• #Evelop / #Barceló_Group : deportation planes from Spain

    The Barceló Group is a leading Spanish travel and hotel company whose airline Evelop is an eager deportation profiteer. Evelop is currently the Spanish government’s main charter deportation partner, running all the country’s mass expulsion flights through a two-year contract, while carrying out deportations from several other European countries as well.

    This profile has been written in response to requests from anti-deportation campaigners. We look at how:

    - The Barceló Group’s airline Evelop has a €9.9m, 18-month deportation contract with the Spanish government. The contract is up for renewal and Barceló is bidding again.
    - Primary beneficiaries of the contract alternate every few years between Evelop and Globalia’s Air Europa.
    – Evelop also carried out deportations from the UK last year to Jamaica, Ghana and Nigeria.
    – The Barceló Group is run and owned by the Barceló family. It is currently co-chaired by the Barceló cousins, Simón Barceló Tous and Simón Pedro Barceló Vadell. Former senator Simón Pedro Barceló Vadell, of the conservative Partido Popular (PP) party, takes the more public-facing role.
    – The company is Spain’s second biggest hotel company, although the coronavirus pandemic appears to have significantly impacted this aspect of its work.

    What’s the business?

    The Barceló Group (‘#Barceló_Corporación_Empresarial, S.A.’) is made up of the #Barceló_Hotel_Group, Spain’s second largest hotel company, and a travel agency and tour operator division known as #Ávoris. Ávoris runs two airlines: the Portuguese brand #Orbest, which anti-deportation campaigners report have also carried out charter deportations, and the Spanish company, #Evelop, founded in 2013.

    The Barceló Group is based in Palma, #Mallorca. It was founded by the Mallorca-based Barceló family in 1931 as #Autocares_Barceló, which specialised in the transportation of people and goods, and has been managed by the family for three generations. The Barceló Group has a stock of over 250 hotels in 22 countries and claims to employ over 33,000 people globally, though we don’t know if this figure has been affected by the coronavirus pandemic, which has caused massive job losses in the tourism industry.

    The Hotel division has four brands: #Royal_Hideaway_Luxury_Hotels & Resorts; #Barceló_Hotels & Resorts; #Occidental_Hotels & Resorts; and #Allegro_Hotels. The company owns, manages and rents hotels worldwide, mostly in Spain, Mexico and the US. It works in the United States through its subsidiary, Crestline Hotels & Resorts, which manages third-party hotels, including for big brands like Marriott and Hilton.

    Ávoris, the travel division, runs twelve tour brands, all platforms promoting package holidays.

    Their airlines are small, primarily focused on taking people to sun and sand-filled holidays. In total the Barceló Group airlines have a fleet of just nine aircraft, with one on order, according to the Planespotters website. However, three of these have been acquired in the past two years and a fourth is due to be delivered. Half are leased from Irish airplane lessor Avolon. Evelop serves only a few routes, mainly between the Caribbean and the Iberian peninsula, as well as the UK.

    Major changes are afoot as Ávoris is due to merge with #Halcón_Viajes_and_Travelplan, both subsidiaries of fellow Mallorcan travel giant #Globalia. The combined entity will become the largest group of travel agencies in Spain, employing around 6,000 people. The Barceló Group is due to have the majority stake in the new business.

    Barceló has also recently announced the merger of Evelop with its other airline Orbest, leading to a new airline called Iberojet (the name of a travel agency already operated by Ávoris).

    The new airline is starting to sell scheduled flights in addition to charter operations. Evelop had already announced a reduction in its charter service, at a time when its scheduled airline competitors, such as #Air_Europa, have had to be bailed out to avoid pandemic-induced bankruptcy. Its first scheduled flights will be mainly to destinations in Central and South America, notably Cuba and the Domican Republic, though they are also offering flights to Tunisia, the Maldives and Mauritius.

