trilatéral UA-UE-NU doivent se poursuivre pour contribuer à libérer les migrants se trouvant en #rétention, faciliter le #retour_volontaire (37 000 retours jusqu’à présent) et évacuer les personnes les plus vulnérables (près de 2 500 personnes évacuées).
    #vulnérabilité #évacuation

    Route de la #Méditerranée_orientale : gestion des migrations en #Grèce : alors que la déclaration UE-Turquie a continué à contribuer à la diminution considérable des arrivées sur les #îles grecques, des problèmes majeurs sont toujours en suspens en Grèce en ce qui concerne les retours, le traitement des demandes d’asile et la mise à disposition d’un hébergement adéquat. Afin d’améliorer la gestion des migrations, la Grèce devrait rapidement mettre en place une stratégie nationale efficace comprenant une organisation opérationnelle des tâches.
    #accord_ue-turquie

    Accords temporaires en matière de #débarquement : sur la base de l’expérience acquise au moyen de solutions ad hoc au cours de l’été 2018 et en janvier 2019, des accords temporaires peuvent constituer une approche européenne plus systématique et mieux coordonnée en matière de débarquement­. De tels accords mettraient en pratique la #solidarité et la #responsabilité au niveau de l’UE, en attendant l’achèvement de la réforme du #règlement_de_Dublin.
    #Dublin

    En matière de migration, il est indispensable d’adopter une approche globale, qui comprenne des actions menées avec des partenaires à l’extérieur de l’UE, aux frontières extérieures, et à l’intérieur de l’UE. Il ne suffit pas de se concentrer uniquement sur les problèmes les plus urgents. La situation exige une action constante et déterminée en ce qui concerne l’ensemble des éléments de l’approche globale, pour chacun des quatre piliers de l’agenda européen en matière de migration :

    1. Lutte contre les causes de la migration irrégulière : au cours des quatre dernières années, la migration s’est peu à peu fermement intégrée à tous les domaines des relations extérieures de l’UE :

    Grâce au #fonds_fiduciaire d’urgence de l’UE pour l’Afrique, plus de 5,3 millions de personnes vulnérables bénéficient actuellement d’une aide de première nécessité et plus de 60 000 personnes ont reçu une aide à la réintégration après leur retour dans leur pays d’origine.
    #fonds_fiduciaire_pour_l'Afrique

    La lutte contre les réseaux de passeurs et de trafiquants a encore été renforcée. En 2018, le centre européen chargé de lutter contre le trafic de migrants, établi au sein d’#Europol, a joué un rôle majeur dans plus d’une centaine de cas de trafic prioritaires et des équipes communes d’enquête participent activement à la lutte contre ce trafic dans des pays comme le #Niger.
    Afin d’intensifier les retours et la réadmission, l’UE continue d’œuvrer à la conclusion d’accords et d’arrangements en matière de réadmission avec les pays partenaires, 23 accords et arrangements ayant été conclus jusqu’à présent. Les États membres doivent maintenant tirer pleinement parti des accords existants.
    En outre, le Parlement européen et le Conseil devraient adopter rapidement la proposition de la Commission en matière de retour, qui vise à limiter les abus et la fuite des personnes faisant l’objet d’un retour au sein de l’Union.

    2. Gestion renforcée des frontières : créée en 2016, l’Agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes est aujourd’hui au cœur des efforts déployés par l’UE pour aider les États membres à protéger les frontières extérieures. En septembre 2018, la Commission a proposé de renforce