• How Frontex Helps Haul Migrants Back To Libyan Torture Camps

    Refugees are being detained, tortured and killed at camps in Libya. Investigative reporting by DER SPIEGEL and its partners has uncovered how close the European Union’s border agency Frontex works together with the Libyan coast guard.

    At sunrise, Alek Musa was still in good spirits. On the morning of June 25, 2020, he crowded onto an inflatable boat with 69 other people seeking asylum. Most of the refugees were Sudanese like him. They had left the Libyan coastal city of Garabulli the night before. Their destination: the island of Lampedusa in Italy. Musa wanted to escape the horrors of Libya, where migrants like him are captured, tortured and killed by militias.

    The route across the central Mediterranean is one of the world’s most dangerous for migrants. Just last week, another 100 people died as they tried to reach Europe from Libya. Musa was confident, nonetheless. The sea was calm and there was plenty of fuel in the boat’s tank.

    But then, between 9 a.m. and 10 a.m., Musa saw a small white plane in the sky. He shared his story by phone. There is much to suggest that the aircraft was a patrol of the European border protection agency Frontex. Flight data shows that a Frontex pilot had been circling in the immediate vicinity of the boat at the time.

    However, it appears that Frontex officials didn’t instruct any of the nearby cargo ships to help the refugees – and neither did the sea rescue coordination centers. Instead, hours later, Musa spotted the Ras Al Jadar on the horizon, a Libyan coast guard vessel.

    With none of them wanting to be hauled back to Libya, the migrants panicked. "We tried to leave as quickly as possible,” says Musa, who won’t give his real name out of fear of retaliation.

    Musa claims the Libyans rammed the dinghy with their ship. And that four men had gone overboard. Images from an aircraft belonging to the private rescue organization Sea-Watch show people fighting for their lives in the water. At least two refugees are believed to have died in the operation. All the others were taken back to Libya.
    Frontex Has Turned the Libyans into Europe’s Interceptors

    The June 25 incident is emblematic of the Europeans’ policy in the Mediterranean: The EU member states ceased sea rescue operations entirely in 2019. Instead, they are harnessing the Libyan coast guard to keep people seeking protection out of Europe.

    The European Court of Human Rights ruled back in 2012 that refugees may not be brought back to Libya because they are threatened with torture and death there. But that’s exactly what Libyan border guards are doing. With the help of the Europeans, they are intercepting refugees and hauling them back to Libya. According to an internal EU document, 11,891 were intercepted and taken back ashore last year.

    The EU provides financing for the Libyan coast guard and has trained its members. To this day, though, it claims not to control their operations. “Frontex has never directly cooperated with the Libyan coast guard,” Fabrice Leggeri, the head of the border agency, told the European Parliament in March. He claimed that the Libyans alone were responsible for the controversial interceptions. Is that really the truth, though?

    Together with the media organization “Lighthouse Reports”, German public broadcaster ARD’s investigative magazine “Monitor” and the French daily “Libération”, DER SPIEGEL has investigated incidents in the central Mediterranean Sea over a period of months. The reporters collected position data from Frontex aircraft and cross-checked it with ship data and information from migrants and civilian rescue organizations. They examined confidential documents and spoke to survivors as well as nearly a dozen Libyan officers and Frontex staff.

    This research has exposed for the first time the extent of the cooperation between Frontex and the Libyan coast guard. Europe’s border protection agency is playing an active role in the interceptions conducted by the Libyans. The reporting showed that Frontex flew over migrant boats on at least 20 occasions since January 2020 before the Libyan coast guard hauled them back. At times, the Libyans drove deep in the Maltese Search and Rescue Zone, an area over which the Europeans have jurisdiction.

    Some 91 refugees died in the interceptions or are considered missing – in part because the system the Europeans have established causes significant delays in the interceptions. In most cases, merchant ships or even those of aid organizations were in the vicinity. They would have reached the migrant boats more quickly, but they apparently weren’t alerted. Civilian sea rescue organizations have complained for years that they are hardly ever provided with alerts from Frontex.

    The revelations present a problem for Frontex head Leggeri. He is already having to answer for his agency’s involvement in the illegal repatriation of migrants in the Aegean Sea that are referred to as pushbacks. Now it appears that Frontex is also bending the law in operations in the central Mediterranean.

    An operation in March cast light on how the Libyans operate on the high seas. The captain of the Libyan vessel Fezzan, a coast guard officer, agreed to allow a reporter with DER SPIEGEL to conduct a ride-along on the ship. During the trip, he held a crumpled piece of paper with the coordinates of the boats he was to intercept. He didn’t have any internet access on the ship – indeed, the private sea rescuers are better equipped.

    The morning of the trip, the crew of the Fezzan had already pulled around 200 migrants from the water. The Libyans decided to leave an unpowered wooden boat with another 200 people at sea because the Fezzan was already too full. The rescued people huddled on deck, their clothes soaked and their eyes filled with fear. "Stay seated!” the Libyan officers yelled.

    Sheik Omar, a 16-year-old boy from Gambia squatted at the bow. He explained how, after the death of his father, he struggled as a worker in Libya. Then he just wanted to get away from there. He had already attempted to reach Europe five times. "I’m afraid,” he said. "I don’t know where they’re taking me. It probably won’t be a good place.”

    The conditions in the Libyan detention camps are catastrophic. Some are officially under the control of the authorities, but various militias are actually calling the shots. Migrants are a good business for the groups, and refugees from sub-Saharan countries, especially, are imprisoned and extorted by the thousands.

    Mohammad Salim was aware of what awaited him in jail. He’s originally from Somalia and didn’t want to give his real name. Last June, he and around 90 other migrants tried to flee Libya by boat, but a Frontex airplane did a flyover above them early in the morning. Several merchant ships that could have taken them to Europe passed by. But then the Libyan coast guard arrived several hours later.

    Once back on land, the Somali was sent to the Abu Issa detention center, which is controlled by a notorious militia. “There was hardly anything to eat,” Salim reported by phone. On good days, he ate 18 pieces of maccaroni pasta. On other days, he sucked on toothpaste. The women had been forced by the guards to strip naked. Salim was only able to buy his freedom a month later, when his family had paid $1,200.

    The EU is well aware of the conditions in the Libyan refugee prisons. German diplomats reported "concentration camp-like conditions” in 2017. A February report from the EU’s External Action described widespread "sexual violence, abduction for ransom, forced labor and unlawful killings.” The report states that the perpetrators include "government officials, members of armed groups, smugglers, traffickers and members of criminal gangs.”

    Supplies for the business are provided by the Libyan coast guard, which is itself partly made up of militiamen.

    In response to a request for comment from DER SPIEGEL, Frontex asserted that it is the agency’s duty to inform all internationally recognized sea rescue coordination centers in the region about refugee boats, including the Joint Rescue Coordination Center (JRCC). The sea rescue coordination center reports to the Libyan Defense Ministry and is financed by the EU.

    According to official documents, the JRCC is located at the Tripoli airport. But members of the Libyan coast guard claim that the control center is only a small room at the Abu Sitta military base in Tripoli, with just two computers. They claim that it is actually officers with the Libyan coast guard who are on duty there. That the men there have no ability to monitor their stretch of coastline, meaning they would virtually be flying blind without the EU’s aerial surveillance. In the event of a shipping accident, they almost only notify their own colleagues, even though they currently only have two ships at their disposal. Even when their ships are closer, there are no efforts to inform NGOs or private shipping companies. Massoud Abdalsamad, the head of the JRCC and the commander of the coast guard even admits that, "The JRCC and the coast guard are one and the same, there is no difference.”

    WhatsApp Messages to the Coast Guard

    As such, experts are convinced that even the mere transfer of coordinates by Frontex to the JRCC is in violation of European law. "Frontex officials know that the Libyan coast guard is hauling refugees back to Libya and that people there face torture and inhumane treatment,” says Nora Markard, professor for international public law and international human rights at the University of Münster.

    In fact, it appears that Frontex employees are going one step further and sending the coordinates of the refugee boats directly to Libyan officers via WhatsApp. That claim has been made independently by three different members of the Libyan coast guard. DER SPIEGEL is in possession of screenshots indicating that the coast guard is regularly informed – and directly. One captain was sent a photo of a refugee boat taken by a Frontex plane. “This form of direct contact is a clear violation of European law,” says legal expert Markard.

    When confronted, Frontex no longer explicitly denied direct contact with the Libyan coast guard. The agency says it contacts everyone involved in emergency operations in order to save lives. And that form of emergency communication cannot be considered formal contact, a spokesman said.

    But officials at Frontex in Warsaw are conscious of the fact that their main objective is to help keep refugees from reaching Europe’s shores. They often watch on their screens in the situation center how boats capsize in the Mediterranean. It has already proven to be too much for some – they suffer from sleep disorders and psychological problems.

    https://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/libya-how-frontex-helps-haul-migrants-back-to-libyan-torture-camps-a-d62c396

    #Libye #push-backs #refoulements #Frontex #complicité #milices #gardes-côtes_libyens #asile #migrations #réfugiés #externalisation #Ras_Al_Jadar #interception #Fezzan #Joint_Rescue_Coordination_Center (#JRCC) #WhatsApp #coordonnées_géographiques

    ping @isskein @karine4 @rhoumour @_kg_ @i_s_

    • Frontex : l’agence européenne de garde-frontières au centre d’une nouvelle polémique

      Un consortium de médias européens, dont le magazine Der Spiegel et le journal Libération, a livré une nouvelle enquête accablante sur l’agence européenne des gardes-frontières. Frontex est accusée de refouler des bateaux de migrants en mer Méditerranée.

      Frontex, c’est quoi ?

      L’agence européenne des gardes-frontières et gardes-côtes a été créée en 2004 pour répondre à la demande d’aides des pays membres pour protéger les frontières extérieures de l’espace Schengen. Frontex a trois objectifs : réduire la vulnérabilité des frontières extérieures, garantir le bon fonctionnement et la sécurité aux frontières et maintenir les capacités du corps européen, recrutant chaque année près de 700 gardes-frontières et garde-côtes. Depuis la crise migratoire de 2015, le budget de l’agence, subventionné par l’Union Européen a explosé passant 142 à 460 millions d’euros en 2020.

      Nouvelles accusations

      Frontex est de nouveau au centre d’une polémique au sein de l’UE. En novembre 2020, et en janvier 2021 déjà, Der Spiegel avait fait part de plusieurs refoulements en mer de bateaux de demandeurs d’asile naviguant entre la Turquie et la Grèce et en Hongrie. Dans cette enquête le magazine allemand avait averti que les responsables de Frontex étaient"conscients des pratiques illégales des gardes-frontières grecs et impliqués dans les refoulements eux-mêmes" (https://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/eu-border-agency-frontex-complicit-in-greek-refugee-pushback-campaign-a-4b6c).

      A la fin de ce mois d’avril, de nouveaux éléments incriminants Frontex révélés par un consortium de médias vont dans le même sens : des agents de Frontex auraient donné aux gardes-côtes libyens les coordonnées de bateaux de réfugiés naviguant en mer Méditerranée pour qu’ils soient interceptés avant leurs arrivées sur le sol européen. C’est ce que l’on appelle un « pushback » : refouler illégalement des migrants après les avoir interceptés, violant le droit international et humanitaire. L’enquête des médias européens cite un responsable d’Amnesty International, Mateo de Bellis qui précise que « sans les informations de Frontex, les gardes-côtes libyens ne pourraient jamais intercepter autant de migrants ».

      Cet arrangement entre les autorités européennes et libyennes « constitue une violation manifeste du droit européen », a déclaré Nora Markard, experte en droit international de l’université de Münster, citée par Der Spiegel.

      Une politique migratoire trop stricte de l’UE ?

      En toile de fond, les détracteurs de Frontex visent également la ligne politique de l’UE en matière d’immigration, jugée trop stricte. Est-ce cela qui aurait généré le refoulement de ces bateaux ? La Commissaire européenne aux affaires intérieures, Ylva Johansson, s’en défendait en janvier dernier, alors que Frontex était déjà accusé d’avoir violé le droit international et le droit humanitaire en refoulant six migrants en mer Egée. « Ce que nous protégeons, lorsque nous protégeons nos frontières, c’est l’Union européenne basée sur des valeurs et nous devons respecter nos engagements à ces valeurs tout en protégeant nos frontières (...) Et c’est une des raisons pour lesquelles nous avons besoin de Frontex », expliquait la Commissaire à euronews.

      Pour Martin Martiniello, spécialiste migration à l’université de Liège, « l’idée de départ de l’Agence Frontex était de contrôler les frontières européennes avec l’espoir que cela soit accompagné d’une politique plus positive, plus proactive de l’immigration. Cet aspect-là ne s’est pas développé au cours des dernières années, mais on a construit cette notion de crise migratoire. Et cela renvoie une image d’une Europe assiégée, qui doit se débarrasser des migrants non souhaités. Ce genre de politique ne permet pas de rencontrer les défis globaux des déplacements de population à long terme ».

      Seulement trois jours avant la parution de l’enquête des médias européens incriminant Frontex, L’Union européenne avait avancé sa volonté d’accroître et de mieux encadrer les retours volontaires des personnes migrantes, tout en reconnaissant que cet axe politique migratoire était, depuis 2019, un échec. L’institution avait alors proposé à Frontex un nouveau mandat pour prendre en charge ces retours. Selon Martin Martiniello, « des montants de plus en plus élevés ont été proposés, pour financer Frontex. Même si le Parlement européen a refusé de voter ce budget, celui-ci comporte de la militarisation encore plus importante de l’espace méditerranéen, avec des drones et tout ce qui s’en suit. Et cela fait partie d’une politique européenne ».

      Les accusations de novembre et janvier derniers ont généré l’ouverture d’une enquête interne chez Frontex, mais aussi à l’Office européen de lutte antifraude (OLAF). Pour Catherine Woolard, directrice du Conseil européen des Réfugiés et Exilés (ECRE), « On voit tout le problème des structures de gouvernance de Frontex : ce sont les États membres qui font partie du conseil d’administration et de gestion de Frontex, et ces États membres ont fait une enquête préliminaire. Mais cette enquête ne peut pas être profonde et transparente, puisque ces États membres sont parties prenantes dans ce cas de figure ».

      Pour la directrice de l’ECRE, une enquête indépendante serait une solution pour comprendre et réparer les torts causés, et suggère une réforme du conseil d’administration de Frontex. « La décision du Parlement concernant le budget est importante. En plus des enquêtes internes, le Parlement a créé un groupe de travail pour reformer le scrutin au sein du conseil administratif de l’agence, ce qui est essentiel. Nous attendons le rapport de ce groupe de travail, qui permettra de rendre compte de la situation chez Frontex ».

      Certains députés européens ont demandé la démission du directeur exécutif de Frontex. « C’est un sujet sensible » souligne Catherine Woolard. « Dans le contexte de l’augmentation des ressources de Frontex, le recrutement d’agents de droits fondamentaux, ainsi que les mesures et mécanismes mentionnés, sont essentiels. Le Parlement européen insiste sur la création de ces postes et n’a toujours pas eu de réponse de la part du directeur de Frontex. Entretemps, l’agence a toujours l’obligation de faire un rapport sur les incidents où il y a une suspicion de violation du droit international et humanitaire ».

      https://www.levif.be/actualite/europe/frontex-l-agence-europeenne-de-garde-frontieres-au-centre-d-une-nouvelle-polemique/article-normal-1422403.html?cookie_check=1620307471

  • Rückführung illegaler MigrantenNGOs üben scharfe Kritik an Nehammers Balkan-Plänen

    Österreich hat mit Bosnien die Rückführung illegaler Migranten vereinbart, Nehammer sagte Unterstützung zu. Laut NGOs mache sich Österreich damit „zum Komplizen eines Völkerrechtsbruches“.

    Innenminister #Karl_Nehammer (ÖVP) hat am Mittwoch seine Westbalkanreise fortgesetzt und mit Bosnien einen Rückführungsplan für irreguläre Migranten vereinbart. Mit dem Sicherheitsminister von Bosnien und Herzegowina, #Selmo_Cikotić, unterzeichnete er eine Absichtserklärung. Scharfe Kritik äußerten mehrere Initiativen in Österreich. Außerdem kündigte Nehammer an, dass Österreich für das abgebrannte Camp #Lipa 500.000 Euro bereitstellt, damit dieses winterfest gemacht wird.

    Die Arbeiten dazu haben laut dem Innenministerium bereits begonnen, mit dem Geld sollen ein Wasser- und Abwassernetz sowie Stromanschlüsse errichtet werden. Im Dezember war die Lage in Bihać eskaliert, nachdem das Camp Lipa im Nordwesten des Landes kurz vor Weihnachten von der Internationalen Organisation für Migration (IOM) geräumt worden war – mit der Begründung, dass es die bosnischen Behörden nicht winterfest gemacht hätten. Kurz darauf brannten die Zelte aus, den damaligen Berichten zufolge hatten Bewohner das Feuer selbst gelegt. Beobachter gehen davon aus, dass auch die Einheimischen das Feuer aus Wut auf die Flüchtenden gelegt haben könnten.

    Charterflüge für Migranten ohne Bleibechancen

    Zentrales Ziel der Balkanreise von Innenminister Nehammer ist die Erarbeitung von Rückführungsplänen mit den besuchten Ländern. Migranten ohne Bleibewahrscheinlichkeit, die laut Nehammer auch ein Sicherheitsproblem sind, sollen bereits von den Balkanländern in die Herkunftsländer zurückgebracht werden. Mit Bosnien wurde bereits ein Charterflug vereinbart. Damit zeige man den Menschen, dass es nicht sinnvoll sei, Tausende Euro in die Hände von Schleppern zu legen, ohne die Aussicht auf eine Bleibeberechtigung in der EU zu haben, betonte Nehammer.

    Die geplanten Rückführungen sollen über die im vergangenen Sommer bei der Ministerkonferenz in Wien angekündigte „Plattform gegen illegale Migration“ operativ organisiert werden. In die Koordinierungsplattform für Migrationspolitik mehrerer EU-Länder – darunter Deutschland – sowie der Westbalkanstaaten wird auch die EU-Kommission miteinbezogen.
    Beamte sollen im „Eskortentraining“ geschult werden

    Bosnien hat bereits auch konkrete Anliegen für Unterstützung vorgebracht. So sollen 50 sogenannte „Rückführungsspezialisten“ in Österreich trainiert werden. Diese sind bei Abschiebungen und freiwilligen Ausreisen für die Sicherheit in den Flugzeugen zuständig. Bei diesem sogenannten Eskortentraining werden die bosnischen Beamten theoretisch und praktisch geschult, in Absprache mit Frontex und unter Miteinbeziehung der Cobra, berichtete Berndt Körner, stellvertretender Exekutivdirektor von Frontex.

    „Wir helfen bei der Ausbildung, vermitteln Standards, das ändert aber nichts an der Verantwortlichkeit, die bleibt in den jeweiligen Ländern“, sagte er im Gespräch mit der APA. Es gehe darum, dass „alle internationalen Standards eingehalten werden“, betonte der österreichische Spitzenbeamte.
    NGOs sehen „falsches Zeichen“

    Scharfe Kritik an dem von Nehammer geplanten „Rückführungsplan“ übten unterdessen zahlreiche Initiativen aus der Zivilgesellschaft. „Wenn Österreich den Westbalkanländern helfen will, dann soll es diese Länder beim Aufbau von rechtsstaatlichen Asylverfahren unterstützen. Wenn allerdings Menschen, die in diesen Ländern keine fairen Verfahren erwarten können, einfach abgeschoben werden sollen und Österreich dabei hilft, macht es sich zum Komplizen eines Völkerrechtsbruches“, kritisierte etwa Maria Katharina Moser, Direktorin der Diakonie Österreich, in einer Aussendung.

    „Die Vertiefung der Zusammenarbeit mit der EU-Agentur Frontex ist ein falsches Zeichen“, erklärte Lukas Gahleitner-Gertz, Sprecher der NGO Asylkoordination Österreich. „Die Vorwürfe gegen Frontex umfassen inzwischen unterschiedlichste Bereiche von unterlassener Hilfeleistung über Beteiligung an illegalen Push-backs bis zur Verschwendung von Steuergeldern bei ausufernden Betriebsfeiern. Statt auf die strikte Einhaltung der völker- und menschenrechtlichen Verpflichtungen zu pochen, stärkt Österreich der umstrittenen Grenztruppe den Rücken.“

    „Im Flüchtlingsschutz müssen wir immer die Menschen im Auge haben, die Schutz suchen. Ich habe bei meiner Reise nach Bosnien selbst gesehen, unter welchen Bedingungen Geflüchtete leben müssen. Für mich ist klar: Diejenigen, die Schutz vor Verfolgung brauchen, müssen durch faire Asylverfahren zu ihrem Recht kommen“, sagte Erich Fenninger, Direktor der Volkshilfe Österreich und Sprecher der Plattform für eine menschliche Asylpolitik.

    https://www.kleinezeitung.at/politik/innenpolitik/5972469/Rueckfuehrung-illegaler-Migranten_NGOs-ueben-scharfe-Kritik-an

    #Autriche #Bosnie #accord #accord_bilatéral #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Balkans #renvois #route_des_Balkans #expulsions #Nehammer #Selmo_Cikotic #externalisation #camp_de_réfugiés #encampement #IOM #OIM #vols #charter #dissuasion #Plattform_gegen_illegale_Migration #machine_à_expulsion #Rückführungsspezialisten #spécialistes_du_renvoi (tentative de traduction de „Rückführungsspezialisten“) #avions #Eskortentraining #Frontex #Cobra #Berndt_Körner

  • #Campagnes de #dissuasion massive

    Pour contraindre à l’#immobilité les candidats à la migration, jugés indésirables, les gouvernements occidentaux ne se contentent pas depuis les années 1990 de militariser leurs frontières et de durcir leur législation. Aux stratégies répressives s’ajoutent des méthodes d’apparence plus consensuelle : les campagnes d’information multimédias avertissant des #dangers du voyage.

    « Et au lieu d’aller de l’avant, il pensa à rentrer. Par le biais d’un serment, il dit à son cousin décédé : “Si Dieu doit m’ôter la vie, que ce soit dans mon pays bien-aimé.” » Cette #chanson en espagnol raconte le périple d’un Mexicain qui, ayant vu son cousin mourir au cours du voyage vers les États-Unis, se résout à rebrousser chemin. Enregistrée en 2008 grâce à des fonds gouvernementaux américains, elle fut envoyée aux radios de plusieurs pays d’Amérique centrale par une agence de #publicité privée, laquelle se garda bien de révéler l’identité du commanditaire (1).

    Arme de découragement typiquement américaine ? Plusieurs États européens recourent eux aussi à ces méthodes de #communication_dissuasive, en particulier depuis la « crise » des réfugiés de l’été 2015. En #Hongrie comme au #Danemark, les pouvoirs publics ont financé des publicités dans des quotidiens libanais et jordaniens. « Les Hongrois sont hospitaliers, mais les sanctions les plus sévères sont prises à l’encontre de ceux qui tentent d’entrer illégalement en Hongrie », lisait-on ici. « Le Parlement danois vient d’adopter un règlement visant à réduire de 50 % les prestations sociales pour les réfugiés nouvellement arrivés », apprenait-on là (2). En 2017, plusieurs #artistes ouest-africains dansaient et chantaient dans un #clip intitulé #Bul_Sank_sa_Bakane_bi (« Ne risque pas ta vie »). « L’immigration est bonne si elle est légale », « Reste en Afrique pour la développer, il n’y a pas mieux qu’ici », « Jeunesse, ce que tu ignores, c’est qu’à l’étranger ce n’est pas aussi facile que tu le crois », clamait cette chanson financée par le gouvernement italien dans le cadre d’une opération de l’#Organisation_internationale_pour_les_migrations (#OIM) baptisée « #Migrants_conscients » (3).

    « Pourquoi risquer votre vie ? »

    Ces campagnes qui ciblent des personnes n’ayant pas encore tenté de rejoindre l’Occident, mais susceptibles de vouloir le faire, insistent sur l’inutilité de l’immigration irrégulière (ceux qui s’y essaient seront systématiquement renvoyés chez eux) et sur les rigueurs de l’« État-providence ». Elles mettent en avant les dangers du voyage, la dureté des #conditions_de_vie dans les pays de transit et de destination, les #risques de traite, de trafic, d’exploitation ou tout simplement de mort. Point commun de ces mises en scène : ne pas évoquer les politiques restrictives qui rendent l’expérience migratoire toujours plus périlleuse. Elles cherchent plutôt à agir sur les #choix_individuels.

    Déployées dans les pays de départ et de transit, elles prolongent l’#externalisation du contrôle migratoire (4) et complètent la surveillance policière des frontières par des stratégies de #persuasion. L’objectif de #contrôle_migratoire disparaît sous une terminologie doucereuse : ces campagnes sont dites d’« #information » ou de « #sensibilisation », un vocabulaire qui les associe à des actions humanitaires, destinées à protéger les aspirants au départ. Voire à protéger les populations restées au pays des mensonges de leurs proches : une vidéo financée par la #Suisse (5) à destination du Cameroun enjoint ainsi de se méfier des récits des émigrés, supposés enjoliver l’expérience migratoire (« Ne croyez pas tout ce que vous entendez »).

    Initialement appuyées sur des médias traditionnels, ces actions se développent désormais via #Facebook, #Twitter ou #YouTube. En #Australie, le gouvernement a réalisé en 2014 une série de petits films traduits dans une quinzaine de langues parlées en Asie du Sud-Est, en Afghanistan et en Indonésie : « Pas question. Vous ne ferez pas de l’Australie votre chez-vous. » Des responsables militaires en treillis exposent d’un ton martial la politique de leur pays : « Si vous voyagez par bateau sans visa, vous ne pourrez jamais faire de l’Australie votre pays. Il n’y a pas d’exception. Ne croyez pas les mensonges des passeurs » (6).

    Les concepteurs ont sollicité YouTube afin que la plate-forme diffuse les #vidéos sous la forme de publicités précédant les contenus recherchés par des internautes susceptibles d’émigrer. Le recours aux #algorithmes permet en effet de cibler les utilisateurs dont le profil indique qu’ils parlent certaines langues, comme le farsi ou le vietnamien. De même, en privilégiant des vidéos populaires chez les #jeunes, YouTube facilite le #ciblage_démographique recherché. Par la suite, ces clips ont envahi les fils d’actualités Facebook de citoyens australiens issus de l’immigration, sélectionnés par l’#algorithme car ils parlent l’une des langues visées par la campagne. En s’adressant à ces personnes nées en Australie, les autorités espéraient qu’elles inviteraient elles-mêmes les ressortissants de leur pays d’origine à rester chez eux (7).

    C’est également vers Facebook que se tourne le gouvernement de la #Norvège en 2015. Accusé de passivité face à l’arrivée de réfugiés à la frontière russe, il finance la réalisation de deux vidéos, « Pourquoi risquer votre vie ? » et « Vous risquez d’être renvoyés » (8). Les utilisateurs du réseau social avaient initialement la possibilité de réagir, par le biais des traditionnels « j’aime » ou en postant des commentaires, ce qui aurait dû permettre une circulation horizontale, voire virale, de ces vidéos. Mais l’option fut suspendue après que la page eut été inondée de commentaires haineux issus de l’extrême droite, suscitant l’embarras de l’État.

    Ici encore, Facebook offre — ou plutôt, commercialise — la possibilité de cibler des jeunes hommes originaires d’Afghanistan, d’Éthiopie et d’Érythrée, dont le gouvernement norvégien considère qu’ils ne relèvent pas du droit d’asile. L’algorithme sélectionne en particulier les personnes situées hors de leur pays d’origine qui ont fait des recherches sur Internet dénotant leur intérêt pour l’Europe et la migration. Il s’agit de toucher des migrants en transit, qui hésitent quant à leur destination, et de les dissuader de choisir la Norvège. Les Syriens ne font pas partie des nationalités visées, afin de ne pas violer le droit d’asile. De même, le message mentionne explicitement que seuls les adultes seront refoulés, afin de ne pas contester le droit des enfants à être pris en charge.

    À plusieurs reprises, depuis 2015, les autorités belges ont elles aussi utilisé Facebook pour ce type d’initiatives (9). En 2018, des photographies de centres de détention et d’un jeune migrant menotté, assorties du slogan « Non à l’immigration illégale. Ne venez pas en #Belgique » (10), furent relayées à partir d’une page Facebook créée pour l’occasion par l’Office des étrangers. Cette page n’existait toutefois qu’en anglais, ce qui a fait croire à un faux (y compris parmi les forces de l’ordre), poussant le gouvernement belge à la supprimer au profit d’un site plus classique, humblement intitulé « Faits sur la Belgique » (11).

    Si de telles initiatives prolifèrent, c’est que les États européens sont engagés dans une course à la dissuasion qui les oppose les uns aux autres. Le 30 mai 2018, en France, M. Gérard Collomb, alors ministre de l’intérieur, affirmait lors d’une audition au Sénat que les migrants faisaient du « #benchmarking » pour identifier les pays les plus accueillants. Cette opinion semble partagée par ses pairs, et les États se montrent non seulement fermes, mais soucieux de le faire savoir.

    Le recours aux plates-formes de la Silicon Valley s’impose d’autant plus aisément que les autorités connaissent l’importance de ces outils dans le parcours des migrants. Une très large majorité d’entre eux sont en effet connectés. Ils dépendent de leur #téléphone_portable pour communiquer avec leur famille, se repérer grâce au #GPS, se faire comprendre par-delà les barrières linguistiques, conserver des photographies et des témoignages des atrocités qui justifient leur demande d’asile, appeler au secours en cas de naufrage ou de danger, ou encore retrouver des connaissances et des compatriotes dispersés.

    Un doute taraudait les autorités des États occidentaux : en connectant les individus et en leur facilitant l’accès à diverses sources d’information, les #technologies_numériques ne conféraient-elles pas une plus grande #autonomie aux migrants ? Ne facilitaient-elles pas en définitive l’immigration irrégulière (12) ? Dès lors, elles s’emploieraient à faire de ces mêmes outils la solution au problème : ils renseignent sur la #localisation et les caractéristiques des migrants, fournissant un canal privilégié de communication vers des publics ciblés.

    Systématiquement financées par les États occidentaux et impliquant de plus en plus souvent les géants du numérique, ces campagnes mobilisent aussi d’autres acteurs. Adopté sous les auspices de l’Organisation des Nations unies en 2018, le pacte mondial pour des migrations sûres, ordonnées et régulières (ou pacte de Marrakech) recommande ainsi de « mener des campagnes d’information multilingues et factuelles », d’organiser des « réunions de sensibilisation dans les pays d’origine », et ce notamment pour « mettre en lumière les risques qu’il y a à entreprendre une migration irrégulière pleine de dangers ». Le Haut-Commissariat pour les réfugiés (HCR) et l’OIM jouent donc le rôle d’intermédiaires privilégiés pour faciliter le financement de ces campagnes des États occidentaux en dehors de leur territoire.

    Efficacité douteuse

    Interviennent également des entreprises privées spécialisées dans le #marketing et la #communication. Installée à Hongkong, #Seefar développe des activités de « #communication_stratégique » à destination des migrants potentiels en Afghanistan ou en Afrique de l’Ouest. La société australienne #Put_It_Out_There_Pictures réalise pour sa part des vidéos de #propagande pour le compte de gouvernements occidentaux, comme le #téléfilm #Journey, qui met en scène des demandeurs d’asile tentant d’entrer clandestinement en Australie.

    Enfin, des associations humanitaires et d’aide au développement contribuent elles aussi à ces initiatives. Créée en 2015, d’abord pour secourir des migrants naufragés en Méditerranée, l’organisation non gouvernementale (ONG) #Proactiva_Open_Arms s’est lancée dans des projets de ce type en 2019 au Sénégal (13). Au sein des pays de départ, des pans entiers de la société se rallient à ces opérations : migrants de retour, journalistes, artistes, dirigeants associatifs et religieux… En Guinée, des artistes autrefois engagés pour l’ouverture des frontières militent à présent pour l’#immobilisation de leurs jeunes compatriotes (14).

    Le #discours_humanitaire consensuel qui argue de la nécessité de protéger les migrants en les informant facilite la coopération entre États, organisations internationales, secteurs privé et associatif. La plupart de ces acteurs sont pourtant étrangers au domaine du strict contrôle des frontières. Leur implication témoigne de l’extension du domaine de la lutte contre l’immigration irrégulière.