    Deportation dealers

    Evelop currently holds the contract to carry out the Spanish government’s mass deportation flights, through an agreement made with the Spanish Interior Ministry in December 2019. Another company, Air Nostrum, which operates the Iberia Regional franchise, transports detainees within Spain, notably to Madrid, from where they are deported by Evelop. The total value of the contract for the two airlines is €9.9m, and lasts 18 months.

    This is the latest in a long series of such contracts. Over the years, the beneficiaries have alternated between the Evelop- #Air_Nostrum partnership, and another partnership comprising Globalia’s #Air_Europa, and #Swiftair (with the former taking the equivalent role to that of Evelop). So far, the Evelop partnership has been awarded the job twice, while its Air Europa rival has won the bidding three times.

    However, the current deal will end in spring 2021, and a new tender for a contract of the same value has been launched. The two bidders are: Evelop-Air Nostrum; and Air Europa in partnership with #Aeronova, another Globalia subsidiary. A third operator, #Canary_Fly, has been excluded from the bidding for failing to produce all the required documentation. So yet again, the contract will be awarded to companies either owned by the Barceló Group or Globalia.

    On 10 November 2020, Evelop carried out the first charter deportations from Spain since the restrictions on travel brought about by the cCOVID-19 pandemic. On board were 22 migrants, mostly Senegalese, who had travelled by boat to the Canary Islands. Evelop and the Spanish government dumped them in Mauritania, under an agreement with the country to accept any migrants arriving on the shores of the Islands. According to El País newspaper, the number of actual Mauritanians deported to that country is a significant minority of all deportees. Anti-deportation campaigners state that since the easing up of travel restrictions, Evelop has also deported people to Georgia, Albania, Colombia and the Dominican Republic.

    Evelop is not only eager to cash in on deportations in Spain. Here in the UK, Evelop carried out at least two charter deportations last year: one to Ghana and Nigeria from Stansted on 30 January 2020; and one to Jamaica from Doncaster airport on 11 February in the same year. These deportations took place during a period of mobile network outages across Harmondsworth and Colnbrook detention centres, which interfered with detainees’ ability to access legal advice to challenge their expulsion, or speak to loved ones.

    According to campaigners, the company reportedly operates most of Austria and Germany’s deportations to Nigeria and Ghana, including a recent joint flight on 19 January. It also has operated deportations from Germany to Pakistan and Bangladesh.

    Evelop is not the only company profiting from Spain’s deportation machine. The Spanish government also regularly deports people on commercial flights operated by airlines such as Air Maroc, Air Senegal, and Iberia, as well as mass deportations by ferry to Morocco and Algeria through the companies #Transmediterránea, #Baleària and #Algérie_Ferries. #Ferry deportations are currently on hold due to the pandemic, but Air Maroc reportedly still carry out regular deportations on commercial flights to Moroccan-occupied Western Sahara.

    Where’s the money?

    The financial outlook for the Barceló Group as a whole at the end of 2019 seemed strong, having made a net profit of €135 million.

    Before the pandemic, the company president said that he had planned to prioritise its hotels division over its tour operator segment, which includes its airlines. Fast forward a couple of years and its hotels are struggling to attract custom, while one of its airlines has secured a multimillion-euro deportation contract.

    Unsurprisingly, the coronavirus pandemic has had a huge impact on the Barceló Group’s operations. The company had to close nearly all of its hotels in Europe, the Middle East and Africa during the first wave of the pandemic, with revenue down 99%. In the Caribbean, the hotel group saw a 95% drop in revenue in May, April and June. They fared slightly better in the US, which saw far fewer COVID-19 restrictions, yet revenue there still declined 89%. By early October, between 20-60% of their hotels in Europe, the Middle East and the Caribbean had reopened across the regions, but with occupancy at only 20-60%.

    The company has been negotiating payments with hotels and aircraft lessors in light of reduced demand. It claims that it has not however had to cut jobs, since the Spanish government’s COVID-19 temporary redundancy plans enable some workers to be furloughed and prevent employers from firing them in that time.

