#evros

  • Chrysochoidis meets Austrian interior minister

    Citizens’ Protection Minister #Michalis_Chrysochoidis on Tuesday thanked Austria for helping Greece secure its border with Turkey which tens of thousands of migrants and refugees tried for days to breach in March.

    Chrysochoidis was speaking during a meeting with Austrian Interior Minister #Karl_Nehammer in Athens for talks on security, migration and the novel coronavirus.

    “In #Evros in March, we, you and other Europeans moved Europe forward. We fought for a common cause: our borders,” Chrysochoidis said.

    “There was no hesitation about supporting Greece,” Nehammer said about the decision to send dozens of police officers to the border.

    “At this difficult time, European solidarity depends on actions, not just words,” he said.

    “We had to send a clear message to Turkey that no one will be left alone,” he said.

    https://www.ekathimerini.com/256205/article/ekathimerini/news/chrysochoidis-meets-austrian-interior-minister
    #Autriche #Grèce #frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #externalisation #Turquie #police #solidarité_européenne (sic)

    –---

    Ajouté au fil de discussion sur l’extension du mur dans l’Evros, car l’envoi de policiers participe aussi à la militarisation de la frontière :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/830355

  • Taking Hard Line, Greece Turns Back Migrants by Abandoning Them at Sea

    Many Greeks have grown frustrated as tens of thousands of asylum seekers languished on Greek islands. Now, evidence shows, a new conservative government has a new method of keeping them out.

    The Greek government has secretly expelled more than 1,000 refugees from Europe’s borders in recent months, sailing many of them to the edge of Greek territorial waters and then abandoning them in inflatable and sometimes overburdened life rafts.

    Since March, at least 1,072 asylum seekers have been dropped at sea by Greek officials in at least 31 separate expulsions, according to an analysis of evidence by The New York Times from three independent watchdogs, two academic researchers and the Turkish Coast Guard. The Times interviewed survivors from five of those episodes and reviewed photographic or video evidence from all 31.

    “It was very inhumane,” said Najma al-Khatib, a 50-year-old Syrian teacher, who says masked Greek officials took her and 22 others, including two babies, under cover of darkness from a detention center on the island of Rhodes on July 26 and abandoned them in a rudderless, motorless life raft before they were rescued by the Turkish Coast Guard.

    “I left Syria for fear of bombing — but when this happened, I wished I’d died under a bomb,” she told The Times.

    Illegal under international law, the expulsions are the most direct and sustained attempt by a European country to block maritime migration using its own forces since the height of the migration crisis in 2015, when Greece was the main thoroughfare for migrants and refugees seeking to enter Europe.

    The Greek government denied any illegality.

    “Greek authorities do not engage in clandestine activities,’’ said a government spokesman, Stelios Petsas. “Greece has a proven track record when it comes to observing international law, conventions and protocols. This includes the treatment of refugees and migrants.”

    Since 2015, European countries like Greece and Italy have mainly relied on proxies, like the Turkish and Libyan governments, to head off maritime migration. What is different now is that the Greek government is increasingly taking matters into its own hands, watchdog groups and researchers say.

    ​For example, migrants have been forced onto sometimes leaky life rafts and left to drift at the border between Turkish and Greek waters, while others have been left to drift in their own boats after Greek officials disabled their engines.

    “These pushbacks are totally illegal in all their aspects, in international law and in European law,” said Prof. François Crépeau, an expert on international law and a former United Nations special rapporteur on the human rights of migrants.

    “It is a human rights and humanitarian disaster,” Professor Crépeau added.

    Greeks were once far more understanding of the plight of migrants. But many have grown frustrated and hostile after a half-decade in which other European countries offered Greece only modest assistance as tens of thousands of asylum seekers languished in squalid camps on overburdened Greek islands.

    Since the election last year of a new conservative government under Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis, Greece has taken a far harder line against the migrants — often refugees from the war in Syria — who push off Turkish shores for Europe.

    The harsher approach comes as tensions have mounted with Turkey, itself burdened with 3.6 million refugees from the Syrian war, far more than any other nation.

    Greece believes that Turkey has tried to weaponize the migrants to increase pressure on Europe for aid and assistance in the Syrian War. But it has also added pressure on Greece at a time when the two nations and others spar over contested gas fields in the eastern Mediterranean.

    For several days in late February and early March, the Turkish authorities openly bused thousands of migrants to the Greek land border in a bid to set off a confrontation, leading to the shooting of at least one Syrian refugee and the immediate extrajudicial expulsions of hundreds of migrants who made it to Greek territory.

    For years, Greek officials have been accused of intercepting and expelling migrants, on a sporadic and infrequent basis, usually before the migrants manage to land their boats on Greek soil.

    But experts say Greece’s behavior during the pandemic has been far more systematic and coordinated. Hundreds of migrants have been denied the right to seek asylum even after they have landed on Greek soil, and they’ve been forbidden to appeal their expulsion through the legal system.

    “They’ve seized the moment,” Professor Crépeau said of the Greeks. “The coronavirus has provided a window of opportunity to close national borders to whoever they’ve wanted.”

    Emboldened by the lack of sustained criticism from the European Union, where the migration issue has roiled politics, Greece has hardened its approach in the eastern Mediterranean in recent months.

    Migrants landing on the Greek islands from Turkey have frequently been forced onto sometimes leaky, inflatable life rafts, dropped at the boundary between Turkish and Greek waters, and left to drift until being spotted and rescued by the Turkish Coast Guard.

    “This practice is totally unprecedented in Greece,” said Niamh Keady-Tabbal, a doctoral researcher at the Irish Center for Human Rights, and one of the first to document the phenomenon.

    “Greek authorities are now weaponizing rescue equipment to illegally expel asylum seekers in a new, violent and highly visible pattern of pushbacks spanning several Aegean Islands,” Ms. Keady-Tabbal said.

    Ms. al-Khatib, who recounted her ordeal for The Times, said she entered Turkey last November with her two sons, 14 and 12, fleeing the advance of the Syrian Army. Her husband, who had entered several weeks earlier, soon died of cancer, Ms. al-Khatib said.

    With few prospects in Turkey, the family tried to reach Greece by boat three times this summer, failing once in May because their smuggler did not show up, and a second time in June after being intercepted in Greek waters and towed back to the Turkish sea border, she said.

    On their third attempt, on July 23 at around 7 a.m., they landed on the Greek island of Rhodes, Ms. al-Khatib said, an account corroborated by four other passengers interviewed by The Times. They were detained by Greek police officers and taken to a small makeshift detention facility after handing over their identification documents.

    Using footage filmed at this site by two passengers, a Times reporter was able to identify the facility’s location beside the island’s main ferry port and visit the camp.

    A Coast Guard officer and an official at the island’s mayoralty both said the site falls under the jurisdiction of the Port Police, an arm of the Hellenic Coast Guard.

    A Palestinian refugee, living in a disused slaughterhouse beside the camp, confirmed that Ms. al-Khatib had been there, recounting how he had spoken to her through the camp’s fence and bought her tablets to treat her hypertension, which Greek officials had refused to supply her.

    On the evening of July 26, Ms. al-Khatib and the other detainees said that police officers had loaded them onto a bus, telling them they were being taken to a camp on another island, and then to Athens.

    Instead, masked Greek officials transferred them to two vessels that ferried them out to sea before dropping them on rafts at the Turkish maritime border, she and other survivors said.

    Amid choppy waves, the group, which included two babies, was forced to drain the raft using their hands as water slopped over the side, they said.

    The group was rescued at 4:30 a.m. by the Turkish Coast Guard, according to a report by the Coast Guard that included a photograph of Ms. al-Khatib as she left the life raft.

    Ms. al-Khatib tried to reach Greece for a fourth time, on Aug. 6, but said her boat was stopped off the island of Lesbos by Greek officials, who removed its fuel and towed it back to Turkish waters.

    Some groups of migrants have been transferred to the life rafts even before landing on Greek soil.

    On May 13, Amjad Naim, a 24-year-old Palestinian law student, was among a group of 30 migrants intercepted by Greek officials as they approached the shores of Samos, a Greek island close to Turkey.

    The migrants were quickly transferred to two small life rafts that began to deflate under the weight of so many people, Mr. Naim said. Transferred to two other rafts, they were then towed back toward Turkey.

    Videos captured by Mr. Naim on his phone show the two rafts being tugged across the sea by a large white vessel. Footage subsequently published by the Turkish Coast Guard shows the same two rafts being rescued by Turkish officials later in the day.

    Migrants have also been left to drift in the boats they arrived on, after Greek officials disabled their engines, survivors and researchers say. And on at least two occasions, migrants have been abandoned on Ciplak, an uninhabited island within Turkish waters, instead of being placed on life rafts.

    “Eventually the Turkish Coast Guard came to fetch us,” said one Palestinian survivor who was among a group abandoned on Ciplak in early July, and who sent videos of their time on the island. A report from the Turkish Coast Guard corroborated his account.

    In parallel, several rights organizations, including Human Rights Watch, have documented how the Greek authorities have rounded up migrants living legally in Greece and secretly expelled them without legal recourse across the Evros River, which divides mainland Greece from Turkey.

    Feras Fattouh, a 30-year-old Syrian X-ray technician, said he was arrested by the Greek police on July 24 in Igoumenitsa, a port in western Greece. Mr. Fattouh had been living legally in Greece since November 2019 with his wife and son, and showed The Times documents to prove it.

    But after being detained by the police in Igoumenitsa, Mr. Fattouh said, he was robbed and driven about 400 miles east to the Turkish border, before being secretly put on a dinghy with 18 others and sent across the river to Turkey. His wife and son remain in Greece.

    “Syrians are suffering in Turkey,” Mr. Fattouh said. “We’re suffering in Greece. Where are we supposed to go?”

    Ylva Johansson, who oversees migration policy at the European Commission, the civil service for the European Union, said she was concerned by the accusations but had no power to investigate them.

    “We cannot protect our European border by violating European values and by breaching people’s rights,” Ms. Johansson said in an email. “Border control can and must go hand in hand with respect for fundamental rights.”

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/08/14/world/europe/greece-migrants-abandoning-sea.html?searchResultPosition=1

    #Grèce #refoulement #refoulements #expulsions #Evros #îles #Turquie #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #push-back

    –—

    sur les refoulements dans la région de l’Evros (à partir de 2018), voir aussi :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/710720

    • Message de l’Aegean Boat Report, 12.08.2020 :

      57 people that arrived on two boats on Lesvos north yesterday seems to have disappeared, port police on Lesvos claims there was no arrivals.
      First boat arrived on a Korakas, Lesvos north during the night, locals in the area claims to have heard gunshots coming from Korakas. The boat was carrying 24 people, 7 was picked up by police on arrival location, the rest, 17 people managed to flee to the woods in the dark. Later in the day, the rest was found by port police, transported from the area in a minivan. Question is, where did port police take them? They are not registered as arrived anywhere, neither the quarantine camp in the north or south has any new arrivals registered.
      Second boat landed in Gavathas, Lesvos north west before first light, carrying 33 people. Locals in the area reported on the new arrivals, also these people were taken away by port police, nobody has seen them since, they are not registered anywhere on Lesvos.
      Port police on Lesvos claims that there has been no new arrivals at all yesterday in the north, and that anyone saying otherwise is pushing “fake news”. There are no reports in any local newspaper on arrivals from Lesvos north yesterday, only one boat carrying 55 people that landed in Skala Mistegnon last night.
      Aegean Boat Report has received documentation that proves that these people actually arrived, there is no question about it! Videos, pictures and location data proves that they where there, question is where did port police take them, and why are they not registered anywhere?
      Yesterday before sundown Turkish coast guard picked up 57 people from two life rafts drifting outside Bademli, Turkey. From pictures posted by TCG, Aegean Boat Report has identified 4 people that also are in pictures and videos that ABR received from Korakas yesterday morning, the identification is 100%.
      There is no doubt that the people from the two boats that landed on Lesvos north yesterday was illegal deported by the Greek Coast Guard. They where taken from safety on land on Lesvos, and put back in the sea in life rafts, helplessly drifting, what kind of people would put children adrift at sea, how can they sleep at night.. This is not human behavior, not even animals would be this cruel!
      Many of Aegean Boat Report’s followers have in the past asked “what can we do?”, “how can we stop this?”, and the usual reply was, you can spread the news, share the info. It’s obviously not enough, now the gloves are off, it’s time to take action in a more direct way!
      Aegean Boat Report call’s upon all followers to participate, to make your voice heard, together this voice can make a difference! Pick up your phone and call the port authority of Mytilíni, Lesvos, and demand answers! They will deny any involvement in illegal activities, but we know they are lying!
      Port police Mytilini: +30 2251 040827
      (Number is open 24/7)
      We need them to understand that we don’t tolerate this any longer, and that there are many people all over the world that are watching what they are doing. One call will not change anything, but if 100 people call, 1000 people, perhaps they will start to understand that we do not tolerate this any longer!
      To call any public authority number is a common right, without any conditions or clauses, it’s fully legal activity that can be taken by anyone without any legal consequences. ABR has consulted Greek lawyers on the matter, and it’s totally legal. But ABR ask you to stay clear of all Emergancy channel’s, don’t flood European Emergancy numbers, only use numbers provided her!
      Aegean Boat Report will from now on, in every case regarding pushbacks and other illegal activities, publish the Port Police number of the area the incident has taken place, so that people can call to demand answers. The more people that calls these numbers, asking questions, the better. At some point they will understand that we will not stop before they do!
      These violations of international laws and human rights has been going on for to long, blessed and financed by Europe. The presence of NATO and FRONTEX is massive in the Aegean Sea, they all know what is going on every single day, but they do nothing, they just watch.
      It’s time we make them listen, it’s time to step up and demand answers, it’s time for YOU to take action!!
      Call port police of Mytilíni, tell them how you feel, make your voice heard!
      Port police Mytilini: +30 2251 040827
      Please share this post as much as possible!

      https://www.facebook.com/AegeanBoatReport/posts/895342667655505

      #Frontex #OTAN #NATO

  • OP-ed : La guerre faite aux migrants à la frontière grecque de l’Europe par #Vicky_Skoumbi

    La #honte de l’Europe : les #hotspots aux îles grecques
    Devant les Centres de Réception et d’Identification des îles grecques, devant cette ‘ignominie à ciel ouvert’ que sont les camps de Moria à Lesbos et de Vathy à Samos, nous sommes à court de mots ; en effet il est presque impossible de trouver des mots suffisamment forts pour dire l’horreur de l’enfermement dans les hot-spots d’hommes, femmes et enfants dans des conditions abjectes. Les hot-spots sont les Centres de Réception et d’Identification (CIR en français, RIC en anglais) qui ont été créés en 2015 à la demande de l’UE en Italie et en Grèce et plus particulièrement dans les îles grecques de Lesbos, Samos, Chios, Leros et Kos, afin d’identifier et enregistrer les personnes arrivantes. L’approche ‘hot-spots’ introduite par l’UE en mai 2015 était destinée à ‘faciliter’ l’enregistrement des arrivants en vue d’une relocalisation de ceux-ci vers d’autres pays européens que ceux de première entrée en Europe. Force est de constater que, pendant ces cinq années de fonctionnement, ils n’ont servi que le but contraire de celui initialement affiché, à savoir le confinement de personnes par la restriction géographique voire par la détention sur place.

    Actuellement, dans ces camps, des personnes vulnérables, fuyant la guerre et les persécutions, fragilisées par des voyages longs et éprouvants, parmi lesquels se trouvent des victimes de torture ou de naufrage, sont obligées de vivre dans une promiscuité effroyable et dans des conditions inhumaines. En fait, trois quart jusqu’à quatre cinquième des personnes confinées dans les îles grecques appartiennent à des catégories reconnues comme vulnérables, même aux yeux de critères stricts de vulnérabilité établis par l’UE et la législation grecque[1], tandis qu’un tiers des résidents des camps de Moria et de Vathy sont des enfants, qui n’ont aucun accès à un circuit scolaire. Les habitants de ces zones de non-droit que sont les hot-spots, passent leurs journées à attendre dans des files interminables : attendre pour la distribution d’une nourriture souvent avariée, pour aller aux toilettes, pour se laver, pour voir un médecin. Ils sont pris dans un suspens du temps, sans aucune perspective d’avenir de sorte que plusieurs d’entre eux finissent par perdre leurs repères au détriment de leur équilibre mental et de leur santé.

    Déjà avant l’épidémie de Covid 19, plusieurs organismes internationaux comme le UNHCR[2] avaient dénoncé les conditions indignes dans lesquelles étaient obligées de vivre les demandeurs d’asile dans les hot-spots, tandis que des ONG comme MSF[3] et Amnesty International[4] avaient à plusieurs reprises alerté sur le risque que représentent les conditions sanitaires si dégradées, en y pointant une situation propice au déclenchement des épidémies. De son côté, Jean Ziegler, dans son livre réquisitoire sorti en début 2020, désignait le camp de #Moria, le hot-spot de Lesbos, comme la ‘honte de l’Europe’[5].

    Début mars 2020, 43.000 personnes étaient bloquées dans les îles dont 20.000 à Moria et 7.700 à Samos pour une capacité d’accueil de 2.700 et 650 respectivement[6]. Avec les risques particulièrement accrus de contamination, à cause de l’impossibilité de respecter la distanciation sociale et les mesures d’hygiène, on aurait pu s’attendre à ce que des mesures urgentes de décongestion de ces camps soient prises, avec des transferts massifs vers la Grèce continentale et l’installation dans des logements touristiques vides. A vrai dire c’était l’évacuation complète de camps si insalubres qui s’imposait, mais étant donné la difficulté de trouver dans l’immédiat des alternatives d’hébergement pour 43.000 personnes, le transfert au moins des plus vulnérables à des structures plus petites offrant la possibilité d’isolement- comme les hôtels et autres logements touristiques vides dans le continent- aurait été une mesure minimale de protection. Au lieu de cela, le gouvernement Mitsotakis a décidé d’enfermer les résidents des camps dans les îles dans des conditions inhumaines, sans qu’aucune mesure d’amélioration des conditions sanitaires ne soit prévue[7].

    Car, les mesures prises le 17 mars par le gouvernement pour empêcher la propagation du virus dans les camps, consistaient uniquement en une restriction des déplacements au strict minimum nécessaire et même en deça de celui-ci : une seule personne par famille aura désormais le droit de sortir du camp pour faire des courses entre 7 heures et 19 heures, avec une autorisation fournie par la police, le nombre total de personnes ayant droit de sortir par heure restant limité. Parallèlement l’entrée des visiteurs a été interdite et celle des travailleurs humanitaires strictement limitée à ceux assurant des services vitaux. Une mesure supplémentaire qui a largement contribué à la détérioration de la situation des réfugiés dans les camps, a été la décision du ministère d’arrêter de créditer de fonds leur cartes prépayés (cash cards ) afin d’éviter toute sortie des camps, laissant ainsi les résidents des hot-spots dans l’impossibilité de s’approvisionner avec des produits de première nécessité et notamment de produits d’hygiène. Remarquez que ces mesures sont toujours en vigueur pour les hot-spots et toute autre structure accueillant des réfugiés et des migrants en Grèce, en un moment où toute restriction de mouvement a été déjà levée pour la population grecque. En effet, après une énième prolongation du confinement dans les camps, les mesures de restriction de mouvement ont été reconduites jusqu’au 5 juillet, une mesure d’autant plus discriminatoire que depuis cinq semaines déjà les autres habitants du pays ont retrouvé une entière liberté de mouvement. Etant donné qu’aucune donnée sanitaire ne justifie l’enfermement dans les hot-spots où pas un seul cas n’a été détecté, cette extension de restrictions transforme de facto les Centres de Réception et Identification (RIC) dans les îles en centres fermés ou semi-fermés, anticipant ainsi à la création de nouveaux centres fermés, à la place de hot-spots actuels –voir ici et ici. Il est fort à parier que le gouvernement va étendre de prolongation en prolongation le confinement de RIC pendant au moins toute la période touristique, ce qui risque de faire monter encore plus la tension dans les camps jusqu’à un niveau explosif.

    Ainsi les demandeurs d’asile ont été – et continuent toujours à être – obligés de vivre toute la période de l’épidémie, dans une très grande promiscuité et dans des conditions sanitaires qui suscitaient déjà l’effroi bien avant la menace du Covid-19[8]. Voyons de plus près quelles conditions de vie règnent dans ce drôle de ‘chez soi’, auquel le Ministre grec de la politique migratoire invitait les réfugiés à y passer une période de confinement sans cesse prolongée, en présentant le « Stay in camps » comme le strict équivalent du « Stay home », pour les citoyens grecs. Dans l’extension « hors les murs » du hotspot de Moria, vers l’oliveraie, repartie en Oliveraie I, II et III, il y a des quartiers où il n’existe qu’un seul robinet d’eau pour 1 500 personnes, ce qui rend le respect de règles d’hygiène absolument impossible. Dans le camp de Moria il n’y a qu’une seule toilette pour 167 personnes et une douche pour 242, alors que dans l’Oliveraie, 5 000 personnes n’ont aucun accès à l’électricité, à l’eau et aux toilettes. Selon le directeur des programmes de Médecins sans Frontières, Apostolos Veizis, au hot-spot de Samos à Vathy, il n’y a qu’une seule toilette pour 300 personnes, tandis que l’organisation MSF a installé 80 toilettes et elle fournit 60 000 litres d’eau par jour pour couvrir, ne serait-ce que partiellement- les besoins de résidents à l’extérieur du camp.

    Avec la restriction drastique de mouvement contre le Covid-19, non seulement les sorties du camp, même pour s’approvisionner ou pour aller consulter, étaient faites au compte-goutte, mais aussi les entrées, limitant ainsi dramatiquement les services que les ONG et les collectifs solidaires offraient aux réfugiés. La réduction du nombre des ONG et l’absence de solidaires a créé un manque cruel d’effectifs qui s’est traduit par une désorganisation complète de divers services et notamment de la distribution de la nourriture. Ainsi, dans le camp de Moria en pleine pandémie, ont eu lieu des scènes honteuses de bousculade effroyable où les réfugiés étaient obligés de se battre pour une portion de nourriture- voir la vidéo et l’article de quotidien grec Ephimérida tôn Syntaktôn. Ces scènes indignes ne sauraient que se multiplier dans la mesure où le gouvernement en imposant aux ONG un procédé d’enregistrement très complexe et coûteux a réussi à exclure plus que la moitié de celles qui s’activent dans les camps. Car, par le processus de ‘régulation’ d’un domaine censément opaque, imposé par la récente loi sur l’asile, n’ont réussi à passer que 18 ONG qui elles seules auront désormais droit d’entrée dans les hot-spots[9]. En fait, l’inscription des ONG dans le registre du Ministère s’avère un procédé plein d’embûches bureaucratiques. Qui plus est le Ministre peut décider à son gré de refuser l’inscription des organisations qui remplissent tous les critères requis, ce qui serait une ingérence flagrante du pouvoir dans le domaine humanitaire.

    Car, il faudrait aussi savoir que les réfugiés enfermés dans les camps se trouvent à la limite de la survie, après la décision du Ministère de leur couper, à partir du début mars, les aides –déjà très maigres, 90 euros par mois pour une personne seule- auxquelles ils avaient droit jusqu’à maintenant. En ce qui concerne la couverture sociale de santé, à partir de juillet dernier les demandeurs ne pouvaient plus obtenir un numéro de sécurité sociale et étaient ainsi privés de toute couverture santé. Après des mois de tergiversation et sous la pression des organismes internationaux, le gouvernement grec a enfin décidé de leur accorder un numéro provisoire de sécurité sociale, mais cette mesure reste pour l’instant en attente de sa pleine réalisation. Entretemps, l’exclusion des demandeurs d’asile du système national de santé a fait son effet : non seulement, elle a conduit à une détérioration significative de la santé des requérant, mais elle a également privé des enfants réfugiés de scolarisation, car, faute de carnet de vaccination à jour, ceux-ci ne pouvaient pas s’inscrire à l’école.

    En d’autres termes, au lieu de déployer pendant l’épidémie une politique de décongestion avec transferts massifs à des structures sécurisées, le gouvernement a traité les demandeurs d’asile comme porteurs virtuels du virus, à tenir coûte que coûte à l’écart de la société ; non seulement les réfugiés et les migrants n’ont pas été protégés par un confinement sécurisé, mais ils ont été enfermés dans des conditions sanitaires mettant leur santé et leur vie en danger. La preuve, si besoin est, ce sont les mesures prises par le gouvernement dans des structures d’accueil du continent où des cas de coronavirus ont été détectés ; par ex. la gestion catastrophique de la quarantaine dans une structure d’accueil hôtelière à Kranidi en Péloponnèse où une femme enceinte a été testée positive en avril. Dans cet hôtel géré par l’IOM qui accueille 470 réfugiés de l’Afrique sub-saharienne, après l’indentification de deux cas (une employée et une résidente), un dépistage généralisé a été effectué et le 21 avril 150 cas ont été détectés ; très probablement le virus a été ‘importé’ dans la structure par les contacts des réfugiés et du personnel avec les propriétaires de villas voisines installés dans la région pour la période de confinement et qui les employaient pour divers services. Après une quarantaine de trois semaines, trois nouveaux cas ont été détectés avec comme résultat que toutes les personnes testées négatives ont été placées en quarantaine avec celles testées positives au même endroit[10].

    Exactement la même tactique a été adoptée dans les camps de Ritsona (au nord d’Athènes) et de Malakassa (à l’est d’Attique), où des cas ont été détectés. Au lieu d’isoler les porteurs du virus et d’effectuer un dépistage exhaustif de toute la population du camp, travailleurs compris, ce qui aurait pu permettre d’isoler tout porteur non-symptomatique, les camps avec tous leurs résidents ont été mis en quarantaine. Les autorités « ont imposé ces mesures sans prendre de dispositions nécessaires …pour isoler les personnes atteintes du virus à l’intérieur des camps, ont déclaré deux travailleurs humanitaires et un résident du camp. Dans un troisième cas, les autorités ont fermé le camp sans aucune preuve de la présence du virus à l’intérieur, simplement parce qu’elles soupçonnaient les résidents du camp d’avoir eu des contacts avec une communauté voisine de Roms où des gens avaient été testés positifs [11] » [il s’agit du camp de Koutsohero, près de Larissa, qui accueille 1.500 personnes][12].

    Un travailleur humanitaire a déclaré à Human Rights Watch : « Aussi scandaleux que cela puisse paraître, l’approche des autorités lorsqu’elles soupçonnent qu’il pourrait y avoir un cas de virus dans un camp consiste simplement à enfermer tout le monde dans le camp, potentiellement des milliers de personnes, dont certaines très vulnérables, et à jeter la clé, sans prendre les mesures appropriées pour retracer les contacts de porteurs du virus, ni pour isoler les personnes touchées ».

    Il va de soi qu’une telle tactique ne vise nullement à protéger les résidents de camp, mais à les isoler tous, porteurs et non-porteurs, ensemble, au risque de leur santé et de leur vie. Au fond, la stratégie du gouvernement a été simple : retrancher complètement les réfugiés du reste de la population, tout en les excluant de mesures de protection efficiantes. Bref, les réfugiés ont été abandonnés à leur sort, quitte à se contaminer les uns les autres, pourvu qu’ils ne soient plus en contact avec les habitants de la région.

    La gestion par les autorités de la quarantaine à l’ancien camp de Malakasa est également révélatrice de la volonté des autorités non pas de protéger les résidents des camps mais de les isoler à tout prix de la population locale. Une quarantaine a été imposée le 5 avril suite à la détection d’un cas. A l’expiration du délai réglementaire de deux semaines, la quarantaine n’a été que très partiellement levée. Pendant la durée de la quarantaine l’ancien camp de Malakasa abritant 2.500 personnes a été approvisionné en quantité insuffisante en nourriture de basse valeur nutritionnelle, et pratiquement pas du tout en médicaments et aliments pour bébés. Le 22 avril un nouveau cas a été détecté et la quarantaine a été de nouveau imposée à l’ensemble de 2.500 résidents du camp. Entretemps quelques tests de dépistage ont été faits par-ci et par-là, mais aucune mesure spécifique n’a été prise pour les cas détectés afin de les isoler du reste de la population du camp. Pendant cette nouvelle période de quarantaine, la seule mesure prise par les autorités a été de redoubler les effectifs de police à l’entrée du camp, afin d’empêcher toute sortie, et ceci à un moment critique où des produits de première nécessité manquaient cruellement dans le camp. Ni dépistage généralisé, ni visite d’équipes médicales spécialisées, ni non plus séparation spatiale stricte entre porteurs et non-porteurs du virus n’ont été mises en place. La quarantaine, avec une courte période d’allégement de mesures de restriction, dure déjà depuis deux mois et demi. Car, le 20 juin elle a été prolongée jusqu’au 5 juillet, transformant ainsi de facto les résidents du camp en détenus[13].

    La façon aussi dont ont été traités les nouveaux arrivants dans les îles depuis le début de la période du confinement et jusqu’à maintenant est également révélatrice de la volonté du gouvernement de ne pas faire le nécessaire pour assurer la protection des demandeurs d’asile. Non seulement ceux qui sont arrivés après le début mars n’ont pas été mis à l’abri pour y passer la période de quarantaine de 14 jours dans des conditions sécurisées, mais ils ont été systématiquement ‘confinés en plein air’ à la proximité de l’endroit où ils ont débarqué : les nouveaux arrivants, femmes enceintes et enfants compris, ont été obligés de vivre en plein air, exposés aux intempéries dans une zone circonscrite placée sous la surveillance de la police, pendant deux, trois voire quatre semaines et sans aucun accès à des infrastructures sanitaires. Le cas de 450 personnes arrivées début mars est caractéristique : après avoir été gardées en « quarantaine » dans une zone entourée de barrières au port de Mytilène, elles ont été enfermées pendant 13 jours dans des conditions inimaginables dans un navire militaire grec, où ils ont été obligés de dormir sur le sol en fer du navire, vivant littéralement les uns sur les autres, sans même qu’on ne leur fournisse du savon pour se laver les mains.

    Cet enfermement prolongé dans des conditions abjectes, en contre-pied du confinement sécurisé à la maison, que la plupart d’entre nous, citoyens européens, avons connu, transforme de fait les demandeurs en détenus et crée inévitablement des situations explosives avec une montée des incidents violents, des affrontements entre groupes ethniques, des départs d’incendies à Lesbos, à Chios et à Samos. Ne serait-ce qu’à Moria, et surtout dans l’Oliveraie qui entoure le camp officiel, dès la tombée de la nuit l’insécurité règne : depuis le début de l’année on y dénombre au moins 14 agressions à l’arme blanche qui ont fait quatre morts et 14 blessés[14]. Bref aux conditions de vie indignes et dangereuses pour la santé, il faudrait ajouter l’insécurité croissante, encore plus pesante pour les femmes, les personnes LGBT+ et les mineurs isolés.

    Affronté aux réactions des sociétés locales et à la pression des organismes internationaux, le gouvernement grec a fini par reconnaître la nécessité de la décongestion des îles par le biais du transfert de réfugiés et des demandeurs d’asile vulnérables au continent. Mais il s’en est rendu compte trop tard ; entretemps le discours haineux qui présente les migrants comme une menace pour la sécurité nationale voire pour l’identité de la nation, ce poison qu’elle-même a administré à la population, a fait son effet. Aujourd’hui, le ministre de la politique migratoire a été pris au piège de sa propre rhétorique xénophobe haineuse ; c’est au nom justement de celle-ci que les autorités régionales et locales (et plus particulièrement celles proches à la majorité actuelle), opposent un refus catégorique à la perspective d’accueillir dans leur région des réfugiés venant des hot-spots des îles. Des hôtels où des familles en provenance de Moria auraient dû être logées ont été en partie brûlés, des cars transportant des femmes et des enfants ont été attaqués à coup de pierres, des tenanciers d’établissements qui s’apprêtaient à les accueillir, ont reçu des menaces, la liste des actes honteux ne prend pas fin[15].

    Mais le ministre grec de la politique migratoire n’est jamais en court de moyens : il a un plan pour libérer plus que 10.000 places dans les structures d’accueil et les appartements en Grèce continentale. A partir du 1 juin, les autorités ont commencé à mettre dans la rue 11.237 réfugiés reconnus comme bénéficiaires de protection internationale, un mois après l’obtention de leur carte de réfugiés ! Evincés de leurs logements, ces réfugiés, femmes, enfants et personnes vulnérables compris, se retrouveront dans la rue et sans ressources, car ils n’ont plus le droit de recevoir les aides qui ne leur sont destinées que pendant les 30 jours qui suivent l’obtention de leur carte[16]. Cette décision du ministre Mitarakis a été mise sur le compte d’une politique moins accueillante, car selon lui, les aides, assez maigres, par ailleurs, constituaient un « appel d’air » trop attractif pour les candidats à l’exil ! Le comble de l’affaire est que tant le programme d’hébergement en appartements et hôtels ESTIA que les aides accordées aux réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile sont financées par l’UE et des organismes internationaux, et ne coûtent strictement rien au budget de l’Etat. Le désastre qui se dessine à l’horizon a déjà pointé son nez : une centaine de réfugiés dont une quarantaine d’enfants, transférés de Lesbos à Athènes, ont été abandonnés sans ressources et sans toit en pleine rue. Ils campent actuellement à la place Victoria, à Athènes.

    Le dernier cercle de l’enfer : les PROKEKA

    Au moment où est écrit cet article, les camps dans les îles fonctionnent cinq, six voire dix fois au-dessus de leur capacité d’accueil. 34.000 personnes sont actuellement entassées dans les îles, dont 30.220 confinées dans les conditions abjectes de hot-spots prévus pour accueillir 6 000 personnes au grand maximum ; 750 en détention dans les centres de détention fermés avant renvoi (PROΚEΚA), et le restant dans d’autres structures[17].

    Plusieurs agents du terrain ont qualifié à juste titre les camps de Moria à Lesbos et celui de Vathy à Samos[18] comme l’enfer sur terre. Car, comment désigner autrement un endroit comme Moria où les enfants – un tiers des habitants du camp- jouent parmi les ordures et les déjections et où plusieurs d’entre eux touchent un tel fond de désespoir qu’ils finissent par s’automutiler et/ou par commettre de tentatives de suicide[19], tandis que d’autres tombent dans un état de prostration et de mutisme ? Comment dire autrement l’horreur d’un endroit comme le camp de Vathy où femmes enceintes et enfants de bas âge côtoient des serpents, des rats et autres scorpions ?

    Cependant, il y a pire, en l’occurrence le dernier cercle de l’Enfer, les ‘Centres de Détention fermés avant renvoi’ (Pre-moval Detention Centers, PROKEKA en grec), l’équivalent grec des CRA (Centre de Rétention Administrative) en France[20]. Aux huit centres fermés de détention et aux postes de police disséminés partout en Grèce, plusieurs milliers de demandeurs d’asile et d’étrangers sans-papiers sont actuellement détenus dans des conditions terrifiantes. Privés même des droits les plus élémentaires de prisonniers, les détenus restent presque sans soins médicaux, sans contact régulier avec l’extérieur, sans droit de visite ni accès assuré à une aide judiciaire. Ces détenus qui sont souvent victimes de mauvais traitements de la part de leurs gardiens, n’ont pas de perspective de sortie, dans la mesure où, en vertu de la nouvelle loi sur l’asile, leur détention peut être prolongée jusqu’à 36 mois. Leur maintien en détention est ‘justifié’ en vue d’une déportation devenue plus qu’improbable – qu’il s’agisse d’une expulsion vers le pays d’origine ou d’une réadmission vers un tiers pays « sûr ». Dans ces conditions il n’est pas étonnant qu’en désespoir de cause, des détenus finissent par attenter à leur jours, en commettant des suicides ou des tentatives de suicide.

    Ce qui est encore plus alarmant est qu’à la fin 2018, à peu près 28% des détenus au sein de ces centres fermés étaient des mineurs[21]. Plus récemment et notamment fin avril dernier, Arsis dans un communiqué de presse du 27 avril 2020, a dénoncé la détention en tout point de vue illégale d’une centaine de mineurs dans un seul centre de détention, celui d’Amygdaleza en Attique. D’après les témoignages, c’est avant tout dans les préfectures et les postes de police où sont gardés plus que 28% de détenus que les conditions de détention virent à un cauchemar, qui rivalise avec celui dépeint dans le film Midnight Express. Les cellules des commissariats où s’entassent souvent des dizaines de personnes sont conçus pour une détention provisoire de quelques heures, les infrastructures sanitaires sont défaillantes, et il n’y a pas de cour pour la promenade quotidienne. Quant aux policiers, ils se comportent comme s’ ils étaient au-dessus de la loi face à des détenus livrés à leur merci : ils leur font subir des humiliations systématiques, des mauvais traitements, des violences voire des tortures.

    Plusieurs témoignages concordants dénoncent des conditions horribles dans les préfectures et les commissariats : les détenus peuvent être privés de nourriture et d’eau pendant des journées entières, plusieurs entre eux sont battus et peuvent rester entravés et ligotés pendant des jours, privés de soins médicaux, même pour des cas urgents. En mars 2017, Ariel Rickel (fondatrice d’Advocates Abroad) avait découvert dans le commissariat du hot-spot de Samos, un mineur de 15 ans, ligoté sur une chaise. Le jeune homme qui avait été violement battu par les policiers, avait eu des côtes cassées et une blessure ouverte au ventre ; il était resté dans cet état ligoté trois jours durant, et ce n’est qu’après l’intervention de l’ombudsman, sollicité par l’avocate, qu’il a fini par être libéré.[22] Le cas rapporté par Ariel Rickel à Valeria Hänsel n’est malheureusement pas exceptionnel. Car, ces conditions inhumaines de détention dans les PROKEKA ont été à plusieurs reprises dénoncées comme un traitement inhumain et dégradant par la Cour Européenne de droits de l’homme[23] et par le Comité Européen pour la prévention de la torture du Conseil de l’Europe (CPT).

    Il faudrait aussi noter qu’au sein de hot-spot de Lesbos et de Kos, il y a de tels centres de détention fermés, ‘de prison dans les prisons à ciel ouvert’ que sont ces camps. Un rapport récent de HIAS Greece décrit les conditions inhumaines qui règnent dans le PROKEKA de Moria où sont détenus en toute illégalité des demandeurs d’asile n’ayant commis d’autre délit que le fait d’être originaire d’un pays dont les ressortissants obtiennent en moyenne en UE moins de 25% de réponses positives à leurs demandes d’asile (low profile scheme). Il est évident que la détention d’un demandeur d’asile sur la seule base de son pays d’origine constitue une mesure de ségrégation discriminatoire qui expose les requérants à des mauvais traitements, vu la quasi inexistence de services médicaux et la très grande difficulté voire l’impossibilité d’avoir accès à l’aide juridique gratuite pendant la détention arbitraire. Ainsi, p.ex. des personnes ressortissant de pays comme le Pakistan ou l’Algérie, même si ils/elles sont LGBT+, ce qui les exposent à des dangers graves dans leur pays d’origine, seront automatiquement détenus dans le PROKEKA de Moria, étant ainsi empêchés d’étayer suffisamment leur demande d’asile, en faisant appel à l’aide juridique gratuite et en la documentant. Début avril, dans deux centres de détention fermés, celui au sein du camp de Moria et celui de Paranesti, près de la ville de Drama au nord de la Grèce, les détenus avaient commencés une grève de la faim pour protester contre la promiscuité effroyable et réclamer leur libération ; dans les deux cas les protestations ont été très violemment réprimées par les forces de l’ordre.

    La déclaration commune UE-Turquie

    Cependant il faudrait garder à l’esprit qu’à l’origine de cette situation infernale se trouve la décision de l’UE en 2016 de fermer ses frontières et d’externaliser en Turquie la prise en charge de réfugiés, tout en bloquant ceux qui arrivent à passer en Grèce. C’est bien l’accord UE-Turquie du 18 mars 2016[24] – en fait une Déclaration commune dépourvue d’un statut juridique équivalent à celui d’un accord en bonne et due forme- qui a transformé les îles grecques en prison à ciel ouvert. En fait, cette Déclaration est un troc avec la Turquie où celle-ci s’engageait non seulement à fermer ses frontières en gardant sur son sol des millions de réfugiés mais aussi à accepte les réadmissions de ceux qui ont réussi à atteindre l’Europe ; en échange une aide de 6 milliards lui serait octroyée afin de couvrir une partie de frais générés par le maintien de 3 millions de réfugiés sur son sol, tandis que les ressortissants turcs n’auraient plus besoin de visa pour voyager en Europe. En fait, comme le dit un rapport de GISTI, la nature juridique de la Déclaration du 18 mars a beau être douteuse, elle ne produit pas moins les « effets d’un accord international sans en respecter les règles d’élaboration ». C’est justement le statut douteux de cette déclaration commune, que certains analystes n’hésitent pas de désigner comme un simple ‘communiqué de presse’, qui a fait que la Cour Européenne a refusé de se prononcer sur la légalité, en se déclarant incompétente, face à un accord d’un statut juridique indéterminé.

    Or, dans le cadre de la mise en œuvre de cet accord a été introduite par l’article 60(4) de la loi grecque L 4375/2016, la procédure d’asile dite ‘accélérée’ dans les îles grecques (fast-track border procedure) qui non seulement réduisaient les garanties de la procédure au plus bas possible en UE, mais qui impliquait aussi comme corrélat l’imposition de la restriction géographique de demandeurs d’asile dans les îles de première arrivée. Celle-ci fut officiellement imposée par la décision 10464/31-5-2017 de la Directrice du Service d’Asile, qui instaurait la restriction de circulation des requérant, afin de garantir le renvoi en Turquie de ceux-ci, en cas de rejet de leurs demandes. Rappelons que ces renvois s’appuient sur la reconnaissance -tout à fait infondée-, de la Turquie comme ‘pays tiers sûr’. Même des réfugiés Syriens ont été renvoyés en Turquie dans le cadre de la mise en application de cette déclaration commune.

    La restriction géographique qui contraint les demandeurs d’asile de ne quitter sous aucun prétexte l’île où ils ont déposé leur demande, jusqu’à l’examen complet de celle-ci, conduit inévitablement au point où nous sommes aujourd’hui à savoir à ce surpeuplement inhumain qui non seulement crée une situation invivable pour les demandeurs, mais a aussi un effet toxique sur les sociétés locales. Déjà en mai 2016, François Crépeau, rapporteur spécial de NU aux droits de l’homme de migrants, soulignait que « la fermeture de frontières de pays au nord de la Grèce, ainsi que le nouvel accord UE-Turquie a abouti à une augmentation exponentielle du nombre de migrants irréguliers dans ce pays ». Et il ajoutait que « le grand nombre de migrants irréguliers bloqués en Grèce est principalement le résultat de la politique migratoire de l’UE et des pays membres de l’UE fondée exclusivement sur la sécurisation des frontières ».

    Gisti, dans un rapport sur les hotspots de Chios et de Lesbos notait également depuis 2016 que, étant donné l’accord UE-Turquie, « ce sont les Etats membres de l’UE et l’Union elle-même qui portent l’essentiel de la responsabilité́ des mauvais traitements et des violations de leurs droits subis par les migrants enfermés dans les hotspots grecs.

    La présence des agences européennes à l’intérieur des hotspots ne fait que souligner cette responsabilité ». On le verra, le rôle de l’EASO est crucial dans la décision finale du service d’asile grec. Quant au rôle joué par Frontex, plusieurs témoignages attestent sa pratique quotidienne de non-assistance à personnes en danger en mer voire sa participation à des refoulements illégaux. Remarquons que c’est bien cette déclaration commune UE-Turquie qui stipule que les demandeurs déboutés doivent être renvoyés en Turquie et à cette fin être maintenus en détention, d’où la situation actuelle dans les centres de détention fermés.

    Enfin la situation dans les hot-spots s’est encore plus aggravée, en raison de la décision du gouvernement Mitsotakis de geler pendant plusieurs mois tout transfert vers la péninsule grecque, bloquant ainsi même les plus vulnérables sur place. Sous le gouvernement précédent, ces derniers étaient exceptés de la restriction géographique dans les hot-spots. Mais à partir du juillet 2020 les transferts de catégories vulnérables -femmes enceintes, mineurs isolés, victimes de torture ou de naufrages, personnes handicapées ou souffrant d’une maladie chronique, victimes de ségrégations à cause de leur orientation sexuelle, – avaient cessé et n’avaient repris qu’au compte-goutte début janvier, plusieurs mois après leurs suspension.

    Le dogme de la ‘surveillance agressive’ des frontières

    Les refoulements groupés sont de plus en plus fréquents, tant à la frontière maritime qu’à la frontière terrestre. A Evros cette pratique était assez courante bien avant la crise à la frontière gréco-turque de mars dernier. Elle consistait non seulement à refouler ceux qui essayaient de passer la frontière, mais aussi à renvoyer en toute clandestinité ceux qui étaient déjà entrés dans le territoire grec. Les faits sont attestés par plusieurs témoignages récoltés par Human Rights 360 dans un rapport publié fin 2018 :The new normality : Continuous push-backs of third country nationals on the Evros river. Les « intrus » qui ont réussi à passer la frontière sont arrêtés et dépouillés de leur biens, téléphone portable compris, pour être ensuite déportés vers la Turquie, soit par des forces de l’ordre en tenue, soit par des groupes masqués et cagoulés difficiles à identifier. En effet, il n’est pas exclu que des patrouilles paramilitaires, qui s’activent dans la région en se prenant violemment aux migrants au vu et au su des autorités, soient impliquées à ses opérations. Les réfugiés peuvent être gardés non seulement dans des postes de police et de centres de détention fermés, mais aussi dans des lieux secrets, sans qu’ils n’aient la moindre possibilité de contact avec un avocat, le service d’asile, ou leurs proches. Par la suite ils sont embarqués de force sur des canots pneumatiques en direction de la Turquie.

    Cette situation qui fut dénoncée par les ONG comme instaurant une nouvelle ‘normalité’, tout sauf normale, s’est dramatiquement aggravée avec la crise à la frontière terrestre fin février et début mars dernier[25]. Non seulement la frontière fut hermétiquement fermée et des refoulements groupés effectués par la police anti-émeute et l’armée, mais, dans le cadre de la soi-disant défense de l’intégrité territoriale, il y a eu plusieurs cas où des balles réelles ont été tirées par les forces grecques contre les migrants, faisant quatre morts et plusieurs blessés[26].

    Cependant ces pratiques criminelles ne sont pas le seul fait des autorités grecques. Depuis le 13 mars dernier, des équipes d’Intervention Rapide à la Frontière de Frontex, les Rapid Border Intervention Teams (RABIT) ont été déployées à la frontière gréco-turque d’Evros, afin d’assurer la ‘protection’ de la frontière européenne. Leur intervention qui aurait dû initialement durer deux mois, a été entretemps prolongée. Ces équipes participent elles, et si oui dans quelle mesure, aux opérations de refoulement ? Il faudrait rappeler ici que, d’après plusieurs témoignages récoltés par le Greek Council for Refugees, les équipes qui opéraient les refoulements en 2017 et 2018 illégaux étaient déjà mixtes, composées des agents grecs et des officiers étrangers parlant soit l’allemand soit l’anglais. Il n’y a aucune raison de penser que cette coopération en bonne entente en matière de refoulement, entre forces grecques et celles de Frontex ait cessé depuis, d’autant plus que début mars la Grèce fut désignée par les dirigeants européens pour assurer la protection de l’Europe, censément menacée par les migrants à sa frontière.

    Plusieurs témoignages de réfugiés refoulés à la frontière d’Evros ainsi que des documents vidéo attestent l’existence d’un centre de détention secret destiné aux nouveaux arrivants ; celui-ci n’est répertorié nulle part et son fonctionnement ne respecte aucune procédure légale, concernant l’identification et l’enregistrement des arrivants. Ce centre, fonctionnant au noir, dont l’existence fut révélée par un article du 10 mars 2020 de NYT, se situe à la proximité de la frontière gréco-turque, près du village grec Poros. Les malheureux qui y échouent, restent détenus dans cette zone de non-droit absolu[27], car, non seulement leur existence n’est enregistrée nulle part mais le centre même n’apparaît sur aucun registre de camps et de centres de détention fermés. Au bout de quelques jours de détention dans des conditions inhumaines, les détenus dépouillés de leurs biens sont renvoyés de force vers la Turquie, tandis que plusieurs d’entre eux ont été auparavant battus par la police.

    La situation est aussi alarmante en mer Egée, où les rapports dénonçant des refoulements maritimes violents mettant en danger la vie de réfugiés, ne cessent de se multiplier depuis le début mars. D’après les témoignages il y aurait au moins deux modes opératoires que les garde-côtes grecs ont adoptés : enlever le moteur et le bidon de gasoil d’une embarcation surchargée et fragile, tout en la repoussant vers les eaux territoriaux turques, et/ou créer des vagues, en passant en grande vitesse tout près du bateau, afin d’empêcher l’embarcation de s’approcher à la côte grecque (voir l’incident du 4 juin dernier, dénoncé par Alarm Phone). Cette dernière méthode de dissuasion ne connaît pas de limites ; des vidéos montrent des incidents violents où les garde-côtes n’hésitent pas à tirer des balles réelles dans l’eau à côté des embarcations de réfugiés ou même dans leurs directions ; il y a même des vidéos qui montrent les garde-côtes essayant de percer le canot pneumatique avec des perches.

    Néanmoins, l’arsenal de garde-côtes grecs ne se limite pas à ces méthodes extrêmement dangereuses ; ils recourent à des procédés semblables à ceux employés en 2013 par l’Australie pour renvoyer les migrants arrivés sur son sol : ils obligent des demandeurs d’asile à embarquer sur des life rafts -des canots de survie qui se présentent comme des tentes gonflables flottant sur l’eau-, et ils les repoussent vers la Turquie, en les laissant dériver sans moteur ni gouvernail[28].

    Des incidents de ce type ne cessent de se multiplier depuis le début mars. Victimes de ce type de refoulement qui mettent en danger la vie des passagers, peuvent être même des femmes enceintes, des enfants ou même des bébés –voir la vidéo glaçante tournée sur un tel life raft le 25 mai dernier et les photographies respectives de la garde côtière turque.

    Ce mode opératoire va beaucoup plus loin qu’un refoulement illégal, car il arrive assez souvent que les personnes concernées aient déjà débarqué sur le territoire grec, et dans ce cas ils avaient le droit de déposer une demande d’asile. Cela veut dire que les garde-côtes grecs ne se contentent pas de faire des refoulements maritimes qui violent le droit national et international ainsi que le principe de non-refoulement de la convention de Genève[29]. Ioannis Stevis, responsable du média local Astraparis à Chios, avait déclaré au Guardian « En mer Egée nous pouvions voir se dérouler cette guerre non-déclarée. Nous pouvions apercevoir les embarcations qui ne pouvaient pas atteindre la Grèce, parce qu’elles en étaient empêchées. De push-backs étaient devenus un lot quotidien dans les îles. Ce que nous n’avions pas vu auparavant, c’était de voir les bateaux arriver et les gens disparaître ».