    Avec quelle #efficacité ? Il existe très peu d’évaluations de l’impact de ces campagnes. En 2019, une étude norvégienne (15) a analysé leurs effets sur des migrants en transit à Khartoum, avec des résultats peu concluants. Ils étaient peu nombreux à avoir eu connaissance des messages gouvernementaux et ils s’estimaient de toute manière suffisamment informés, y compris à propos des aspects les plus sombres de l’expérience migratoire. Compte tenu de la couverture médiatique des drames de l’immigration irrégulière, il paraît en effet vraisemblable que les migrants potentiels connaissent les risques… mais qu’ils migrent quand même.

    https://www.monde-diplomatique.fr/2021/03/PECOUD/62833
    #migrations #réfugiés #privatisation #Italie #humanitaire #soft_power

    –-

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur les #campagnes de #dissuasion à l’#émigration :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/763551

    ping @isskein @karine4 @_kg_ @rhoumour @etraces

  • The Death of Asylum and the Search for Alternatives

    March 2021 saw the announcement of the UK’s new post-Brexit asylum policy. This plan centres ‘criminal smuggling gangs’ who facilitate the cross border movement of people seeking asylum, particularly in this case, across the English Channel. It therefore distinguishes between two groups of people seeking asylum: those who travel themselves to places of potential sanctuary, and those who wait in a refugee camp near the place that they fled for the lottery ticket of UNHCR resettlement. Those who arrive ‘spontaneously’ will never be granted permanent leave to remain in the UK. Those in the privileged group of resettled refugees will gain indefinite leave to remain.

    Resettlement represents a tiny proportion of refugee reception globally. Of the 80 million displaced people globally at the end of 2019, 22,800 were resettled in 2020 and only 3,560 were resettled to the UK. Under the new plans, forms of resettlement are set to increase, which can only be welcomed. But of course, the expansion of resettlement will make no difference to people who are here, and arriving, every year. People who find themselves in a situation of persecution or displacement very rarely have knowledge of any particular national asylum system. Most learn the arbitrary details of access to work, welfare, and asylum itself upon arrival.

    In making smugglers the focus of asylum policy, the UK is inaugurating what Alison Mountz calls the death of asylum. There is of course little difference between people fleeing persecution who make the journey themselves to the UK, or those who wait in a camp with a small chance of resettlement. The two are often, in fact, connected, as men are more likely to go ahead in advance, making perilous journeys, in the hope that safe and legal options will then be opened up for vulnerable family members. And what makes these perilous journeys so dangerous? The lack of safe and legal routes.

    Britain, and other countries across Europe, North America and Australasia, have gone to huge efforts and massive expense in recent decades to close down access to the right to asylum. Examples of this include paying foreign powers to quarantine refugees outside of Europe, criminalising those who help refugees, and carrier sanctions. Carrier sanctions are fines for airlines or ferry companies if someone boards an aeroplane without appropriate travel documents. So you get the airlines to stop people boarding a plane to your country to claim asylum. In this way you don’t break international law, but you are certainly violating the spirit of it. If you’ve ever wondered why people pay 10 times the cost of a plane ticket to cross the Mediterranean or the Channel in a tiny boat, carrier sanctions are the reason.

    So government policy closes down safe and legal routes, forcing people to take more perilous journeys. These are not illegal journeys because under international law one cannot travel illegally if one is seeking asylum. Their only option becomes to pay smugglers for help in crossing borders. At this point criminalising smuggling becomes the focus of asylum policy. In this way, government policy creates the crisis which it then claims to solve. And this extends to people who are seeking asylum themselves.

    Arcane maritime laws have been deployed by the UK in order to criminalise irregular Channel crossers who breach sea defences, and therefore deny them sanctuary. Specifically, if one of the people aboard a given boat touches the tiller, oars, or steering device, they become liable to be arrested under anti-smuggling laws. In 2020, eight people were jailed on such grounds, facing sentences of up to two and a half years, as well as the subsequent threat of deportation. For these people, there are no safe and legal routes left.

    We know from extensive research on the subject, that poverty in a country does not lead to an increase in asylum applications elsewhere from that country. Things like wars, genocide and human rights abuses need to be present in order for nationals of a country to start seeking asylum abroad in any meaningful number. Why then, one might ask, is the UK so obsessed with preventing people who are fleeing wars, genocide and human rights abuses from gaining asylum here? On their own terms there is one central reason: their belief that most people seeking asylum today are not actually refugees, but economic migrants seeking to cheat the asylum system.

    This idea that people who seek asylum are largely ‘bogus’ began in the early 2000s. It came in response to a shift in the nationalities of people seeking asylum. During the Cold War there was little concern with the mix of motivations in relation to fleeing persecution or seeking a ‘better life’. But when people started to seek asylum from formerly colonised countries in the ‘Third World’ they began to be construed as ‘new asylum seekers’ and were assumed to be illegitimate. From David Blunkett’s time in the Home Office onwards, these ‘new asylum seekers’, primarily black and brown people fleeing countries in which refugee producing situations are occurring, asylum has been increasingly closed down.

    The UK government has tended to justify its highly restrictive asylum policies on the basis that it is open to abuse from bogus, cheating, young men. It then makes the lives of people who are awaiting a decision on their asylum application as difficult as possible on the basis that this will deter others. Forcing people who are here to live below the poverty line, then, is imagined to sever ‘pull factors’ for others who have not yet arrived. There is no evidence to support the idea that deterrence strategies work, they simply costs lives.

    Over the past two decades, as we have witnessed the slow death of asylum, it has become increasingly difficult to imagine alternatives. Organisations advocating for people seeking asylum have, with diminishing funds since 2010, tended to focus on challenging specific aspects of the system on legal grounds, such as how asylum support rates are calculated or whether indefinite detention is lawful.

    Scholars of migration studies, myself included, have written countless papers and books debunking the spurious claims made by the government to justify their policies, and criticising the underlying logics of the system. What we have failed to do is offer convincing alternatives. But with his new book, A Modern Migration Theory, Professor of Migration Studies Peo Hansen offers us an example of an alternative strategy. This is not a utopian proposal of open borders, this is the real experience of Sweden, a natural experiment with proven success.

    During 2015, large numbers of people were displaced as the Syrian civil war escalated. Most stayed within the region, with millions of people being hosted in Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon. A smaller proportion decided to travel onwards from these places to Europe. Because of the fortress like policies adopted by European countries, there were no safe and legal routes aboard aeroplanes or ferries. Horrified by the spontaneous arrival of people seeking sanctuary, most European countries refused to take part in burden sharing and so it fell to Germany and Sweden, the only countries that opened their doors in any meaningful way, to host the new arrivals.

    Hansen documents what happened next in Sweden. First, the Swedish state ended austerity in an emergency response to the challenge of hosting so many refugees. As part of this, and as a country that produces its own currency, the Swedish state distributed funds across the local authorities of the country to help them in receiving the refugees. And third, this money was spent not just on refugees, but on the infrastructure needed to support an increased population in a given area – on schools, hospitals, and housing. This is in the context of Sweden also having a welfare system which is extremely generous compared to Britain’s stripped back welfare regime.

    As in Britain, the Swedish government had up to this point spent some years fetishizing the ‘budget deficit’ and there was an assumption that spending so much money would worsen the fiscal position – that it would lead both to inflation, and a massive national deficit which must later be repaid. That this spending on refugees would cause deficits and hence necessitate borrowing, tax hikes and budget cuts was presented by politicians and the media in Sweden as a foregone conclusion. This foregone conclusion was then used as part of a narrative about refugees’ negative impact on the economy and welfare, and as the basis for closing Sweden’s doors to people seeking asylum in the future.

    And yet, the budget deficit never materialised: ‘Just as the finance minister had buried any hope of surpluses in the near future and repeated the mantra of the need to borrow to “finance” the refugees, a veritable tidal wave of tax revenue had already started to engulf Sweden’ (p.152). The economy grew and tax revenue surged in 2016 and 2017, so much that successive surpluses were created. In 2016 public consumption increased 3.6%, a figure not seen since the 1970s. Growth rates were 4% in 2016 and 2017. Refugees were filling labour shortages in understaffed sectors such as social care, where Sweden’s ageing population is in need of demographic renewal.

    Refugees disproportionately ended up in smaller, poorer, depopulating, rural municipalities who also received a disproportionately large cash injections from the central government. The arrival of refugees thus addressed the triple challenges of depopulation and population ageing; a continuous loss of local tax revenues, which forced cuts in services; and severe staff shortages and recruitment problems (e.g. in the care sector). Rather than responding with hostility, then, municipalities rightly saw the refugee influx as potentially solving these spiralling challenges.

    For two decades now we have been witnessing the slow death of asylum in the UK. Basing policy on prejudice rather than evidence, suspicion rather than generosity, burden rather than opportunity. Every change in the asylum system heralds new and innovative ways of circumventing human rights, detaining, deporting, impoverishing, and excluding. And none of this is cheap – it is not done for the economic benefit of the British population. It costs £15,000 to forcibly deport someone, it costs £95 per day to detain them, with £90 million spent each year on immigration detention. Vast sums of money are given to private companies every year to help in the work of denying people who are seeking sanctuary access to their right to asylum.

    The Swedish case offers a window into what happens when a different approach is taken. The benefit is not simply to refugees, but to the population as a whole. With an economy to rebuild after Covid and huge holes in the health and social care workforce, could we imagine an alternative in which Sweden offered inspiration to do things differently?

    https://discoversociety.org/2021/04/07/the-death-of-asylum-and-the-search-for-alternatives

    #asile #alternatives #migrations #alternative #réfugiés #catégorisation #tri #réinstallation #death_of_asylum #mort_de_l'asile #voies_légales #droit_d'asile #externalisation #passeurs #criminalisation_des_passeurs #UK #Angleterre #colonialisme #colonisation #pull-factors #pull_factors #push-pull_factors #facteurs_pull #dissuasion #Suède #déficit #économie #welfare_state #investissement #travail #impôts #Etat_providence #modèle_suédois

    ping @isskein @karine4

    –-

    ajouté au fil de discussion sur le lien entre économie et réfugiés/migrations :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/705790

    • A Modern Migration Theory. An Alternative Economic Approach to Failed EU Policy

      The widely accepted narrative that refugees admitted to the European Union constitute a fiscal burden is based on a seemingly neutral accounting exercise, in which migrants contribute less in tax than they receive in welfare assistance. A “fact” that justifies increasingly restrictive asylum policies. In this book Peo Hansen shows that this consensual cost-perspective on migration is built on a flawed economic conception of the orthodox “sound finance” doctrine prevalent in migration research and policy. By shifting perspective to examine migration through the macroeconomic lens offered by modern monetary theory, Hansen is able to demonstrate sound finance’s detrimental impact on migration policy and research, including its role in stoking the toxic debate on migration in the EU. Most importantly, Hansen’s undertaking offers the tools with which both migration research and migration policy could be modernized and put on a realistic footing.

      In addition to a searing analysis of EU migration policy and politics, Hansen also investigates the case of Sweden, the country that has received the most refugees in the EU in proportion to population. Hansen demonstrates how Sweden’s increased refugee spending in 2015–17 proved to be fiscally risk-free and how the injection of funds to cash-strapped and depopulating municipalities, which received refugees, boosted economic growth and investment in welfare. Spending on refugees became a way of rediscovering the viability of welfare for all. Given that the Swedish approach to the 2015 refugee crisis has since been discarded and deemed fiscally unsustainable, Hansen’s aim is to reveal its positive effects and its applicability as a model for the EU as a whole.

      https://cup.columbia.edu/book/a-modern-migration-theory/9781788210553
      #livre #Peo_Hansen

  • The fortified gates of the Balkans. How non-EU member states are incorporated into fortress Europe.

    Marko Gašperlin, a Slovenian police officer, began his first mandate as chair of the Management Board of Frontex in spring 2016. Less than two months earlier, then Slovenian Prime Minister Miro Cerar had gone to North Macedonia to convey the message from the EU that the migration route through the Balkans — the so-called Balkan route — was about to close.

    “North Macedonia was the first country ready to cooperate [with Frontex] to stop the stampede we had in 2015 across the Western Balkans,” Gašperlin told K2.0 during an interview conducted at the police headquarters in Ljubljana in September 2020.

    “Stampede” refers to over 1 million people who entered the European Union in 2015 and early 2016 in search of asylum, the majority traveling along the Balkan route. Most of them were from Syria, but also some other countries of the global South where human rights are a vague concept.

    According to Gašperlin, the European Border and Coast Guard Agency’s primary interest at the EU’s external borders is controlling the movement of people who he describes as “illegals.”

    Given numerous allegations by human rights organizations, Frontex could itself be part of illegal activity as part of the push-back chain removing people from EU territory before they have had the opportunity to assert their right to claim asylum.

    In March 2016, the EU made a deal with Turkey to stop the flow of people toward Europe, and Frontex became even more active in the Aegean Sea. Only four years later, at the end of 2020, Gašperlin established a Frontex working group to look into allegations of human rights violations by its officers. So far, no misconduct has been acknowledged. The final internal Frontex report is due at the end of February.

    After allegations were made public during the summer and fall of 2020, some members of the European Parliament called for Frontex director Fabrice Leggeri to step down, while the European Ombudsman also announced an inquiry into the effectiveness of the Agency’s complaints mechanism as well as its management.

    A European Parliament Frontex Scrutiny Working Group was also established to conduct its own inquiry, looking into “compliance and respect for fundamental rights” as well as internal management, and transparency and accountability. It formally began work this week (February 23) with its fact-finding investigation expected to last four months.

    2021 started with more allegations and revelations.

    In January 2021 the EU anti-fraud office, OLAF, confirmed it is leading an investigation over allegations of harassment and misconduct inside Frontex, and push-backs conducted at the EU’s borders.

    Similar accusations of human rights violations related to Frontex have been accumulating for years. In 2011, Human Rights Watch issued a report titled “The EU’s Dirty Hands” that documented the ill-treatment of migrant detainees in Greece.

    Various human rights organizations and media have also long reported about Frontex helping the Libyan Coast Guard to locate and pull back people trying to escape toward Europe. After being pulled back, people are held in notorious detention camps, which operate with the support of the EU.

    Nonetheless, EU leaders are not giving up on the idea of expanding the Frontex mission, making deals with governments of non-member states in the Balkans to participate in their efforts to stop migration.

    Currently, the Frontex plan is to deploy up to 10,000 border guards at the EU external borders by 2027.

    Policing Europe

    Frontex, with its headquarters in Poland, was established in 2004, but it remained relatively low key for the first decade of its existence. This changed in 2015 when, in order to better control Europe’s visa-free Schengen area, the European Commission (EC) extended the Agency’s mandate as it aimed to turn Frontex into a fully-fledged European Border and Coastguard Agency. Officially, they began operating in this role in October 2016, at the Bulgarian border with Turkey.

    In recent years, the territory they cover has been expanding, framed as cooperation with neighboring countries, with the main goal “to ensure implementation of the European integrated border management.”

    The budget allocated for their work has also grown massively, from about 6 million euros in 2005, to 460 million euros in 2020. According to existing plans, the Agency is set to grow still further and by 2027 up to 5.6 billion euros is expected to have been spent on Frontex.

    As one of the main migration routes into Europe the Balkans has become the key region for Frontex. Close cooperation with authorities in the region has been growing since 2016, particularly through the “Regional Support to Protection-Sensitive Migration Management in the Western Balkans and Turkey” project: https://frontex.europa.eu/assets/Partners/Third_countries/IPA_II_Phase_II.pdf.

    In order to increase its powers in the field, Frontex has promoted “status agreements” with the countries in the region, while the EC, through its Instrument for Pre-Accession (IPA) fund, has dedicated 3.4 million euros over the two-year 2019-21 period for strengthening borders.

    The first Balkan state to upgrade its cooperation agreement with Frontex to a status agreement was Albania in 2018; joint police operations at its southern border with Greece began in spring 2019. According to the agreement, Frontex is allowed to conduct full border police duties on the non-EU territory.

    Frontex’s status agreement with Albania was followed by a similar agreement with Montenegro that has been in force since July 2020.

    The signing of a status agreement with North Macedonia was blocked by Bulgaria in October 2020, while the agreement with Bosnia and Herzegovina requires further approvals and the one with Serbia is awaiting ratification by the parliament in Belgrade.

    “The current legal framework is the consequence of the situation in the years from 2014 to 2016,” Gašperlin said.

    He added that he regretted that the possibility to cooperate with non-EU states in returns of “illegals” had subsequently been dropped from the Frontex mandate after an intervention by EU parliamentarians. In 2019, a number of changes were made to how Frontex functions including removing the power to “launch return interventions in third countries” due to the fact that many of these countries have a poor record when it comes to rule of law and respect of human rights.

    “This means, if we are concrete, that the illegals who are in BiH — the EU can pay for their accommodation, Frontex can help only a little with the current tools it has, while when it comes to returns, Frontex cannot do anything,” Gašperlin said.

    Fortification of the borders

    The steady introduction of status agreements is intended to replace and upgrade existing police cooperation deals that are already in place with non-EU states.

    Over the years, EU member states have established various bilateral agreements with countries around the world, including some in the Balkan region. Further agreements have been negotiated by the EU itself, with Frontex listing 20 “working arrangements” with different non-member states on its website.

    Based on existing Frontex working arrangements, exchange of information and “consultancy” visits by Frontex officials — which also include work at border crossings — are already practiced widely across the Balkan-EU borders.

    The new status agreements allow Frontex officers to guard the borders and perform police tasks on the territory of the country with which the agreement is signed, while this country’s national courts do not have jurisdiction over the Frontex personnel.

    Comparing bilateral agreements to status agreements, Marko Gašperlin explained that, with Frontex taking over certain duties, individual EU states will be able to avoid the administrative and financial burdens of “bilateral solidarity.”

    Radoš Đurović, director of the NGO Asylum Protection Centre (APC) which works with migrants in Serbia, questions whether Frontex’s presence in the region will bring better control over violations and fears that if past acts of alleged violence are used it could make matters worse.

    “The EU’s aim is to increase border control and reduce the number of people who legally or illegally cross,” Đurović says in a phone interview for K2.0. “We know that violence does not stop the crossings. It only increases the violence people experience.”

    Similarly, Jasmin Redžepi from the Skopje-based NGO Legis, argues that the current EU focus on policing its borders only entraps people in the region.

    “This causes more problems, suffering and death,” he says. “People are forced to turn to criminals in search of help. The current police actions are empowering criminals and organized crime.”

    Redžepi believes the region is currently acting as some kind of human filter for the EU.

    “From the security standpoint this is solidarity with local authorities. But in the field, it prevents greater numbers of refugees from moving toward central Europe,” Redžepi says.

    “They get temporarily stuck. The EU calls it regulation but they only postpone their arrival in the EU and increase the violations of human rights, European law and international law. In the end people cross, just more simply die along the way.”

    EU accused of externalizing issues

    For the EU, it was a shifting pattern of migratory journeys that signified the moment to start increasing its border security around the region by strengthening its cooperation with individual states.

    The overland Balkan route toward Western Europe has always been used by people on the move. But it has become even more frequented in recent years as changing approaches to border policing and rescue restrictions in the Central Mediterranean have made crossings by sea even more deadly.

    For the regional countries, each at a different stage of a still distant promise of EU membership, partnering with Frontex comes with the obvious incentive of demonstrating their commitment to the bloc.

    “When regional authorities work to stop people crossing towards the EU, they hope to get extra benefits elsewhere,” says APC Serbia’s Radoš Đurovic.

    There are also other potential perks. Jasmin Redžepi from Legis explains that police from EU states often leave behind equipment for under-equipped local forces.

    But there has also been significant criticism of the EU’s approach in both the Balkans and elsewhere, with many accusing it of attempting to externalize its borders and avoid accountability by pushing difficult issues elsewhere.

    According to research by Violeta Moreno-Lax and Martin Lemberg-Pedersen, who have analyzed the consequences of the EU’s approach to border management, the bloc’s actions amount to a “dispersion of legal duties” that is not “ethically and legally tenable under international law.”

    One of the results, the researchers found, is that “repressive forces” in third countries gain standing as valid interlocutors for cooperation and democratic and human rights credentials become “secondary, if at all relevant.”

    APC’s Radoš Đurović agrees, suggesting that we are entering a situation where the power of the law and international norms that prevent illegal use of force are, in effect, limited.

    “Europe may not have enough power to influence the situations in places further away that push migration, but it can influence its border regions,” he says. “The changes we see forced onto the states are problematic — from push-backs to violence.”

    Playing by whose rules?

    One of the particular anomalies seen with the status agreements is that Albanian police are now being accompanied by Frontex forces to better control their southern border at the same time as many of Albania’s own citizens are themselves attempting to reach the EU in irregular ways.

    Asked about this apparent paradox, Marko Gašperlin said he did “not remember any Albanians among the illegals.”

    However, Frontex’s risk analysis for 2020, puts Albania in the top four countries for whose citizens return orders were issued in the preceding two years and second in terms of returns effectively carried out. Eurostat data for 2018 and 2019 also puts Albania in 11th place among countries from which first time asylum seekers come, before Somalia and Bangladesh and well ahead of Morocco and Algeria.

    While many of these Albanian citizens may have entered EU countries via regular means before being subject to return orders for reasons such as breaching visa conditions, people on the move from Albania are often encountered along the Balkan route, according to activists working in the field.

    Meanwhile, other migrants have complained of being subjected to illegal push-backs at Albania’s border with Greece, though there is a lack of monitoring in this area and these claims remain unverified.

    In Serbia, the KlikAktiv Center for Development of Social Policies has analyzed Belgrade’s pending status agreement for Frontex operations.

    It warns that increasing the presence of armed police, from a Frontex force that has allegedly been involved in violence and abuses of power, is a recipe for disaster, especially when they will have immunity from local criminal and civil jurisdiction.

    It also flags that changes in legislation will enable the integration of data systems and rapid deportations without proper safeguards in place.

    Police activities to secure borders greatly depend on — and supply data to — EU information technology systems. But EU law provides fewer protections for data processing of foreign nationals than for that of EU citizens, effectively creating segregation in terms of data protection.

    The EU Fundamental Rights Agency has warned that the establishment of a more invasive system for non-EU nationals could potentially lead to increased discrimination and skew data that could further “fuel existing misperceptions that there is a link between asylum-seekers, migration and crime.”

    A question of standards

    Frontex emphasizes that there are codified safeguards and existing internal appeal mechanisms.

    According to the status agreements, violations of fundamental rights such as data protection rules or the principle of non-refoulement — which prohibits the forcible return of individuals to countries where they face danger through push-backs or other means — are all reasons for either party to suspend or terminate their cooperation.

    In January, Frontex itself suspended its mission in Hungary after the EU member state failed to abide by an EU Court of Justice decision. In December 2020, the court found that Hungarian border enforcement was in violation of EU law by restricting access to its asylum system and for carrying out illegal push-backs into Serbia.

    Marko Gašperlin claimed that Frontex’s presence improved professional police standards wherever it operated.

    However, claims of raising standards have been questioned by human rights researchers and activists.

    Jasmin Redžepi recounts that the first complaint against a foreign police officer that his NGO Legis filed with North Macedonian authorities and international organizations was against a Slovenian police officer posted through bilateral agreement; the complaint related to allegations of unprofessional conduct toward migrants.

    “Presently, people cross illegally and the police push them back illegally,” Redžepi says. “They should be able to ask for asylum but cannot as police push people across borders.”

    Gašperlin told K2.0 that it is natural that there will be a variation of standards between police from different countries.

    In its recruitment efforts, Frontex has sought to enlist police officers or people with a customs or army background. According to Gašperlin, recruits have been disproportionately from Romania and Italy, while fewer have been police officers from northern member states “where standards and wages are better.”

    “It would be illusory to expect that all of the EU would rise up to the level of respect for human rights and to the high standards of Sweden,” he said. “There also has not been a case of the EU throwing a member out, although there have been examples of human rights violations, of different kinds.”

    ‘Monitoring from the air’

    One of the EU member states whose own police have been accused of serious human rights violations against refugees and migrants, including torture, is Croatia.

    Despite the allegations, in January 2020, Croatia’s Ministry of the Interior Police Academy was chosen to lead the first Frontex-financed training session for attendees from police forces across the Balkan route region.

    Frontex currently has a presence in Croatia, at the EU border area with Bosnia and Herzegovina, amongst other places.

    Asked about the numerous reports from international NGOs and collectives, as well as from the national Ombudsman Lora Vidović and the Council of Europe, of mass human rights violations at the Croatian borders, Gašperlin declined to engage.

    “Frontex helps Croatia with monitoring from the air,” he said. “That is all.”

    Gašperlin said that the role of his agency is only to notify Croatia when people are detected approaching the border from Bosnia. Asked if Frontex also monitors what happens to people once Croatian police find them, given continuously worsening allegations, he said: “From the air this might be difficult. I do not know if a plane from the air can monitor that.”

    Pressed further, he declined to comment.

    To claim ignorance is, however, becoming increasingly difficult. A recent statement on the state of the EU’s borders by UNHCR’s Assistant High Commissioner for Protection, Gillian Triggs, notes: “The pushbacks [at Europe’s borders] are carried out in a violent and apparently systematic way.”

    Radoš Đurović from APC Serbia pointed out that Frontex must know about the alleged violations.

    “The question is: Do they want to investigate and prevent them?” he says. “All those present in the field know about the violence and who perpetrates it.”

    Warnings that strict and violent EU border policies are increasing the sophistication and brutality of smugglers, while technological “solutions” and militarization come with vested interests and more potential human rights violations, do not seem to worry the head of Frontex’s Management Board.

    “If passage from Turkey to Germany is too expensive, people will not decide to go,” said Gašperlin, describing the job done by Frontex:

    “We do the work we do. So people cannot simply come here, sit and say — here I am, now take me to Germany, as some might want. Or — here I am, I’m asking for asylum, now take me to Postojna or Ljubljana, where I will get fed, cared for, and then I’ll sit on the bus and ride to Munich where I’ll again ask for asylum. This would be a minimal price.”

    Human rights advocates in the region such as Jasmin Redžepi have no illusions that what they face on the ground reflects the needs and aims of the EU.

    “We are only a bridge,” Redžepi says. “The least the EU should do is take care that its policies do not turn the region into a cradle for criminals and organized crime. We need legal, regular passages and procedures for people to apply for asylum, not illegal, violent push-backs.

    “If we talk about security we cannot talk exclusively about the security of borders. We have to talk about the security of people as well.”

    https://kosovotwopointzero.com/en/the-fortified-gates-of-the-balkans

    #Balkans #route_des_Balkans #frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #externalisation #frontex #Macédoine_du_Nord #contrôles_frontaliers #militarisation_des_frontières #push-backs #refoulements #refoulements_en_chaîne #frontières_extérieures #Regional_Support_to_Protection-Sensitive_Migration_Management_in_the_Western_Balkans_and_Turkey #Instrument_for_Pre-Accession (#IPA) #budget #Albanie #Monténégro #Serbie #Bosnie-Herzégovine #accords_bilatéraux

    –—

    ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation des frontières :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749
    Et plus particulièrement ici :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message782649

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • The big wall


    https://thebigwall.org/en

    An ActionAid investigation into how Italy tried to stop migration from Africa, using EU funds, and how much money it spent.

    There are satellites, drones, ships, cooperation projects, police posts, repatriation flights, training centers. They are the bricks of an invisible but tangible and often violent wall. Erected starting in 2015 onwards, thanks to over one billion euros of public money. With one goal: to eliminate those movements by sea, from North Africa to Italy, which in 2015 caused an outcry over a “refugee crisis”. Here we tell you about the (fragile) foundations and the (dramatic) impacts of this project. Which must be changed, urgently.

    –---

    Ready, Set, Go

    Imagine a board game, Risk style. The board is a huge geographical map, which descends south from Italy, including the Mediterranean Sea and North Africa and almost reaching the equator, in Cameroon, South Sudan, Rwanda. Places we know little about and read rarely about.

    Each player distributes activity cards and objects between countries and along borders. In Ethiopia there is a camera crew shooting TV series called ‘Miraj’ [mirage], which recounts the misadventures of naive youth who rely on shady characters to reach Europe. There is military equipment, distributed almost everywhere: off-road vehicles for the Tunisian border police, ambulances and tank trucks for the army in Niger, patrol boats for Libya, surveillance drones taking off from Sicily.

    There is technology: satellite systems on ships in the Mediterranean, software for recording fingerprints in Egypt, laptops for the Nigerian police. And still: coming and going of flights between Libya and Nigeria, Guinea, Gambia. Maritime coordination centers, police posts in the middle of the Sahara, job orientation offices in Tunisia or Ethiopia, clinics in Uganda, facilities for minors in Eritrea, and refugee camps in Sudan.

    Hold your breath for a moment longer, because we still haven’t mentioned the training courses. And there are many: to produce yogurt in Ivory Coast, open a farm in Senegal or a beauty salon in Nigeria, to learn about the rights of refugees, or how to use a radar station.

    Crazed pawns, overlapping cards and unclear rules. Except for one: from these African countries, more than 25 of them, not one person should make it to Italy. There is only one exception allowed: leaving with a visa. Embassy officials, however, have precise instructions: anyone who doesn’t have something to return to should not be accepted. Relationships, family, and friends don’t count, but only incomes, properties, businesses, and titles do.

    For a young professional, a worker, a student, an activist, anyone looking for safety, future and adventure beyond the borders of the continent, for people like me writing and perhaps like you reading, the only allies become the facilitators, those who Europe calls traffickers and who, from friends, can turn into worst enemies.

    We called it The Big Wall. It could be one of those strategy games that keeps going throughout the night, for fans of geopolitics, conflicts, finance. But this is real life, and it’s the result of years of investments, experiments, documents and meetings. At first disorderly, sporadic, then systematized and increased since 2015, when United Nations agencies, echoed by the international media, sounded an alarm: there is a migrant crisis happening and Europe must intervene. Immediately.

    Italy was at the forefront, and all those agreements, projects, and programs from previous years suddenly converged and multiplied, becoming bricks of a wall that, from an increasingly militarized Mediterranean, moved south, to the travelers’ countries of origin.

    The basic idea, which bounced around chancelleries and European institutions, was to use multiple tools: development cooperation, support for security forces, on-site protection of refugees, repatriation, information campaigns on the risks of irregular migration. This, in the language of Brussels, was a “comprehensive approach”.

    We talked to some of the protagonists of this story — those who built the wall, who tried to jump it, and who would like to demolish it — and we looked through thousands of pages of reports, minutes, resolutions, decrees, calls for tenders, contracts, newspaper articles, research, to understand how much money Italy has spent, where, and what impacts it has had. Months of work to discover not only that this wall has dramatic consequences, but that the European – and Italian – approach to international migration stems from erroneous premises, from an emergency stance that has disastrous results for everyone, including European citizens.
    Libya: the tip of the iceberg

    It was the start of the 2017/2018 academic year and Omer Shatz, professor of international law, offered his Sciences Po students the opportunity to work alongside him on the preparation of a dossier. For the students of the faculty, this was nothing new. In the classrooms of the austere building on the Rive Gauche of Paris, which European and African heads of state have passed though, not least Emmanuel Macron, it’s normal to work on real life materials: peace agreements in Colombia, trials against dictators and foreign fighters. Those who walk on those marble floors already know that they will be able to speak with confidence in circles that matter, in politics as well as diplomacy.

    Shatz, who as a criminal lawyer in Israel is familiar with abuses and rights violations, launched his students a new challenge: to bring Europe to the International Criminal Court for the first time. “Since it was created, the court has only condemned African citizens – dictators, militia leaders – but showing European responsibility was urgent,” he explains.

    One year after first proposing the plan, Shatz sent an envelope to the Court’s headquarters, in the Dutch town of The Hague. With his colleague Juan Branco and eight of his students he recounted, in 245 pages, cases of “widespread and systematic attack against the civilian population”, linked to “crimes against humanity consciously committed by European actors, in the central Mediterranean and in Libya, in line with Italian and European Union policies”.

    The civilian population to which they refer comprises migrants and refugees, swallowed by the waves or intercepted in the central Mediterranean and brought back to shore by Libyan assets, to be placed in a seemingly endless cycle of detention. Among them are the 13.000 dead recorded since 2015, in the stretch of sea between North Africa and Italy, out of 523.000 people who survived the crossing, but also the many African and Asian citizens, who are rarely counted, who were tortured in Libya and died in any of the dozens of detention centers for foreigners, often run by militias.

    “At first we thought that the EU and Italy were outsourcing dirty work to Libya to block people, which in jargon is called ‘aiding and abetting’ in the commission of a crime, then we realized that the Europeans were actually the conductors of these operations, while the Libyans performed”, says Shatz, who, at the end of 2020, was preparing a second document for the International Criminal Court to include more names, those of the “anonymous officials of the European and Italian bureaucracy who participated in this criminal enterprise”, which was centered around the “reinvention of the Libyan Coast Guard, conceived by Italian actors”.