    Despite these difficulties, the company may be saved, like other tourism multinationals, by a big bailout from the state. Barceló’s Ávoris division is set to share a €320 million bailout from the Spanish government as part of the merger with Globalia’s subsidiaries. Is not known if the Barceló Group’s hotel lines will benefit from state funds.

    Key people

    The eight members of the executive board are unsurprisingly, male, pale and frail; as are all ten members of the Ávoris management team.

    The company is co-chaired by cousins with confusingly similar names: #Simón_Barceló_Tous and #Simón_Pedro_Barceló_Vadell. We’ll call them #Barceló_Tous and #Pedro_Barceló from here. The family are from Felanitx, Mallorca.

    Barceló Tous is the much more low-key of the two, and there is little public information about him. Largely based in the Dominican Republic, he takes care of the Central & Latin American segment of the business.

    His cousin, Pedro Barceló, runs the European and North American division. Son of Group co-founder #Gabriel_Barceló_Oliver, Pedro Barceló is a law graduate who has been described as ‘reserved’ and ‘elusive’. He is the company’s executive president. Yet despite his apparent shyness, he was once the youngest senator in Spanish history, entering the upper house at age 23 as a representative for the conservative party with links to the Francoist past, #Partido_Popular. For a period he was also a member of the board of directors of Globalia, Aena and #First_Choice_Holidays.

    The CEO of Evelop is #Antonio_Mota_Sandoval, formerly the company’s technical and maintenance director. He’s very found of #drones and is CEO and founder of a company called #Aerosolutions. The latter describes itself as ‘Engineering, Consulting and Training Services for conventional and unmanned aviation.’ Mota appears to live in Alcalá de Henares, a town just outside Madrid. He is on Twitter and Facebook.

    The Barceló Foundation

    As is so often the case with large businesses engaging in unethical practises, the family set up a charitable arm, the #Barceló_Foundation. It manages a pot of €32 million, of which it spent €2m in 2019 on a broad range of charitable activities in Africa, South America and Mallorca. Headed by Antonio Monjo Tomás, it’s run from a prestigious building in Palma known as #Casa_del_Marqués_de_Reguer-Rullán, owned by the Barceló family. The foundation also runs the #Felanitx_Art & Culture Center, reportedly based at the Barceló’s family home. The foundation partners with many Catholic missions and sponsors the #Capella_Mallorquina, a local choir. The foundation is on Twitter and Facebook.

    The Barceló Group’s vulnerabilities

    Like other tourism businesses, the group is struggling with the industry-wide downturn due to COVID-19 travel measures. In this context, government contracts provide a rare reliable source of steady income — and the Barcelós will be loathe to give up deportation work. In Spain, perhaps even more than elsewhere, the tourism industry and its leading dynasties has very close ties with government and politicians. Airlines are getting heavy bailouts from the Spanish state, and their bosses will want to keep up good relations.

    But the deportation business could become less attractive for the group if campaigners keep up the pressure — particularly outside Spain, where reputational damage may outweigh the profits from occasional flights. Having carried out a charter deportation to Jamaica from the UK earlier in the year, the company became a target of a social media campaign in December 2020 ahead of the Jamaica 50 flight, after which they reportedly said that they were not involved. A lesser-known Spanish airline, Privilege Style, did the job instead.

    https://corporatewatch.org/evelop-barcelo-group-deportation-planes-from-spain
    #Espagne #business #compagnies_aériennes #complexe_militaro-industriel #renvois #expulsions #migrations #réfugiés #asile #tourisme #charter #Maurtianie #îles_Canaries #Canaries #Géorgie #Albanie #Colombie #République_dominicaine #Ghana #Nigeria #Allemagne #Standsted #UK #Angleterre #Pakistan #Bangladesh #Air_Maroc #Air_Senegal #Iberia #Maroc #Algérie #ferrys #Sahara_occidental #covid-19 #pandémie #coronavirus #hôtels #fondation #philanthrocapitalisme