    Cette pratique illégale va beaucoup plus loin, dans la mesure où les garde-côtes s’appliquent à renvoyer en Turquie ceux qui ont réussi à fouler le sol grec, sans qu’aucun protocole ni procédure légale ne soient respectés. Car, ces personnes embarquées sur les life rafts, ne sont pas à strictement parler refoulées – et déjà le refoulement est en soi illégal de tout point de vue-, mais déportées manu militari et en toute illégalité en Turquie, sans enregistrement ni identification préalable. C’est bien cette méthode qui explique comment des réfugiés dont l’arrivée sur les côtes de Samos et de Chios est attestée par des vidéos et des témoignages de riverains, se sont évaporés dans la nature, n’apparaissant sur aucun registre de la police ou des autorités portuaires[30]. Malgré l’existence de documents photos et vidéos attestant l’arrivée des embarcations des jours où aucune arrivée n’a été enregistrée par les autorités, le ministre persiste et signe : pour lui il ne s’agirait que de la propagande turque reproduite par quelques esprits malveillants qui voudraient diffamer la Grèce. Néanmoins les photographies horodatées publiées sur Astraparis, dans un article intitulé « les personnes que nous voyons sur la côte Monolia à Chios seraient-ils des extraterrestres, M. le Ministre ? », constituent un démenti flagrant du discours complotiste du Ministre.

    Question cruciale : quelle est le rôle exact joué par Frontex dans ces refoulements ? Est-ce que les quelques 600 officiers de Frontex qui opèrent en mer Egée dans le cadre de l’opération Poséidon, y participent d’une façon ou d’une autre ? Ce qui est sûr est qu’il est quasi impossible qu’ils n’aient pas été de près ou de loin témoins des opérations de push-back. Le fait est confirmé par un article du Spiegel sur un incident du 13 mai, un push-back de 27 réfugiés effectué par la garde côtière grecque laquelle, après avoir embarqué les réfugiés sur un canot de sauvetage, a remorqué celui-ci en haute mer. Or, l’embarcation de réfugiés a été initialement repéré près de Samos par les hommes du bateau allemand Uckermark faisant partie des forces de Frontex, qui l’ont ensuite signalé aux officiers grecs ; le fait que cette embarcation ait par la suite disparu sans laisser de trace et qu’aucune arrivée de réfugiés n’ait été enregistrée à Samos ce jour-là, n’a pas inquiété outre-mesure les officiers allemands.

    Nous savons par ailleurs, grâce à l’attitude remarquable d’un équipage danois, que les hommes de Frontex reçoivent l’ordre de ne pas porter secours aux réfugiés navigant sur des canots pneumatiques, mais de les repousser ; au cas où les réfugiés ont déjà été secourus et embarqués à bord d’un navire de Frontex, celui-ci reçoit l’ordre de les remettre sur des embarcations peu fiables et à peine navigables. C’est exactement ce qui est arrivé début mars à un patrouilleur danois participant à l’opération Poséidon, « l’équipage a reçu un appel radio du commandement de Poséidon leur ordonnant de remettre les [33 migrants qu’ils avaient secourus] dans leur canot et de les remorquer hors des eaux grecques »[31], ordre, que le commandant du navire danois Jan Niegsch a refusé d’exécuter, estimant “que celui-ci n’était pas justifiable”, la manœuvre demandée mettant en danger la vie des migrants. Or, il n’y aucune raison de penser que l’ordre reçu -et fort heureusement non exécuté grâce au courage du capitaine Niegsch et du chargé de l’unité danoise de Frontex, Jens Moller- soit un ordre exceptionnel que les autres patrouilleurs de Frontex n’ont jamais reçu. Les officiers danois ont d’ailleurs confirmé que les garde-côtes grecs reçoivent des ordres de repousser les bateaux qui arrivent de Turquie, et ils ont été témoins de plusieurs opérations de push-back. Mais si l’ordre de remettre les réfugiés en une embarcation non-navigable émanait du quartier général de l’opération Poséidon, qui l’avait donc donné [32] ? Des officiers grecs coordonnant l’opération, ou bien des officiers de Frontex ?

    Remarquons que les prérogatives de Frontex ne se limitent pas à la surveillance et la ‘protection’ de la frontière européenne : dans une interview que Fabrice Leggeri avait donné en mars dernier à un quotidien grec, il a révélé que Frontex était en train d’envisager avec le gouvernement grec les modalités d’une action communes pour effectuer les retours forcés des migrants dits ‘irréguliers’ à leurs pays d’origine. « Je m’attends à ce que nous ayons bientôt un plan d’action en commun. D’après mes contacts avec les officiers grecs, j’ai compris que la Grèce est sérieusement intéressée à augmenter le nombre de retours », avait-il déclaré.

    Tout démontre qu’actuellement les sauvetages en mer sont devenus l’exception et les refoulements violents et dangereux la règle. « Depuis des années, Alarm Phone a documenté des opérations de renvois menées par des garde-côtes grecs. Mais ces pratiques ont considérablement augmenté ces dernières semaines et deviennent la norme en mer Égée », signale un membre d’Alarm Phone à InfoMigrants. De sorte que nous pouvons affirmer que le dogme du gouvernement Mitsotakis consiste en une inversion complète du principe du non-refoulement : ne laisser passer personne en refoulant coûte que coûte. D’ailleurs, ce nouveau dogme a été revendiqué publiquement par le ministre de Migration et de l’Asile Mitarakis, qui s’est vanté à plusieurs reprises d’avoir réussi à créer une frontière maritime quasi-étanche. Les quatre volets de l’approche gouvernementale ont été résumés ainsi par le ministre : « protection des frontières, retours forcés, centres fermés pour les arrivants, et internationalisation des frontières »[33]. Dans une émission télévisée du 13 avril, le même ministre a déclaré que la frontière était bien gardée, de sorte qu’aujourd’hui, les flux sont quasi nuls, et il a ajouté que “l’armée et des unités spéciaux, la marine nationale et les garde-côtes sont prêts à opérer pour empêcher les migrants en situation irrégulière d’entrer dans notre pays’’. Bref, des forces militaires sont appelées de se déployer sur le front de guerre maritime et terrestre contre les migrants. Voilà comment est appliqué le dogme de zéro flux dont se réclame le Ministre.

    Le Conseil de l’Europe a publié une déclaration très percutante à ce sujet le 19 juin. Sous le titre Il faut mettre fin aux refoulements et à la violence aux frontières contre les réfugiés, la commissaire aux droits de l’homme Dunja Mijatović met tous les états membres du Conseil de l’Europe devant leurs responsabilités, en premier lieu les états qui commettent de telles violations de droits des demandeurs d’asile. Loin de considérer que les refoulements et les violences à la frontière de l’Europe sont le seul fait de quelques états dont la plupart sont situés à la frontière externe de l’UE, la commissaire attire l’attention sur la tolérance tacite de ces pratiques illégales, voire l’assistance à celles-ci de la part de la plupart d’autres états membres. Est responsable non seulement celui qui commet de telles violations des droits mais aussi celui qui les tolère voire les encourage.

    Asile : ‘‘mission impossible’’ pour les nouveaux arrivants ?

    Actuellement en Grèce plusieurs dizaines de milliers de demandes d’asile sont en attente de traitement. Pour donner la pleine mesure de la surcharge d’un service d’asile qui fonctionne actuellement à effectifs réduits, il faudrait savoir qu’il y a des demandeurs qui ont reçu une convocation pour un entretien en…2022 –voir le témoignage d’un requérant actuellement au camp de Vagiohori. En février dernier il y avait 126.000 demandes en attente d’être examinées en première et deuxième instance. Entretemps, par des procédures expéditives, 7.000 demandes ont été traitées en mars et 15 000 en avril, avec en moyenne 24 jours par demande pour leur traitement[34]. Il devient évident qu’il s’agit de procédures expéditives et bâclées. En même temps le pourcentage de réponses négatives en première instance ne cesse d’augmenter ; de 45 à 50% qu’il était jusqu’à juillet dernier, il s’est élevé à 66% en février[35], et il a dû avoir encore augmenté entre temps.

    Ce qui est encore plus inquiétant est l’ambition affichée du Ministre de la Migration de réaliser 11000 déportations d’ici la fin de l’année. A Lesbos, à la réouverture du service d’asile, le 18 mai dernier, 1.789 demandeurs ont reçu une réponse négative, dont au moins 1400 en première instance[36]. Or, ces derniers n’ont eu que cinq jours ouvrables pour déposer un recours et, étant toujours confinés dans l’enceinte de Moria, ils ont été dans l’impossibilité d’avoir accès à une aide judiciaire. Ceux d’entre eux qui ont osé se déplacer à Mytilène, chef-lieu de Lesbos, pour y chercher de l’aide auprès du Legal Center of Lesbos ont écopé des amendes de 150€ pour violation de restrictions de mouvement[37] !

    Jusqu’à la nouvelle loi votée il y a six semaines au Parlement Hellénique, la procédure d’asile était un véritable parcours du combattant pour les requérants : un parcours plein d’embûches et de pièges, entaché par plusieurs clauses qui violent les lois communautaires et nationales ainsi que les conventions internationales. L’ancienne loi, entrée en vigueur seulement en janvier 2020, introduisait des restrictions de droits et un raccourcissement de délais en vue de procédures encore plus expéditives que celles dites ‘fast-track’ appliquées dans les îles (voir ci-dessous). Avant la toute nouvelle loi adoptée le 8 mai dernier, Gisti constatait déjà des atteintes au droit national et communautaire, concernant « en particulier le droit d’asile, les droits spécifiques qui doivent être reconnus aux personnes mineures et aux autres personnes vulnérables, et le droit à une assistance juridique ainsi qu’à une procédure de recours effectif »[38]. Avec la nouvelle mouture de la loi du 8 mai, les restrictions et la réduction de délais est telle que par ex. la procédure de recours devient vraiment une mission impossible pour les demandeurs déboutés, même pour les plus avertis et les mieux renseignés parmi eux. Les délais pour déposer une demande de recours se réduisent en peau de chagrin, alors que l’aide juridique au demandeur, de même que l’interprétariat en une langue que celui-ci maîtrise ne sont plus assurés, laissant ainsi le demandeur seul face à des démarches complexes qui doivent être faites dans une langue autre que la sienne[39]. De même l’entretien personnel du requérant, pierre angulaire de la procédure d’asile, peut être omis, si le service ne trouve pas d’interprète qui parle sa langue et si le demandeur vit loin du siège de la commission de recours, par ex. dans un hot-spot dans les îles ou loin de l’Attique. Le 13 mai, le ministre Mitarakis avait déclaré que 11.000 demandes ont été rejetées pendant les mois de mars et avril, et que ceux demandeurs déboutés « doivent repartir »[40], laissant entendre que des renvois massifs vers la Turquie pourraient avoir lieu, perspective plus qu’improbable, étant donné la détérioration grandissante de rapport entre les deux pays. Ces demandeurs déboutés ont été sommés de déposer un recours dans l’espace de 5 jours ouvrables après notification, sans assistance juridique et sous un régime de restrictions de mouvements très contraignant.

    En vertu de la nouvelle loi, les personnes déboutées peuvent être automatiquement placées en détention, la détention devenant ainsi la règle et non plus l’exception comme le stipule le droit européen. Ceci est encore plus vrai pour les îles. Qui plus est, selon le droit international et communautaire, la mesure de détention ne devrait être appliquée qu’en dernier ressort et seulement s’il y a une perspective dans un laps de temps raisonnable d’effectuer le renvoi forcé de l’intéressé. Or, aujourd’hui et depuis quatre mois, il n’y a aucune perspective de cet ordre. Car les chances d’une réadmission en Turquie ou d’une expulsion vers le pays d’origine sont pratiquement inexistantes, pendant la période actuelle. Si on tient compte que plusieurs dizaines de milliers de demandes restent en attente d’être traitées et que le pourcentage de rejet ne cesse d’augmenter, on voit avec effroi s’esquisser la perspective d’un maintien en détention de dizaines de milliers de personnes pour un laps de temps indéfini. La Grèce compte-t-elle créer de centres de détention pour des dizaines de milliers de personnes, qui s’apparenteraient par plusieurs traits à des véritables camps de concentration ? Le fera-t-elle avec le financement de l’UE ?

    Nous savons que le rôle de EASO, dont la présence en Grèce s’est significativement accrue récemment,[41] est crucial dans ces procédures d’asile : c’est cet organisme européen qui mène le pré-enregistrement de la demande d’asile et qui se prononce sur sa recevabilité ou pas. Jusqu’à maintenant il intervenait uniquement dans les îles dans le cadre de la procédure dite accélérée. Car, depuis la Déclaration de mars 2016, dans les îles est appliquée une procédure d’asile spécifique, dite procédure fast-track à la frontière (fast-track border procedure). Il s’agit d’une procédure « accélérée », qui s’applique dans le cadre de la « restriction géographique » spécifique aux hotspots »,[42] en application de l’accord UE-Turquie de mars 2016. Dans le cadre de cette procédure accélérée, c’est bien l’EASO qui se charge de faire le premier ‘tri’ entre les demandeurs en enregistrant la demande et en effectuant un premier entretien. La procédure ‘fast-track’ aurait dû rester une mesure exceptionnelle de courte durée pour faire face à des arrivées massives. Or, elle est toujours en vigueur quatre ans après son instauration, tandis qu’initialement sa validité n’aurait pas dû dépasser neuf mois – six mois suivis d’une prolongation possible de trois mois. Depuis, de prolongation en prolongation cette mesure d’exception s’est installée dans la permanence.

    La procédure accélérée qui, au détriment du respect des droits des réfugiés, aurait pu aboutir à un raccourcissement significatif de délais d’attente très longs, n’a même pas réussi à obtenir ce résultat : une partie des réfugiés arrivés à Samos en août 2019, avaient reçu une notification de rendez-vous pour l’entretien d’asile (et d’admissibilité) pour 2021 voire 2022[43] ! Mais si les procédures fast-track ne raccourcissent pas les délais d’attente, elles raccourcissent drastiquement et notamment à une seule journée le temps que dispose un requérant pour qu’il se prépare et consulte si besoin un conseiller juridique qui pourrait l’assister durant la procédure[44]. Dans le cas d’un rejet de la demande en première instance, le demandeur débouté ne dispose que de cinq jours après la notification de la décision négative pour déposer un recours en deuxième instance. Bref, le raccourcissement très important de délais introduits par la procédure accélérée n’affectait jusqu’à maintenant que les réfugiés qui sont dans l’impossibilité d’exercer pleinement leurs droits, et non pas le service qui pouvait imposer un temps interminable d’attente entre les différentes étapes de la procédure.

    Cependant l’implication d’EASO dépasse et de loin le pré-enregistrement, car ce sont bien ses fonctionnaires qui, suite à un entretien de l’intéressé, dit « interview d’admission », établissent le dossier qui sera transmis aux autorités grecques pour examen[45]. Or, nous savons par la plainte déposée contre l’EASO par les avocats de l’ONG European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights (ECCHR), en 2017, que les agents d’EASO ne consacrait à l’interrogatoire du requérant que 15 minutes en moyenne,[46] et ceci bien avant que ne monte en flèche la pression exercée par le gouvernement actuel pour accélérer encore plus les procédures. La même plainte dénonçait également le fait que la qualité de l’interprétation n’était point assurée, dans la mesure où, au lieu d’employer des interprètes professionnels, cet organisme européen faisait souvent recours à des réfugiés, pour faire des économies. A vrai dire, l’EASO, après avoir réalisé un entretien, rédige « un avis (« remarques conclusives ») et recommande une décision à destination des services grecs de l’asile, qui vont statuer sur la demande, sans avoir jamais rencontré » les requérants[47]. Mais, même si en théorie la décision revient de plein droit au Service d’Asile grec, en pratique « une large majorité des recommandations transmises par EASO aux services grecs de l’asile est adoptée par ces derniers »[48]. Or, depuis 2018 les compétences d’EASO ont été étendues à tout le territoire grec, ce qui veut dire que les officiers grecs de cet organisme européen ont le droit d’intervenir même dans le cadre de la procédure régulière d’asile et non plus seulement dans celui de la procédure accélérée. Désormais, avec le quadruplication des effectifs en Grèce continentale prévue pour 2020, et le dédoublement de ceux opérant dans les îles, l’avis ‘consultatif’ de l’EASO va peser encore plus sur les décisions finales. De sorte qu’on pourrait dire, que le constat que faisait Gisti, bien avant l’extension du domaine d’intervention d’EASO, est encore plus vrai aujourd’hui : l’UE, à travers ses agences, exerce « une forme de contrôle et d’ingérence dans la politique grecque en matière d’asile ». Si avant 2017, l’entretien et la constitution du dossier sur la base duquel le service grec d’asile se prononce étaient faits de façon si bâclée, que va—t-il se passer maintenant avec l’énorme pression des autorités pour des procédures fast-track encore plus expéditives, qui ne respectent nullement les droits des requérants ? Enfin, une fois la nouvelle loi mise en vigueur, les fonctionnaires européens vont-ils rédiger leurs « remarques conclusives » en fonction de celle-ci ou bien en respectant la législation européenne ? Car la première comporte des clauses qui ne respectent point la deuxième.

    La suspension provisoire de la procédure d’asile et ses effets à long terme

    Début mars, afin de dissuader les migrants qui se rassemblaient à la frontière gréco-turque d’Evros, le gouvernement grec a décidé de suspendre provisoirement la procédure d’asile pendant la durée d’un mois[49]. L’acte législatif respectif stipule qu’à partir du 1 mars et jusqu’au 30 du même mois, ceux qui traversent la frontière n’auront plus le droit de déposer une demande d’asile. Sans procédure d’identification et d’enregistrement préalable ils seront automatiquement maintenus en détention jusqu’à leur expulsion ou leur réadmission en Turquie. Après une cohorte de protestations de la part du Haut-Commissariat, des ONG, et même d’Ylva Johansson, commissaire aux affaires internes de l’UE, la procédure d’asile suspendue a été rétablie début avril et ceux qui sont arrivés pendant la durée de sa suspension ont rétroactivement obtenu le droit de demander la protection internationale. « Le décret a cessé de produire des effets juridiques à la fin du mois de mars 2020. Cependant, il a eu des effets très néfastes sur un nombre important de personnes ayant besoin de protection. Selon les statistiques du HCR, 2 927 personnes sont entrées en Grèce par voie terrestre et maritime au cours du mois de mars[50]. Ces personnes automatiquement placées en détention dans des conditions horribles, continuent à séjourner dans des établissements fermés ou semi-fermés. Bien qu’elles aient finalement été autorisées à exprimer leur intention de déposer une demande d’asile auprès du service d’asile, elles sont de fait privées de toute aide judiciaire effective. La plus grande partie de leurs demandes d’asile n’a cependant pas encore été enregistrée. Le préjudice causé par les conditions de détention inhumaines est aggravé par les risques sanitaires graves, voire mortels, découlant de l’apparition de la pandémie COVID-19, qui n’ont malheureusement pas conduit à un réexamen de la politique de détention en Grèce ».[51]

    En effet, les arrivants du mois de mars ont été jusqu’à il y a peu traités comme des criminels enfreignant la loi et menaçant l’intégrité du territoire grec ; ils ont été dans un premier temps mis en quarantaine dans des conditions inconcevables, gardés par la police en zones circonscrites, sans un abri ni la moindre infrastructure sanitaire. Après une période de quarantaine qui la plupart du temps durait plus longtemps que les deux semaines réglementaires, ceux qui sont arrivés pendant la suspension de la procédure, étaient transférés, en vue d’une réadmission en Turquie, à Malakassa en Attique, où un nouveau camp fermé, dit ‘le camp de tentes’, fut créé à proximité de de l’ancien camp avec les containeurs.

    700 d’entre eux ont été transférés au camp fermé de Klidi, à Serres, au nord de la Grèce, construit sur un terrain inondable au milieu de nulle part. Ces deux camps fermés présentent des affinités troublantes avec des camps de concentration. Les conditions de vie inhumaines au sein de ces camps s’aggravaient encore plus par le risque de contamination accru du fait de la très grande promiscuité et des conditions sanitaires effrayantes (coupures d’eau sporadiques à Malakassa, manque de produits d’hygiène, et approvisionnement en eau courante seulement deux heures par jour à Klidi)[52]. Or, après le rétablissement de la procédure d’asile, les 2.927 personnes arrivées en mars, ont obtenu–au moins en théorie- le droit de déposer une demande, mais n’ont toujours ni l’assistance juridique nécessaire, ni interprètes, ni accès effectif au service d’asile. Celui-ci a rouvert depuis le 18 mars, mais fonctionne toujours à effectif réduit, et est submergé par les demandes de renouvellement des cartes. Actuellement les réfugiés placés en détention sont toujours retenus dans les même camps qui sont devenus des camps semi-fermés sans pour autant que les conditions de vie dégradantes et dangereuses pour la santé des résidents aient vraiment changé. Ceci est d’autant plus vrai que le confinement de réfugiés et de demandeurs d’asile a été prolongé jusqu’au 5 juillet, ce qui ne leur permet de circuler que seulement avec une autorisation de la police, tandis que la population grecque est déjà tout à fait libre de ses mouvements. Dans ces conditions, il est pratiquement impossible d’accomplir des démarches nécessaires pour le dépôt d’une demande bien documentée.

    Refugee Support Aegean a raison de souligner que « les répercussions d’une violation aussi flagrante des principes fondamentaux du droit des réfugiés et des droits de l’homme ne disparaissent pas avec la fin de validité du décret, les demandeurs d’asile concernés restant en détention arbitraire dans des conditions qui ne sont aucunement adaptées pour garantir leur vie et leur dignité. Le décret de suspension crée un précédent dangereux pour la crédibilité du droit international et l’intégrité des procédures d’asile en Grèce et au-delà ».

    Cependant, nous ne pouvons pas savoir jusqu’où pourrait aller cette escalade d’horreurs. Aussi inimaginable que cela puisse paraître , il y a pire, même par rapport au camp fermé de Klidi à Serres, que Maria Malagardis, journaliste à Libération, avait à juste titre désigné comme ‘un camp quasi-militaire’. Car les malheureux arrêtés à Evros fin février et début mars, ont été jugés en procédure de flagrant délit, et condamnés pour l’exemple à des peines de prison de quatre ans ferme et des amendes de 10.000 euros -comme quoi, les autorités grecques peuvent revendiquer le record en matière de peine pour entrée irrégulière, car même la Hongrie de Orban, ne condamne les migrants qui ont osé traverser ses frontières qu’à trois ans de prison. Au moins une cinquantaine de personnes ont été condamnées ainsi pour « entrée irrégulière dans le territoire grec dans le cadre d’une menace asymétrique portant sur l’intégrité du pays », et ont été immédiatement incarcérées. Et il est fort à parier qu’aujourd’hui, ces personnes restent toujours en prison, sans que le rétablissement de la procédure ait changé quoi que ce soit à leur sort.

    Eriger l’exception en règle

    Qui plus est la suspension provisoire de la procédure laisse derrière elle des marques non seulement aux personnes ayant vécu sous la menace de déportation imminente, et qui continuent à vivre dans des conditions indignes, mais opère aussi une brèche dans la validité universelle du droit international et de la Convention de Genève, en créant un précédent dangereux. Or, c’est justement ce précédent que M. Mitarakis veut ériger en règle européenne en proposant l’introduction d’une clause de force majeure dans la législation européenne de l’asile[53] : dans le débat pour la création d’un système européen commun pour l’asile, le Ministre grec de la politique migratoire a plaidé pour l’intégration de la notion de force majeure dans l’acquis européen : celle-ci permettrait de contourner la législation sur l’asile dans des cas où la sécurité territoriale ou sanitaire d’un pays serait menacée, sans que la violation des droits de requérants expose le pays responsable à des poursuites. Pour convaincre ses interlocuteurs, il a justement évoqué le cas de la suspension par le gouvernement de la procédure pendant un mois, qu’il compte ériger en paradigme pour la législation communautaire. Cette demande fut réitérée le 5 juin dernier, par une lettre envoyée par le vice-ministre des Migrations et de l’Asile, Giorgos Koumoutsakos, au vice-président Margaritis Schinas et au commissaire aux affaires intérieures, Ylva Johansson. Il s’agit de la dite « Initiative visant à inclure une clause d’état d’urgence dans le Pacte européen pour les migrations et l’asile », une initiative cosignée par Chypre et la Bulgarie. Par cette lettre, les trois pays demandent l’inclusion au Pacte européen d’une clause qui « devrait prévoir la possibilité d’activer les mécanismes d’exception pour prévenir et répondre à des situations d’urgence, ainsi que des déviations [sous-entendu des dérogations au droit européen] dans les modes d’action si nécessaire ».[54] Nous le voyons, la Grèce souhaite, non seulement poursuivre sa politique de « surveillance agressive » des frontières et de violation des droits de migrants, mais veut aussi ériger ces pratiques de tout point de vue illégales en règle d’action européenne. Il nous faudrait donc prendre la mesure de ce que laisse derrière elle la fracture dans l’universalité de droit d’asile opérée par la suspension provisoire de la procédure. Même si celle-ci a été bon an mal an rétablie, les effets de ce geste inédit restent toujours d’actualité. L’état d’exception est en train de devenir permanent.

    Une rhétorique de la haine

    Le discours officiel a changé de fond en comble depuis l’arrivée au pouvoir du gouvernement Mitsotakis. Des termes, comme « clandestins » ont fait un retour en force, accompagnés d’une véritable stratégie de stigmatisation visant à persuader la population que les arrivants ne sont point des réfugiés mais des immigrés économiques censés profiter du laxisme du gouvernement précédent pour envahir le pays et l’islamiser. Cette rhétorique haineuse qui promeut l’image des hordes d’étrangers envahisseurs menaçant la nation et ses traditions, ne cesse d’enfler malgré le fait qu’elle soit démentie d’une façon flagrante par les faits : les arrivants, dans leur grande majorité, ne veulent pas rester en Grèce mais juste passer par celle-ci pour aller ailleurs en Europe, là où ils ont des attaches familiales, communautaires etc. Ce discours xénophobe aux relents racistes dont le paroxysme a été atteint avec la mise en avant de l’épouvantail du ‘clandestin’ porteur du virus venant contaminer et décimer la nation, a été employé d’une façon délibérée afin de justifier la politique dite de la « surveillance agressive » des frontières grecques. Il sert également à légitimer la transformation programmée des actuels CIR (RIC en anglais) en centres fermés ‘contrôlés’, où les demandeurs n’auront qu’un droit de sortie restreint et contrôlé par la police. Le ministre Mitarakis a déjà annoncé la transformation du nouveau camp de Malakasa, où étaient détenus ceux qui sont arrivés pendant la durée de la suspension d’asile, un camp qui était censé s’ouvrir après la fin de validité du décret, en camp fermé ‘contrôlé’ où toute entrée et sortie seraient gérées par la police[55].

    Révélateur des intentions du gouvernement grec, est le projet du Ministre de la politique migratoire d’étendre les compétences du Service d’Asile bien au-delà de la protection internationale, et notamment aux …expulsions ! D’après le quotidien grec Ephimérida tôn Syntaktôn, le ministre serait en train de prospecter pour la création de trois nouvelles sections au sein du Service d’Asile : Coordination de retours forcés depuis le continent et retours volontaires, Coordination des retours depuis les îles, Appels et exclusions. Bref, le Service d’Asile grec qui a déjà perdu son autonomie, depuis qu’il a été attaché au Secrétariat général de la politique de l’Immigration du Ministère, risque de devenir – et cela serait une première mondiale- un service d’asile et d’expulsions. Voilà comment se met en œuvre la consolidation du rôle de la Grèce en tant que « bouclier de l’Europe », comme l’avait désigné début mars Ursula von der Leyden. Voilà ce qu’est en train d’ériger l’Europe qui soutient et finance la Grèce face à des personnes persécutées fuyant de guerres et de conflits armés : un mur fait de barbelés, de patrouilles armés jusqu’aux dents et d’une flotte de navires militaires. Quant à ceux qui arrivent à passer malgré tout, ils seront condamnés à rester dans les camps de la honte.

    Que faire ?

    Certaines analyses convoquent la position géopolitique de la Grèce et le rapport de forces dans l’UE, afin de présenter cette situation intolérable comme une fatalité dont on ne saurait vraiment échapper. Mais face à l’ignominie, dire qu’il n’y aurait rien ou presque à faire, serait une excuse inacceptable. Car, même dans le cadre actuel, des solutions il y en a et elles sont à portée de main. La déclaration commune UE-Turquie mise en application le 20 mars 2016, n’est plus respectée par les différentes parties. Déjà avant février 2020, l’accord ne fut jamais appliqué à la lettre, autant par les Européens qui n’ont pas fait les relocalisations promises ni respecté leurs engagements concernant la procédure d’intégration de la Turquie en UE, que par la Turquie qui, au lieu d’employer les 6 milliards qu’elle a reçus pour améliorer les conditions de vie des réfugiés sur son sol, s’est servi de cet argent pour construire un mur de 750 km dans sa frontière avec la Syrie, afin d’empêcher les réfugiés de passer. Cependant ce sont les récents développements de mars 2020 et notamment l’afflux organisé par les autorités turques de réfugiés à la frontière d’Evros qui ont sonné le glas de l’accord du 18 mars 2016. Dans la mesure où cet accord est devenu caduc, avec l’ouverture de frontières de la Turquie le 28 février dernier, il n’y plus aucune obligation officielle du gouvernement grec de continuer à imposer le confinement géographique dans les îles des demandeurs d’asile. Leur transfert sécurisé vers la péninsule pourrait s’effectuer à court terme vers des structures hôtelières de taille moyenne dont plusieurs vont rester fermées cet été. L’appel international Évacuez immédiatement les centres d’accueil – louez des logements touristiques vides et des maisons pour les réfugiés et les migrants ! qui a déjà récolté 11.500 signatures, détaille un tel projet. Ajoutons, que sa réalisation pourrait profiter aussi à la société locale, car elle créerait des postes de travail en boostant ainsi l’économie de régions qui souvent ne dépendent que du tourisme pour vivre.

    A court et à moyen terme, il faudrait qu’enfin les pays européens honorent leurs engagements concernant les relocalisations et se mettent à faciliter au lieu d’entraver le regroupement familial. Quelques timides transferts de mineurs ont été déjà faits vers l’Allemagne et le Luxembourg, mais le nombre d’enfants concernés est si petit que nous pouvons nous pouvons nous demander s’il ne s’agirait pas plutôt d’une tentative de se racheter une conscience à peu de frais. Car, sans un plan large et équitable de relocalisations, le transfert massif de requérants en Grèce continentale, risque de déplacer le problème des îles vers la péninsule, sans améliorer significativement les conditions de vie de réfugiés.

    Si les requérants qui ont déjà derrière eux l’expérience traumatisante de Moria et de Vathy, sont transférés à un endroit aussi désolé et isolé de tout que le camp de Nea Kavala (au nord de la Grèce) qui a été décrit comme un Enfer au Nord de la Grèce, nous ne faisons que déplacer géographiquement le problème. Toute la question est de savoir dans quelles conditions les requérants seront invités à vivre et dans quelles conditions les réfugiés seront transférés.

    Les solutions déjà mentionnées sont réalisables dans l’immédiat ; leur réalisation ne se heurte qu’au fait qu’elles impliquent une politique courageuse à contre-pied de la militarisation actuelle des frontières. C’est bien la volonté politique qui manque cruellement dans la mise en œuvre d’un plan d’urgence pour l’évacuation des hot-spots dans les îles. L’Europe-Forteresse ne saurait se montrer accueillante. Tant du côté grec que du côté européen la nécessité de créer des conditions dignes pour l’accueil de réfugiés n’entre nullement en ligne de compte.

    Car, même le financement d’un tel projet est déjà disponible. Début mars l’UE s’est engagé de donner à la Grèce 700 millions pour qu’elle gère la crise de réfugiés, dont 350 millions sont immédiatement disponibles. Or, comme l’a révélé Ylva Johansson pendant son intervention au comité LIBE du 2 avril dernier, les 350 millions déjà libérés doivent principalement servir pour assurer la continuation et l’élargissement du programme d’hébergement dans le continent et le fonctionnement des structures d’accueil continentales, tandis que 35 millions sont destinés à assurer le transfert des plus vulnérables dans des logements provisoires en chambres d’hôtel. Néanmoins la plus grande somme (220 millions) des 350 millions restant est destinée à financer de nouveaux centres de réception et d’identification dans les îles (les dits ‘multi-purpose centers’) qui vont fonctionner comme des centres semi-fermés où toute sortie sera règlementée par la police. Les 130 millions restant seront consacrés à financer le renforcement des contrôles – et des refoulements – à la frontière terrestres et maritime, avec augmentation des effectifs et équipement de la garde côtière, de Frontex, et des forces qui assurent l’étanchéité des frontières terrestres. Il aurait suffi de réorienter la somme destinée à financer la construction des centres semi-fermés dans les îles, et de la consacrer au transfert sécurisé au continent pour que l’installation des requérants et des réfugiés en hôtels et appartements devienne possible.

    Mais que faire pour stopper la multiplication exponentielle des refoulements à la frontière ? Si Frontex, comme Fabrice Leggeri le prétend, n’a aucune implication dans les opérations de refoulement, si ses agents n’y participent pas de près ou de loin, alors ces officiers doivent immédiatement exercer leur droit de retrait chaque fois qu’ils sont témoins d’un tel incident ; ils pouvaient même recevoir la directive de ne refuser d’appliquer tout ordre de refoulement, comme l’avait fait début mars le capitaine danois Jan Niegsch. Dans la mesure où non seulement les témoignages mais aussi des documents vidéo et des audio attestent l’existence de ces pratiques en tous points illégales, les instances européennes doivent mettre une condition sine qua non à la poursuite du financement de la Grèce pour l’accueil de migrants : la cessation immédiate de ces types de pratiques et l’ouverture sans délai d’une enquête indépendante sur les faits dénoncés. Si l’Europe ne le fait pas -il est fort à parier qu’elle n’en fera rien-, elle se rend entièrement responsable de ce qui se passe à nos frontières.

    Car,on le voit, l’UE persiste dans la politique de la restriction géographique qui oblige réfugiés et migrants à rester sur les îles pour y attendre la réponse définitive à leur demande, tandis qu’elle cautionne et finance la pratique illégale des refoulements violents à la frontière. Les intentions d’Ylva Johansson ont beau être sincères : une politique qui érige la Grèce en ‘bouclier de l’Europe’, ne saurait accueillir, mais au contraire repousser les arrivants, même au risque de leur vie.

    Quant au gouvernement grec, force est de constater que sa politique migratoire du va dans le sens opposé d’un large projet d’hébergement dans des structures touristiques hors emploi actuellement. Révélatrice des intentions du gouvernement actuel est la décision du ministre Mitarakis de fermer 55 à 60 structures hôtelières d’accueil parmi les 92 existantes d’ici fin 2020. Il s’agit de structures fonctionnant dans le continent qui offrent un niveau de vie largement supérieur à celui des camps. Or, le ministre invoque un argument économique qui ne tient pas la route un seul instant, pour justifier cette décision : pour lui, les structures hôtelières seraient trop coûteuses. Mais ce type de structure n’est pas financé par l’Etat grec mais par l’IOM, ou par l’UE, ou encore par d’autres organismes internationaux. La fermeture imminente des hôtels comme centres d’accueil a une visée autre qu’économique : il faudrait retrancher complètement les requérants et les réfugiés de la société grecque, en les obligeant à vivre dans des camps semi-fermés où les sorties seront limitées et contrôlées. Cette politique d’enfermement vise à faire sentir tant aux réfugiés qu’à la population locale que ceux-ci sont et doivent rester un corps étranger à la société grecque ; à cette fin il vaut mieux les exclure et les garder hors de vue.

    Qui plus est la fermeture de deux tiers de structures hôtelières actuelles ne pourra qu’aggraver encore plus le manque de places en Grèce continentale, rendant ainsi quasiment impossible la décongestion des îles. Sauf si on raisonne comme le Ministre : le seul moyen pour créer des places est de chasser les uns – en l’occurrence des familles de réfugiés reconnus- pour loger provisoirement les autres. La preuve, les mesures récentes de restrictions drastiques des droits aux allocations et à l’hébergement des réfugiés, reconnus comme tels, par le service de l’asile. Ceux-ci n’ont le droit de séjourner aux appartements loués par l’UNHCR dans le cadre du programme ESTIA, et aux structures d’accueil que pendant un mois (et non pas comme auparavant six) après l’obtention de leur titre, et ils ne recevront plus que pendant cette période très courte les aides alloués aux réfugiés qui leur permettraient de survivre pendant leur période d’adaptation, d’apprentissage de la langue, de formation etc. Depuis la fin du mois de mai, les autorités ont entrepris de mettre dans la rue 11.237 personnes, dont la grande majorité de réfugiés reconnus, afin de libérer des places pour la supposée imminente décongestion des îles. Au moins 10.000 autres connaîtront le même sort en juillet, car en ce moment le délai de grâce d’un mois aura expiré pour eux aussi. Ce qui veut dire que le gouvernement grec non seulement impose des conditions de vie inhumaines et de confinements prolongés aux résidants de hot-spots et aux détenus en PROKEKA (les CRA grecs), mais a entrepris à réduire les familles de réfugiés ayant obtenu la protection internationale en sans-abri, errant sans toit ni ressources dans les villes.

    La dissuasion par l’horreur

    De tout ce qui précède, nous pouvons aisément déduire que la stratégie du gouvernement grec, une stratégie soutenue par les instances européennes et mise en application en partie par des moyens que celles-ci mettent à la disposition de celui-là, consiste à rendre la vie invivable aux réfugiés et aux demandeurs d’asile vivant dans le pays. Qui plus est, dans le cadre de cette politique, la dérogation systématique aux règles du droit et notamment au principe de non-refoulement, instauré par la Convention de Genève est érigée en principe régulateur de la sécurisation des frontières. Le maintien de camps comme Moria à Lesbos et Vathy à Samos témoignent de la volonté de créer des lieux terrifiants d’une telle notoriété sinistre que l’évocation même de leurs noms puisse avoir un effet de dissuasion sur les candidats à l’exil. On ne saurait expliquer autrement la persistance de la restriction géographique de séjour dans les îles de dizaines de milliers de requérants dans des conditions abjectes.

    Nous savons que l’Europe déploie depuis plusieurs années en Méditerranée centrale la politique de dissuasion par la noyade, une stratégie qui a atteint son summum avec la criminalisation des ONG qui essaient de sauver les passagers en péril ; l’autre face de cette stratégie de la terreur se déploie à ma frontière sud-est, où l’Europe met en œuvre une autre forme de dissuasion, celle effectuée par l’horreur des hot-spots. Aux crimes contre l’humanité qui se perpétuent en toute impunité en Méditerranée centrale, entre la Libye et l’Europe, s’ajoutent d’autres crimes commis à la frontière grecque[56]. Car il s’agit bien de crimes : poursuivre des personnes fuyant les guerres et les conflits armés par des opérations de refoulement particulièrement violentes qui mettent en danger leurs vies est un crime. Obliger des personnes dont la plus grande majorité est vulnérable à vivoter dans des conditions si indignes et dégradantes en les privant de leurs droits, est un acte criminel. Ceux qui subissent de tels traitement n’en sortent pas indemnes : leur santé physique et mentale en est marquée. Il est impossible de méconnaître qu’un séjour – et qui plus est un séjour prolongé- dans de telles conditions est une expérience traumatisante en soi, même pour des personnes bien portantes, et à plus forte raison pour celles et ceux qui ont déjà subi des traumatismes divers : violences, persécutions, tortures, viols, naufrages, pour ne pas mentionner les traumas causés par des guerres et de conflits armés.

    Gisti, dans son rapport récent sur le hotspot de Samos, soulignait que loin « d’être des centres d’accueil et de prise en charge des personnes en fonction de leurs besoins, les hotspots grecs, à l’image de celui de Samos, sont en réalité des camps de détention, soustraits au regard de la société civile, qui pourraient n’avoir pour finalité que de dissuader et faire peur ». Dans son rapport de l’année dernière, le Conseil Danois pour les réfugiés (Danish Refugee Council) ne disait pas autre chose : « le système des hot spots est une forme de dissuasion »[57]. Que celle-ci se traduise par des conditions de vie inhumaines où des personnes vulnérables sont réduites à vivre comme des bêtes[58], peu importe, pourvu que cette horreur fonctionne comme un repoussoir. Néanmoins, aussi effrayant que puisse être l’épouvantail des hot-spots, il n’est pas sûr qu’il puisse vraiment remplir sa fonction de stopper les ‘flux’. Car les personnes qui prennent le risque d’une traversée si périlleuse ne le font pas de gaité de cœur, mais parce qu’ils n’ont pas d’autre issue, s’ils veulent préserver leur vie menacée par la guerre, les attentats et la faim tout en construisant un projet d’avenir.

    Quoi qu’il en soit, nous aurions tort de croire que tout cela n’est qu’une affaire grecque qui ne nous atteint pas toutes et tous, en tout cas pas dans l’immédiat. Car, la stratégie de « surveillance agressive » des frontières, de dissuasion par l’imposition de conditions de vie inhumaines et de dérogation au droit d’asile pour des raisons de « force majeure », est non seulement financée par l’UE, mais aussi proposée comme un nouveau modèle de politique migratoire pour le cadre européen commun de l’asile en cours d’élaboration. La preuve, la récente « Initiative visant à inclure une clause d’état d’urgence dans le Pacte européen pour les migrations et l’asile » lancée par la Grèce, la Bulgarie et Chypre.

    Il devient clair, je crois, que la stratégie du gouvernement grec s’inscrit dans le cadre d’une véritable guerre aux migrants que l’UE non seulement cautionne mais soutient activement, en octroyant les moyens financiers et les effectifs nécessaires à sa réalisation. Car, les appels répétés, par ailleurs tout à fait justifiés et nécessaires, de la commissaire Ylva Johansson[59] et de la commissaire au Conseil de l’Europe Dunja Mijatović[60] de respecter les droits des demandeurs d’asile et de migrants, ne servent finalement que comme moyen de se racheter une conscience, devant le fait que cette guerre menée contre les migrants à nos frontières est rendue possible par la présence entre autres des unités RABIT à Evros et des patrouilleurs et des avions de Frontex et de l’OTAN en mer Egée. La question à laquelle tout citoyen européen serait appelé en son âme et conscience à répondre, est la suivante : sommes-nous disposés à tolérer une telle politique qui instaure un état d’exception permanent pour les réfugiés ? Car, comment désigner autrement cette ‘situation de non-droit absolu’[61] dans laquelle la Grèce sous la pression et avec l’aide active de l’Europe maintient les demandeurs d’asile ? Sommes-nous disposés à la financer par nos impôts ?

    Car le choix de traiter une partie de la population comme des miasmes à repousser coûte que coûte ou à exclure et enfermer, « ne saurait laisser intacte notre société tout entière. Ce n’est pas une question d’humanisme, c’est une question qui touche aux fondements de notre vivre-ensemble : dans quel type de société voulons-nous vivre ? Dans une société qui non seulement laisse mourir mais qui fait mourir ceux et celles qui sont les plus vulnérables ? Serions-nous à l’abri dans un monde transformé en une énorme colonie pénitentiaire, même si le rôle qui nous y est réservé serait celui, relativement privilégié, de geôliers ? [62] » La commissaire aux droits de l’homme au Conseil de l’Europe, avait à juste titre souligné que les « refoulements et la violence aux frontières enfreignent les droits des réfugiés et des migrants comme ceux des citoyens des États européens. Lorsque la police ou d’autres forces de l’ordre peuvent agir impunément de façon illégale et violente, leur devoir de rendre des comptes est érodé et la protection des citoyens est compromise. L’impunité d’actes illégaux commis par la police est une négation du principe d’égalité en droit et en dignité de tous les citoyens... »[63]. A n’importe quel moment, nous pourrions nous aussi nous trouver du mauvais côté de la barrière.

    Il serait plus que temps de nous lever pour dire haut et fort :

    Pas en notre nom ! Not in our name !

    https://migration-control.info/?post_type=post&p=63932
    #guerre_aux_migrants #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Grèce #îles #Evros #frontières #hotspot #Lesbos #accord_UE-Turquie #Vathy #Samos #covid-19 #coronavirus #confinement #ESTIA #PROKEKA #rétention #détention_administrative #procédure_accélérée #asile #procédure_d'asile #EASO #Frontex #surveillance_des_frontières #violence #push-backs #refoulement #refoulements #décès #mourir_aux_frontières #morts #life_rafts #canots_de_survie #life-raft #Mer_Egée #Méditerranée #opération_Poséidon #Uckermark #Klidi #Serres

    ping @isskein

  • Les députés demandent une enquête sur les allégations de refoulement de demandeurs d’asile à la frontière gréco-turque

    Les autorités grecques et de l’UE doivent enquêter sur les rapports récurrents faisant état de refoulements violents à la frontière avec la Turquie.

    Lundi, les députés de la #commission_des_libertés_civiles ont demandé au gouvernement grec de clarifier sa position concernant des reportages dans différents médias et des rapports de la société civile indiquant que la police et les garde-frontières du pays empêchaient de façon systématique les migrants d’entrer sur le territoire grec (par voies terrestre et maritime) et ce, en faisant usage de la violence et même en tirant sur eux.

    Le ministre grec de la protection des citoyens, Michalis Chrisochoidis, et le ministre de la migration et de l’asile, Notis Mitarachi, ont nié ces accusations, les qualifiant de ‘‘fake news’’ et soulignant le rôle essentiel que jouait la Grèce pour ‘‘maintenir les frontières de l’UE sûres, en respectant toujours les droits fondamentaux’’. Ils ont également averti qu’une répétition des événements qui se sont produits en mars, quand le Président Erdoğan a annoncé qu’il ouvrait les frontières turques, ne pouvait pas être écartée.

    Une majorité des députés a appelé la Commission à s’assurer que les autorités grecques respectaient la législation européenne relative à l’asile, l’exhortant à condamner l’usage de la violence et à imposer des sanctions si les violations étaient confirmées. La commissaire Ylva Johansson a convenu que les violences contre les demandeurs d’asile devaient faire l’objet d’enquêtes, non seulement en Grèce mais dans toute l’UE. ‘‘Nous ne pouvons pas protéger nos frontières en violant les droits des citoyens’’, a-t-elle déclaré.

    Certains députés ont félicité la Grèce pour son contrôle des frontières de l’UE avec la Turquie. La commissaire Johansson a également salué les progrès réalisés ces derniers mois et souligné que, malgré une situation très compliquée, les autorités grecques avaient réussi à empêcher la propagation du COVID-19 au sein des camps de réfugiés.

    https://www.europarl.europa.eu/news/fr/press-room/20200703IPR82627/demandeurs-d-asile-a-la-frontiere-greco-turque-les-deputes-veulent-u

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #violence #LIBE #Grèce #Evros #refoulement #push-backs #refoulements #droits_humains #îles

    • La (non-) réponse de Ministres grecs à la #commission_LIBE concernant les violences et les morts aux frontières gréco-turques (https://multimedia.europarl.europa.eu/en/libe-committee-meeting_20200706-1645-COMMITTEE-LIBE_vd)

      Αλλα λόγια ν’ αγαπιόμαστε...

      Θλίψη και ντροπή προκαλούσε η εικόνα των Νότη Μηταράκη, Γιώργου Κουμουτσάκου και Μιχάλη Χρυσοχοΐδη στη χθεσινή Επιτροπή Πολιτικών Ελευθεριών, Δικαιοσύνης και Εσωτερικών Υποθέσεων του Ευρωκοινοβουλίου ● Οι Ελληνες υπουργοί δέχτηκαν καταιγισμό ερωτήσεων σχετικά με τις αποκαλύψεις για τη βία και τους θανάτους στα ελληνικά σύνορα και δεν έδωσαν ούτε... μισή απάντηση με ουσία !

      Σε Βατερλό για τους υπουργούς Μ. Χρυσοχοΐδη, Γ. Κουμουτσάκο και Ν. Μηταράκη εξελίχθηκε η χθεσινή Επιτροπή Πολιτικών Ελευθεριών, Δικαιοσύνης και Εσωτερικών Υποθέσεων του Ευρωκοινοβουλίου με θέμα την κατάσταση στα ελληνοτουρκικά σύνορα και τον σεβασμό των ανθρωπίνων δικαιωμάτων, παρουσία της επιτρόπου Εσωτερικών Υποθέσεων Ιλβα Γιόχανσον.

      Μόνο θλιβερή μπορεί να χαρακτηριστεί η εικόνα των Ελλήνων υπουργών, που δέχονταν βροχή τις ερωτήσεις για τις αποκαλύψεις για παράνομες επιχειρήσεις αποτροπής και επαναπροώθησης και για την ανεξέλεγκτη βία και τους νεκρούς στον Εβρο.

      Καμία συγκεκριμένη απάντηση δεν έδωσαν, αντιθέτως επαναλάμβαναν γενικολογίες για τον σεβασμό των ανθρωπίνων δικαιωμάτων και του διεθνούς δικαίου και την προστασία της ανθρώπινης ζωής εκ μέρους της Ελλάδας, ζητώντας μάλιστα τον λόγο για τις αιχμηρές επισημάνσεις των ευρωβουλευτών. Η στάση τους σχολιάστηκε έντονα και επικριτικά.

      « Είναι εκτός θέματος, σαν να έχουν προσκληθεί σε γάμο και να απαγγέλλουν επικήδειους » ήταν το ειρωνικό σχόλιο ευρωβουλευτή, ενώ και ο πρόεδρος της επιτροπής, Χουάν Φερνάντο Λόπεζ Αγκιλάρ, σημείωσε : « Δεν θέλουν να απαντήσουν, αυτό είναι το πολιτικό συμπέρασμα της συνεδρίασης ». Η συνεδρίαση πραγματοποιήθηκε στον απόηχο του βίντεο της ερευνητικής ομάδας Forensic Architecture (La (non-) réponse de Ministres grecs à la #commission_LIBE concernant les violences et les morts aux frontières gréco-turques (https://multimedia.europarl.europa.eu/en/libe-committee-meeting_20200706-1645-COMMITTEE-LIBE_vd)) για τη δολοφονία του 22χρονου Σύρου πρόσφυγα στον Εβρο και πληθώρας δημοσιευμάτων για την πολιτική της ελληνικής κυβέρνησης στα σύνορα, αλλά και καταγγελιών που δέχτηκε η Επιτροπή από οργανώσεις δικαιωμάτων, όπως η Human Rights Watch και η Διενής Αμνηστία.
      Ράπισμα από Γιόχανσον

      Κατηγορηματική ήταν η επίτροπος Εσωτερικών Υποθέσεων Ιλβα Γιόχανσον : « Υπάρχουν αναφορές για απωθήσεις μεταναστών, οι οποίες απαγορεύονται ρητά. Οι απωθήσεις είναι παράνομες και καλώ τις ελληνικές αρχές να τις διερευνήσουν όλες ». Μάταια διαβεβαίωναν ο κ. Χρυσοχοΐδης ότι « η Ελλάδα φυλάσσει τα ευρωπαϊκά σύνορα με αποτελεσματικό τρόπο » και ο κ. Μηταράκης ότι η κυβέρνηση « δίνει ιδιαίτερη έμφαση στην προστασία της ανθρώπινης ζωής ».