    Identifying heads of department, office directors, and institution executives in democratic countries as alleged criminals might seem excessive. For Shatz, however, “this is the first time, after the Nuremberg trials, after Eichmann, that Europe has committed crimes of this magnitude, outside of an armed conflict”. The court, which routinely rejects at least 95 percent of the cases presented, did not do so with Shatz and his students’ case. “Encouraging news, but that does not mean that the start of proceedings is around the corner”, explains the lawyer.

    At the basis of the alleged crimes, he continues, are “regulations, memoranda of understanding, maritime cooperation, detention centers, patrols and drones” created and financed by the European Union and Italy. Here Shatz is speaking about the Memorandum of Understanding between Italy and Libya to “reduce the flow of illegal migrants”, as the text of the document states. An objective to be achieved through training and support for the two maritime patrol forces of the very fragile Libyan national unity government, by “adapting” the existing detention centers, and supporting local development initiatives.

    Signed in Rome on February 2, 2017 and in force until 2023, the text is grafted onto the Treaty of Friendship, Partnership and Cooperation signed by Silvio Berlusconi and Muammar Gaddafi in 2008, but is tied to a specific budget: that of the so-called Africa Fund, established in 2016 as the “Fund for extraordinary interventions to relaunch dialogue and cooperation with African countries of priority importance for migration routes” and extended in 2020 — as the Migration Fund — to non-African countries too.

    310 million euros were allocated in total between the end of 2016 and November 2020, and 252 of those were disbursed, according to our reconstruction.

    A multiplication of tools and funds that, explains Mario Giro, “was born after the summit between the European Union and African leaders in Malta, in November 2015”. According to the former undersecretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, from 2013, and Deputy Minister for Foreign Affairs between 2016 and 2018, that summit in Malta “sanctioned the triumph of a European obsession, that of reducing migration from Africa at all costs: in exchange of this containment, there was a willingness to spend, invest”. For Giro, the one in Malta was an “attempt to come together, but not a real partnership”.

    Libya, where more than 90 percent of those attempting to cross the central Mediterranean departed from in those years, was the heart of a project in which Italian funds and interests support and integrate with programs by the European Union and other member states. It was an all-European dialogue, from which powerful Africans — political leaders but also policemen, militiamen, and the traffickers themselves — tried to obtain something: legitimacy, funds, equipment.

    Fragmented and torn apart by a decade-long conflict, Libya was however not alone. In October 2015, just before the handshakes and the usual photographs at the Malta meeting, the European Commission established an Emergency Trust Fund to “address the root causes of migration in Africa”.

    To do so, as Dutch researcher Thomas Spijkerboer will reconstruct years later, the EU executive declared a state of emergency in the 26 African countries that benefit from the Fund, thus justifying the choice to circumvent European competition rules in favor of direct award procedures. However “it’s implausible – Spijkerboeker will go on to argue – that there is a crisis in all 26 African countries where the Trust Fund operates through the duration of the Trust Fund”, now extended until the end of 2021.

    However, the imperative, as an advisor to the Budget Commission of the European Parliament explains, was to act immediately: “not within a few weeks, but days, hours“.

    Faced with a Libya still ineffective at stopping flows to the north, it was in fact necessary to intervene further south, traveling backwards along the routes that converge from dozens of African countries and go towards Tripolitania. And — like dominoes in reverse — raising borders and convincing, or forcing, potential travelers to stop in their countries of origin or in others along the way, before they arrived on the shores of the Mediterranean.

    For the first time since decolonization, human mobility in Africa became the keystone of Italian policies on the continent, so much so that analysts began speaking of migration diplomacy. Factors such as the number of migrants leaving from a given country and the number of border posts or repatriations all became part of the political game, on the same level as profits from oil extraction, promises of investment, arms sales, or trade agreements.

    Comprising projects, funds, and programs, this migration diplomacy comes at a cost. For the period between January 2015 and November 2020, we tracked down 317 funding lines managed by Italy with its own funds and partially co-financed by the European Union. A total of 1.337 billion euros, spent over five years and destined to eight different items of expenditure. Here Libya is in first place, but it is not alone.

    A long story, in short

    For simplicity’s sake, we can say that it all started in the hot summer of 2002, with an almost surrealist lightning war over a barren rock on the edge of the Mediterranean: the Isla de Persejil, the island of parsley. A little island in the Strait of Gibraltar, disputed for decades between Morocco and Spain, which had its ephemeral moment of glory when in July of that year the Moroccan monarchy sent six soldiers, some tents and a flag. Jose-Maria Aznar’s government quickly responded with a reconquista to the sound of fighter-bombers, frigates, and helicopters.

    Peace was signed only a few weeks later and the island went back to being a land of shepherds and military patrols. Which from then on, however, were joint ones.

    “There was talk of combating drug trafficking and illegal fishing, but the reality was different: these were the first anti-immigration operations co-managed by Spanish and Moroccan soldiers”, explains Sebastian Cobarrubias, professor of geography at the University of Zaragoza. The model, he says, was the one of Franco-Spanish counter-terrorism operations in the Basque Country, exported from the Pyrenees to the sea border.

    A process of externalization of Spanish and European migration policy was born following those events in 2002, and culminating years later with the crisis de los cayucos, the pirogue crisis: the arrival of tens of thousands of people – 31,000 in 2006 alone – in the Canary Islands, following extremely dangerous crossings from Senegal, Mauritania and Morocco.

    In close dialogue with the European Commission, which saw the Spanish border as the most porous one of the fragile Schengen area, the government of José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero reacted quickly. “Within a few months, cooperation and repatriation agreements were signed with nine African countries,” says Cobarrubias, who fought for years, with little success, to obtain the texts of the agreements.

    The events of the late 2000s look terribly similar to what Italy will try to implement a decade later with its Mediterranean neighbors, Libya first of all. So much so that in 2016 it was the Spanish Minister of the Interior himself, Jorge Fernández Díaz, who recalled that “the Spanish one is a European management model, reproducible in other contexts”. A vision confirmed by the European Commission officials with whom we spoke.

    At the heart of the Spanish strategy, which over a few short years led to a drastic decrease of arrivals by sea, was the opening of new diplomatic offices in Africa, the launch of local development projects, and above all the support given to the security forces of partner countries.

    Cobarrubias recounts at least four characteristic elements of the Madrid approach: the construction of new patrol forces “such as the Mauritanian Coast Guard, which did not exist and was created by Spain thanks to European funds, with the support of the newly created Frontex agency”; direct and indirect support for detention centers, such as the infamous ‘Guantanamito’, or little Guantanamo, denounced by civil society organizations in Mauritania; the real-time collection of border data and information, carried out by the SIVE satellite system, a prototype of Eurosur, an incredibly expensive intelligence center on the EU’s external borders launched in 2013, based on drones, satellites, airplanes, and sensors; and finally, the strategy of working backwards along migration routes, to seal borders, from the sea to the Sahara desert, and investing locally with development and governance programs, which Spain did during the two phases of the so-called Plan Africa, between 2006 and 2012.

    Replace “Spain” with “Italy”, and “Mauritania” with “Libya”, and you’ll have an idea of what happened years later, in an attempt to seal another European border.

    The main legacy of the Spanish model, according to the Italian sociologist Lorenzo Gabrielli, however, is the negative conditionality, which is the fact of conditioning the disbursement of these loans – for security forces, ministries, trade agreements – at the level of the African partners’ cooperation in the management of migration, constantly threatening to reduce investments if there are not enough repatriations being carried out, or if controls and pushbacks fail. An idea that is reminiscent both of the enlargement process of the European Union, with all the access restrictions placed on candidate countries, and of the Schengen Treaty, the attempt to break down internal European borders, which, as a consequence, created the need to protect a new common border, the external one.
    La externalización europea del control migratorio: ¿La acción española como modelo? Read more

    At the end of 2015, when almost 150,000 people had reached the Italian coast and over 850,000 had crossed Turkey and the Balkans to enter the European Union, the story of the maritime migration to Spain had almost faded from memory.

    But something remained of it: a management model. Based, once again, on an idea of crisis.

    “We tried to apply it to post-Gaddafi Libya – explains Stefano Manservisi, who over the past decade has chaired two key departments for migration policies in the EU Commission, Home Affairs and Development Cooperation – but in 2013 we soon realized that things had blown up, that that there was no government to talk to: the whole strategy had to be reformulated”.

    Going backwards, through routes and processes

    The six-month presidency of the European Council, in 2014, was the perfect opportunity for Italy.

    In November of that year, Matteo Renzi’s government hosted a conference in Rome to launch the Khartoum Process, the brand new initiative for the migration route between the EU and the Horn of Africa, modeled on the Rabat Process, born in 2006, at the apex of the crisis de los cayucos, after pressure from Spain. It’s a regional cooperation platform between EU countries and nine African countries, based on the exchange of information and coordination between governments, to manage migration.
    Il processo di Khartoum: l’Italia e l’Europa contro le migrazioni Read more

    Warning: if you start to find terms such as ‘process’ and ‘coordination platform’ nebulous, don’t worry. The backbone of European policies is made of these structures: meetings, committees, negotiating tables with unattractive names, whose roles elude most of us. It’s a tendency towards the multiplication of dialogue and decision spaces, that the migration policies of recent years have, if possible, accentuated, in the name of flexibility, of being ready for any eventuality. Of continuous crisis.

    Let’s go back to that inter-ministerial meeting in Rome that gave life to the Khartoum Process and in which Libya, where the civil war had resumed violently a few months earlier, was not present.

    Italy thus began looking beyond Libya, to the so-called countries of origin and transit. Such as Ethiopia, a historic beneficiary of Italian development cooperation, and Sudan. Indeed, both nations host refugees from Eritrea and Somalia, two of the main countries of origin of those who cross the central Mediterranean between 2013 and 2015. Improving their living conditions was urgent, to prevent them from traveling again, from dreaming of Europe. In Niger, on the other hand, which is an access corridor to Libya for those traveling from countries such as Nigeria, Gambia, Senegal, and Mali, Italy co-financed a study for a new law against migrant smuggling, then adopted in 2015, which became the cornerstone of a radical attempt to reduce movement across the Sahara desert, which you will read about later.

    A year later, with the Malta summit and the birth of the EU Trust Fund for Africa, Italy was therefore ready to act. With a 123 million euro contribution, allocated from 2017 through the Africa Fund and the Migration Fund, Italy became the second donor country, and one of the most active in trying to manage those over 4 billion euros allocated for five years. [If you are curious about the financing mechanisms of the Trust Fund, read here: https://thebigwall.org/en/trust-fund/].

    Through the Italian Agency for Development Cooperation (AICS), born in 2014 as an operational branch of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Italy immediately made itself available to manage European Fund projects, and one idea seemed to be the driving one: using classic development programs, but implemented in record time, to offer on-site alternatives to young people eager to leave, while improving access to basic services.

    Local development, therefore, became the intervention to address the so-called root causes of migration. For the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the newborn AICS, it seemed a winning approach. Unsurprisingly, the first project approved through the Trust Fund for Africa was managed by the Italian agency in Ethiopia.

    “Stemming irregular migration in Northern and Central Ethiopia” received 19.8 million euros in funding, a rare sum for local development interventions. The goal was to create job opportunities and open career guidance centers for young people in four Ethiopian regions. Or at least that’s how it seemed. In the first place, among the objectives listed in the project sheet, there is in fact another one: to reduce irregular migration.

    In the logical matrix of the project, which insiders know is the presentation – through data, indicators and figures – of the expected results, there is no indicator that appears next to the “reduction of irregular migration” objective. There is no way, it’s implicitly admitted, to verify that that goal has been achieved. That the young person trained to start a micro-enterprise in the Wollo area, for example, is one less migrant.

    Bizarre, not to mention wrong. But indicative of the problems of an approach of which, an official of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs explains to us, “Italy had made itself the spokesperson in Europe”.

    “The mantra was that more development would stop migration, and at a certain point that worked for everyone: for AICS, which justified its funds in the face of political landscape that was scared by the issue of landings, and for many NGOs, which immediately understood that migrations were the parsley to be sprinkled on the funding requests that were presented”, explains the official, who, like so many in this story, prefers to remain anonymous.

    This idea of the root causes was reproduced, as in an echo chamber, “without programmatic documents, without guidelines, but on the wave of a vague idea of political consensus around the goal of containing migration”, he adds. This makes it almost impossible to talk about, so much so that a proposal for new guidelines on immigration and development, drawn up during 2020 by AICS, was set aside for months.

    Indeed, if someone were to say, as evidenced by scholars such as Michael Clemens, that development can also increase migration, and that migration itself is a source of development, the whole ‘root causes’ idea would collapse and the already tight cooperation budgets would risk being cut, in the name of the same absolute imperative as always: reducing arrivals to Italy and Europe.

    Maintaining a vague, costly and unverifiable approach is equally damaging.

    Bram Frouws, director of the Mixed Migration Center, a think-tank that studies international mobility, points out, for example, how the ‘root cause’ approach arises from a vision of migration as a problem to be eradicated rather than managed, and that paradoxically, the definition of these deep causes always remains superficial. In fact, there is never talk of how international fishing agreements damage local communities, nor of land grabbing by speculators, major construction work, or corruption and arms sales. There is only talk of generic economic vulnerability, of a country’s lack of stability. An almost abstract phenomenon, in which European actors are exempt from any responsibility.

    There is another problem: in the name of the fight against irregular migration, interventions have shifted from poorer and truly vulnerable countries and populations to regions with ‘high migratory rates’, a term repeated in dozens of project descriptions funded over the past few years, distorting one of the cardinal principles of development aid, codified in regulations and agreements: that of responding to the most urgent needs of a given population, and of not imposing external priorities, even more so if it is countries considered richer are the ones doing it.

    The Nigerien experiment

    While Ethiopia and Sudan absorb the most substantial share of funds destined to tackle the root causes of migration — respectively 47 and 32 million euros out of a total expenditure of 195 million euros — Niger, which for years has been contending for the podium of least developed country on the planet with Central African Republic according to the United Nations Human Development Index — benefits from just over 10 million euros.

    Here in fact it’s more urgent, for Italy and the EU, to intervene on border control rather than root causes, to stop the flow of people that cross the country until they arrive in Agadez, to then disappear in the Sahara and emerge, days later — if all goes well — in southern Libya. In 2016, the International Organization for Migration counted nearly 300,000 people passing through a single checkpoint along the road to Libya. The figure bounced between the offices of the European Commission, and from there to the Farnesina, the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs: faced with an uncontrollable Libya, intervening in Niger became a priority.

    Italy did it in great style, even before opening an embassy in the country, in February 2017: with a contribution to the state budget of Niger of 50 million euros, part of the Africa Fund, included as part of a maxi-program managed by the EU in the country and paid out in several installments.

    While the project documents list a number of conditions for the continuation of the funding, including increased monitoring along the routes to Libya and the adoption of regulations and strategies for border control, some local and European officials with whom we have spoken think that the assessments were made with one eye closed: the important thing was in fact to provide those funds to be spent in a country that for Italy, until then, had been synonymous only with tourism in the Sahara dunes and development in rural areas.

    Having become a priority in the New Partnership Framework on Migration, yet another EU operational program, launched in 2016, Niger seemed thus exempt from controls on the management of funds to which beneficiaries of European funds are normally subject to.

    “Our control mechanisms, the Court of Auditors, the Parliament and the anti-corruption Authority, do not work, and yet the European partners have injected millions of euros into state coffers, without imposing transparency mechanisms”, reports then Ali Idrissa Nani , president of the Réseau des Organizations pour la Transparence et l’Analyse du Budget (ROTAB), a network of associations that seeks to monitor state spending in Niger.

    “It leaves me embittered, but for some years we we’ve had the impression that civil liberties, human rights, and participation are no longer a European priority“, continues Nani, who —- at the end of 2020 — has just filed a complaint with the Court of Niamey, to ask the Prosecutor to open an investigation into the possible disappearance of at least 120 million euros in funds from the Ministry of Defense, a Pandora’s box uncovered by local and international journalists.

    For Nani, who like other Nigerien activists spent most of 2018 in prison for encouraging demonstrations against high living costs, this explosion of European and Italian cooperation didn’t do the country any good, and in fact favoured authoritarian tendencies, and limited even more the independence of the judiciary.

    For their part, the Nigerien rulers have more than others seized the opportunity offered by European donors to obtain legitimacy and support. Right after the Valletta summit, they were the first to present an action plan to reduce migration to Libya, which they abruptly implemented in mid-2016, applying the anti-trafficking law whose preliminary study was financed by Italy, with the aim of emptying the city of #Agadez of migrants from other countries.

    The transport of people to the Libyan border, an activity that until that point happened in the light of day and was sanctioned at least informally by the local authorities, thus became illegal from one day to the next. Hundreds of drivers, intermediaries, and facilitators were arrested, and an entire economy crashed

    But did the movement of people really decrease? Almost impossible to tell. The only data available are those of the International Organization for Migration, which continues to record the number of transits at certain police posts. But drivers and foreign travelers no longer pass through them, fearing they will be arrested or stopped. Routes and journeys, as always happens, are remodeled, only to reappear elsewhere. Over the border with Chad, or in Algeria, or in a risky zigzagging of small tracks, to avoid patrols.

    For Hamidou Manou Nabara, a Nigerien sociologist and researcher, the problems with this type of cooperation are manifold.

    On the one hand, it restricted the free movement guaranteed within the Economic Community of West African States, a sort of ‘Schengen area’ between 15 countries in the region, making half of Niger, from Agadez to the north, a no-go areas for foreign citizens, even though they still had the right to move throughout the national territory.

    Finally, those traveling north were made even more vulnerable. “The control of borders and migratory movements was justified on humanitarian grounds, to contrast human trafficking, but in reality very few victims of trafficking were ever identified: the center of this cooperation is repression”, explains Nabara.

    Increasing controls, through military and police operations, actually exposes travelers to greater violations of human rights, both by state agents and passeurs, making the Sahara crossings longer and riskier.

    The fight against human trafficking, a slogan repeated by European and African leaders and a central expenditure item of the Italian intervention between Africa and the Mediterranean — 142 million euros in five years —- actually risks having the opposite effect. Because a trafiicker’s bread and butter, in addition to people’s desire to travel, is closed borders and denied visas.

    A reinvented frontier

    Galvanized by the activism of the European Commission after the launch of the Trust Fund but under pressure internally, faced with a discourse on migration that seemed to invade every public space — from the front pages of newspapers to television talk-shows — and unable to agree on how to manage migration within the Schengen area, European rulers thus found an agreement outside the continent: to add more bricks to that wall that must reduce movements through the Mediterranean.

    Between 2015 and 2016, Italian, Dutch, German, French and European Union ministers, presidents and senior officials travel relentlessly between countries considered priorities for migration, and increasingly for security, and invite their colleagues to the European capitals. A coming and going of flights to Niger, Mali, Burkina Faso, Nigeria, Ethiopia, Sudan, Tunisia, Senegal, Chad, Guinea, to make agreements, negotiate.

    “Niamey had become a crossroads for European diplomats”, remembers Ali Idrissa Nani, “but few understood the reasons”.

    However, unlike the border with Turkey, where the agreement signed with the EU at the beginning of 2016 in no time reduced the arrival of Syrian, Afghan, and Iraqi citizens in Greece, the continent’s other ‘hot’ border, promises of speed and effectiveness by the Trust Fund for Africa did not seem to materialize. Departures from Libya, in particular, remained constant. And in the meantime, in the upcoming election in a divided Italy, the issue of migration seemed to be tipping the balance, capable of shifting votes and alliances.

    It is at that point that the Italian Ministry of the Interior, newly led by Marco Minniti, put its foot on the accelerator. The Viminale, the Italian Ministry of the Interior, became the orchestrator of a new intervention plan, refined between Rome and Brussels, with German support, which went back to focusing everything on Libya and on that stretch of sea that separates it from Italy.

    “In those months the phones were hot, everyone was looking for Marco“, says an official of the Interior Ministry, who admits that “the Ministry of the Interior had snatched the Libyan dossier from Foreign Affairs, but only because up until then the Foreign Ministry hadn’t obtained anything” .

    Minniti’s first move was the signing of the new Memorandum with Libya, which gave way to a tripartite plan.

    At the top of the agenda was the creation of a maritime interception device for boats departing from the Libyan coast, through the reconstruction of the Coast Guard and the General Administration for Coastal Security (GACS), the two patrol forces belonging to the Ministry of Defense and that of the Interior, and the establishment of a rescue coordination center, prerequisites for Libya to declare to the International Maritime Organization that it had a Search and Rescue Area, so that the Italian Coast Guard could ask Libyan colleagues to intervene if there were boats in trouble.

    Accompanying this work in Libya is a jungle of Italian and EU missions, surveillance systems and military operations — from the European Frontex, Eunavfor Med and Eubam Libya, to the Italian military mission “Safe Waters” — equipped with drones, planes, patrol boats, whose task is to monitor the Libyan Sea, which is increasingly emptied by the European humanitarian ships that started operating in 2014 (whose maneuvering spaces are in the meantime reduced to the bone due to various strategies) to support Libyan interception operations.

    The second point of the ‘Minniti agenda’ was to progressively empty Libya of migrants and refugees, so that an escape by sea would become increasingly difficult. Between 2017 and 2020, the Libyan assets, which are in large part composed of patrol boats donated by Italy, intercepted and returned to shore about 56,000 people according to data released by UN agencies. The Italian-European plan envisages two solutions: for economic migrants, the return to the country of origin; for refugees, the possibility of obtaining protection.

    There is one part of this plan that worked better, at least in terms of European wishes: repatriation, presented as ‘assisted voluntary return’. This vision was propelled by images, released in October 2017 by CNN as part of a report on the abuse of foreigners in Libya, of what appears to be a slave auction. The images reopened the unhealed wounds of the slave trade through Atlantic and Sahara, and helped the creation of a Joint Initiative between the International Organization for Migration, the European Union, and the African Union, aimed at returning and reintegrating people in the countries of origin.

    Part of the Italian funding for IOM was injected into this complex system of repatriation by air, from Tripoli to more than 20 countries, which has contributed to the repatriation of 87,000 people over three years. 33,000 from Libya, and 37,000 from Niger.

    A similar program for refugees, which envisages transit through other African countries (Niger and Rwanda gave their availability) and from there resettlement to Europe or North America, recorded much lower numbers: 3,300 evacuations between the end of 2017 and the end of 2020. For the 47,000 people registered as refugees in Libya, leaving the country without returning to their home country, to the starting point, is almost impossible.

    Finally, there is a third, lesser-known point of the Italian plan: even in Libya, Italy wants to intervene on the root causes of migration, or rather on the economies linked to the transit and smuggling of migrants. The scheme is simple: support basic services and local authorities in migrant transit areas, in exchange for this transit being controlled and reduced. The transit of people brings with it the circulation of currency, a more valuable asset than usual in a country at war, and this above all in the south of Libya, in the immense Saharan region of Fezzan, the gateway to the country, bordering Algeria, Niger, and Chad and almost inaccessible to international humanitarian agencies.

    A game in which intelligence plays central role (as also revealed by the journalist Lorenzo D’Agostino on Foreign Policy), as indeed it did in another negotiation and exchange of money: those 5 million euros destined — according to various journalistic reconstructions — to a Sabratha militia, the Anas Al-Dabbashi Brigade, to stop departures from the coastal city.

    A year later, its leader, Ahmed Al-Dabbashi, will be sanctioned by the UN Security Council, as leader for criminal activities related to human trafficking.

    The one built in record time by the ministry led by Marco Minniti is therefore a complicated and expensive puzzle. To finance it, there are above all the Trust Fund for Africa of the EU, and the Italian Africa Fund, initially headed only by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and unpacked among several ministries for the occasion, but also the Internal Security Fund of the EU, which funds military equipment for all Italian security forces, as well as funds and activities from the Ministry of Defense.

    A significant part of those 666 million euros dedicated to border control, but also of funds to support governance and fight traffickers, converges and enters this plan: a machine that was built too quickly, among whose wheels human rights and Libya’s peace process are sacrificed.

    “We were looking for an immediate result and we lost sight of the big picture, sacrificing peace on the altar of the fight against migration, when Libya was in pieces, in the hands of militias who were holding us hostage”. This is how former Deputy Minister Mario Giro describes the troubled handling of the Libyan dossier.

    For Marwa Mohamed, a Libyan activist, all these funds and interventions were “provided without any real clause of respect for human rights, and have fragmented the country even more, because they were intercepted by the militias, which are the same ones that manage both the smuggling of migrants that detention centers, such as that of Abd el-Rahman al-Milad, known as ‘al-Bija’ ”.

    Projects aimed at Libyan municipalities, included in the interventions on the root causes of migration — such as the whole detention system, invigorated by the introduction of people intercepted at sea (and ‘improved’ through millions of euros of Italian funds) — offer legitimacy, when they do not finance it directly, to the ramified and violent system of local powers that the German political scientist Wolfram Lacher defines as the ‘Tripoli militia cartel‘. [for more details on the many Italian funds in Libya, read here].
    Fondi italiani in Libia Read more

    “Bringing migrants back to shore, perpetuating a detention system, does not only mean subjecting people to new abuses, but also enriching the militias, fueling the conflict”, continues Mohamed, who is now based in London, where she is a spokesman of the Libyan Lawyers for Justice organization.

    The last few years of Italian cooperation, she argues, have been “a sequence of lost opportunities”. And to those who tell you — Italian and European officials especially — that reforming justice, putting an end to that absolute impunity that strengthens the militias, is too difficult, Mohamed replies without hesitation: “to sign the Memorandum of Understanding, the authorities contacted the militias close to the Tripoli government one by one and in the meantime built a non-existent structure from scratch, the Libyan Coast Guard: and you’re telling me that you can’t put the judicial system back on its feet and protect refugees? ”

    The only thing that mattered, however, in that summer of 2017, were the numbers. Which, for the first time since 2013, were falling again, and quickly. In the month of August there were 80 percent fewer landings than the year before. And so it would be for the following months and years.

    “Since then, we have continued to allocate, renewing programs and projects, without asking for any guarantee in exchange for the treatment of migrants”, explains Matteo De Bellis, researcher at Amnesty International, remembering that the Italian promise to modify the Memorandum of Understanding, introducing clauses of protection, has been on stop since the controversial renewal of the document, in February 2020.

    Repatriations, evacuations, promises

    We are 1500 kilometers of road, and sand, south of Tripoli. Here Salah* spends his days escaping a merciless sun. The last three years of the life of the thirty-year-old Sudanese have not offered much else and now, like many fellow sufferers, he does not hide his fatigue.

    We are in a camp 15 kilometers from Agadez, in Niger, in the middle of the Sahara desert, where Salah lives with a thousand people, mostly Sudanese from the Darfur region, the epicenter of one of the most dramatic and lethal conflicts of recent decades.

    Like almost all the inhabitants of this temporary Saharan settlement, managed by the UN High Commissioner for Refugees and — at the end of 2020 — undergoing rehabilitation also thanks to Italian funds, he passed through Libya and since 2017, after three years of interceptions at sea and detention, he’s been desperately searching for a way out, for a future.

    Salah fled Darfur in 2016, after receiving threats from pro-government armed militias, and reached Tripoli after a series of vicissitudes and violence. In late spring 2017, he sailed from nearby Zawiya with 115 other people. They were intercepted, brought back to shore and imprisoned in a detention center, formally headed by the government but in fact controlled by the Al-Nasr militia, linked to the trafficker Al-Bija.

    “They beat us everywhere, for days, raped some women in front of us, and asked everyone to call families to get money sent,” Salah recalls. Months later, after paying some money and escaping, he crossed the Sahara again, up to Agadez. UNHCR had just opened a facility and from there, as rumour had it, you could ask to be resettled to Europe.

    Faced with sealed maritime borders, and after experiencing torture and abuse, that faint hope set in motion almost two thousand people, who, hoping to reach Italy, found themselves on the edges of the Sahara, along what many, by virtue of investments and negotiations, had started to call the ‘new European frontier’.

    Three years later, a little over a thousand people remain of that initial group. Only a few dozen of them had access to resettlement, while many returned to Libya, and to all of its abuses.

    Something similar is also happening in Tunisia, where since 2017, the number of migrants and refugees entering the country has increased. They are fleeing by land and sometimes by sea from Libya, going to crowd UN structures. Then, faced with a lack of real prospects, they return to Libya.

    For Romdhane Ben Amor, spokesman for the Tunisian Federation for Economic and Social Rights, “in Tunisia European partners have financed a non-reception: overcrowded centers in unworthy conditions, which have become recruitment areas for traffickers, because in fact there are two options offered there: go home or try to get back to the sea “.

    In short, even the interventions for the protection of migrants and refugees must be read in a broader context, of a contraction of mobility and human rights. “The refugee management itself has submitted to the goal of containment, which is the true original sin of the Italian and European strategy,” admits a UNHCR official.

    This dogma of containment, at any cost, affects everyone — people who travel, humanitarian actors, civil society, local governments — by distorting priorities, diverting funds, and undermining future relationships and prospects. The same ones that European officials call partnerships and which in the case of Africa, as reiterated in 2020 by President Ursula Von Der Leyen, should be “between equals”.

    Let’s take another example: the Egypt of President Abdel Fetah Al-Sisi. Since 2016, it has been increasingly isolated on the international level, also due to violent internal repression, which Italy knows something about. Among the thousands of people who have been disappeared or killed in recent years, is researcher Giulio Regeni, whose body was thrown on the side of a road north of Cairo in February 2016.

    Around the time of the murder, in which the complicity and cover-ups by the Egyptian security forces were immediately evident, the Italian Ministry of the Interior restarted its dialogue with the country. “It’s absurd, but Italy started to support Egypt in negotiations with the European Union,” explains lawyer Muhammed Al-Kashef, a member of the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Right and now a refugee in Germany.

    By inserting itself on an already existing cooperation project that saw italy, for example, finance the use of fingerprint-recording software used by the Egyptian police, the Italian Ministry of the Interior was able to create a police academy in Cairo, inaugurated in 2018 with European funds, to train the border guards of over 20 African countries. Italy also backed Egyptian requests within the Khartoum Process and, on a different front, sells weapons and conducts joint naval exercises.

    “Rome could have played a role in Egypt, supporting the democratic process after the 2011 revolution, but it preferred to fall into the migration trap, fearing a wave of migration that would never happen,” says Al-Kashef.

    With one result: “they have helped transform Egypt into a country that kills dreams, and often dreamers too, and from which all young people today want to escape”. Much more so than in 2015 or that hopeful 2011.

    Cracks in the wall, and how to widen them

    If you have read this far, following personal stories and routes of people and funds, you will have understood one thing, above all: that the beating heart of this strategy, set up by Italy with the participation of the European Union and vice versa, is the reduction of migrations across the Mediterranean. The wall, in fact.

    Now try to add other European countries to this picture. Since 2015 many have fully adopted — or returned to — this process of ‘externalization’ of migration policies. Spain, where the Canary Islands route reopened in 2019, demonstrating the fragility of the model you read about above; France, with its strategic network in the former colonies, the so-called Françafrique. And then Germany, Belgium, Holland, United Kingdom, Austria.

    Complicated, isn’t it? This great wall’s bricks and builders keep multiplying. Even more strategies, meetings, committees, funds and documents. And often, the same lack of transparency, which makes reconstructing these loans – understanding which cement, sand, and lime mixture was used, i.e. who really benefited from the expense, what equipment was provided, how the results were monitored – a long process, when it’s not impossible.

    The Pact on Migration and Asylum of the European Union, presented in September 2020, seems to confirm this: cooperation with third countries and relaunching repatriations are at its core.

    Even the European Union budget for the seven-year period 2021-2027, approved in December 2020, continues to focus on this expenditure, for example by earmarking for migration projects 10 percent of the new Neighborhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument, equipped with 70 billion euros, but also diverting a large part of the Immigration and Asylum Fund (8.7 billion) towards support for repatriation, and foreseeing 12.1 billion euros for border control.

    While now, with the new US presidency, some have called into question the future of the wall on the border with Mexico, perhaps the most famous of the anti-migrant barriers in the world, the wall built in the Mediterranean and further south, up to the equator, has seemingly never been so strong.

    But economists, sociologists, human rights defenders, analysts and travelers all demonstrate the problems with this model. “It’s a completely flawed approach, and there are no quick fixes to change it,” says David Kipp, a researcher at the German Institute for International Affairs, a government-funded think-tank.