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Interior reactiva las expulsiones desde Canarias y deporta a 22 migrantes a Mauritania

    El Ministerio del Interior ha reactivado este miércoles las deportaciones de migrantes desde Canarias y ha expulsado a 22 las personas que estaban en el Centro de Internamiento de Extranjeros (CIE) de Barranco Seco hacia Mauritania. De ellas, 18 son de Senegal, dos de Gambia, uno de Guinea-Bissau y uno de Mauritania. En este momento, el CIE de Gran Canaria está vacío, y podrá albergar hasta a 42 personas a partir de hoy, ya que el juez de control, Arcadio Díaz-Tejera, en un auto estableció que este era el aforo máximo para evitar el hacinamiento y los posibles contagios en cadena, como sucedió en marzo. Entonces, el magistrado tuvo que ordenar el desalojo y el cierre, ya que trabajadores del centro contagiaron a los internos. Además, el cierre de fronteras decretado para frenar la expansión de la COVID-19 tampoco permitía las expulsiones. La reapertura se ordenó en septiembre, tras la visita del ministro Fernando Grande-Marlaska a Nouakchott.

    El ministro viajó en compañía de la comisaria europea Ylva Johansson para abordar la crisis migratoria que atraviesa el Archipiélago en la actualidad. Uno de los resultados de este encuentro fue la recuperación de las deportaciones hacia Mauritania, aprovechando el acuerdo bilateral que ambos países mantienen. Este documento recoge la expulsión a este país africano tanto de nacionales de este país como de países terceros que en su trayecto migratorio hayan partido del territorio mauritano.

    Aprovechando este epígrafe del convenio, España expulsó a finales de 2019 y comienzos de 2020 incluso a malienses. Algunos de ellos habían solicitado protección internacional ante el conflicto armado que atraviesa su país. Según Acnur, ninguna persona procedente de las regiones afectadas por esta guerra debería ser devuelta de manera forzosa, puesto que el resto del país no debe ser considerado como una alternativa adecuada al asilo hasta el momento en que la situación de seguridad, el estado de derecho y los derechos humanos hayan mejorado significativamente. Así, Acnur insta a los Estados a proporcionar acceso al territorio y a los procedimientos de asilo a las personas que huyen del conflicto en Malí.

    Grande-Marlaska y Johansson también visitaron este fin de semana Canarias, incluido el saturado muelle de Arguineguín que alberga hasta el momento a más de 2.000 personas. El viaje fue criticado por Podemos Canarias, que lo tildó de «hipócrita y decepcionante» por haberse limitado a «poco más que a hacerse una foto y unas declaraciones que son las mismas que se repiten desde hace meses».

    El ministro evidenció en su visita que su apuesta para controlar los flujos migratorios era reforzar la vigilancia y cooperar con los países de origen, poniendo el foco en la lucha contra las mafias de tráfico de personas. Marlaska aseguró que España reforzó tanto a sus Fuerzas y Cuerpos de Seguridad del Estado como a las autoridades de Mauritania. «Un avión de la Guardia Civil ha sido enviado a Nouakchott para realizar labores de prevención y facilitar los rescates en origen y así evitar más muertes»

    Como parte de la estrategia de su departamento, ha solicitado apoyo al Frontex, que ha enviado a siete agentes a Gran Canaria para identificar migrantes y «controlar la inmigración irregular». Con este fin, el ministro ha visitado Argelia, Túnez y Mauritania, y se desplazará a Marruecos el próximo 20 de noviembre. Esta estrategia ya fue empleada en 2006 con fines disuasorios hacia las personas que pretendían partir en cayucos o pateras hacia Canarias. El operativo HERA consistió en el despliegue de personal especializado en la zona, medios marítimos y aéreos que patrullaban el litoral africano, además de sistemas de satélite para controlar el Atlántico. Este equipo no lo aportó Frontex, sino los países miembros de la UE y la agencia reembolsa los costes del despliegue, tantos de los guardias de fronteras como del transporte, combustible y mantenimiento del equipo. La Agencia europea invirtió 3,2 millones de euros de los cuatro que costó la operación en el Atlántico.