      « Σε καμία περίπτωση δεν πρέπει να αποκλειστεί ότι θα υπάρξει νέα απόπειρα να προωθηθούν μετανάστες στην Ελλάδα και την Ευρώπη. Παραμένουμε σε επαγρύπνηση και πρέπει να είμαστε όλοι μας προετοιμασμένοι για να εμποδίσουμε κάθε νέα παρόμοια απόπειρα », σημείωσε ο κ. Κουμουτσάκος, που υπογράμμισε ότι ο ρόλος της ασπίδας της Ευρώπης, τον οποίο βέβαια προθυμότατα δέχτηκε η κυβέρνηση, συνεπάγεται μια συγκεκριμένη πολιτική στα σύνορα.

      Η ευρωβουλευτής των Πρασίνων, Τινέκε Στρικ (https://twitter.com/Tineke_Strik/status/1280181951110971392), αναφέρθηκε στους θανάτους και τους τραυματισμούς μεταναστών από πυροβολισμούς, χαρακτήρισε « ασυνεπή » τη στάση της ελληνικής κυβέρνησης και σχολίασε ότι « μας λένε ότι είναι όλα καλά και πως δεν υπάρχει κανένα πρόβλημα και ύστερα ότι φταίει η Τουρκία, άρα υπάρχει πρόβλημα. Μας λένε ότι δεν υπάρχει ζήτημα· μα αυτό το ζήτημα συζητάμε εδώ. Η ελληνική κυβέρνηση δείχνει άρνηση για ό,τι συμβαίνει ».

      Η Κορνέλια Ερνστ (GUE) ζήτησε από τους Ελληνες υπουργούς να προσκομίσουν τα σχετικά βίντεο και τους ρώτησε αν μπορούν να διεξαγάγουν μια μη κομματική έρευνα, ενώ παράλληλα κάλεσε την Κομισιόν να αναλάβει δράση και να μη μένει μόνο στα λόγια.

      Ο Ισπανός Ντομενέκ Ρουί Ντεβέσα (Σοσιαλδημοκράτες) χαρακτήρισε ακροδεξιά τη διαχείριση του μεταναστευτικού από την ελληνική κυβέρνηση, προκαλώντας την έντονη αντίδραση των υπουργών Μ. Χρυσοχοΐδη και Γ. Κουμουτσάκου (ο Ν. Μηταράκης είχε αποχωρήσει για να συμμετάσχει στη συζήτηση στο ελληνικό Κοινοβούλιο), που του ζήτησαν να ανακαλέσει και συνέστησαν στους ευρωβουλευτές να είναι προσεκτικοί.

      Οσο για τους θανάτους προσφύγων στον Εβρο από πραγματικά πυρά, ο κ. Χρυσοχοΐδης επέμενε ότι « δεν έγινε χρήση όπλων, έγινε μόνο χρήση αστυνομικών μέτρων », και επικαλέστηκε το γεγονός ότι βρίσκονταν εκατοντάδες κάμερες τηλεοπτικών συνεργείων και αυτόπτες μάρτυρες. « Αν υπάρχει καταγγελία, να τη στείλετε να διερευνηθεί », είπε. Αλλά βέβαια οι θάνατοι και οι πυροβολισμοί έχουν καταγραφεί σε κάμερες και ηχητικό υλικό, γεγονός που αναιρεί πλήρως τον ισχυρισμό του υπουργού, ενώ υποτίθεται ότι η κυβέρνηση έχει διερευνήσει τις καταγγελίες.

      Η κατάσταση για τους Ελληνες υπουργούς έγινε χειρότερη στο δεύτερο μέρος της συζήτησης, όταν ο εκτελεστικός διευθυντής της Frontex, Φαμπρίτσε Λετζέρι, παραδέχτηκε ότι σε επιχείρηση ταχείας επέμβασης στα θαλάσσια σύνορα η ελληνική ακτοφυλακή έδωσε εντολή σε σκάφος της Δανίας να μην επιβιβάσει μετανάστες και να τους επαναπροωθήσει στην Τουρκία. Οπως είπε, ζήτησε άμεσα εξηγήσεις από την Ελλάδα για να λάβει την απάντηση « ότι έγινε παρανόηση, κάποιος δεν κατάλαβε καλά την εντολή ! ».

      Στο θέμα των παράνομων επαναπροωθήσεων αναφέρθηκε και ο Μίνως Μουζουράκης από την οργάνωση Υποστήριξη Προσφύγων στο Αιγαίο, λέγοντας « είδαμε κάποιες φορές το Λιμενικό να μην κάνει επιχειρήσεις διάσωσης παρόλο που οι μετανάστες είχαν εκπέμψει SOS, ενώ έχουμε δει ανθρώπους να μένουν στη θάλασσα για 17 ώρες... ». Αλλος ευρωβουλευτής διαμαρτυρήθηκε για το επιχείρημα της ελληνικής κυβέρνησης ότι οι καταγγελίες είναι τουρκική προπαγάνδα. « Είμαστε όλοι εδώ όργανα της τουρκικής κυβέρνησης ; » αναρωτήθηκε σε έντονο ύφος.

      ΣΗΜΕΙΩΣΗ :

      Στο αρχικό κείμενο, μεταφέρθηκε λανθασμένα, με βάση την ταυτόχρονη διερμηνεία της συνεδρίασης στα ελληνικά, η δήλωση του Γιώργου Κουμουτσάκου. Ο αναπληρωτής υπουργός Μετανάστευσης και Ασύλου εμφανιζόταν να λέει ότι δεν πρέπει να αποκλειστεί η ανάγκη επαναπροώθησης παράτυπων μεταναστών. Η σωστή μετάφραση της δήλωσης είναι : « Σε καμία περίπτωση δεν πρέπει να αποκλειστεί ότι θα υπάρξει νέα απόπειρα να προωθηθούν μετανάστες στην Ελλάδα και την Ευρώπη [σσ. εκ μέρους της Τουρκίας] Παραμένουμε σε επαγρύπνηση και πρέπει να είμαστε όλοι μας προετοιμασμένοι για να εμποδίσουμε κάθε νέα παρόμοια απόπειρα ». Η διόρθωση έχει περιληφθεί στο κείμενο.

      https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/dikaiomata/250964_alla-logia-n-agapiomaste

      –---

      Du grand n’importe quoi...

      Le spectacel donné hier Notis Mitarakis (Ministre grec de la politique migratoire), George Koumoutsakos (Vice-ministre de la politique migratoire) et Michalis Chrysochoidis (Ministre de la Protection du Citoyen – euphémisme pour Ministre de l’Ordre Public) à la commission LIBE du Parlement européen est lamentable et fait honte au pays● Les ministres grecs ont reçu des salves des questions concernant les révélations sur les violences et les morts à la frontière grecque et n’ont pas réussi à apporter même l’ombre d’une réponse sur le fond de cette affaire !

      La réunion de la commission des libertés civiles, de la justice et des affaires intérieures du Parlement européen sur la situation aux postes frontaliers gréco-turcs et le respect des droits de l’homme a tourné en Waterloo pour les trois ministres grecs.

      L’image des ministres grecs, recevant des rafales des questions sur les opérations de dissuasion et de refoulements illégaux, et sur les violences incontrôlables et les morts à Evros, a été vraiment désolante. Ils n’ont réussi à donner aucune réponse précise, au contraire, ils n’ont cessé de remâcher des généralités sur le respect des droits de l’homme, du droit international et la protection de la vie humaine de la part de la Grèce, se retournant même contre les députés en raison de leurs remarques tranchantes. Leur attitude a été vivement critiquée.

      "Ils sont tout le temps hors sujet, comme s’ils avaient été invités à un mariage où ils récitent des éloges funéraires", a ironisé un député européen, tandis que le président de la commission, Juan Fernando Lopez Aguilar a déclaré : "Ils ne veulent pas répondre, c’est la conclusion politique de la réunion". . La réunion a eu lieu juste après la publication de la vidéo de l’équipe de recherche de Forensic Architecture sur le meurtre du réfugié syrien de 22 ans à Evros et de nombreuses publications sur la politique du gouvernement grec aux frontières , ainsi que des dénonciations envoyées à la Commission par des Organisations de défense des droits de l’homme telles que Human Rights Watch et Amnesty International.

      Ylva Johansson, commissaire aux affaires intérieures, était catégorique : "Il y a de rapports sur les refoulements de migrants qui sont explicitement interdites. Les refoulements sont illégaux et j’appelle les autorités grecques à enquêter sur tous les cas dénoncés ». En vain, M. Chrysochoidis avait affirmé que "la Grèce protège efficacement les frontières européennes" et M. Mitarakis que le gouvernement "met l’accent sur la protection de la vie humaine".

      « Il ne faut en aucun cas exclure une nouvelle tentative de pousser des migrants vers la Grèce et l’Europe. Nous restons vigilants et nous devons tous être prêts afin d’empêcher de nouvelles tentatives de ce type », a déclaré M. Koumoutsakos, qui a souligné que le rôle du bouclier européen, que le gouvernement a assumé sans rechigner, se traduit par un certain type de gestion politique à la frontière.

      L’eurodéputée du groupe de Verts Tineke Strick a mentionné les migrants morts ou blessés par tirs de balles, et a qualifié la position du gouvernement grec comme "incohérente" : elle a déclaré que "on nous dit que tout va bien et qu’il n’y a pas de problème, et ensuite on nous dit que c’est la faute de la Turquie, ce qui veut dire qu’il y a effectivement un problème. On nous dit qu’il n’y a pas de problème, mais nous en discutons ici. Le gouvernement grec est dans le déni de ce qui se passe. " L’eurodéputée Cornelia Ernst (GUE) a demandé aux ministres grecs de fournir les vidéos pertinentes et leur a demandé s’ils pouvaient mener une enquête non partisane, tout en appelant la Commission à entreprendre des actions et ne pas en rester à la dénonciation. L’Espagnol Domènec Ruiz Devesa (sociaux-démocrates) a parlé de la gestion de l’immigration par le gouvernement grec comme étant d’extrême droite, provoquant la réaction vive des ministres Chrysochoidis et G. Koumoutsakos qui lui ont demandé de retirer ce qu’il venait de dire et ont conseillé aux députés de faire attention.

      Quant aux morts de réfugiés à Evros suite à de tirs à balles réelles, M. Chrysochoidis a insisté sur le fait qu ’"il y a eu aucun usage d’arme, seules des mesures de police ont été déployés", et a évoqué le fait qu’il y avait sur place des centaines de caméras de télévision et de témoins oculaires. "S’il y a une dénonciation, envoyez-la pour enquête", a-t-il dit. Cependant, les décès et les tirs ont été effectivement enregistrés sur caméra et documents audio, ce qui dément complètement les dires du ministre, quant à l’enquête, le gouvernement est censé avoir déjà enquêté sur les allégations.

      La situation des ministres grecs s’est aggravée pendant la deuxième partie de la débat, lorsque le directeur général de Frontex, Fabrice Leggeri, a admis que lors d’une opération rapide à la frontière maritime, les garde-côtes grecs ont ordonné à un bateau danois de ne pas embarquer des migrants et de les refouler vers ka Turquie. Comme il l’a dit, il a immédiatement demandé des explications à la Grèce afin de recevoir la réponse "qu’il y a eu un malentendu, quelqu’un n’a pas bien compris l’ordre !".

      Minos Mouzourakis de l’ONG RSA (Refugees Support Aegean), a également parlé sur la question des refoulements illégaux, affirmant que "quelquefois nous avons vu la Garde côtière ne pas effectuer d’opérations de sauvetage, malgré le fait que les migrants avaient lancé un SOS, et nous avons même vu des personnes rester en mer pendant 17 heures. .. ». Un autre député européen a protesté contre l’argument brandi par le gouvernement grec, selon lequel les allégations de refoulement et de tirs mortels relèvent de la propagande turque. "Sommes-nous tous ici des organes du gouvernement turc ?" a-t-il clamé.

      Traduction reçue via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 07.07.2020

    • Interpellé sur les accusations de Peter Tauber, le secrétaire d’Etat à l’Immigration #George_Koumoutsakos a indirectement mais clairement reconnu l’existence des opérations illégales de refoulement à la frontière grecque. Il a sous-entendu que de telles opérations qui violent le droit international permettent à la Grèce d’assurer son rôle de ’#bouclier_de_l'Europe' et de protéger sa propre population des migrants porteurs éventuels du virus. Il a même insisté sur le fait que la Grèce ne peut pas être à la fois félicitée de garder de frontières européennes et être mise sur le banc des accusés. Mis à part cet aveu indirect mais transparent des opérations de refoulement de plus en plus violentes par un membre du gouvernement grec, la responsabilité des instances européennes pour cette politique criminelle d’une soi-disant ’protection’ à n’importe quel prix des frontières européennes devient évidente.

      https://www.efsyn.gr/stiles/ypografoyn/255729_faidri-omologia-koymoytsakoy (en grec)

      –-----

      Un aveu qui frôle le ridicule

      Le secrétaire d’Etat à l’Immigration Koumoutsakos reconnaît que des refoulements illégaux font partie de l’arsenal de la Grèce, en tant que « bouclier de l’Europe »

      C’est l’image d’une confusion totale et d’un double langage que donne donnée le gouvernement grec, concernant les allégations très graves d’opérations illégales de dissuasion et de refoulement les réfugiés à la frontière ; celles-ci ne font plus seulement l’objet de publication dans la presse internationale et grecque, mais sont confirmées par les gouvernements des états participant à la force navale de la mer Égée, comme l’Allemagne et le Danemark, ainsi que par le directeur de l’agence FRONTEX Fabrice Leggeri.

      Le gouvernement a catégoriquement nié tout soupçon de telles opérations illégales et a vaguement fait référence à des enquêtes, sans, bien entendu, les présenter. Il a même accusé la presse et les députés de l’opposition de reproduire des mensonges de propagande turque, une accusation vulgaire et dangereuse. Tout d’un coup, le disque a changé.

      En réponse à la publication de plaintes par le gouvernement allemand, le secrétaire d’état à l’Immigration et de l’Asile George Koumoutsakos n’a pas seulement nié les allégations de violation flagrante du droit international, mais les a adoptées indirectement mais clairement dans une interview télévisée à la chaîne ANT1 ( en grec à partir du 20ième minute). Il a recouru à un certain nombre d’excuses ridicules, en mentionnant le rôle de la Grèce comme "bouclier de l’Europe", les félicitations données au pays par les dirigeants européens début mars à Evros, et il a même fait appel à l’éventuelle connexion de la pandémie du coronavirus avec l’immigration et à la nécessité de protéger la Grèce. Une protection à assurer avec des fusillades à Evros, des violences et des refoulements illégales ? Des propos qui seraient ridicules si ils n’étaient pas si dangereux qui s’adressent à l’auditoire d’extrême droite du gouvernement et à ses fidèles porte-paroles.

      Plusieurs fois dans le passé, M. Koumoutsakos a tenté d’établir un lien similaire entre les réfugiés et le coronavirus et a été solennellement démenti par des membres même du gouvernement. Mais le problème n’est pas le manque de sérieux du ministre ni son argumentation identique à celui de l’extrême droite. Le problème est que la violation du droit international des réfugiés est la politique officielle du gouvernement grec et elle sape la crédibilité internationale du pays à un moment critique.

      Reçu via Viky Skoumbi via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 17.08.2020

    • Το Βερολίνο καταλογίζει στην Αθήνα παράνομες επαναπροωθήσεις

      H γερμανική κυβέρνηση βρίσκεται « σε συνεχή επαφή » με την ελληνική για τις επαναπροωθήσεις. Της επιρρίπτει παραβίαση του Διεθνούς Δικαίου. Πρόκειται για μια αλλαγή στάσης σε σύγκριση με το πρόσφατο παρελθόν.

      Για πρώτη φορά η γερμανική κυβέρνηση καταλογίζει δημόσια στην Ελλάδα παράνομες επαναπροωθήσεις προσφύγων στην Τουρκία. Αυτό προκύπτει από επιστολή του υφυπουργού Άμυνας Πέτερ Τάουμπερ. Σύμφωνα με τον χριστιανοδημοκράτη πολιτικό, πληρώματα του γερμανικού πολεμικού ναυτικού έγιναν τους τελευταίους μήνες, σε δύο περιπτώσεις, μάρτυρες παράνομων επαναπροωθήσεων στα τουρκικά ύδατα στο Αιγαίο. Όπως τονίζει ο κ.Τάουμπερ, « η γερμανική κυβέρνηση βρίσκεται σε συνεχή επαφή με την ελληνική κυβέρνηση και εφιστά την προσοχή στους ισχύοντες κανόνες του Διεθνούς Δικαίου. »

      Η επιστολή του κ. Τάουμπερ με ημερομηνία 6 Αυγούστου είναι απάντηση σε επερώτηση του βουλευτή Αντρέι Χούνκο. Ο πολιτικός του κόμματος Η Αριστερά είχε ζητήσει να ενημερωθεί σχετικά με το εάν πληρώματα του γερμανικού πολεμικού ναυτικού και της αεροπορίας έχουν παρατηρήσει σκάφη της ελληνικής ακτοφυλακής ή και της Frontex να παρεμποδίζουν φουσκωτά με πρόσφυγες, να εισέλθουν στα ελληνικά ύδατα ή ακόμη να τα ρυμουλκούν πίσω στην Τουρκία.

      Παραδοχή των επαναπροωθήσεων

      Στην απάντηση του, ο κ.Τάουμπερ επιβεβαιώνει ότι το πλήρωμα του εφοδιαστικού σκάφους « Berlin » που ηγείται της Μόνιμης Ναυτικής Δύναμης 2 του ΝΑΤΟ στο Αιγαίο, παρακολούθησε στις 19 Ιουνίου περιστατικό όπως το περιγράφει στην επερώτηση του ο βουλευτής. Στο ίδιο έγγραφο ο υφυπουργός Άμυνας επιβεβαιώνει επίσης ότι το γερμανικό ναυτικό ήταν μάρτυρας ενός παρόμοιου περιστατικού. Από τα συμφραζόμενα προκύπτει ότι πρόκειται για πρόσφυγες που είχαν φτάσει στις 30 Απριλίου στη Χίο και οι οποίοι αυθημερόν μεταφέρθηκαν βίαια σε τουρκικά ύδατα. Παράλληλα ο κ.Τάουμπερ ενημερώνει ότι στις 4 Ιουνίου το « Berlin » διέσωσε στο Αιγαίο 32 άτομα που επέβαιναν σε λέμβο και διέτρεχαν κίνδυνο να πνιγούν.

      Η απάντηση του γερμανού υφυπουργού Άμυνας συνιστά αλλαγή στάσης της γερμανικής κυβέρνησης. Μέχρι πρόσφατα ακόμη αρνούνταν να καταγγείλει την Ελλάδα δημόσια για παράνομες επαναπροωθήσεις. Ενδεικτική για τη μέχρι πρότινος γερμανική στάση είναι η απάντηση που είχε δώσει στις 22 Ιουνίου στο γερμανικό κοινοβούλιο ο υφυπουργός Εσωτερικών Χέλμουτ Τάιχμαν σε ερώτηση της βουλευτού Λουίζε Άμτσμπεργκ. Η πολιτικός των Πρασίνων ζήτησε να ενημερωθεί κατά πόσο έχουν πέσει στην αντίληψη γερμανών αστυνομικών και στρατιωτών που συμμετέχουν σε αποστολές της Frontex και του ΝATO στην Ελλάδα παράνομες επαναπροωθήσεις. Στην απάντηση του, ο υφυπουργός Τάιχμαν είχε επισημάνει πως η « δημόσια αποκάλυψη » τέτοιων στοιχείων « θα μπορούσε να έχει αρνητικές επιπτώσεις στις δραστηριότητες του ΝΑΤΟ στο Αιγαίο καθώς και στις διμερείς σχέσεις μεταξύ Γερμανίας και Ελλάδας και επομένως να βλάψει τα συμφέροντα της Γερμανίας. » Αυτή η επιφυλακτικότητα δεν φαίνεται πλέον να ισχύει.

      Αμφισβήτηση του ρόλου της Frontex

      Σε σημερινή του δήλωση, ο βουλευτής του κόμματος Η Αριστερά Αντρέι Χούνκο καταλογίζει στο γερμανικό ναυτικό πως με την παθητική του στάση συνεργεί στις επαναπροωθήσεις και στη γερμανική κυβέρνηση ότι « παραβιάζει το Διεθνές Δίκαιο ». Οι αποστολές της Frontex στην Ελλάδα πρέπει σύμφωνα με τον κ. Χούνκο να διακοπούν διότι η ελληνική κυβέρνηση παραβιάζει την Ευρωπαϊκή Σύμβαση Δικαιωμάτων του Ανθρώπου.

      https://www.dw.com/el/%CF%84%CE%BF-%CE%B2%CE%B5%CF%81%CE%BF%CE%BB%CE%AF%CE%BD%CE%BF-%CE%BA%CE%B1%CF%84%CE%B1%CE%BB%CE%BF%CE%B3%CE%AF%CE%B6%CE%B5%CE%B9-%CF%83%CF%84%CE%B7%CE%BD-%CE%B1%CE%B8%CE%AE%CE%BD%CE%B1-%CF%80%CE%B1%CF%81%CE%AC%CE%BD%CE%BF%CE%BC%CE%B5%CF%82-%CE%B5%CF%80%CE%B1%CE%BD%CE%B1%CF%80%CF%81%CE%BF%CF%89%CE%B8%CE%AE%CF%83%CE%B5%CE%B9%CF%82/a-54527198

    • Greek Migration Min. Responds to Reports of “Organized Forced Return of Migrants”

      The Greek Ministry of Migration & Asylum refuted reports that it was “organizing the forced return of migrants” on Friday and called related media reports “a systematic effort to distort facts in order to serve specific goals.”

      The policy of the ministry is to work in observance of international laws, “as a contemporary European country that welcomes refugees who are in true need, assists them and supports them to integrate in society and function independently. However, illegal migration remains one of the most serious and sensitive issues that we face as a Greek country and Greek society the last five years, and as a country that serves as an entry gate to the European Union.”

      In this context, it noted, “we obviously proceed to departures, with an emphasis on returns - voluntary or not - of people who are not entitled to international protection” and it called for “greater attention in evaluating such facts as true and reliable.”

      https://www.thenationalherald.com/greece_politics/arthro/greek_migration_min_responds_to_reports_of_organized_forced_retur

    • UNHCR concerned by pushback reports, calls for protection of refugees and asylum-seekers

      UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, remains deeply concerned by an increasing number of credible reports indicating that men, women and children may have been informally returned to Turkey immediately after reaching Greek soil or territorial waters in recent months.

      UNHCR firmly reiterates its call on Greece to refrain from such practices and to seriously investigate these reports, which include a series of credible and direct accounts that have been recorded by the UNHCR Office in Greece and have been brought to the attention of the responsible authorities. Given the nature, content, frequency, and consistency of these accounts, a proper investigation should be launched without further delay.

      UNHCR fully respects the legitimate right of States to control their borders and recognizes the challenges posed by mixed migration movements at the external borders of the EU. However, States must guarantee and safeguard the rights of those seeking international protection in accordance with national, European and international law. Every individual has the right for their case to be heard and their protection needs assessed.

      “Greece and its people have shown immense solidarity and compassion with thousands of refugees and asylum-seekers who have sought safety in the country since 2015,” said Philippe Leclerc, UNHCR Representative in Greece. “The numbers of refugee arrivals have significantly dropped since then but there are still people who continue to seek protection and asylum in Greece and in Europe,” he said.

      “Safeguarding Greece’s borders and protecting refugees are not mutually exclusive. Both are and should be possible. This is not a dilemma but a balance that must be struck,” said Leclerc. “Otherwise, the consequences may be far-reaching and damaging: for the people whose lives and safety may be put at risk; for the upholding of fundamental principles of international and European law; for long-since recognized human rights norms and values, that may be irreparably undermined,” he added.

      UNHCR is particularly concerned about the increasing reports, since March 2020, of alleged informal returns by sea of persons who, according to their own attestations or those of third persons, have disembarked on Greek shores and have thereafter been towed back to sea. Worryingly, UNHCR has also received reports and testimonies about people being left adrift at sea for a long time, often on unseaworthy and overcrowded dinghies, waiting to be rescued.

      UNHCR has also called for further preventive measures against such practices, for clear rules of process at the border and internal monitoring mechanisms, including through the reinforcement of the role of the Greek Ombudsman.

      Saving lives must be the first priority – both on land and at sea. UNHCR acknowledges the challenges faced by frontline states like Greece and calls on EU Member States to demonstrate their solidarity with Greece, particularly through the relocation of asylum-seekers.

      Solutions can be achieved through combating smuggling, expanding legal options for migration, and ensuring that all those in need of protection have effective access to it. At the same time, the return of those who, after a formal assessment of their needs, are found not to be in need of international protection is also part of effective migration management and should be consistently addressed and supported.

      The right to seek asylum is a fundamental human right. With concerted efforts and cooperation between all concerned states and the EU, managing borders can be achieved and protection concerns of refugees addressed.

      https://www.unhcr.org/gr/en/16207-unhcr-concerned-by-pushback-reports-calls-for-protection-of-refugees-an

    • Refoulements illégaux de migrants en mer : des rumeurs relayées par des passeurs, selon Athènes

      Visées par de multiples accusations sur des refoulements illégaux de migrants en mer, les autorités grecques ont estimé que ces allégations étaient le résultat d’une « propagande » menée par les réseaux de passeurs.

      Le ministre des migrations grec, Notis Mitarachi a déclaré, lundi 31 août, que des passeurs étaient à l’origine des déclarations, reléguées au rang de rumeurs, selon lesquelles Athènes expulse illégalement des demandeurs d’asile.

      « Ces incidents n’ont rien de réel », a assuré Notis Mitarachi à la BBC. Selon ce dernier, les passeurs réagiraient aux mesures strictes prises ces derniers mois par Athènes pour freiner l’immigration illégale dans le pays. Des mesures qui, d’après lui, nuisent au business des passeurs.

      « Nous pensons qu’il s’agit du résultat d’une propagande menée par des réseaux de trafic illégal qui perdent des dizaines de millions d’euros », a-t-il affirmé.

      Multiples accusations

      Plusieurs organisations de défense des droits de l’Homme, dont le Haut-commissariat de l’ONU pour les réfugiés (HCR), ont à plusieurs reprises exhorté la Grèce à enquêter sur ces accusations de « push-backs ».

      À la mi-août, des soldats de l’armée allemande ont apporté une confirmation à ces accusations en assurant que des embarcations se dirigeant vers la Grèce avaient été repoussées vers les eaux territoriales turques.

      InfoMigrants avait par ailleurs reçu une vidéo tournée en mer Égée le 30 avril attestant de telles pratiques. Ces images montraient un navire des garde-côtes grecs faire d’énormes vagues autour d’une embarcation de migrants pour les empêcher de rejoindre l’île de Lesbos.

      Plus récemment, des révélations accablantes du New York Times ont jeté la lumière sur le fait que la Grèce a « abandonné » plus d’un millier de migrants en mer depuis le mois de mars, ce qu’Athènes dément. Le journal américain affirme que les autorités grecques laissent les embarcations dériver pour que les garde-côtes turcs leur portent secours.

      « Nous protégeons nos frontières avec détermination »

      Face à ce concert de critiques, les autorités grecques ne dévient pas de leur position. Pour toute réponse à ces accusations, Notis Mitarachi s’est contenté de souligner que les garde-côtes grecs avaient récemment secouru « des dizaines » de migrants et que les garde-côtes turcs avaient, eux, escorté « à de nombreuses occasions » des canots de passeurs dans les eaux grecques.

      « Nous protégeons nos frontières avec détermination, dans le cadre des obligations internationales et des règles européennes », a déclaré Notis Mitarachi. « La Grèce ne peut pas être la porte d’entrée de l’Europe. »

      Le Premier ministre grec, Kyriakos Mitsotakis, a également démenti les accusations de refoulements illégaux, accusant la Turquie de colporter de « fausses informations » à propos des mesures « dures mais justes » appliquées par Athènes.

      La Grèce, pays par lequel plus d’un million de personnes sont passées au cours des années 2015-2016, entretient des relations tendues avec la Turquie. Les deux États ne s’entendent ni sur la question migratoire, ni sur celle des recherches d’hydrocarbures menées par la Turquie en Méditerranée orientale dans des zones disputées à la Grèce et à Chypre.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/26982/refoulements-illegaux-de-migrants-en-mer-des-rumeurs-relayees-par-des-

    • Pushbacks Across the Evros/Meriç River: Situated Testimony

      For years, migrants and refugees crossing the Evros/Meriç River from Turkey to Greece have testified to being detained, beaten, and ‘pushed back’ across the river to Turkey, by unidentified masked men, in full secrecy, at night, and without being granted access to asylum procedures.

      Greek and EU authorities systematically deny any wrongdoing and refuse to investigate these reports.

      The Evros/Meriç river delineates the only ‘land’ border between Greece and Turkey. Spanning from the trilateral border with Bulgaria in the north, where the river is called Maritsa, to the Aegean Sea in the south, this so-called ‘natural’ border has in recent years been incorporated into a wider ecosystem of border defence. Its natural processes have been weaponised to deter and let die those who attempt to cross it and to obfuscate this violence and deflect responsibility.

      For independent researchers, the militarisation of this border region makes access extremely difficult; a restricted ‘buffer zone’ runs along both banks of the river. Detention centres and border guard stations are often located within this buffer zone, keeping detained people out of sight and without access to legal support.

      Witnesses describe having their phones, documents, and possessions confiscated and often thrown into the river, suggesting an operation that is carefully designed to remove any potential evidence of human rights violations.

      Using an interview technique called ‘situated testimony’ we collected and corroborated evidence to prove the practice of ‘pushbacks’ at Evros/Meriç river, are methodical and widespread, and to identify the agents and agencies responsible. Situated Testimony is a technique of interviewing developed by Forensic Architecture, which uses 3D models of the scenes and environments in which traumatic events occurred to aid in the process of interviewing and gathering testimony from witnesses to those events. Together with an architectural researcher, a witness is filmed reconstructing the scene of an event, exploring and accessing their memories of the episode in a controlled and secure manner.

      https://forensic-architecture.org/investigation/evros-situated-testimony

  • Grèce : nouvelle extension du confinement dans les #camps de demandeurs d’asile

    En Grèce, les autorités ont à nouveau prolongé le confinement des principaux camps de demandeurs d’asile pour 15 jours supplémentaires, soit jusqu’au 21 juin. C’est la troisième fois que ce confinement est prolongé depuis le mois de mai, officiellement en raison de la lutte contre la pandémie de coronavirus. Un virus qui a pourtant relativement épargné le pays, où moins de 200 victimes ont été recensées depuis le début de la crise sanitaire.

    C’est début mai que le confinement de la population grecque a été levé. Depuis, celui-ci se poursuit pourtant dans les centres dits « d’accueil et d’identification » de demandeurs d’asile. Des camps où s’entassent au total près de 35 000 personnes et qui se situent sur cinq îles de la mer Égée - à l’image de #Moria sur l’île de #Lesbos - ou à la frontière terrestre avec la Turquie, comme le centre de l’#Evros.

    Officiellement, il s’agit pour les autorités grecques de lutter contre la propagation du coronavirus. Or, parmi l’ensemble des demandeurs d’asile, seuls quelques dizaines de cas ont été signalés à travers le pays et aucune victime n’a été recensée.

    Avant la crise sanitaire, la tension était vive en revanche sur plusieurs îles qui abritent des camps, en particulier à Lesbos fin février et début mars. Une partie de la population locale exprimait alors son ras-le-bol, parfois avec violence, face à cette cohabitation forcée.

    Athènes a d’ailleurs l’intention de mettre prochainement en place de premiers centres fermés ou semi-fermés. Notamment sur l’île de Samos et à Malakassa, au nord de la capitale. La prolongation répétée du confinement pour plusieurs dizaines de milliers de demandeurs d’asile semble ainsi s’inscrire dans une logique parallèle.

    http://www.rfi.fr/fr/europe/20200607-gr%C3%A8ce-nouvelle-extension-confinement-les-camps

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #extension #prolongation #confinement #coronavirus #covid-19 #Grèce #camps_de_réfugiés

    ping @luciebacon @karine4 @isskein

    • Νέα παράταση εγκλεισμού στα ΚΥΤ των νησιών με πρόσχημα τον κορονοϊό

      Αν δεν υπήρχε ο κορονοϊός, η κυβέρνηση θα έπρεπε να τον είχε εφεύρει για να μπορέσει να περάσει ευκολότερα την ακροδεξιά της ατζέντα στο προσφυγικό.

      Από την αρχή της εκδήλωσης της πανδημίας του κορονοϊού η κυβέρνηση αντιμετώπισε την πανδημία όχι σαν κάτι από το οποίο έπρεπε να προστατέψει τους πρόσφυγες και τους μετανάστες που ζουν στις δομές, αλλά αντιθέτως σαν άλλη μια ευκαιρία για να τους στοχοποιήσει σαν υποτιθέμενη υγειονομική απειλή. Εξού και δεν πήρε ουσιαστικά μέτρα πρόληψης και προστασίας των δομών, αγνοώντας επιδεικτικά τις επείγουσες συστάσεις ελληνικών, διεθνών και ευρωπαϊκών φορέων.

      Δεν προχώρησε ούτε στην άμεση εκκένωση των Κέντρων Υποδοχής και Ταυτοποίησης από τους περισσότερους από 2.000 πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες που είναι ιδιαίτερα ευπαθείς στον κορονοϊό - άνθρωποι ηλικιωμένοι ή με χρόνια σοβαρά προβλήματα υγείας. Αντιθέτως, ανέβαλε στην πράξη με προσχηματικές αοριστολογίες ή και σιωπηρά για τουλάχιστον δύο μήνες τη σχετική συμφωνία που είχε κάνει το υπουργείο Μετανάστευσης και Ασύλου με την κυρία Γιόχανσον στις αρχές Απριλίου.

      Με άλλα λόγια, αν δεν υπήρχε ο κορονοϊός, η κυβέρνηση θα έπρεπε να τον είχε εφεύρει για να μπορέσει να περάσει ευκολότερα την ακροδεξιά της ατζέντα στο προσφυγικό. Στην πραγματικότητα, αυτό ακριβώς κάνει ο υπουργός Μετανάστευσης και Ασύλου : χρησιμοποιεί την πανδημία του κορονοϊού για να παρατείνει ξανά και ξανά την καραντίνα σε δομές. Ιδίως στα Κέντρα Υποδοχής και Ταυτοποίησης στα νησιά, όπου εξελίχθηκαν σε φιάσκο οι άτσαλες και βιαστικές απόπειρες του υπουργού Νότη Μητασράκη και του υπουργού Προστασίας του Πολίτη Μιχάλη Χρυσοχοΐδη να επιβάλουν με επιτάξεις, απευθείας αναθέσεις και άγρια καταστολή έργα πολλών δεκάδων εκατομμυρίων ευρώ για τη δημιουργία νέων Κέντρων Υποδοχής και Ταυτοποίησης, πολλαπλάσιας χωρητικότητας από ατυτή των σημερινών.

      Η επιβολή καραντίνας στα ΚΥΤ στα νησιά ξεκίνησε στις 24 Μαρτίου, αρκετά πριν την επιβολή καραντίνας στο γενικό πληθυσμό, και από τότε ανανεώνεται συνεχώς. Το Σάββατο 20 Ιουνίου οι υπουργοί Μηταράκης και Χρυσοχοΐδης έδωσαν άλλη μια παράταση υγειονομικού αποκλεισμού των ΚΥΤ μέχρι τις 5 Ιουλίου, οπότε και θα συμπληρωθούν 3,5 μήνες συνεχούς καραντίνας. Τουλάχιστον για τα μάτια των ξενοφοβικών, καθώς στην πράξη οι αρχές αδυνατούν να επιβάλουν καραντίνα σε δομές που εξαπλώνονται σε μεγάλη έκταση έξω από τους οριοθετημένους χώρους των ΚΥΤ.

      Οι υπουργοί ανακοίνωσαν επίσης παράταση της καραντίνας στις δομές της Μαλακάσας, της Ριτσώνας και του Κουτσόχερου, όπου είχαν εμφανιστεί κρούσματα πριν από πολλές εβδομάδες, και έκτοτε δεν υπάρχει ενημέρωση για νέα κρούσματα μέσα στις δομές, παρόλο που έχει παρέλθει προ πολλού το προβλεπόμενο χρονικό όριο της καραντίνας.

      Πρόκειται για σκανδαλωδώς προκλητική διαχείριση, επικοινωνιακή και μόνο, τόσο του προσφυγικού και μεταναστευτικού όσο και του ζητήματος του κορονοϊού.

      https://www.efsyn.gr/node/248622

      #hotspot #hotpspots

      –—

      Avec ce commentaire de Vicky Skoumbi, reçu le 21.06.2020 via la mailing-list Migreurop :

      Sous des prétexte fallacieux, le gouvernement prolonge une énième fois les mesures de restriction de mouvement pour les résidents de hotspots dans les #îles et pour trois structures d’accueil au continent, #Malakasa, #Ritsona et #Koutsohero. Le 5 juillet, date jusqu’à laquelle court cette nouvelle #prolongation, les réfugiés dans les camps auront passés trois mois et demi sous #quarantaine. Je rappelle que depuis au moins un mois la population grecque a retrouvé une entière liberté de mouvement. Il est fort à parier que de prolongation en prolongation tout le reste de l’été se passera comme cela, jusqu’à la création de nouveaux centres fermés dans les îles. Cette éternisation de la quarantaine -soi-disant pour des raisons sanitaires qu’aucune donné réel ne justifie, transforme de fait les hotspots en #centres_fermés anticipant ainsi le projet du gouvernement.

      #stratégie_du_choc

    • Pro-migrant protests in Athens as Greece extends lockdown

      Following protests in Athens slamming the government for its treatment of migrants, the Greek government over the weekend said it would extend the COVID-19 lockdown on the migrant camps on Greek Aegean islands and on the mainland.

      Greece has extended a coronavirus lockdown on its migrant camps for a further two weeks. On Saturday, Greece announced extension of the coronavirus lockdown on its overcrowded and unsanitary migrant camps on its islands in the Aegean Sea for another fortnight.

      The move came hours after some 2,000 people protested in central Athens on Saturday to mark World Refugee Day and denounced the government’s treatment of migrants.

      The migration ministry said migrants living in island camps as well as those in mainland Greece will remain under lockdown until July 5. It was due to have ended on Monday, June 22, along with the easing of general community restrictions as the country has been preparing to welcome tourists for the summer.

      The Greek government first introduced strict confinement measures in migrant camps on March 21. A more general lockdown was imposed on March 23; it has since been extended a number of times. No known coronavirus deaths have been recorded in Greek migrant camps so far and only a few dozen infections have surfaced. Rights groups have expressed concern that migrants’ rights have been eroded by the restrictions.

      On May 18, the Greek asylum service resumed receiving asylum applications after an 11-week pause. Residence permits held by refugees will be extended six months from their date of expiration to prevent the service from becoming overwhelmed by renewal applications.

      ’No refugee homeless, persecuted, jailed’

      During the Saturday protests, members of anti-racist groups, joined by residents from migrant camps, marched in central Athens. They were holding banners proclaiming “No refugee homeless, persecuted, jailed” and chanting slogans against evictions of refugees from temporary accommodation in apartments.

      More than 11,000 refugees who have been living in reception facilities for asylum seekers could soon be evicted. Refugees used to be able to keep their accommodation for up to six months after receiving protected status.

      But the transitional grace period was recently reduced significantly: Since March of this year, people can no longer stay in the reception system for six months after they were officially recognized as refugees — they only have 30 days.

      Refugee advocacy groups and UNHCR have expressed concern that the people evicted could end up homeless. “Forcing people to leave their accommodation without a safety net and measures to ensure their self-reliance may push many into poverty and homelessness,” UNHCR spokesperson Andrej Mahecic said last week.

      The government insists that it is doing everything necessary “to assure a smooth transition for those who leave their lodgings.”

      Moreover, UNHCR and several NGOs and human rights groups have spoken out to criticize the Greek government’s decision to cut spending on a housing program for asylum seekers by up to 30%. They said that it means less safe places to live for vulnerable groups.

      Asylum office laments burden, defends action

      In a message for World Refugee Day, the Ministry for Migration and Asylum said Greece has found itself “at the centre of the migration crisis bearing a disproportionate burden”, news agency AFP cites.

      “The country is safeguarding the rights of those who are really persecuted and operates as a shield of solidarity in the eastern Mediterranean,” it added.

      Government officials have repeatedly said Greece must become a less attractive destination for asylum seekers.

      The continued presence of more than 36,000 refugees and asylum seekers on the islands — over five times the intended capacity of shelters there — has caused major friction with local communities who are demanding their immediate removal.

      An operation in February to build detention centers for migrants on the islands of Lesbos and Chios had to be abandoned due to violent protests.

      Accusations of push-backs

      Greece has also been repeatedly accused of illegal pushbacks by its forces at its land and sea borders, which according to reports have spiked since March.

      On land, a Balkans-based network of human rights organizations said migrants reported beatings and violent collective expulsions from inland detention spaces to Turkey on boats across the Evros River. In the Aegean, a recent investigation by three media outlets claims that Greek coast guard officers intercept migrant boats coming from Turkey and send them back to Turkey in unseaworthy life rafts.

      Athens has repeatedly denied using illegal tactics to guard its borders, and has in turn accused Turkey of sending patrol boats to escort migrant boats into its waters.

      According to UNHCR, around 3,000 asylum seekers arrived in Greece by land and sea since the start of March, far fewer people than over previous months. Some 36,450 refugees and asylum seekers are currently staying on the Aegean islands.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/25521/pro-migrant-protests-in-athens-as-greece-extends-lockdown

      #résistance

    • Greek government must end lockdown for locked up people on Greek islands

      COVID-19-related lockdown measures have had an impact on the lives of everyone around the world and generated increasing levels of stress and anxiety for many of us. However, the restriction of movement imposed in places like Moria and Vathy, on the Greek islands, have proven to be toxic for the thousands of people contained there.

      When COVID-19 reached Greece, more than 30,000 asylum seekers and migrants were contained in the reception centres on the Greek islands in appalling conditions, without access to regular healthcare or basic services. Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) runs mental health clinics on the islands.

      In March 2020, a restriction of movement imposed by the central government in response to COVID-19 has meant that these people, 55 per cent of whom are women and children, have essentially been forced to remain in these overcrowded and unhygienic centres with no possibility to escape the dangerous conditions which are part of their daily life.

      Despite the fact that there have been zero cases of COVID-19 in any of the reception centres on the Greek islands, and that life has returned to normal for local people and tourists alike, these discriminatory measures for asylum seekers and migrants continue to be extended every two weeks.

      Today, these men, women and children continue to be hemmed in, in dire conditions, resulting in a deterioration of their medical and mental health.

      “The tensions have increased dramatically and there is much more violence since the lockdown, and the worst part is that even children cannot escape from it anymore,” says Mohtar, the father of a patient from MSF’s mental health clinic for children. “The only thing I could do before to help my son was to take him away from Moria; for a walk or to swim in the sea, in a calm place. Now we are trapped.”

      MSF cannot stay silent about this blatant discrimination, as the restriction of movement imposed on asylum seekers dramatically reduces their already-limited access to basic services and medical care.

      In the current phase of the COVID-19 epidemic in Greece, this measure is absolutely unjustified from a public health point of view – it is discriminatory towards people that don’t represent a risk and contributes to their stigmatisation, while putting them further at risk.

      “The restrictions of movement for migrants and refugees in the camp have affected the mental health of my patients dramatically,” says Greg Kavarnos, a psychologist in the MSF Survivors of Torture clinic on Lesbos. “If you and I felt stressed and were easily irritated during the period of the lockdown in our homes, imagine how people who have endured very traumatic experiences feel now that they have to stay locked up in a camp like Moria.”

      “Moria is a place where they cannot find peace, they cannot find a private space and they have to stand in lines for food, for the toilet, for water, for everything,” says Kavarnos.

      COVID-19 should not be used as a tool to detain migrants and refugees. We continue to call for the evacuation of people, especially those who belong to high-risk groups for COVID-19, from the reception centres to safe accommodation. The conditions in these centres are not acceptable in normal times however, they have become even more perilous pits of violence, sickness, and misery when people are unable to move due to arbitrary restrictions.

      https://www.msf.org/covid-19-excuse-keep-people-greek-islands-locked

    • La Grèce prolonge à nouveau le confinement dans les camps de migrants

      Athènes a annoncé vendredi une prolongation jusqu’à la fin du mois d’août du confinement dans les camps de migrants installés sur ses îles et le continent. Le pays connaît une hausse du nombre d’infections mais aucun décès n’a encore été enregistré dans les camps de migrants.

      Les camps de migrants de Grèce resteront confinés au moins jusqu’à la fin du mois d’août. Vendredi 31 juillet, le ministère des Migrations a déclaré que le confinement – entré en vigueur le 21 mars – sera prolongé jusqu’au 31 août "pour prévenir l’apparition et la diffusion des cas de coronavirus". Il s’agit de la 6e prolongation du confinement des camps de migrants, alors que la population grecque, elle, est sortie du confinement le 4 mai dernier.

      La Grèce, avec 203 décès dus au Covid-19, n’a pas été aussi sévèrement touchée que d’autres pays européens et aucun décès n’a été enregistré dans les camps de migrants.

      Mais ces derniers sont surpeuplés, en mer Egée particulièrement. Plus de 26 000 demandeurs d’asile y vivent, pour une d’une capacité d’accueil de moins de 6 100 places. Une situation qui génère de plus en plus de tensions avec la population locale.

      Néanmoins, la prolongation du confinement des seuls camps de migrants ne constitue pas moins une discrimination manifeste des droits des personnes migrantes, ont dénoncé de nombreuses ONG dans un communiqué publié le 17 juillet.

      “Nous sommes de plus en plus inquiets car les températures montent, nous sommes au milieu de l’été, et les migrants sont obligés de vivre dans des espaces saturés avec trop peu d’accès à l’hygiène, l’eau manque ainsi que les produits sanitaires dans la plupart des camps. Il y a un donc un risque que ces prolongement indéterminés provoquent d’importants problèmes sanitaires au sein des camps puisque les gens ne peuvent même plus sortir pour se faire soigner ou acheter des médicaments et des produits de première nécessité”, a indiqué à InfoMigrants Adriana Tidona, chercheuse spécialiste des questions migratoires en Europe pour Amnesty International.
      Augmentation du nombre de cas

      Si les autorités grecques veulent que les migrants restent dans des camps, elles invitent les touristes à venir dans le pays. Les aéroports grecs et les frontières ont ainsi été rouverts aux touristes étrangers. Or, ces mesures se sont accompagnées d’une augmentation du nombre de cas de Covid-19 dans le pays.

      Depuis le 1er juillet, plus de 340 cas confirmés ont été enregistrés parmi les près de 1,3 million de voyageurs entrant en Grèce, a indiqué mardi la protection civile

      Mardi, la Grèce a annoncé qu’elle rendait le masque obligatoire dans les magasins, les banques, les services publics et la quasi-totalité des lieux clos, en réponse à une résurgence des infections.


      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/26383/la-grece-prolonge-a-nouveau-le-confinement-dans-les-camps-de-migrants

    • Grèce : prolongation du confinement dans les camps de migrants

      Plus de 24.000 demandeurs d’asile sont logés dans des camps insalubres, d’une capacité d’accueil de moins de 6100 places.

      La Grèce a annoncé vendredi 28 août une prolongation jusqu’au 15 septembre du confinement imposé aux migrants dans les camps aux portes d’entrée de l’Europe, sur les îles et à la frontière terrestre du pays, qui connaît une résurgence des cas de coronavirus. Le confinement des camps, entré en vigueur le 21 mars, sera prolongé jusqu’au 15 septembre « pour empêcher l’apparition et la propagation des cas de coronavirus », a déclaré le ministère des Migrations.

      La présence de plus de 24.000 demandeurs d’asile dans des camps insalubres, d’une capacité d’accueil de moins de 6100 places, situés sur les cinq îles de la mer Égée, est une source d’inquiétude pour les autorités.

      Mais les ONG ont plusieurs fois dénoncé l’enfermement des demandeurs d’asile dans ces structures qui ne sont pas adaptées pour mettre en place les mesures barrières nécessaires. Les nouveaux arrivants sur les îles grecques sont par ailleurs placés en quarantaine dans des structures séparées pour ne pas prendre le risque de contaminer tout le camp. Alors que les arrivées s’étaient taries pendant le confinement, elles ont repris légèrement pendant l’été.

      Dans la nuit de jeudi à vendredi, les gardes-côtes grecs ont entrepris une opération de sauvetage d’un voilier au large de l’île de Rhodes avec à bord 55 migrants. Mercredi, la police portuaire avait déjà effectué une opération similaire au large de l’île de Halki et avait secouru 96 personnes. Pour la troisième journée consécutive, des recherches se poursuivent pour retrouver un homme de 35 ans et son fils de 4 ans, portés disparus depuis le naufrage selon la mère de l’enfant. La Grèce, avec 254 décès dus au Covid-19, n’a pas été aussi sévèrement touchée que d’autres pays européens, et aucun décès n’a été enregistré dans les camps de migrants.

      https://www.lefigaro.fr/flash-actu/grece-prolongation-du-confinement-dans-les-camps-de-migrants-1-20200828

    • More camps locked down

      Migrant reception centers in #Thiva, central Greece, and Serres, in the country’s north, have been put on lockdown following outbreaks of the coronavirus.

      The lockdowns were announced on Saturday in a joint decision by the ministries of Migration, Citizens’ Protection and Health and are to remain in force until October 9 when they will be reviewed.

      Migrant facilities in Elaionas, Malakasa, Oinofyta, Ritsona, Schistos, Koutsohero and Fylakio, on the mainland, and on the islands of Samos and Leros are also under lockdown following outbreaks there.