    For Kipp, however, we must begin to deflate this migration bubble, and go back to addressing migration as a human phenomenon, to be understood and managed. “I dream of the moment when this issue will be normalized, and will become something boring,” he admits timidly.

    To do this, cracks must be opened in the wall and in a model that seems solid but really isn’t, that has undesirable effects, violates human rights, and isolates Europe and Italy.

    Anna Knoll, researcher at the European Center for Development Policy Management, explains for example that European policies have tried to limit movements even within Africa, while the future of the continent is the freedom of movement of goods and people, and “for Europe, it is an excellent time to support this, also given the pressure from other international players, China first of all”.

    For Sabelo Mbokazi, who heads the Labor and Migration department of the Social Affairs Commission of the African Union (AU), there is one issue on which the two continental blocs have divergent positions: legal entry channels. “For the EU, they are something residual, we have a much broader vision,” he explains. And this will be one of the themes of the next EU-AU summit, which was postponed several times in 2020.

    It’s a completely flawed approach, and there are no quick fixes to change it
    David Kipp - researcher at the German Institute for International Affairs

    Indeed, the issue of legal access channels to the Italian and European territory is one of the most important, and so far almost imperceptible, cracks in this Big Wall. In the last five years, Italy has spent just 15 million euros on it, 1.1 percent of the total expenditure dedicated to external dimensions of migration.

    The European Union hasn’t done any better. “Legal migration, which was one of the pillars of the strategy born in Valletta in 2015, has remained a dead letter, but if we limit ourselves to closing the borders, we will not go far”, says Stefano Manservisi, who as a senior official of the EU Commission worked on all the migration dossiers during those years.

    Yet we all know that a trafficker’s worst enemy are passport stamps, visas, and airline tickets.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=HmR96ySikkY

    Helen Dempster, who’s an economist at the Center for Global Development, spends her days studying how to do this: how to open legal channels of entry, and how to get states to think about it. And there is an effective example: we must not end up like Japan.

    “For decades, Japan has had very restrictive migration policies, it hasn’t allowed anyone in”, explains Dempster, “but in recent years it has realized that, with its aging population, it soon won’t have enough people to do basic jobs, pay taxes, and finance pensions”. And so, in April 2019, the Asian country began accepting work visa applications, hoping to attract 500,000 foreign workers.

    In Europe, however, “the hysteria surrounding migration in 2015 and 2016 stopped all debate“. Slowly, things are starting to move again. On the other hand, several European states, Italy and Germany especially, have one thing in common with Japan: an increasingly aging population.

    “All European labor ministries know that they must act quickly, but there are two preconceptions: that it is difficult to develop adequate projects, and that public opinion is against it.” For Dempster, who helped design an access program to the Belgian IT sector for Moroccan workers, these are false problems. “If we want to look at it from the point of view of the security of the receiving countries, bringing a person with a passport allows us to have a lot more information about who they are, which we do not have if we force them to arrive by sea”, she explains.

    Let’s look at some figures to make it easier: in 2007, Italy made 340,000 entry visas available, half of them seasonal, for non-EU workers, as part of the Flows Decree, Italy’s main legal entry channel adopted annually by the government. Few people cried “invasion” back then. Ten years later, in 2017, those 119,000 people who reached Italy through the Mediterranean seemed a disproportionate number. In the same year, the quotas of the Flow decree were just 30,000.

    Perhaps these numbers aren’t comparable, and building legal entry programs is certainly long, expensive, and apparently impractical, if we think of the economic and social effects of the coronavirus pandemic in which we are immersed. For Dempster, however, “it is important to be ready, to launch pilot programs, to create infrastructures and relationships”. So that we don’t end up like Japan, “which has urgently launched an access program for workers, without really knowing how to manage them”.

    The Spanish case, as already mentioned, shows how a model born twenty years ago, and then adopted along all the borders between Europe and Africa, does not really work.

    As international mobility declined, aided by the pandemic, at least 41,000 people landed in Spain in 2020, almost all of them in the Canary Islands. Numbers that take us back to 2006 and remind us how, after all, this ‘outsourcing’ offers costly and ineffective solutions.

    It’s reminiscent of so-called planned obsolescence, the production model for which a technological object isn’t built to last, inducing the consumer to replace it after a few years. But continually renewing and re-financing these walls can be convenient for multinational security companies, shipyards, political speculators, authoritarian regimes, and international traffickers. Certainly not for citizens, who — from the Italian and European institutions — would expect better products. May they think of what the world will be like in 10, 30, 50 years, and avoid trampling human rights and canceling democratic processes in the name of a goal that — history seems to teach — is short-lived. The ideas are not lacking. [At this link you’ll find the recommendations developed by ActionAid: https://thebigwall.org/en/recommendations/].

    https://thebigwall.org/en
    #Italie #externalisation #complexe_militaro-industriel #migrations #frontières #business #Afrique #budget #Afrique_du_Nord #Libye #chiffres #Niger #Soudan #Ethiopie #Sénégal #root_causes #causes_profondes #contrôles_frontaliers #EU_Trust_Fund_for_Africa #Trust_Fund #propagande #campagne #dissuasion

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749
    Et plus précisément :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765328

    ping @isskein @karine4 @rhoumour @_kg_

  • European Commission Publishes Findings of the First Annual Assessment of Third Countries’ Cooperation on Readmission

    Following changes to the #Visa_Code in 2019, the Commission (https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/sites/homeaffairs/files/pdf/10022021_communication_on_enhancing_cooperation_on_return_and_readmission_) assessed the level of readmission cooperation with third countries and submitted a report to the Council. While the report itself is not public, a Communication published this week summarises the main findings of this assessment and sets out next steps regarding the EU’s own return policy and in relation to third countries.

    The Commission has completed its first factual assessment on readmission cooperation, an obligation that stems from the recently introduced Article 25a of the Visa Code. It is based on quantitative and qualitative data provided by Member States and Schengen Associated Countries and data collected by Eurostat and the European Border and Coast Guard Agency (Frontex) on return and irregular arrivals. The third countries covered by the assessment are not listed but based on the information regarding the selection criteria, it is likely to include around 50 countries.

    While the actual report which the Commission prepared for the consideration of the Council is not publicly available, a Communication published alongside it summarises the challenges of return procedures within the EU and highlights the gap between the number of return orders issues and readmission requests to third countries.

    The different obstacles that Member States face in returning people range from the level of cooperation of third country governments in the identification and issuance of travel documents to the refusal of some countries to accept non-voluntary returnees. Those obstacles are experienced differently, depending on which type of cooperation framework is used. Cooperation on readmission is improved through the deployment of electronic platforms for processing readmission applications (Readmission Case Management Systems – RCMS) and European Return or Migration Liaison Officers who are based in third countries.

    The Communication points out that for almost one third of the countries covered by the assessment, cooperation works well with most Member States, for almost another one third the level of cooperation is average and for more than one third the level of cooperation needs to be improved from the perspective of Member States.

    To address this, the Council will discuss more restrictive or more favourable visa measures for third countries as foreseen under the Visa Code. The Communication also makes reference to the usage of EU funding to support the objective of increasing returns, such as the Asylum Migration and Integration Fund (AMIF), the Border Management and Visa Instrument (BMVI), the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI), and the Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA III) as well as changes introduced in the proposal for the recast Return Directive. It recalls that work on readmission will be part of the partnerships the EU is pursuing and the new proposals as set out in the Pact on Migration and Asylum. In relation to this, the model of return sponsorship and the upcoming appointment of the Return Coordinator is mentioned.

    For Further Information:

    – ECRE, Return Policy: Desperately seeking evidence and balance, July 2019: https://www.ecre.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/Policy-Note-19.pdf
    - ECRE Comments on Recast Return Directive , November 2018: https://www.ecre.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/ECRE-Comments-Commission-Proposal-Return-Directive.pdf
    - ECRE, Return: No Safety in Numbers, November 2017: https://www.ecre.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Policy-Note-09.pdf

    https://www.ecre.org/european-commission-publishes-findings-of-the-first-annual-assessment-of-third

    –-> Dans le bulletin hebdomadaire d’ECRE, il est fait état d’un rapport élaboré par la Commission sur une évaluation factuelle en matière de réadmission. Ecre dit à ce propos que « Les pays tiers couverts par l’évaluation ne sont pas énumérés mais, sur la base des informations relatives aux critères de sélection, il est probable qu’elle inclue une cinquantaine de pays. »
    Ce rapport n’est pas public.

    #externalisation #réadmission #accords_de_réadmission #UE #EU #Union_européenne #asile #migrations #réfugiés #pays_tiers #code_des_visas

    –—

    ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation des frontières :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765331

  • Migration and asylum: updates to the EU-Africa ’#Joint_Valletta_Action_Plan' on the way

    In November 2015 European and African heads of state met at a summit in Valletta, Malta, “to discuss a coordinated answer to the crisis of migration and refugee governance in Europe.” Since then joint activities on migration and asylum have increased significantly, according to documents published here by Statewatch. The Council is now examining an update to the ’Joint Valletta Action Plan’ (JVAP) and considering how to give it “a renewed sense of purpose”.

    "The #JVAP has an important bearing within the #GAMM [#Global_Approach_on_Migration_and_Mobility] and in the EU migration policies context, since it established the first ever framework for exchanges and monitoring of migration priorities involving a significant number of both European and African partners. The JVAP plays an important role in the implementation of the proposed new Pact on Migration and Asylum, tabled by the Commission in September 2020.

    “Over the last five years, the JVAP’s operational focus has grown in size and scope, as evidenced by the JVAP database.

    Several other benefits stem from the strategic linkage between the JVAP and the two Processes. One worth mentioning is the growing operationalisation of the regional migration dialogues through, in particular, the development of resources with an operational focus and the participant profiling, increasingly adapted to the stakes of the meetings. For example, the Rabat Process has developed the labelling mechanism, the reference countries system and the laboratory of ideas to step up the implementation and monitoring of each area of the Marrakesh Action Plan.”

    “The JVAP is therefore widely seen as having contributed to shaping the political, technical, and financial architecture of EU-Africa engagement on migration and mobility. At the same time, the JVAP provides a forum of discussion that rises to the political level and so could serve as a forum for debate and discussion in the future, especially should political circumstances call for high-level multilateral engagement on migration.”

    https://www.statewatch.org/news/2021/february/migration-and-asylum-updates-to-the-eu-africa-joint-valletta-action-plan

    #update #mise_à_jour #Valletta #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #sommet_de_La_Vallette #La_Vallette #Vallette

    –---

    ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation:
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749

  • Danish government : Pushing migration outside Europe’s boundaries

    Denmark has appointed a new special migration envoy to “help open doors” towards a new EU migration policy which would push reception centers outside EU borders. The government on Thursday also said that Tunisia should take in the 27 migrants aboard the Danish-flagged tanker Maersk Etienne which has been stranded off Malta for weeks.

    On Thursday, Denmark’s foreign ministry announced it will be appointing Anders Tang Friborg to the post of special envoy on migration. The new ambassador is expected to “help open doors” towards a new EU migration policy, which the Danes hope will move towards opening reception centers outside EU borders in order to process asylum claims more quickly and return anyone who is refused protection by EU countries, the news agency Associated Press (AP) reports.

    Friborg has held leading positions in the Danish Foreign Ministry, the UN and was head of Denmark’s mission in the Palestinian Territories. According to the Copenhagen Post (CPH), he would be there to “promote the Danish government’s ideas on asylum and migration issues.”

    Towards a new system of migration

    Denmark hopes to help migrants in their own regions, in order to try and prevent them ever setting out on dangerous journeys towards Europe in the first place.

    Foreign Minister Jeppe Kofod told CPH that “the current international asylum system is inhumane, unfair and untenable.”

    “We want a system that tackles the problem of cynical human traffickers earning immense sums while children, women and men are abused along migration routes or drown in the Mediterranean,” Kofod told CPH.

    The goal of Denmark’s Social Democratic-led coalition is to prevent as many “spontaneous asylum-seekers as possible” coming into the country, reported AP. The way to achieve this goal was to establish “one or more reception centers outside the EU and thereby removing the migrants’ incentive to cross the Mediterranean,” said Denmark’s Acting Immigration Minister Kaare Dybvad Bek, quoted by AP.

    Bek added that the new ambassador would have a taskforce, which was established at the beginning of September, in order to carry out the work. Bek admitted to AP that his task would be “anything but easy.” The Danish government has not yet clarified in which countries they are hoping to set up the new reception centers.

    Migrants stranded on Etienne tanker off Malta

    Meanwhile on Thursday the Danish government indicated that Tunisia should accept the 27 migrants which have been stranded on board the Danish-flagged freighter Etienne for over a month.

    The Danish immigration ministry told the news agency Agence France Presse (AFP) in a statement that “the Danish government’s assessment is that Tunisia should honor its responsibility for receiving the 27 people [aboard the Maersk Etienne].” The ministry clarified that their assesment was “among other things based on the fact that the ship’s planned destination was Tunisia and that the migrants were rescued close to Tunisia.”

    The oil and chemical tanker Etienne, which belongs to the Danish shipping company Maersk, picked up the 27 migrants in August after it was called to provide assistance by the Maltese Search and Rescue Coordination. The group include one child and a pregnant woman.

    Since then, the tanker has been stranded off Malta and has been denied entry to Mediterranean ports.

    On Sunday, Maltese Prime Minister Robert Abela also abdicated responsibility for the people on board, according to AFP, saying the migrants on board were “not his country’s responsibility as the vessel sails under the Danish flag.”

    “Stuck at sea for 35 days and counting,” said Maersk in a tweet on Wedensday. “The crew and the people they rescued, now need rescuing from this stalemate. When will relevant authorities take responsibility?”

    ’Not a safe place’

    The ship’s Captain, a Ukrainian, has repeatedly called to be allowed to disembark the rescued migrants, explaining in video messages and statements that his tanker is not set up to host guests on board. In videos he and the ship’s crew have shown how the migrants are sleeping mostly on deck, tucked in between metal struts with only buckets and hoses in which to wash and prepare food.

    According to a press release by the UN refugee agency UNHCR, the ship’s crew have been “sharing food, water and blankets with those rescued,” but are “not trained or able to provide medical assistance to those who need it.” The UNHCR added that “a commercial vessel is not a safe environment for these vulnerable people and they must be immediately brought to a safe port.”

    The statement reads: “The Maersk Etienne fulfilled its responsibilities, but now finds itself in a diplomatic game of pass the parcel.”

    ’Conditions are rapidly deteriorating’

    Four days ago, the Secretary General of the International Chamber of Shipping, Guy Platten, also spoke up on the ship’s behalf, explaining that “conditions are rapidly deteriorating onboard, and we can no longer sit by while governments ignore the plight of these people.”

    Three of the migrants already jumped overboard in desperation, only to be recovered again by the crew of the Etienne. Platten added that the “shipping industry takes its legal and humanitarian obligations to assist people in distress at sea extremely seriously, and has worked hard to ensure that ships are as prepared as they can be when presented with the prospect of large-scale reescues at sea. However, merchant vessels are not designed or equipped for this purpose, and states need to play their part.”

    https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/27216/danish-government-pushing-migration-outside-europe-s-boundaries

    –-> Une nouvelle qui date de septembre 2020 et que je mets ici pour archivage...

    #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #procédure_d'asile #Danemark

    –----

    voir la métaliste sur les tentatives d’externalisation de la procédure d’asile de différents pays européens dans l’histoire :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/900122

  • L’ASGI demande à la #Cour_des_comptes italienne l’ouverture d’une #enquête sur l’utilisation des #fonds_publics dans les #centres_de_détention en Libye

    L’ASGI a déposé une #plainte auprès de la Cour des comptes à Rome, soulignant plusieurs profils critiques liés aux activités menées par certaines ONG italiennes en Libye avec des fonds de l’#Agence_italienne_pour_la_coopération_au_développement (AICS).

    La plainte est basée sur le rapport « Profils critiques des activités des ONG italiennes dans les centres de détention en Libye avec des fonds de l’AICS » (https://sciabacaoruka.asgi.it/en/italian-ngos-activities-in-libyan-detention-centres), publié le 15 juillet 2020, dans lequel l’ASGI analyse une série de documents obtenus du ministère des affaires étrangères et de l’AICS suite à des demandes d’accès civique. La plainte porte à l’attention de la Cour des comptes de nombreux profils critiques dans la conception et la mise en œuvre des actions au sein des centres de détention en Libye, en partie déjà mis en évidence dans le rapport.

    La plainte affirme que dans certains centres, les ONG italiennes semblent avoir effectué des activités au profit de l’entretien des locaux de détention plutôt que des détenus, avec des activités visant à préserver leur solidité et leur efficacité. Par conséquent, ces interventions pourraient avoir contribué à renforcer la capacité du centre à accueillir, même à l’avenir, de nouveaux prisonniers dans des conditions désespérément inhumaines. En outre, bien que les centres libyens soient universellement reconnus comme des lieux de torture et de mortification de la dignité humaine, le gouvernement italien n’a pas conditionné la mise en œuvre de ces interventions à un engagement quelconque envers les autorités de Tripoli pour apporter une amélioration durable des conditions des étrangers y détenus.

    Dans la plainte l’ASGI souligne que la mise en œuvre d’interventions d’urgence en faveur de personnes détenues dans des conditions inhumaines sur ordre d’un gouvernement étranger ne semble pas relever de la promotion de la « coopération et du #développement » prévue par le statut de l’AICS.

    La plainte attire également l’attention de la Cour des comptes sur les doutes de l’ASGI quant à la destination réelle des biens et services fournis, compte tenue aussi de la décision du ministère des affaires étrangères d’interdire au personnel italien de se rendre en Libye. Le fait que la gestion de la plupart des centres de détention officiels soit menée par les milices, et l’approximation de la déclaration des dépenses encourues par certaines ONG dans leurs activités, ne semblent pas avoir conduit l’AICS à exercer un contrôle strict sur la dépense de fonds publics et sur ce qui est effectivement mis en œuvre par les partenaires libyens sur le terrain.

    Par cette plainte, l’ASGI demande donc à la Cour des comptes d’examiner si le comportement de l’AICS est conforme à ses objectifs statutaires et à ses obligations de veiller à la bonne utilisation des fonds publics, en déterminant les responsabilités éventuelles de l’Agence tant du point de vue d’un éventuel #préjudice_budgétaire que d’un éventuel préjudice à l’image du gouvernement italien.

    https://sciabacaoruka.asgi.it/fr/lasgi-demande-a-la-cour-des-comptes-italienne-louverture-dune-enq
    #justice #Italie #centres #camps #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés

  • Le droit d’asile à l’épreuve de l’externalisation des politiques migratoires

    Le traitement des #demandes_d’asile s’opère de plus en plus en #périphérie et même en dehors des territoires européens. #Hotspots, missions de l’#Ofpra en #Afrique, #accord_UE-Turquie : telles sont quelques-unes des formes que prend la volonté de mise à distance des demandeurs d’asile et réfugiés qui caractérise la politique de l’Union européenne depuis deux décennies.

    Pour rendre compte de ce processus d’#externalisation, les auteur·es de ce nouvel opus de la collection « Penser l’immigration autrement » sont partis d’exemples concrets pour proposer une analyse critique de ces nouvelles pratiques ainsi que de leurs conséquences sur les migrants et le droit d’asile. Ce volume prolonge la journée d’étude organisée par le #Gisti et l’Institut de recherche en droit international et européen (Iredies) de la Sorbonne, le 18 janvier 2019, sur ce thème.

    Sommaire :

    Introduction
    I. Les logiques de l’externalisation

    – Externalisation de l’asile : concept, évolution, mécanismes, Claire Rodier

    - La #réinstallation des réfugiés, aspects historiques et contemporains, Marion Tissier-Raffin

    – Accueil des Syriens : une « stratification de procédures résultant de décisions chaotiques », entretien avec Jean-Jacques Brot

    - #Dublin, un mécanisme d’externalisation intra-européenne, Ségolène Barbou des Places

    II. Les lieux de l’externalisation

    - L’accord Union européenne - Turquie, un modèle ? Claudia Charles

    – La #Libye, arrière-cour de l’Europe, entretien avec Jérôme Tubiana

    - L’#Italie aux avant-postes, entretien avec Sara Prestianni

    - Le cas archétypique du #Niger, Pascaline Chappart

    #Etats-Unis- #Mexique : même obsession, mêmes conséquences, María Dolores París Pombo

    III. Les effets induits de l’externalisation

    – Une externalisation invisible : les #camps, Laurence Dubin

    - #Relocalisation depuis la #Grèce : l’illusion de la solidarité, Estelle d’Halluin et Émilie Lenain

    - Table ronde : l’asile hors les murs ? L’Ofpra au service de l’externalisation

    https://www.gisti.org/publication_pres.php?id_article=5383
    #procédures_d'asile #asile #migrations #réfugiés #rapport #USA

    ping @karine4 @isskein @rhoumour @_kg_

  • Financement des frontieres : fonds et stratégies pour arrêter l’immigration
    Funding the border : funds and strategies to stop migration
    Financement des frontieres : fonds et stratégies pour arrêter l’immigration

    Dans la première partie de ce document, nous analysons les dépenses pour l’externalisation de la gestion migratoire prévues dans le prochain budget de l’UE ; nous sommes actuellement dans la phase finale des #négociations et le rapport donne un aperçu des négociations jusqu’à présent.
    Dans la deuxième partie, nous nous concentrons sur l’évolution des politiques d’externalisation concernant la route migratoire qui intéresse le plus l’Italie : l’article de Sara Prestianni (EuroMed Rights) présente un panorama sur la situation dangereuse de violations continues des droits de l’Homme en Méditerranée centrale. Dans les deux chapitres suivants, les chercheurs Jérôme Tubiana et Clotilde Warin décrivent l’évolution de l’externalisation des frontières au Soudan et dans la région du #Sahel.

    Pour télécharger les rapports (en français, anglais et italien) :
    FR : https://www.arci.it/app/uploads/2020/12/FR_ARCI-report_Financement-de-Frontie%CC%80res.pdf
    EN : https://www.arci.it/app/uploads/2020/12/ENG_ARCI-report_Funding-the-Border.pdf
    IT : https://www.arci.it/app/uploads/2020/12/Quarto-Rapporto-di-esternalizzazione.pdf

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #externalisation #frontières #financement #budget #Mali #Méditerranée_centrale #mer_Méditerranée #Soudan #fonds #rapport #ARCI

    –-

    ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation des frontières :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749

    ping @_kg_ @karine4 @rhoumour @isskein

  • EU concludes €6 billion contract for refugees in Turkey

    The European Union has paid the final instalment of a €6 billion fund to Turkey as part of a deal on hosting refugees. The 2016 agreement has led to standoffs, as Turkey claimed that it had not received all the money promised.

    In a statement on December 17, the EU delegation to Turkey, led by Nikolaus Meyer-Landrut, said that it had finalized “the contracting of €6 billion in EU support to refugees and host communities in Turkey,” reported the French news agency AFP. On Twitter, it described the finalization as a “major milestone accomplished.”

    The EU-Turkey deal was struck in March 2016 to try to ease Europe’s biggest refugee crisis since World War Two, which saw more than a million people arrive in Europe in 2015. The terms of the deal stipulated that Turkey would agree to accept the return of migrants from Greece who did not qualify for asylum, and would do more to control its borders and the numbers attempting to leave Turkey for Greece and admission to the EU.

    In return, the EU promised €6 billion in aid. However, earlier this year the Turkish government accused the EU of having reneged on its payments and claimed to have spent around €32 billion on hosting the community of 3.6 million Syrian refugees in Turkey, AFP reports.

    In spring 2020, the EU and Turkey came to a standoff with Turkey saying it would refuse to control its borders to Greece if the monies were not paid. The EU said that it had paid everything it had promised up to that point. Talks between the two sides calmed the waters but not before Turkey had allegedly helped bus thousands of migrants to the Greek border, where some managed to cross but many more were blocked by Greek border guards.
    Focus on making sure refugees benefit

    The EU delegation said that now all the money has been handed over, it hopes that the two countries will “focus on making sure that the refugees and host communities will benefit from our projects.”

    AFP reported that the EU money was not paid directly to the Turkish government but had been “earmarked for specific social projects inside Turkey for helping refugees.” Some of the money supports health services for migrants and other projects seek to improve living conditions for vulnerable refugee communities.

    The English version of Turkish newspaper, Hurriyet Daily News, said the EU delegation was contracted to provide not just basic needs and healthcare for refugees but also “protection, municipal infrastructure and vocational and technical education and training, employment and support to private sector SMEs and entrepreneurship.” This was estimated to cost €780 million.
    Various projects

    Hurriyet added that the EU was allocating €300 million to support Migrant Health Services in Turkey. The Turkish Family, Labor and Social Services Ministry will take charge of two different projects to ease living conditions for vulnerable refugees and offer them “protective social services.”

    A smaller social assistance project to the tune of €245 million will be able to offer refugees cash payments when needed.

    The French development agency AFD will be receiving €59 million to improve municipal infrastructure, including “the construction or the rehabilitation of water, wastewater and solid waste systems.”

    A further €156 million will be for development projects, reported Hurriyet. A German state development bank KfW will be running vocational training projects for young people in the refugee and host communities. They will also receive €75 million to support Syrian and Turkish small and medium businesses.

    According to Hurriyet, Meyer-Landrut commended Turkey for hosting so many refugees and further promised that the EU would “be prepared to continue providing financial assistance to Syrian refugees and host communities in Turkey.”

    Adnan Ertem, the Deputy Family, Labor and Social Services Minister, told Hurriyet that the Turkish Red Crescent would be Turkey’s main partner in the project.
    Turkey ’could face extended sanctions’

    Meanwhile, in Greece, the English language news site Ekathimerini sounded a more negative vote. As one deal was finalized, it warned that Turkey was “at risk of extended sanctions by March,” over its drilling operations inside the Republic of Cyprus’ exclusive economic zone EEZ.

    Ekathimerini said that, if imposed, the sanctions could also be extended to entities and not just placed on individuals. Earlier in October, the European Commission handed a mandate to EU Commissioner Josep Borrell to prepare a report on the “state of play concerning the EU-Turkey political, economic and trade relations and on instruments and options on how to proceed, including on the extension and the scope” of the sanctions.

    https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/29205/eu-concludes-6-billion-contract-for-refugees-in-turkey
    #Turquie #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #EU #UE #financement #accord_EU-Turquie #Union_européenne #aide_financière #budget

    –—

    ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation des #frontières :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765319

  • AIBD - Indignation de passagers sénégalais après des contrôles à l’embarquement faits par des policiers français et espagnols : la #souveraineté sénégalaise à rude épreuve !

    Des témoignages de passagers qui ont transité cette semaine par l’Aéroport Blaise Diagne de #Diass font état d’une situation inédite au niveau du contrôle préalable à l’embarquement. Pour la plupart en route pour des pays européens, ils ont remarqué selon certains qui ont bien voulu témoigner à Dakaractu, un contrôle a posteriori effectué par des éléments qui semblaient appartenir à des polices étrangères. En effet, après le contrôle des sociétés habituelles et connues à l’#AIBD, des policiers étrangers et principalement français et espagnols se chargeaient en dernier lieu, de vérifier la paperasse des passagers.

    Dakaractu qui a cherché à en savoir plus, a câblé quelques hauts gradés de la sécurité intérieure du pays. Selon un responsable c’est deux coopérants espagnols qui étaient à l’AIBD. Il a ainsi écarté toute présence de policiers français sur le périmètre du contrôle aéroportuaire. Un fait infirmé par les témoignages des passagers qui confirment bien l’enseigne de la #police française sur les tenues des agents avec le drapeau tricolore à l’appui.

    Une situation inédite qui a révulsé plus d’un passager qui ne se sont pas privés de commenter « cette bizarrerie ». D’autant plus que personne n’imagine voir un jour des policiers sénégalais préposés au contrôle dans un aéroport Européen, quel que puisse être le pays.

    Mais du côté de notre interlocuteur au niveau de la sécurité intérieure toujours, on se défend en indiquant que « ces deux agents étaient dans ce que l’on appelle dans le jargon de la sécurité publique, des « #mentors ». Leur présence entre dans le cadre d’un #accord nommé #programme_opérationnel_conjoint entre l’État et l’Union européenne, a-t-il renseigné en outre. Ils devraient selon lui, former de jeunes policiers sénégalais à certaines méthodes de #dissimulation. Sauf que selon nos sources de l’aéroport du côté des passagers, il n’y avait nulle part trace de policiers sénégalais près des « fameux mentors » en mission de #formation. Quoi de plus logique ?

    Du côté des passagers qui ont câblé Dakaractu on pense vraiment qu’un aéroport mais aussi le port restent des symboles de la #souveraineté_nationale d’un pays. De petites choses que l’État sénégalais « minimise », se plaignent nos interlocuteurs, mais qui donnent encore raison aux activistes qui pensent que le « Sénégal est toujours sous le joug de l’impérialisme français ».

    https://www.dakaractu.com/AIBD-Indignation-de-passagers-senegalais-apres-des-controles-a-l-embarque
    #aéroport #asile #migrations #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #externalisation #Sénégal #contrôles_d'identité #police #France #Espagne #officiers_de_liaison_immigration (#OLI)

    ping @rhoumour @karine4 @_kg_

  • Note d’analyse : La mise en œuvre du #fonds_fiduciaire_d’urgence au #Mali, #Niger et #Sénégal

    Cette note d’analyse actualise le rapport conjoint « Chronique d’un chantage » (https://seenthis.net/messages/652123), publié en 2017 avec le #collectif_Loujna-Tounkaranké et le réseau euro-africain Migreurop, qui dénonçait l’utilisation politique du #FFU.

    Le #fonds_fiduciaire d’urgence en faveur de la stabilité et de la lutte contre les causes profondes de la migration irrégulière et du phénomène des personnes déplacées en Afrique (FFU) de l’Union européenne (UE) a été créé lors du Sommet UE-Afrique sur les migrations de la Valette (Malte) en 2015 en réaction à l’augmentation des arrivées de personnes migrantes sur les côtes européennes.

    Les informations ont été collectées et des entretiens menés avec des acteurs de mise en œuvre dans ces trois pays.

    La Cimade, l’Association malienne des expulsés (AME), Alternative espaces citoyens Niger (AEC) et le Réseau migration et développement du Sénégal (REMIDEV) travaillent depuis de nombreuses années sur la coopération UE-Afrique en matière migratoire et ont choisi les projets en fonction de la pertinence des thématiques et des données disponibles. Certains projets ont dû être écartés (projets régionaux, projets liés à la coopération policière et militaire) par manque d’accès à l’information.

    https://www.lacimade.org/publication/note-analyse-ffu

    Pour télécharger le rapport :
    https://www.lacimade.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/LaCim.CollNotes2-UFF-10F-.pdf

    Analyse détaillée sur le Mali :
    https://www.lacimade.org/note-analyse-ffu-mali

    Analyse détaillée sur le Niger :
    https://www.lacimade.org/note-analyse-ffu-niger

    #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #rapport #La_Cimade #Cimade

    ping @isskein @_kg_ @rhoumour @karine4

    • La mise en œuvre du fonds fiduciaire d’urgence au Niger

      Analyse détaillé de la mise en œuvre du fonds fiduciaire d’urgence de l’UE au Niger à travers deux projets FFU particulièrement emblématiques en complément de la note d’analyse « La mise en œuvre du fonds fiduciaire d’urgence au Mali, Niger et Sénégal : outil de développement ou de contrôle des migrations ? ».

      Contexte de la mise en œuvre du FFU au Niger

      Un pays d’accueil de toutes formes de mobilités

      Le Niger est régulièrement évoqué comme un pays de transit des personnes migrantes vers les pays du Nord de l’Afrique et vers l’Europe. C’est notamment sur cette base que la coopération avec l’Union européenne (UE) sur les questions migratoires s’est développée. Pourtant, le Niger est avant tout depuis plusieurs années un pays « où se superposent toutes les formes de mobilités, volontaires comme forcées[1] ». Près de 500 000 personnes y sont en effet sous la protection du Haut-commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (HCR)[2] : des personnes réfugiées fuyant le conflit au Mali depuis 2012, des personnes fuyant le Nigéria ou la zone frontalière avec ce pays en raison des exactions de Boko Haram (réfugié·e·s nigérian·ne·s, personnes nigériennes de retour ou déplacées internes) ainsi que des personnes, en majorité soudanaises, en demande d’asile. Le pays accueille aussi des personnes de retour de Libye et des personnes expulsées d’Algérie (plus de 25 000 en 2019 dont 10 000 ressortissant·e·s nigérien·ne·s)[3].