    El objetivo se cumplió, ya que de las 31.678 personas que sobrevivieron a la ruta migratoria canaria ese año, se pasó a 12.478 en 2007, 9.181 en 2008, 2.246 en 2009 y a 196 en 2010.

    https://www.eldiario.es/canariasahora/migraciones/interior-reactiva-expulsiones-canarias-deporta-22-migrantes-mauritania_1_63

    –-> 22 personnes expulsées des Canaries vers la Mauritanie. Une personne mauritanienne parmi elles, les autres viennent du Sénégal, de Gambie et de Guinée Bissau. Selon l’article, la reprise des expulsions a été décidée en septembre après la visite du ministre de l’intérieur.

    –—

    A mettre en lien avec la « réactivation des routes migratoires à travers la #Méditerranée_occidentale » :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/885310

    #Canaries #îles_Canaries #Mauritanie #expulsions #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Espagne #evelop #externalisation

    ping @_kg_ @rhoumour @isskein @karine4

    • Marruecos aumenta las deportaciones de migrantes desde el Sáhara Occidental, punto de partida clave hacia Canarias

      Hablamos con varios de los migrantes deportados por Marruecos en los últimos meses tras un pausa durante el confinamiento.

      Aminata Camara, de 25 años, es una de las 86 personas migrantes guineanas expulsadas por Marruecos el pasado 28 de septiembre desde la ciudad de Dajla. El reino marroquí retomó entonces las deportaciones de migrantes desde el Sáhara Occidental, punto de partida clave de pateras hacia Canarias. «Nos llevaron al aeropuerto, no nos tomaron las huellas, no nos pidieron nada ni los datos. Nos dieron los billetes del vuelo, sin equipaje», contaba la mujer guineana a elDiario.es mientras acababa de embarcar en el avión.

      De fondo se escuchaba el revuelo, los gritos de un grupo de mujeres, mientras ella se atropellaba al denunciar nerviosa que los militares la habían metido en un avión en Dhkala junto a otros 80 compatriotas (28 mujeres), y que los expulsaban a su país. «Los militares que nos acompañaron en el viaje nos abandonaron en el avión. Un bus nos llevó a la parte nacional del aeropuerto de Conakri y nos dejaron allí sin más, a pesar del coronavirus. Tuvimos que coger taxis para llegar a nuestras casas», denunciaba ya en su país.

      Desde entonces, han salido al menos tres aviones más con personas migrantes desde Dajla a Guinea Conakry, Senegal y Mali. El último vuelo de deportación se organizó el pasado 11 de noviembre, con alrededor de un centenar de personas que la Marina Real marroquí había interceptado en la costa atlántica intentando salir hacia las Islas Canarias. Los metieron en dos autocares en la ciudad saharaui para enviarlos en avión a Dakar. Allí, fuentes del aeropuerto, corroboran a este medio que el miércoles llegó un grupo de senegaleses.

      En el momento en que se ejecutaba la expulsión de los ciudadanos malienses el pasado 2 de octubre, elDiario.es contactó telefónicamente con Traore, el presidente de la comunidad maliense en Marruecos. «Hemos sido detenidos ilegalmente, nos cogieron en las casas y nos encerraron tres semanas en un centro de detención en El Aaiún. Hoy nos llevan al aeropuerto de Dajla para deportarnos a Mali. Somos algo más de 80 personas. Y las autoridades malienses han firmado una deportación voluntaria, mientras que nos están forzado a dejar el país sin ningún papel».