      On Lesvos, following the destruction of the Moria camp in fires earlier this month, migrants have been transferred to a temporary facility where Covid-19 infected residents have been segregated.

      https://www.ekathimerini.com/257425/article/ekathimerini/news/more-camps-locked-down

  • During and After Crisis : Evros Border Monitoring Report

    #HumanRights360 documents the recent developments in the European land border of Evros as a result of the ongoing policy of externalization and militarization of border security of the EU member States. The report analyses the current state of play, in conjunction with the constant amendments of the Greek legislation amid the discussions pertaining to the reform of the Common European Asylum System (CEAS) and the Return Directive.

    https://www.humanrights360.org/during-and-after-crisis-evros-border-monitoring-report

    #rapport #Evros #migrations #réfugiés #Grèce #frontières #2019 #militarisation_des_frontières #loi_sur_l'asile #Kleidi #Serres #covid-19 #coronavirus #Turquie #push-backs #refoulements #refoulement #push-back #statistiques #passages #chiffres #frontière_terrestre #murs #barrières_frontalières #Kastanies #violence #Komotini #enfermement #détention #rétention_administrative #Thiva #Fylakio #transferts

    –------
    Pour télécharger le rapport


    https://www.humanrights360.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/During-After-Crisis-Evros.pdf

    ping @luciebacon

  • Collective Expulsion from Greek Centres

    The Border Violence Monitoring Network are releasing new case material presenting evidence of removals from Greek centres and the subsequent pushback of at least 194 people to Turkey. The incidents, occurring from the camp in #Diavata and the #Drama_Paranesti Pre-removal Centre, show the extension of collective expulsion during the COVID-19 period. These are brazen acts which situate institutional accommodation sites and detention spaces firmly within the illegal pushback regime. Find out more in the full briefing attached below:

    https://www.borderviolence.eu/wp-content/uploads/Press-Release_Greek-Pushbacks.pdf
    #push-backs #push-back #renvois #refoulements #refoulement #Grèce #Turquie #Grèce #covid-19 #coronavirus #apport #Evros

    ping @luciebacon

    • Migrants accuse Greece of forced deportations

      New findings suggest Greek authorities are illegally deporting refugees across the Turkish border. As part of an international research team, DW identified and met some of the victims who were forced back. 

      “Come with us and we will issue you new papers,” a Greek police officer told Bakhtyar on a Wednesday morning in late April. The 22-year-old Afghan man believed the offer was the key to realizing his dream of starting a new life in Europe.

      Two months earlier Bakhtyar had crossed the Evros River, a border between Turkey and Greece, and a key route for refugees seeking to reach the European Union. He continued onward to Diavata, the official refugee camp set up on the outskirts of Greece’s second-largest city, Thessaloniki. Upon arrival he was careful to register with the Greek police, the precursor to seeking international protection — and a first step in the asylum process. A photograph of his document shows the date to be February 12, 2020.

      The coronavirus lockdown had closed most public services, and Bakhtyar says he had been anxious for the office to reopen so he could make an official asylum claim. He would not get the chance to do so.

      Recalling his encounter with police in April, Bakhtyar says he was put in a white van and taken to a police station in the center of Thessaloniki. Instead of getting the crucial papers as he was promised, Bakhtyar says the police confiscated all his belongings, including his phone. He was later relocated to another police station where, he says, officers slapped and kicked him before putting him onto the back of a truck. Bakhtyar remembers a sheet being pulled down to prevent anyone seeing who was inside the truck. He did not realize it at the time, but the truck was heading east — retracing his arduous journey back towards Turkey.

      When the truck stopped, Bakhtyar realized he was not alone. Other asylum-seekers like him were lined up along the banks of the Evros River. He recalls seeing young men loaded onto dinghies, 10 at a time. The boatman, Bakhtyar says, spoke in Greek to people he assumed were police, and to the asylum-seekers in their native Dari. DW could not independently verify that the men were Greek police officers. For Bakhtyar, he says it was clear it was not the boatman’s first such crosing to Turkey.

      Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the border between Greece and Turkey is closed. All official deportation procedures have been put on hold. When Bakhtyar and other asylum-seekers reached the far bank on the Turkish side, there was nothing and no-one waiting for them.  

      DW meets pushback victims 

      When DW met with Bakhtyar for this report, he was staying in Istanbul’s Esenler district, home to a substantial Afghan population. The city was under lockdown at the time and it was hard to move around. Wearing a red T-shirt with “New York” written across the front, Bakhtyar appeared sad and upset. He wants to get back to Greece as soon as possible to pursue his dream of living in Europe.

      Bakhtyar’s experience is not an isolated story. In a joint investigation between DW, the Dutch news publication Trouw, media nonprofit Lighthouse Reports, and the independent verification collective Bellingcat, we were able to locate Bakhtyar and other young men in Turkey and verify that they had been forcibly returned after previously being in Greece. Their accounts, all given separately, establish a clear pattern: male, under 30 and traveling by themselves. Most of them are from Afghanistan, some of them are from Pakistan and North Africa. They were either arrested in the Greek camp of Diavata or picked up seemingly at random by local police near the camp.

      Together with our news partners, we met with and interviewed multiple eyewitnesses in Greece and Turkey, collected Greek police documents and established a chain of evidence, from the refugee camp in Diavata to the streets of Istanbul. Using publicly available data, including refugees’ social media posts, which were time-stamped and featured photographs of landmarks in Greece that were geolocated, we were able to corroborate key elements of witness testimony.

      In total we contacted six people in Istanbul who recounted their experiences with “pushbacks” — the forceful return of refugees and migrants across a border — and located another four elsewhere in Turkey, all of whom could prove their previous stays in Greece.

      Pushbacks are deportations carried out without consideration of individual circumstances and without any possibility to apply for asylum or to put forward arguments against the measures taken, according to the European Convention on Human Rights.

      ’Modern slavery’

      One of the other men we met in Istanbul is Rashid, who fled his native Afghanistan three years ago and made his way to Turkey. He worked as a packer and mover in Ankara, the Turkish capital, before heading to Istanbul where he found work as a welder. He has temporary protection status in Turkey but is not provided with medical assistance or housing.

      “In Turkey, life is full of uncertainties for young Afghan men who lack access to basic healthcare and social services,” Zakira Hekmat, co-founder of the Afghan Refugees Solidarity Association in Turkey, told DW. “They are precariously employed in low-paid jobs without permits. It is modern slavery.” Afghan men in Turkey mostly toil in the underground economy working tough, physical jobs in construction, transportation or textiles.

      Hoping for a better future, Rashid left Turkey for Greece at the beginning of 2020. He recalls crossing the Evros River with about 20 other people on a boat. He says he stayed in a tent for roughly two months next to the refugee camp at Diavata. But everything changed for him in late March when he was returning from Friday prayers.

      Rashid says he was stopped by Greek police who told him to wait. He then describes to DW how a white van pulled up and armed men without uniforms appeared. They told him to get in. Rashid says he did not even know who the men were and that he only found out later that they were working with Greek police after he was taken to a police station. DW could not verify the connection between the men and the police.

      His Greek documents, originally valid for one month, had expired but renewal during the coronavirus outbreak had not been possible as immigration offices were closed. At the station, Rashid says, the police confiscated all his belongings.

      “They didn’t even give me a glass of water at the police station,” he recalls. Rashid was not asked to sign any papers by the Greek authorities. He says he was later driven for hours in a van across Greece and then forced onto a small boat to cross the Evros River back into Turkey.

      Recognizing a pattern

      Reports on alleged pushbacks, especially at the Evros border, are numerous. The witness accounts we have gathered with our news partners corroborate reports from human rights organizations working with the Border Violence Monitoring Network, an independent database. They indicate that there were at least five police raids carried out in Diavata camp between March 31 and May 5, resulting in the seemingly illegal deportation of dozens of migrants. In almost all cases, police appear to have targeted young, single men from Afghanistan, Pakistan and North Africa.

      Vassilis Papadopoulos, president of the Greek Council of Refugees and a migration official in a previous administration, sees a clear pattern in the pushbacks.

      “Police vans come to the camp and the officers carry out a brief check of the people who are not yet registered. They ask for their papers  [...] they detain them and tell them that they will be taken to the station, to either check their papers or to provide them with new papers and instead of that, according to the complaints, [these people] are returned to Turkey,” he says. 

      “What is important and unprecedented in these allegations, if proven valid, is that we are talking about pushbacks from [deep] inside the country and even so from a camp without any formal deportation procedure being followed.”

      When DW confronted the Ministry of Migration and Asylum with the reports of illegal pushbacks, Alternate Minister Giorgos Koumoutsakos denied them. “The allegations about human rights violations by Greek law enforcement personnel are fabricated, false and uncorroborated,” he said.

      Sealing the borders

      Greece has been under intense pressure at its borders since the end of February when Turkey signaled the end of its 2016 agreement with the EU over restricting refugee and migrant flows. Ankara had encouraged migrants to head towards the land and maritime borders with Greece. Athens responded by sealing its borders and suspended access to asylum during March. While the asylum system officially resumed in April, the number of arrivals is 97% below levels for the previous April, according to statistics from the Ministry of Migration and Asylum.

      In early May, Greek media reported that the government was said to be pursuing “aggressive surveillance” aimed at preventing refugees from arriving. The government has not specified what this entails.

      DW approached the Ministry of Migration and Asylum for further details on the extent of the government’s activities. Alternate Minister Koumoutsakos said, “measures taken so far have been proportionate to the gravity of the situation and pursued legitimate aims, such as, in particular, the protection of national security, public order and public health.”

      Notis Mitarakis, the Greek Minister on Migration and Asylum, has defended the government’s harder line on asylum and migration. Speaking to state television during a visit to Samos on April 28, he said: “There have been zero arrivals to our country in April 2020 thanks to the very big efforts made by our security forces.”

      On the same day, however, residents of the Aegean island reported on local media and Facebook that they had seen newly arrived migrants in the village of Drakei. Lighthouse Reports and Bellingcat analyzed video footage from the Turkish coast guardand refugees that indicated a boat carrying 22 asylum-seekers arrived at a cove on Samos at around 7:30 a.m. that day.
      Pushed back from Samos island

      Jouma was among the refugees who climbed the steep path up from the remote cove on Samos to the village. This was the fourth time the young man from Damascus, Syria had tried to reach Greece. For a few hours on the morning of April 28 he believed he had finally made it.

      In a detailed account, Jouma recalls what he experienced after the refugees reached Samos. He says that a girl from the group who spoke a little English asked a local to notify Greek police that they had arrived. The new arrivals expected that they would be taken to the Samos’ refugee camp. Instead, the police who came detained them and took their phones. They were driven to a port where they were transferred between boats before being loaded onto a black-orange life raft without an engine or paddles. Jouma says they were towed towards Turkish waters. The raft was set adrift in the open sea with the waves pushing them back towards Greece and a Greek vessel pushing them towards Turkey.

      The worst thing, Jouma says, was a Greek power boat maneuvering around them trying to push them into Turkish waters, while the Turkish coast guard was just observing. “The Greek coast guard would retreat to make room for their Turkish counterparts to come and take us, but they wouldn’t come, and it went on all night,” Jouma says.

      The group was eventually picked up at noon the next day by the Turks. The port authorities on Samos told DW that there were no arrivals of asylum seekers to the island on April 28. The apparent use of orange life rafts in previous pushback operations was reported by Greek national newspaper Efimerida Ton Syntakton on April 7.

      Are pushbacks in compliance with EU law?

      Greece, like other EU border states such as Croatia, has long been dogged by accusations of pushbacks. Dimitris Christopoulos, who was until recently the president of the International Federation for Human Rights, says that the new intensity of incidents and the number of witnesses raises questions to what extent Greek authorities have been authorizing these pushbacks and how much the EU is aware of what is happening on the Greek border.

      “Obviously, these tactics are violating the Greek Constitution and customary international law, yet they seem to be tolerated by the EU since they serve the purpose of preventing further people from crossing the Aegean or the River Evros into Europe,” says Christopoulos.

      When DW again questioned the Ministry of Migration and Asylum about the legality of the government’s tactics, Alternate Minister Koumoutsakos categorically denied that such operations were taking place. “Greece has been complying, and will continue to do so, with its obligations under international law, including all relevant human rights treaties to which it is a party, also mindful of its obligations under the borders, migration and asylum EU legal framework, as enshrined in the EU Treaties.”

      Jürgen Bast, Professor of European Law at the University of Giessen in Germany, calls such a pushback strategy a clear violation of the law “This goes against everything European law stipulates.” The pushbacks, as described by the refugees, break all the rules of the official return directive, Bast says, referring to the orderly procedure that an asylum request entails, including a personal interview and the right of the individual to stay in Greece until a decision is made. The destination country, Bast continues, must also be informed and may have the right to refuse rejected asylum-seekers from third countries.

      None of the young men DW met said they had been notified ahead of time that they would have to leave Greece; nor did they give the impression that they had been informed of their legal rights. Instead, the experiences recounted by Bakhtyar, Jouma, Rashid, and the others interviewed suggest that forceful pushbacks across the Greek-Turkish border have become an increasingly common pattern.

      Desperate to get to Europe

      Rashid now lives in a cramped Istanbul flat with 10 other young Afghans. As an undocumented migrant in Turkey, he faces the threat of being deported back to Afghanistan. According to official statistics, 302,278 Afghans have been apprehended by security forces in Turkey in the last two years. Since 2018 it has become extremely difficult for Afghans to register for asylum in Turkey.

      Surrounded by what appear to be dead ends for him in Turkey, Rashid is desperately searching for a way to once again reach Europe. “I do not know what I will do here. We are not guilty. Of course, I want to cross the border again,” he says. “I have to.”

      https://www.dw.com/en/migrants-accuse-greece-of-forced-deportations/a-53520642

  • Are You Syrious (AYS)
    AYS Daily Digest 07/04/20

    https://medium.com/are-you-syrious/ays-daily-digest-07-04-20-luxembourg-and-germany-agree-to-take-in-small-numb

    AYS Daily Digest 07/04/20

    FEATURE Luxembourg and Germany are finally going to take in some children suffering in Greece’s island camps.
    Germany is going to take in 50 and Luxembourg will take in…12. There are at least 5,500 unaccompanied minors currently in Greece. A group of countries decided last week to collectively bring in 1,600 of these unaccompanied children, but COVID-19 has slowed this process.
    Luxembourg is the first country escort any these children; their 12 being on Lesvos and Chios currently. Their relocation will happen sometime next week. At least 5,488 unaccompanied children will remain living in horrid conditions afterwards.

    #Covid-19 #Migration #Migrant #Balkans #Grèce #Camp #Luxembourg #Allemagne #Enfant #mineursnonaccompagnés #Lesbos #Chios #transfert

    *

    3rd day of hunger strike in Moria Prison
    On April 5th, the prisoners in Moria’s pre-removal detention centre went on strike for their immediate removal. No Border Kitchen Lesvos explains:
    “These days governments across the world have been releasing people with short sentences from prison, while the Greek state continues to insist that no migrant detainees will be released. The men here in the prison are held in administrative detention and have committed no crime. They are detained only because of their status. Some because of their nationality, some because their asylum claim was rejected, some because they tried to leave the islands, some even because they signed up for supposed “voluntary return”. Many of those with rejected claims haven’t even had the opportunity to apply for asylum, because of recent legal changes discriminating against people who don’t speak the colonialist language of the country they fled from. They are awaiting deportation to Turkey, despite there being no deportations scheduled for the foreseeable future.”

    #Moria #Camp #Expulsion #Turquie #Grèvedelafaim #Asile #Retourvolontaire

    *

    Migration Minister’s page says medical staff is recruited for detention centres:

    “today began(…) recruitment of emergency staff(…), lasting three (3) months to meet the extraordinary needs of the Reception and Identification Centers and Temporary Supply and Supply Structures for Hosting Services. A total of 150 people will be hired at the KYT of #Lesvos, #Chios, #Samos, #Leros and #Kos, as well as at the Structures of #Malakassa and #Sintiki” and #Evros #prison #outpost.
    “new arrivals from March 1 have not been taken to the Reception and Identification Centers of the Islands but in separate quarantine areas, however there are difficulties to do so(…). So far, the Ministry has not received a positive response from the municipalities for hotel rentals for the removal of vulnerable groups from the KYT to the islands. “The European Commission has offered to cover hotels for the most vulnerable for a short time now due to the crisis, we have a written response from the local municipality that it refuses to use hotels to get the most vulnerable out of #Moria. What some are calling for a mass decongestion of Moria, that is, for 15,000 people to come from Moria to mainland Greece amid the crisis of the corona (…).there are no 15,000 vacancies in the hinterland and if there were they would be in structures like Ritsona. And in the end, it is not a given which place is safer “, the Minister stressed.

    **

    #Ritsona #camp has been in lock down for 5 days now
    …no asylum seeker in or out since at least 23 out of 2,700 people living in the camp have tested positive for COVID-19.
    The 23 people who tested positive for the virus continue to live with their families, who most likely will contact it soon, and none of them show any symptoms of the virus as of yet. Therefore, they are said to feel discriminated by the tests and are refusing to move to the camp’s designated quarantine areas.
    All 23 persons are from African nations, which is unfortunately increasing acts of #racism in the camp. One of the residents said that the other refugees are avoiding African nationals.
    Testing has stalled in the camp because the medical professionals can only go in to conduct the tests with police, but fewer police are willing to enter now.

  • Ι. Γιόχανσον : Δεν είναι δυνατόν να ανασταλούν οι διαδικασίες ασύλου

    Την επανεκκίνηση των διαδικασιών ασύλου στην Ελλάδα ζήτησε η Επίτροπος Μετανάστευσης Ίλβα Γιόχανσον. Μιλώντας στο Euronews, η Επίτροπος επισήμανε ότι έθεσε το ζήτημα και στον Έλληνα πρωθυπουργό Κυριακο Μητσοτάκη.

    « Δεν είναι δυνατόν να ανασταλούν οι διαδικασίες ασύλου. Όλοι οι μετανάστες που φθάνουν θα πρέπει να έχουν δικαίωμα ασύλου. Μπορώ να καταλάβω ότι εάν υπάρξει μια ιδιαίτερη ένταση, μπορεί να υπάρξουν κάποιες ημέρες ή εβδομάδες για να δεχθούν οι αρχές την αίτηση ασύλου. Ημουν στην Ελλάδα την περασμένη εβδομάδα και συναντήθηκα τόσο με τον πρωθυπουργό όσο και με τον αρμόδιο υπουργό και το κατέστησα σαφές : είναι ένα θεμελιώδες δικαίωμα να ζητήσει κανείς άσυλο και να αξιολογηθεί το αίτημά του », τόνισε η Επίτροπος Μετανάστευσης.

    Την ίδια στιγμή, προχωράει η πρωτοβουλία της Κομισιόν για μετεγκατάσταση ανηλίκων από την Ελλάδα στην υπόλοιπη Ευρώπη. Σύμφωνα με την Επίτροπο, η μετεγκατάσταση θα γίνει ακόμη και εν καιρώ κορονοϊού, αφού ληφθούν ωστόσο όλα τα απαραίτητα μέτρα.

    « Υπήρξε μια πολύ θετική απάντηση από πολλά κράτη-μέλη να προχωρήσουν στην μετεγκατάσταση ασυνόδευτων ανηλίκων από την Ελλάδα, ειδικά από τις υπερπλήρεις δομές στα νησιά. Εργαζόμαστε σκληρά με τα κράτη-μέλη, τις ελληνικές Αρχές και τις αρμόδιες υπηρεσίες και οργανώσεις της ΕΕ και προσπαθούμε να το κάνουμε αυτό, παρόλο που ενδέχεται να υπάρξουν πρόσθετα μέτρα που πρέπει να ληφθούν για την αντιμετώπιση του κορονοϊού, ώστε τα επιλεγμένα άτομα να μην είναι θετικά για να μην μεταδώσουν τον ιό. Αυτό που περιμένουμε τώρα είναι οι ελληνικές αρχές να κάνουν εκτίμηση της ηλικίας των επιλεγμένων, ώστε να είναι βέβαιο ότι είναι παιδιά που πρόκειται να μετεγκατασταθούν », τόνισε η Επίτροπος Ίλβα Γιόχανσον.

    Προς το παρόν, πάντως, το επείγον ζήτημα είναι να θωρακιστούν οι μετανάστες και οι πρόσφυγες αλλά και οι κάτοικοι των νησιών από τον κορονοϊό.
    Έκκληση από 21 ΜΚΟ να μετακινηθούν αιτούντες άσυλο από τα νησιά

    Έκκληση προς την κυβέρνηση να μετακινήσει τους αιτούντες άσυλο και τους μετανάστες άμεσα από τα Κέντρα Υποδοχής και Ταυτοποίησης στα νησιά σε ασφαλή τοποθεσία, ώστε να αποφευχθεί μία κρίση δημόσιας υγείας εν μέσω πανδημίας κορονοϊού, απευθύνουν σήμερα 21 ανθρωπιστικές οργανώσεις με κοινή τους ανακοίνωση.

    Όπως σημειώνουν, χιλιάδες άτομα, συμπεριλαμβανομένων ηλικιωμένων, πασχόντων από χρόνιες παθήσεις, παιδιών, εγκύων, νέων μητέρων και ατόμων με αναπηρία, « είναι παγιδευμένα υπό άθλιες συνθήκες επικίνδυνου συνωστισμού στα νησιά εν μέσω πανδημίας ».

    Την ίδια ώρα υπενθυμίζουν ότι οι διαμένοντες στις εγκαταστάσεις έρχονται αντιμέτωποι με « εξαιρετικά περιορισμένη πρόσβαση σε τρεχούμενο νερό, τουαλέτες και ντουζιέρες, καθώς και πολύωρη αναμονή σε ουρές για τη διανομή τροφίμων και ανεπάρκεια ιατρικού και νοσηλευτικού προσωπικού », συνθήκες που « καθιστούν αδύνατη τη συμμόρφωση με τις κατευθυντήριες οδηγίες για την προστασία από τον κορονοϊό, θέτοντας τους ανθρώπους σε σημαντικά αυξημένο κίνδυνο εν όψει της αυξανόμενης απειλής ευρείας μετάδοσης του COVID-19 ».

    Οι οργανώσεις ζητούν από την κυβέρνηση να υιοθετήσει μέτρα για να παρεμποδίσει την εξάπλωση και να ετοιμάσει ένα σχέδιο ανταπόκρισης προς άμεση εφαρμογή μόλις ανιχνευτεί το πρώτο κρούσμα σε κέντρο υποδοχής. Μεταξύ άλλων ζητούν να μετακινηθούν τα άτομα εκτός κέντρων υποδοχής σε κατάλληλα κέντρα μικρότερης κλίμακας στην ηπειρωτική χώρα, όπως ξενοδοχεία και διαμερίσματα, λαμβάνοντας όλες τις απαραίτητες προφυλάξεις για την ασφαλή μετακίνηση, με προτεραιότητα στους ηλικιωμένους, σε άτομα με χρόνιες ασθένειες και με σοβαρές υποκείμενες παθήσεις, άτομα με αναπηρία, εγκύους, νέες μητέρες και τα παιδιά τους και παιδιά, συμπεριλαμβανομένων των ασυνόδευτων.

    Επίσης, να υιοθετηθούν ειδικά μέτρα για την εγγύηση της καθολικής και δωρεάν απρόσκοπτης πρόσβασης στο δημόσιο σύστημα υγείας για αιτούντες άσυλο, πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες χωρίς διακρίσεις, συμπεριλαμβανομένων των ελέγχων και της θεραπείας για τον COVID-19, και να λάβουν οι αιτούντες άσυλο χωρίς καθυστέρηση τον Προσωρινό Αριθμό Ασφάλισης και Υγειονομικής Περίθαλψης Αλλοδαπού (ΠΑΑΥΠΑ), όπως ορίζεται από τη σχετική κοινή υπουργική απόφαση. Τέλος, να παρασχεθούν στα κέντρα υποδοχής επαρκή προϊόντα προσωπικής καθαριότητας και υγιεινής, να διασφαλιστεί το τρεχούμενο νερό προκειμένου οι διαμένοντες να είναι σε θέση να ακολουθούν τις κατευθυντήριες οδηγίες του ΕΟΔΥ και του Παγκόσμιου Οργανισμού Υγείας αναφορικά με την προστασία από τον ιό, και να διασφαλιστεί η τακτική απολύμανση στους κοινόχρηστους χώρους.

    Την ανακοίνωση συνυπογράφουν οι οργανώσεις : Action Aid Hellas, Διεθνής Αμνηστία, ΑΡΣΙΣ, Defence for Children International, ELIX, Ελληνικό Φόρουμ Προσφύγων, Help Refugees, HIAS Ελλάδος, HumanRights360, Human Rights Watch, International Rescue Committee, JRS Ελλάδας, Legal Centre Lesvos, Γιατροί του Κόσμου Ελλάδας, Δίκτυο για τα Δικαιώματα του Παιδιού, Praksis, Refugee Legal Support, Refugee Rights Europe, Refugee Support Aegean, Solidarity Now και Terre des hommes Hellas.

    https://gr.euronews.com/2020/03/24/ilva-johanson-den-einai-dynaton-na-anastaloun-oi-diadikasies-asyloy

    –-> commentaire de Vicky Skoumbi, reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 25.03.2020 :

    Il n’est pas possible de suspendre les procédures d’asile, a déclaré sur Euronews Mme Ylva Johansson, Commissaire à l’Immigration. Elle a demandé au gouvernement grec la réouverture de procédures selon les règles internationales.

    La commissaire de l’Immigration a souligné que : « Il n’est possible de suspendre les procédures d’asile. Tous les migrants qui arrivent doivent avoir accès à la procédure. Je peux comprendre que dans une situation de tension particulière, il peut y avoir quelques jours ou quelques semaines de retard pour que les autorités enregistrent la demande d’asile. J’ai été en Grèce la semaine dernière et j’ai rencontré tant le PM que le Ministre compétent, et je leur ai dit clairement que c’est un droit fondamental de demander l’asile et d’avoir sa demande être examiné selon les règles »

    #suspension #procédure_d'asile #migrations #asile #réfugiés #Grèce #coronavirus #covid-19

    ping @thomas_lacroix

    • Grèce : recours en justice contre la suspension de la procédure d’octroi d’asile

      Le conseil grec des réfugiés (GCR), ONG grecque de défense du droit d’asile, a annoncé mardi avoir formulé un recours devant le Conseil d’Etat contre une ordonnance de l’exécutif qui en suspend temporairement la procédure.

      Le conseil grec des réfugiés (GCR), ONG grecque de défense du droit d’asile, a annoncé mardi avoir formulé un recours devant le Conseil d’Etat contre une ordonnance de l’exécutif qui en suspend temporairement la procédure.

      Adoptée le 1er mars, à effet immédiat et valable un mois, cette ordnnance, qui permet aussi le refoulement des demandeurs d’asile, a été la réponse d’Athènes à la décision d’Ankara d’ouvrir fin février les frontières aux migrants qui souhaitaient passer en Europe.

      De violents incidents avaient alors eu lieu à Kastanies, l’un des deux postes frontaliers grecs avec la Turquie, où des milliers de demandeurs d’asile avaient alors afflué à destination de l’Europe.

      Le recours du GCR a été déposé lundi pour le compte de demandeurs d’asile que cette ONG assiste dans leurs démarches.

      « Trois femmes qui accompagnent leurs enfants sont menacées d’expulsion immédiate vers Afghanistan ou la Turquie alors que leur vie, leur santé et leurs droits fondamentaux sont en danger », prévient dans u communiqué l’ONG, qui souligne que la suspension de l’octroi du droit d’asile « a été fortement critiquée par des organisations nationales et internationales, y compris la Commission nationale des droits de l’homme et l’Agence onusienne du Haut commissariat des réfugiés ».

      L’ONG rappelle que ce droit est prévu par « le droit international » et qu’« on ne peut pas le suspendre ».

      Elle exhorte la présidente de la République hellénique, Katerina Sakellaropoulou, à « annuler cet acte législatif illégal et le Parlement grec à ne pas le ratifier pour que la Grèce ne soit pas le premier pays après la Seconde guerre mondiale à violer le principe international du non refoulement ».

      De nombreux demandeurs d’asile entrés en Grèce après le 1er mars ont été arrêtés et transférés dans des camps fermés avant leur expulsion prévue en vertu de cette ordonnance malgré les critiques des ONG de défense des droits de l’homme, comme Amnesty International.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/fil-dactualites/240320/grece-recours-en-justice-contre-la-suspension-de-la-procedure-d-octroi-d-a

    • Procédures pour le droit d’asile gelées

      « De quel crime se sont rendus coupables, ces gens pour être confinés dans cette situation inhumaine ? », s’est ému cette semaine le quotidien Efimerida Ton Syntakton (« Le journal des rédacteurs »), l’un des rares médias grecs à avoir dénoncé cet #enfermement qui ne respecte ni la convention de Genève, ni la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme. Qui s’en soucie ? Bruxelles se tait. Et le gouvernement grec du Premier ministre, Kyriákos Mitsotákis, a de toute façon gelé toutes les procédures de droit d’asile depuis le 1er mars, réagissant alors à la décision du président turc, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, d’ouvrir les frontières aux réfugiés et migrants qui se trouvaient en Turquie. La menace d’un afflux massif depuis la Turquie a permis à la Grèce de faire jouer une clause d’urgence, bloquant provisoirement le droit d’asile, tout en négligeant de consulter ses partenaires européens, comme le veut pourtant la règle.

      Et dans l’immédiat, la mise entre parenthèses du droit d’asile permet désormais de considérer de facto comme des migrants illégaux promis à la déportation, tous ceux qui ont accosté depuis mars sur les îles grecques. Avant même de quitter Lesbos, les 189 réfugiés transportés à Klidi avaient d’ailleurs été sommés de signer un document en grec. Sans savoir qu’ils acceptaient ainsi leur future déportation. Le coronavirus (et les mauvaises relations actuelles entre la Grèce et la Turquie) retarde dans l’immédiat ces rapatriements forcés. Mais le confinement dans un camp quasi militaire au nord de la Grèce risque de générer de nouvelles souffrances pour ces réfugiés jugés indésirables.

      https://seenthis.net/messages/825871#message834430

    • Europe must act to stop coronavirus outbreak in Lesbos, say MEPs

      NGOs have raised concerns over asylum procedures being frozen. According to the Commissioner for Home Affairs, processing applications must not be stopped.

      “People arriving at the borders still have the right to apply for asylum and cannot be sent away without their claim being assessed,” explains Professor Philippe De Bruycker, Institute for European Studies, Université Libre de Bruxelles. “This does not mean that nothing can be done regarding the protection of health: People requiring asylum maybe tested to see if they are sick or not, and if they are it can be applied measures such as quarantine, or even detention or restrictions of movement within the territory of the states.”

      Restrictions on travel and social distancing measures means delays in the asylum process are inevitable.

      “A lot of member states are making the decision that the interviews with asylum seekers should not take place right now because they would like to limit the social interaction,” says Commissioner Johansson. “So there will be delays in the processes of asylum, but I think that member states are taking measures to deal with the risk of the virus being spread.”

      MEPs have called for an “immediate European response” to avoid a humanitarian crisis spiralling into a public health crisis. NGOs warn there is little chance of not getting infected living in such conditions.

      https://www.euronews.com/2020/03/24/europe-must-act-to-stop-coronavirus-outbreak-in-lesbos-say-meps

    • Grèce : un nouveau projet de loi encore plus restrictif pour l’asile en cours d’élaboration

      Le quotidien grec Efimerida tôn syntaktôn (Journal des Rédacteurs) (https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/dikaiomata/237741_etoimazoyn-nomoshedio-eytelismoy-tis-diadikasias-asyloy) révèle le nouveau projet du ministère de l’Immigration pour la procédure d’asile

      Un nouveau projet de loi est en cours d’élaboration avec des dispositions problématiques en termes de finalité, d’efficacité et de légalité.

      Ce projet de loi vient à peine cinq mois après la loi sur la protection internationale, dont les dispositions restrictives ont été dénoncées par plusieurs organisations.

      Le nouveau projet en élaboration comprend les dispositions suivantes, très problématiques du point de vue de leur opportunité, de leur applicabilité, mais surtout de leur conformité au droit européen, international et national :

      • la possibilité d’omettre l’entretien personnel, pierre angulaire de la procédure d’asile, s’il s’avère impossible de trouver un interprète dans la langue choisie par l’interviewé, dans le cas où celle-ci est différente de la langue officielle de son pays d’origine

      • L’aide juridique, lors de l’examen en deuxième instance de la demande d’asile sera fournie uniquement à la demande de l’intéressé dans les deux jours qui suivent la notification de la décision de première instance. La demande d’aide juridique ne sera pas satisfaite automatiquement, mais sera examinée par le président de la commission de recours et ne sera accordée que si celui-ci juge probable une issue favorable à l’intéressé de l’appel. L’absence d’assistance judiciaire ne constituera pas une raison valable pour un report du réexamen de la demande d’asile, à moins que la Commission de recours ne considère que cette absence puisse provoquer un préjudice irréparable au demandeur d’asile, et que l’appel ait de fortes chances d’aboutir à l’annulation de la décision en première instance.

      • si le demandeur d’asile a déjà séjourné dans un autre pays pendant plus que de deux mois, sans être menacé de poursuite individuelle pour des raisons de race, de religion, de nationalité, d’appartenance à un groupe social particulier ou de convictions politiques, alors ce pays est considéré comme offrant une protection adéquate et sa demande d’asile en Grèce est irrecevable

      • en cas de rejet en deuxième instance de la demande d’asile, le demandeur sera maintenu en centre de détention jusqu’à son expulsion ou jusqu’à ce que la procédure arrive à son terme, sans qu’il puisse être libéré, s’il dépose une demande d’annulation du rejet ou une demande de suspension de son expulsion.

      Ce nouveau projet réduit à moins que rien, voire annule des garanties de la procédure d’asile ; il est introduit quelques jours après l’expiration de la loi sans précédent qui suspendait le dépôt de nouvelles demandes d’asile pendant un mois et prévoyait l’expulsion immédiate vers les pays d’origine des nouveaux arrivants. Il s’agissait d’une suspension de la Convention de Genève, qui n’est pas prévue par celle-ci même en temps de guerre. Il faudrait ajouter que la fin de la période de suspension ne se traduit pas par une réouverture de la procédure car le service d’asile reste fermé jusqu’au 10 avril à cause de mesures de protection sanitaire. Et tout laisse croire que la fermeture du service, sera prolongée pour au moins un mois.

      Enfin, le projet de loi réduit de plus que de moitié le temps prévu pour l’examen et l’adoption d’une décision en appel, en introduisant de nouveaux délais impossible à tenir : un mois pour la décision en appel contre trois actuellement, vingt jours pour la procédure accélérée appliquée aux frontières contre 40 jours en vigueur aujourd’hui, dix jours pour l’audition de l’appel si l’intéressé est en détention.

      L’expulsion en application du décret de suspension de la procédure d’asile de deux femmes vulnérables d’origine afghane, a été stoppée par le Conseil d’État, qui a ordonné leur maintien dans le territoire. Le sort d’une troisième femme afghane sera décidée en séance plénière du Conseil d’Etat en septembre.

      Source (en grec)

      https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/dikaiomata/237741_etoimazoyn-nomoshedio-eytelismoy-tis-diadikasias-asyloy

      https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/dikaiosyni/237450_stamatiste-tis-ameses-apelaseis

      –-> reçu de Vicky Skoumbi, via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 04.04.2020

    • GCR’s comments on the draft law amending asylum legislation

      Athens, 27 April 2020—The Greek Council for Refugees (GCR) expresses its deep concern over the new draft law that inter alia amends asylum legislation[1], which was submitted for public consultation amidst a public health crisis, at a time when the main concern is the protection of asylum seekers and the entire population from the risks and effects of the pandemic, and while concerns for asylum seekers who remain in overcrowded sites and/or in administrative detention in the midst of the pandemic are increasing.

      The Ministry’s of Migration and Asylum new draft law comes within less than 4 months since the entry into force (January 1, 2020) of L. 4636/2019 "On International Protection”, i.e. the law that entailed extensive changes of the Greek asylum law, which in itself is not an example of good law-making, and which in practice invalidates the invoked purpose of systematizing and codifying the relevant legislation (see explanatory memorandum law 4636/2019).

      In addition, despite the fact that L. 4636/2019 has been consistently and substantively criticized by all national and international bodies and civil society organisations, due its numerous problematic regulations having led to deregulating the Greek asylum system, weakening the safeguards of refugee protection in Greece and “placing people in need of international protection in danger”,[2] the proposed amendments do not, in any part, restore the extremely problematic provisions of L. 4636/2019.

      On the contrary, the introduced amendments are once more and in many respects contrary to the EU acquis in the field of asylum, and in this sense constitute a direct violation of EU law and of the Asylum and Return Directives, weakening basic guarantees for persons in need of protection, introducing additional procedural obstacles and reflecting, at the legislative level, the repeatedly stated intention to generalize detention and to increase returns, by preventing actual access to international protection. Accordingly, the draft law’s title “Improving Legislation on Migration, etc.” can only be considered as a euphemism.

      Amongst a set of extremely problematic provisions, the following are indicatively highlighted:

      The possibility for a non-competent Service (Regional Reception and Identification Services), which unlike the Asylum Service does not have the status of an independent Agency, to register requests for international protection, without even ensuring that this procedure can be completed by properly trained staff or compliance with the necessary guarantees for properly completing the procedure (Article 5 of the draft law)

      The deviation from the obligation to provide interpretation in a language that the applicant understands and the limitation of the obligation to conduct a personal interview with the applicant prior to a decision on a request for international protection (articles 7 & 11 of the draft law), in direct violation of the Procedures’ Directive (Directive 2013/32/ EU).

      The proposed amendments derogate from the minimum guarantees provided by the Procedures’ Directive, allowing for a personal interview to be conducted in the official language of the applicant’s country of origin “if it proves impossible to provide interpretation in the language of his/her choice" and for a decision to be issued without having previously conducted a personal interview, “if the applicant does not wish to conduct the interview in the official language of his/her country of origin", irrespective of whether the applicant is in fact able to understand this language. It is recalled that the competent Commissioner of the European Commission recently reiterated that “as far as interpretation is concerned, the Asylum Procedure Directive provides that communication takes place in the language preferred by the applicant, unless there is another language which the applicant understands and in which he/she can communicate in a clear and concise manner”,[3] while the Directive does not, under any circumstances, infer that the language understood by the applicant is the official language of their country of origin. Syrian Kurds, who constitute the largest minority in Syria and who largely do not speak/understand the official language of their state (Arabic), but only the Kurdish dialect kurmanji, are a typical such case. It is further noted that the cases under which a first instance asylum decision can be issued without conducting a personal interview are restrictively regulated under Article 14 of Directive 2013/32/EU. The proposed omission of the personal interview, under Article 11 of the draft law, does not constitute one of the cases provided in the Directive, nor is it left at the Member States’ discretion to foresee additional exceptions to the obligation to conduct a personal interview. In any case, the possibility of issuing a decision without conducting a personal interview with the applicant places asylum seekers at increased risk of return, in violation of the principle of non-refoulement.

      The obstruction of the right to legal aid and the right to effective remedies (article 9 of the draft law). As has been repeatedly documented, to date, the Greek authorities have yet to ensure real access to free legal aid at second instance, as is enshrined in EU law. On the contrary, in 2019 only 33% of asylum seekers who appealed a negative decision were able to benefit from free legal aid at second instance, and only 21% in 2018. [4] A fact that demonstrates “an administrative practice that is incompatible with EU law, and which to an extent is of a permanent and genera nature”. [5]

      However and instead of taking all necessary measures to ensure the right to free legal aid, the proposed amendment introduces an additional restriction on this right, requiring for applicants to submit, within a very short and exclusive period of two days, after the notification of their negative decision, an application for legal aid, which is granted by the President of the Appeals Committee “only if it is considered probable for the appeal to succeed.” In this case, and in order to provide legal assistance to the applicant, the appointed lawyer has the opportunity to submit a memorandum, which can exclusively include “belated (οψιφανείς and και οψιγενείς)” claims.

      Specifically, it is noted that a) The amendment reverses the rule and standard of proof set out in Article 20 (3) of Directive 2013/32/EU, which states that “Member States may provide that free legal assistance and representation not be granted where the applicant’s appeal is considered by a court or tribunal or other competent authority to have no tangible prospect of success", instead providing that legal assistance is restricted not in case where the appeal “has no tangible prospects of success”, but in case it is merely “presumed that the appeal has no prospects of success”.

      b) The amendment of article 9 of the draft law introduces an additional procedural obstacle to accessing legal aid and the right to an effective remedy, in what concerns the applicants, as well as added workload in what concerns the Appeals Committees. Applicants are required to submit a request in Greek (and for that matter, within a deadline of only two days from the moment the decision has been notified), following which the existence of the substantial preconditions for the provision of free legal aid shall be examined. Without the assistance of a lawyer, without specialized legal knowledge and without knowledge of the language, it is obvious that this request, in the oumost favorable event, will necessarily be limited to a standardised form, essentially depriving the applicant of the opportunity to develop the reasons his/her meeting, in the specific case, the substantial reasons for being granted legal aid.

      (c) In the proposed amendment it is stated that the request for legal aid is “examined by the President of the Committee, before which the appeal is pending” and “is granted only if the appeal is presumed likely to be successful”, whereas if the request is granted, the lawyer that represents the applicant, in the context of legal aid, can only "submit a memorandum on the appeal, with which they can make “belated and posterior (οψιφανείς and και οψιγενείς) claims”. Based on this, it appears as if the provision indicates that the request for legal aid is submitted after the appeal has already been lodged (as, otherwise, neither a determination of the appeal can take place, nor can the probability of success of an appeal that has yet to be lodged be examined). However, it is recalled that in accordance with Article 93 (c) L. 4636/2019, the appeal must inter alia cite the “specific reasons on which the appeal is based”, which in itself requires the drafting of a legal document in Greek, [6] unless the appeal is to be rejected as inadmissible; i.e. rejected without previously having examined the substance of the appeal. Consequently, even in the event that the request for free legal aid is ultimately granted, the content of the legal aid ends up being devoid of meaning, in violation of Article 20 (1) of Directive 2013/32/ EU, which provides that free legal assistance “shall include, at least, the preparation of the required procedural documents […]“. By contrast, in accordance with the introduced amendment, the lack of “specific reasons” in the initial appeal cannot be remedied by the appointed lawyer, nor is a possibility to develop any potential claims in the memorandum even provided, as currently provided by article 99 L. 4636/2019; instead, the lawyer can only make “belated (οψιφανείς και οψιγενείς) claims” that is new or subsequent arguments, under an obvious and actual fear that, even after granting free legal aid, the appeal can be rejected as inadmissible; i.e. without examining the merits of the applicant’s claims at second instance, practically depriving the applicant of actual access to an effective remedy, in violation of Directive 2013/33/EU and article 47 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights.

      The retroactive abolition of the possibility for the applicant to be referred for the issuance of a residence permit on humanitarian grounds, in case their application for international protection is rejected (Article 33). The possibility of referral for the issuance of a residence permit on humanitarian grounds is to this day an important safeguard and complements the Greek state’s obligations in view of its international commitments to protect individuals who, although not recognized as beneficiaries of international protection, fall under the non-refoulement principle (eg. unaccompanied minors, persons with special connection with the country - right to private or family life under Article 8 of the ECHR, serious health reasons) that prevent their removal. The abolition of the relevant provision contributes to creating a significant group of persons who cannot be removed from the country, yet whom being deprived fundamental rights, remain in a prolonged state of insecurity and peril.

      The generalization of the possibility to impose detention measures and the reduction of basic guarantees when imposing such a measure (articles 2, 21 and 52 of the draft law). The proposed amendments attempt a further strictening of legislation with respect to the imposition of detention measures, in violation of fundamental guarantees enshrined in EU law and international human rights law. Indicatively, article 2 proposes the abolition of the obligation to provide “full and thorough reasoning” when ordering the detention of asylum seekers. The provision of article 52 attempts to reverse the rule that administrative detention in view of return is applied, exclusively, as an exceptional measure, and only if the possibility of implementing alternatives to detention has been exhausted, while at the same time attempts to limit the control of legality. In view of CJEU case law, based on which the Return Directive foresees “a gradation of the measures to be taken in order to enforce the return decision, a gradation which goes from the measure which allows the person concerned the most liberty, namely granting a period for his voluntary departure, to measures which restrict that liberty the most, namely detention in a specialised facility",[7] the proposed provision is in check for compliance with the minimum standards of protection guaranteed by the EU.

      [1] “Improvements on the Legislation on Migration, amendments of provisions of laws 4636/2019 (A ’169), 4375/2016 (A’ 51), 4251/2014 (A ’80) and other provisions”.

      [2] See UNHCR, UNHCR urges Greece to strengthen safeguards in draft asylum law, 24 October 2019, available at: https://www.unhcr.org/gr/en/13170-unhcr-urges-greece-to-strengthen-safeguards-in-draft-asylum-law.html; GNCHR Observations [in Greek] on the Draft Law of the Ministry of Citizen Protection: “On International Protection: provisions on the recognition and status of third-country nationals or stateless persons as beneficiaries of international protection, on a single status for refugees or for persons entitled to subsidiary protection and on the content of the protection provided, unification of provisions on the reception of applicants for international protection, the procedure for granting and revoking the status of international protection, restructuring of judicial protection for asylum seekers and other provisions”, 24 October 2019, available at: http://www.nchr.gr/images/pdf/apofaseis/prosfuges_metanastes/Paratiriseis%20EEDA%20sto%20nomosxedio%20gia%20Asylo%2024.10.2019.pdf; GCR, GCR’s comments on the draft bill “On International Protection, 22 October 2019, available at: https://www.gcr.gr/media/k2/attachments/GCR_on_bill_about_International_Protection_en.pdf.

      [3] P-004017/2019, Commissioner Johansson’s reply on behalf of the European Commission, 5 February 2020, available at: https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/P-9-2019-004017-ASW_EL.pdf

      [4] AIDA Report on Greece, Update 2019, forthcoming and AIDA Report on Greece, Update 2018, March 2019, available at: https://www.asylumineurope.org/reports/country/greece.

      [5] See case C‑525/14, Commission v Czech Republic, EU C 2016 714, recital 14.

      [6] Indicatively, see GCR, GCR’s comments on the draft bill “On International Protection”, op. cit.

      [7] CJEU, El Dridi, C-61/11, recital 41.

      https://www.gcr.gr/en/news/press-releases-announcements/item/1434-gcr-s-comments-on-the-draft-law-amending-asylum-legislation

    • Asylum-seekers in Evros center protest asylum procedures delays

      Young asylum-seekers rioted on Tuesday morning in the Reception and Identification Center of #Fylakio in northern Evros. They set mattresses in the ward for unaccompanied minors on fire and it needed the intervention of the fire service extinguish the blaze.

      The riots started short before 10 o’ clock. Police forces rushed to the center to restore the order..

      Nobody was injured, yet significant material damage was reportedly caused.

      According to state broadcaster ERT TV, the protest was staged against the delays in asylum procedures and the extension of the lockdown in refugees centers until May 21.

      Local media report adds also the living conditions as one of the reasons for the protest.


      https://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2020/05/12/evros-asylum-seekers-riot
      #résistance #protestation #Evros

    • Grèce : prison ferme pour deux demandeurs d’asile accusés de violences dans un camp

      Deux demandeurs d’asile afghans ont été condamnés jeudi 14 mai par la justice grecque à six ans et huit mois de prison ferme pour des violences commises lors d’une manifestation dans le camp de Fylakio, au nord du pays.

      Ils réclamaient l’accélération du traitement de leur demande d’asile, ils ont obtenu de la prison ferme.

      Deux demandeurs d’asile originaires d’Afghanistan, âgés de 22 et 23 ans, ont écopé jeudi en Grèce de peines de six ans et huit mois de prison pour violences, trouble à l’ordre public, possession et utilisation illégale d’armes.

      Mardi 12 mai, des migrants avaient exprimé leur mécontentement en mettant le feu à des matelas et en agressant des policiers présents dans le camp de Fylakio (https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/24711/grece-des-demandeurs-d-asile-manifestent-contre-la-lenteur-du-traiteme), à la frontière gréco-turque. Selon les forces de l’ordre appelées à la barre lors de l’audience de jeudi, plusieurs personnes les ont attaquées avec des tournevis, des lames métalliques et des haches.

      Vingt-six autres demandeurs d’asile, qui avaient également été interpellés par la police grecque lors de cette manifestation, seront jugés ultérieurement.

      La centaine de migrants, dont des mineurs isolés, hébergés dans le centre de Fylakio y sont détenus le temps du traitement de leur dossier d’asile. Certains attendent depuis plus de six mois l’examen de leur demande.

      La pandémie de coronavirus a aggravé les retards déjà existants dans le traitement des dossiers, les services d’asile fonctionnant au ralenti ces dernières semaines.

      Athènes a été critiqué à plusieurs reprises par des ONG de défense des droits de migrants et réfugiés pour les défaillances chroniques de son système d’octroi d’asile et les conditions de vie épouvantables dans les camps de réfugiés surpeuplés.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/24782/grece-prison-ferme-pour-deux-demandeurs-d-asile-accuses-de-violences-d

  • #Muhamad_Gulzar (ou #Mohamad_Goulzhar), mort aux portes de l’Europe... dans la région de l’#Evros, à la #frontière_terrestre entre la #Grèce et la #Turquie...

    Κι άλλη σφαίρα στην καρδιά μετανάστη

    Δύο σφαίρες, πραγματικά πυρά, μία στην καρδιά και μία στο δεξί μέρος του σώματος, δέχτηκε ο Μουχάμαντ Γκουλζάρ, ενώ προσπαθούσε να περάσει το συρματόπλεγμα κοντά στις Καστανιές στον Εβρο, το πρωί της Τετάρτης, μεταξύ 10.30 και 11.00, σύμφωνα με το Κέντρο Ανθρωπίνων Δικαιωμάτων του Δικηγορικού Συλλόγου Κωνσταντινούπολης, το οποίο καταγράφει συστηματικά τα τεκταινόμενα στα ελληνοτουρκικά σύνορα.

    Πρόκειται για τον δεύτερο γνωστό νεκρό πρόσφυγα ή μετανάστη στα σύνορα την περασμένη εβδομάδα, που έχει καταγραφεί σε βίντεο διεθνών μέσων ενημέρωσης. Τα βίντεο και οι πληροφορίες που δημοσιεύει σήμερα η « Εφ.Συν. » έρχονται σε πλήρη αντίθεση με τους ισχυρισμούς του κυβερνητικού εκπροσώπου Στέλιου Πέτσα, ο οποίος αποδίδει τις ειδήσεις για ύπαρξη νεκρών στα σύνορα σε προπαγάνδα της τουρκικής κυβέρνησης. Ερευνα για τις καταγγελίες δεν έχει γίνει γνωστή από τις ελληνικές αρχές, ενώ πληθαίνουν οι καταγγελίες και οι μαρτυρίες για τη βίαιη δράση ελληνικών ένοπλων ομάδων, που χτυπούν πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες που καταφέρνουν να διασχίσουν τα σύνορα και για την προκλητική παρουσία εκεί ακροδεξιών από την Ευρώπη (Αυστρία και Γερμανία), ακόμα και του γνωστού επικεφαλής ταγμάτων εφόδου Γιάννη Λαγού. Τη δράση όλων αυτών ο κυβερνητικός εκπρόσωπος Στέλιος Πέτσας αρχικά δεν την έβλεπε, αλλά μετά και το πρωτοσέλιδο της « Εφ.Συν. » το Σάββατο (« Κύριε Μητσοτάκη ιδού οι... εθνοφύλακές σας », 7-8 Μαρτίου 2020), τελικά την είδε, δηλώνοντας (Open) ότι « καταδικάζονται και απομονώνονται ».