      Coopération avec l’Union européenne sur les questions de migrations

      La coopération de l’UE avec le Niger sur les questions de migrations n’est pas nouvelle. Elle s’est particulièrement intensifiée à partir de 2015 suite à une augmentation des arrivées de personnes migrantes sur les côtes européennes depuis la Libye, cette année-là. L’UE rencontrant des difficultés à mener des projets destinés à contenir les personnes migrantes en Libye du fait du contexte chaotique depuis la chute de Kadhafi, elle s’est tournée vers le Niger. L’agenda européen en matière de migration adopté en mai 2015 prévoyait déjà plusieurs mesures concernant le Niger. Il a ensuite été un pays clé du Sommet UE-Afrique de La Valette (Malte) sur les migrations en novembre 2015 où les chefs d’État européens et africains ont développé un plan d’action conjoint sur les migrations, et un des principaux bénéficiaires du Fonds fiduciaire d’urgence pour l’Afrique (FFU) adopté à cette occasion.

      La loi 2015-036 sur le trafic illicite des migrants

      C’est dans ce contexte que le Niger a adopté la loi 2015-036 sur le trafic illicite des migrants en mai 2015, quelques mois avant le Sommet UE-Afrique de la Valette, durant lequel le Niger a présenté un plan spécifique de « lutte contre les migrations irrégulières ». Cette loi criminalise l’aide à l’entrée ou la sortie illégale du Niger et l’aide au maintien sur le territoire de personnes en situation irrégulière.

      Elle a été appliquée durement plusieurs mois après son adoption (été 2016), notamment dans la région d’#Agadez, et sans information préalable et préparation des populations concernées et des instances étatiques régionales. Les transporteurs (chauffeurs de bus ou d’autres véhicules privés) se dirigeant vers le Nord en dehors des convois officiels ont été particulièrement visé. Les véhicules ont été saisis et les chauffeurs déférés en justice sur la base d’une suspicion d’entrée irrégulière à venir en Algérie ou en Libye[4]. Elle a également visé les hébergeurs, les intermédiaires mais aussi les vendeurs de cartes téléphone ou d’eau…

      À Agadez, les revenus liés à la migration étaient une ressource importante pour l’économie locale. L’application de la loi a été très mal perçue par la population. Le transport des personnes dans cette région est une activité majoritairement exercée par des membres des communautés touarègue et Toubou, disposant d’agences de voyage créées à l’époque où l’économie du tourisme était encore florissante, puis reconverties dans le transport des personnes migrantes depuis la fin de la rébellion touarègue au milieu des années 1990. Cette activité était parfaitement légale et s’exerçait majoritairement avec des permis estampillés dans les mairies et escortes militaires[5]. La loi 2015-036 a interdit cette activité du jour au lendemain et criminalisé les transporteurs. Ces conséquences ont été telles sur l’économie d’Agadez et une partie de sa population qu’elles ont fait craindre pour la stabilité de celle-ci. C’est la Haute autorité à la consolidation de la paix (HACP) créé en 1995 pour la mise en œuvre des accords de pays après la rébellion touarègue, qui a alerté sur ces enjeux.
      La mise en œuvre du FFU au Niger

      Le Niger est l’un des premiers pays bénéficiaires du FFU et a bénéficié des tous premiers projets signés en 2016. Il est aussi concerné par certains projets régionaux. 12 projets nationaux sont mis en œuvre au Niger (pour un montant total de 253 millions d’euros).

      A l’image de l’ensemble des projets du FFU, la majorité (6) est gérée par des coopérations européennes ou par des organisations internationales (OIM et HCR) (3). Seuls deux projets sont gérés par un acteur nigérien (la HACP), et un par un consortium d’ONG. Cette gestion pose question, notamment en ce qui concerne la pertinence des projets comme réponses aux besoins des États bénéficiaires et leur appropriation[6]. Au Niger, un responsable de la HACP souligne que les fonds du FFU « ne vont pas aux pays bénéficiaires », ce qui revient à « affaiblir l’État qui perd en crédibilité[7] ». Dans le même sens, le bilan migration 2018-2019 du gouvernement du Niger indique que certains projets « exécutés au compte du Niger par les partenaires ne correspondent pas toujours aux besoins réels des populations au niveau des collectivités », notamment car ils ne tiennent pas compte des « plans de développement communaux et régionaux », ce qui « fait courir (…) le risque d’un déphasage par rapport aux besoins réels des populations[8] ».

      En termes d’objectifs, bien que le FFU soit principalement financé par le Fonds européen de développement (FED), une grande partie des projets pour la région Sahel (48% des fonds, 1,6 milliards d’euros) sont affectés à des projets « directement liés à la migration[9] », contrairement aux principes de l’aide au développement[10]. Le Niger reçoit la plus grosse part (24% du budget) et fait figure de pays pilote en matière de lutte contre le trafic de personnes ou les migrations « irrégulières ».

      Ainsi, concernant les objectifs des 12 projets nationaux, trois projets concernent directement la « gestion » de la migration à travers le développement local (coopération allemande – GIZ), le renforcement de la chaîne pénale (AFD) et la création d’une équipe conjointe d’investigation (ECI) « pour la lutte contre les réseaux criminels liés à l’immigration irrégulière, la traite des êtres humains et le trafic des migrants » (coopération espagnole – FIIAPP) ; deux projets de l’Organisation internationale des migrations (OIM) concernent l’assistance aux personnes migrantes et leur retour « volontaire ».

      Par ailleurs, sur la quinzaine de projets régionaux concernant le Niger, sept projets portent sur l’appui au G5 Sahel[11] (cinq projets pour 177 millions d’euros) et aux forces de police ; deux projets financent l’assistance et le retour des personnes migrantes détenues en Libye ; et un seul porte sur la mobilité légale (initiative Erasmus+ d’échanges entre étudiant·e·s universitaires avec l’Europe).

      Le projet PAIERA (Plan d’actions à impact économique rapide à Agadez) – projet terminé

      Ce projet d’un montant de 8 millions d’euros est devenu un projet phare du FFU au Niger, mis en exergue dans la communication de l’UE pour ses « success stories ». Pourtant, celui-ci a été élaboré et mis en œuvre de manière très différente des autres projets.

      Preuve du manque de prise en compte des besoins des pays concernés et de leur contexte dans l’élaboration des projets (cf. note d’analyse), celui-ci n’était pas prévu initialement. Il est un des très rares projets émanant des autorités nationales et géré directement par un organisme d’un État bénéficiaire. Ce sont en effet les autorités nigériennes, notamment la HACP, qui ont sollicité l’UE. Révélant d’une part, la capacité des autorités nigériennes à négocier avec l’UE, mais surtout l’urgence de la situation, qui a contraint l’UE à valider un tel projet, non prévu.

      Face au mécontentement de la population et aux tensions à Agadez, il vise à compenser les conséquences économiques et politiques de l’application de la loi 2015-036 en offrant « des opportunités d’emploi et d’insertion socioprofessionnelle aux acteurs économiques qui bénéficient directement ou indirectement des retombées financières liées aux migrant·e·s ».

      Le projet est géré par la HACP et par Karkara, une des plus importantes ONG de développement nigérienne. Sa mise en œuvre a été compliquée. La sélection des bénéficiaires a été longue et contestée, certaines personnes dénonçant le faible nombre de personnes retenues, leur profil et des montants alloués insuffisants. Dès la première phase de sélection, des personnes ont été exclues, notamment celles estimées être des « trafiquants » (généralement les propriétaires de véhicules ou de maisons). Il a été jugé que d’une part, elles n’avaient pas besoin du soutien du projet car elles « gagnaient beaucoup d’argent », et d’autres part qu’il n’était pas éthique de les soutenir puisqu’elles seraient des « criminelles »[12]. Par ailleurs, les montants alloués par personne se sont très vite avérés insuffisants. Des pourparlers ont été menés pendant plusieurs mois entre la HACP, Karkara et l’UE afin d’augmenter les montants pour certaines catégories de personnes. Au final, il a été convenu que les projets des ménages vulnérables pourraient atteindre 500 000 à 600 000 CFA (1000€) et ceux des acteurs de la migration jusqu’à 1,5 millions de CFA (2 287€).

      Au total, sur les 23 mois du projet, 6 565 personnes ont été recensées, 1 447 écartées, 2 345 ont déposé un dossier (constituant un projet de reconversion professionnelle) parmi lesquelles seules 371 personnes ont reçu une aide, soit à peine 6%.

      Le projet a aussi financé des activités génératrices de revenus à haute intensité de main-d’œuvre (comme la réhabilitation de la veille ville, la création de petites infrastructures dans les communes, etc.). 1 713 personnes en ont bénéficié en percevant un petit salaire (1 000 à 2 500 CFA/jour soit 1,50 à 3,80€) durant la réalisation de ces activités (en moyenne 45 à 90 jours).

      Selon les acteurs, l’évaluation finale réalisée en décembre 2019 (et dont le rapport était en cours début 2020), serait très positive. 80% des bénéficiaires auraient trouvé une occupation loin de la migration et seraient devenus autonomes financièrement.

      Mais, si le projet a eu un impact sur la stabilisation de la région d’Agadez et a permis des créations d’emplois en dehors de la migration, les emplois créés restent peu qualifiés et précaires (vendeurs de crédits de téléphone, taxi-moto, etc.). Par ailleurs, leur nombre demeure faible (371) au regard des sommes investies (8 millions d’euros) et des objectifs initiaux (65 000 emplois étaient prévus dans la fiche projet). Au final, le projet apporte une aide individuelle de court terme qui ne crée pas de valeur ou de débouchés économiques globaux pour la région comme cela pourrait être pensé dans un projet de développement à la hauteur du budget dédié.

      Le projet Mécanisme de réponse et de ressource pour les migrants (MRRM) – OIM

      Le développement impressionnant de l’OIM au Niger et de ses activités de soutien aux retours « volontaires » est sans doute un des principaux résultats du FFU au Niger. Présente depuis 2006 au Niger, l’OIM est passée d’un bureau de 39 personnes en 2015 à plus de 500 personnes en 2020 selon la Cheffe de mission. Le projet « Mécanisme de réponse et de ressources pour les migrants (MRRM) » a été un des premiers validés pour la fenêtre Sahel et Lac Tchad en janvier 2016. Il correspond à la mise en œuvre d’une « approche globale » proposée par l’OIM dès juin 2015[13] et qui a donné lieu à l’Initiative conjointe UE-OIM pour la protection et la réintégration financée à hauteur de 638 000 000€ dans le cadre du FFU et mise en œuvre dans 27 pays d’Afrique dont le Niger. Bien que déjà développée sur le continent africain, notamment en Tunisie, cette approche est pour la première fois mise en œuvre dans sa forme la plus poussée. Le Niger est ainsi « pionnier dans cette approche » et est considéré comme « une bonne pratique » pour l’OIM[14]. Le financement de cette « approche globale » est justifié dans la fiche projet FFU quasiment uniquement sur le fait que le Niger soit un pays de transit.

      Au Niger, le MRRM est une réponse à « la crise migratoire » reposant sur 5 piliers[16] :

      Le « sauvetage humanitaire » : il se déroule essentiellement dans la zone frontalière avec l’Algérie, autour d’Assamaka. Il concerne les personnes expulsées par les autorités algériennes – en dehors de tout cadre légal – et abandonnées à la frontière en plein désert (à environ 12 kilomètres d’Assamaka). Les personnes secourues sont accueillies dans un centre de transit temporaire de l’OIM à Assamaka où elles reçoivent des premières aides (nourriture, soins médicaux d’urgence). Puis l’OIM assure le transfert jusqu’à son centre de transit à Agadez des personnes qui acceptent de retourner dans leur pays d’origine. Les autres sont livrées à elles-mêmes, certaines choisiraient de tenter de repartir en Algérie. Selon l’OIM, 80 à 90% des personnes iraient au moins jusqu’à Arlit (entre Assamaka et Agadez). On retrouve ici une des composantes majeures de l’OIM au Niger : la conditionnalité de l’aide à un retour « volontaire ». L’OIM mène aussi des opérations avec la protection civile nigérienne autour de Dirkou (route de la Libye) lorsqu’elle reçoit une alerte. En 2019, environ 1000 personnes ont été assistées[17].
      L’assistance directe : elle est fournie dans les centres de transit de l’OIM (Niamey, Agadez, Dirkou, Arlit). En 2019, 18 534 personnes ont été assistées dans le centre de transit d’Agadez, dont environ 17 000 sont retournées dans leur pays « volontairement », soit 92% des personnes assistées. Le nombre de personnes migrantes « en transit » assistées par l’OIM serait marginal, l’organisation assiste essentiellement de personnes de retour de Libye ou expulsées d’Algérie. Pourtant, l’identification, le référencement et les mesures de protection des personnes en demande d’asile, et des personnes vulnérables ou victimes de violations des droits humains n’est pas (ou peu) faite. Un seul protocole semble mis en place pour les victimes de traite. Il n’existe pas de procédure systématique d’identification des personnes souhaitant demander l’asile. L’OIM ne réfère au HCR que les personnes déclarant spontanément lors du premier entretien être déjà reconnues réfugié·e·s dans un autre pays ou vouloir demander l’asile. Ainsi, seuls 23 « cas » ont été transmis au HCR en 2018, et 60 à 80 en 2019 sur les 18 534 personnes assistées. En ce sens, l’utilisation du terme « protection » ne recouvre que les besoins primaires des personnes.
      L’aide au retour volontaire et à la réintégration (AVRR) : Le Niger est devenu en peu de temps le premier pays au monde d’où partent les retours volontaires de l’OIM[18]. Ces retours concernant essentiellement des personnes de retour ou refoulées de Libye (2016-2017) ou expulsées d’Algérie (depuis fin 2017) ou, plus rarement, des personnes en transit bloquées au Niger, le caractère volontaire de ces retours peut être questionné, d’autant qu’il est la condition sine qua none pour avoir accès au centre de l’OIM à Agadez et à ses services. Comme le soulignait en 2018 le Rapporteur spécial sur les droits de l’Homme des migrants « lorsqu’il n’existe aucune solution valable susceptible de remplacer l’aide au retour volontaire (par exemple, des mesures visant à faciliter l’obtention d’un permis de séjour temporaire ou permanent, assorties d’un appui administratif, logistique et financier approprié), le retour peut difficilement être qualifié de volontaire[19] ».
      La sensibilisation à la migration « sûre et informée » : L’OIM déploie des campagnes de communication sur « la migration sûre et informée » ou « les risques de la migration irrégulière », notamment à Agadez à travers une cinquantaine de « mobilisateurs communautaires ». L’OIM utilise également les réseaux sociaux et d’autres outils comme des panneaux d’affichage dans les lieux stratégiques et une caravane de sensibilisation a eu lieu en avril 2019 baptisée In da na sa’ni (« Si seulement jamais su » en langue haussa)[20]. Des cartes avec un numéro vert sont aussi distribuées, mais l’assistance proposée sera un retour « volontaire ».
      Le suivi des flux migratoires (displacement tracking mechanism – DTM) à certains « points de suivi des flux ».

      Ainsi, le FFU au Niger a contribué à financer et à mettre en œuvre des politiques migratoires sécuritaire tournées vers le contrôle des frontières, la coopération policière et « la lutte contre les migrations irrégulières ». Sous couvert d’humanitarisme, les personnes se retrouvent bloquées le long des routes, contraintes à emprunter des routes toujours plus dangereuses et risquées au lieu de prendre des transports officiels, et sont éloignées des frontières européennes à travers les retours « volontaires » assistés de l’OIM.

      Sources :

      [1] Florence Boyer et Harouna Mounkaila, « Européanisation des politiques migratoires au Sahel, Le Niger dans l’imbroglio sécuritaire », L’Etat réhabilité en Afrique. Réinventer les politiques publiques à l’ère néolibérale, 2018.

      [2] HCR, portail opérationnel crises des réfugiés, Niger, 30/04/2020

      [3] Entretien avec l’OIM Niamey du 07/02/2020

      [4] La Cimade – Migreurop – Loujna-Tounkaranké, Chronique d’un chantage, Coopération UE-Afrique, Décryptage des instruments financiers et politiques de l’Union européenne, 2017

      [5] International Crisis Group, Garder le trafic sous contrôle dans le Nord du Niger, 06/01/2020

      [6] La Cimade, Chronique d’un chantage, op. cit

      [7] Entretien avec la HACP au Niger du 04/02/2020

      [8] Secrétariat permanent du Cadre de concertation sur la migration, Bilan migration Niger 2018-2019, 2020

      [9] Altai Consulting, EUTF Monitoring and Learning system SLC yearly 2019 report, 2020

      [10] Site de l’OCDE, Aide publique au développement, novembre 2020.

      [11] Cadre de coordination en matière de sécurité et développement réunissant le Burkina Faso, la Mauritanie, le Mali, le Niger et le Tchad.

      [12] Entretien avec Karkara Agadez, 12/02/2020

      [13] OIM, Addressing Complex Migration Flows in the Mediterranean : IOM Response Plan, 06/2015

      [14] Entretien avec l’OIM Niamey du 07/02/2020

      [15] OIM, État de la migration dans le monde 2020

      [16] Entretien avec l’OIM Agadez du 10/02/2020

      [17] Entretien avec l’OIM Niamey du 07/02/2020

      [18] OIM, 2019 return and reintegration key highlights, 2020

      [19] Conseil des droits de l’Homme des Nations unies, Rapport du Rapporteur spécial sur les droits de l’homme des migrants sur sa visite au Niger, A/HRC/41/38/Add.1, 2019

      [20] OIM, « Une caravane de sensibilisation part pour un périple d’un mois à travers le Niger », 04/05/2019

      https://www.lacimade.org/note-analyse-ffu-niger

    • La mise en œuvre du fonds fiduciaire d’urgence au #Mali

      Analyse détaillé de la mise en œuvre du fonds fiduciaire d’urgence de l’UE au Mali à travers deux projets FFU particulièrement emblématiques en complément de la note d’analyse « La mise en œuvre du fonds fiduciaire d’urgence au Mali, Niger et Sénégal : outil de développement ou de contrôle des migrations ? ».

      Contexte de la mise en œuvre du FFU au Mali

      Le contexte sécuritaire au Mali est particulièrement dégradé. Depuis 2012, le pays est en proie à un conflit interne qui déstabilise l’État en perte de contrôle sur son territoire et complexifie notamment l’accès des organisations humanitaires à certaines régions. La situation sécuritaire reste particulièrement problématique dans le nord et le centre du pays, à travers la présence de milices et de groupes armés non-étatiques. Cette situation a favorisé la résurgence de conflits communautaires qui ont fait des centaines de mort·e·s en 2019. Ce conflit a entraîné d’importants déplacements de populations vers les pays voisins ou à l’intérieur du pays (164 500 réfugié·e·s et 844 400 déplacé·e·s en 2019[1]).

      Pays à forte émigration, en particulier vers la sous-région, le Mali est aussi ciblé par l’UE comme pays de retour. Tout d’abord des populations réfugiées, selon le Haut-commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (HCR), 76 000 personnes ont été rapatriées depuis le Niger, le Burkina Faso, la Mauritanie et l’Algérie[2]. Par ailleurs, le Mali a accueilli en 2019, selon l’Organisation internationale des migrations (OIM), 5 622 personnes de retour « volontaire » de Libye, mais aussi du Niger (personnes expulsées d’Algérie) et de Mauritanie (personnes expulsées d’Espagne).

      Le Mali a lancé en 2015 une politique nationale migratoire (PONAM) mais sa mise en œuvre tarde, faute de financement. Cette politique se focalise sur la protection des Malien·ne·s de l’extérieur, l’information sur les risques de la migration irrégulière, la réinsertion des Malien·ne·s de retour (volontaire ou non) et la valorisation de la diaspora. Néanmoins, elle ne prévoit aucune mesure visant à garantir l’accueil et la protection des droits des personnes en situation de migration au Mali. En 2019, le Mali a également inauguré une brigade de répression du trafic de migrants et de la traite des êtres humains.

      La coopération de l’Union européenne avec le Mali sur les questions migratoires

      L’Union européenne (UE) est très impliquée au Mali, au même titre que la France, dans le règlement du conflit au Nord. Elle appuie la mise en œuvre de l’accord d’Alger (2015) et y intervient à travers deux missions civiles (EUTM-European training mission, ciblant les forces armées et EUCAP Mali – mission civile de formation des forces de sécurité intérieure). L’UE et la France appuient aussi le G5 Sahel[3] qui, en 2017 s’est doté d’une force conjointe transfrontalière de lutte contre le terrorisme, le crime organisé transfrontalier et le trafic d’êtres humains. Le portefeuille de l’UE était de 948,5 millions d’euros en 2017[4]. La France y intervient également militairement à travers l’opération « Barkhane ».

      En matière migratoire, l’UE a soutenu la création du CIGEM (Centre d’information et de gestions des migrations) en 2008 à hauteur de 12 millions d’euros contre 8 prévus initialement à travers le 9ème Fonds européen de développement (FED)[5]. Elle a aussi appuyé la définition et la mise en œuvre de PONAM, toujours sur le financement du FED. Depuis 2015, l’UE a intensifié la coopération en matière migratoire avec certains pays d’Afrique, dont le Mali qui fait partie des cinq pays prioritaires pour la mise en œuvre d’un « nouveau cadre de partenariat en matière de migration »[6]. En ce sens, le Mali est un des pays bénéficiaires du Fonds fiduciaire d’urgence pour l’Afrique en faveur de la stabilité et de la lutte contre les causes profondes de la migration irrégulière et du phénomène des personnes déplacées en Afrique (FFU) adopté à l’occasion du Sommet UE-Afrique sur les migration de La Valette (Malte) en 2015[7].

      La mise en œuvre du FFU au Mali

      Au Mali, l’élaboration des projets s’est déroulée en deux temps. Tout d’abord, les projets ont été écrits directement depuis Bruxelles et répartis entre les États membres. Puis, une équipe de consultant·e·s s’est rendue à Bamako pour recenser les besoins du gouvernement. Les discussions se seraient faites par ministère et non au global avec le gouvernement, ce qui, selon certains acteurs, a donné lieu à une concurrence effrénée entre ministères. Selon le Haut conseil des Maliens de l’extérieur (HCME), « le Mali a présenté des projets au FFU. Il y a eu 8 réunions sur cette question. Des propositions chiffrées ont été faites pour le développement local, la réinsertion, etc. mais (…) au final, des négociations parallèles ont eu lieu avec certains départements (sécurité, territoire pour état-civil) et l’UE a choisi ces projets[8] ».

      Cette manière d’élaborer les projets est problématique en termes de prise en compte des besoins des pays bénéficiaires et de leur implication. La PONAM, par exemple, dont la mise en œuvre n’est pas encore entièrement financée, aurait pu constituer une stratégie ou une référence pour la sélection de projets portant sur la migration, ce qui n’a pas été le cas. Un seul projet soutient directement la mise en œuvre de cette politique nationale, mais il n’n’apparaît pas dans le portefeuille du Mali car il est porté par un autre pays, le Maroc (projet coopération sud-sud).

      Pour quelques projets, des unités de gestion de projet ont été mises en place, permettant aux coopérations de déléguer la gestion à une équipe internationale et locale, sous la responsabilité d’un ministère national. Ce n’est pas le cas de tous les projets et en particulier ceux de coopération militaire et policière, gérés par les États membres.

      Le Mali s’est vu attribuer 12 projets nationaux, pour un montant total de 214,5 millions d’euros[9] dont huit sont confiés à des coopérations des États membres de l’UE et un à l’OIM. Seuls trois sont mis en œuvre par des ONG ou le secteur privé et aucun par une organisation locale. Cette gestion pose question, notamment en ce qui concerne la pertinence des projets comme réponses aux besoins des États bénéficiaires et leur appropriation[10].

      Huit projets sont orientés vers le soutien à l’économie, la création d’emplois et la résilience des communautés (projet d’assistance humanitaire essentiellement)
      Deux soutiennent les forces de sécurité intérieures,
      Un projet sur la gestion de la gouvernance des migrations, le retour et la réintégration au Mali,
      Et un projet pour le renforcement de l’état civil au Mali.

      A ces projets, s’ajoutent des projets régionaux :

      Huit portent sur l’appui au G5 Sahel (cinq projets pour 177 millions d’euros), et aux forces de police.
      Huit autres portent sur le redressement économique, le soutien aux entreprises et l’assistance aux personnes déplacées ou réfugiées.
      un projet finance l’assistance au retour et à la réintégration des personnes migrantes
      et un seul projet porte sur la mobilité légale (Initiative Erasmus+ d’échanges entre étudiant·e·s universitaires avec l’Europe.

      Il apparaît clairement que les projets soutenus par le FFU au Mali ont été orientés vers le développement et la sécurité en raison du conflit au Nord Mali. Au final, très peu de projets sont directement liés aux migrations si ce n’est réintégrer les personnes de retour et favoriser les investissements de la diaspora.

      Projet de renforcement de la gestion et de la gouvernance des migrations et le retour et la réintégration durable au Mali – T05-EUTF-SAH-ML-07

      Ce projet de 15 000 000€ est mis en œuvre par la coopération espagnole (AECID) et l’OIM. Il a pour objectif de « contribuer au renforcement de la gestion et de la gouvernance des migrations et assurer la protection, le retour et la réintégration durable des migrants au Mali ». En clair, il vise à soutenir la « réintégration » des Malien·ne·s de retour dans leur pays (OIM) et à « sensibiliser sur les risques de l’émigration irrégulière » (AECID). C’est un des 18 projets de l’OIM financés par le FFU et mis en œuvre dans 27 pays d’Afrique pour soutenir les retours « volontaires » et la réintégration des personnes migrantes dans leur pays de retour.

      Dans la fiche projet, le Mali est ciblé comme pays de départ, l’UE ayant établi qu’en 2015 « les migrants originaires d’Afrique de l’Ouest occupent une part croissante des flux migratoires ». Il est aussi présenté comme un pays de retour (forcé ou volontaire) des personnes migrantes maliennes (estimées à 90 000 de 2002 à 2014). Le Mali est enfin présenté comme « stratégique » en termes de « sensibilisation aux risques de la migration irrégulière » au sein de la CEDEAO, représentant « 70% des mouvements migratoires de la région, liés pour la plupart à la recherche d’emploi ».

      Le projet devait initialement assurer l’assistance à 1 600 personnes en transit, soutenir 4 000 « retours volontaires » de l’OIM et la réintégration de 1 900 personnes, et sensibiliser 200 communautés et 70 000 migrants·e·s en transit. Ces objectifs ont été largement dépassés à l’heure actuelle à tel point qu’une rallonge d’un an a été accordée par l’UE à l’OIM. Selon l’OIM à Bamako, 180 personnes sont accueillies tous les trois jours à la Cité d’accueil des Maliens de l’extérieur (centre de transit à Bamako). Cela représente 8 000 à 8 500 personnes par an, soit 18 000 personnes depuis le début du projet en 2017 dont 50% arrivent de Libye et 50% du Niger.

      Concernant l’aide à la réintégration, le projet reçoit certaines critiques notamment du HCME qui souligne les inégalités qu’il créé parmi les personnes de retour. Ainsi, en cas de retour collectif, toutes les personnes sont accueillies durant 72h au centre de transit de Bamako géré par le HCME et la direction générale des Maliens de l’extérieur (DGME). L’OIM y intervient pour l’enregistrement. Les personnes de retour dans le cadre du programme de l’OIM reçoivent un pécule de 52 000 FCFA (79€) pour rejoindre leur région d’origine. Les autres reçoivent de la DGME un pécule de 10 000 FCFA (15€), somme parfois insuffisante pour prendre le transport en charge jusqu’à la ville d’origine.

      Le HCME souligne également que la « réintégration » n’est pas à la hauteur des attentes. Auparavant, une aide financière et matérielle était donnée aux personnes de retour en fonction d’un projet formulé. Or, elle a été arrêtée et l’aide à la réintégration consiste uniquement à une formation en gestion de sa microentreprise, pour à peine 6% des personnes de retour sous financement OIM. Par ailleurs, les personnes ne bénéficient d’aucun suivi ni soutien par la suite.

      Enfin, ce programme fait concurrence à un autre projet de la DGME financé sur le budget spécial d’investissement qui, pour éviter les doublons, s’adresse aux personnes qui n’entrent pas dans les critères du programme de l’OIM et leur propose une aide à la création d’activité économique. Or ces personnes ne sont pas forcément en capacité de présenter des projets (projets à hauteur de 3 à 5 millions de FCFA (soit 4 573€ à 7 622€). Ainsi, selon le HCME, seuls 130 projets individuels ou collectifs ont été financés depuis 2017.

      Concernant l’assistance aux personnes en transit au Mali, le projet prévoyait la construction de trois centres de transit au Mali (Bamako, Gao et Kayes). Or, un centre de transit, dédié à l’accueil des personnes de retour, existait déjà à Bamako (la Cité), construit par le HCME dans ses locaux et géré conjointement avec la DGME. Les centres de Gao et Kayes semblent par ailleurs être l’objet de controverse. Un existe déjà à Gao à travers les locaux et la prise en charge de la protection civile. Quant à Kayes, la construction d’un centre est jugée peu pertinente, les personnes de retour dans la région se rendant directement dans leur famille. Néanmoins, la délégation de l’UE au Mali maintient construire des centres de transit, tandis que l’OIM affirme construire des bureaux régionaux pour la DGME malienne[11].

      Le volet « sensibilisation » est indépendante de la partie « retour ». Confié à la coopération espagnole (AECID), il est géré par une unité de gestion du projet sous la tutelle du ministère des Maliens de l’extérieur. 27 agents de terrain (12 à Bamako, 7 Sikasso, 7 à Kayes) sont chargés de mettre en œuvre des activités de sensibilisation notamment dans les lycées. Selon AECID, le projet ciblait 70 000 jeunes (alors que la fiche projet mentionne 70 000 « migrants en transit »), objectif déjà atteint. Par ailleurs, l’unité de gestion du projet gère directement des formations auprès d’acteurs institutionnels (agents aux frontières, douanes, journalistes, spots radio grand public, etc.). Les organisations de la société civile maliennes sont également mises à contribution à travers un fonds d’appui. Le programme est également censé promouvoir les « opportunités de migration régulière » dans l’espace CEDEAO, mais celles-ci sont uniquement utilisées comme une alternative à la migration irrégulière – sous-entendu vers l’Europe.

      La pertinence de ce projet peut être questionnée. Il n’y pas d’indicateurs de résultats, mais uniquement d’activité, ainsi son évaluation porte uniquement sur la réalisation de telle ou telle activité sans analyser l’impact de celle-ci ou ce qu’elle a pu apporter comme changement. Alors que l’impact des campagnes de sensibilisation menées dans différents pays de départ et de transit depuis des années reste toujours à démontrer[12], ce projet une fois encore finance cette sensibilisation sans savoir si elles ont un réel impact sur la migration dite irrégulière.

      Projet d’appui à la filière de l’anacarde au Mali – PAFAM – T05-EUTF-SAH-ML-02

      Ce projet d’un montant de 13 000 000 €, vise à « contribuer à la lutte contre la pauvreté et au développement durable de la population du Mali par la mise en valeur de la chaine de valeur de l’anacarde (noix de cajou) ». Il est mis en œuvre par la coopération espagnole (AECID).

      Selon le coordinateur international de l’unité de gestion du projet, celui-ci a été demandé par le gouvernement malien afin de poursuivre un projet similaire déjà mené par AECID en 2010 avant le FFU bien que de ce dernier, n’a pas été pérennisé du fait de la fermeture de l’usine créée[13]. Les objectifs « d’augmentation des opportunités économiques et d’emploi et d’amélioration de la sécurité alimentaire » poursuivis par le projet, sont justifiés par le fait qu’ils permettront « d’atténuer les causes de l’émigration par le biais de l’amélioration de la production, la transformation et la commercialisation de l’anacarde ».

      En réalité le lien de ce projet avec la migration est assez faible, si ce n’est les zones de mise en œuvre, Kayes étant la plus importante région d’origine des ressortissant·e·s malien·ne·s en France et étant également une zone de production de la noix de cajou. Le projet se base ainsi sur le lien préconçu entre pauvreté et migration qui reste peu démontré à ce jour, voire remis en cause. En effet, comme le souligne le Programme des Nations unies pour le développement (PNUD), les études montrent que « les progrès réalisés en matière de développement (…) favorisent les migrations », ainsi, « la plupart des pays africains [auraient] tout juste atteint les niveaux de croissance et de développement auxquels l’émigration commence à s’intensifier[14] ». Le faible lien avec les migrations, conjugué au fait que le projet a été approuvé parmi les premiers en 2016, laisse supposer que ce projet était déjà validé sur d’autres instruments financiers de l’UE et intégré dans le FFU.