      Desde Dajla, François, que se salvó de la expulsión, asegura a este medio: «A los subsaharianos nos cogen diciendo que tenemos el coronavirus para meternos en cuarentena. Los test de PCR en los trabajos son obligatorias para los subsaharianos. Y a 115 senegaleses, 95 guineanos y 80 malienses los deportaron a sus países».

      Entre los expulsados había migrantes que residían desde hace tiempo en El Aaiún y Dajla, ciudades saharauis desde donde se registran la mayoría de las salidas en embarcaciones a Canarias, la ruta migratoria más transitada actualmente en España. Hasta el 15 de noviembre, llegaron 16.760 personas en 553 embarcaciones, según los datos del Ministerio del Interior. En plena crisis migratoria en las islas, Marlaska viaja este viernes a Marruecos con el objetivo de reforzar la cooperación en materia fronteriza y evitar la salida de pateras hacia las islas.

      Por su parte, una fuente oficial de migración desde Rabat confirma a elDiario.es los cuatro aviones de expulsión, pero con 120 personas de Mali, entre los que se encontraban cinco guineanos; 28 mujeres deportadas a Guinea Conakry y 144 senegaleses rescatados en el mar. A los que hay añadir los últimos 100 enviados a Senegal la semana pasada. «Algunos son migrantes expulsados inicialmente de Tánger, Nador, Rabat, Casablanca y Alhucemas hacia la frontera de Marruecos con Argelia en Tiouli, región de Jerada, a unos 60 kilómetros de Oujda», precisa la misma fuente. Las devoluciones se hicieron con tres de los cuatro países –el otro es Costa de Marfil– con los que Marruecos estableció un acuerdo para acceder al país sin visado.
      «Había un bebé de tres meses con nosotros»

      Aminara pasó tres semanas encerrada junto al resto de personas de origen subsahariano antes de ser expulsadas desde el Sáhara Occidental. «Había un bebé de tres meses con nosotros, otro de dos meses con su madre, dos niños de 5 y 8, una niña de 9 años», recuerda ya desde una localidad cercana a Boffa, en la región de Boké (Guinea Conakry).

      «La Gendarmería vino a la casa por la noche. Estábamos dormidos. Llamaron a la puerta y nos pidieron que abriésemos, cuando lo hicimos, nos hicieron salir y montar en los vehículos, nos llevaron a prisión y nos encerraron tres semanas.
      »¿Qué hemos hecho?", preguntaron. «Nada, tenéis que salir» respondieron los militares.

      Después la encerraron tres semanas en un centro de detención improvisado. «Nos maltrataron, nos trataban como esclavos. Pegaron a una amiga allí, y le rompieron el pie. Cuando alguien caía enfermo, lo abandonaban fuera, y nadie te miraba, ni siquiera te llevaban al hospital. Solo comíamos pan y sardinas, ni agua nos daban. Enfermó mucha gente, yo misma me puse mala. Fue un calvario», enumera apresuradamente por teléfono.

      Durante el encierro les hicieron dos veces los test PCR para detectar el coronavirus. Y después de que las autoridades firmasen junto a los representantes de los consulados su expulsión, los metieron en aviones a sus países de origen. «Nos maltrataron, nos encerraron, nos pegaron, nos hicieron todo lo malo, lo prometo», dice en un susurro.
      «Han violado nuestros derechos y queremos verdaderamente justicia»

      Precisamente, la Asociación Marroquí de Derechos Humanos (AMDH) de Nador ha denunciado detenciones forzosas desde que comenzó el confinamiento en el mes de marzo. «Estas condiciones inhumanas de confinamiento son una práctica voluntaria de las autoridades marroquíes para instar a los migrantes secuestrados a que revelen sus datos personales para posteriormente identificarlos y deportarlos contra su voluntad», mantiene la AMDH.