    Σύμφωνα με το Κέντρο, στο σημείο εκείνο της γραμμής των συνόρων δεν υπάρχουν ένοπλοι Τούρκοι στρατιωτικοί ή αστυνομικοί. Σύμφωνα με πληροφορίες στην στην « Εφ.Συν. » οι σφαίρες τραυμάτισαν άλλους δύο πρόσφυγες ή μετανάστες που βρίσκονταν μαζί με τον Μουχάμαντ, έναν στο κεφάλι και έναν στο πόδι.

    Συνολικά οι τραυματίες του τραγικού περιστατικού, που νοσηλεύτηκαν, εισήχθησαν στο νοσοκομείο της Αδριανούπολης ήταν πέντε. Πληροφορίες αναφέρουν ότι έχουν εμφανιστεί χιλιάδες τραυματίες από βίαιες επιχειρήσεις επαναπροώθησης στα σύνορα, χτυπημένοι με ρόπαλα ή κλομπ, συχνά χωρίς τα ρούχα τους και χωρίς τα υπάρχοντά τους, ενώ υπάρχουν καταγγελίες για βιασμούς γυναικών και ανδρών.

    Από την ελληνική πλευρά

    Όπως έγραφε η « Εφ.Συν. » (« Ο κ. Πέτσας δεν βλέπει νεκρούς, τραυματίες και τάγματα εφόδου. Βλέπει μόνο προβοκάτσιες », 6 Μαρτίου 2020), την ύπαρξη δεύτερου νεκρού είχε δημοσιοποιήσει ο βρετανικός τηλεοπτικός σταθμός Channel 4, δημοσιοποιώντας συνεντεύξεις με πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες που νοσηλεύονταν στο νοσοκομείο της Αδριανούπολης, τραυματισμένοι στο ίδιο περιστατικό, ενώ δημοσιοποιούσε και βίντεο από τη μεταφορά των τραυματιών.

    Το βράδυ του Σαββάτου, έγινε γνωστό το όνομα του νεκρού από ανάρτηση στο Facebook της πρώην κατάληψης φιλοξενίας προσφύγων City Plaza. Για τους ανθρώπους της κατάληψης, που αναγνώρισαν το όνομα και τη φωτογραφία του νεκρού από το ρεπορτάζ του τηλεοπτικού σταθμού SKY News, ήταν ο Μουχάμαντ από το 611, το νούμερο του δωματίου του κατειλημμένου ξενοδοχείου, στο οποίο έμενε πριν από περίπου τρία χρόνια. « Πυροβολήθηκε, απλά και μόνο επειδή είναι μετανάστης. Ενας αθώος άνθρωπος που πάλευε να ζήσει σαν άνθρωπος και που τον ονόμασαν “εχθρό” και “εισβολέα” της Ευρώπης. Ενας άμαχος πολίτης που του έριξαν σαν να ’ταν ζώο. Η σφαίρα που τον σκότωσε βγήκε απ’ την κάννη στην ελληνική πλευρά. Από ένα όπλο που σημάδευε μια στον ουρανό και μια σ’ αυτούς που περνούσαν τα σύνορα –ήταν συνοροφύλακας ; μια “πολιτοφυλακή εθελοντών” ; κάποιος Ελληνας ή Ευρωπαίος φασίστας ; ’Η ήταν ένας νεαρός φαντάρος που πήρε εντολή χρήσης πραγματικών πυρών ; », σημειώνουν στην ανάρτηση.

    Στο ρεπορτάζ του Sky News απεικονίζεται μια σφαίρα, που μένει να φανεί από τη βαλλιστική εξέταση από τι όπλο προήλθε, όπως και η μεταφορά του χτυπημένου Μουχάμαντ από άλλους πρόσφυγες μέσα σε κουβέρτα –αυτοσχέδιο φορείο, λίγο μετά το τραγικό περιστατικό, και η γυναίκα του Μουχάμαντ, η οποία κλαίει απαρηγόρητη έξω από το νοσοκομείο της Αδριανούπολης. Ήταν μπροστά την ώρα που έπεφτε χτυπημένος ο σύζυγός της από σφαίρες, που τραυμάτισαν άλλους πέντε και που πέρασαν ξυστά και από την ίδια, όπως σημειώνει το Κέντρο. Η γυναίκα του Μουχάμαντ περιμένει τα αποτελέσματα της αυτοψίας και της ιατροδικαστικής εξέτασης.

    Οι πληροφορίες αναφέρουν ότι ο Μουχάμαντ πήγε από την Ελλάδα στο Πακιστάν για να παντρευτεί. Το νιόπαντρο ζεύγος ταξίδεψε στο Ιράν και από κει στην Κωνσταντινούπολη, όπου την περασμένη εβδομάδα άκουσαν ότι έχουν ανοίξει τα ελληνοτουρκικά σύνορα και κατευθύνθηκαν εκεί για να περάσουν.

    https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/koinonia/234353_ki-alli-sfaira-stin-kardia-metanasti

    –----

    Et un message de l’ancien squat City Plaza, reçu par email le 10.03.2020 :

    Un adieu à notre ami Muhamad Gulzar, tué à la frontière d’Evros

    La rumeur d’un deuxième réfugié tué aux frontières, s’est répandue il y a trois jours. Comment imaginer qu’il puisse s’agir de notre ami ? Comment cela a-t-il pu se produire ? Et hier les premiers messages. Sa femme, apparaissant dans un reportage de Sky News. Une prise lointaine, à l’extérieur de l’hôpital, en pleurs et en deuil. C’est par elle que nous avons appris que Muhamad a franchi une nouvelle fois les frontières, cette fois-ci de la Grèce à la Turquie et de nouveau au Pakistan. Pour l’emmener et être ensemble.

    Mercredi dernier, dans la matinée, notre ami Muhamad, notre Muhamad de la chambre 611, a été abattu simplement parce qu’il était un migrant. Un homme en lutte, un innocent, déclaré « ennemi » et « envahisseur » de l’Europe. Un civil abattu comme un animal sauvage.

    La balle est sortie d’un pistolet du côté grec, ... était-ce la police des frontières, une milice, un volontaire fasciste grec ou étranger ou était-ce un jeune soldat à qui le gouvernement avait ordonné d’utiliser des « balles réelles » ?

    Le gouvernement a dit que c’était des fausses nouvelles et de la propagande turque. La veille, le commissaire européen a déclaré que le gouvernement grec faisait ce qu’il fallait, il agit comme un « bouclier de l’Europe ».

    Nous, amis de #Muhamad_Gulzar, qui l’avons rencontré dans l’hôtel squatté City Plaza à Athènes il y a trois ans, nous disons que notre frère a été assassiné. Nous ne pouvons pas trouver le véritable meurtrier, mais nous savons qui est responsable. Nous ne pouvons pas savoir qui portait l’arme, mais nous savons que Mohammed a été tué par une balle tirée d’un fusil, qui pointait une fois en l’air et une autre fois vers les gens qui couraient, dans une chasse à l’homme honteuse aux frontières de l’Europe en 2020.

    Muhamad, pour toi, pour ta femme et ta famille, pour nous tous et pour les enfants qui vont naître. Pour tous les peuples, quelles que soient leur nationalité, leur couleur de peau et leur religion, nous disons que nous allons lutter davantage et que nous allons nous battre plus durement. Nous vaincrons la barbarie qui se répand si vite dans le monde. Et nous nous souviendrons de vous en train de courir librement au-delà des frontières sanglantes. En Grèce, en Turquie, en Europe et partout dans le monde, partout où les gens luttent pour une vie meilleure, sans guerre et sans racisme, sans oppression et sans humiliation des peuples.

    Vos amis et camarades de l’ancien squat City Plaza, à Athènes !

    #morts #décès #mourir_aux_frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés

    Ajouté à cette métaliste des morts dans l’Evros :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/830045

    • The Killing of a Migrant at the Greek-Turkish Border

      On March 4, Pakistan national #Muhammad_Gulzar was shot and killed at the Greek-Turkish border. Evidence overwhelmingly suggests that the bullet came from a Greek firearm. An investigation into the tragedy at the edge of Europe.

      The land border between Greece and Turkey is 212 kilometers long, with most of it running along the Maritsa River. There’s just one segment in the north where an 11-kilometer stretch of border fence runs between the two countries near Karaağaç.

      In early March, just before the coronavirus took over the news cycle, this fence was the focus of headlines around the world.

      On that early spring day, thousands of migrants were crowding the Turkish side of the border, while on the Greek side, security forces had taken up their positions. The acrid odor of tear gas filled the air and helicopters circled the area. People were shouting back and forth.

      Muhammad Gulzar, 42, hadn’t slept well the night before, his wife Saba Khan, 38, would later recall, and he woke up hungry on March 4. Khan would have preferred, that morning, to return to Istanbul, from where the couple had started their journey in the hopes of making it to Europe. But Gulzar had talked his wife into making one final attempt to get across the fence. A short time later, Gulzar was dead, struck by a bullet in the chest.

      Muhammad Gulzar and Saba Khan, both from Pakistan, had only recently got married, on Jan. 21. Just a few days after the shooting, Khan was sitting in a restaurant in Istanbul, her face buried in her hands. On her wrist was the watch that her husband had given her. Khan was in a state of deep desperation, wondering if Muhammad might still be alive if she had insisted on turning around and going back.

      The deadly incident that unfolded in the first week of March along the border between Turkey and Greece has long since dropped out of the international headlines. Khan, though, can’t put it behind her - nor can the other families who lost relatives in those chaotic March days. At least two people died trying to cross the border into Greece, and dozens were injured, some seriously. And to this day, it still isn’t entirely clear who bears responsibility.

      A propaganda war over the incident has broken out between Turkey and Greece. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan alleges that Greek security forces deliberately fired on the migrants, while the Greek government denies all such claims.

      DER SPIEGEL

      DER SPIEGEL reporters spent weeks reporting on both sides of the border, together with the research teams Forensic Architecture, Lighthouse Reports and Bellingcat. The reporters interviewed two dozen witnesses, including refugees, border guards, politicians and doctors. They also reviewed official documents, including Muhammad Gulzar’s autopsy report, and evaluated more than 100 videos and photos taken by migrants at the border.

      The findings of the reporting contradict the official versions, especially – on decisive points – the Greek account. Muhammad Gulzar’s death may well have been an accident, but it was a predictable accident. A reconstruction of the events surrounding his March 4 death reads as though both sides were eager to escalate the situation.
      BLACKMAIL

      On Feb. 27, Russian fighter jets are believed to have killed at least 33 Turkish soldiers in an attack on military posts in the Syrian province of Idlib. The Turkish authorities blocked both Facebook and Twitter, but they were unable to suppress news about the deaths for long. In response to the incident, Erdoğan convened a crisis meeting, which ended with a surprising decision: Turkey would be opening its border to Europe.

      That border had been closed ever since the EU and Turkey had agreed to a pact years earlier that would sharply reduce the number of refugees making their way north to Europe. And by publicly breaching that deal, Erdoğan was likely seeking to distract from the problems his military was having in Syria, while at the same time blackmailing the Europeans for more money to care for the large numbers of refugees in Turkey. And the gambit seemed to have had the desired effect: Over the course of the next few days, there was little talk about the Turkish losses in Idlib.

      At the height of the refugee crisis in 2015, the bus station in Istanbul’s Aksaray neighborhood served as a hub for migrants making their way to Europe, and now, refugees were once again boarding buses at the site. The news had spread on Facebook and WhatsApp that the gates to Europe had reopened, and more than 10,000 migrants had decided to see for themselves. In some instances, the Turkish authorities even chartered buses to transport migrants to the border.

      Pakistan national Gulzar and his wife were among those who took a bus from Istanbul to the border. It wasn’t the first time that Gulzar had traveled to Europe. In 2007, he had made his way to Greece, where he ended up working for years – most of the time with a "tolerated” status from the immigration authorities. He was initially on his own, but was later joined by his oldest son. His wife at the time and four children remained in Pakistan. Gulzar repaired fireplaces in Greek homes, with his last boss, Nikolaos Tzokanis, describing him as honest and hard-working.

      Things were going well professionally for Gulzar, but privately, something was amiss. He was married, but his true love, Saba Khan, lived in Pakistan, so he decided to separate from his wife and move back to Pakistan to marry Khan. Tzokanis says he asked Gulzar to wait until Khan received an official entry permit before returning to Greece. But that would have taken months and they didn’t want to wait that long. He says Gulzar told him: "I’ve made it to Europe before. I can do it again.”

      Gulzar flew from Greece to Pakistan, where he and Khan married on Jan. 21, and a few days later, the newlyweds traveled to Turkey via Iran. They had big plans for their future in Greece: Khan wanted to work as a hairdresser and maybe even open up her own beauty salon. The only thing standing in their way were the Greek border guards.

      Kyriakos Mitsotakis had only been prime minister of Greece for nine months, but the refugee crisis was already overshadowing his tenure. Migrants were living in overcrowded camps on the Greek islands and there had been repeated instances of violence against them. Mitsotakis was well aware that the asylum system would collapse for good if the number of refugees was to rise sharply. But that’s exactly what was in store now that Erdoğan had reopened the border.

      Facing this dilemma, Mitsotakis suspended the right of asylum on March 1 for one month, a move lawyers would later deem illegal. He also dispatched 1,000 soldiers and 1,000 police officers to the north.
      THE BATTLEFIELD

      Gulzar and Khan believed Erdoğan’s claim that the border had been opened. But when they arrived at Pazarkule, it was like a battlefield. Thousands of people were camping outdoors while Greek security forces were firing tear gas and water cannons.

      Khan says they never would have boarded the bus had they known what was awaiting them at the border, adding that they would have tried to get to a Greek island by boat instead. But now they were stuck at the border area. To keep pressure on the Europeans, Turkish gendarmes even prevented refugees from returning to Istanbul from Pazarkule.

      The migrants grew increasingly desperate as a result, with some throwing rocks at Greek border guards. The BND, Germany’s foreign intelligence service, believes that Turkish agents mixed in with the crowds to exacerbate the situation. The Greeks clearly sought to keep the onslaught at bay – and not just with water cannons and tear gas. Several refugees told DER SPIEGEL that they had been shot at by Greek security forces.

      One Syrian said his wife has been missing since Greek border guards stopped the family from crossing the Maritsa River. He claims that Greek officers fired at him several times and forcibly separated him from his wife. Another Syrian man, Mohammad al-Arab, died on March 2 along the Maritsa, more than 80 kilometers south of the Pazarkule border post. The research agency Forensic Architecture has determined through video analysis that al-Arab was shot. Two witnesses claim it was Greek soldiers who opened fire on him.

      European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen traveled to the crisis area on March 3. For the first time in four years, the EU could no longer rely on Erdoğan to stop the refugees, and Greece, in the words of von der Leyen had become Europe’s "shield.” She made no mention of the accusations of violence against Greek security forces.

      Elias Tzimitras always gets called in when there’s danger. He’s part of a Greek armed forces special unit that the military leadership had deployed at the Greek-Turkish border. The Greek security forces were organized in two lines: On the front line were the police officers with shields, batons and pistols, while behind them were soldiers with semi-automatic rifles. Tzimitras and his men.

      As an officer, Tzimitras is forbidden from speaking to the media. As such, we have decided to keep secret his real name, rank and the name of his unit. Tzimitras reports that the situation at the border was extremely tense. He and his colleagues feared they might get kidnapped and said that some of the migrants were also armed. Tzimitras and his comrades worked in day shifts and night shifts, and they were constantly subjected to provocations by Turkish soldiers, Tzimitras says.

      The government in Athens has denied that Greek security forces used live ammunition. Tzimitras, however, disputes such claims. "We fired both blanks and live ammunition,” he says. But he claims they were only warning shots into the air or the ground. Authorization to do so, he says, came from the military leadership.

      Videos that have been evaluated by the forensics experts also prove that shots were fired with live ammunition on March 4. One video filmed on the Turkish side of the border and shown by Turkish state broadcaster TRT shows a fire at the border fence. Then shots ring out and a young man collapses.

      The man filming the blurred images shouts in English: "Gunfire from the Greece army … I have seen someone who is shot.” Migrants can be seen fleeing from the fence, and a little later, men appear behind the fire at the fence – apparently Greek soldiers.

      In a video from the Greek side, the same sequence of shots can be found. Two Greeks can be heard talking to each other off camera. “They aimed”, the first person says in it. “They aimed,” the second person confirms. "That’s the only way …”

      In the video, the characteristic sounds of live ammunition can be heard: first a crack produced by the shock wave of the projectile followed by the sound of the muzzle blast. With blanks, you would only hear the muzzle blast. Steven Beck, an American weapons expert who reviewed the footage, is certain that the shots that can be heard in the video are live ammunition. According to his analysis, the intervals between the shots indicate it was a semi-automatic weapon. He believes the shooter was standing around 40 to 60 meters away from the camera. In all the available videos, it is only on the Greek side that individuals can be seen standing within a radius of 60 meters and carrying such weapons.
      THE SHOT

      When Gulzar and Khan woke up after a restless night, the first altercations had already broken out at the border post and the air was full of tear gas. Khan could barely breathe.

      That day, Gulzar wore a black jacket, a pair of blue jeans with holes and black, ankle-high boots with a zipper. He took his wife’s hand and they marched toward the fence together. "Do not attempt to cross the border,” Greek border guards warned over a loudspeaker. Khan watched as a man cut a hole in the fence just a few meters away from them. Some of the migrants used bolt cutters, which the Turkish gendarmes likely supplied.

      The Greek soldiers stood parallel to the fence, with a few meters between them. They wore face masks and carried semi-automatic rifles. Shots could be heard every few minutes, including from semi-automatic weapons. But the men continue trying to break through the fence. A group of migrants carried the first injured person away, the man holding the left side of his face with his arm. The migrants placed his legs in a blanket to make it easier to carry him. When they reached the road, they put the injured man in a Turkish ambulance.

      Gulzar and Khan weren’t far from the border fence. Gulzar spoke to the security forces in Greek and had just turned away, Khan says, when the fatal shot was fired. Her husband collapsed with his hand on his chest. "Get up,” she screamed at him, "get up!”

      "The shot definitely came from the Greek side,” Khan says. She says she barely missed getting shot in the foot.

      In the video, you can see people rushing to the injured Gulzar. His face is covered, but the zippered boots, the pattern of the torn blue jeans and the black jacket leave no doubt that it is Gulzar who is lying there on the ground.

      “They killed him, lift him up!” the migrants shouted in Arabic. They pulled him up by his shirt and jacket, running as they carried Gulzar toward the street to the ambulance.

      DER SPIEGEL spoke with two of the migrants who filmed the events that day. Both claim that Gulzar was shot and killed by the Greeks. One of the men, named Sobhi, says that a soldier shot Gulzar with an assault rifle. He can be seen in a video shortly after the incident. He says: "There’s a Pakistani who’s been shot in the shoulder with live ammunition. At the fence. The ambulance just took him away.”

      Images from the Greek television station Skai TV show Greek soldiers along the fence near the place where Gulzar was shot and killed. They are carrying FN Minimi, M4 and M16 semi-automatic weapons, which fire 5.56-millimeter caliber bullets. According to the autopsy report of the Istanbul Institute of Forensic Medicine, which DER SPIEGEL has obtained, it is precisely one of these bullets that was found inside Gulzar’s body.

      The rattle of automatic weapons never seemed to stop on that day. Mobile phone cameras captured the sound, and more migrants started filming. Some fled the fence area in panic. Within four minutes, four injured men were carried away. Fourteen minutes later, a fifth was taken away. Some suffered from gunfire wounds.

      One of the injured can be identified beyond any doubt. His name is Mohammad Hantou. Videos show him stumbling across the field, holding his head with one hand. When he falls down, other men help him up and support him.

      DER SPIEGEL met with Hantou at the hospital at Edirne one day later. His brother Riad was with him, and Hantou had a bandage on his right ear. Two pieces of shot from a shotgun struck him there, one of them destroying a bone behind his ear, he says. That’s what the doctors told him. Hantou is certain that Greek security forces fired on him that day.

      The university hospital in Edirne is located only 14 kilometers from the border post. Gulzar arrived at the hospital’s emergency room a half hour after he was shot and the doctors tried in vain to reanimate him. They declared him dead 45 minutes later.

      When Saba Khan received the news, she collapsed on the sidewalk next to the hospital, as can be seen in a video shot by a CNN camera team. It shows Khan sobbing, screaming and banging her head against a car repeatedly. She will say later that she believed right to the very end that Gulzar would survive.

      When contacted by DER SPIEGEL for a statement, the Greek government rejected all the accusations, dismissing them as "Turkish propaganda.” Greece has the "right to protect its borders,” the government said in a written statement.

      The European Union member states have been tightening their migration policies since 2015 and they have ceased conducting rescue missions in the Mediterranean, but Gulzar’s death nonetheless marks a turning point. In his case, border guards not only failed to help – in all likelihood, they themselves were the ones who killed him.

      It’s quite possible that Gulzar was shot accidentally, that he was hit by a ricochet. But it is also the responsibility of the authorities to determine exactly what happened. By dismissing all reports on the attacks against migrants as fake news, however, the Greek government is making it impossible to uncover all the facts.

      https://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/greek-turkish-border-the-killing-of-muhammad-gulzar-a-7652ff68-8959-4e0d-910

    • Migrante morto al confine con la Turchia, hanno sparato i militari greci?

      Dopo un’indagine giornalistica, cento europarlamentari hanno chiesto alla Commissione europea di investigare sulla morte di Muhammad Gulzar, migrante morto lo scorso 4 marzo mentre tentava di attraversare il confine greco-turco. Francesco Martino (OBCT) per il GR di Radio Capodistria [17 maggio 2020]

      I militari greci sono “probabilmente” responsabili della morte del pakistano Muhammad Gulzar, morto a inizio marzo mentre insieme ad altre migliaia di persone tentava di attraversare il confine greco dalla vicina Turchia. E’ questo il risultato di un’articolata indagine collettiva che vede tra i suoi protagonisti il settimanale tedesco Spiegel e il sito di giornalismo investigativo Bellingcat.

      I giornalisti, attraverso lo studio di materiale video e il confronto con testimoni diretti, sono arrivati alla conclusione che il ferimento di almeno sette persone, tra cui Gulzar, che poi è deceduto, è con tutta probabilità conseguenza dell’esplosione di proiettili veri da parte dei militari greci a guardia della frontiera, ed hanno chiesto l’apertura di un’inchiesta giudiziaria per accertare la verità.

      Una richiesta fatta propria anche da cento eurodeputati, che con una lettera alla presidente della Commissione europea, hanno domandato indagini approfondite, anche se le autorità greche continuano a rigettare ogni accusa, e hanno più volte parlato di “fake news” gestite dal governo turco.

      La morte di Gulzar è avvenuta dopo che Ankara ha fine febbraio ha aperto le sue frontiere verso l’UE, denunciando gli accordi sulla gestione delle migrazioni firmati con Bruxelles nel 2016: dopo l’annuncio, migliaia di migranti si sono ammassati alla frontiera greca per tentare di attraversarla con il supporto attivo delle autorità turche, mentre Atene ha schierato anche l’esercito per bloccare ogni ingresso.

      La crisi è rientrata solo dopo lo scoppiare dell’epidemia di COVID19, che ha convinto la Turchia a riaccompagnare i migranti verso i centri d’accoglienza sul proprio territorio.

      https://www.balcanicaucaso.org/Media/Multimedia/Migrante-morto-al-confine-con-la-Turchia-hanno-sparato-i-militari-gr

  • Greece to extend border fence over migration surge

    Greece will extend its fence on the border with Turkey, a government source said Sunday (8 March), amid continuing efforts by migrants to break through in a surge enabled by Ankara.

    “We have decided to immediately extend the fence in three different areas,” the government source told AFP, adding that the new sections, to the south of the area now under pressure, would cover around 36 kilometres (22 miles).

    The current stretch of fence will also be upgraded, the official added.

    Tens of thousands of asylum-seekers have been trying to break through the land border from Turkey for a week after Ankara announced it would no longer prevent people from trying to cross into the European Union.

    A police source Sunday told AFP that riot police reinforcements from around the country had been sent to the border in recent days, in addition to drones and police dogs.

    There have been numerous exchanges of tear gas and stones between Greek riot police and migrants.

    Turkey has also bombarded Greek forces with tear gas at regular intervals, and Athens has accused Turkish police of handing out wire cutters to migrants to help them break through the border fence.

    The Greek government over the weekend also released footage which it said showed a Turkish armoured vehicle assisting efforts to bring down the fence.

    “Parts of the fence have been removed, both by the (Turkish) vehicle and with wire cutters, but they are constantly being repaired,” local police unionist Elias Akidis told Skai TV.

    Turkey has accused Greek border guards of using undue force against the migrants, injuring many and killing at least five.

    The government in Athens has consistently dismissed the claim as lies.

    https://www.euractiv.com/section/justice-home-affairs/news/greece-to-extend-border-fence-over-migration-surge
    #murs #Evros #barrières_frontalières #Grèce #Turquie #frontières #extension
    ping @fil @reka @albertocampiphoto

    • je suis tombé sur une vidéo YT d’un compte néo-nazi montrant une attaque du mur de l’Evros par des migrants. L’attaque y est présentée comme soutenue par la police turque, ce qui est vraiment beaucoup solliciter les images… les migrants sont noyés sous les lacrymos.

    • Evros: Greece to extend the fence on the borders with Turkey to 40km

      Greece will extend the fence to its Evros borders with Turkey to 40 km, government spokesman Stelios Petsas said on Friday morning. The additional fence will be installed in “sensitive” areas preferred for illegal entries by migrants and refugees.

      The fence currently covers 12.5 km.

      Speaking to ANT1 TV, Petsas noted that at the moment the most vulnerable border point is in the south.

      The current 12.5 km fence of land access points is installed north and south of Kastanies customs office, where thousands of migrants and refugees have amassed.

      According to the daily Kathimerini, the 40 kilometers new fence is planned to be partially installed either in areas where the Evros waters are low or in areas where the landscape favors illegla paasage.

      Sections such as Ormenio, Gardens, Feres, Tychero, Soufli, Dikaia, Dilofo, Marassia, Nea Vyssa and elsewhere have been designated as the areas where the new fence will installed by the Greek Army and support by the police.

      According to a report by daily Elftheros Typos, Greece’s Plan B aside from the fence extension is the presence of about 4,000 police officers and soldiers in parallel patrols, helicopters, unmanned aircraft, message broadcasting, cameras for audio-video.

      A Greek Army – Greek Police “joint operations center” is to be established in Nea Vryssa.

      According to the daily more than 1,000 soldiers, two commandos squads, 1,500 police and national guards are currently operating in the Evros area.

      Petsas underlined that the Greek government has changed its policy because there is a national security issue at the moment.

      He reiterated the new policy saying that “no one will cross the border.”

      https://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2020/03/06/evros-greece-fence-borders-turkey-extension

    • Video 2 - Violences contre les exilé·es à la frontière gréco-turque

      Depuis le début du mois de mars 2020, des milliers d’exilé·es, incité·es voire poussé·es par les autorités turques, se sont précipité·es aux frontières terrestres et maritimes entre la Turquie et la Grèce. Ils et elles se sont heurté·es à la violence de la police et de l’armée grecque, ainsi que de groupe fascistes, mobilisés pour leur en interdire le franchissement, la suite : www.gisti.org/spip.php ?article6368

      https://indymotion.fr/videos/watch/e8938a1c-5456-46e8-a0cb-be0806c96051?start=1s

    • Greece shields Evros border with blades wire, 400 new border guards

      Greece is strengthening ifs defense and is preparing for a possible new wave of migrants at its Evros border. A fence of sharp blades wire (concertina wire) and 400 additional border guards are to shield the country for the case Turkey will open its borders again so that migrants can cross into Europe.

      According to daily ethnos (https://www.ethnos.gr/ellada/105936_ohyronetai-o-ebros-frahtis-me-lepidoforo-syrmatoplegma-kai-400-neoi-sy), Ankara has already been holding groups of migrants in warehouses near the border, while the Greek side is methodically being prepared for the possibility of a new attempt for waves of migrants to try to cross again the border.

      “At the bridgeheads of Peplos and Fera, at the land borders after the riverbed is aligned, and in other vulnerable areas along the border, kilometer-long of metal fence with sharp blades wire are being installed, the soil is being cleaned from wild vegetation and clearing of marsh lands.

      The fence in the northern part is being strengthened and expanded, and 11 additional border pylons, each one 50 meters high, will be installed along the river in the near future. Each pylon will be equipped with cameras and modern day and night surveillance systems, with a range of several kilometers and multiple telecommunications capabilities, the daily notes.

      Within the next few months, 400 newly recruited border guards will be on duty and will almost double the deterrent force and enhance the joint patrols of the Army and Police, ethnos adds.

      Big armored military vehicles destined for Libya and confiscated five years ago south of Crete have been made available to the Army in the area, the daily notes.

      One and a half month after the end of the “war without arms” at the Evros border from end of February till the end of March, sporadic movement on the Turkish side of the border has been observed.

      At least four shooting incidents have been reported in the past two weeks, with Turkish jandarmerie to have fired at Greek border guards and members of the Frontex.

      Greece’s security forces are on high alert.

      Just a few days ago, Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu reiterated that Ankara’s policy of “open borders” will continue for anyone wishing to cross into Europe.

      Speaking to nationalist Akit TV on Wednesday, Cavusoglu claimed that Greece used “inhumane” behavior towards the migrants who want to cross into the country.

      Also Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu had threatened that the migrants will be allowed to leave Turkey again once the pandemic was over.

      PS It could be a very hot summer, should Turkey attempt to send migrants to Europe by land through Evros and by sea with boats to the Aegean islands and at the same time, deploys a drilling ship off Crete in July, as it claimed a few days ago.

      https://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2020/05/17/greece-shields-evros-border-blades-wire-400-border-guards

      #militarisation_des_frontières

    • Pour la bagatelle de 63 millions d’euro...

      Greece to extend fence on land border with Turkey to deter migrants

      Greece will proceed with plans to extend a cement and barbed-wire fence that it set up in 2012 along its northern border with Turkey to prevent migrants from entering the country, the government said on Monday.

      The conservative government made the decision this year, spokesman Stelios Petsas said, after tens of thousands of asylum seekers tried to enter EU member Greece in late February when Ankara said it would no longer prevent them from doing so.

      Greece, which is at odds with neighbouring Turkey over a range of issues, has been a gateway to Europe for people fleeing conflicts and poverty in the Middle East and beyond, with more than a million passing through the country in 2015-2016.

      The project led by four Greek construction companies will be completed within eight months at an estimated cost of 63 million euros, Petsas told a news briefing.

      The 12.5-kilometre fence was built eight years ago to stop migrants from crossing into Greece. It will be extended in areas indicated by Greek police and the army, Petsas said without elaborating. In March, he said it would be extended to 40 kilometres.

      Tensions between NATO allies Greece and Turkey, who disagree over where their continental shelves begin and end, have recently escalated further over hydrocarbon resources in the eastern Mediterranean region.

      https://kdal610.com/2020/08/24/greece-to-extend-fence-on-land-border-with-turkey-to-deter-migrants

    • Greece to extend fence on land border with Turkey to deter migrants

      Greece will proceed with plans to extend a cement and barbed-wire fence that it set up in 2012 along its northern border with Turkey to prevent migrants from entering the country, the government said on Monday.

      The conservative government made the decision this year, spokesman Stelios Petsas said, after tens of thousands of asylum seekers tried to enter EU member Greece in late February when Ankara said it would no longer prevent them from doing so.

      Greece, which is at odds with neighbouring Turkey over a range of issues, has been a gateway to Europe for people fleeing conflicts and poverty in the Middle East and beyond, with more than a million passing through the country in 2015-2016.

      The project led by four Greek construction companies will be completed within eight months at an estimated cost of 63 million euros, Petsas told a news briefing.

      The 12.5-kilometre fence was built eight years ago to stop migrants from crossing into Greece. It will be extended in areas indicated by Greek police and the army, Petsas said without elaborating. In March, he said it would be extended to 40 kilometres.

      Tensions between NATO allies Greece and Turkey, who disagree over where their continental shelves begin and end, have recently escalated further over hydrocarbon resources in the eastern Mediterranean region.

      https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-greece-turkey-fence/greece-to-extend-fence-on-land-border-with-turkey-to-deter-migrants-idUK

    • Evros land border fence to be ready in eight months

      The construction of a new fence on northeastern Greece’s Evros land border with Turkey will be completed in eight months, according to Citizens’ Protection Minister Michalis Chrysochoidis, speaking in Parliament on Monday.

      The border fence project has a total budget of 62.9 million euros and has been undertaken by a consortium put together by four construction companies.

      It will have a total length of 27 kilometers and eight elevated observatories will be constructed to be used by the Hellenic Army.

      Moreover, the existing fence will be reinforced with a steel railing measuring 4.3 meters in height, instead of the current 3.5 meters.

      Damage to the existing fence during attempts by thousands of migrants to cross into Greece territory from Turkey, as well as bad weather, will be repaired – including a 400-meter stretch that collapsed as a result of flooding.

      https://www.ekathimerini.com/256184/article/ekathimerini/news/evros-land-border-fence-to-be-ready-in-eight-months

    • Greece fortifies border security against refugees
      Athens reportedly installs devices that can cause deafness at Turkish-Greek border

      Greece installed two electronic devices that can produce strong sound waves that cause deafness in the area bordering Turkey to prevent possible refugee waves entering the country.

      Two #Long_Range_Acoustic_Device (#LRAD) that can also cause severe pain and serious health problems to those who are exposed to it were delivered to police responsible for the border, according to media reports.

      Four drones, 15 thermal cameras, five Zodiacs boats and 10 armored patrol vehicles (APV) were also integrated into the border surveillance system.

      Greece also began building a new fence across its northeastern border with Turkey.

      The fence will be 27 kilometers (17 miles) long and eight elevated observatories will be constructed to be used by the army.

      https://www.aa.com.tr/en/europe/greece-fortifies-border-security-against-refugees/2008011

      #barrière_acoustique #surdité #mur_acoustique

    • Construction of Evros border fence begins

      The construction of a fence running along a section of the Greek-Turkish land border in Evros, has started.

      In March this year, Turkey attempted to asymmetrically invade Greece with the use of tens of thousands of illegal immigrants from Africa, Afghanistan and Pakistan. Turkey had not only falsely told the illegal immigrants that Greece’s borders were open, but it also facilitated the transportation of the illegal immigrants and utilized their army to try and tear down Greece’s border wall. This damage is currently being repaired.

      From February 28 to August 3 this year, over 60,000 illegal immigrants were prevented from entering Greece from the Evros area on the Greek-Turkish border region.

      According to SKAI, many of the illegal immigrants arrested by authorities were seeking political asylum in Greece, claiming they were government officials in Turkey and opponents of the Erdoğan government.

      The border fence project has a total budget of €62.9 million. It will have a total length of 27 kilometres and eight elevated observatories will be constructed to be used by the Hellenic Army. Moreover, the existing fence will be reinforced with a steel railing measuring 4.3 meters in height, instead of the current 3.5 meters.

      Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis will visit Evros over the weekend to overview the work.

      Furthermore, according to reports, Greece has started using two sound cannons to stop illegal immigrants crossing into Europe.

      The sonic weapons can emit powerful sound waves which may cause pain and shock to the human body.

      The devices have been set up in the Greek province of Alexandroupolis alongside the Maritsa river, which runs through the Balkans and southeast Europe.

      https://greekcitytimes.com/2020/10/16/construction-of-evros-border-fence-begins
      #armes_sonores

    • New Evros fence to be completed by April next year, PM says during on-site inspection

      Construction of a new fence designed to stop undocumented migrants from slipping into Greece along its northeastern border with Turkey, demarcated by the Evros River, is expected to be completed by April next year, Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis said during a visit at the area of Ferres on Saturday.

      “Building the Evros fence was the least we could do to secure the border and make the people of Evros feel more safe,” Mitsotakis said.

      The 62.9-million-euro steel fence with barbed wire will be five meters high and have a total length of 27 kilometers. Eight elevated observatories will be constructed to be used by the Hellenic Army. The project, which is designed to also serve as anti-flood protection, has been undertaken by a consortium put together by four construction companies.

      During a meeting with local officials, Mitsotakis also confirmed the hiring of 400 guards to patrol the border.

      https://www.ekathimerini.com/258187/article/ekathimerini/news/new-evros-fence-to-be-completed-by-april-next-year-pm-says-during-on-s

    • #Muhammad_al-Arab, 02.03.2020

      –-> #Forensic_Architecture releases video confirming murder of Syrian refugee on Greek border
      https://seenthis.net/messages/828209#message829209

      Mediapart en a aussi parlé :

      Mohamed Al Arab avait 22 ans et était originaire d’Alep, rapporte Le Parisien. Le gouvernement grec, lui, « dément catégoriquement » ces tirs. « La police grecque n’a pas tiré, maintient M. Moutzouris, mais malheureusement cela ne serait pas surprenant que la situation dérape. »

      https://seenthis.net/messages/828209#message829196

      ##Muhammad_al_Arab

    • Et en 2012, un réfugié palestinien nous avait livré ce témoignage d’un meurtre suite à un #push-back dans la même région :

      On l’avait reportée dans l’article publié pour @visionscarto.

      C’est dans un bar situé dans un patio au bout d’un étroit passage du quartier de Taksim que se rencontrent des jeunes syriens pour discuter de la meilleure manière d’aider leurs compatriotes restés au pays. Parmi eux, il y a K. Nous partageons une bière avec lui alors qu’il nous raconte son histoire, ses deux tentatives de passage de la frontière. La première fois, la police turque l’a arrêté avant qu’il n’arrive à Edirne, et il a passé quatre jours en centre de rétention. Son récit indique que les abords de la frontière gréco-turque ont tout l’air d’une « zone de non-droit ».
      En payant 400 euros par personne, K. et ses compagnons de voyage sont parvenus à traverser le fleuve et à fouler le sol grec. Comme tous les autres migrants, une fois arrivé en Grèce, K. se rend alors au poste de police le plus proche. Il est aussitôt transféré dans un centre de rétention, sans doute celui de Fylakio, ou dans un des nombreux postes de police qui servent également de centres de rétention dans la région de l’Evros. Les policiers, qui n’étaient pas accompagnés par des agents Frontex, l’ont interrogé, ont rempli un formulaire et ont écrit avec un stylo un numéro à deux chiffres sur sa main. (Le numéro ainsi que la date du déroulement de ces événements ne sont pas mentionnés ici, par mesure de sécurité.) À ce moment là, par rapport à la procédure officielle, une étape essentielle a déjà été omise : l’enregistrement des empreintes digitales, prévu par le règlement Dublin II pour tous les migrants interceptés sur le sol européen. K. entend les policiers discuter entre eux, puis celui qui avait écrit le numéro sur sa main revient pour l’effacer avec de l’alcool. K. avait pourtant le droit de déposer une demande d’asile politique en Grèce. Il en a été empêché.

      L’histoire s’est écrite différemment pour K. qui a aussi dessiné des croquis pour nous aider à comprendre.


      À la nuit tombée, K. a été conduit dans un fourgon à bord duquel il y avait trente-sept autres migrants. Après trente minutes de voyage, et deux heures d’attente dans ce véhicule – aux fenêtres minuscules –, tout près du fleuve Evros, les policiers ont fait sortir les migrants du fourgon vers trois heures du matin pour les faire monter huit par huit sur des canots, en les menaçant : « Et si vous essayez de revenir, nous vous abattrons ! » K. se souvient qu’il faisait froid et humide, cette nuit-là. Autour d’eux, les policiers formaient un cordon pour les empêcher de revenir en arrière. K. raconte que l’un d’entre eux a essayé de prendre la fuite, mais un policier l’a attrapé et l’a frappé avec une matraque, longuement… avant de jeter le corps sans vie dans le fleuve. Son cadavre refera probablement surface plus tard dans l’année, et sera ramené à la morgue de l’hôpital d’Alexandroupoli, où le Docteur Pavlidis essaiera de retrouver son identité (Les déportations illégales à la frontière ont été dénoncées également par The Guardian : lire « Syrian refugees ‘turned back from Greek border by police’ »).

      Entre temps, K. et S. sont repassés par la case départ, en Turquie. Ils nous ont tous deux expliqué qu’ils prévoyaient de passer la frontière le lendemain. Même parcours : le groupe de migrants sera transporté près de la frontière dans un petit fourgon, puis ils devront aller à pied jusqu’au fleuve, où un canot les attendra pour faire la traversée. Prix du voyage : 400 euros par personne. Nous leur promettons de les retrouver en Grèce la semaine suivante.

      Ce soir, nous les quittons, là, en nous demandant au nom de quoi cette frontière si facile à traverser pour nous devrait être si dangereuse pour eux.

      Source :
      À Kumkapı, avant de passer la frontière
      https://visionscarto.net/a-kumkapi-avant-de-passer-la-frontiere

  • ***ATTENTION ! C’EST PROBABLEMENT UNE FAKE-NEWS, VOIR PLUS BAS DANS CE FIL DE DISCUSSION !***

    La #cruauté de cette #Europe qui perd toute #humanité à ses #frontières...
    Bulgaria Floods Evros River to Prevent Migrants Storming Greek Borders

    Bulgaria Floods Evros River to Prevent Migrants Storming Greek Borders
    At the request of Greece, Bulgaria opened an Evros River dam located on its territory on Monday in order to cause intentional flooding and make it more difficult for migrants amassed at the Greek-Turkish border to cross the river.

    The opening of the #Ivaylovgrad Dam accordingly resulted in rising levels of the Evros River, Star TV reported.

    As the standoff between thousands of migrants and refugees on the Turkish side of the Evros and Greek security forces continues, PM Kyriakos Mitsotakis met his German counterpart Angela Merkel in Berlin and stressed that Greece and Europe cannot be blackmailed.

    He pointed out that if the Turkish President wants a review of the EU-Turkey agreement on migration “which he has, himself, effectively demolished,” then he must take the following actions: Remove the desperate people from Evros and stop spreading disinformation and propaganda.

    The Greek PM suggested that Erdogan should also examine other possible improvements, such as joint patrols to control the flow of migrants at the Turkish border. He also pointed out that the repatriation of those who illegally enter Greece should be possible from mainland Greece, as well as the islands.

    ”Greece has always recognized and continues to recognize that Turkey has played a crucial role in the management of the refugee issue — but this can’t be done using threats and blackmail,” he added.

    https://greece.greekreporter.com/2020/03/10/bulgaria-floods-evros-river-to-prevent-migrants-storming-greek

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Bulgarie #Evros #Grèce #fleuve_Evros #barrage #environnement_hostile #ouverture #barrage_hydroélectrique #inhumanité #inondation #noyades #dangers #dangerosité

    Le barrage en question...

    –----

    Ajouté à ce fil de discussion :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/828209

    • Bulgaria opens dam in Evros – Water level rises closing passage for illegal immigrants

      Greece is taking every measure necessary to demonstrate its determination to guard the borders of Europe.
      Τhe passage for migrants from the Evros river became even more difficult as the dams from Bulgaria opened and water levels began to rise.

      The Bulgarian authorities, at Greece’s request, proceeded forward with the action.

      Greece is taking every measure necessary to demonstrate its determination to guard the borders of Europe.

      The Ivailograc Dam releases even greater quantities of water from noon onwards, resulting in the rising levels of the Arda and Evros rivers.

      http://en.protothema.gr/bulgaria-opens-dam-in-evros-water-level-rises-closing-passage-for-ille

    • Non, la Bulgarie n’a pas ouvert un barrage pour aider la Grèce à stopper les migrants

      De nombreux sites internet et comptes d’extrême droite affirment que « la Bulgarie a ouvert [lundi 9 mars] un barrage pour faire monter le niveau du fleuve Evros » et ainsi empêcher les migrants de franchir la frontière turco-grecque. Faux, selon le gouvernement bulgare. Des relevés au barrage d’Ivaylovgrad et des images satellites contredisent également cette affirmation.

      « Les autorités bulgares, à la demande de la Grèce, ont ouvert le barrage d’Ivaïlovgrad, de sorte que le fleuve Evros qui délimite une majeure partie de la frontière gréco-turque soit en crue, plus difficile à traverser à pied (...) Voici un bel exemple de la solidarité européenne », écrit le site d’extrême droite FL24.

      L’affirmation, relayée lundi 9 mars par la chaîne grecque Star TV, a été reprise le 11 mars par les sites Valeurs Actuelles et Fdesouche, par un porte-parole de Génération identitaire et par de nombreux sites anglophones, comme ici et ici.


      « La Bulgarie n’a pas reçu de demande de la Grèce pour un lâcher contrôlé au barrage d’Ivaylovgrad », a déclaré à l’AFP Ivan Dimov, conseiller de la ministre bulgare des Affaires étrangères Ekaterina Zaharieva.

      Ce barrage est situé sur la rivière Arda, affluent du fleuve Evros, à quelques kilomètres en amont de la frontière bulgaro-grecque, et à une trentaine de kilomètres à vol d’oiseau de la frontière gréco-turque.

      « On n’observe pas de hausse du niveau du fleuve Maritsa au niveau de Svilengrad », ville bulgare située en aval, près de la frontière gréco-turque, affirme M. Dimov.

      Le ministre bulgare de l’Environnement et de l’Eau, Emil Dimitrov, a également démenti mercredi sur la chaîne bulgare BTV (voir ici) avoir reçu une telle demande des autorités grecques. Le barrage d’Ivaylovgrad n’a pas été ouvert ces derniers jours, a-t-il affirmé.

      « C’est une fake news (...). Personne n’a autorisé une telle chose. Je signe chaque mois un programme d’utilisation de l’eau libérée par les barrages », et ce document « est valable pour le mois en cours », a déclaré le ministre.

      Les images utilisées pour illustrer la prétendue nouvelle remontent par ailleurs à plusieurs années.

      La photo ci-dessous circulait déjà sur internet en février 2015 (voir ici).


      Les images du tweet ci-dessous, reprises par la plupart des sites, dont Valeurs Actuelles, avaient déjà été diffusées par un site grec en juillet 2018 (captures d’écran ci-dessous à droite).

      Des relevés, disponibles sur le site du ministère bulgare de l’Environnement et de l’Eau, montrent eux que le niveau du barrage d’Ivaylovgrad a légèrement augmenté entre le 6 et le 10 mars, contredisant la thèse d’un lâcher d’eau massif le 9 mars.

      « Barrage d’Ivaylovgrad : 120.161 millions de m3, soit 76,68% de son volume total », est-il écrit dans le relevé du 10 mars. Celui du 6 mars indique un niveau inférieur, avec 119.302 m3 d’eau, soit 76,13% de sa capacité.

      Une comparaison d’images satellites (disponibles sur le site Sentinel Hub) des 8 et 11 mars ne montre pas non plus de crue significative du fleuve Evros.

      Un petit banc de sable, situé en aval du barrage et à 1,5 km en amont de la frontière turco-grecque, est notamment visible aux deux dates, bien que légèrement moins au 11 mars. Pour autant, un correspondant de l’AFP présent à la frontière gréco-turque à ces dates explique que la zone a connu d’importantes précipitations.

      Des images satellites plus anciennes montrent que ce banc s’est réduit de manière nettement plus significative entre le 6 et le 8 mars, et que ce banc varie régulièrement - et fortement - en fonction du niveau du fleuve.

      Le ministre M. Dimitrov a expliqué à la télévision bulgare qu’un lâcher d’eau au barrage d’Ivaylovgrad aurait fait monter le niveau du fleuve Evros durant quelques heures, mais n’aurait eu selon lui aucun effet durable susceptible de dissuader des migrants de tenter la traversée.

      La Grèce possède en outre un barrage sur la rivière Arda (voir ici), affluent de l’Evros, a-t-il rappelé, suggérant que le pays aurait pu créer une crue artificielle sans l’aide de la Bulgarie.

      Des milliers de migrants se sont rués vers la frontière terrestre turco-grecque, délimitée par le fleuve Evros, quand Ankara a annoncé le 28 février l’ouverture de ses portes à tous les demandeurs d’asile souhaitant rejoindre l’Europe. Des dizaines ont réussi à traverser le fleuve et à pénétrer sur le territoire grec.

      Contacté mercredi 11 mars, le gouvernement grec n’avait pas répondu à nos questions.

      https://factuel.afp.com/non-la-bulgarie-na-pas-ouvert-un-barrage-pour-aider-la-grece-stopper-le
      #fake-news

  • Hidden infrastructures of the European border regime : the #Poros detention facility in Evros, Greece

    This blog post and the research it draws on date before the onset of the current border spectacle in Evros of February/March 2020. Obviously, the situation in Evros region has changed dramatically. Our research however underlines that the Greek state has always resorted to extra-legal methods of border and migration control in the Evros region. Particularly the violent and illegal pushback practices which have persisted for decades in Evros region have now been elevated to official government policy.

    The region of Evros at the Greek-Turkish border was the scene of many changes in the European and Greek border regimes since 2010. The most well-known was the deployment of the Frontex RABIT force in October of that year; while it concluded in 2011, Frontex has had a permanent presence in Evros ever since. In 2011, the then government introduced the ‘Integrated Program for Border Management and Combating Illegal Immigration’ (European Migration Network, 2012), which reflected EU and domestic processes of the Europeanisation of border controls (European Migration Network, 2012; Ilias et al., 2019). The program stipulated a number of measures which impacted the border regime in Evros: the construction of a 12.5km fence along the section of the Greek Turkish border which did not coincide with the Evros river (after which the region takes its name); the expansion of border surveillance technologies and capacities in the area; and the establishment of reception centres where screening procedures would be undertaken (European Migration Network, 2012; Ilias et al., 2019). In this context, one of the measures taken was the establishment of a screening centre in South Evros, near the village of Poros, 46km away from the city of Alexandroupoli – the main urban centre in the area.

    The operation of the Centre for the First Management of Illegal Immigration is documented in Greek (Ministry for Public Order and Citizen Protection, 2013a) and EU official documents (European Parliament, 2012; European Migration Network, 2013), reports by the EU’s Fundamental Rights Agency (2011), NGOs (Pro Asyl, 2012) and activists (CloseTheCamps, 2012), media articles (To Vima, 2012) and research (Düvell, 2012; Schaub, 2013) between 2011 and 2015.

    Yet, during our fieldwork in the area in 2018, none of our respondents mentioned it. Nor could we find any recent research, reports or official documents after 2015 referring to it. It was only a tip from someone we collaborate with that reminded us of the existence of the Poros facility. We found its ‘disappearance’ from public view intriguing. Through fieldwork, document analysis and queries to the Greek authorities, we constructed a genealogy of the Poros centre, from its inception in 2011 to its ambivalent present. Our findings not only highlight the shifting nature of local assemblages of the European border regime, but also raise questions on such ‘hidden’ infrastructures, and the implications of their use for the rights of the people who cross the border.