      Pour répondre aux objectifs du FFU, les « personnes de retour » ont été intégrées parmi les bénéficiaires. Néanmoins début 2020, l’équipe de gestion du projet était toujours en cours de réflexion pour mettre en œuvre cet aspect du projet. En effet, il ne s’agit pas du public habituel des acteurs de mise en œuvre, qui n’ont pas, par ailleurs, d’expérience spécifique sur l’identification et l’accompagnement des personnes migrantes, notamment de retour.

      Un des indicateurs du projet prévoit également la réduction de 100% du nombre de personnes émigrantes (émigration saisonnière ou de longue durée), tout comme l’augmentation de la population de retour grâce à la création d’opportunités d’emplois. Des indicateurs qui semblent bien difficiles à atteindre d’autant que l’équipe de coordination ne semble pas disposer de données de départ sur le nombre de personnes émigrant par manque d’opportunités économiques.

      La mise en œuvre du FFU au Mali illustre son utilisation comme un outil de financement de la coopération des États membres de l’UE et de leurs priorités politiques. Au Mali, la plupart des projets sont orientés vers la stabilisation du pays et le rétablissement de la sécurité pour « créer des pôles de développement » et soutenir l’État malien dans la reprise du contrôle du territoire et la lutte anti-terrorisme. Côté migrations, les seules actions financées sont principalement l’aide au retour « volontaire » et à la réintégration des personnes de retour à travers l’OIM, et ce, malgré l’existence de programmes gouvernementaux.

      Sources :

      [1] UNHCR, Global report 2019

      [2] Cluster protection Mali, Rapport sur les mouvements de population, 31 décembre 2019

      [3] Cadre de coordination en matière de sécurité et développement regroupant le Burkina Faso, la Mauritanie, le Mali, le Niger et le Tchad.

      [4] https://eeas.europa.eu/sites/eeas/files/delegation_ue_mali_10.2017.pdf

      [5] Voir également sur ce sujet : La Cimade, Prisonniers du désert, 2010

      [6] Commission européenne, Communication relative à la mise en place d’un nouveau cadre de partenariat avec les pays tiers dans le cadre de l’agenda européen en matière de migration, 7 juin 2016.

      [7] La Cimade – Loujna-Tounkaranké – Migreurop, Chronique d’un chantage, 2017

      [8] Entretien avec le HCME du 03/03/2020

      [9] Site internet du FFU : https://ec.europa.eu/trustfundforafrica/region/sahel-lake-chad/mali

      [10] La Cimade, Chronique d’un chantage, op. cit

      [11] Entretiens avec la Délégation de l’UE au Mali du 04/03/2020 et avec l’OIM Bamako du 05/03/2020

      [12] OIM, Evaluating the impact of information campaigns in the field of migration, a systematic review of the evidence, and practical guidance, Central Mediterranean Route Thematic Report Series, Issue n°1

      [13] Foreingpolicy.com, “Europe slams its gates – a foreign policy special investigation”, “The paradox of prosperity”, 2017

      [14] PNUD, Au-delà des barrières : voix des migrants africains irréguliers en Europe, 2019

      https://www.lacimade.org/note-analyse-ffu-mali

  • Au #Niger, contrôler les flux de migrants

    Le Niger, deuxième pays le plus pauvre du monde, est au cœur de la région du Sahel en Afrique. Il accueille aujourd’hui quelque 300 000 réfugiés et personnes déplacées de pays voisins qui fuient les attaques terroristes. Beaucoup tentent de partir d’ici pour rejoindre l’Europe. Pour contrer cette migration, des fonds européens sont destinés à faire de ce pays de transit un lieu de réinstallation temporaire de certains migrants qui se trouvaient en Libye. Si ce programme, qui vise à répartir les migrants, a du mal à décoller, le flux migratoire s’est déjà tari : en 2016, l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations comptaient 333 891personnes traversant la frontière du Niger, principalement vers la Libye. En 2017, le nombre a chuté à 17 634.


    https://www.mediapart.fr/studio/portfolios/au-niger-controler-les-flux-de-migrants

    #Agadez #portfolio #photographie #migrations #asile #réfugiés #frontières #réinstallation #Libye #externalisation #OIM #IOM #FMP #Flow_monitoring_points #Tillabéri #Ayorou #Tabarey-barey #camps_de_réfugiés #HCR #Niamey #ETM #mécanisme_d'évacuation_d'urgence #passeurs

    ping @rhoumour @_kg_ @karine4 @isskein

  • Deal signed for construction of new migrant centers

    Migration Minister #Notis_Mitarakis and the director of the European Commission, #Beate_Gminder, have signed a financing agreement for the construction of new closed structures on the eastern Aegean islands of #Samos, #Kos and #Leros.

    The funding for these projects will be fully covered by the European Commission.

    Also on Friday, the working group for the coordination of the procedures for the final termination of the operations of the reception and identification centers in #Vathi on Samos and on Leros met for the first time.

    The group’s main objective is the coordination of all involved bodies (Ministry of Health, the National Public Health Organization, local authorities, the Hellenic Police, the armed forces, the fire brigade and international bodies) to ensure the smooth shutdown of the existing structures and the operation of the new closed facilities of Samos and Leros.

    https://www.ekathimerini.com/259140/article/ekathimerini/news/deal-signed-for-construction-of-new-migrant-centers

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Grèce #centres #camps_de_réfugiés #financement #Mer_Egée #îles #centres_fermés #financement #EU #internal_externalization #externalisation_intérieure #Union_européenne #UE

    –—

    Et voilà que #Moria_2.0 se généralise à toutes les îles grecques...
    Merci le #nouveau_pacte:


    https://seenthis.net/messages/875903
    https://seenthis.net/messages/876752
    #pacte_européen

    ping @isskein @karine4

    • Accord entre l’#Union_européenne et la Grèce pour un nouveau camp d’accueil pour migrants à Lesbos en 2021

      Le camp de Moria avait été ravagé par un incendie au mois de septembre 2020. Un campement provisoire, où se trouve 7 300 demandeurs d’asile, a depuis été établi sur l’île.

      Presque trois mois après un incendie ravageur, l’Union européenne (UE) et la Grèce ont signé un accord, jeudi 3 décembre, pour la mise en place d’ici septembre 2021 d’un nouveau camp d’accueil pour migrants sur l’île de Lesbos. Ce nouveau camp doit remplacer celui de Moria détruit en septembre.

      Le soutien de l’Union européenne dans la gestion de ce nouveau « centre d’accueil » sera inédit, et l’accord prévoit une répartition des responsabilités entre la Commission, les autorités grecques et les agences de l’UE.

      Après la destruction du camp insalubre de Moria, le plus grand d’Europe, un campement provisoire a été établi sur l’île. Plus de 7 300 demandeurs d’asile, parmi lesquels des enfants, des personnes handicapées ou malades, s’entassent sous des tentes, sans chauffage ni eau chaude à l’approche de l’hiver.

      Dans le nouveau camp, « nous allons fournir des conditions décentes aux migrants et réfugiés qui arrivent, et aussi soutenir les habitants sur les îles grecques », a déclaré la présidente de la Commission européenne, Ursula von der Leyen, dans un communiqué, où elle souligne également la nécessité de « procédures rapides et équitables » pour l’examen des demandes d’asile. Pour les migrants, « les centres doivent n’être qu’un arrêt temporaire avant leur retour (vers leur pays d’origine ou de transit) ou leur intégration », précise Mme von der Leyen.

      « Une étape importante »

      La Commission prévoit de consacrer environ 130 millions d’euros pour les sites de Lesbos et de Chios, dont la très grosse majorité pour Lesbos. En outre, 121 millions d’euros ont été alloués le mois dernier à la construction de trois camps moins importants sur les îles de Samos, Kos et Leros.

      « Cet accord est une étape importante (…) pour s’assurer qu’une situation comme celle de Moria ne puisse plus se reproduire », a ajouté la commissaire européenne aux affaires intérieures, Ylva Johansson. Elle a estimé que ce nouveau camp « marquait un changement dans la façon d’appréhender la gestion des migrations, et ouvre la voie à une mise en pratique des principes directeurs du nouveau pacte sur la migration et l’asile ».

      La Commission européenne a présenté fin septembre un projet de réforme de la politique commune de l’asile, un dossier ultrasensible sur lequel la recherche d’un compromis est extrêmement difficile, cinq ans après la crise migratoire de 2015.

      Lesbos, en mer Egée ainsi que d’autres îles grecques proches des côtes occidentales de la Turquie voisine, est l’une des principales portes d’entrée des migrants en Europe. La Grèce a considérablement réduit le nombre d’arrivées en 2020 mais les conditions de vie dans les camps d’accueil restent particulièrement éprouvantes.

      https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2020/12/03/accord-entre-l-union-europeenne-et-la-grece-pour-un-nouveau-camp-a-lesbos-en

  • With @ItalyMFA support; IOM has built a new police border post at the Assamaka border, equipped with the Migration Information and Data Analysis System (MIDAS). This project aims to reinforce the operational capacities of the Government of Niger on border management.

    https://twitter.com/OIM_Niger/status/1326033475514855424
    #IOM #Niger #contrôles_frontaliers #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #OIM #Assamaka #MIDAS #Migration_Information_and_Data_Analysis_System #poste-frontière

    Localisation de Assamaka :

    via @rhoumour (twitter)

    ping @isskein @karine4

    • IOM Supports Safe Migration with New Police Post at Niger’s Border with Algeria

      Situated in the heart of the Sahara at only 15 km from Niger’s border with Algeria, the town of Assamaka is a major migratory hub, as the main point of entry for migrants returning from Algeria, and the last place of transit for migrants coming from Niger on their way to Algeria.

      Since late 2017, over 30,000 migrants have arrived in Assamaka from Algeria, mostly from West African countries of origins.

      On Wednesday (14/10), the Government of Niger and the International Organization for Migration (IOM) inaugurated the first fixed border police post in Assamaka, built and equipped with funding from the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation.

      This extensive, impoverished and sparsely populated area has long been exploited by criminal and smuggling networks. Nowadays, these ancestral trade and migration routes between Niger and Algeria are often used for smuggling illicit goods and migrants.

      In recent years, border management and border security have become top priorities for the Sahel and for Niger in particular. The Government of Niger strives to reduce illicit cross-border activities, including human smuggling and trafficking, and to prevent the entry of members of violent extremism organizations through the country’s borders.

      In addition to a sharp rise in crime in the border town, Assamaka also faces increasingly high migration flows, due to its position on the trans-Saharan migration route. These are proving difficult to manage to the detriment of the town’s 1,000 or so permanent inhabitants.

      Watch video: New Police Border Post in Assamaka

      Up to now, migrant registration had always been done manually or through IOM’s Mobile Border Post, temporarily deployed by the Government of Niger to the Agadez region. This truck-borne mobile police post was adapted specifically for meeting the challenges in remote desert locations. But it cannot replace a fixed police station.

      The newly constructed border post and its facilities will allow the police to be compliant with national and international norms and fulfill the required security and safety standards.

      The border post is part of a larger project whose objective is to strengthen the capacities of Niger’s immigration service – the Directorate for Territorial Surveillance (DST). The project also aims to reinforce the cooperation between Nigerien and Algerian law enforcement agencies, as well as the coordination between Nigerien security forces, local authorities and relevant technical services, such as the Regional Directorate of Public Health in the Agadez region.

      Through this new border post, eight workstations are equipped with the Migration Information and Data Analysis System (MIDAS), developed by IOM. These will allow authorities to digitally register people transiting the border. The data collected can be transmitted in real time to a central server, allowing authorities to better track and manage migration flows in and out of Niger.

      “We hope that this new infrastructure will alleviate some of the current challenges faced by local authorities and will improve cross-border cooperation,” said Barbara Rijks, IOM’s Chief of Mission in Niger. “Ultimately, this border post aims to contribute to the improvement of the security and stability in Assamaka and its surroundings.”


      https://www.iom.int/news/iom-supports-safe-migration-new-police-post-nigers-border-algeria

      Autres photos sur twitter:


      https://twitter.com/OIM_Niger/status/1317040811536715778

  • Migration : la #France et l’#Italie déploieront des #navires et des #avions pour alerter la Tunisie sur le départ des migrants

    Le ministre français de l’Intérieur, #Gérald_Darmanin, est attendu, ce weekend, en visite en Tunisie pour de décisives discussions dans la foulée de l’attentat contre la basilique de Nice commis par un migrant illégal tunisien, qui a fait trois morts. Une visite qui intervient aussi dans un climat de plus en plus tendu en France dont le gouvernement et le président de la République, Emmanuel Macron, s’emploient à restreindre au maximum les flux migratoires à travers la Méditerranée.

    A la veille de cette visite, le ministre français de l’Intérieur, qui se trouve ce vendredi à Rome , envisage avec son homologue italienne, #Luciana_Lamorgese, de déployer des navires ou des avions pour alerter la Tunisie du départ de #bateaux clandestins transportant des migrants vers les côtes italiennes, comme le jeune Tunisien qui est le principal suspect d’une attaque à l’arme blanche dans une église française la semaine dernière, a déclaré vendredi la ministre italienne.

    A l’issue d’une entrevue entre les deux ministres, Gerald Darmanin s’est gardé de critiquer l’Italie pour sa gestion du suspect tunisien, qui a débarqué sur l’île italienne de Lampedusa en septembre, a été mis en quarantaine en vertu du protocole sanitaire relatif à la pandémie et reçu des papiers d’expulsion des autorités italiennes avant de gagner la France en octobre.

    « A aucun moment, je n’ai pensé qu’il y avait quelque chose de défectueux » dans la façon dont l’Italie a géré l’affaire, a déclaré Darmanin, en réponse à une question posée lors d’une conférence de presse avec Lamorgese après leurs entretiens. Il a plutôt remercié Lamorgese et les services de renseignement italiens pour l’échange d’informations dans les jours qui ont suivi l’#attentat de #Nice.

    Les Tunisiens qui fuient une économie dévastée par les effets du virus, constituent le plus grand contingent de migrants débarqués en Italie cette année, et ils arrivent directement de Tunisie dans des bateaux assez solides pour ne pas avoir besoin de secours, souligne le Washington Post, rappelant que, ces dernières années, la majorité des migrants qui ont atteint les côtes méridionales de l’Italie venaient d’Afrique subsaharienne et traversaient la Méditerranée dans des embarcations de fortune , donc en mauvais état pour la plupart, et opérées par des trafiquants en Libye.

    Lamorgese a déclaré qu’elle avait discuté avec Darmarin d’un #plan prévoyant le déploiement de « moyens navals ou aériens qui pourraient alerter les autorités tunisiennes d’éventuels départs » et les aider à intercepter les bateaux, « dans le respect de leurs souveraineté et autonomie que nous ne voulons pas violer ».

    Selon ce plan, il n’y aurait « qu’une #alerte que nous donnerions aux autorités tunisiennes pour faciliter le #traçage des navires qui partent de leur territoire pour rejoindre les côtes italiennes », a déclaré la ministre italienne. « Il est évident que cela suppose la #collaboration des autorités tunisiennes ».

    La France aurait-elle son « #Patriot_Act ?

    Après sa réunion du matin à Rome, Darmarin a déclaré qu’il se rend en Tunisie, en Algérie et à Malte, pour discuter des questions de migration et de #terrorisme.

    « La France et l’Italie doivent définir une position commune pour la lutte contre l’immigration clandestine au niveau européen », a-t-il déclaré.

    Il a été demandé à Darmarin si, à la suite des récents attentats terroristes en France, le gouvernement français devrait adopter une loi comme le « USA Patriot Act » promulgué après les attentats du 11 septembre 2001 pour intensifier les efforts de détection et de prévention du terrorisme.

    « Plus qu’un Patriot Act, ce qu’il faut, c’est un #acte_européen », a répondu Darmarin. « La France ne peut pas lutter seule contre la politique islamiste ».

    La Tunisie est l’un des rares pays à avoir conclu un accord de rapatriement avec l’Italie. Mais avec des milliers de Tunisiens arrivés par mer récemment et moins de 100 migrants expulsés et renvoyés dans le pays par voie aérienne chaque semaine, la priorité est donnée aux personnes considérées comme dangereuses, indique le Washington Post. Selon Lamorgese, rien n’indique que l’agresseur de Nice, Ibrahim Issaoui, 21 ans, constituait une menace.

    Les deux ministres se sont rencontrés un jour après que le président français Emmanuel Macron ait déclaré que son pays renforcera ses contrôles aux frontières après les multiples attaques de cet automne.

    L’Italie et la France lancent, sur une base expérimentale de six mois, des #brigades_mixtes de forces de sécurité italiennes et françaises à leurs frontières communes pour renforcer les contrôles, a déclaré Lamorgese aux journalistes.

    #externalisation #asile #réfugiés #migrations #frontières #surveillance_frontalière #Tunisie #militarisation_des_frontières #Darmanin #accord_de_réadmission

    ping @isskein @karine4

    • Union européenne – Tunisie : l’illusion d’une coopération équilibrée

      Dans la nuit de vendredi 12 au samedi 13 février, 48 personnes de différentes nationalités africaines sont parties de Sidi Mansour, dans la province de Sfax en Tunisie, direction les côtes italiennes. La marine tunisienne est intervenue à une centaine de kilomètres au nord-ouest de Lampedusa lorsque les passagers naviguaient dans une mer agitée. Tandis que 25 personnes ont pu être secourues, une personne est décédée et 22 autres sont déclarées « disparues », comme des milliers d’autres avant elles [1]. Cet énième naufrage témoigne des traversées plus importantes au cours des derniers mois depuis la Tunisie, qui sont rendues plus dangereuses alors que l’Union européenne (UE) renforce ses politiques sécuritaires en Méditerranée en collaboration avec les États d’Afrique du Nord, dont la Tunisie.

      Au cours de 2020, plus de 13 400 personnes migrantes parties de Tunisie ont été interceptées par les garde-côtes tunisiens et plus de 13 200 autres sont parvenues à rejoindre les côtes européennes [2]. Jamais les chiffres n’ont été aussi élevés et depuis l’été 2020, jamais la Tunisie n’a été autant au centre de l’attention des dirigeant·e·s européen·ne·s. A l’occasion d’une rencontre dans ce pays le 17 août 2020, l’Italie et la Tunisie ont ainsi conclu un accord accompagné d’une enveloppe de 11 millions d’euros pour le renforcement des contrôles aux frontières tunisiennes et en particulier la surveillance maritime [3]. Le 6 novembre 2020, à l’issue d’une réunion à Rome, la ministre italienne de l’Intérieur et son homologue français ont également décidé de déployer au large des côtes tunisiennes des « moyens navals ou aériens qui pourraient alerter les autorités tunisiennes d’éventuels départs » [4].

      Cette attention a été redoublée au lendemain de l’attentat de Nice, le 29 octobre 2020. Lors d’une visite à Tunis, le ministre français, jouant de l’amalgame entre terrorisme et migration, faisait du contrôle migratoire le fer de lance de la lutte contre le terrorisme et appelait à une coopération à l’échelle européenne avec les pays d’Afrique du Nord pour verrouiller leurs frontières. Suivant l’exemple de l’Italie qui coopère déjà de manière étroite avec la Tunisie pour renvoyer de force ses ressortissant·e·s [5], la France a demandé aux autorités tunisiennes la délivrance automatique de laissez-passer pour faciliter les expulsions et augmenter leurs cadences.

      Cette coopération déséquilibrée qui met la Tunisie face à l’UE et ses États membres, inlassablement dénoncée des deux côtés de la Méditerranée par les associations de défense des droits, n’est pas nouvelle et s’accélère.

      Alors qu’a augmenté, au cours de l’année 2020, le nombre d’exilé·e·s en provenance d’Afrique subsaharienne et quittant les côtes tunisiennes en direction de l’Italie [6], les dirigeant·e·s européen·ne·s craignent que la Tunisie ne se transforme en pays de départ non seulement pour les ressortissant·e·s tunisien·ne·s mais également pour des exilé·e·s venu·e·s de tout le continent. Après être parvenue à réduire les départs depuis les côtes libyennes, mais surtout à augmenter le nombre de refoulements grâce à l’intervention des pseudo garde-côtes libyens en Méditerranée centrale (10 000 rien qu’en 2020) [7], l’UE et ses États membres se tournent de plus en plus vers la Tunisie, devenue l’une des principales cibles de leur politique d’externalisation en vue de tarir les passages sur cette route. Dès 2018, la Commission européenne avait d’ailleurs identifié la Tunisie comme candidate privilégiée pour l’installation sur son sol de « plateformes de débarquement » [8], autrement dit des camps de tri externalisés au service de l’UE, destinés aux exilé·e·s secouru·e·s ou intercepté·e·s en mer. Le plan prévoyait également le renforcement des capacités d’interception des dits garde-côtes tunisiens.

      Si à l’époque la Tunisie avait clamé son refus de devenir le hotspot africain et le garde-frontière de l’Europe [9], Tunis, sous la pression européenne, semble accepter peu à peu d’être partie prenante de cette approche [10]. Le soutien que la Tunisie reçoit de l’UE pour surveiller ses frontières maritimes ne cesse de s’intensifier. Depuis 2015, Bruxelles multiplie en effet les programmes destinés à la formation et au renforcement des capacités des garde-côtes tunisiens, notamment en matière de collecte de données personnelles. Dans le cadre du programme « Gestion des frontières au Maghreb » [11] lancé en juillet 2018, l’UE a prévu d’allouer 24,5 millions d’euros qui bénéficieront principalement à la Garde nationale maritime tunisienne [12]. Sans oublier l’agence européenne Frontex qui contrôle les eaux tunisiennes au moyen d’images satellite, de radars et de drones [13] et récolte des données qui depuis quelques mois sont partagées avec les garde-côtes tunisiens [14], comme cela se fait déjà avec les (soi-disant) garde-côtes libyens [15]. Le but est simple : détecter les embarcations au plus tôt pour alerter les autorités tunisiennes afin qu’elles se chargent elles-mêmes des interceptions maritimes. Les moyens de surveillance navals et aériens que l’Italie et la France veulent déployer pour surveiller les départs de Tunisie viennent compléter cet édifice.

      Les gouvernements européens se félicitent volontiers des résultats de leur stratégie des « #refoulements_par_procuration » [16] en Libye. Cette stratégie occulte cependant les conséquences d’un partenariat avec des « garde-côtes » liés à des milices et des réseaux de trafiquants d’êtres humains [17], à savoir le renvoi des personnes migrantes dans un pays non-sûr, qu’elles tentent désespérément de fuir, ainsi qu’une hécatombe en mer Méditerranée. A mesure que les autorités européennes se défaussent de leurs responsabilités en matière de recherche et de secours sur les garde-côtes des pays d’Afrique du Nord, les cas de non-assistance et les naufrages se multiplient [18]. Alors que la route de la Méditerranée centrale est l’une des mieux surveillées au monde, c’est aussi l’une des plus mortelles du fait de cette politique du laisser-mourir en mer. Au cours de l’année 2020, près de 1 000 décès y ont été comptabilisés [19], sans compter les nombreux naufrages invisibles [20].

      Nous refusons que cette coopération euro-libyenne, dont on connaît déjà les conséquences, soit dupliquée en Tunisie. Si ce pays en paix et doté d’institutions démocratiques peut à première vue offrir une image plus « accueillante » que la Libye, il ne saurait être considéré comme un pays « sûr », ni pour les migrant·e·s, ni pour ses propres ressortissant·e·s, de plus en plus nombreux·ses à fuir la situation socio-économique dégradée, et aggravée par la crise sanitaire [21]. Les pressions exercées par l’UE et ses États membres pour obliger la Tunisie à devenir le réceptacle de tou·te·s les migrant·e·s « indésirables » sous couvert de lutte contre le terrorisme sont inacceptables. La complaisance des autorités tunisiennes et le manque de transparence des négociations avec l’UE et ses États membres le sont tout autant. En aucun cas le combat contre le terrorisme ne saurait justifier que soient sacrifiées les valeurs de la démocratie et du respect des droits fondamentaux, tels que la liberté d’aller et venir et le droit de trouver une véritable protection.

      De part et d’autre de la Méditerranée, nos organisations affirment leur solidarité avec les personnes exilées de Tunisie et d’ailleurs. Nous condamnons ces politiques sécuritaires externalisées qui génèrent d’innombrables violations des droits et ne font que propager l’intolérance et la haine.

      –—

      Notes :

      [1] « En Tunisie, 22 migrants sont portés disparus après le naufrage d’un bateau », La Presse.ca, 13 février 2021

      [2] Rapport du mois de décembre 2020 des mouvements sociaux, suicides, violences, et migrations, n°87, Observatoire social tunisien, FTDES

      [3] Quel est le contenu du récent accord entre la Tunisie et l’Italie ? Réponses aux demandes d’accès introduit par ASGI, FTDES et ASF, Projet Sciabaca & Oruka, 7 décembre 2020

      [4] « Migration : la France et l’Italie déploieront des navires et des avions pour alerter la Tunisie sur le départ des migrants », African Manager, 6 décembre 2020

      [5] Chaque semaine, deux charters partent de Sicile pour renvoyer une centaine de migrant·e·s tunisien·ne·s. En 2019, selon les chiffres du FTDES, 1 739 ressortissant·e·s tunisien·ne·s ont été expulsé·e·s d’Italie via ces vols. En 2020, ceux-ci étaient encore affrétés malgré la crise sanitaire.

      [6] Rapport du mois d’octobre 2020 des mouvements sociaux, suicides, violences, et migrations, n°85, Observatoire social tunisien, FTDES

      [7] Le nombre de migrant·e·s ayant été intercepté·e·s par les pseudo garde-côtes libyens en 2019 est estimé à 9 000 selon Alarmphone (voir : Central Mediterranean Regional Analysis 1 October 2019-31 December 2019, 5 janvier 2020).

      [8] Migration : Regional disembarkation arrangements - Follow-up to the European Council Conlusions of 28 June 2018

      [9] « Tri, confinement, expulsion : l’approche hotspot au service de l’UE », Migreurop, 25 juin 2019

      [10] « Comment l’Europe contrôle ses frontières en Tunisie ? », Inkyfada, 20 mars 2020

      [11] Programme du Fonds fiduciaire d’urgence de l’UE pour l’Afrique, mis en œuvre par l’ICMPD et le Ministère italien de l’intérieur - Document d’action pour la mise en œuvre du programme Afrique du Nord, Commission européenne (non daté)

      [12] Réponse de la Commission européenne à une question parlementaire sur les programmes de gestion des frontières financés par le Fonds fiduciaire d’urgence, 26 octobre 2020

      [13] « EU pays for surveillance in Gulf of Tunis », Matthias Monroy, 28 juin 2020

      [14] Réponse question parlementaire donnée par la Haute représentante/Vice-présidente Borrell au nom de la Commission européenne sur le projet Seahorse Mediterraneo 2.0, 7 mai 2020

      [15] « A Struggle for Every Single Boat- Central Mediterranean Analysis, July - December 2020 », Alarm Phone, 14 janvier 2021

      [16] « MARE CLAUSUM - Italy and the EU’s undeclared operation to stem migration across the Mediterranea » ; Forensic Oceanography, Forensic Architecture agency, Goldsmiths, Université de Londres, Mai 2018

      [17] « Migrants detained in Libya for profit, leaked EU report reveals », The Guardian, 20 novembre 2019

      [18] « Carnage in the Mediterranean is the direct result of European state policies », MSF 13 novembre 2020

      [19] Selon les chiffres de l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) en Méditerranée : https://missingmigrants.iom.int/region/mediterranean?migrant_route%5B%5D=1376

      [20] « November Shipwrecks - Hundreds of Visible and Invisible Deaths in the Central Med », Alarmphone, 26 novembre 2020

      [21] « Politiques du non-accueil en Tunisie : des acteurs humanitaires au service des politiques sécuritaires européennes », Migreurop, FTDES juin 2020

      https://www.migreurop.org/article3028.html

    • La Tunisia come frontiera esterna d’Europa: a farne le spese sono sempre i diritti umani

      Migreurop, FTDES e EuroMed Rights lanciano un appello congiunto contro la riproposizione del “modello libico” in Tunisia.

      La Tunisia è divenuta negli ultimi anni uno degli interlocutori principali per le politiche securitarie europee basate sull’esternalizzazione delle frontiere. Il governo tunisino si presta, in modo sempre più evidente, a soddisfare le richieste dell’Unione europea e dei suoi paesi membri, Italia e Francia in particolare, che mirano a bloccare nel paese i flussi migratori, ancor prima che possano raggiungere il territorio europeo.

      Ma la situazione non può essere sostenibile sul lungo termine: una grande quantità di denaro viene investita nel finanziamento e supporto alla Guardia costiera tunisina e alle forze di polizia, che controllano i confini marittimi e riportano indietro le persone intercettate in mare, in quelli che sono stati definiti “respingimenti per procura” di cui le autorità europee non vogliono farsi carico, per non dover rispondere degli obblighi internazionali in materia di protezione e asilo.

      Intanto, nel paese imperversa una crisi socio-economica molto grave, che sta smorzando l’entusiasmo nei confronti della giovane democrazia tunisina, unico esperimento politico post-2011 ad aver resistito finora alle spinte autocratiche. Al malessere della popolazione, che nelle ultime settimane ha manifestato nelle strade di diverse città, lo Stato sembra saper rispondere solo con la forza e la repressione.
      La precarietà della situazione economica e sociale non farà che alimentare le partenze dalla Tunisia, che avevano registrato numeri consistenti durante il 2020.

      La guardia costiera, seppure ben equipaggiata e addestrata, non può rappresentare un vero deterrente per chi non ha nulla da perdere: e infatti negli ultimi giorni sono sbarcate a Lampedusa complessivamente più di 230 persone provenienti dall’area di Sfax, attualmente isolati nell’hotspot dell’isola. Altri arrivano invece a Pantelleria, situata a pochi chilometri dalle coste della capitale [1].

      Ma nel Mediterraneo si continua anche a morire: l’ultimo episodio noto che ha coinvolto la Tunisia è avvenuto tra il 12 e il 13 febbraio, quando un’imbarcazione in difficoltà è stata soccorsa dalla marina tunisina al largo di Lampedusa. Secondo le informazioni disponibili, la barca era partita da Sidi Mansour, nella provincia di Sfax, e le 48 persone a bordo erano di varie nazionalità africane. Il maltempo aveva spinto la marina tunisina a interrompere le operazioni di soccorso: delle 48 persone a bordo, 25 sono state tratte in salvo e ricondotte in Tunisia, una è morta e le altre 22 sono state dichiarate “disperse” [2].

      Sono numerose, ma ancora ampiamente inascoltate, le voci che contestano l’approccio del governo tunisino in tema di emigrazione nei rapporti con i paesi a nord del Mediterraneo. Un comunicato congiunto pubblicato il 17 febbraio da Migreurop, del Forum Tunisino per i Diritti Economici e Sociali e di EuroMed Rights, dal titolo “Unione europea - Tunisia: l’illusione di una cooperazione equilibrata” [3], denuncia la complicità delle autorità tunisine nell’assecondare le politiche securitarie europee, che rende sempre più preoccupante la situazione per chi tenta di raggiungere l’Europa dalla Tunisia. Lo Stato tunisino non è in grado di difendere i diritti dei propri cittadini o di chi, in generale, parte dalle proprie coste, di fronte alle pressioni europee che perseguono imperterrite delle politiche emergenziali insostenibili sul lungo periodo.

      Il comunicato esprime la propria contrarietà alla riproposizione in Tunisia del tristemente noto modello libico, basato sulla delegazione alle forze locali dei controlli frontalieri europei, sui respingimenti collettivi e sulla criminalizzazione delle persone migranti. Il 2020 è stato un anno cruciale per l’inasprimento dei controlli alle frontiere nel paese: l’aumento delle partenze dalle coste tunisine a causa della crisi economica, e l’attacco di Nizza ad opera di un cittadino tunisino hanno comportato una maggiore attenzione dei governi europei al paese nordafricano, con conseguente aumento dei finanziamenti destinati al controllo frontaliero. A farne le spese, nel caso tunisino come in quello libico, saranno ancora una volta le persone che vedranno violati i loro diritti:

      “Con le autorità europee che si sottraggono alle loro responsabilità in materia di ricerca e di soccorso in mare, affidandole alle guardie costiere dei paesi nordafricani, i casi di mancata assistenza sono in aumento e i naufragi proliferano. Benché la rotta del Mediterraneo centrale sia una delle più controllate al mondo, è anche una delle più mortali, a causa di questa politica di lasciar morire la gente in mare. Durante il 2020, sono stati registrati quasi 1.000 morti, senza contare i casi di naufragi invisibili.