      Finalmente, Amina está en Guinea: «No es fácil. No tengo apoyo ni nadie que me pueda ayudar. Cuando llegamos, contactamos con Naciones Unidas. Nos dijeron que nos iban ayudar, pero después no nos han llamado, también nos ha abandonado. Nadie nos ha escuchado».

      Esta joven viajó a Marruecos para mejorar el nivel de vida. En su país, creció en la calle después de perder a sus padres. Habló con un amigo magrebí y emprendió la ruta de Argelia, pasando por Mali y entrando finalmente a Marruecos. El objetivo era trabajar, «jamás osé a cruzar a España. Lo encuentro muy peligroso. Cada día muere gente en el agua. Nunca intenté eso», confiesa.

      «Los dos años en Marruecos no había nada que hacer. Tampoco fue fácil», rememora desde Guinea. Compartía una habitación con ocho personas y trabajaba en una empresa de pescado en Dkhala, pero «los militares me pegaron y perdí mi bebé. Tuve un aborto». Tras esta desgracia, se trasladó a una residencia particular en El Aaiún «donde trabajaba día y noche por 150 euros al mes, que me llegaba para pagar el alojamiento y la comida».
      AMDH denuncia las «deportaciones forzosas» que el gobierno disfraza de «voluntarias»

      El gobierno disfraza estos vuelos con datos de «retorno voluntario» porque los están gestionando al margen de los organismos internacionales. La AMDH de Nador denunció en las redes sociales: «La deportación forzosa de migrantes subsaharianos por las autoridades marroquíes continúa desde Dajla».

      «Desalojos inhumanos que no podían hacerse sin la complicidad de las embajadas en Rabat y sin el dinero de la Unión Europea (UE)», apunta la AMDH. Incide además en sus publicaciones en Facebook en que «son expulsados con la complicidad de su embajada y con el dinero de la UE y la Organización Internacional de Migraciones (OIM)».
      «Retornos a la fuerza, y no voluntarios»

      Desde el organismo confirman que se trataba de «retornos a la fuerza, y no voluntarios». Las ONG denuncian «corrupción» porque los cónsules firmaron un retorno voluntario con Marruecos basándose en acuerdos entre los países que además se han instalado recientemente en el Sáhara Occidental, como es el caso de Guinea Conakry, Senegal y Mali.

      Moussa Coulibaly (31 años) habla con elDiario.es desde Mali. Llevaba cuatros años y medio en Marruecos, pero el 2 de octubre por la tarde fue deportado, junto a otras 83 personas malienses. «Fue el consulado el que firmó que nos trajeran al país. Nuestros gobiernos son malos. Realmente sufrimos. Las autoridades han deportado a la mayoría», delata.

      Marruecos ha retomado las deportaciones tras el confinamiento. «Desde principios de julio hasta septiembre de 2020, alrededor de 157 personas han sido expulsadas de Marruecos entre las que había 9 mujeres, 11 menores y 7 personas heridas», detallaban desde Rabat a principios de octubre.

      La AMDH ya denunció en su informe de 2019, que cerca de 600 migrantes habían sido expulsados en autocares desde un centro de internamiento de Nador al aeropuerto de Casablanca en 35 operaciones de deportación durante el año. Entonces ya desveló que los seis países que cooperan con Marruecos para deportar a sus nacionales son Camerún, Costa de Marfil, Guinea, Senegal, Mali y Burkina Faso.

      Precisamente la Organización Democrática del Trabajo (ODT) acusa al gobierno magrebí de descuidar a las personas migrantes desde que apareció la Covid–19. Denuncia en un comunicado que «el sufrimiento de los migrantes africanos en Marruecos solo se ha intensificado y exacerbado durante el período de la pandemia».

      https://www.eldiario.es/desalambre/marruecos-aumenta-deportaciones-migrantes-subsaharianos-dajla-principales-p

      #Sahara_occidental #Maroc #Dajla #Dhkala #Sénégal #Mali #Guinée-Conakry #Guinée