    A genealogy of Poros

    The Poros centre was originally a military facility, used for border surveillance. In 2012, it was transferred to the Hellenic Police, the civilian authority responsible for migration control and border management, and was formally designated a Centre for the First Management of Illegal Immigration, similar to the more well-known First Reception Centre in Fylakio, in North Evros. The refurbishment and expansion of the old facilities and purchase of necessary equipment were financed through the External borders fund of the European Union (Alexandroupoli Police Directorate, 2011). Visits by the European Commissioner for Home Affairs, Cecilia Malmström (To Vima, 2012), the then executive director of Frontex, Ilkka Laitinen (Ministry for Public Order and Citizen Protection, 2013b), and a delegation of the LIBE committee of the European Parliament (2012) illustrated the embeddedness of the centre in the European border regime. The Commission’s report on the implementation of the Greek National Action Plan on Migration Management and Asylum Reform specifically refers the Poros centre as a facility that could be used for screening procedures and vulnerability assessments (European Commission, 2012).

    The Poros facility was indeed used as a screening and identification centre, activities that fell under both border management and the Greek framework for reception procedures introduced in 2011. While official documents of the Greek Government suggest that the centre started operating in 2012 (Council of Europe, 2012), a media article (Alexandroupoli Online, 2011) and a report by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (2011) provide evidence that it was already operational the year before, as an informal reception centre. When the centre became the main screening facility for South Evros in 2012 (European Parliament, 2012), screening, identification and debriefing procedures at the time were carried out both by Hellenic Police personnel and Frontex officers deployed in the area (Council of Europe, 2012).

    One of the very few research sources referring to Poros, a PhD thesis by Laurence Pillant (2017) provides a detailed description of the space and the activities carried out in the old wooden building and the white containers (image 3), visible in the stills from the video we took in December 2020 (image 4). A mission of Medecins sans frontiers, indicated in Pillant’s diagram, provided health screening in 2012 (European Migration Network, 2013).

    The organisation and function of the centre at the time is also documented in a number of mundane administrative acts which we located through diavgeia.gov.gr, a website storing Greek public administration decisions. Containers were bought to create space for the screening and identification procedures (Regional Police Directorate of Macedonia and Thrace, 2012). A local company was awarded contracts for the cleaning of the facilities (Regional Police Directorate of Macedonia and Thrace, 2013). The last administrative documents we were able to locate concerned the establishment of a committee of local police officers to procure services for emptying the cesspit of the centre (Regional Police Directorate of Macedonia and Thrace, 2015) – not all buildings in the area are linked to the local sewage system. This is the point when the administrative trail for Poros goes cold. No documents were found in diavgeia.gov.gr after January 2015.

    So what happened to the Poros Centre?

    After 2015, we found a mere five online references to the centre, despite extensive searches of sources such as official documents, research or reports by human rights bodies and NGOs. A 2016 newspaper article mentioned that arrested migrants were led there for screening (Ta Nea, 2016). A 2018 article in a local online news outlet mentioned a case of malaria in the village of Poros (Evros News, 2018a), while in another article (Evros News, 2018b), the president of the village council blamed a case of malaria in the village on the lack of health screening in the centre. An account of activities of the municipal council of Alexandroupoli referred to fixing an electrical fault in the centre in May 2019 (Municipality of Alexandroupoli, 2019). Τhe Global Detention Project (2019) also refers to Poros as a likely detention place.

    These sources suggested that the centre might be operational in some capacity, yet they raised more questions than they answered. If the centre has been in operation since 2015, why is there such an absence of official sources referring to it? Equally surprising was the absence of administrative acts related to the Poros centre in diavgeia.gov.gr, in contrast to all other facilities in the area where migrants are detained, such as the Fylakio Reception and Identification Centre and the pre-removal centres and police stations. It was conceivable, of course, that the centre fell into disuse. Since the deployment of Frontex and the border control measures taken under the Integrated Plan, entries through the Greek-Turkish land border decreased significantly – from 54,974 in 2011 to 3,784 in 2016 (Hellenic Police, 2020), and screening procedures were transferred to Fylakio, fully operational since 2013 (Reception and Identification Service, 2020).

    Trying to find answers to our questions, we contacted the Hellenic Police. An email we sent in January 2020 was never answered. In early February, following a series of phone calls, we obtained some answers to our questions. The police officer who answered the phone call did not seem to have heard of the centre and wanted to ask other departments for more information, as well as the First Reception and Identification Service, now responsible for screening procedures. The next day, he said it is occasionally used as a detention facility, when there is a high number of apprehended people that cannot be detained in police cells. According to the police officer, they are detained there for one or two days, until they can be transferred to the Reception and Identification Centre of Fylakio for reception procedures, or detention in the pre-removal detention centre adjacent to it. At the same time, he stated that he was told that Poros has been closed for a long time.

    This contradictory information could be down to the distance between the central police directorate in Athens and the area of Evros – it is not unlikely that local arrangements are not known in the central offices. Yet, it was also at odds both with the description of the use of the centre that our informant himself gave us – using the present tense in Greek –, with what the local media articles suggest, and with what we saw on site. Stills from the video taken during fieldwork in December 2020 suggest that the Poros centre is not disused, although no activity could be observed on the day. The cars and vans parked outside did not seem abandoned or rusting. The main building and the containers appeared to be in a good condition. A bright red cloth, maybe a canvas bag, was hanging outside one of them. The rubbish bins were full, but the black bags and other objects in them did not seem as they have been left in the open for a long time (image 4).

    The police officer also asked, however, how we had heard of Poros – a question that alerted us to both the obscure nature of the facility and the sensitivity of our query.
    A hidden infrastructure of pushbacks?

    The Poros centre, at one level, illustrates how the function of such border facilities can change over time, as the local border regime adapts and responds to migratory movements. Fylakio has become the main reception and detention centre in Evros, and between 2015 and 2017, the Aegean islands became the main point of entry into Greece and the European Union. Yet, our findings raised a lot of significant questions regarding the new function of Poros, given the increase in migratory movements in the area since 2018.

    While we obtained official confirmation that the Poros centre is now used for temporary detention and not screening, it remains the case that there are no official documents – including any administrative acts on diavgeia.gov.gr – that confirm its use as a temporary closed detention centre. Equally, we did not manage to obtain any information about how the facility is funded from the Hellenic Police. Our respondent did not know, and another departments we called did not want to share any information about the centre. It also became evident in the course of our research that most of our contacts in Greece – NGOS and journalists – had never heard of the facility or had no recent information about it. We found no evidence to suggest that Greek and European human rights bodies or NGOs which monitor detention facilities have visited the Poros centre after 2015. A mission of the Council of Europe (2019), for example, visited several detention facilities in Evros in April 2018 but the Poros centre was not listed among them. Similarly, the Fundamental Rights Officer of Frontex, in a partly joined mission with the Fundamental Rights Agency, visited detention facilities in South Evros in 2019, the operational area where the Poros centre is located. However, the centre is not mentioned in the report on that visit (Frontex, 2019).

    The dearth of information and absence of monitoring of the facility means that it is unclear whether the facility provides adequate conditions for detention. While our Hellenic police informant stated that detention there lasts for one or two days, there is no outside gate at the Poros centre, just a rather flimsy looking wire fence. Does this mean that detainees are kept inside the main building or containers the whole time they are detained there? We also do not know if detainees have access to phones, legal assistance or healthcare, which the articles in the local press suggest that is absent from the Poros centre. Equally, in the absence of inspections by human rights bodies, we are unaware of the standards of hygiene inside the facilities, or if there is sufficient food available. Administrative acts archived in diavgeia.gov.gr normally offer some answers to such questions but, as we mentioned above, we could find none. In short, it appears that Poros is used as an informal detention centre, hidden from public view.

    The obscurity surrounding the facility, in the context of the local border regime, is extremely worrying. Many NGOs and journalists have documented widespread pushback practices (Arsis et al., 2018; Greek Council for Refugees, 2018; Koçulu, 2019), evidenced through migrant testimonies (Mobile Info Team 2019) and, more recently, videos (Forensic Architecture, 2019a; 2019b). Despite denials by the Hellenic Police and the Greek government, European and international international human rights bodies (Council of Europe, 2019; Committee Against torture 2019) have accepted these testimonies as credible. We have no firm evidence that the Poros facility may be one of the many ‘informal’ detention places migrant testimonies implicated in pushbacks. Yet, the centre is located no further than two kilometres from the Greek-Turkish border, and the layout of the area is similar to the location of a pushback captured on camera and analysed by Forensic Architecture (2019a): near a dirt road with direct access to the Evros River. Black cars and white vans (images 5 and 6), without police insignia and some without number plates, such as those in the Poros centre, have been mentioned in testimonies of pushbacks (Arsis et al., 2018). Objects looking like inflatable boats are visible in our video stills. While there might be other explanations for their presence (used for patrolling the river or confiscated from migrants crossing the river) they are also used during pushbacks operations, and their presence in a detention centre seems odd.

    These uncertainties, and the tendency of security bodies to avoid revealing information on spaces of detention, are not unusual. However, the obscurity surrounding the Poros centre, located in an area of the European border where detention have long attracted criticism and there is considerable evidence of illegal and violent border control practices, should be a concern for all.

    https://www.respondmigration.com/blog-1/border-regime-poros-detention-facility-evros-greece
    #Evros #détention #rétention #détention_administrative #Grèce #refoulement #push-back #push-backs #invisibilité #invisibilisation #Centre_for_the_First_Management_of_Illegal_Immigration #Fylakio #Frontex

    Ce centre, selon ce que le chercheur·es écrivent, est ouvert depuis 2012... or... pas entendu parler de lui avec @albertocampiphoto quand on a été sur place... alors qu’on a vraiment sillonnée la (relativement petite) région pendant 1 mois !

    Donc pas mention de ce centre dans la #carte qu’on a publiée notamment sur @visionscarto :


    https://visionscarto.net/evros-mur-inutile

    ping @reka @karine4

    • En fait, en regardant mieux « notre » carte je me rends compte que peut-être le centre que nous avons identifié comme « #Feres » est en réalité le centre que les auteur·es appellent Poros... les deux localités sont à moins de 5 km l’une de l’autre.
      J’ai écrit aux auteur·es...

      Réponse de Bernd Kasparek, 12.03.2020 :

      Since we have been in front of Poros detention centre, we are certain that it is a distinct entity from the Feres police station, which, as you rightly observe, is also often implicated in reports about push-backs.

      Réponse de Lena Karamanidou le 13.03.2020 :

      Feres is located here: https://goo.gl/maps/gQn15Hdfwo4f3cno6​ , and it’s a much more modern facility (see photo, complete with ubiquitous military van!). However, ​I’m not entirely certain when the new Feres station was built - I think there was an older police station, but then both police and border guard functions were transfered to the new building. Something for me to check in obscure news items and databases!

    • ‘We Are Like Animals’ : Inside Greece’s Secret Site for Migrants

      The extrajudicial center is one of several tactics Greece is using to prevent a repeat of the 2015 migration crisis.


      The Greek government is detaining migrants incommunicado at a secret extrajudicial location before expelling them to Turkey without due process, one of several hard-line measures taken to seal the borders to Europe that experts say violate international law.

      Several migrants said in interviews that they had been captured, stripped of their belongings, beaten and expelled from Greece without being given a chance to claim asylum or speak to a lawyer, in an illegal process known as refoulement. Meanwhile, Turkish officials said that at least three migrants had been shot and killed while trying to enter Greece in the past two weeks.

      The Greek approach is the starkest example of European efforts to prevent a reprise of the 2015 migration crisis in which more than 850,000 undocumented people passed relatively easily through Greece to other parts of Europe, roiling the Continent’s politics and fueling the rise of the far right.

      If thousands more refugees reach Greece, Greek officials fear being left to care for them for years, with little support from other members in the European Union, exacerbating social tensions and further fraying a strained economy. Tens of thousands of migrants already live in squalor on several Greek islands, and many Greeks feel they have been left to shoulder a burden created by wider European indifference.

      The Greek government has defended its actions as a legitimate response to recent provocations by the Turkish authorities, who have transported thousands of migrants to the Greek-Turkish border since late February and have encouraged some to charge and dismantle a border fence.

      The Greek authorities have denied reports of deaths along the border. A spokesman for the Greek government, Stelios Petsas, did not comment on the existence of the site, but said that Greece detained and expelled migrants in accordance with local law. An act passed March 3, by presidential decree, suspended asylum applications for a month and allowed immediate deportations.

      But through a combination of on-the-ground reporting and forensic analysis of satellite imagery, The Times has confirmed the existence of the secret center in northeastern Greece.

      Presented with diagrams of the site and a description of its operations, François Crépeau, a former U.N. Special Rapporteur on the human rights of migrants, said it was the equivalent of a domestic “black site,” since detainees are kept in secret and without access to legal recourse.

      Using footage supplied to several media outlets, The Times has also established that the Greek Coast Guard, nominally a lifesaving institution, fired shots in the direction of migrants onboard a dinghy that was trying to reach Greek shores early this month, beat them with sticks and sought to repel them by driving past them at high speed, risking tipping them into water.

      Forensic analysis of videos provided by witnesses also confirmed the death of at least one person — a Syrian factory worker — after he was shot on the Greek-Turkish border.
      A Secret Site

      When Turkish officials began to bus migrants to the Greek border on Feb. 28, a Syrian Kurd named Somar al-Hussein had a seat on one of the first coaches.

      Turkey already hosts more refugees than any other country — over four million, mostly Syrians — and fears that it may be forced to admit another million because of a recent surge in fighting in northern Syria. To alleviate this pressure, and to force Europe to do more to help, it has weaponized refugees like Mr. al-Hussein by shunting them toward the Continent.

      Mr. al-Hussein, a trainee software engineer, spent that night in the rain on the bank of the Evros River, which divides western Turkey from eastern Greece. Early the next morning, he reached the Greek side in a rubber dinghy packed with other migrants.

      But his journey ended an hour later, he said in a recent interview. Captured by Greek border guards, he said, he and his group were taken to a detention site. Following the group’s journey on his mobile phone, he determined that the site was a few hundred yards east of the border village of Poros.

      The site consisted principally of three red-roofed warehouses set back from a farm road and arranged in a U-shape. Hundreds of other captured migrants waited outside. Mr. al-Hussein was taken indoors and crammed into a room with dozens of others.

      His phone was confiscated to prevent him from making calls, he said, and his requests to claim asylum and contact United Nations officials were ignored.

      “To them, we are like animals,” Mr. al-Hussein said of the Greek guards.

      After a night without food or drink, on March 1 Mr. al-Hussein and dozens of others were driven back to the Evros River, where Greek police officers ferried them back to the Turkish side in a small speedboat.

      Mr. al-Hussein was one of several migrants to provide similar accounts of extrajudicial detentions and expulsions, but his testimony was the most detailed.

      By cross-referencing drawings, descriptions and satellite coordinates that he provided, The Times was able to locate the detention center — in farmland between Poros and the river.

      A former Greek official familiar with police operations confirmed the existence of the site, which is not classified as a detention facility but is used informally during times of high migration flows.

      On Friday, three Times journalists were stopped at a roadblock near the site by uniformed police officers and masked special forces officers.

      The site’s existence was also later confirmed by Respond, a Sweden-based research group.

      Mr. Crépeau, now a professor of international law at McGill University, said the center represented a violation of the right to seek asylum and “the prohibition of cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment, and of European Union law.”
      Violence at Sea

      Hundreds of miles to the south, in the straits of the Aegean Sea between the Turkish mainland and an archipelago of Greek islands, the Greek Coast Guard is also using force.

      On March 2, a Coast Guard ship violently repelled an inflatable dinghy packed with migrants, in an incident that Turkish officials captured on video, which they then distributed to the press.

      The footage shows the Coast Guard vessel and an unmarked speedboat circling the dinghy. A gunman on one boat shot at least twice into waters by the dinghy, with what appeared to be a rifle, before men from both vessels shoved and struck the dinghy with long black batons.

      It is not clear from the footage whether the man was firing live or non-lethal rounds.

      Mr. Petsas, the government spokesman, did not deny the incident, but said the Coast Guard did not fire live rounds.

      The larger Greek boat also sought to tip the migrants into the water by driving past them at high speed.
      Forensic analysis by The Times shows that the incident took place near the island of Kos after the migrants had clearly entered Greek waters.

      “The action of Greek Coast Guard ships trying to destabilize the refugees’ fragile dinghies, thus putting at risk the life and security of their passengers, is also a violation,” said Mr. Crépeau, the former United Nations official.
      A Killing on Land

      The most contested incident concerns the lethal shooting of Mohammed Yaarub, a 22-year-old Syrian from Aleppo who tried to cross Greece’s northern land border with Turkey last week.

      The Greek government has dismissed his death as “fake news” and denied that anyone has died at the border during the past week.

      An analysis of videos, coupled with interviews with witnesses, confirmed that Mr. Yaarub was killed on the morning of March 2 on the western bank of the Evros River.

      Mr. Yaarub had lived in Turkey for five years, working at a shoe factory, according to Ali Kamal, a friend who was traveling with him. The two friends crossed the Evros on the night of March 1 and camped with a large group of migrants on the western bank of the river.

      By a cartographical quirk, they were still in Turkey: Although the river mostly serves as the border between the two countries, this small patch of land is one of the few parts of the western bank that belongs to Turkey rather than Greece.

      Mr. Kamal last saw his friend alive around 7:30 a.m. the next morning, when the group began walking to the border. The two men were separated, and soon Greek security forces blocked them, according to another Syrian man who filmed the aftermath of the incident and was later interviewed by The Times. He asked to remain anonymous because he feared retribution.

      During the confrontation, Mr. Yaarub began speaking to the men who were blocking their path and held up a white shirt, saying that he came in peace, the Syrian man said.

      Shortly afterward, Mr. Yaarub was shot.

      There is no known video of the moment of impact, but several videos captured his motionless body being carried away from the Greek border and toward the river.

      Several migrants who were with Mr. Yaarub at the time of his death said a Greek security officer had shot him.

      Using video metadata and analyzing the position of the sun, The Times confirmed that he was shot around 8:30 a.m., matching a conclusion reached by Forensic Architecture, an investigative research group.

      Video shows that it took other migrants about five minutes to ferry Mr. Yaarub’s body back across the river and to a car. He was then taken to an ambulance and later a Turkish hospital.

      An analysis of other footage shot elsewhere on the border showed that Greek security forces used lethal and non-lethal ammunition in other incidents that day, likely fired from a mix of semiautomatic and assault rifles.
      E.U. Support for Greece

      Mr. Petsas, the government spokesman, defended Greece’s tough actions as a reasonable response to “an asymmetrical and hybrid attack coming from a foreign country.”

      Besides ferrying migrants to the border, the Turkish police also fired tear-gas canisters in the direction of Greek security forces and stood by as migrants dismantled part of a border fence, footage filmed by a Times journalist showed.

      Before this evidence of violence and secrecy had surfaced, Greece won praise from leaders of the European Union, who visited the border on March 3.

      “We want to express our support for all you did with your security services for the last days,” said Charles Michel, the president of the European Council, the bloc’s top decision-making body.

      The European Commission, the bloc’s administrative branch, said that it was “not in a position to confirm or deny” The Times’s findings, and called on the Greek justice system to investigate.

      https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/10/world/europe/greece-migrants-secret-site.html

      https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/10/world/europe/greece-migrants-secret-site.html

      #Mohammed_Yaarub #décès #mourir_aux_frontières

    • Grécia nega existência de centro de detenção “secreto” onde os migrantes são tratados “como animais”

      New York Times citou vários migrantes que dizem ter sido roubados e agredidos pelos guardas fronteiriços, antes de deportados para a Turquia. Erdogan compara gregos aos nazis.

      Primeiro recusou comentar, mas pouco mais de 24 horas depois o Governo da Grécia refutou totalmente a notícia do New York Times. Foi esta a sequência espaçada da reacção de Atenas ao artigo do jornal norte-americano, publicado na terça-feira, que deu conta da existência de um centro de detenção “secreto”, perto da localidade fronteiriça de Poros, onde muitos dos milhares de migrantes que vieram da Turquia, nos últimos dias, dizem ter sido roubados, despidos e agredidos, impedidos de requerer asilo ou de contactar um advogado, e deportados, logo de seguida, pelos guardas fronteiriços gregos.
      Mais populares

      Coronavírus: Meninos, isto não são umas férias – Opinião de Bárbara Wong
      Coronavírus
      Coronavírus: o que comprar sem levar o supermercado para casa
      i-album
      Festival
      Cores e mais cores: o Holi e “o triunfo do bem sobre o mal” na Índia

      “Para eles somos como animais”, acusou Somar al-Hussein, sírio, um dos migrantes entrevistados pelo diário nova-iorquino, que entrou na Grécia através do rio Evros e que diz ter sido alvo de tratamento abusivo no centro de detenção “secreto”.

      “Não há nenhum centro de detenção secreto na Grécia”, garantiu, no entanto, esta quarta-feira, Stelios Petsas, porta-voz do executivo grego. “Todas as questões relacionadas com a protecção e a segurança das fronteiras são transparentes. A Constituição está a ser aplicada e não há nada de secreto”, insistiu.

      Com jornalistas no terreno, impedidos de entrar no local por soldados gregos, o New York Times entrevistou diversos migrantes que dizem ter sido ali alvo de tratamento desumano, analisou imagens de satélite, informou-se junto de um centro de estudos sueco sobre migrações que opera na zona e falou com um antigo funcionário grego familiarizado com as operações policiais fronteiriças. Informação que diz ter-lhe permitido confirmar a existência do centro.

      https://www.publico.pt/2020/03/11/mundo/noticia/grecia-nega-existencia-centro-detencao-secreto-onde-migrantes-sao-tratados-a

      #paywall

    • Greece : Rights watchdogs report spike in violent push-backs on border with Turkey

      A Balkans-based network of human rights organizations says that the number of migrants pushed back from Greece into Turkey has spiked in recent weeks. The migrants allegedly reported beatings and violent collective expulsions from inland detention spaces to Turkey on boats across the Evros River.

      Greek officers “forcefully pushed [people] in the van while the policemen were kicking them with their legs and shouting at them.” Then, the migrants were detained, forced to sign untranslated documents and pushed back across the Evros River at night. Over the next few days, Turkish authorities returned them to Greece, but then they were pushed back again.

      This account from 50 Afghans, Pakistanis, Syrians and Algerians aged between 15 and 35 years near the town of Edirne at the Greek-Turkish border was one of at least seven accounts a network of Balkans-based human rights watchdogs says it received from refugees over the course of six weeks, between March and late April.

      The collection of reports (https://www.borderviolence.eu/press-release-documented-pushbacks-from-centres-on-the-greek-mainland), published last week by the Border Violence Monitoring Network (BVMN), with help from its members Mobile Info Team (MIT) and Wave Thessaloniki, consists of “first-hand testimonies and photographic evidence” which the network says shows “violent collective expulsions” of migrants and refugees. According to the network, the number of individuals who were pushed back in groups amount to 194 people.
      https://twitter.com/mobileinfoteam/status/1257632384348020737?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E12

      Without exception, according to the report, all accounts come from people staying in the refugee camp in Diavata and the Drama Paranesti pre-removal detention center. They included Afghans, Pakistanis, Algerians and Moroccans, as well as Bangladeshi, Tunisian and Syrian nationals.

      In the case of Diavata, according to the report, migrants said police took them away, telling them they would receive a document known as “Khartia” to regularize their stay temporarily. The Diavata camp is located near the northern Greek city of Thessaloniki.

      Instead, the migrants were “beaten, robbed and detained before being driven to the border area where military personnel used boats to return them to Turkey across the Evros River,” they said. Another large group reported that they were taken from detention in Drama Paranesti, also located in northern Greece, some 80 kilometers from the border with Turkey, and expelled in the same way.

      While such push-backs from Greece into Turkey are not new, the network of NGOs says the latest incidents are somewhat different: “Rarely have groups been removed from inner-city camps halfway across the territory or at such a scale from inland detention spaces,” Simon Campbell of the Border Violence Monitoring Network told InfoMigrants.

      “Within the existing closure of the Greek asylum office and restriction measures due to COVID-19, the repression of asylum seekers and wider transit community looks to have reached a zenith in these cases,” Campbell said.

      Although Greece last month lifted a controversial temporary ban on asylum applications imposed in response to an influx of refugees from Turkey, all administrative services to the public by the Greek Asylum Service were suspended on March 13.

      The suspension, which the Asylum Service said serves to “control the spread of COVID-19” pandemic, will continue at least through May 15.

      https://twitter.com/GreekAsylum/status/1248651007489433600?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E12

      Reports of violence and torture

      The accounts in the report by the network of NGOs describe a range of violent actions toward migrants, from electricity tasers and water immersion to beatings with batons.

      According to one account, some 50 people were taken from Diavata camp to a nearby police station, where they were ordered to lie on the ground and told to “sleep here, don’t move.” Then they were beaten with batons, while others were attacked with tasers.

      They were held overnight in a detention space near the border, and beaten further by Greek military officers. The next day, they were boated across the river to Turkey by authorities with ’military uniform, masks, guns, electric [taser].’"

      Another group reported that they were “unloaded in the dark” next to the Evros River and “ordered to strip to their underwear.” Greek authorities allegedly used batons and their fists to hit some members of the group.

      Alexandra Bogos, advocacy officer with the Mobile Info Team, told InfoMigrants they were concerned about the “leeway afforded for these push-backs from the inner mainland to take place.”

      Bogos said they reached out to police departments after they learned about the arrests, but police felt “unencumbered” and continued transporting the people to the Greek-Turkish border. “On one occasion, we reached out and asked specifically for information about one individual. The answer was: ’He does not appear in our system’,” Bogos said.

      https://twitter.com/juliahahntv/status/1246165904406261773?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E12

      An Amnesty report (https://www.amnesty.org/en/documents/eur01/2077/2020/en) from April about unlawful push-backs, beatings and arbitrary detention echoes the accusations in the report by the network of NGOs.

      History of forcible rejections

      Over the past three years, violent push-backs have been documented in several reports. Last November, German news magazine Spiegel reported that between 2017 and 2018 Greece illegally deported 60,000 migrants to Turkey. The process involved returning asylum seekers without assessing their status. Greece dismissed the accusations.

      In 2018, the Greek Refugee Council and other NGOs published a report containing testimonies from people who said they had been beaten, sometimes by masked men, and sent back to Turkey (https://www.gcr.gr/en/news/press-releases-announcements/item/1028-the-new-normality-continuous-push-backs-of-third-country-nationals-on-the-e).

      UN refugee agency UNHCR and the European Human Rights Commissioner called on Greece to investigate the claims. In late 2018, another report by Human Rights Watch (HRW), also based on testimonies of migrants, said that violent push-backs were continuing (https://www.hrw.org/news/2018/12/18/greece-violent-pushbacks-turkey-border).

      It is often unclear who is carrying out the push-backs because they often wear masks and cannot be easily identified. In the HRW report, they are described as paramilitaries. Eyewitnesses interviewed by HRW said the perpetrators “looked like police officers or soldiers, as well as some unidentified masked men.”

      Simon Campbell of the Border Violence Monitoring Network said the reports he receives also regularly describe “military uniforms,” which “suggests it is the Greek army carrying out the push-backs,” he told InfoMigrants.

      Last week, the Spiegel published an investigation into the killing of Pakistani Muhammad Gulzar (https://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/greek-turkish-border-the-killing-of-muhammad-gulzar-a-7652ff68-8959-4e0d-910), who was shot at the Greek-Turkish border on March 4. “Evidence overwhelmingly suggests that the bullet came from a Greek firearm,” the authors wrote.

      Violations of EU and international law

      Push-backs are prohibited by Greek and EU law as well as international treaties and agreements. They also violate the principle of non-refoulement, which means the forcible return of a person to a country where they are likely to be subject to persecution.

      In March, Jürgen Bast, professor for European law at the University of Gießen in Germany, called the action of Greek security forces an “open breach of the law” on German TV magazine Monitor.

      Greece is not the only country accused of violating EU laws at the bloc’s external border: On top of the 100 additional border guards the European border and coast guard agency Frontex deployed to the Greek border with Turkey in March, Germany sent 77 police officers to help with border security.
      Professor Bast called Berlin’s involvement a “complete political joint responsibility” of the German government. “All member states of the European Union...including the Commission...have decided to ignore the validity of European law,” he told Monitor.

      In response to a request for comment from InfoMigrants, a spokesperson for EU border and coast guard agency Frontex would confirm neither the reports by the three NGOs nor the existence of systematic push-backs from Greece to Turkey.

      “Frontex has not received any reports of such violations from the officers involved in its activities in Greece,” the spokesperson said, adding that its officers’ job is to “support member states and to ensure the rule of law.”

      Coronavirus used as a pretext?

      On the afternoon of May 5, as the network of NGOs published their report on push-backs, police reportedly rounded up 26-year-old Pakistani national Sheraz Khan outside the Diavata refugee camp. After sending the Mobile Info Team (MIT) a message telling them “Police caught us,” he tried calling the NGO twice, but the connection failed both times.

      MIT’s Alexandra Bogos told InfoMigrants that Khan has not been heard of since and he has not returned to the camp. “We have strong reasons to believe that he may have been pushed back to Turkey,” Bogos said.

      A day later, the police arrived in the morning and “started removing tents and structures set up in an overflow area” outside the Diavata camp.

      Simon Campbell of the Border Violence Monitoring Network said the restrictive measures taken as a response to the coronavirus pandemic have been used to remove those who have crossed the border.

      “COVID-19 has been giving the Greek authorities a blank cheque to act with more impunity,” Campbell told InfoMigrants. “When Covid-19 restrictions lift, will we have already seen this more expansive push-back practice entrenched, and will it persist beyond the lockdown?”

      https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/24620/greece-rights-watchdogs-report-spike-in-violent-push-backs-on-border-w

  • Une coalition contre les violences aux frontières

    Nous déposerons plainte contre la Grèce et l’UE pour les violations des droits des personnes migrantes et réfugiées fuyant la Turquie

    Ces derniers jours, les #violations des droits des migrant·e·s et réfugié·e·s qui cherchent à accéder au territoire européen via la Grèce ont pris une tournure dramatique. Si les #violences contre les exilé·e·s atteignent aujourd’hui un niveau inouï, les conditions de cette #escalade ont été posées par les dirigeants européens depuis plusieurs années. En 2015, l’Union européenne (UE) a introduit son « #approche_hotspot », obligeant l’Italie et la Grèce à trier les migrant·e·s et réfugié·e·s arrivant sur leurs côtes. En mars 2016, l’UE a signé un arrangement avec la Turquie qui, pour un temps, a permis de contenir de nouvelles arrivées. Sans surprise, ces dispositifs ont transformé les îles grecques en prisons à ciel ouvert et exacerbé la catastrophe humanitaire aux frontières grecques. La coopération avec la Turquie – largement dénoncée par la société civile –, s’effondre aujourd’hui, alors que les autorités turques, cherchant à faire pression sur l’UE, poussent les personnes migrantes et réfugiées en sa direction.

    Pour empêcher l’arrivée d’un plus grand nombre d’exilé·e·s – principalement Syrien⋅ne·s – fuyant la guerre et maintenant les menaces turques, les agents grecs ont déployé un niveau de #violence inédit, rejoints par une partie de la population. En mer, les garde-côtes coupent la route aux bateaux des migrant·e·s et réfugié·e·s, tirant en l’air et blessant certain·e·s passager·e·s. [1] Un enfant s’est noyé durant la traversée [2] Sur terre, les refoulements à la rivière #Evros ont continué. Une vidéo - qualifiée de « fake news » par les autorités grecques [3] mais vérifiée par #Forensic_Architecture - montre un réfugié syrien tué par balle alors qu’il tentait de traverser la rivière. [4] Par ailleurs, les militant⋅e·s, agissant en solidarité avec les personnes migrantes et réfugiées sont criminalisé⋅e·s et attaqué⋅e·s par des groupes d’extrême droite. [5] Des violations graves sont en cours et les principes de base du droit d’asile sont foulés au pied.

    Cette violence vise à envoyer un message simple aux migrant·e·s et réfugié·e·s potentiel·le·s, celui que le ministère des Affaires Étrangères a exprimé via Twitter : « Personne ne peut traverser les frontières grecques ». [6] Cette politique grecque de fermeture des frontières [7] est soutenue par l’UE. Charles Michel, président du Conseil européen, a ainsi encensé les efforts des Grecs pour « protéger les frontières de l’Europe » [8]. Ursula von der Leyen, présidente de la Commission européenne, a qualifié la Grèce de « bouclier européen » - suggérant ainsi que les personnes migrantes et réfugiées constituent une menace physique pour l’Europe. [9] Enfin, l’agence européenne Frontex va déployer une intervention rapide dans la zone. [10] La Grèce et l’UE sont ainsi prêtes à recourir à tous les moyens pour tenter de dissuader les migrant·e·s et réfugié·e·s et empêcher la répétition des arrivées en grand nombre de 2015 – et la crise politique qu’elles ont générée à travers l’Europe.

    Nous condamnons fermement l’instrumentalisation des migrant·e·s et réfugié·e·s par la Turquie et par l’UE. Aucun objectif politique ne peut justifier de telles exactions. Il est révoltant que des personnes fuyant la violence se trouvent exposées à de nouvelles violences commises par les États européens dont le cynisme et l’hypocrisie culminent. Nos organisations s’engagent à joindre leurs efforts pour forcer les États à rendre compte de leurs crimes. Nous documenterons ainsi les violations des droits des migrant·e·s et réfugié·e·s et déposerons plainte contre ceux qui en sont responsables. Nous soutenons également celles et ceux qui sont de plus en plus criminalisé·e·s pour leur solidarité.

    Nos efforts visent à utiliser tous les outils d’#investigation et du #droit pour faire cesser la #violence_d’État, en finir avec la multiplication et la #banalisation des pratiques de #refoulement en Grèce, et ailleurs aux frontières de l’Europe. Les migrant·e·s et réfugié·e·s ne sont pas une menace face à laquelle l’Europe doit ériger un bouclier, mais sont eux même menacés par la violence des États tout au long de leurs trajectoires précaires. Nous utiliserons les outils du droit pour tenter de les protéger contre cette #brutalité.


    https://www.gisti.org/spip.php?article6320
    #plainte #justice #frontières #migrations #asile #réfugiés #Grèce #Turquie #mourir_aux_frontières #morts #décès #îles #mer_Egée #push-back #push-backs #refoulements

  • Turkey to open #Idlib border and allow Syrian refugees free passage to Europe

    Route out of northwestern Syria to be opened for 72 hours, officials tell MEE, after 33 Turkish troops killed in attack by pro-Assad forces.

    Turkey will open its southwestern border with Syria for 72 hours to allow Syrians fleeing the pro-government forces’ assault free passage to Europe, Turkish official sources have told Middle East Eye.

    The decision came after a security meeting chaired by Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in Ankara late on Thursday after 33 Turkish soldiers were killed in Syria’s Idlib province.

    A senior Turkish official said on Thursday that Syrian refugees headed towards Europe would not be stopped either on land or by sea.

    The official said that Ankara would order police and border and sea patrols to stand down if they detected any Syrian refugees trying to cross into Europe.

    Groups of Syrian refugees and migrants from other countries began heading to Turkey’s borders with Greece and Bulgaria after the announcement was made.

    Various Turkish refugee groups have also organised buses for Syrian refugees intending to head to Turkey’s border with Europe.

    The governor of Hatay province said that Turkish soldiers were killed in a Syrian government attack in Idlib, a province where forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad have been staging an offensive against rebels since December.

    Since then, about a million civilians have been displaced towards the Turkish border - more than half of them children - and hundreds have been killed in the onslaught.
    Nato meeting

    Turkey blamed Thursday’s air strike on Syrian government forces, who are backed by Russia.

    However, Russia’s defence ministry was cited by the RIA news agency on Friday as saying that the Turkish troops had been hit by artillery fire from Syrian government forces who were trying to repel an offensive by Turkish-backed rebel forces.

    Russia is sending two warships equipped with cruise missiles to the Mediterranean Sea towards the Syrian coast, the Interfax news agency cited Russia’s Black Sea fleet as saying on Friday.

    North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) ambassadors were meeting in Brussels on Friday at Turkey’s request to hold consultations about developments in Syria, the alliance said.

    Under article four of Nato’s founding Washington Treaty, any ally can request consultations whenever, in their opinion, their territorial integrity, political independence or security are threatened.
    Migrants not allowed through

    Turkey’s Demiroren news agency said around 300 migrants, including women and children, had begun heading towards the borders between European Union countries Greece and Bulgaria and Turkey’s Edirne province at around midnight on Thursday.

    Syrians, Iranians, Iraqis, Pakistanis and Moroccans were among those in the group, it said.

    It said migrants had also gathered in the western Turkish coastal district of Ayvacik in Canakkale province with the aim of travelling by boat to the Greek island of Lesbos.

    Video footage of the migrants broadcast by pro-government Turkish television channels could also not immediately be verified.

    Turkish broadcaster NTV showed scores of people walking through fields wearing backpacks and said the refugees had tried to cross the Kapikule border into Bulgaria, but were not allowed through.

    It said the same group of migrants had then walked through fields to reach the Pazarkule border crossing into Greece, but it was unclear what happened to them thereafter.

    Greece has tightened sea and land borders with Turkey after the overnight developments in Idlib, government sources told Reuters on Friday.

    The sources, who declined to be identified, said Athens was also in contact with the European Union and Nato on the matter.
    ’Turkey is currently hitting all known regime targets’

    The Turkish soldiers’ deaths are the biggest number of fatalities suffered by Ankara’s forces in a single day since it began deploying thousands of troops into Idlib in recent weeks in a bid to halt the military push by Assad’s forces and their allies.

    The latest incident means a total of 46 Turkish security personnel have been killed this month in Idlib.

    Fahrettin Altun, Erdogan’s communications director, said in a written statement that the Turkish government had decided in the meeting to retaliate against Assad’s forces by land and by air.

    “Turkey is currently hitting all known regime targets. What happened in Rwanda and Bosnia cannot be allowed to be repeated in Idlib,” he said.

    Attacks on Turkish forces have caused severe tensions between the Syrian government’s key ally, Russia, and Turkey, which backs certain opposition groups in Idlib.

    Erdogan had vowed to launch a military operation to push back Syrian government forces if they did not retreat from a line of Turkish observations posts by the end of February.

    The nine-year war in Syria has devastated much of the country. An estimated half a million people have been killed and millions have been forced to live as refugees.

    Turkey hosts the largest number of refugees in the world, having taken in some 3.7 million Syrians.

    Erdogan has repeatedly threatened to open the gates for migrants to travel to Europe.

    If it did so, it would reverse a pledge Turkey made to the EU in 2016 and could draw western powers into the standoff over Idlib.

    https://www.middleeasteye.net/news/turkey-syrian-refugees-free-passage-europe-soldiers-killed-Idlib

    #turquie #frontières #ouverture_des_frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Erdogan #bras_de_fer #Europe

    • La #Grèce bloque des centaines de migrants à sa frontière avec la Turquie

      A la suite de la montée des tensions en Syrie, Ankara avait plus tôt affirmé que le pays « ne retiendrait pas » les migrants qui cherchent à rejoindre l’Europe. La Grèce a annoncé avoir renforcé ses patrouilles à la frontière.


      https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2020/02/28/la-turquie-menace-d-ouvrir-la-porte-de-l-europe-aux-migrants_6031137_3210.ht

    • Greek police fire teargas on migrants at border with Turkey

      Greek police fired teargas toward migrants who were gathered on its border with Turkey and demanding entry on Saturday, as a crisis over Syria abruptly moved onto the European Union’s doorstep.

      The Greek government reiterated its promise to keep migrants out.

      “The government will do whatever it takes to protect its borders,” government spokesman Stelios Petsas told reporters, adding that in the past 24 hours Greek authorities had averted attempts by 4,000 people to cross.

      Live images from Greece’s Skai TV on the Turkish side of the northern land border at Kastanies showed Greek riot police firing teargas rounds at groups of migrants who were hurling stones and shouting obscenities.

      Media were not permitted to approach the Greek side of the border in the early morning, but the area smelled heavily of teargas, a Reuters witness said.

      A Turkish government official said late Thursday that Turkey will no longer contain the hundreds of thousands of asylum seekers after an air strike on war-ravaged Idlib in Syria killed 33 Turkish soldiers earlier that day.

      Almost immediately, convoys of people appeared heading to the Greek land and sea borders on Friday.

      An estimated 3,000 people had gathered on the Turkish side of the border at Kastanies, according to a Greek government official. Kastanies lies just over 900 km (550 miles)north-east of Athens.

      Greece, which was a primary gateway for hundreds of thousands of asylum seekers in 2015 and 2016, has promised it will keep the migrants out.

      However, Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan said on Saturday that some 18,000 migrants had crossed borders from Turkey into Europe. Speaking in Istanbul, he did not immediately provide evidence for the number, but said it would rise.

      Greek police were keeping media about a kilometre away from the Kastanies border crossing, but the broader area, where the two countries are divided by a river, was more permeable.

      A group of Afghans with young children waded across fast-moving waters of the Evros river and took refuge in a small chapel. They crossed into Greece on Friday morning.

      “Today is good” said Shir Agha, 30 in broken English. “Before, Erdogan people, police problem,” he said. Their shoes were caked in mud. It had rained heavily the night before, and by early morning, temperatures were close to freezing.

      Greece had already said on Thursday it would tighten border controls to prevent coronavirus reaching its Aegean islands, where thousands of migrants are living in poor conditions.

      Nearly a million refugees and migrants crossed from Turkey to Greece’s islands in 2015, setting off a crisis over immigration in Europe, but that route all but closed after the European Union and Ankara agreed to stop the flow in March 2016.

      https://af.reuters.com/article/worldNews/idAFKBN20N0F6
      #Evros #région_de_l'Evros

    • ’Following last night’s announcement of Turkish plans to open the borders with Greece for 72 hours, a large number of people attempted to cross the Evros/Meriç border near the 11km-long fence in Kastanies.
      They were stopped and are now trapped in the buffer zone between the two countries, surrounded by Greek and Turkish armed forces. Tear gas and stun grenade were reportedly used to dispersed the crowds.
      Human Rights 360 and @ForensicArchi have obtained material from the ground, including proof of people being pushed back across the border from Greece to Turkey and are monitoring the situation.
      As night has fallen, these people fear their human rights will be violated further. We urge the European, Greek, and Turkish authorities to safeguard their rights and safety.


      https://twitter.com/rights360/status/1233468982788841479

    • ’Number of migrants leaving Turkey reaches 36,776’

      Migrants departing from Turkey via northwestern border province of #Edirne, says country’s interior minister.

      The number of migrants leaving Turkey via its northwestern border province of Edirne reached 36,776, the country’s interior minister said on Saturday.

      In a statement on Twitter, Suleyman Soylu said that the number was registered as of 9.02 p.m. local time (1802 GMT).

      Turkish officials announced Friday that they would no longer try to stop irregular migrants from reaching Europe.

      The decision was made as 34 Turkish soldiers were martyred at the hands of regime forces in Idlib, Syria. The Turkish soldiers are working to protect local civilians under a 2018 deal with Russia under which acts of aggression are prohibited in the region.

      Since then, thousands of irregular migrants have flocked to Edirne to make their way into Europe.

      Turkey already hosts some 3.7 million migrants from Syria alone, more than any other country in the world.

      It has repeatedly complained that Europe has failed to keep its promises to help migrants and stem further migrant waves.

      https://www.aa.com.tr/en/turkey/number-of-migrants-leaving-turkey-reaches-36-776/1750216

    • Erdoğan says border will stay open as Greece tries to repel influx

      Turkish leader claims 18,000 people have crossed into EU but some are met with teargas.

      Thousands of migrants may be in no man’s land between Turkey and Greece after Ankara opened its western borders, sparking chaotic scenes as Greek troops attempted to prevent refugees from entering Europe en masse.

      Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, claimed 18,000 migrants had crossed the border, without immediately providing supporting evidence, but many appear to have been repelled by Greek border patrols firing teargas and stun grenades.

      Erdoğan has long threatened to allow refugees and migrants transit into the EU, with which Turkey signed an accord in 2016 to stem westward migration in return for financial aid.

      He stressed the frontier would remain open. “We will not close these doors in the coming period and this will continue,” he said in Istanbul on Saturday. “Why? The European Union needs to keep its promises. We are not obliged to look after and feed so many refugees. If you’re honest, if you’re sincere, then you need to share.”

      Erdoğan complained that funds transferred to Turkey from the EU to support refugees were arriving too slowly, saying he had asked Angela Merkel, the German chancellor, to send them directly to his government.

      But the policy shift appears to be intended to force the EU and Nato to support Ankara’s new military campaign in the north-western province of Idlib, Syria’s last rebel stronghold, where thousands of Turkish soldiers are supporting opposition forces facing an onslaught from regime forces backed by Russian air power.

      Erdoğan said Turkey could not handle a new wave of migration, in an apparent reference to the growing humanitarian crisis in Idlib.

      The Idlib offensive has pushed almost a million displaced civilians toward the Syrian-Turkish border, and hundreds of thousands of Syrian civilians remain between advancing Syrian government forces backed by Russia and rebel fighters supported by Turkey.

      In the largest single loss of life to Turkish forces since their country became involved in the Syria conflict, at least 33 Turkish soldiers were killed in an airstrike on Thursday night.

      After officials briefed on Friday that police, coastguard and border guards had been ordered to stand down, meaning passage to Europe would be no longer prevented, thousands of refugees and migrants made haste to Turkey’s borders with Greece and Bulgaria. Many travelled on buses provided by the Turkish state.

      They were met by Greek border patrols reportedly firing teargas and stun grenades. Some young migrants and refugees appeared to hurl rocks at the guards.

      “A titanic battle [is being waged] to keep our frontiers closed,” said Panayiotis Harelas, who heads the federation of border guards during an impromptu press conference at the scene.

      A 17-year-old Iranian who had made it into Greece overnight along with a group of friends told the Associated Press he had spent two months in Turkey and could not sustain himself there. “We learned the border was open and we headed there,” he said. “But we saw it was closed and we found a hole in the fence and went through it.”

      Greek authorities said 52 ships were patrolling the seas around Lesbos, along with other Aegean isles, in an apparent show of force to deter clandestine voyages. Greece has also bolstered its eastern land border, while Bulgaria has sent an extra 1,000 troops to its border with Turkey.

      A Greek government spokesperson, Stelios Petsas, said after an emergency meeting of ministers that security forces had repelled “more than 4,000 illegal entries”. Sixty-six people had been arrested after making their way through forest land into the country, none of whom were believed to hail from Idlib, according to Petsas.

      On Saturday morning high winds on Lesbos were mostly preventing arrivals there, with just one boat containing 27 people from various African countries reported to have reached the island. Another 180 reached other Greek islands from Turkey between Friday morning and Saturday morning, according to the coastguard.

      There are more than 3.5 million Syrian refugees in Turkey, along with many others fleeing war and poverty in Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Turkey’s borders to Europe were closed to migrants following a £5.2bn deal with the EU in 2016 after more than a million people crossed into Europe by foot.

      As that policy was effectively reversed, Erdoğan claimed that the number of people entering Europe from Turkey could rise to up to 30,000 on Saturday.

      He also said he had told Vladimir Putin, the Russian president, to end his support for Bashar al-Assad’s regime in Syria so that Turkey could more easily battle Assad’s forces.

      “We did not go [to Syria] because we were invited by [Assad],” he said. “We went there because we were invited by the people of Syria. We don’t intend to leave before the people of Syria [say] OK, this is done.”

      Syrian and Russian warplanes kept up airstrikes on the strategically important Idlib city of Saraqib on Saturday, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. There were reports that nine Assad-supporting Hezbollah forces were killed by Turkish smart missiles and drones.

      Russia’s foreign ministry said on Saturday that the two sides had agreed this week to reduce tensions on the ground in Idlib, though military action will continue, after Nato envoys held emergency talks at the request of Turkey, a member of the alliance.

      While urging de-escalation in Idlib, Nato offered no immediate assistance but said it would consider strengthening Ankara’s air defences.

      The UN secretary general, António Guterres, called for an immediate ceasefire and said the risk of ever greater escalation was growing by the hour, with civilians paying the gravest price.

      https://seenthis.net/messages/828209

    • Austria says it will stop any migrants trying to rush its border

      Austria will stop any migrants attempting to rush its border if measures to halt them in Greece and through the Balkans fail, conservative Interior Minister Karl Nehammer said on Sunday.

      Greek police fired tear gas to repel hundreds of stone-throwing migrants who tried to force their way across the border from Turkey on Sunday, with thousands more behind them after Ankara relaxed curbs on their movement. It was the second straight day of clashes.

      The rush echoes Europe’s migration crisis in 2015-2016, when Austria served as a corridor into Germany for hundreds of thousands of migrants who traveled through Greece and the Balkans. Austria also took in more than 1% of its population in asylum seekers in the process.

      “Hungary has assured us that it will protect its borders as best it can, like Croatia’s,” Nehammer told broadcaster ORF, referring to two of Austria’s neighbors. Migrants coming up through the Balkans would almost certainly have to pass through either of those countries before reaching Austria.

      “Should, despite that, people reach us then they must be stopped,” he said when asked what Austria would do.

      Nehammer’s boss, Chancellor Sebastian Kurz, built his career on a hard line on immigration, pledging to prevent a repeat of 2015’s influx. He governed in coalition with the far right from 2017 until last year, and is back in power with the Greens as a junior partner.

      When Kurz was foreign minister in 2016, Austria coordinated border restrictions in neighboring Balkan countries to stop migrants reaching it from Greece.

      Austria is prepared to do the same again if necessary, Kurz and Nehammer have indicated. Kurz is an outspoken critic of Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan’s government, a popular stance in his conservative Alpine country.

      Turkey said on Thursday it would let migrants cross its borders into Europe, despite a commitment to hold them in its territory under a 2016 deal with the European Union.

      Turkey’s turnabout came after an air strike killed 33 Turkish soldiers in Syria, and appeared to be an effort to press for more EU aid in tackling the refugee crisis from Syria’s civil war.

      “The second safety net, and here the Austrian security services have a lot of previous experience, is close cooperation and also support, whether that be financial, material or in terms of personnel, with countries along the (migrants’) escape route,” Nehammer said, referring to Balkan countries.

      https://www.reuters.com/article/us-syria-security-austria-idUSKBN20O2CS
      #route_des_Balkans #Autriche

    • Evros: Greek Army announces exercise with live ammunition on March 2

      Real ammunition will be used on Monday, March 2, 2020, across the Evros river, an announcement by the Greek Army said late on Sunday.

      The 4th Army Corps has announced military exercises with live ammunition at all border outposts at Kipoi and Kastanies where thousands of migrants and refugees have amassed. The broader area of the 24-hour exercise is where also all migrants crossings are in general.

      According to the announcement, guns, machine guns, rifles and pistols will be used during the military exercise with live ammunition.

      Listing the specific areas where the exercise will take place, the Army warns that “movement or stay of persons, trucks and animals during shooting hours is prohibited to avoid accidents.”

      “Non-exploded bullets that may be found, shod not me removed,” and the nearest police authorities should be immediately notified.”