      Ci rifiutiamo di lasciare che il modello di cooperazione euro-libica venga riproposto in Tunisia, con le conseguenze che già conosciamo. Se questo paese, in pace e con istituzioni democratiche, può a prima vista offrire un’immagine più «accogliente» della Libia, non può però essere considerato un paese «sicuro», né per le persone migranti né per i suoi stessi cittadini, che fuggono dal deterioramento della situazione socio-economica, aggravata dalla crisi sanitaria.

      La pressione esercitata dall’Ue e dai suoi Stati membri per costringere la Tunisia a diventare un rifugio per tutti/e i/le migranti «indesiderabili» con il pretesto della lotta al terrorismo è inaccettabile. La connivenza delle autorità tunisine e la mancanza di trasparenza nei negoziati con l’Ue e i suoi Stati membri sono altrettanto inaccettabili. In nessun caso la lotta contro il terrorismo può giustificare il sacrificio dei valori della democrazia e del rispetto dei diritti fondamentali, come la libertà di movimento e il diritto a una vera protezione.”

      https://www.meltingpot.org/La-Tunisia-come-frontiera-esterna-d-Europa-a-farne-le-spese.html?var_mod

      #Tunisie #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #modèle_libyen #externalisation

    • Unmanned surveillance for Fortress Europe

      The agencies #EMSA and Frontex have spent more than €300 million on drone services since 2016. The Mediterranean in particular is becoming a testing track for further projects.

      According to the study „Eurodrones Inc.“ presented by Ben Hayes, Chris Jones and Eric Töpfer for Statewatch seven years ago, the European Commission had already spent over €315 million at that time to investigate the use of drones for border surveillance. These efforts focused on capabilities of member states and their national contact centres for #EUROSUR. The border surveillance system, managed by Frontex in Warsaw, became operational in 2014 – initially only in some EU Member States.

      The Statewatch study also documented in detail the investments made by the Defence Agency (EDA) in European drone research up to 2014. More than €190 million in funding for drones on land, at sea and in the air has flowed since the EU military agency was founded. 39 projects researched technologies or standards to make the unmanned systems usable for civilian and military purposes.

      Military research on drone technologies should also benefit border police applications. This was already laid down in the conclusions of the “ First European High Level Conference on Unmanned Aerial Systems“, to which the Commission and the EDA invited military and aviation security authorities, the defence industry and other „representatives of the European aviation community“ to Brussels in 2010. According to this, once „the existing barriers to growth are removed, the civil market could be potentially much larger than the military market“.

      Merging „maritime surveillance“ initiatives

      Because unmanned flights over land have to be set up with cumbersome authorisation procedures, Europe’s unregulated seas have become a popular testing ground for both civilian and military drone projects. It is therefore not surprising that in 2014, in the action plan of its „Maritime Security Strategy“, the Commission also called for a „cross-sectoral approach“ by civilian and military authorities to bring together the various „maritime surveillance initiatives“ and support them with unmanned systems.

      In addition to the military EDA, this primarily meant those EU agencies that take on tasks to monitor seas and coastlines: The Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) in Lisbon, founded in 2002, the Border and Coast Guard Agency (Frontex) in Warsaw since 2004, and the Fisheries Control Agency (EFCA) in Vigo, Spain, which followed a year later.

      Since 2009, the three agencies have been cooperating within the framework of bi- and trilateral agreements in certain areas, this mainly concerned satellite surveillance. With „CleanSeaNet“, EMSA has had a monitoring system for detecting oil spills in European waters since 2007. From 2013, the data collected there was continuously transmitted to the Frontex Situation Centre. There, they flow into the EUROSUR border surveillance system, which is also based on satellites. Finally, EFCA also operates „Integrated Maritime Services“ (IMS) for vessel detection and tracking using satellites to monitor, control and enforce the common EU fisheries policy.

      After the so-called „migration crisis“ in 2015, the Commission proposed the modification of the mandates of the three agencies in a „set of measures to manage the EU’s external borders and protect our Schengen area without internal borders“. They should cooperate more closely in the five areas of information exchange, surveillance and communication services, risk analysis, capacity building and exchange. To this end, the communication calls for the „jointly operating Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (drones) in the Mediterranean Sea“.

      Starting in 2016, Frontex, EMSA and EFCA set out the closer cooperation in several cooperation agreements and initially carried out a research project on the use of satellites, drones and manned surveillance aircraft. EMSA covered the costs of €310,000, and the fixed-wing aircraft „AR 5 Evo“ from the Portuguese company Tekever and a „Scan Eagle“ from the Boeing offshoot Insitu were flown.

      EMSA took the lead

      Since then, EMSA has taken the lead regarding unmanned maritime surveillance services. The development of such a drone fleet was included in the proposal for a new EMSA regulation presented by the Commission at the end of 2015. Drones were to become a „complementary tool in the overall surveillance chain“. The Commission expected this to provide „early detection of migrant departures“, another purpose was to „support of law enforcement activities“.

      EMSA initially received €67 million for the new leased drone services, with further money earmarked for the necessary expansion of satellite communications. In a call for tenders, medium-sized fixed-wing aircraft with a long range as well as vertical take-off aircraft were sought; as basic equipment, they were to carry optical and infrared cameras, an optical scanner and an AIS receiver. For pollution tracking or emission monitoring, manufacturers should fit additional sensors.

      From 2018, EMSA awarded further contracts totalling €38 million for systems launching either on land or from ships. Also in 2018, the agency paid €2.86 million for quadrocopters that can be launched from ships. In the same year, EMSA signed a framework contract worth €59 million for flights with the long-range drone „Hermes 900“ from Israeli company Elbit Systems. In 2020, for €20 million, the agency was again looking for unmanned vertical take-off aircraft that can be launched either on land or from ships and can stay in the air for up to four hours.

      In addition to the „Hermes 900“, the EMSA drone fleet includes three fixed-wing aircraft, the „AR5 Evo“ from Tekever (Portugal), the „Ouranos“ from ALTUS (Greece) and the „Ogassa“ from UAVision (Portugal). The larger helicopter drones are the „Skeldar V-200“ from UMS (Sweden) and the „Camcopter S-100“ from Schiebel GmbH (Austria), as well as the „Indago“ quadrocopter from Lockheed Martin (USA).

      EMSA handles flights with different destinations for numerous EU member states, as well as for Iceland as the only Schengen state. Due to increasing demand, capacities are now being expanded. In a tender worth €20 million, „RPAS Services for Maritime Surveillance with Extended Coastal Range“ with vertically launched, larger drones are being sought. Another large contract for „RPAS Services for Multipurpose Maritime Surveillance“ is expected to cost €50 million. Finally, EMSA is looking for several dozen small drones under 25 kilograms for €7 million.

      Airbus flies for Frontex

      As early as 2009, the EU border agency hosted relevant workshops and seminars on the use of drones and invited manufacturers to give demonstrations. The events were intended to present marketable systems „for land and sea border surveillance“ to border police from member states. In its 2012 Work Programme, Frontex announced its intention to pursue „developments regarding identification and removing of the existing gaps in border surveillance with special focus on Unmanned Aircraft Systems“.

      After a failed award in 2015, Frontex initially tendered a „Trial of Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) for long endurance Maritime Aerial Surveillance“ in Crete and Sicily in 2018. The contract was awarded to Airbus (€4.75 million) for flights with a „Heron 1“ from Israel Aeronautics Industries (IAI) and Leonardo (€1.7 million) with its „Falco Evo“. The focus was not only on testing surveillance technology, but also on the use of drones within civilian airspace.

      After the pilot projects, Frontex then started to procure its own drones of the high-flying MALE class. The tender was for a company that would carry out missions in all weather conditions and at day and night time off Malta, Italy or Greece for €50 million. The contract was again awarded to the defence company Airbus for flights with a „Heron 1“. The aircraft are to operate in a radius of up to 250 nautical miles, which means they could also reconnoitre off the coasts of Tunisia, Libya and Egypt. They carry electro-optical cameras, thermal imaging cameras and so-called „daylight spotters“ to track moving targets. Other equipment includes mobile and satellite phone tracking systems.

      It is not yet clear when the Frontex drones will begin operations, nor does the agency say where they will be stationed in the central Mediterranean. However, it has announced that it will launch two tenders per year for a total of up to 3.000 contracted hours to operate large drones.

      Drone offensive for „pull backs“

      So since 2016, EMSA and Frontex have spent more than €300 million on drone services. On top of that, the Commission has spent at least €38 million funding migration-related drone research such as UPAC S-100, SARA, ROBORDER, CAMELOT, COMPASS2020, FOLDOUT, BorderUAS. This does not include the numerous research projects in the Horizon2020 framework programme, which, like unmanned passenger transport, are not related to border surveillance. Similar research was also carried out during the same period on behalf of the Defence Agency, which spent well over €100 million on it.

      The new unmanned capabilities significantly expand maritime surveillance in particular and enable a new concept of joint command and control structures between Frontex, EMSA and EFCA. Long-range drones, such as those used by EMSA with the „Hermes 900“ and Frontex with the „Heron 1“ in the Mediterranean, can stay in the air for a whole day, covering large sea areas.

      It is expected that the missions will generate significantly more situational information about boats of refugees. The drone offensive will then ensure even more „pull backs“ in violation of international law, after the surveillance information is passed on to the coast guards in countries such as Libya as before, in order to intercept refugees as quickly as possible after they set sail from the coasts there.

      https://digit.site36.net/2021/04/30/unmanned-surveillance-for-fortress-europe
      #drones

  • Interior reactiva las expulsiones desde Canarias y deporta a 22 migrantes a Mauritania

    El Ministerio del Interior ha reactivado este miércoles las deportaciones de migrantes desde Canarias y ha expulsado a 22 las personas que estaban en el Centro de Internamiento de Extranjeros (CIE) de Barranco Seco hacia Mauritania. De ellas, 18 son de Senegal, dos de Gambia, uno de Guinea-Bissau y uno de Mauritania. En este momento, el CIE de Gran Canaria está vacío, y podrá albergar hasta a 42 personas a partir de hoy, ya que el juez de control, Arcadio Díaz-Tejera, en un auto estableció que este era el aforo máximo para evitar el hacinamiento y los posibles contagios en cadena, como sucedió en marzo. Entonces, el magistrado tuvo que ordenar el desalojo y el cierre, ya que trabajadores del centro contagiaron a los internos. Además, el cierre de fronteras decretado para frenar la expansión de la COVID-19 tampoco permitía las expulsiones. La reapertura se ordenó en septiembre, tras la visita del ministro Fernando Grande-Marlaska a Nouakchott.

    El ministro viajó en compañía de la comisaria europea Ylva Johansson para abordar la crisis migratoria que atraviesa el Archipiélago en la actualidad. Uno de los resultados de este encuentro fue la recuperación de las deportaciones hacia Mauritania, aprovechando el acuerdo bilateral que ambos países mantienen. Este documento recoge la expulsión a este país africano tanto de nacionales de este país como de países terceros que en su trayecto migratorio hayan partido del territorio mauritano.

    Aprovechando este epígrafe del convenio, España expulsó a finales de 2019 y comienzos de 2020 incluso a malienses. Algunos de ellos habían solicitado protección internacional ante el conflicto armado que atraviesa su país. Según Acnur, ninguna persona procedente de las regiones afectadas por esta guerra debería ser devuelta de manera forzosa, puesto que el resto del país no debe ser considerado como una alternativa adecuada al asilo hasta el momento en que la situación de seguridad, el estado de derecho y los derechos humanos hayan mejorado significativamente. Así, Acnur insta a los Estados a proporcionar acceso al territorio y a los procedimientos de asilo a las personas que huyen del conflicto en Malí.

    Grande-Marlaska y Johansson también visitaron este fin de semana Canarias, incluido el saturado muelle de Arguineguín que alberga hasta el momento a más de 2.000 personas. El viaje fue criticado por Podemos Canarias, que lo tildó de «hipócrita y decepcionante» por haberse limitado a «poco más que a hacerse una foto y unas declaraciones que son las mismas que se repiten desde hace meses».

    El ministro evidenció en su visita que su apuesta para controlar los flujos migratorios era reforzar la vigilancia y cooperar con los países de origen, poniendo el foco en la lucha contra las mafias de tráfico de personas. Marlaska aseguró que España reforzó tanto a sus Fuerzas y Cuerpos de Seguridad del Estado como a las autoridades de Mauritania. «Un avión de la Guardia Civil ha sido enviado a Nouakchott para realizar labores de prevención y facilitar los rescates en origen y así evitar más muertes»

    Como parte de la estrategia de su departamento, ha solicitado apoyo al Frontex, que ha enviado a siete agentes a Gran Canaria para identificar migrantes y «controlar la inmigración irregular». Con este fin, el ministro ha visitado Argelia, Túnez y Mauritania, y se desplazará a Marruecos el próximo 20 de noviembre. Esta estrategia ya fue empleada en 2006 con fines disuasorios hacia las personas que pretendían partir en cayucos o pateras hacia Canarias. El operativo HERA consistió en el despliegue de personal especializado en la zona, medios marítimos y aéreos que patrullaban el litoral africano, además de sistemas de satélite para controlar el Atlántico. Este equipo no lo aportó Frontex, sino los países miembros de la UE y la agencia reembolsa los costes del despliegue, tantos de los guardias de fronteras como del transporte, combustible y mantenimiento del equipo. La Agencia europea invirtió 3,2 millones de euros de los cuatro que costó la operación en el Atlántico.

    El objetivo se cumplió, ya que de las 31.678 personas que sobrevivieron a la ruta migratoria canaria ese año, se pasó a 12.478 en 2007, 9.181 en 2008, 2.246 en 2009 y a 196 en 2010.

    https://www.eldiario.es/canariasahora/migraciones/interior-reactiva-expulsiones-canarias-deporta-22-migrantes-mauritania_1_63

    –-> 22 personnes expulsées des Canaries vers la Mauritanie. Une personne mauritanienne parmi elles, les autres viennent du Sénégal, de Gambie et de Guinée Bissau. Selon l’article, la reprise des expulsions a été décidée en septembre après la visite du ministre de l’intérieur.

    –—

    A mettre en lien avec la « réactivation des routes migratoires à travers la #Méditerranée_occidentale » :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/885310

    #Canaries #îles_Canaries #Mauritanie #expulsions #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Espagne #evelop #externalisation

    ping @_kg_ @rhoumour @isskein @karine4

    • Marruecos aumenta las deportaciones de migrantes desde el Sáhara Occidental, punto de partida clave hacia Canarias

      Hablamos con varios de los migrantes deportados por Marruecos en los últimos meses tras un pausa durante el confinamiento.

      Aminata Camara, de 25 años, es una de las 86 personas migrantes guineanas expulsadas por Marruecos el pasado 28 de septiembre desde la ciudad de Dajla. El reino marroquí retomó entonces las deportaciones de migrantes desde el Sáhara Occidental, punto de partida clave de pateras hacia Canarias. «Nos llevaron al aeropuerto, no nos tomaron las huellas, no nos pidieron nada ni los datos. Nos dieron los billetes del vuelo, sin equipaje», contaba la mujer guineana a elDiario.es mientras acababa de embarcar en el avión.

      De fondo se escuchaba el revuelo, los gritos de un grupo de mujeres, mientras ella se atropellaba al denunciar nerviosa que los militares la habían metido en un avión en Dhkala junto a otros 80 compatriotas (28 mujeres), y que los expulsaban a su país. «Los militares que nos acompañaron en el viaje nos abandonaron en el avión. Un bus nos llevó a la parte nacional del aeropuerto de Conakri y nos dejaron allí sin más, a pesar del coronavirus. Tuvimos que coger taxis para llegar a nuestras casas», denunciaba ya en su país.

      Desde entonces, han salido al menos tres aviones más con personas migrantes desde Dajla a Guinea Conakry, Senegal y Mali. El último vuelo de deportación se organizó el pasado 11 de noviembre, con alrededor de un centenar de personas que la Marina Real marroquí había interceptado en la costa atlántica intentando salir hacia las Islas Canarias. Los metieron en dos autocares en la ciudad saharaui para enviarlos en avión a Dakar. Allí, fuentes del aeropuerto, corroboran a este medio que el miércoles llegó un grupo de senegaleses.

      En el momento en que se ejecutaba la expulsión de los ciudadanos malienses el pasado 2 de octubre, elDiario.es contactó telefónicamente con Traore, el presidente de la comunidad maliense en Marruecos. «Hemos sido detenidos ilegalmente, nos cogieron en las casas y nos encerraron tres semanas en un centro de detención en El Aaiún. Hoy nos llevan al aeropuerto de Dajla para deportarnos a Mali. Somos algo más de 80 personas. Y las autoridades malienses han firmado una deportación voluntaria, mientras que nos están forzado a dejar el país sin ningún papel».

      Desde Dajla, François, que se salvó de la expulsión, asegura a este medio: «A los subsaharianos nos cogen diciendo que tenemos el coronavirus para meternos en cuarentena. Los test de PCR en los trabajos son obligatorias para los subsaharianos. Y a 115 senegaleses, 95 guineanos y 80 malienses los deportaron a sus países».

      Entre los expulsados había migrantes que residían desde hace tiempo en El Aaiún y Dajla, ciudades saharauis desde donde se registran la mayoría de las salidas en embarcaciones a Canarias, la ruta migratoria más transitada actualmente en España. Hasta el 15 de noviembre, llegaron 16.760 personas en 553 embarcaciones, según los datos del Ministerio del Interior. En plena crisis migratoria en las islas, Marlaska viaja este viernes a Marruecos con el objetivo de reforzar la cooperación en materia fronteriza y evitar la salida de pateras hacia las islas.

      Por su parte, una fuente oficial de migración desde Rabat confirma a elDiario.es los cuatro aviones de expulsión, pero con 120 personas de Mali, entre los que se encontraban cinco guineanos; 28 mujeres deportadas a Guinea Conakry y 144 senegaleses rescatados en el mar. A los que hay añadir los últimos 100 enviados a Senegal la semana pasada. «Algunos son migrantes expulsados inicialmente de Tánger, Nador, Rabat, Casablanca y Alhucemas hacia la frontera de Marruecos con Argelia en Tiouli, región de Jerada, a unos 60 kilómetros de Oujda», precisa la misma fuente. Las devoluciones se hicieron con tres de los cuatro países –el otro es Costa de Marfil– con los que Marruecos estableció un acuerdo para acceder al país sin visado.
      «Había un bebé de tres meses con nosotros»

      Aminara pasó tres semanas encerrada junto al resto de personas de origen subsahariano antes de ser expulsadas desde el Sáhara Occidental. «Había un bebé de tres meses con nosotros, otro de dos meses con su madre, dos niños de 5 y 8, una niña de 9 años», recuerda ya desde una localidad cercana a Boffa, en la región de Boké (Guinea Conakry).

      «La Gendarmería vino a la casa por la noche. Estábamos dormidos. Llamaron a la puerta y nos pidieron que abriésemos, cuando lo hicimos, nos hicieron salir y montar en los vehículos, nos llevaron a prisión y nos encerraron tres semanas.
      »¿Qué hemos hecho?", preguntaron. «Nada, tenéis que salir» respondieron los militares.

      Después la encerraron tres semanas en un centro de detención improvisado. «Nos maltrataron, nos trataban como esclavos. Pegaron a una amiga allí, y le rompieron el pie. Cuando alguien caía enfermo, lo abandonaban fuera, y nadie te miraba, ni siquiera te llevaban al hospital. Solo comíamos pan y sardinas, ni agua nos daban. Enfermó mucha gente, yo misma me puse mala. Fue un calvario», enumera apresuradamente por teléfono.

      Durante el encierro les hicieron dos veces los test PCR para detectar el coronavirus. Y después de que las autoridades firmasen junto a los representantes de los consulados su expulsión, los metieron en aviones a sus países de origen. «Nos maltrataron, nos encerraron, nos pegaron, nos hicieron todo lo malo, lo prometo», dice en un susurro.
      «Han violado nuestros derechos y queremos verdaderamente justicia»

      Precisamente, la Asociación Marroquí de Derechos Humanos (AMDH) de Nador ha denunciado detenciones forzosas desde que comenzó el confinamiento en el mes de marzo. «Estas condiciones inhumanas de confinamiento son una práctica voluntaria de las autoridades marroquíes para instar a los migrantes secuestrados a que revelen sus datos personales para posteriormente identificarlos y deportarlos contra su voluntad», mantiene la AMDH.

      Finalmente, Amina está en Guinea: «No es fácil. No tengo apoyo ni nadie que me pueda ayudar. Cuando llegamos, contactamos con Naciones Unidas. Nos dijeron que nos iban ayudar, pero después no nos han llamado, también nos ha abandonado. Nadie nos ha escuchado».

      Esta joven viajó a Marruecos para mejorar el nivel de vida. En su país, creció en la calle después de perder a sus padres. Habló con un amigo magrebí y emprendió la ruta de Argelia, pasando por Mali y entrando finalmente a Marruecos. El objetivo era trabajar, «jamás osé a cruzar a España. Lo encuentro muy peligroso. Cada día muere gente en el agua. Nunca intenté eso», confiesa.

      «Los dos años en Marruecos no había nada que hacer. Tampoco fue fácil», rememora desde Guinea. Compartía una habitación con ocho personas y trabajaba en una empresa de pescado en Dkhala, pero «los militares me pegaron y perdí mi bebé. Tuve un aborto». Tras esta desgracia, se trasladó a una residencia particular en El Aaiún «donde trabajaba día y noche por 150 euros al mes, que me llegaba para pagar el alojamiento y la comida».
      AMDH denuncia las «deportaciones forzosas» que el gobierno disfraza de «voluntarias»

      El gobierno disfraza estos vuelos con datos de «retorno voluntario» porque los están gestionando al margen de los organismos internacionales. La AMDH de Nador denunció en las redes sociales: «La deportación forzosa de migrantes subsaharianos por las autoridades marroquíes continúa desde Dajla».

      «Desalojos inhumanos que no podían hacerse sin la complicidad de las embajadas en Rabat y sin el dinero de la Unión Europea (UE)», apunta la AMDH. Incide además en sus publicaciones en Facebook en que «son expulsados con la complicidad de su embajada y con el dinero de la UE y la Organización Internacional de Migraciones (OIM)».
      «Retornos a la fuerza, y no voluntarios»

      Desde el organismo confirman que se trataba de «retornos a la fuerza, y no voluntarios». Las ONG denuncian «corrupción» porque los cónsules firmaron un retorno voluntario con Marruecos basándose en acuerdos entre los países que además se han instalado recientemente en el Sáhara Occidental, como es el caso de Guinea Conakry, Senegal y Mali.

      Moussa Coulibaly (31 años) habla con elDiario.es desde Mali. Llevaba cuatros años y medio en Marruecos, pero el 2 de octubre por la tarde fue deportado, junto a otras 83 personas malienses. «Fue el consulado el que firmó que nos trajeran al país. Nuestros gobiernos son malos. Realmente sufrimos. Las autoridades han deportado a la mayoría», delata.

      Marruecos ha retomado las deportaciones tras el confinamiento. «Desde principios de julio hasta septiembre de 2020, alrededor de 157 personas han sido expulsadas de Marruecos entre las que había 9 mujeres, 11 menores y 7 personas heridas», detallaban desde Rabat a principios de octubre.

      La AMDH ya denunció en su informe de 2019, que cerca de 600 migrantes habían sido expulsados en autocares desde un centro de internamiento de Nador al aeropuerto de Casablanca en 35 operaciones de deportación durante el año. Entonces ya desveló que los seis países que cooperan con Marruecos para deportar a sus nacionales son Camerún, Costa de Marfil, Guinea, Senegal, Mali y Burkina Faso.

      Precisamente la Organización Democrática del Trabajo (ODT) acusa al gobierno magrebí de descuidar a las personas migrantes desde que apareció la Covid–19. Denuncia en un comunicado que «el sufrimiento de los migrantes africanos en Marruecos solo se ha intensificado y exacerbado durante el período de la pandemia».

      https://www.eldiario.es/desalambre/marruecos-aumenta-deportaciones-migrantes-subsaharianos-dajla-principales-p

      #Sahara_occidental #Maroc #Dajla #Dhkala #Sénégal #Mali #Guinée-Conakry #Guinée

  • Proceedings of the conference “Externalisation of borders : detention practices and denial of the right to asylum”

    Présentation de la conférence en vidéo :
    http://www.alessiobarbini.com/Video_Convegno_Def_FR.mp4

    –---

    In order to strengthen the network among the organizations already engaged in strategic actions against the outsourcing policies implemented by Italy and Europe, during the work of the conference were addressed the issues of the impact of European and Italian policies and regulations, as well as bilateral agreements between European and African countries. Particular attention was given to the phenomenon of trafficking in human beings and detention policies for migrants and asylum seekers.

    PANEL I – BILATERAL AGREEMENTS BETWEEN AFRICAN AND EU MEMBER STATES AND THEIR CONSEQUENCES ON DETENTION

    Detention and repatriation of migrants in Europe: a comparison between the different Member States of the EU
    Francesca Esposito – Border Criminologies, University of Oxford. Esposito ITA; Esposito ENG.

    The phenomenon of returnees in Nigeria: penal and administrative consequences after return
    Olaide A. Gbadamosi- Osun State University. Gbadamosi ITA; Gbadamosi ENG.

    European externalisation policies and the denial of the right to asylum: focus on ruling no. 22917/2019 of the Civil Court of Rome
    Loredana Leo – ASGI. Leo ITA; Leo ENG.

    PANEL II – THE PHENOMENON OF TRAFFICKING AND THE
    RIGHT TO ASYLUM

    Recognition of refugee status for victims of trafficking
    Nazzarena Zorzella – ASGI. Zorzella ITA; Zorzella ENG; Zorzella FRA.

    Voluntariness in return processes: nature of consent and role of the IOM
    Jean Pierre Gauci – British Institute of International and Comparative Law. Gauci ITA; Gauci ENG; Gauci FRA.

    Conditional refugees: resettlement as a condition to exist
    Sara Creta – Independent journalist. Creta ITA; Creta ENG.

    Resettlement: legal nature and the Geneva Convention
    Giulia Crescini – ASGI. Crescini ITA; Crescini ENG; Crescini FRA.

    PANEL III – THE RISKS ARISING FROM THE REFOULEMENT
    OF TRAFFICKED PERSONS, MEMBER STATES’ RESPONSIBILITIES
    AND LAW ENFORCEMENT ACTIONS

    Introduction of Godwin Morka (Director of research and programme development, NAPTIP) and Omoruyi Osula (Head of Admin/Training, ETAHT). Morka ITA; Morka ENG. Osula ITA; Osula ENG.

    The phenomenon of re-trafficking of women repatriated in Nigeria
    Kokunre Agbontaen-Eghafona – Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Benin. Kokunre ITA; Kokunre ENG.

    The phenomenon of trafficking: social conditions before departure from a gender perspective
    R. Evon Benson-Idahosa – Pathfinders Justice Initiative. Idahosa ITA; Idahosa ENG.

    Strategic litigation on externalisation of borders and lack of access to the right to asylum for victims of trafficking
    Cristina Laura Cecchini – ASGI. Cecchini ITA; Cecchini ENG.

    Protection for victims of trafficking in transit countries: focus on Niger. Yerima Bako Djibo Moussa – Head of the Department of Legal Affairs and Compensation at the National Agency for Combating Trafficking in Human Beings in Niger. Yerima ITA; Yerima FRA.

    PANEL IV – LIBERTÀ DI MOVIMENTO

    ECOWAS free movement area: interferences of European policies and remedies
    Ibrahim Muhammad Mukhtar – Law Clinic Coordinator, NILE University. Mukhtar ITA; Mukhtar ENG.

    The consequences of migration policies on freedom of movement: focus on Niger
    Harouna Mounkaila – Professor and Researcher, Department of Geography, Abdou Moumouni University, Niamey. Mounkaila ITA; Mounkaila FRA.

    Identification of African citizens in transit to the European Union: functioning of data collection and privacy
    Jane Kilpatrick – Statewatch. Kilpatrick ITA; Kilpatrick ENG; Kilpatrick FRA.

    EU funding for ECOWAS countries’ biometric data registry systems: level of funding and impact on the population
    Giacomo Zandonini – Journalist. Zandonini ITA; Zandonini ENG.

    The right to leave any country, including his own, in international law
    Francesca Mussi – Research fellow in International Law, University of Trento. Mussi ITA; Mussi ENG; Mussi FRA.

    Human Rights Protection Mechanisms in Africa
    Giuseppe Pascale – Researcher of International Law, University of Trieste. Pascale ITA; Pascale ENG.

    https://sciabacaoruka.asgi.it/en/proceedings-of-the-conference-externalisation-of-borders-detention-practices-and-denial-of-the-right-to-asylum/#smooth-scroll-top

    #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #retour_volontaire #renvois #expulsions #détention_administrative #rétention #Nigeria #returnees #droit_d'asile #trafic_d'êtres_humains #IOM #OIM #ASGI #rapport #réinstallation #refoulement #genre #Niger #liberté_de_mouvement #liberté_de_circulation #identification #données #collecte_de_données #biométrie #ECOWAS #droits_humains

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749

    ping @isskein @rhoumour @karine4 @_kg_

  • Revealed: No 10 explores sending asylum seekers to Moldova, Morocco and Papua New Guinea | UK news | The Guardian
    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/sep/30/revealed-no-10-explores-sending-asylum-seekers-to-moldova-morocco-and-p

    Downing Street has asked officials to consider the option of sending asylum seekers to Moldova, Morocco or Papua New Guinea and is the driving force behind proposals to hold refugees in offshore detention centres, according to documents seen by the Guardian.

    The documents suggest officials in the Foreign Office have been pushing back against No 10’s proposals to process asylum applications in detention facilities overseas, which have also included the suggestion the centres could be constructed on the south Atlantic islands of Ascension and St Helena.

    The documents, marked “official” and “sensitive” and produced earlier this month, summarise advice from officials at the Foreign Office, which was asked by Downing Street to “offer advice on possible options for negotiating an offshore asylum processing facility similar to the Australian model in Papua New Guinea and Nauru”.

    #migration #asile #déportation #externalisation #déterritorialisation

    • Downing Street has asked officials to consider the option of sending asylum seekers to Moldova, Morocco or Papua New Guinea and is the driving force behind proposals to hold refugees in offshore detention centres, according to documents seen by the Guardian.

      The documents suggest officials in the Foreign Office have been pushing back against No 10’s proposals to process asylum applications in detention facilities overseas, which have also included the suggestion the centres could be constructed on the south Atlantic islands of Ascension and St Helena.

      The documents, marked “official” and “sensitive” and produced earlier this month, summarise advice from officials at the Foreign Office, which was asked by Downing Street to “offer advice on possible options for negotiating an offshore asylum processing facility similar to the Australian model in Papua New Guinea and Nauru”.

      The Australian system of processing asylum seekers in on the Pacific Islands costs AY$13bn (£7.2bn) a year and has attracted criticism from human rights groups, the United Nations and even the UK government, according to the documents, which reveal British ministers have “privately” raised concerns with Australia over the abuse of detainees in its offshore detention facilities.

      The Financial Times reported on Wednesday that the home secretary, Priti Patel, asked officials to consider processing asylum seekers Ascension and St Helena, which are overseas British territories. Home Office sources were quick to distance Patel from the proposals and Downing Street has also played down Ascension and St Helena as destinations for asylum processing centres.

      However, the documents seen by the Guardian suggest the government has for weeks been working on “detailed plans” that include cost estimates of building asylum detention camps on the south Atlantic islands, as well as other proposals to build such facilities in Moldova, Morocco and Papua New Guinea.

      The documents suggest the UK’s proposals would go further than Australia’s hardline system, which is “based on migrants being intercepted outside Australian waters”, allowing Australia to claim no immigration obligations to individuals. The UK proposals, the documents state, would involve relocating asylum seekers who “have arrived in the UK and are firmly within the jurisdiction of the UK for the purposes of the ECHR and Human Rights Act 1998”.

      The documents suggest that the idea that Morocco, Moldova and Papua New Guinea might make suitable destinations for UK asylum processing centres comes directly from Downing Street, with documents saying the three countries were specifically “suggested” and “floated” by No 10. One document says the request for advice on third country options for detention facilities came from “the PM”.

      The Times reported that the government was also giving serious consideration to the idea of creating floating asylum centres in disused ferries moored off the UK coast.