      The timing of the military exercise and thus on a Greek holiday – Clean Monday – is peculiar, but it may serve rather the “internal consumption” and to scare off the migrants, comments news website tvxs.gr

      On Sunday, Greek special police forces and army fired warning shots during patrol in the Evros area in order to deter migrants trying to cross into the country.

      https://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2020/03/02/greece-army-exercise-live-ammunition-mar2

      #armée #militarisation_des_frontières #armes #armes_à_feu

    • Greece Suspends Asylum as Turkey Opens Gates for Migrants

      Greece took a raft of tough measures Sunday as it tried to repel thousands of migrants amassed at its border with Turkey.

      It deployed major military forces to the border, seeking to fortify the area after Turkey allowed migrants to pass through to the European Union over the weekend. The Greek government also said it would suspend asylum applications for a month and summarily deport migrants entering illegally.

      The developments were increasing tensions between the two countries, leaving thousands of people exposed to winter weather and caught in an increasingly volatile situation.

      Neither move announced by Greece is permitted by European Union law, but the Greek government said it would request special dispensation from the bloc. International protocols on the protection of refugees, of which Greece is a signatory, also prohibit such policies.

      “Turkey, instead of curbing migrant and refugee smuggling networks, has become a smuggler itself,” the Greek government said in a statement.

      Military officials would not say how many additional troops were being deployed, but they confirmed that they were stepping up joint military and police operations along the border. Dozens of military vehicles were seen moving toward various outposts along Greece’s 120-mile boundary with Turkey.

      The fortification of the area came after President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey confirmed on Saturday that he was opening Turkey’s border for migrants to enter Europe, saying that his country could no longer handle the huge numbers of people fleeing the war in Syria.

      Mr. Erdogan accused European leaders of failing to keep their promise to help Turkey bear the load of hosting 3.6 million Syrian refugees. And he demanded European support for his military operation against a Russian and Syrian offensive in northern Syria that has displaced at least a million Syrians, many of whom are now heading toward the Turkish border. The Turkish Army also suffered significant casualties last week in an airstrike in northwest Syria.

      The president of the European Council said he would visit the Greek-Turkish line on Tuesday with the Greek prime minister, and the European Union announced an urgent foreign ministers’ meeting sometime this week to deliberate on the crisis.

      Thousands of migrants languishing in Turkey were on the move this weekend after Mr. Erdogan said he would not stand in their way. Many dropped everything the moment they heard the border was opening and rushed by bus or taxi, fearing they might miss the chance to get across.

      The Greek government, alarmed at the unfolding migrant wave, said it had sent a warning through mass text messages to all international phone numbers in the area. “From the Hellenic Republic: Greece is increasing border security to level maximum,” the message said in English. “Do not attempt illegally to cross the border.”

      Many migrants went ahead anyway, and some succeeded. Many ended up clashing with the authorities in Greece as riot police officers with batons, shields and masks tried to block their path, sometimes firing tear gas.

      Turkey’s interior minister, Suleyman Soylu, wrote Sunday on Twitter that more than 76,000 people had left Turkey for Greece — a drastically inflated number, according to ground reports from both sides of the border.

      The United Nations estimated that about 15,000 people from several countries, including families with children, were on their way in Turkey to the northern land border with Greece.

      Hundreds of people crossed the Turkish border, either over farmland or the Evros River. Nearly 500 others arrived by boat on the islands near Turkey in the northeastern Aegean, creating small-scale scenes reminiscent of the 2015 crisis that paralyzed parts of Europe.

      The Greek government said it had thwarted nearly 10,000 crossing attempts in 24 hours and arrested 150 people over the weekend.

      But dozens of migrants in small groups could be seen scattered in the region’s villages. The Greek government claimed that those attempting to cross into Greece were all single men and that none were Syrians, but families and Syrians did manage to reach Greece.
      Image

      One man with his wife and small children took shelter in a church, trying to warm up and regroup after the arduous crossing.

      Another migrant, Kaniwar Ibrahim, a 26-year-old tailor from Kobane, Syria, said he had heard from friends that Mr. Erdogan was opening the borders to Europe, so he rushed north.

      Mr. Ibrahim, his face ashen and his lips blue from the cold, was planning his next move at the train station in Orestiada with three West Africans and a few Palestinian migrants who had crossed the border with him overnight.

      He had spent two terrible years in Turkey, he said, so he grabbed the chance to join relatives legally settled in Germany.

      On the Turkish side, where thousands were gathering and smugglers were flocking to offer rides, boats and other services, others were less fortunate, and the hazards of attempting the crossing were becoming clear.

      One migrant died from the cold overnight, according to other migrants, and others said they were badly beaten by Greek border guards or vigilantes — an assertion that the Greek government denied.

      Abdul Kareem al Mir, 23, from the city of Al Salamiyah in central Syria, reached Edirne, Turkey, near Greece, but he was already having second thoughts.

      “I’ve been stuck here for three days in the rain and cold,” he said in a series of messages. “I guess the promises and statements were just a lie.”

      https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/01/world/europe/greece-migrants-border-turkey.html?smtyp=cur&smid=tw-nytimesworld

    • Greece freezes asylum applications from illegally entering migrants

      Greece will not accept for a month, beginning Sunday, any asylum applications from migrants entering the country illegally and, where possible, will immediately return them to the country they entered from, Greece’s government spokesman Stelios Petsas announced Sunday.

      The announcement was made at the conclusion of a cabinet meeting on national security.

      Greece will also ask the European Border and Coast Guard Agency, also known as Frontex, to engage in a rapid border intervention to protect Greece’s borders, which are also EU’s borders, Petsas said.

      The above decisions will be communicated to the EU’s Foreign Affairs Council so that Greece can benefit from temporary measures to face an emergency.

      Petsas said Turkey is violating its commitments from the 2016 EU-Turkey agreement and of becoming itself a trafficker instead of cracking down on them. He called the migrant movement “a sudden, massive, organized and coordinated pressure from population movements in its eastern, land and sea, borders.”

      Charles Michel, President of the European Council, tweeted a few minutes ago:

      “Support for Greek efforts to protect the European borders. Closely monitoring the situation on the ground. I will be visiting the Greek-Turkish border on Tuesday with @PrimeministerGR Mitsotakis.”


      http://www.ekathimerini.com/250097/article/ekathimerini/news/greece-freezes-asylum-applications-from-illegally-entering-migrants

      #procédure_d'asile

    • Griechenland setzt Asylrecht für einen Monat aus

      Der Lage an der griechisch-türkischen Grenze spitzt sich weiter zu: Nun kündigte der griechische Ministerpräsident an, dass sein Land für einen Monat keine neuen Anträge auf Asyl annehmen werde.

      https://www.spiegel.de/politik/ausland/fluechtlinge-griechenland-setzt-asylrecht-fuer-einen-monat-aus-a-14421c7e-80

    • Clashes as thousands gather at Turkish border to enter Greece

      EU border agency Frontex on high alert as Turkish president keeps crossings open.

      Migrants trying to reach Europe have clashed violently with Greek riot police as Turkey claimed more than 76,000 people were now heading for the EU as a result of President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s decision to open the Turkish side of the border.

      Officers fired teargas at the migrants, some of whom threw stones and wielded metal bars as they sought to force their way into Greece at the normally quiet crossing in the north-eastern town of Kastanies.

      As the situation escalated, Turkey’s interior minister, Süleyman Soylu, fuelled the anxiety in Greece and Bulgaria, which also shares a border with Turkey, by tweeting on Sunday morning that 76,385 refugees had left his country through Edirne, a province bordering the two EU member states. He provided no evidence pto support the claim.

      The UN’s International Organization for Migration had said earlier in the day that at least 13,000 people had gathered by Saturday evening at the formal border crossing points at Pazarkule and İpsala, among others, in groups of between several dozen and more than 3,000. The majority were said to have been from Afghanistan.

      Greek police confirmed that at least 500 people had arrived by sea on the islands of Lesbos, Chios and Samos near the Turkish coast within a few hours.

      The Greek government said on Sunday evening that it would suspend EU asylum law to implement summary deportations over the next month, a fix allowed within the treaties.

      Earlier in the day the government in Athens had sent a mass text message to all international numbers in the border region appealing for people to stay away. “From the Hellenic Republic: Greece is increasing border security to level maximum,” read the message in English. “Do not attempt illegally to cross the border.”

      The EU’s border protection agency, Frontex, said it was on high alert and had deployed extra support to Greece, as the country’s prime minister, Kyriakos Mitsotakis, held a meeting of his national security council.

      “We … have raised the alert level for all borders with Turkey to high,” a Frontex spokeswoman said. “We have received a request from Greece for additional support. We have already taken steps to redeploy to Greece technical equipment and additional officers.”

      The Greek government accused Turkey of orchestrating a “coordinated and mass” attempt to breach the country’s borders by encouraging thousands of asylum seekers to illegally cross them.

      Mitsotakis said he would visit the land border Greece shares with Turkey along the Evros river alongside Charles Michel, the European Council president, on Tuesday. “Once more, do not attempt to enter Greece illegally – you will be turned back,” Mitsotakis said after the national security council meeting.

      Along the north-eastern mainland border, some people waded across a shallow section of the Evros river to the Greek side. Witnesses said there were groups of up to 30, including an Afghan woman with a five-day-old infant.

      Erdoğan opened his western border after an airstrike on Thursday night in Syria’s Idlib province killed at least 33 Turkish soldiers recently deployed to support the Syrian opposition.

      The deaths came as fighting in north-west Syria between Turkish-backed rebels and Russian-backed Syrian government forces escalated, raising the risk of the two regional powers being brought into direct confrontation.

      The Turkish president had repeatedly said he would break his country’s deal with Brussels to prevent migrants entering the EU unless he received greater support from the 27 member states for his intervention in Syria.

      Erdoğan said in a speech on Saturday that he had no intention of rethinking his decision. “What did we say? If this continues, we will be forced to open the doors,” he told a meeting of the ruling Justice and Development party.

      “They did not believe what we said. What did we do yesterday? We opened our border. The number of people crossing the doors to Europe reached around 18,000 by Saturday morning, but today the number could reach 25 or even 30,000, and we will not close the passages during the period to come.”

      The EU has insisted it expects Ankara to abide by a €6bn (£5.2bn) deal signed in 2016, under which Turkey agreed to halt the flow of people to the EU in return for funds. Turkey hosts about 3.6 million refugees from Syria.

      The European council president, Charles Michel, spoke to Erdoğan on Saturday. “The EU is actively engaged to uphold the EU-Turkey statement and to support Greece and Bulgaria to protect the EU’s external borders,” he said in a statement.

      The Kremlin said on Sunday that it hoped Vladimir Putin and Erdoğan would hold talks in Moscow on Thursday or Friday. Istanbul police released Mahir Boztepe, the editor-in-chief of the Turkish edition of Sputnik, the Russian news website, on Sunday.

      Boztepe had been held for two hours as part of what the Ankara public prosecutor’s office said was an investigation into whether Sputnik had been involved in “degrading the Turkish people, the Turkish state, state institutions” and “disrupting the unity and territorial integrity of the state”.

      https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/01/thousands-gather-at-turkish-border-to-cross-into-greece#maincontent

    • Migrants : Erdogan ouvre sa frontière, la Grèce la ferme

      Mécontent du manque de soutien de l’UE, le président turc a mis à exécution vendredi sa menace de laisser passer des réfugiés.

      « Yunanistan ! » C’est avec ce cri de ralliement, qui désigne la Grèce en turc, que plusieurs centaines de réfugiés se sont amassés dès vendredi matin le long du fleuve Evros qui marque la frontière terrestre entre la Grèce et la Turquie. Très vite, les autorités grecques ont fermé le principal point de passage situé à Kastanies, alors que le chef d’état-major des armées se précipitait sur place pour annoncer l’arrivée d’hélicoptères et de renforts militaires pour empêcher toute incursion massive. Les menaces d’Erdogan d’ouvrir les vannes des flux migratoires, qui lui permettent depuis cinq ans de souffler le chaud et le froid vis-à-vis de l’Europe, ont donc été mises à exécution. Furieux du peu de soutien de l’Occident après la perte de 33 soldats jeudi en Syrie, Erdogan a joué la pression sur le point faible de l’UE. Et un simple effet d’annonce a suffi pour ressusciter le spectre d’un remake de 2015, lorsque la Grèce, et l’Europe, avaient dû faire face à un afflux massif de réfugiés, considéré comme le plus important mouvement de population depuis 1945.
      Promesse

      Et pour Athènes, cette menace réactualisée ne pouvait tomber à un plus mauvais moment. Alors que la surpopulation des camps de réfugiés sur les îles grecques faisant face à la Turquie a déjà conduit à une situation explosive, cette semaine des affrontements d’une violence inédite ont eu lieu sur les îles de Lesbos et Chios. De véritables batailles rangées entre les forces de l’ordre et les populations locales, qui refusent la construction de nouveaux centres. Longtemps les habitants avaient pourtant fait preuve d’une générosité et d’une patience à toute épreuve. Mais l’inaction des autorités, qui ont laissé les camps se dégrader jusqu’à l’intolérable, et l’indifférence de l’Europe, qui a renié sa promesse de partager le fardeau migratoire, ont fini par provoquer la colère populaire sur les îles. Et c’est dans ce climat toxique que la Turquie fait soudain basculer le fragile dispositif censé contenir les réfugiés aux portes de l’Europe.

      En réalité, le deal conclu en 2016 entre Ankara et l’Union européenne avait dès le départ tout d’un marché de dupes, sacrifiant de facto la Grèce, chargée de jouer les zones tampons en confinant les nouveaux arrivants sur les îles. Or les flux n’ont jamais totalement cessé. Ils sont même repartis à la hausse en 2019, avec plus de 70 000 arrivées depuis les côtes turques, faisant à nouveau de la Grèce la principale porte d’entrée en Europe.

      En comparaison, les mouvements observés dans la journée de vendredi n’avaient rien d’impressionnant dans l’immédiat : quelques centaines de réfugiés regroupés le long de l’Evros, certes, mais seulement deux canots pneumatiques ont accosté dans la journée de vendredi dans le petit port de Skala Sikaminia, dans le nord de Lesbos. Le premier transportait une quinzaine de personnes, le second une cinquantaine. Alors que pour le seul mois de janvier, 3 136 réfugiés avaient débarqué à Lesbos.

      Mais le vrai sujet d’inquiétude est ailleurs. « Le problème, ce n’est pas seulement que la Turquie annonce qu’elle ne surveille plus ses frontières. Ce qui est plus grave, et totalement nouveau, c’est que les autorités turques semblent organiser et encadrer ces départs vers la Grèce », souligne un humanitaire joint à Athènes. Toute la journée de vendredi, les médias turcs ont ainsi relayé les images de réfugiés invités à monter dans des bus, mis spécialement à disposition pour eux, et qui les ont conduits de la périphérie d’Istanbul jusqu’à la frontière grecque. Au même moment, plusieurs chaînes de télévision, dont la version turque de CNN, filmaient d’autres réfugiés se rassemblant sur des plages pour grimper tranquillement dans un canot pneumatique en partance vers la Grèce, comme pour une banale balade en mer. « Du jamais-vu. En 2015, au moins, la Turquie prétendait ne pas voir et ne pas pouvoir contenir les flux en partance vers la Grèce », soulignait vendredi un internaute grec.
      Horizon

      Par ailleurs, la crise syrienne, qui sert de prétexte à la Turquie pour rompre le statu quo migratoire, a pour l’instant motivé non pas les innombrables réfugiés du pays qu’elle accueille à quitter son sol, mais en priorité des Afghans, à l’image de ceux arrivés en canots vendredi à Lesbos. Sur cette île, où se trouvent près de 20 000 réfugiés, nombreux sont ceux qui dans les prochains jours guetteront l’horizon avec inquiétude. Et d’ores et déjà, les habitants ont noté un fait révélateur : vendredi, Athènes comme Bruxelles sont restés très discrets. Comme si les deux principaux interlocuteurs d’Ankara étaient totalement tétanisés. Sans aucune stratégie face à un voisin pourtant notoirement imprévisible.

      https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2020/02/28/migrants-erdogan-ouvre-sa-frontiere-la-grece-la-ferme_1780087

    • Schreie der Verzweiflung am Grenzzaun

      Rund 15.000 Migranten stehen am türkisch-griechischen Grenzübergang inzwischen den Polizisten gegenüber. Die griechischen Beamten treiben die Geflüchteten mit Tränengas zurück. Premier Mitsotakis bittet um Hilfe von Frontex.

      Die Migranten, die am Samstag durch die Straßen auf der griechischen Seite der Grenze zur Türkei laufen, haben es eilig. „Wir wollen nach Deutschland“, sagt eine Frau aus Algerien. Sie ist mit drei Männern unterwegs, in der Nacht haben sie den Evros überquert, der Fluss markiert die Grenze zwischen Türkei und EU. Ihre Kleidung ist noch nass. Jetzt haben sie Angst, von der griechischen Polizei oder dem Militär festgenommen zu werden. So wie 66 andere Geflüchtete, die es auf griechischen Boden geschafft hatten.

      Der Grenzposten Kastanies ist zum Mittelpunkt eines Kräfteringens zwischen Türkei und Griechenland geworden. Nach SPIEGEL-Informationen schätzen Behörden, dass inzwischen 15.000 Migranten in der Nähe ausharren. Am Samstag versuchten immer wieder Gruppen von Migranten den Grenzzaun zu überwinden, auf Videos sind ihre Schreie der Verzweiflung zu hören. Die griechische Polizei setzte Tränengas ein, um sie daran zu hindern. 4000 Grenzübertritte verhinderte sie nach eigenen Angaben.

      Einige Hundert Migranten wateten durch den Evros, um die griechische Seite zu erreichen. Andere waren in der Pufferzone zwischen dem türkischen und dem griechischen Grenzposten gefangen. Vor ihnen: Stacheldraht und griechische Grenzschützer.

      Der türkische Präsident Recep Tayyip Erdogan bekräftigte am Samstag in Istanbul noch einmal, was schon am Freitag offensichtlich war: „Wir haben die Tore geöffnet“, sagte er. Es ist das faktische Ende des Flüchtlingsdeals zwischen der Europäischen Union und der Türkei.

      Sein Land könne so viele Flüchtlinge nicht versorgen, sagte Erdogan. Außerdem habe Europa seine Versprechen gebrochen. Die Türkei spricht von 35.000 Migranten, die es bereits nach Europa geschafft hätten. Das ist wohl übertrieben, wahrscheinlich waren es bisher nur ein paar Hundert.

      Erdogan hatte die Anweisung am Donnerstagabend erteilt, nachdem bei Kämpfen in Idlib mindestens 36 türkische Soldaten gestorben waren. Im Syrienkrieg hat er sich in eine Sackgasse manövriert. Wenn er noch eine Chance haben will, die türkische Einflusszone im Norden Syriens zu sichern, braucht er nun amerikanische oder europäische Unterstützung.

      Dass die Europäer sich noch in den schon neun Jahre andauernden Bürgerkrieg einmischen wollen, ist unwahrscheinlich. Mit der Grenzöffnung versucht Erdogan nun, die EU zu Konzessionen zu zwingen.

      https://www.spiegel.de/politik/ausland/tuerkei-schickt-fluechtlinge-nach-europa-schreie-der-verzweiflung-am-grenzza

    • Réfugiés : « La Turquie se sert des Syriens pour faire pression sur l’UE »

      La Turquie a annoncé vendredi qu’elle n’assurait plus le contrôle de ses frontières européennes, ajoutant qu’elle ne souhaitait pas accueillir davantage de réfugiés sur son territoire. Les télévisions turques ont filmé desmilliers de Syriens se mettant en route vers la Grèce. Face au chantage d’Ankara, l’UE craint une nouvelle crise migratoire, comme avant 2016.

      « La Turquie n’est plus en mesure de retenir les réfugiés souhaitant se rendre en Europe », a affirmé vendredi 28 février le porte-parole du Parti de la Justice et du Développement (AKP). Cette déclaration intervient dans un contexte particulier : la nuit précédente, 33 soldats turcs ont été tué dans le bombardement d’un bâtiment dans la région d’Idlib.

      Militairement présente dans cette région, la Turquie soutient les rebelles syriens, alors que Bachar Al-Assad tente de récupérer cet ultime bastion rebelle avec l’aide de la Russie. Ces dernières semaines, il a ainsi reconquis près de la moitié de la province, entraînant des mouvements de population qui tentaient de fuir les bombardements. Au total, depuis décembre 2019, l’offensive du régime de Damas a engendré le déplacement de plus de 900 000 Syriens.

      De son côté, la Turquie, qui accueille sur son territoire 3,6 millions de réfugiés syriens, maintient fermée sa frontière avec la Syrie. Ses frontières européennes, en revanche, ne sont désormais plus contrôlées. « Le pays ne souhaite pas accueillir davantage de réfugiés sur son territoire et, aucune sortie de conflit n’étant en vue à Idlib, elle ouvre ses frontières aux réfugiés et facilite leur passage vers l’UE, ce qui s’appelle du chantage », estime une chercheuse indépendante basée en Turquie, sous couvert d’anonymat.

      « La Turquie se sert de nouveau des Syriens pour faire pression sur l’UE », poursuit-elle. « Certains Syriens sont choqués d’être ainsi utilisés et disent qu’ils ne vont pas être manipulés par les Turcs, alors que d’autres saisissent cette opportunité pour fuir la Turquie où les conditions de vie sont de plus en plus précaires. » Depuis l’annonce d’Ankara, des centaines de réfugiés ont pris la direction de la Bulgarie et de la Grèce. « Beaucoup sont sur le départ, tout le monde veut tenter sa chance. Les gens se rendent à Edirne et dans les ports maritimes. Des bus gratuits sont mis à leur disposition et de plus en plus de bateaux partent. »

      “Ce ne sont pas tant les intérêts des réfugiés qui sont au cœur de la question, mais ceux de la Turquie, ou plutôt ceux de sa classe dirigeante.”

      Cette instrumentalisation de la question migratoire de la part de l’AKP n’est pas nouvelle. « Ce ne sont pas tant les intérêts des réfugiés qui sont au cœur de la question, mais ceux de la Turquie, ou plutôt ceux de sa classe dirigeante », explique Juliette Tolay, professeure de Sciences politiques à l’Université de Penn State Harrisburg. Elle ajoute que le Président turc Recep Tayyip Erdoğan menace régulièrement de rouvrir la frontières turque à des fins diverses : accélérer la libéralisation des visas pour les citoyens turcs, éviter toute critique sur le référendum constitutionnel de 2017 ou obtenir un soutien pour la création d’une zone de sécurité en Syrie.

      Dans un article du New York Times, Matina Stevis-Gridneff et Patrick Kingsley observent que les autorités locales ont acheté plusieurs milliers de billets, qu’elles ont aidé les réfugiés syriens à monter dans des autocars Mercedes et les ont conduits à la frontière. 

Tout cela a été filmé par les médias pro-gouvernement, précisent-ils, tandis que les chaînes de télévision ont retransmis en direct des scènes où l’on voit de familles se dirigeant vers les îles grecques, rappelant la crise de 2015.

      La situation évoque désormais celle précédant l’accord de 2016 entre l’UE et la Turquie, venant ainsi mettre unilatéralement fin à ce traité devenu moribond. Signé avec les 28 États membres de l’UE de l’époque, l’objectif de cet accord était de faire cesser l’arrivée quotidienne des migrants sur les îles grecques. Il prévoyait également, en échange d’un considérable soutien financier, le renvoi systématique de tous les migrants vers la Turquie. 

Le traité n’a pourtant pas empêché l’arrivée de migrants sur les îles de la mer Égée et, depuis cet été, le nombre de réfugiés est en hausse. Alors que les patrouilles turques étaient toujours présentes, certains chercheurs affirmaient que la Turquie laissait délibérément passer les réfugiés.

      Quelques heures après l’annonce de l’AKP, ce vendredi, des réfugiés tentant de se rendre en Grèce par voie terrestre se sont retrouvés coincés dans le no man’s land séparant les deux pays. Renforçant sa sécurité à la frontière de Kastanies, la police grecque a réprimé à coups de gaz lacrymogènes toute tentative de traversée. Le porte-parole du gouvernement Stelios Petsas a indiqué que la Grèce avait empêché 4000 migrants venant de Turquie d’entrer « illégalement » sur le territoire.

      Selon Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, depuis vendredi, 18 000 migrants auraient franchi les frontières de la Turquie pour se rendre en Europe.

      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Turquie-syriens-pression-UE

    • Réfugiés : catastrophe humanitaire en vue sur les frontières de la Grèce

      Depuis vendredi, des milliers de réfugiés tentent de passer la frontière terrestre entre la Turquie et la Grèce, avec le soutien d’Ankara qui joue cette carte pour faire pression sur l’Union européenne. Des réfugiés débarquent aussi sur les îles de la mer Égée, où la tension ne cesse de monter avec la population locale.

      Depuis que la Turquie a annoncé qu’elle n’était « plus en mesure de retenir les réfugiés souhaitant se rendre en Europe », vendredi 28 février, la Grèce est débordée à ses frontières. Au poste de Kastanies, dans la région de l’Evros (nord-est de la Grèce, sur la route d’Edirne), plus de 13 000 migrants sont arrivés durant le week-end depuis Istanbul pour tenter de passer. Un chiffre toutefois « gonflé » par la Turquie, qui utilise les réfugiés pour faire pression sur l’Union européenne. Des chaînes de télévision turques ont même diffusé des cartes du chemin à suivre pour se rendre en Europe...

      Vendredi, la Grèce a doublé ses patrouilles à la frontière terrestre et sur les îles de la mer Egée, face à la Turquie. Des drones ont été déployés à la frontière terrestre pour localiser les réfugiés et les avertir par haut-parleur que la frontière était fermée. Des SMS en anglais ont été envoyés sur tous les téléphones portables étrangers à la frontière : « Personne ne peut traverser les frontières grecques. Tous ceux qui tentent d’entrer illégalement sont dans les faits empêchés d’entrer ». L’agence européenne de contrôle des frontières Frontex a également annoncé avoir « redéployé de l’équipement technique et des agents supplémentaires en Grèce ».

      Les autorités grecques ont déclaré le lendemain avoir empêché « 9972 entrées illégales » dans la région de l’Evros, le long des 212 km de frontière terrestre avec la Turquie. « Personne ne venait d’Idlib, mais la plupart venaient d’Afghanistan, du Pakistan et de Somalie », ont précisé les autorités grecques, dénonçant le « chantage d’Ankara ».

      Dimanche, les autorités grecques ont annoncé avoir arrêté, dans la journée, 5500 migrants tentant de traverser illégalement la frontière. Depuis vendredi, des échauffourées ont lieu entre les forces de l’ordre et les migrants au poste-frontière de Kastanies, où des gaz lacrymogènes ont été tirés. Selon une source gouvernementale grecque, des gaz lacrymogènes auraient aussi été distribués par les autorités turques aux migrants pour les utiliser contre la police grecque. Le Haut-Commissariat aux Réfugiés de l’Onu (HCR) a appelé « au calme et au relâchement des tensions à la frontière ». Mais dimanche, la situation restait tendue : un policier grec a été blessé et transporté à l’hôpital.

      Sur les îles, la tension monte

      Sur les îles grecques, alors que la situation semblait calme vendredi et samedi, au moins 500 migrants ont débarqué dimanche, en raison d’une météo favorable, sur l’île de Lesbos et près de 200 à Chios et Samos, selon l’Agence de presse grecque ANA. Dimanche, les gardes-côtes turcs ne répondaient plus à l’appel de leurs homologues grecs et laissaient passer les embarcations. Alors que le camp de Moria accueille déjà 19 000 personnes dans des conditions sordides et que les habitants de Lesbos s’opposent à la construction de nouveaux camps fermés, la tension a augmenté. Un groupe de personnes a notamment empêché un canot chargé d’environ 50 migrants de descendre à terre en leur criant de rentrer chez eux. Certains insulaires en colère s’en sont également pris aux journalistes, à un représentant du HCR et à des membres d’ONG. D’autres habitants ont bloqué l’accès d’autocars transportant des demandeurs d’asile vers le camp de Moria.

      En rompant de facto l’accord signé avec l’UE en mars 2016 pour lequel elle a perçu six milliards d’euros, et en laissant passer les réfugiés en Europe, la Turquie cherche à obtenir de l’UE et des membres de l’Otan leur soutien dans ses opérations militaires en Syrie. Dimanche, Joseph Borrell, haut-représentant pour les Affaires étrangères européennes, a annoncé la tenue extraordinaire d’un conseil des ministres des Affaires étrangères pour répondre à l’urgence de la situation et soutenir la Grèce et la Bulgarie. Selon son communiqué, « l’accord UE-Turquie doit être maintenu ».

      La procédure d’asile provisoirement suspendue

      En attendant, le Conseil grec de sécurité nationale, convoqué dimanche soir par le Premier ministre, a décidé le renforcement maximal de la garde des frontières orientales, tant terrestres que maritimes. Les forces de l’ordre et l’armée se chargent de refouler les migrants « illégaux » qui essaient d’entrer sur le territoire.

      La procédure d’asile a par ailleurs été suspendue pour une durée d’un mois. Ce qui signifie que ceux qui entrent « illégalement » en Grèce ne pourront pas y déposer une demande d’asile. Ils seront immédiatement expulsés, si possible dans leur pays d’origine, sans procédure préalable d’identification.

      Athènes a également demandé à Frontex de déployer ses unités RABIT pour protéger les frontières du pays, qui sont aussi de frontières de l’UE. Cette décision sera communiqué au Conseil des ministres des Affaires étrangères de l’UE, où la Grèce demandera la mise en application de l’article 78 paragraphe 3 de la Convention européenne, afin que, dans le cadre de la solidarité entre les États membres, des mesures provisoires de protection du territoire soient prises pour faire face à l’urgence.

      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/La-Grece-debordee-par-l-arrivee-de-milliers-de-migrants

    • Réfugiés : la #Bulgarie envoie la gendarmerie à la frontière turque

      La Bulgarie a dépêché vendredi la gendarmerie à sa frontière terrestre et maritime avec la Turquie, le Premier ministre Boïko Borissov évoquant le « danger réel » d’une pression migratoire, suite à la menace d’Ankara de ne plus retenir les candidats au départ.

      La Bulgarie a dépêché vendredi la gendarmerie à sa frontière terrestre et maritime avec la Turquie, le Premier ministre Boïko Borissov évoquant le « danger réel » d’une pression migratoire, suite à la menace d’Ankara de ne plus retenir les candidats au départ.

      M. Borissov s’est notamment inquiété devant des journalistes « du retrait des garde-frontières turcs » et dit attendre un entretien téléphonique avec le président turc Recep Tayyip Erdogan. « Avec ce qui se passe, le danger est réel en ce moment : les gens fuient face aux missiles », a-t-il déclaré à Sofia, annonçant avoir déployé « tôt ce matin » des renforts.

      La Turquie accueille sur son territoire quelque 3,6 millions de Syriens ayant fui la guerre et craint l’arrivée de nouveaux réfugiés. Un haut responsable turc a assuré vendredi à l’AFP qu’Ankara n’empêchera plus ceux qui essaient de se rendre en Europe de franchir sa frontière, après la mort d’au moins 33 militaires turcs dans la région d’Idleb (nord-ouest de la Syrie) dans des frappes aériennes attribuées par Ankara au régime syrien.

      La Bulgarie partage 259 km de frontière terrestre clôturée avec la Turquie. Elle est membre de l’Union européenne (UE), mais pas de l’espace de libre circulation Schengen.

      En mars 2016, la Turquie et l’UE ont conclu un pacte migratoire qui a fait chuter drastiquement le nombre de passages vers l’Europe. Dans le passé, la Turquie a plusieurs fois menacé d’« ouvrir les portes » de l’Europe aux candidats à l’asile, les observateurs y voyant une manière de faire pression sur Bruxelles.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/fil-dactualites/280220/refugies-la-bulgarie-envoie-la-gendarmerie-la-frontiere-turque

    • Violations des droits humains à la frontière gréco-turque : l’Union européenne complice !

      Les expulsions d’exilé·e·s décidées par la Grèce, qui annonce vouloir les renvoyer non seulement vers la Turquie d’Erdogan mais même dans leur pays d’origine, sans aucun examen de leur situation et de leur besoin de protection, sont insupportables.

      La situation à la frontière gréco-turque est la conséquence de la politique de l’Union européenne fondée sur la fermeture des frontières, l’externalisation de l’asile et le marchandage avec des États sans scrupules.

      La xénophobie, le racisme et leur normalisation doivent être combattus partout où ils apparaissent, que ce soit en Turquie, en Grèce ou ailleurs. L’instrumentalisation de la vie des migrants, des demandeurs d’asile et des réfugiés réduite à une menace et à une monnaie d’échange doit cesser, tant dans les campagnes électorales nationales que dans les relations entre le gouvernement turc et l’UE.

      Les politiques de rejet qui poussent des milliers de personnes déjà déplacées dans les limbes et les régimes frontaliers qui provoquent le cycle sans fin de la violence à leur encontre doivent être abandonnées.

      Dans l’immédiat, les États membres doivent assurer la libre entrée des exilé·e·s nassé·e·s à la frontière grecque en attente de protection et de soins et l’UE doit cesser de mobiliser Frontex pour les refouler.

      Ce que nous exigeons, c’est la paix, les droits et libertés fondamentaux de chaque personne en déplacement.

      Les frontières tuent, ouvrez les frontières !
      Arrêtez la guerre contre les réfugié·e·s et les migrant·e·s !
      La solidarité transnationale contre le racisme et la guerre !
      Liberté de circulation et d’installation pour tou·te·s !

      Nous appelons à des rassemblements de protestation partout où ce sera possible, et à Paris ce lundi 2 mars à 18 heures devant la représentation de la Commission européenne, 288, boulevard Saint-Germain, métro Assemblée nationale.

      http://www.migreurop.org/article2957

    • Entre crispation et la solidarité, l’UE en ordre dispersé sur la situation des migrants à la frontière greco-turque

      Tandis que certains pays européens prennent leurs dispositions à la perspective d’un nouvel afflux de migrants, d’autres appellent à la solidarité européenne. L’agence européenne de garde-frontières, Frontex, a déployé des dizaines d’agents en Grèce et réfléchit à muscler davantage ses opérations, à la demande d’Athènes.

      « Après que nous avons ouvert les portes, les coups de téléphone se sont multipliés, ils nous disent ’fermez les portes’. Je leur ai dit : ’C’est fait, c’est fini. Les portes sont désormais ouvertes. Maintenant, vous allez prendre votre part du fardeau’. » Dans un discours prononcé lundi 2 mars à Ankara, le président turc Recep Tayyip Erdogan a sommé l’Europe de prendre ses responsabilités quant aux milliers de migrants massés à la frontière greco-turque depuis vendredi.

      En face, les réactions sont nombreuses, à commencer par la Grèce, première concernée, qui a envoyé l’armée à la frontière et a annoncé la suspension de toute demande d’asile, en vertu de l’article 78.3 du Traité sur le fonctionnement de l’Union européenne. En invoquant ce texte, le Premier ministre grec Kyriakos Mitsotakis veut s’assurer d’avoir « le soutien total » des Vingt-sept.

      Celui-ci n’a pas tardé. Dès samedi, la commissaire européenne Ursula von der Leyen avait indiqué que l’Union européenne (UE) observait avec « préoccupation » l’afflux de migrants depuis la Turquie vers ses frontières orientales, en Grèce et en Bulgarie. « Notre première priorité à ce stade est de veiller à ce que la Grèce et la Bulgarie reçoivent notre plein soutien. Nous sommes prêts à fournir un appui supplémentaire, notamment par l’intermédiaire de Frontex (l’agence européenne de garde-frontières) aux frontières terrestres », avait-elle affirmé dans un tweet.

      https://twitter.com/vonderleyen/status/1233828575029186567?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E12

      Dimanche, Frontex a répondu présent en déployant des renforts. « Nous (...) avons remonté le niveau d’alerte pour toutes les frontières avec la Turquie à ’élevé’ », a déclaré une porte-parole de l’agence européenne dans un communiqué. « Nous examinons d’autres moyens de soutenir les pays de l’UE frontaliers avec la Turquie », ajoute la porte-parole qui précise que l’agence suivait également de très près la situation à Chypre, un membre de l’UE dont la partie nord est contrôlée par la Turquie mais qui n’est pas reconnue par quiconque sauf Ankara.

      https://twitter.com/Frontex/status/1234075394619400193?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E12

      Actuellement, la plus grosse opération de Frontex se trouve dans les îles grecques avec 400 personnes sur le terrain, tandis qu’un petit groupe d’agents se trouve dans la région grecque d’Evros, à la frontière turque. Soixante agents sont également déployés en Bulgarie, selon Frontex.

      « Une menace à la stabilité de la région », selon la Bulgarie

      Bien que la frontière bulgare n’a connu aucun mouvement comparable à ceux en cours en Grèce, Sofia a pris les devant. Ainsi, le Premier ministre bulgare Boïko Borissov, dont le pays est voisin de la Turquie, doit rencontrer lundi à Ankara le président turc Recep Tayyip Erdogan pour discuter de l’aggravation de la situation à Idleb et de l’afflux de migrants aux portes de l’UE.

      Boïko Borissov a déjà prévenu qu’un nouvel afflux de migrants clandestin constituait, selon lui « une menace à la stabilité de la région » alors même que l’Europe « peine à gérer l’épidémie de coronavirus ». La Bulgarie entretient des relations diplomatiques et économiques privilégiées avec son voisin turc. Les deux pays partagent plus de 250 kilomètres de frontière le long de laquelle Sofia a fait installer depuis 2016 une clôture pour bloquer les migrants.

      https://twitter.com/BoykoBorissov/status/1232666456283844608?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E12

      La Bulgarie n’est pas la seule à avoir a fait un pas vers Ankara. Recep Tayyip Erdogan a indiqué, lundi, que des responsables européens - sans préciser lesquels - lui avaient proposé de se réunir avec lui pour un sommet « à quatre ou cinq » pays. Il a aussi déclaré avoir eu un entretien téléphonique avec la chancelière allemande Angela Merkel. L’Allemagne, de son côté, affirme que sa chancelière s’est entretenue avec son homologue bulgare et qu’ils ont convenu ensemble qu’il était nécessaire d’ouvrir le dialogue avec Ankara.

      Fidèle à ses positions conservatrices, l’Autriche a prévenu dès dimanche, par la voix de son ministre de l’Intérieur Karl Nehammer, qu’elle empêcherait tous les migrants clandestins d’entrer sur son territoire. Des déclarations qui font écho à celles prononcées en 2015 et 2016 au pic de la crise migratoire, lorsque l’Autriche servait principalement de pays de transit pour des milliers de migrants en provenance des Balkans qui souhaitaient atteindre l’Allemagne. « La Hongrie nous a assuré qu’elle ferait tout pour protéger ses frontières, tout comme la Croatie. Mais si des migrants arrivent quand même à passer, nous les stopperons », a expliqué Karl Nehammer qui se dit prêt à réinstaurer d’importants contrôles aux frontières comme ce fut le cas en 2015-2016.

      « La Hongrie n’ouvrira ou ne laissera passer personne », a déclaré pour sa part Gyorgy Bakondi, conseiller du Premier ministre nationaliste Viktor Orban. Des renforts policiers et militaires ont été envoyés aux frontières du pays qui avait vu, lui aussi, transiter des dizaines de milliers d’exilés en 2015-2016.

      Autre pays de transit, la Macédoine du nord qui voit le nombre de migrants à sa frontière en augmentation ces derniers mois, se dit prête à faire face à un nouvel afflux. Sa position est de demeurer « un pays de transit » en n’autorisant les migrants à rester sur le sol macédonien que 72 heures, a rappelé lundi le Premier ministre Oliver Spasovski. Se voulant rassurant, celui-ci affirme que la situation est sous contrôle et que la communication avec la Grèce à cet égard était fluide.

      https://denesen.mk/spasovski-nema-da-ima-nov-migrantski-bran-kje-prodolzi-dogovorot-pomegju-eu-

      « Nous devons agir ensemble pour éviter une crise humanitaire et migratoire », dit Paris

      Le président français Emmanuel Macron assure, de son côté, que « la France est prête à contribuer aux efforts européens pour prêter [à la Grèce et à la Bulgarie] une assistance rapide et protéger les frontières. » Et le dirigeant français d’appeler à la solidarité de tous : « Nous devons agir ensemble pour éviter une crise humanitaire et migratoire », a-t-il lancé dans un tweet.

      https://twitter.com/EmmanuelMacron/status/1234233225700048900?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E12

      Même discours d’appel à la solidarité pour la Croatie, située sur la route migratoire des Balkans et qui a récemment pris pour six mois la présidence tournante de l’UE : « La Croatie se tient aux côtés de la Grèce et la Bulgarie pour protéger les frontières de l’Europe. Nous exprimons notre pleine solidarité et nous tenons prêts à intervenir si besoin », a déclaré le gouvernement croate sur Twitter.

      https://twitter.com/MVEP_hr/status/1234134767328747529?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E12

      Reste que l’UE n’a jamais réussi à parler d’une seule voix depuis le début de la crise migratoire en 2015. Bruxelles appelle à une réunion d’urgence des ministres européens des Affaires étrangères afin de décider des prochaines étapes dans cette affaire. Le président du Conseil européen Charles Michel se rendra dans la région d’Evros à la frontière turque mardi aux côtés du Premier ministre grec Kyriakos Mitsotakis.

      https://twitter.com/eucopresident/status/1234188948735430656?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E12
      Les Nations unies ont appelé dimanche au calme et à la retenue : « Les États ont certes le droit légitime de contrôler leurs frontières et de gérer les mouvements irréguliers, mais ils devraient se retenir d’user d’une force excessive et disproportionnée et mettre en place un système permettant de faire une demande d’asile de manière ordonnée », a écrit un porte-parole du Haut commissariat aux réfugiés (HCR), Babar Baloch, dans un email à l’AFP. Le HCR appelle également les demandeurs d’asile à « respecter la loi et se retenir de créer des situations perturbant l’ordre public et la sécurité aux frontières et ailleurs ».

      La Turquie accueille sur son sol plus de quatre millions de réfugiés et migrants, en majorité des Syriens, et affirme qu’elle ne pourra pas faire face seule à un nouvel afflux, alors que près d’un million de personnes fuyant les violences à Idleb sont massées à sa frontière. L’Organisation internationale des migrations (OIM) a annoncé samedi soir que quelque 13 000 migrants s’étaient amassés à la frontière gréco-turque, dont des familles avec de jeunes enfants qui ont passé la nuit dans le froid. Environ 2 000 personnes supplémentaires sont arrivées au poste-frontière de Pazarkule (Turquie) dimanche, dont des Afghans, des Syriens et des Irakiens, a constaté un journaliste de l’AFP.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/23128/entre-crispation-et-la-solidarite-l-ue-en-ordre-disperse-sur-la-situat

    • Le quotidien grec Efimerida tôn Syntaktôn a publié le communiqué de l’armée qui dit en somme que le 4ième corps de l’Armée fera un exercice avec des tirs à balles réelles à diverses région frontalières dont la forêt de Kastanies et l’endroit dit Gefyra Koipôn (Pont des Jardins) :
      Βολές με πραγματικά πυρά στον Έβρο την Καθαρά Δευτέρα

      Ξεκάθαρο μήνυμα με συγκεκριμένους αποδέκτες έστειλαν οι ελληνικές ένοπλες δυνάμεις, το βράδυ της Κυριακής, ανακοινώνοντας πως το Δ’ Σώμα Στρατού θα προχωρήσει σε βολές με πραγματικά πυρά, την Καθαρά Δευτέρα, 2 Μαρτίου καθ΄ όλη τη διάρκεια του 24ώρου στην περιοχή του Έβρου.

      Η ανακοίνωση γίνεται τη στιγμή που χιλιάδες πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες βρίσκονται στα ελληνοτουρκικά σύνορα και επιδιώκουν να εισέλθουν σε ελληνικό έδαφος, και ενώ το ΚΥΣΕΑ αποφάσισε (μεταξύ άλλων) την « αναβάθμιση σε μέγιστο επίπεδο των μέτρων φύλαξης των ανατολικών, χερσαίων και θαλάσσιων, συνόρων της χώρας από τα σώματα ασφαλείας και τις ένοπλες δυνάμεις για την αποτροπή παράνομων εισόδων στη χώρα ».

      Επίσης, στην ανακοίνωση γίνεται σαφής αναφορά για βολές « ευθυτενούς τροχιάς με πολυβόλα, τυφέκια και πιστόλια με πραγματικά πυρά », ενώ υπάρχει ξεκάθαρη προειδοποίηση πως « απαγορεύεται κάθε κίνηση ή παραμονή ατόμων... για αποφυγή ατυχημάτων ».

      Η ανακοίνωση

      Το Δ΄ ΣΩΜΑ ΣΤΡΑΤΟΥ ανακοινώνει ότι, από την 02 Μαρτίου 2020 και καθόλη τη διάρκεια του 24ώρου, θα εκτελούνται βολές ευθυτενούς τροχιάς με πολυβόλα, τυφέκια και πιστόλια με πραγματικά πυρά, σε όλη την παρέβρια περιοχή όπως παρακάτω :

      Επικίνδυνες περιοχές είναι αυτές , που περικλείονται από τα σημεία : α. ΕΦ Διλόφου – Λυκόνησος – Μουσμουλιές – ΕΦ Μαρασίων .β. ΕΦ Μαρασίων -Δάσος Καστανιών – ΕΦ 1- Περιοχή αποτρεπτικού εμποδίου- ΕΦ 5 – Πράσινη Πόρτα.γ. Πράσινη Πόρτα- ΕΦ 10- ΕΦ Γέφυρας Πυθίου.δ. ΕΦ Γέφυρας Πυθίου -ΕΦ Μαύρου Όγκου- ΕΦ 126- ΕΦ Σουφλίου-ΕΦΜανίτσας.ε. ΕΦ Μανίτσας -ΕΦ. Πλαγιές- Περιοχή Τυχερού- ΕΦ Γεμιστής- ΕΦ ΓέφυραΚήπων- ΕΦ Πετάλου- Αινήσιο Δέλτα.

      Στις παραπάνω περιοχές απαγορεύεται κάθε κίνηση ή παραμονή ατόμων, τροχοφόρων και ζώων κατά τις ώρες των βολών, για αποφυγή ατυχημάτων.

      Βλήματα μη εκραγέντα, που τυχόν θα βρεθούν, να μη μετακινηθούν και να ειδοποιείται άμεσα η πλησιέστερη Αστυνομική Αρχή.

      https://www.efsyn.gr/node/233421

    • Βολές με πραγματικά πυρά σε Έβρο και νησιά

      Βολές με πραγματικά πυρά, την Καθαρά Δευτέρα, καθ΄ όλη τη διάρκεια του 24ώρου στην περιοχή του Έβρου και σε περιοχές των νησιών του ανατολικού Αιγαίου ανακοίνωσε το Δ’ Σώμα Στρατού και η Ανώτατη Στρατιωτική Διοίκηση Εσωτερικού και Νήσων (ΑΣΔΕΝ).

      Οι ανακοινώσεις γίνονται τη στιγμή που πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες βρίσκονται στα ελληνοτουρκικά σύνορα (χερσαία και θαλάσσια) και επιδιώκουν να εισέλθουν σε ελληνικό έδαφος.

      Σύμφωνα με πηγές του στρατού, καθ’ όλη τη διάρκεια του 24ώρου, θα εκτελούνται βολές (Έβρος) « ευθυτενούς τροχιάς με πολυβόλα, τυφέκια και πιστόλια με πραγματικά πυρά », ενώ υπάρχει ξεκάθαρη προειδοποίηση πως « απαγορεύεται κάθε κίνηση ή παραμονή ατόμων... για αποφυγή ατυχημάτων ».

      Στα νησιά, η ΑΣΔΕΝ ανακοίνωσε βολές « ευθυτενούς τροχιάς » στις θαλάσσιες περιοχές ανατολικά των νησιών του ανατολικού Αιγαίου από τη νήσο Σαμοθράκη μέχρι Μεγίστη.

      Στο μεταξύ, στη Λέσβο βρίσκεται εκτάκτως ο υφυπουργός Εθνικής Άμυνας, Αλκιβιάδης Στεφανής, προκειμένου να δει από κοντά την κατάσταση που έχει δημιουργηθεί.


      https://www.efsyn.gr/node/233432

    • Πρωτοφανής ποινικοποίηση της αίτησης ασύλου

      Σε ευθεία και κατάφωρη παραβίαση των διεθνών και ελληνικών νόμων περί ασύλου έχει προβεί η κυβέρνηση της Νέας Δημοκρατίας, με αφορμή τα γεγονότα που εξελίσσονται τις τελευταίες ημέρες στα ελληνοτουρκικά σύνορα.

      Εκτός, λοιπόν, από την αναστολή που αποφάσισε χθες (Κυριακή) το ΚΥΣΕΑ για την υποβολή των αιτήσεων ασύλου —ενέργεια για την οποία ήδη έχει εκφράσει την αντίθεσή της η Ύπατη Αρμοστεία του ΟΗΕ— η κυβέρνηση προχώρησε σε δίκη και καταδίκη των ανθρώπων που εισέρχονται παράνομα σε ελληνικό έδαφος.

      Όπως ανακοινώθηκε από την κυβέρνηση, σήμερα (Καθαρά Δευτέρα) πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες δικάστηκαν και καταδικάστηκαν σε τέσσερα έτη φυλάκισης, χωρίς αναστολή και 10.000 ευρώ χρηματική ποινή έκαστος. Μάλιστα, οι καταδικασθέντες μεταφέρθηκαν σε καταστήματα κράτησης.

      Μέχρι στιγμής δεν έχει γίνει γνωστός ο αριθμός των ανθρώπων που έχουν οδηγηθεί στις φυλακές. Πάντως, από τις 6 το πρωί του Σαββάτου ως τις 6 το απόγευμα της Καθαράς Δευτέρας, έχουν συλληφθεί 183 άτομα.

      Σημειώνεται πως ο ελληνικός νόμος 4636/2019 για τη διεθνή προστασία (άρθρο 46) που εφαρμόζει τις ευρωπαϊκές οδηγίες (άρθρα 8 και 9 Οδηγίας 2013/33/ΕΕ) είναι σαφής, όπως καταγράφεται παρακάτω :

      Σε κάθε περίπτωση, οι δίκες και οι καταδίκες προσφύγων και μεταναστών διαφοροποιούν εντελώς τη μέχρι στιγμής πολιτική των ελληνικών κυβερνήσεων, που ήταν να μην προχωρούν σε διώξεις ανθρώπων που θεωρείται ότι ανήκουν σε ευάλωτες ομάδες. Υπενθυμίζεται πως μέχρι σήμερα, οι διώξεις αφορούσαν μόνο τους διακινητές προσφύγων και μεταναστών.

      Σημειώνεται ότι σύμφωνα με πληροφορίες από τα νησιά, ο υπουργός Μετανάστευσης και Ασύλου ενημέρωσε σήμερα τη δημοτική αρχή Χίου ότι έχουν παραχωρηθεί δημοτικό κτήριο στην οδό Λάδης και χώρος στα Καρδάμυλα, όπου θα κρατούνται οι νεοεισερχόμενοι και θα μεταφέρονται μέσα σε τρεις μέρες σε κλειστές δομές της ενδοχώρας.

      https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/dikaiomata/233470_protofanis-poinikopoiisi-tis-aitisis-asyloy

      –-> Commentaire de Vicky Skoumbi :

      Criminalisation sans précédent de la demande d’asile

      D’après le quotidien grec Efimerida tôn Syntatktôn, le gouvernement grec ne s’est pas contenté de suspendre la procédure d’asile pour les nouveaux arrivants- suspension contre laquelle l’HCR a exprimé son opposition- mais il franchit un nouveau seuil dans la repression en procédant à des jugements et des condamnations de ceux qui entrent ‘illégalement’ dans le territoire grec. Le gouvernement a annoncé qu’aujourd’hui des réfugiés et des migrants ont été jugés dans un procès sans doute plus qu’expéditif, et condamnés à quatre ans de détention sans sursis et à 10.000 euros d’amende chacun. Les personnes ayant écopés ces peines ahurissantes ont été déjà transférées à des prisons. Pour l’instant on ignore combien furent condamnés. Toutefois on sait du samedi matin jusqu’à cet après-midi, 183 personnes ont été arrêtées à la frontière.

      Ces faits et gestes constituent une flagrante violation de la législation grecque, car selon la loi grecque 4636/2019 / article 46, pour la protection international, et conformément aux directives européennes (articles 8 et 9 de la directive 2013/33/UE, un ressortissant d’un pays tiers, demandeur d’asile, ne peut pas être détenu du fait qu’il est entré d’une façon irrégulière au pays, ou bien du fait qu’il y séjourne sans autorisation des autorités.

      Le Ministre de l’Immigration et de l’asile, aurait informé les autorités municipales de Chios qu’un immeuble municipal sera transformé en lieu de détention et les arrivants y seront détenus pour trois jours après lesquels ils seront transférés à des centres fermés de la Grèce continentale.

    • Commission pledges border guards, aid to Greece to tackle migrant surge

      The European Commission presented on Wednesday a six-point action plan to support Greece for border policing, that includes financial aid and beefing up #Frontex patrols in the Aegean and Evros, the northeastern border with Turkey.

      More than 10,000 migrants have been trying to breach the Greek border with Turkey after Ankara said last Thursday it would no longer try to halt illegal migration flows to Europe.

      “Greece faces an incredibly challenging situation, one that is completely unprecedented and this difficult task cannot fall on Greece alone. It is the responsibility of the whole of Europe,” Commission Vice-President Margaritis Schinas said in a joint press conference with EU Home Affairs Commissioner Ylva Johansson in Brussels.

      Presenting the plan, Schinas said Frontex would launch two rapid border operations both on the land and sea border, that will include an additional 100 border guards and equipment.

      Frontex, the EU’s border control agency, is also preparing the deployment of one offshore patrol vessel, six coastal patrol vessels, two helicopters, one aircraft and three thermo-vision vehicles.

      Schinas said the Commission has also asked Frontex to coordinate a new return program for the quick return of “persons without the right to stay” to their countries of origin from Greece, making use of Frontex’s new mandate on returns.

      The EU will provide immediate financial assistance of 350 million euros to support increased reception capacity on the five Greek islands receiving the bulk of migrants, voluntary returns of migrants, and all the infrastructure needed to carry out screening procedures for health and security on the islands.

      The Commission will in addition propose an amended budget to make available a further 350 million euros, if needed.

      On Greece’s request the Commission also launched the civil protection mechanism through which Greece can receive additional medical staff and equipment, blankets and tents, Schinas added.

      At the same time, the EU agency for refugees, the European Asylum Support Office (EASO), will accelerate the deployment of an additional number of around 160 case workers in Greece to support the process of asylum applications.

      The Commissioner also said the EU aims to strengthen regional cooperation by developing a coordinating mechanism with countries in the Western Balkan countries on migration.

      The plan will be introduced before the extraordinary meeting of the Justice and Home Office Ministers who will meet later on Wednesday.

      http://www.ekathimerini.com/250222/article/ekathimerini/news/commission-pledges-border-guards-aid-to-greece-to-tackle-migrant-surge

    • Ankara déploie un millier de policiers à la frontière avec la Grèce

      La Turquie a annoncé jeudi que 1 000 policiers « pleinement équipés » allaient être déployés à la frontière avec la Grèce. Ankara espère ainsi « empêcher » Athènes de « repousser » les migrants qui tentent d’entrer sur son territoire depuis près d’une semaine.

      Le bras de fer entre la Grèce et la Turquie continue à la frontière entre ces deux pays. Ankara a annoncé, jeudi 5 mars, le déploiement d’un millier de policiers, « pleinement équipés », le long du fleuve frontalier Evros (Meriç en turc) afin « d’empêcher » Athènes de « repousser » les migrants qui essayent de pénétrer sur son sol.

      La semaine dernière, la Turquie a ouvert ses frontières avec la Grèce pour laisser passer les migrants déjà présents sur son territoire. Depuis cette annonce, des dizaines de milliers de personnes se sont massées le long de la frontière terrestre entre la Turquie et la Grèce, essayant de passer par des postes frontaliers ou en traversant le fleuve. Certains ont fini par renoncer, comme l’a confié à InfoMigrants Khaled, un Palestinien reparti à Istanbul après avoir tenté en vain de rentrer sur le territoire grec.
      35 000 migrants empêchés d’entrer en Grèce

      Une guerre de communication fait rage entre les deux pays voisins. Athènes a annoncé avoir empêché ces derniers jours près de 35 000 migrants d’entrer « illégalement » sur son territoire. La Turquie accuse de son côté la Grèce d’avoir tué plusieurs migrants, ce qu’Athènes a démenti, rejetant des « fausses informations ». De plus, selon le ministre turc de l’Intérieur, Süleyman Soylu, les forces de sécurité grecques ont « blessé 164 personnes et tenté d’en repousser 4 900 sur le territoire turc ».

      Des migrants présents à la frontière et rencontrés par une équipe d’InfoMigrants sur place ont en effet expliqué avoir été repoussés par les Grecs « violemment ». Ils « utilisent du gaz lacrymogène et des grenades assourdissantes. L’un de mes camarades a même dû aller se faire soigner à l’hôpital pour une blessure reçue au bras », a déclaré Mounir, un migrant marocain.

      L’Union européenne a qualifié de « chantage » la décision prise par Ankara d’ouvrir ses frontières, au moment où la Turquie est en quête d’un appui occidental en Syrie.

      L’afflux de migrants vers la Grèce a réveillé en Europe la crainte d’une nouvelle crise migratoire semblable à celle qui a secoué le continent en 2015.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/23219/ankara-deploie-un-millier-de-policiers-a-la-frontiere-avec-la-grece
      #militarisation_des_frontières #police

      Localisation de #Pazarkule :


      –-> ce #poste-frontière se trouve dans le #triangle_de_Karaagac, un territoire attribué à la Grèce en 1923 par le traité de Lausanne et permettant au fleuve Evros de faire une incursion dans le territoire turc (https://visionscarto.net/evros-mur-inutile), soit là où la Grèce a construit un #mur en 2012...

    • La Grèce veut « renvoyer dans leurs pays » les migrants arrivés après le 1er mars

      Le ministre grec chargé des migrations a annoncé mercredi que les migrants arrivés sur les îles grecques depuis le 1er mars seraient transférés vers la ville de Serres, dans le nord du pays, au cours des prochains jours. « Notre objectif est de les ramener dans leurs pays », a-t-il affirmé.

      Les migrants qui sont arrivés illégalement en Grèce après le 1er mars 2020 seront transférés vers la ville de Serres, située dans le nord du pays, a annoncé le ministre chargé des migrations, Notis Mitarachi dans la soirée du 4 mars. Les autorités grecques prévoient, dans un second temps, de renvoyer ces nouveaux arrivants vers leurs différents pays d’origine.

      « Notre objectif est de les ramener dans leurs pays », a affirmé Notis Mitarachi à l’agence de presse Athens News. Il a par ailleurs ajouté que les personnes entrées dans le pays avant le 1er janvier 2019 et vivant sur les îles grecques seraient transférées sur le continent dans les prochains jours.

      Le 1er mars, la Grèce avait déjà annoncé qu’elle n’accepterait plus de nouvelles demandes d’asile pendant un mois.

      Suite à l’ouverture des frontières turques la semaine dernière, plusieurs centaines de migrants ont réussi à entrer illégalement en Grèce, la plupart en rejoignant les îles via la mer. Selon le gouvernement grec, près de 7 000 tentatives d’entrées illégales ont été empêchées en 24 heures dans la région et une vingtaine de migrants y ont été arrêtés, surtout originaires d’Afghanistan et du Pakistan, entre mercredi matin et jeudi matin.

      La Turquie, qui accueille déjà 3,7 millions de réfugiés syriens, a annoncé le 28 février qu’elle se désengageait d’un accord conclu en 2016 avec l’Union européenne et qu’elle n’empêcherait plus les migrants de quitter son territoire. Une manière de faire pression sur Bruxelles et d’obtenir soit davantage de moyens financiers pour prendre en charge les migrants, soit un soutien diplomatique à ses visées géopolitiques dans le conflit syrien, accusent la Grèce et l’Union européenne.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/23230/la-grece-veut-renvoyer-dans-leurs-pays-les-migrants-arrives-apres-le-1
      #01_mars_2020

    • Migrants : la Grèce accusée de recourir à la manière forte

      Refoulement en Turquie, utilisation de gaz lacrymogènes, confiscation de biens : la Grèce est accusée de recourir à la manière forte avec les migrants qui tentent d’entrer en Europe, et Ankara lui attribue même la mort de trois personnes.

      « Des soldats grecs (...) nous ont pris notre argent, nos téléphones. Il est arrivé la même chose à nos amis », raconte Resul,un jeune Afghan, rencontré par l’AFP le long de la longue frontière terrestre qui sépare la Turquie et la Grèce sur plus de 200 km.

      D’autres candidats malheureux à l’exil rencontrés sur les routes affirment qu’ils ont été rossés par les forces de l’ordre grecques, déjà montrées du doigt pour avoir utilisé des gaz lacrymogènes aux ogives potentiellement mortelles en cas de tir tendu sur une personne.

      Depuis que le président turc Recep Tayyip Erdogan a ordonné l’ouverture des frontières pour laisser passer les migrants désireux de se rendre dans l’Union européenne, Athènes a complètement fermé sa frontière terrestre tout en déployant des forces le long du fleuve Evros.

      Les pratiques présumées de « push-back », qui consistent à repousser les personnes qui voudraient entrer sur un territoire sont dénoncées par plusieurs organisations internationales et des ONG, qui reprochent également au gouvernement grec de contrevenir au droit international et européen en décidant de suspendre les demandes d’asile pendant un mois.
      Etat de siège

      De source gouvernementale grecque, on assure qu’"il n’y a pas de refoulements". Le gouvernement « empêche l’entrée (sur son territoire ndlr), c’est tout à fait différent », a déclaré cette source à l’AFP.

      Parmi les mesures décidées par le conseil gouvernemental de sécurité nationale détaillées dans un acte législatif, figurent « l’arrestation, le transfert dans des centres de détention et le retour immédiat, si c’est possible dans leur pays d’origine, de tous ceux qui entrent illégalement dans le territoire grec ».

      « Le principe fondamental de non-refoulement » stipule que « personne ne peut être renvoyé dans un pays où sa vie ou sa liberté seraient en péril », a souligné mardi Stella Nanou, la responsable de l’Agence des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (HCR) en Grèce, lors d’une visite au poste-frontière de Kastanies (Pazarkule côté turc).

      L’ONG allemande de défense des droits des réfugiés Pro Asyl a elle aussi tancé les autorités grecques, jugeant « illégaux » les renvois vers la Turquie « sans que les procédures d’asile n’aient été enclenchées ».

      A la frontière, la région reculée de terres agricoles et de villages assoupis offre le spectacle d’une zone en état de siège : camions militaires et véhicules de police quadrillent la zone du nord au sud et d’est en ouest.

      La Turquie accuse aussi les gardes-frontières grecs d’avoir tué trois migrants lors de heurts à la frontière, ce qu’Athènes a fermement démenti, rejetant des « fausses informations ».
      Chaussures et téléphones portables

      Des journalistes de l’AFP ont vu le long de la frontière des soldats grecs cagoulés embarquant des migrants dans des véhicules militaires. Certains réfugiés se trouvaient aussi à bord de fourgonnettes sans plaques d’immatriculation.

      Les policiers et les militaires ont systématiquement refusé d’indiquer la destination de ces personnes interpellées.

      « On les livre à la justice pour entrée illégale sur le territoire », se contente d’indiquer à l’AFP un policier qui refuse de décliner son identité, à Tychero, un bourg collé à la frontière.

      Des forces de l’ordre grecques sont également soupçonnées d’avoir dépouillé des réfugiés de leurs effets personnels.

      A Tychero, des paires de chaussures souillées de boue sont entassées à côté de l’entrée du poste de police, ainsi que des téléphones portables. De l’autre côté de la frontière, des migrants marchent pieds nus et affirment que les policiers grecs leur ont pris leurs chaussures.

      Quand ils parviennent à entrer en Grèce, les migrants sont livrés à eux-mêmes. A la différence des îles de la mer Egée, aucune organisation humanitaire n’est déployée dans cette vaste région.

      https://www.lepoint.fr/monde/migrants-la-grece-accusee-de-recourir-a-la-maniere-forte-05-03-2020-2365952_

    • La Grèce veut dissuader les exilés de franchir ses frontières

      Depuis l’annonce d’Ankara concernant l’ouverture de la frontière, la Grèce et la Turquie mènent une véritable bataille de la communication : bataille de chiffres, accusations d’exactions, dénonciations de propagande. Côté grec, le ton redouble de fermeté.

      Lesbos (Grèce), de notre envoyée spéciale.– Les rafales de vent fouettent les visages sur le port bétonné de Mytilène, à Lesbos. Les côtes turques, à une dizaine de kilomètres, sont noyées dans la brume ce mercredi.

      Derrière des barrières gardées par des policiers, ils sont près de 560 migrants, majoritairement venus d’Afghanistan et de pays d’Afrique. Depuis des heures, ils guettent l’arrivée d’un bateau qui viendrait les extirper de l’île grecque.

      Peu d’informations circulent sur ces passagers, ce matin-là. Les quelques journalistes autorisés à observer cette scène sous haute surveillance n’ont pas le droit de leur parler. « Pour éviter tout mouvement de foule », explique d’un ton ferme un policier.

      On sait seulement que ces migrants en quête d’Europe sont les derniers à avoir accosté à Lesbos. Ils ont pris la mer à bord d’une dizaine de bateaux pneumatiques depuis la Turquie les 1er, 2 et 3 mars, encouragés par l’annonce de l’ouverture de la frontière par Ankara.

      Isolés dès leur arrivée, les réfugiés n’ont pas fait escale dans le camp surchargé de l’île, Moria, où s’entassent déjà 20 000 migrants dans l’attente de leur traitement d’asile.

      L’imposante frégate militaire s’approche du port en fin de matinée. Elle amarre. Elle devrait embarquer les réfugiés puis prendre le chemin de Serres dans le nord de la Grèce. Mais là-bas, la colère des habitants gronde déjà contre leur venue. Les réfugiés ne le savent pas encore, mais Serres ne sera peut-être qu’une escale.

      « Notre but est de les renvoyer dans leur pays », a révélé le ministre de l’immigration, Notis Mitarachi à l’agence Reuters mercredi, en évoquant l’ensemble des quelque 1 500 exilés arrivés sur les îles depuis le 1er mars.

      Le sort de ces passagers illustre la politique de dissuasion voulue par la Grèce, qui qualifie d’« invasion » et de « menace asymétrique » le déplacement de migrants à ses portes depuis l’annonce par Ankara de l’ouverture de cette frontière, jeudi 27 février. Le message se veut clair. Il n’y aura pas d’accueil pour les nouveaux exilés dans ce pays redevenu en 2019 la première porte d’entrée de l’Europe pour les demandeurs d’asile, qui peine à traiter les quelque 60 000 requêtes déjà en cours.

      La campagne de communication du gouvernement grec a commencé dès vendredi par l’envoi de renforts de police et de l’armée à sa frontière terrestre, dans le nord-est, dans le nome de l’Évros. Il faut dissuader les 12 000 migrants massés du côté turc de la frontière.

      Les images de l’afflux de soldats, puis du chef d’état-major grec et du ministre de la protection du citoyen, Michalis Chryssochoidis, en visite ce jour-là dans la ville-frontière de Kastanies, ont fait le tour des télévisions grecques. La tournée de ces hauts responsables a pour objectif d’envoyer un message fort. « La Grèce est un pays sûr. La Grèce protège les frontières », martèle le ministre.

      La frontière grecque est bien fermée : ce refrain est aussi repris par le premier ministre conservateur Kyriakos Mitsotákis. Le 1er mars, il annonçait également la suspension, à compter de cette date, du dépôt des demandes d’asile pour toutes les personnes arrivées illégalement en Grèce. Une décision illégale, dénoncent de nombreuses ONG, et contraire au droit international selon le Haut-Commissariat aux réfugiés (HCR).

      Les autorités grecques, qui dénoncent un « chantage » d’Ankara, ont également annoncé le renvoi systématique des migrants vers leurs pays, la demande de déploiement de la force de réaction rapide (Rabit) de la force européenne Frontex à sa frontière puis le soutien de l’UE « par tous les moyens possibles ».

      Kostas Moutzouris, gouverneur local des îles du nord de l’Égée, assume ce qu’il qualifie de politique de « dissuasion » du gouvernement grec. Droit dans son bureau qui surplombe le port de Mytilène, l’homme populaire à Lesbos précise lui aussi « qu’il faut décourager ces gens de venir ».

      « Les habitants ici étaient solidaires, mais ils n’en peuvent plus, il y a trop de monde », insiste le politicien de droite. « [Le président turc] Erdogan fait de la propagande de l’autre côté, il incite les migrants à venir jusqu’aux frontières depuis Constantinople [Istanbul – ndlr] et d’autres villes du pays. Ils sont pour l’instant dans le nord de la Grèce, à l’Évros, mais comme ils ne peuvent pas passer, ils commenceront à descendre vers la frontière maritime face aux îles », croit-il.

      Les deux pays se livrent une guerre de communication. Les autorités grecques accusent Ankara d’inciter les migrants à venir et de les escorter jusqu’aux eaux grecques. « Le transport [de migrants] est organisé gratuitement jusqu’à la frontière, accompagnés par l’armée turque », a expliqué mercredi 4 mars le porte-parole du gouvernement grec, Stelios Petsas, au cours d’un point presse.

      Il affirme que « des SMS [sont] reçus par les migrants sur leurs téléphones portables au sujet des frontières prétendument ouvertes… [que] la télévision d’État turque […] a diffusé une carte avec des itinéraires vers la région d’Évros et la côte ». De son côté, Ankara nie et affirme qu’Athènes tire à balles réelles sur les réfugiés aux frontières terrestre et maritime. La Grèce dément.

      Une vidéo datant de début mars a fait le tour des réseaux sociaux, relayée par les autorités turques. On y voit un bateau pneumatique de migrants en mer Égée, et une vedette qui fonce à toute vitesse faisant tanguer le zodiac. On y entend les cris des passagers apeurés, puis des tirs de sommation, visant à repousser l’embarcation, au large de Lesbos, d’après Ankara.

      « J’ignore si ce contenu est authentique, avoue Kostas Moutzouris. Mais si c’est avéré, cela ne me paraît pas étrange : il faut dissuader les gens de venir, ces hommes [garde-côtes – ndlr] ne tirent pas sur les réfugiés, mais en l’air pour les dissuader. Les migrants ne doivent pas passer et les militaires grecs feront tout pour qu’ils ne viennent pas. »

      Mercredi 4 mars, des heurts entre migrants et forces de l’ordre grecques à la frontière terrestre ont aussi fait six blessés en raison de « tirs à balles réelles », affirme le gouvernement local turc, qui précisait qu’un migrant était mort de ses blessures.

      Mohamed Al Arab avait 22 ans et était originaire d’Alep, rapporte Le Parisien. Le gouvernement grec, lui, « dément catégoriquement » ces tirs. « La police grecque n’a pas tiré, maintient M. Moutzouris, mais malheureusement cela ne serait pas surprenant que la situation dérape. »

      Une enquête vidéo (visible ci-dessous en anglais) de Forensic Architecture – laboratoire d’investigation pluridisciplinaire avec qui Mediapart a déjà travaillé – sur le meurtre de #Mohamed_Al_Arab contredit la version des autorités grecques.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/050320/la-grece-veut-dissuader-les-exiles-de-franchir-ses-frontieres

    • #Forensic_Architecture releases video confirming murder of Syrian refugee on Greek border

      London-based research group Forensic Architecture has released an investigative video yesterday debunking Greek government’s claims of fake news over the killing of Syrian refugee #Muhammad_al-Arab by Greek fire on the country’s land border with Turkey.

      Twenty-two-year-old al-Arab’s murder was first reported by journalist Jenan Moussa on 02 March on Twitter. Moussa shared videos of the incident and managed to track down al-Arab’s family in Istanbul, who confirmed his death. Greek government spokesperson Stelios Petsas immediately tweeted that the reports were fake news and “Turkish propaganda”, to which Moussa responded with a photo of al-Arab’s coffin.

      Reuters and other international media picked up the story of al-Arab’s death by Greek fire on the border, but local media’s silence on the issue has been deafening. For two days it was unclear whether a killing had actually taken place, with the government repeatedly denouncing reports as inaccurate.

      Last night, Forensic Architecture released a video of their research on al-Arab’s killing. The video confirms the time, date and location of videos shot by witnesses during the incident, using video metadata and comparing video footage with satellite images of the area. The video therefore proves that al-Arab was indeed killed by live ammunition on the Greek-Turkish border as he was trying to cross into Greece. You can watch the Forensic Architecture video here (warning: graphic content).

      This is not the first case Forensic Architecture investigates in Greece. The Turner-nominated group conducted research on the murder of Pavlos Fyssas, the lynching of Zak Kostopoulos, a shipwreck off the coast of Lesvos that resulted in the death of at least 43 people, and the extradiction of Turkish political asylum seekers by Greece. In September 2019, Forensic Architecture had its first solo exhibition in Greece at State of Concept in Athens.

      The killing of al-Arab is the result of escalating violence on the Greek side of the border and rampant racism among Greek citizens, fuelled by politicians and the media. On 02 March, the Greek armed forces announced that they would be using live ammunition on the land border with Turkey and the coast of Lesvos. Meanwhile, armed vigilante groups have emerged patrolling the border, in order to deter refugees from crossing. According to Die Linke and Twitter reports, these groups are joined by neonazi groups from Germany and Austria.

      Amnesty International has released a statement calling out Greece for betraying its human rights responsibilities and for putting people’s lives at risk, stating that Greece should do whatever possible to protect the arrival of asylum seekers to the country. The Greek section of Amnesty International has released a separate report, pointing out that the situation along the Greek-Turkish border is “a humanitarian crisis caused by Europe”, and that Greece should protect the right to asylum with support from the EU.

      Demonstrations in solidarity with refugees and against state violence and racism have been announced for today, Thursday 05 March, in various cities in Greece.

      http://und-athens.com/journal/fa-alarab-killing
      #assassinat #meurtre #preuves

    • Pourquoi les migrants bloqués à la frontière grecque évitent-ils la #Bulgarie ?

      Réputé pour faire la vie dure aux réfugiés, le pays est aussi protégé par les bonnes relations que son Premier ministre entretient avec le président turc, Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

      Dans le bras de fer migratoire qui oppose la Turquie à l’Union européenne (UE), un pays pourtant géographiquement en première ligne est resté jusqu’ici bien discret. Alors qu’environ 35 000 migrants ont tenté d’entrer en Grèce depuis la fin février d’après les autorités nationales, la situation à la frontière bulgare reste calme.

      Le 28 février, au lendemain de la décision du président turc Recep Tayyip Erdogan de laisser passer les réfugiés cherchant à rejoindre l’Union européenne, le ministre bulgare de l’Intérieur, Mladen Marinov, s’est rendu au poste frontière de Kapitan Andreevo, situé à une vingtaine de kilomètres seulement du village grec de Kastaniès, pour constater « qu’aucune tentative de franchir la frontière [n’avait] été relevée, à l’exception de quelques cas isolés ». Depuis, la situation n’a pas évolué alors que migrants et réfugiés continuent à affluer à la frontière grecque.

      Ce contraste peut en partie s’expliquer par une réticence des réfugiés eux-mêmes à se rendre en Bulgarie, selon Miladina Monova, anthropologue à l’Académie des sciences bulgares et engagée dans l’aide aux migrants. « La situation est particulièrement difficile pour les migrants en Bulgarie, explique-t-elle. Depuis 2015, le message circule dans le milieu des réfugiés qu’il vaut mieux éviter de passer par ce pays car les risques d’être tabassé et dépouillé à la frontière sont particulièrement élevés. »

      Depuis 2016, Sofia a fait installer une clôture métallique équipée de détecteurs de mouvements le long des 250 kilomètres de frontière avec la Turquie. Le gouvernement défend une politique « zéro migration ». Ce mardi, le ministre bulgare de la Défense s’est même opposé à l’installation d’un camp de réfugiés provisoire dans le nord de la Grèce, à 45 km de la Bulgarie, estimant que « l’installation de migrants clandestins du côté grec, près de notre frontière, [créerait] les conditions d’une aggravation de la tension ».
      Violence aux frontières

      Les gardes-frontières bulgares sont effectivement réputés pour leurs pratiques violentes, consistant à repousser physiquement les migrants en dehors du territoire national. « L’usage excessif de la force et les vols par la police des frontières est toujours d’actualité. L’entrée irrégulière sur le territoire reste criminalisée, avec pour conséquence une détention administrative des migrants et réfugiés, y compris des enfants non-accompagnés », rappelle Amnesty international dans son dernier rapport sur la question, publié en 2018. En 2015, un migrant afghan est mort, tué par un coup de feu tiré par un garde-frontière, dans des circonstances qui n’ont toujours pas été éclaircies.

      Malgré sa situation géographique qui en fait une porte de l’UE, la Bulgarie n’a jamais constitué une grosse route migratoire. Ainsi en 2016, seuls 17 187 migrants sont entrés en Bulgarie, dix fois moins qu’en Grèce (176 906). Cette année, entre le premier janvier et la fin du mois de février, ils n’ont été que 141 à passer en Bulgarie, contre 5 854 en Grèce, selon l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM).

      Pour comprendre l’absence actuelle de tension migratoire à frontière turco-bulgare, il faut aussi regarder du côté des relations diplomatiques entre Sofia et Ankara. Le 2 mars, alors que les tensions entre la Turquie et la Grèce étaient à leur comble, le Premier ministre bulgare, Boïko Borissov, a affiché sur les réseaux sociaux sa poignée de main avec Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Et précisé devant les micros : « Nous sommes tombés d’accord pour continuer à entretenir nos relations de bon voisinage, la compréhension réciproque et la paix. » Une relation de bon voisinage qui a probablement évité à la Bulgarie le sort de la Grèce, qui a vu arriver à sa porte des migrants convoyés gratuitement par bus depuis le reste de la Turquie.

      Expulsion des gülenistes

      Au pouvoir depuis 2009, Boïko Borissov entretient depuis longtemps de bonnes relations avec Erdogan. Il a notamment gagné sa confiance en renvoyant vers la Turquie les gülenistes, ces membres d’une confrérie musulmane accusés par le président turc d’avoir organisé la tentative de coup d’Etat de juillet 2016. « On sait dans le milieu des défenseurs des droits de l’homme que le renvoi des gülénistes et des Kurdes est systématique. Mais leur nombre exact est difficile à établir, car il s’agit de renvois immédiats, avant même que ces personnes ne déposent une demande d’asile, note Miladina Monova. La Bulgarie est le seul pays des Balkans à le faire systématiquement, alors même qu’elle est membre de l’UE. » En retour, la Turquie reprend systématiquement les migrants qui tentent de passer en Bulgarie.

      Cette relation entre Borissov et Erdogan a ainsi conduit le Premier ministre conservateur bulgare à servir à plusieurs reprises de médiateur entre l’homme fort d’Ankara et les autres chefs d’Etat européens. En 2018, c’était déjà à son initiative qu’un sommet réunissant dirigeants turcs et européens avait été organisé à Varna, sur la côte bulgare, pour sauver une première fois l’accord migratoire.

      https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2020/03/10/pourquoi-les-migrants-bloques-a-la-frontiere-grecque-evitent-la-bulgarie_

    • Notes From #Pazarkule/ #Evros, Ninth Day

      Pazarkule. Turkey. March 8, 2020. Today we learned that it had become even harder for the refugees to leave the designated area to come to Karaağaç. They are now only allowed to use the main checkpoint. They are also required to give fingerprints and accept bodily checks. The soldiers also take pictures of their eyes. As our friend told us, exists started at 10 o’clock in the morning and went on during the day despite the long queues. Our friends waited two hours in the queue and only after that, they reached to Karaağaç. They were still in a positive mood when we met them there.

      One of our migrant friends told that while they were waiting in the queue a gendarmerie yelled at him saying ‘why are you laughing?’ He answered ‘I am not laughing at anything but why are you yelling?’ Then a higher officer took him to a corner and beat him. In an earlier conversation, this very same friend told us that the soldiers were helping them to cross to Greece. They even gave them hooks and ropes to take down the last remaining fence in front of the border gate. Our friends often tell us about incidents of ill-treatment by the same soldiers who ‘help’ them to cross to the Greek side.

      We also learned that although independent aid organizations were not allowed in the fenced-off area, Yavuz Selim Association was given permission to enter and distribute aid. Our friends from the inside also told us that the Beşir Association had been present on the ground since the first day and they distributed blue clothing items today.

      Our friends went back around 23.00 and reported that their fingerprints were not taken went they re-entered.

      Today we came across a Women’s Day demo in downtown Edirne. Migrants, borders or the war were mentioned neither in the press release nor on the banners and posters; despite the existence of such a large group of migrant women just by the city.

      Today we also had a chance to chat with refugee women. Our female friends who came from the zone told us about their experiences, stories and how they live through this as women. While we were filming, one of the women told us that she studied cinema for one year in Iran and offered to use the camera and make the shooting. We gave her the camera. Thanks to this, the women we were chatting got to know each other and they were relieved because they spoke the same language.

      They told us that in Turkey migrant women were ill approached particularly by men. Their common experience involved being sexually harassed by their bosses. They also mentioned that they had to work for very low wages, could not even get their salaries paid and did not have any access to mechanisms that would guarantee their rights. They also did not have much solidarity from Turkish women. This lack of contact made them feel isolated. Two of these friends told us that although they had Masters degrees and appropriate expertise, they could only find unskilled work. A younger friend said that she wanted to continue with her education and it was not possible in Turkey. They also told us that their future seemed full of uncertainties but they still held the hope that they would be able to cross the border and realize their dreams. Despite all the hardships they had to endure, their only wish is to have an ordinary, quiet and safe life.

      They told us that the conditions in Pazarkule are particularly harsh for women and children; that the sanitary and accommodation conditions were very bad. Women in the area (including themselves) would not go out of their tents often, because they were not feeling safe. There have been incidents of sexual harassment and one woman managed to run away from those who tried to rape her.

      On top of all these problems, the aggression from the Greek side is very tough. Our friends told us with much regret that last night (March 7) the intensity of teargas was really bad, and women with babies lacked protection. Another friend told us that, the same night a mother with a baby in her arms took refuge in our friend’s make-shift nylon tent. The baby had difficulty breathing and the mother was waving a t-shift to air the tent. The baby was now fine, though.

      When we asked about how the women in the area were interacting, they told us that a group of women visited tents to discuss acting in unison. However there was not consensus because everybody had different motivations. Our friends said that they understood these women too because they all were in a struggle for themselves and their children and they would do anything to win this struggle.

      When we chatted about the Women’s Day, they emphasized that their expectation from all women was that women would not discriminate against them. They also expect solidarity between women without any reservations on the basis of language, religion, and nationality. Their wish for all women in the world is to live in equality and freedom. We also learned that some women organized a Women’s day demo in the area. There is a need for more activity directed towards women and other vulnerable groups in the area.

      We also think that sharing our experience in coordination would be useful for new initiatives:

      –Our chat with female migrant friends today reminded us of the importance of maintaining gender equality in our work.

      – All newcomers need orientation about what has been going on here and the material conditions. Short visits only allow getting used to the field, but longer stays are emotionally and physically very tiring.

      –Therefore, we prioritize groups that can stay between 2-5 days. We can manage our activities in groups of 2-5 people. More people are not necessary and larger groups increase the risk of facing interference from officials. If people want to be in the field and commit time and labour, there are plenty of political and practical arenas to contribute. We have at the moment a pool of volunteers that would be enough to do rotations in the coming weeks. If we need further volunteers, we will issue a call again.

      No border pazarkule/edirne, March 8, 2020.

      https://enoughisenough14.org/2020/03/11/notes-from-pazarkule-evros-ninth-day

    • Turkey Steps Back From Confrontation at Greek Border

      The country is winding down an aggressive two-week operation to move tens of thousands of migrants to its frontiers. But relations with Greece and Europe have suffered.

      Turkey has signaled that it is winding down its two-week operation to aid the movement of tens of thousands of people toward Europe, following a tough on-the-ground response from Greek border guards and a tepid diplomatic reaction from European politicians.

      Migrants at the Greek-Turkish land border began to be transported back to Istanbul by bus this week, witnesses at the border said, de-escalating a standoff that initially set off fears of another European migration crisis. Greek officials said the number of attempted border crossings had dwindled from thousands a day to a few hundred, and none were successful on Friday, even as sporadic exchanges of tear-gas with Turkish security forces continued.

      Also Friday, Turkish officials announced that three human smugglers had each been sentenced to 125 years in prison for their roles in the death of a Syrian toddler, Alan Kurdi, whose drowning came to epitomize an earlier migration crisis, in 2015.

      That announcement and the week’s other developments were interpreted by experts and European politicians as signals to Europe that the Turkish authorities were once again willing to police their borders and quell a second wave of migration.

      It follows a tense period in which President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey attempted to engineer the reverse: a new migration crisis on Europe’s borders.

      On Feb. 28, the Turkish government announced it would no longer stop migrants trying to reach Europe, and it then drove hundreds to the threshold of Greece, live-streaming the process to encourage more to follow.

      The move was perceived as an attempt to rally European support for Turkey’s military campaign in northern Syria, and more European aid for the four million refugees inside Turkey.

      On at least one occasion, Turkish officials even forced migrants to leave. In a video clip filmed onboard a bus ferrying people to the border, reluctant migrants were shown being forced off the vehicle at gunpoint by officers in plain clothes, and beaten when they resisted.

      https://twitter.com/daphnetoli/status/1236263937706004481?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E12

      Marc Pierini, a former European Union envoy to Turkey, called it “the first-ever refugee exodus, albeit a limited one, fully organized by one government against another.”

      The border clash not only stirred fears of a new migration crisis, but it also saw both countries react with anger and tough tactics. The Greeks have been condemned for suspending asylum applications and detaining and returning some migrants to Turkey.

      To foment a sense of crisis, Turkish security forces fired tear gas over the border at their Greek counterparts and provided journalists with footage of aggressive Greek responses to migrants. Mr. Erdogan accused Greek officials of behaving like officials in Nazi Germany.

      But the Turks used aggressive tactics of their own.

      Footage captured by The New York Times showed Turkish security forces standing aside to allow migrants to tear down part of a fence dividing Turkey and Greece. And other footage emerged of a Turkish vessel pursuing a Greek coast guard vessel in the Aegean, and of a Turkish armored vehicle ramming a border fence between the two countries.

      The Turkish Interior Ministry then sent more guards to the border — not to prevent people from leaving without documents, but to stop Greece from returning them by force, according to the Turkish interior minister, Suleyman Soylu.

      The confrontation marked a low point in relations between two neighbors who have long had a fragile coexistence within NATO, and it threatened to upend a fine balance in the strategically important, energy-rich southeastern Mediterranean.

      It also brought front and center the European Union’s dependence on Turkey to limit the movement of migrants toward its territory, as well as Mr. Erdogan’s willingness to weaponize migrants for his own purposes.

      But experts said Mr. Erdogan’s mobilization of migrants and security forces at the borders with Europe could have backfired, being so provocative that it may have made European politicians less willing to make concessions.

      “The problem is that because of the blackmail used by Turkey, getting an agreement from the European Council is going to be more difficult,” said Mr. Pierini, who is now an analyst for Carnegie Europe, a research organization.

      The European Union in 2016 agreed to funnel 6 billion euros to organizations helping the nearly four million Syrian refugees in Turkey, in exchange for Turkey’s help in securing its borders with Greece.

      That deal came after nearly one million refugees left Turkey for Greece, allowing them to reach the Continent’s prosperous north relatively easily.

      But Turkey has complained that European funding has been slow in coming, and has been paid to aid groups as well as into its own government coffers, making it less efficient. At a meeting in Brussels this week, European Union leaders discussed with Mr. Erdogan whether the agreement would be extended and how to restore it.

      Ursula von der Leyen, the president of the European Commission, said the meeting with Mr. Erdogan on Monday had been a “good start” in restoring normalcy at the Greek-Turkish borders.

      “Migrants need support, Greece needs support but also Turkey needs support, and this involves finding a path forward with Turkey,” she said. “Clearly we have our disagreements but we have spoken plainly and we have spoken openly to each other about these.”

      https://twitter.com/vonderleyen/status/1237119313447923712?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E12

      The European Union is likely to eventually agree to send more money to Turkey to help with challenges posed by the refugee influx, Mr. Pierini said.

      But European leaders have taken a dim view of Mr. Erdogan’s latest showmanship, and may have become even more reluctant to accede to other Turkish diplomatic priorities, Mr. Pierini added. Those include an expansion of the Turkey’s joint customs union with Europe, and further visa reforms for Turkish nationals.

      The awkward coexistence between Greece and Turkey since the mid-1990s, when the two countries came close to war, could be at even greater risk of lasting damage.

      “Greek-Turkish détente has been one of the cornerstones of geostrategic relations in the southeastern Mediterranean — and the potential of this collapsing is alarming to the region and Western allies,” said Ian Lesser, the vice president of the German Marshall Fund.

      He said that the escalation had unleashed forces that may not be easy to manage.

      “Once someone opens up Pandora’s box, in an environment when you have proxy groups, coast guards, criminal traffickers, many actors who may not be fully under the control of governments, there is always the potential to go wrong,” Mr. Lesser said.

      “That’s true in Syria but it’s also true on the Greek-Turkish border,” he added.

      https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/13/world/europe/turkey-greece-border-migrants.html

    • Que sait-on de ces photos montrant des migrants quasi nus à la frontière gréco-turque ?

      Des images publiées par la chaîne turque TRT accusent la police grecque de frapper et de dépouiller des migrants. Propagande, répond Athènes. Les témoignages accablant les policiers grecs sont pourtant nombreux.

      CheckNews a retrouvé l’auteur de ces images : il s’agit du photographe Belal Khaled, qui travaille pour la chaîne turque TRT World. Joint par CheckNews, il a accepté de nous transmettre les originaux de plusieurs photos et vidéos, dont nous avons pu extraire les métadonnées. Elles montrent que ces photographies ont été prises le 5 mars 2020, entre 18 h 30 et 20 h, à quelques mètres de la frontière greco-turque, près de la ville d’Uzunköprü, dans la province d’Edirne.

      Belal Khaled raconte y avoir croisé plusieurs groupes de migrants originaires de divers pays (Afghanistan, Pakistan, Syrie, Irak, Maroc…) : « Ils revenaient de Grèce vers la Turquie. Cette zone est actuellement sèche, donc les migrants peuvent passer en marchant. Ils ont été arrêtés en Grèce, parfois à la proximité de la frontière, d’autres dans des villages ou même à 100 kilomètres dans le pays, puis ont été ramenés par les policiers grecs à la frontière. » Des vues satellites consultées à l’aide du logiciel Google Earth Pro permettent de se rendre compte que le fleuve Evros (en turc Meriç) peut atteindre un faible niveau à certaines périodes de l’année.

      Le photographe a également filmé des images pour la chaîne de télévision turque TRT, dans laquelle des migrants accusent des soldats grecs de les avoir battus et dépouillés de leur argent, de leurs téléphones et de leurs vêtements.

      Des anti-migrants dénoncent une mise en scène, sans preuve

      Suite à la diffusion de ces images, des internautes hostiles à l’arrivée de nouveaux migrants en Europe ont dénoncé des mises en scène de la part de la chaîne de télévision turque. Selon eux, les hommes se seraient dévêtus peu avant d’être photographiés.

      Ils soulignent également que sur cette photo, un homme torse nu sourit. Une preuve, selon eux, qu’il ne s’agit pas de « vrais migrants », mais de propagandistes voulant nuire à l’image de la Grèce.

      CheckNews a observé de près les photos et vidéos de Belal Khaled. En comparant les visages des hommes présents sur la série prise par Belal Khaled, il apparaît que l’homme au t-shirt blanc n’est pas la même personne que l’homme entouré sur une autre photo. Les métadonnées des photos indiquent que la première image (avec l’homme en tee-shirt) a été prise à 18 h 24, tandis que celle montrant le groupe d’hommes autour du feu a été faite à 19 h 31.

      Nous avons également remarqué que le groupe présent sur les photos avec l’homme en tee-shirt blanc n’est pas le même que celui en sous-vêtements. Belal Khaled explique : « Il y avait deux groupes. Si vous observez la lumière dans la vidéo, elle est plus sombre quand il y a le groupe venu par la rivière, car il est arrivé plus tard, mais les monteurs l’ont mis au début de la vidéo [du reportage de TRT] pour commencer l’histoire. L’autre groupe [avec l’homme en tee-shirt blanc, ndlr] est celui que nous avons vu en arrivant. Nous les avons trouvés assis dans l’herbe, certains d’entre eux étaient quasiment nus, d’autres portaient des vêtements. »

      Quant aux accusations de mise en scène, prouvées selon les internautes anti-migrants par les rires des hommes près de la rivière, le photographe répond : « Si nous avions voulu falsifier nos images, nous n’aurions pas diffusé celles avec des gens qui sourient. C’est pour cela qu’on peut dire que ce sont des vraies photos. C’est normal qu’ils sourient. Je ne sais pas pourquoi ils rient ou de quoi ils parlaient, mais ils peuvent se dire : "Regarde, il prend une photo de toi !" et ça les fait sourire. »

      Contacté par CheckNews, un représentant du gouvernement grec estime que « les documents de propagande turcs ont été réfutés à plusieurs reprises par le porte-parole du gouvernement, Stelios Petsas. Quant à la vidéo présentée par la chaîne d’Etat turque, il suffit de la regarder pour pouvoir la juger. »
      Des témoignages récoltés par des ONG et le New York Times accablent les policiers grecs

      Si le gouvernement grec refuse d’accorder de la valeur aux images capturées par la chaîne turque TRT, les témoignages rapportant des abus des forces grecques à l’égard des migrants sont cependant nombreux.

      CheckNews a ainsi pu retrouver sur Twitter plusieurs photos et vidéos de migrants torse nu et affichant des traces de coups sur leurs dos. Et qui accusent les forces de sécurité grecques de les avoir battus.

      L’auteur de ces tweets est Mohammed Yaşar, un Turc qui travaille pour le groupe de solidarité Tarlabasi, une ONG basée à Uzunköprü qui vient en aide aux migrants en leur fournissant des couvertures et vêtements. Il dit avoir observé le retour de personnes sans vêtements depuis le 3 mars, et publie depuis des vidéos qu’il a lui-même réalisées au contact des migrants maltraités, pour « montrer à tous les peuples du monde comment la Grèce agit et pour que ça cesse ». Il a accepté de nous fournir les fichiers originaux, dont les métadonnées confirment que les images ont bien été prises entre le 4 et le 8 mars 2020, le long de la frontière turque.

      Dans une enquête parue le 10 mars, le New York Times révèle l’existence d’un site secret en Grèce, où les migrants sont « détenus en secret et sans accès à un recours juridique ». Le journal américain note aussi, photo à l’appui, que « plusieurs migrants ont déclaré dans des interviews qu’ils avaient été capturés, dépouillés de leurs biens, battus et expulsés de Grèce sans avoir eu la possibilité de demander l’asile ou de parler à un avocat, dans le cadre d’une procédure illégale connue sous le nom de refoulement ». Le porte-parole du gouvernement, Stelios Petsas, a réagi à l’enquête en réfutant : « Il n’y a pas de centre de détention secret en Grèce. » Avant d’ajouter que si un journal international connaît le site, c’est qu’il n’est pas secret.

      Interrogé sur de tels faits de maltraitance, le directeur adjoint de la division Crises et conflits à Human Rights Watch, Gerry Simpson, déclare à CheckNews, après deux jours d’observation près de la frontière greco-turque : « Nous disposons de preuves importantes provenant de réfugiés et de Turcs vivant dans les villages frontaliers, qui s’occupent des personnes expulsées de Grèce. Ils racontent que depuis la fin du mois de février, du côté grec, des personnes habillées en uniforme et en tenue civile ont battu et volé des réfugiés. » Dans un tweet publié le 8 mars, Gerry Simpson ajoute que « les forces grecques de sécurité aux frontières ont déshabillé et battu des réfugiés avant de les expulser presque nus avec ce genre de blessures », en postant une des photos de Belal Khaled. Dans un rapport publié en juillet 2018, l’ONG de défense des droits humains avait déjà dénoncé les « conditions inhumaines » auxquelles étaient exposés les migrants dans les centres d’accueil et de détention grecs, ainsi que les « abus et mauvais traitements » causés par la police.

      https://www.liberation.fr/checknews/2020/03/13/que-sait-on-de-ces-photos-montrant-des-migrants-quasi-nus-a-la-frontiere-

    • Turkey to Close Land Borders With Greece, Bulgaria Due to #Coronavirus

      Turkey’s state broadcaster TRT Haber said on Wednesday afternoon that the country’s land borders with Greece and Bulgaria will be closed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

      Thus Turkey’s borders with the European Union will remain closed to the entry and exit of people; however the usual trade which goes on between these countries is not expected to be interrupted.

      It is still unknown for how long the borders will remain closed.

      Later on Wednesday, the Interior Ministry of the country issued a statement, confirming the border closure.

      It remains to be seen if this will affect the border tensions in Evros due to the massed thousands of migrants which have been trying to enter Greece since late February.

      https://greece.greekreporter.com/2020/03/18/turkey-to-close-land-borders-with-greece-bulgaria-due-to-coron
      #fermeture_des_frontières

    • Locals on tractors assist Greek Army and Police along the Evros (video)

      With their farming tractors and headlights on, local residents moved to help the Greek army and police along the Evros river, the natural border to Turkey, to prevent illegal crossing from the Turkish border into Greece.
      Others have gathered to the South Evros with their vehicles and see themselves also as assistants to the Greek Army.

      According to a report by ccn-greece, almost the majority of the locals are on the point on Tuesday night, March 3.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sSOsSJ182Tk&feature=emb_logo


      Some of the citizens who patrol in area “have a rifle,” and abuse migrants when they find them, cnn-greece reported the other day.

      Tuesday was a rather quite day at the Greek-Turkish border, although still q,500 people attempted to enter into Greece and 32 from Afghanistan and Pakistan managed it. They were arrested on the spot.

      After it became clear that the border crossing in Kastanies in the north of Evros s will not open, apparently Turkish authorities changes their plans and decided to move migrants to the south at Evros Delta. Buses were made available on Tuesday for this purpose.

      Several migrants told Greek media reports currently on the Turkish side, that they would try to cross the Evros river by boat.

      One migrant told Star TV that they will get the boats by the Turkish forces in the area. “Children and women will go back to Istanbul,” he said. “Mass crossing of the river will take place happen within or in a week,” he added.

      “It is our duty to support the authorities’ efforts, so that it is clear to everybody and especially Turkey, that Greece is a place where everyone comes in. This should have been done from the first moment, when the problem arose in 2015,” a farmer who joined the patrols with his tractor told protothema. “We are farmers, but we also live at the borders region,” the farmer added.

      In facts, the whole Farmers Association has decided to assist the army and police wherever possible.

      A total of 26,000 people were prevented from entering Greek territory via the Evros from Saturday morning to Tuesday afternoon. More than 218 people have been arrested since Saturday. They were immediately arrested, taken to court and sentence in the average to three to four y

      ears, some with an additional fine of 10,000 euros.

      https://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2020/03/04/evros-citizens-tractors-patrols-greece-turkey-migration
      #milices #milices_privées

    • Les migrants évacués de la frontière gréco-turque et placés en #quarantaine

      Le Premier ministre grec a indiqué vendredi que les migrants massés depuis début mars à la frontière terrestre entre la Grèce et la Turquie avaient quitté les lieux, à leur demande et pour se protéger, selon l’agence turque DHA, de la pandémie de coronavirus.

      « Il semble que le campement installé (depuis le 1er mars) a été démantelé et ceux qui étaient (dans la région frontalière du fleuve) Evros sont partis », a indiqué Kyriakos Mitsotakis lors d’une vidéoconférence du conseil des ministres.

      Le ministre turc de l’Intérieur Suleyman Soylu avait indiqué jeudi que 4600 migrants continuaient de camper près du poste frontalier grec de Kastanies, du côté turc.

      Mais jeudi soir, les demandeurs d’asile ont été transférés à bord d’autocars vers des installations adéquates en Turquie pour qu’ils restent en quarantaine pendant deux semaines afin de garantir qu’ils ne soient pas contaminés par le virus Covid-19, a rapporté l’agence turque DHA. Cette évacuation a eu lieu « à la demande des migrants », selon DHA.
      Le campement brûlé

      De son côté, la télévision publique grecque ERT a indiqué que la police turque avait mis le feu dans la nuit de jeudi à vendredi au campement désert après l’évacuation des demandeurs d’asile. Une vidéo diffusée vendredi par le gouvernement grec montre de hautes flammes le long des barrières qui marquent la frontière.

      Le Premier ministre grec a souligné que les militaires et les policiers grecs resteraient sur place et que la clôture le long de la frontière serait « renforcée ». « Un chapitre est peut-être clos mais la bataille continue », a encore déclaré Kyriakos Mitsotakis.
      Certains sont détenus en Grèce

      En quête de soutien en Syrie, la Turquie avait annoncé le 29 février qu’elle n’empêcherait plus les migrants de passer en Europe et des milliers de demandeurs d’asile s’étaient aussitôt massés à Pazrakule, du côté turc de la frontière.

      La Grèce avait alors demandé et obtenu l’aide de l’Union européenne pour empêcher les demandeurs d’asile de traverser la frontière.

      Les forces antiémeutes grecques dépêchées à Kastanies avaient fait usage de gaz lacrymogènes pour repousser les migrants. Mais certains qui avaient réussi à passer sur le sol grec sont depuis détenus dans des camps fermés en Grèce ou ont été refoulés en Turquie, selon des ONG, qui ont dénoncé des « pratiques illégales »