      While composed in the restrained language of civil servants, the Foreign Office advice contained in the documents appears highly dismissive of the ideas emanating from Downing Street, pointing out numerous legal, practical and diplomatic obstacles to processing asylums seekers oversees. The documents state that:

      • Plans to process asylum seekers at offshore centres in Ascension or St Helena would be “extremely expensive and logistically complicated” given the remoteness of the islands. The estimated cost is £220m build cost per 1,000 beds and running costs of £200m. One document adds: “In relation to St Helena we will need to consider if we are willing to impose the plan if the local government object.”

      • The “significant” legal, diplomatic and practical obstacles to the plan include the existence of “sensitive military installations” on the island of Ascension. One document warns that the military issues mean the “will mean US government would need to be persuaded at the highest levels, and even then success cannot be guaranteed”.

      • It is “highly unlikely” that any north African state, including Morocco, would agree to hosting asylum seekers relocated to the UK. “No north African country, Morocco included, has a fully functioning asylum system,” one document states. “Morocco would not have the resources (or the inclination) to pay for a processing centre.”

      • Seeming to dismiss the idea of sending asylum seekers to Moldova, Foreign Office officials point out there is protracted conflict in the eastern European country over Transnistria as well as “endemic” corruption. They add: “If an asylum centre depended on reliable, transparent, credible cooperation from the host country justice system we would not be able to rely on this.”

      • Officials warned of “significant political and logistical obstacles” to sending asylum seekers to Papua New Guinea, pointing out it is more than 8,500 miles away, has a fragile public health system and is “one of the bottom few countries in the world in terms of medical personnel per head of population”. They also warn any such a move would “renew scrutiny of Australia’s own offshore processing”. One document adds: “Politically, we judge the chances of positive engagement with the government on this to be almost nil.”

      A Foreign Office source played down the idea that the department had objected to Downing Street’s offshoring proposals for asylum seekers, saying officials’ concerns were only about the practicality of the plan. “This was something which the Cabinet Office commissioned, which we responded to with full vigour, to show how things could work,” the source said.

      However, another Whitehall source familiar with the government plans said they were part of a push by Downing Street to “radically beef-up the hostile environment” in 2021 following the end of the Brexit transition. Former prime minister Theresa May’s “hostile environment” phrase, which became closely associated with the polices that led to the Windrush scandal, is no longer being used in government.

      But the source said that moves are afoot to find a slate of new policies that would achieve a similar end to “discourage” and “deter” migrants from entering the UK illegally.

      The documents seen by the Guardian also contain details of Home Office legal advice to Downing Street, which states that the policy would require legislative changes, including “disapplying sections 77 and 78 of the Nationality Immigration and Asylum Act 2002 so that asylum seekers can be removed from the UK while their claim or appeal is pending”.

      Another likely legislative change, according to the Home Office advice, would require “defining what we mean by a clandestine arrival (and potentially a late claim) and create powers allowing us to send them offshore for the purposes of determining their asylum claims”.

      One of the documents states that the option of building detention centres in foreign countries – rather than British overseas territories – is “not the favoured No 10 avenue, but they wish to explore [the option] in case it presents easier pathways to an offshore facility”.

      On Wednesday, asked about the FT’s report about the UK considering plans to ship asylum seekers to the south Atlantic for processing, Boris Johnson’s spokesperson confirmed the UK was considering Australian–style offshore processing centres.

      He said the UK had a “long and proud history” of accepting asylum seekers but needed to act, particularly given migrants making unofficial crossings from France in small boats.

      “We are developing plans to reform our illegal migration and asylum policies so we can keep providing protection to those who need it, while preventing abuse of the system and criminality. As part of this work we’ve been looking at what a whole host of other countries do to inform a plan for the United Kingdom. And that work is ongoing.”

      Asked for comment about the proposals regarding Moldova, Morocco and Papua New Guinea, Downing Street referred the Guardian to the spokesman’s earlier comments. The Foreign Office referred the Guardian to the Home Office. The Home Office said it had nothing to add to comments by the prime minister’s spokesman.

      #UK #Angleterre #Maroc #Papoue_Nouvelle_Guinée #Moldavie
      #offshore_detention_centres
      #procédure_d'asile #externalisation_de_la_procédure #modèle_australien

      #île_de_l'Ascension

      #île_Sainte-Hélène


      #Sainte-Hélène

      –---

      Les #floating_asylum_centres pensés par l’UK rappellent d’autres structures flottantes :
      https://seenthis.net/messages/879396

      –—

      Ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation des frontières :
      https://seenthis.net/messages/731749

    • Ascension Island: Priti Patel considered outpost for UK asylum centre location

      The government has considered building an asylum processing centre on a remote UK territory in the Atlantic Ocean.

      The idea of “offshoring” people is being looked at but finding a suitable location would be key, a source said.

      Home Secretary Priti Patel asked officials to look at asylum policies which had been successful in other countries, the BBC has been told.

      The Financial Times says Ascension Island, more than 4,000 miles (6,000km) from the UK, was a suggested location.

      What happens to migrants who reach the UK?
      More migrants arrive in September than all of 2019
      Fleeing the Syrian war for Belfast

      The Foreign Office is understood to have carried out an assessment for Ascension - which included the practicalities of transferring migrants thousands of miles to the island - and decided not to proceed.

      However, a Home Office source said ministers were looking at “every option that can stop small boat crossings and fix the asylum system”.

      "The UK has a long and proud history of offering refuge to those who need protection. Tens of thousands of people have rebuilt their lives in the UK and we will continue to provide safe and legal routes in the future.

      “As ministers have said we are developing plans to reform policies and laws around illegal migration and asylum to ensure we are able to provide protection to those who need it, while preventing abuse of the system and the criminality associated with it.”

      No final decisions have been made.
      ’Logistical nightmare’

      Labour’s shadow home secretary Nick Thomas-Symonds said: “This ludicrous idea is inhumane, completely impractical and wildly expensive - so it seems entirely plausible this Tory government came up with it.”

      Alan Nicholls, a member of the Ascension Island council, said moving asylum seekers more than 4,000 miles to the British overseas territory would be a “logistical nightmare” and not well received by the islanders.

      He also told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme that the presence of military bases on the island could make the concept “prohibitive” due to security concerns.

      Australia has controversially used offshore processing and detention centres for asylum seekers since the 1980s.

      A United Nations refugee agency representative to the UK, Rossella Pagliuchi-Lor, said the proposal would breach the UK’s obligations to asylum seekers and would “change what the UK is - its history and its values”.

      Speaking to the UK Parliament’s Home Affairs Select Committee, she said the Australian model had “brought about huge suffering for people, who are guilty of no more than seeking asylum, and it has also cost huge amounts of money”.

      The proposal comes amid record numbers of migrants making the journey across the English Channel to the UK in small boats this month, which Ms Patel has vowed to stop.

      Laura Trott, Conservative MP for Sevenoaks in Kent, said it was “absolutely right” that the government was looking at offshore asylum centres to “reduce the pressure” on Kent, which was “unable to take any more children into care”.

      In order to be eligible for asylum in the UK, applicants must prove they cannot return to their home country because they fear persecution due to their race, religion, nationality, political opinion, gender identity or sexual orientation.

      Asylum seekers cannot work while their claims are being processed, so the government offers them a daily allowance of just over £5 and accommodation, often in hostels or shared flats.

      Delays in processing UK asylum applications increased significantly last year with four out of five applicants in the last three months of 2019 waiting six months or more for their cases to be processed.

      That compared with three in four during the same period in 2018.

      –—

      Ascension Island key facts

      The volcanic island has no indigenous population, and the people that live there - fewer than 1,000 - are the employees and families of the organisations operating on the island
      The military airbase is jointly operated by the RAF and the US, and has been used as a staging post to supply and defend the Falkland Islands
      Its first human inhabitants arrived in 1815, when the Royal Navy set up camp to keep watch on Napoleon, who was imprisoned on the island of St Helena some 800 miles away
      It is home to a BBC transmitter - the BBC Atlantic Relay station - which sends shortwave radio to Africa and South America

      https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-54349796

    • UK considers sending asylum seekers abroad to be processed

      Reports suggest using #Gibraltar or the #Isle_of_Man or copying Australian model and paying third countries

      The Home Office is considering plans to send asylum seekers who arrive in the UK overseas to be processed, an idea modelled on a controversial Australian system, it is understood.

      Priti Patel, the home secretary, is expected to publish details next week of a scheme in which people who arrive in the UK via unofficial means, such as crossing the Channel in small boats, would be removed to a third country to have any claim dealt with.

      The government has pledged repeatedly to introduce measures to try to reduce the number of asylum seekers arriving across the Channel. Australia removes arrivals to overseas islands while their claims are processed.

      A Home Office source said: “Whilst people are dying making perilous journeys we would be irresponsible if we didn’t consider every avenue.”

      However, the source played down reports that destinations considered included Turkey, Gibraltar, the Isle of Man or other British islands, and that talks with some countries had begun, saying this was “all speculation”.

      Last year it emerged that meetings involving Patel had raised the possibility of asylum seekers being sent to Ascension Island, an isolated volcanic British territory in the south Atlantic, or St Helena, part of the same island group but 800 miles away.

      At the time, Home Office sources said the proposals came when Patel sought advice from the Foreign Office on how other countries deal with asylum applications, with Australia’s system given as an example.

      Labour described the Ascension Island idea as “inhumane, completely impractical and wildly expensive”.

      After the Brexit transition period finished at the end of 2020, the UK government no longer had the automatic right to transfer refugees and migrants to the EU country in which they arrived, part of the European asylum system known as the Dublin regulation.

      The UK government sought to replace this with a similar, post-Brexit version, but was rebuffed by the EU.

      With the government facing political pressure on migrant Channel crossings from some parts of the media, and from people like Nigel Farage, the former Ukip leader who frequently makes videos describing the boats as “an invasion”, Patel’s department has sought to respond.

      Last year, official documents seen by the Guardian showed that trials had taken place to test a blockade in the Channel similar to Australia’s controversial “turn back the boats” tactic.

      Reports at the time, denied by Downing Street, said that other methods considered to deter unofficial Channel crossings included a wave machine to push back the craft.

      https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2021/mar/18/asylum-seekers-could-be-sent-abroad-by-uk-to-be-processed

  • L’#Université, le #Covid-19 et le danger des #technologies_de_l’éducation

    La crise actuelle et la solution proposée d’un passage des enseignements en ligne en urgence ont accéléré des processus systémiques déjà en cours dans les universités britanniques, en particulier dans le contexte du Brexit. Même si l’enseignement en ligne peut avoir une portée radicale et égalitaire, sa pérennisation dans les conditions actuelles ouvrirait la voie à ce que les fournisseurs privés de technologies de l’éducation (edtech d’après l’anglais educational technology) imposent leurs priorités et fassent de l’exception une norme.

    Mariya Ivancheva, sociologue à l’université de Liverpool dont les recherches portent sur l’enseignement supérieur, soutient que nous devons repenser ce phénomène et y résister, sans quoi le secteur de l’enseignement supérieur britannique continuera d’opérer comme un outil d’extraction et de redistribution de l’argent public vers le secteur privé.

    *

    Avec la propagation mondiale du coronavirus et la désignation du COVID-19 comme pandémie par l’Organisation mondiale de la santé le 11 mars, les universités de nombreux pays ont eu recours à l’enseignement en ligne. Rien qu’aux États-Unis, dès le 12 mars, plus de 100 universités sont passées à l’enseignement à distance. Depuis, rares sont les pays où au moins une partie des cours n’est pas dispensée en ligne. Les prestataires de services d’enseignement privés ont été inondés de demandes de la part des universités, qui les sollicitaient pour faciliter le passage à l’enseignement à distance.

    Au Royaume-Uni, la réticence initiale du gouvernement et des directions de certaines institutions d’enseignement supérieur à imposer des mesures de distanciation sociale et à fermer les établissements ont mené plusieurs universités à prendre cette initiative de leur propre chef. Le 23 mars, lorsque les règles de confinement et de distanciation sociale ont finalement été introduites, la plupart des universités avaient déjà déplacé leurs cours en ligne et fermé la plus grande partie de leur campus, à l’exception des « services essentiels ». Si un débat sur les inégalités face à l’université dématérialisée a eu lieu (accès aux ordinateurs, à une connexion Internet sécurisée et à un espace de travail calme pour les étudiant.e.s issus de familles pauvres, vivant dans des conditions défavorables, porteurs de responsabilités familiales ou d’un handicap), l’impact sur le long terme de ce passage en ligne sur le travail universitaire n’a pas été suffisamment discuté.

    Ne pas laisser passer l’opportunité d’une bonne crise

    Étant donnée la manière criminelle dont le gouvernement britannique a initialement répondu à la crise sanitaire, un retard qui aurait coûté la vie à plus de 50 000 personnes, les mesures de confinement et de distanciation prises par les universités sont louables. Toutefois, la mise en ligne des enseignements a également accéléré des processus déjà existants dans le secteur universitaire au Royaume-Uni.

    En effet, surtout depuis la crise de 2008, ce secteur est aux prises avec la marchandisation, les politiques d’austérité et la précarisation. Désormais, il doit également faire aux conséquences du Brexit, qui se traduiront par une baisse des financements pour la recherche provenant de l’UE ainsi que par une diminution du nombre d’étudiant.e.s européens. Entre l’imminence d’une crise économique sans précédent, les craintes d’une baisse drastique des effectifs d’étudiant.e.s étranger/ères payant des frais de scolarité pour l’année académique à venir et le refus du gouvernement de débourser deux milliards de livres pour renflouer le secteur, la perspective d’une reprise rapide est peu probable.

    Le passage en ligne a permis à de nombreux étudiant.e.s de terminer le semestre et l’année académique : pourtant, les personnels enseignants et administratifs n’ont reçu que de maigres garanties face à la conjoncture. Pour les enseignements, les universités britanniques dépendent à plus de 50% de travailleurs précaires, ayant des contrats de vacation souvent rémunérés à l’heure et sur demande (« zero-hour contract » : contrat sans horaire spécifié). Si certaines universités ont mis en place des systèmes de congé sans solde ou de chômage partiel pour faire face à la pandémie, la majorité d’entre elles envisage de renvoyer les plus vulnérables parmi leurs employés.

    Parallèlement, les sociétés prestataires d’edtech, qui sollicitaient auparavant les universités de manière discrète, sont désormais considérées comme des fournisseurs de services de « premiers secours » voire « palliatifs ». Or, dans le contexte actuel, la prolongation de ces modes d’enseignements entraînerait une précarisation et une externalisation accrues du travail universitaire, et serait extrêmement préjudiciable à l’université publique.

    Les eaux troubles de l’enseignement supérieur commercialisé

    Au cours des dernières décennies, le domaine universitaire britannique a connu une énorme redistribution des fonds publics vers des prestataires privés. Les contributions du public et des particuliers à l’enseignement supérieur se font désormais par trois biais : les impôts (budgets pour la recherche et frais de fonctionnement des universités), les frais d’études (frais de scolarité, frais de subsistance et remboursement des prêts étudiants) et par le port du risque de crédit pour les prêts étudiants (reconditionnés en dette et vendus aux investisseurs privés)[1].

    Lorsque les directions des universités mettent en œuvre des partenariats public-privé dont les conditions sont largement avantageuses pour le secteur privé, elles prétendent que ces contrats profitent au « bien public », et ce grâce à l’investissement qu’ils permettraient dans les infrastructures et les services, et parce qu’ils mèneraient à la création d’emplois et donc à de la croissance. Mais cette rhétorique dissimule mal le fait que ces contrats participent en réalité à un modèle d’expansion de l’université fondé sur la financiarisation et le non-respect des droits des travailleurs dont les conditions de travail deviennent encore plus précaires.

    À cet égard, les retraites des universitaires ont été privatisées par le biais d’un régime appelé Universities Superannuation Scheme (USS), dont il a été divulgué qu’il s’agissait d’un régime fiscal offshore. Par ailleurs, les universités britanniques, très bien notées par les agences de notation qui supposent que l’État les soutiendrait le cas échéant, ont été autorisées à emprunter des centaines de millions de livres pour investir dans la construction de résidences étudiantes privées, s’engageant à une augmentation exponentielle du nombre d’étudiant.e.s.

    Le marché de la construction des résidences universitaires privées atteignait 45 milliards de livres en 2017, et bénéficiait souvent à des sociétés privées offshores. Les étudiant.e.s sont ainsi accueillis dans des dortoirs sans âme, fréquentent des infrastructures basiques (par exemple les installations sportives), alors qu’ils manquent cruellement d’accès aux services de soutien psychologique et social, ou même tout simplement de contact direct avec leurs enseignants, qu’ils voient souvent de loin dans des amphithéâtres bondés. Ces choix ont pour résultat une détérioration dramatique de la santé mentale des étudiant.e.s.

    Avec des frais universitaires pouvant aller jusqu’à £9 000 par an pour les études de premier cycle et dépassant parfois £20 000 par an en cycle de masters pour les étudiant.e.s étranger/ères (sans compter les frais de subsistance : nourriture, logement, loisirs), la dette étudiante liée à l’emprunt a atteint 121 milliards de livres. La prévalence d’emplois précaires et mal payés sur le marché du travail rend à l’évidence ces prêts de plus en plus difficiles à rembourser.

    Enfin, le financement de la recherche provient toujours principalement de sources publiques, telles que l’UE ou les comités nationaux pour la recherche. Candidater pour ces financements extrêmement compétitifs demande un énorme investissement en temps, en main d’œuvre et en ressources. Ces candidatures sont cependant fortement encouragées par la direction des universités, en dépit du faible taux de réussite et du fait que ces financements aboutissent souvent à des collaborations entre université et industrie qui profitent au secteur privé par le biais de brevets, de main-d’œuvre de recherche bon marché, et en octroyant aux entreprises un droit de veto sur les publications.

    Les edtech entrent en scène

    Dans le même temps, les sociétés d’edtech jouent un rôle de plus en plus important au sein des universités, profitant de deux changements du paradigme véhiculé par l’idéologie néolibérale du marché libre appliquée à l’enseignement supérieur – ainsi qu’à d’autres services publics.

    D’abord, l’idée de services centrés sur les « utilisateurs » (les « apprenants »selon la terminologie en cours dans l’enseignement), s’est traduite concrètement par des coûts additionnels pour le public et les usagers ainsi que par l’essor du secteur privé, conduisant à l’individualisation accrue des risques et de la dette. Ainsi, la formation professionnelle des étudiant.e.s, autrefois proposée par les employeurs, est désormais considérée comme relevant de la responsabilité des universités. Les universitaires qui considèrent que leur rôle n’est pas de former les étudiant.e.s aux compétences attendues sur le marché du travail sont continuellement dénigrés.

    Le deuxième paradigme mis en avant par les sociétés edtech pour promouvoir leurs services auprès des universités est celui de l’approche centrée sur les « solutions ». Mais c’est la même « solution » qui est invariablement proposée par les sociétés edtech, à savoir celle de la « rupture numérique », ou, en d’autres termes, la rupture avec l’institution universitaire telle que nous la connaissons. En réponse aux demandes en faveur d’universités plus démocratiques et égalitaires, dégagées de leur soumission croissante aux élites au pouvoir, les sociétés edtech (dont la capitalisation s’élève à des milliards de dollars) se présentent comme offrant la solution via les technologies numériques.

    Elles s’associent à une longue histoire où le progrès technologique (que ce soit les lettres, la radio, les cassettes audio ou les enregistrements vidéo) a effectivement été mis au service d’étudiant.e.s « atypiques » tels que les travailleurs, les femmes, les personnes vivant dans des zones d’accès difficile, les personnes porteuses de handicap ou assumant des responsabilités familiales. L’éducation ouverte par le biais par exemple de webinaires gratuits, les formations en ligne ouvertes à tous (MOOC), les ressources éducatives disponibles gratuitement et les logiciels open source suivaient à l’origine un objectif progressiste d’élargissement de l’accès à l’éducation.

    Toutefois, avec le passage en ligne des enseignements dans un secteur universitaire fortement commercialisé, les technologies sont en réalité utilisées à des fins opposées. Avant la pandémie de COVID-19, certaines universités proposaient déjà des MOOC, des formations de courte durée gratuites et créditées et des diplômes en ligne par le biais de partenariats public-privé avec des sociétés de gestion de programmes en ligne.

    Au sein du marché général des technologies de l’information, ces sociétés représentent un secteur d’une soixantaine de fournisseurs, estimé à 3 milliards de dollars et qui devrait atteindre 7,7 milliards de dollars d’ici 2025 – un chiffre susceptible d’augmenter avec les effets de la pandémie. Le modèle commercial de ces partenariats implique généralement que ces sociétés récoltent entre 50 à 70% des revenus liés aux frais de scolarité, ainsi que l’accès à des mégadonnées très rentables, en échange de quoi elles fournissent le capital de démarrage, la plateforme, des services de commercialisation et une aide au recrutement et assument le coût lié aux risques.

    L’une des différences essentielles entre ces sociétés et d’autres acteurs du secteur des technologies de l’éducation proposant des services numériques est qu’elles contribuent à ce qui est considéré comme le « cœur de métier » : la conception des programmes, l’enseignement et le soutien aux étudiant.e.s. Une deuxième différence est que, contrairement à d’autres prestataires d’enseignement privés, ces sociétés utilisent l’image institutionnelle d’universités existantes pour vendre leur produit, sans être trop visibles.

    Normaliser la précarisation et les inégalités

    Le secteur de la gestion des programmes en ligne repose sur une charge importante de travail académique pour les employés ainsi que sur le recours à une main-d’œuvre précaire et externalisée. Ceci permet aux sociétés bénéficiaires de contourner la résistance organisée au sein des universités. De nombreux MOOC, formations de courte durée et des diplômes en ligne en partenariat avec ces sociétés font désormais partie de l’offre habituelle des universités britanniques.

    La charge de travail académique déjà croissante des enseignants est intensifiée par les enseignements en ligne, sans rémunération supplémentaire, et alors même que de tels cours demandent une pédagogie différente et prennent plus de temps que l’enseignement en classe. Avec la transformation de l’enseignement à distance d’urgence en une offre d’« éducation en ligne », ces modalités pourraient devenir la nouvelle norme.

    L’université de Durham a d’ailleurs tenté d’instaurer un dangereux précédent à cet égard, qui en présage d’autres à venir. L’université a conclu un accord avec la société Cambridge Education Digital (CED), afin d’offrir des diplômes entièrement en ligne à partir de l’automne 2020, sans consultation du personnel, mais en ayant la garantie de CED que seules six heures de formation étaient nécessaires pour concevoir et délivrer ces diplômes.

    Dans le même temps, les sociétés de gestion de programmes en ligne ont déjà recruté de nombreux·ses travailleur/euses diplômé·e·s de l’éducation supérieure, souvent titulaires d’un doctorat obtenu depuis peu, cantonné·e·s à des emplois précaires, et chargés de fournir un soutien académique aux étudiant.e.s. Il s’agit de contrats temporaires, sur la base d’une rémunération à la tâche, peu sécurisés et mal payés, comparables à ceux proposés par Deliveroo ou TaskRabbit. Ces employés, qui ne sont pas syndiqués auprès du même syndicat que les autres universitaires, et qui sont souvent des femmes ou des universitaires noirs ou issus de minorités racisées, désavantagés en matière d’embauche et de promotion, seront plus facilement ciblé·e·s par les vagues de licenciement liées au COVID-19.

    Cela signifie également qu’ils/elles seront utilisé·e·s – comme l’ont été les universitaires des agences d’intérim par le passé – pour briser les piquets de grève lors de mobilisations à l’université. Ce système se nourrit directement de la polarisation entre universitaires, au bénéfice des enseignant·e·s éligibles aux financements de recherche, qui s’approprient les recherches produites par les chercheur/ses précaires et utilisent le personnel employé sur des contrats uniquement dédiés à l’enseignement [pour fournir les charges d’enseignement de collègues déchargés]. Il s’agit là de pratiques légitimées par le mode de financement de l’UE et des comités nationaux pour la recherche ainsi que par le système de classements et d’audits de la recherche.

    Avec le COVID-19, le modèle proposé par les entreprises de gestion de programmes en ligne, fondé sur l’externalisation et la privatisation des activités de base et de la main-d’œuvre de l’université, pourrait gagner encore plus de terrain. Ceci s’inscrit en réalité dans le cadre d’un changement structurel qui présagerait la fin de l’enseignement supérieur public. Le coût énorme du passage en ligne – récemment estimé à 10 millions de livres sterling pour 5-6 cours en ligne par université et 1 milliard de livres sterling pour l’ensemble du secteur – signifie que de nombreuses universités ne pourront pas se permettre d’offrir des enseignements dématérialisés.

    De plus, les sociétés de gestion de programmes en ligne ne travaillent pas avec n’importe quelle université : elles préfèrent celles dont l’image institutionnelle est bien établie. Dans cette conjoncture, et compte tenu de la possibilité que de nombreux/ses étudiant.e.s annulent (ou interrompent) leur inscription dans une université du Royaume-Uni par crainte de la pandémie, de nombreuses universités plus petites et moins visibles à l’échelle internationale pourraient perdre un nombre importante d’étudiant.e.s, et le financement qui en découle.

    En dépit de tous ces éléments, l’appel à une réglementation et à un plafonnement du nombre d’étudiant.e.s admis par chaque institution, qui permettraient une redistribution sur l’ensemble du secteur et entre les différentes universités, semble tomber dans l’oreille d’un sourd.

    Un article sur le blog de Jo Johnson, ancien ministre de l’Éducation et frère du Premier ministre britannique, exprime une vision cynique de l’avenir des universités britanniques. Sa formule est simple : le gouvernement devrait refuser l’appel au soutien des universités moins bien classées, telles que les « instituts polytechniques », anciennement consacrés à la formation professionnelle et transformés en universités en 1992. Souvent davantage orientées vers l’enseignement que vers la recherche, ceux-ci n’ont que rarement des partenariats avec des sociétés de gestion de programmes en ligne ou une offre de cours à distance. Selon Johnson, ces universités sont vouées à mourir de mort naturelle, ou bien à revenir à leur offre précédente de formation professionnelle.

    Les universités du Groupe Russell[2], très concentrées sur la recherche, qui proposent déjà des enseignements dématérialisés en partenariat avec des prestataires de gestion des programmes en ligne, pourraient quant à elles se développer davantage, à la faveur de leur image institutionnelle de marque, et concentreraient ainsi tous les étudiant.e.s et les revenus. Ce qu’une telle vision ne précise pas, c’est ce qu’il adviendrait du personnel enseignant. Il est facile d’imaginer que les nouvelles méga-universités seraient encore plus tributaires des services de « soutien aux étudiant.e.s » et d’enseignement dispensés par des universitaires externalisés, recrutés par des sociétés de gestion des programmes en ligne avec des contrats à la demande, hyper-précaires et déprofessionnalisés.

    Lieux de lutte et de résistance

    Ce scénario appelle à la résistance, mais celle-ci devient de plus en plus difficile. Au cours des six derniers mois, les membres du syndicat « University and College Union » (UCU) ont totalisé 22 jours de grève. L’une des deux revendications portées par cette mobilisation, parmi les plus longues et les plus soutenues dans l’enseignement supérieur britannique, portait sur les retraites.

    La seconde combinait quatre revendications : une réduction de la charge de travail, une augmentation des salaires sur l’ensemble du secteur (ils ont diminué de 20% au cours de la dernière décennie), s’opposer à la précarisation, et supprimer les écarts de rémunération entre hommes et femmes (21%) et ceux ciblant les personnes racisées (26%). Les employeurs, représentés par « Universities UK » et l’Association des employeurs « Universities and Colleges », n’ont jusqu’à présent pas fait de concessions significatives face à la grève. La crise du COVID-19 a limité l’option de la grève, alors que l’augmentation de la charge de travail, la réduction des salaires et la précarisation sont désormais présentées comme les seules solutions pour faire face à la pandémie et aux crises économiques.

    Dans ce contexte, le passage vers l’enseignement en ligne doit devenir un enjeu central des luttes des syndicats enseignants. Toutefois, la possibilité de mener des recherches sur ce processus – un outil clé pour les syndicats – semble limitée. De nombreux contrats liant les universités et les entreprises de gestion de programme en ligne sont conclus sans consultation du personnel et ne sont pas accessibles au public. En outre, les résultats de ces recherches sont souvent considérés comme nocifs pour l’image des sociétés.

    Pourtant, un diagnostic et une réglementation des contrats entre les universités et ces entreprises, ainsi que celle du marché de l’edtech en général, sont plus que jamais nécessaires. En particulier, il est impératif d’en comprendre les effets sur le travail universitaire et de faire la lumière sur l’utilisation qui est faite des données collectées concernant les étudiant.e.s par les sociétés d’edtech. Tout en s’opposant aux licenciements, l’UCU devrait également se mettre à la disposition des universitaires travaillant de manière externalisée, et envisager de s’engager dans la lutte contre la sous-traitance du personnel enseignant.

    Bien que tout cela puisse aujourd’hui sembler être un problème propre au Royaume-Uni, la tempête qui y secoue aujourd’hui le secteur de l’enseignement supérieur ne tardera pas à se propager à d’autres contextes nationaux.

    Traduit par Céline Cantat.

    Cet article a été publié initialement sur le blog du bureau de Bruxelles de la Fondation Rosa Luxemburg et de Trademark Trade-union.
    Notes

    [1] La réforme de 2010 a entraîné le triplement des droits d’inscriptions, qui sont passés de 3000 à 9000 livres (soit plus de 10 000 euros) par an pour une année en licence pour les étudiant.e.s britanniques et originaires de l’UE (disposition qui prendra fin pour ces dernier.e.s avec la mise en œuvre du Brexit). Le montant de ces droits est libre pour les étudiant.e.s hors-UE, il équivaut en général au moins au double. Il est également bien plus élevé pour les masters.

    [2] Fondé en 1994, le Russell Group est un réseau de vingt-quatre universités au Royaume-Uni censé regrouper les pôles d’excellence de la recherche et faire contrepoids à la fameuse Ivy League étatsunienne.

    https://www.contretemps.eu/universite-covid19-technologies-education

    #le_monde_d'après #enseignement #technologie #coronavirus #facs #UK #Angleterre #distanciel #enseignement_en_ligne #privatisation #edtech #educational_technology #Mariya_Ivancheva #secteur_privé #enseignement_à_distance #dématérialisation #marchandisation #austérité #précarisation #Brexit #vacation #précaires #vacataires #zero-hour_contract #externalisation #ESR #enseignement_supérieur #partenariats_public-privé #financiarisation #conditions_de_travail #Universities_Superannuation_Scheme (#USS) #fiscalité #résidences_universitaires_privées #immobilier #santé_mentale #frais_universitaires #dette #dette_étudiante #rupture_numérique #technologies_numériques #MOOC #business #Cambridge_Education_Digital (#CED) #ubérisation #Russell_Group

  • Réfugiés : les Balkans jouent les « #chiens_de-garde » de l’UE

    La #Serbie a commencé durant l’été à construire une barrière de barbelés sur sa frontière avec la #Macédoine_du_Nord. Officiellement pour empêcher la propagation de la Covid-19... #Jasmin_Rexhepi, qui préside l’ONG Legis, dénonce la dérive sécuritaire des autocrates balkaniques. Entretien.

    D. Kožul (D.K.) : Que pensez-vous des raisons qui ont poussé la Serbie à construire une barrière à sa frontière avec la Macédoine du Nord ? Officiellement, il s’agit de lutter contre la propagation de l’épidémie de coronavirus. Or, on sait que le nombre de malades est minime chez les réfugiés...

    Jasmin Rexhepi (J.R.) : C’est une mauvaise excuse trouvée par un communicant. On construit des barbelés aux frontières des pays des Balkans depuis 2015. Ils sont posés par des gouvernements ultra-conservateurs, pour des raisons populistes. Les réfugiés ne sont pas une réelle menace sécuritaire pour nos pays en transition, ils ne sont pas plus porteurs du virus que ne le sont nos citoyens, et les barbelés n’ont jamais été efficaces contre les migrations.

    “Faute de pouvoir améliorer la vie de leurs citoyens, les populistes conservateurs se réfugient dans une prétendue défense de la nation contre des ennemis imaginaires.”

    D.K. : Peut-on parler d’une « orbanisation » des pays des Balkans occidentaux ? Quelle est la position à ce sujet des autorités de Macédoine du Nord ?

    J.R. : Tous les pays des Balkans aimeraient rejoindre l’Union européenne (UE), cela ne les empêche pas d’élever des barbelés sur leurs frontières mutuelles, ce qui est contraire aux principes européens de solidarité et d’unité. Quand les dirigeants populistes conservateurs ne peuvent offrir de progrès et d’avancées à leurs citoyens, ils se réfugient dans une prétendue défense de l’État, de la nation et de la religion contre des ennemis imaginaires. Dans le cas présent, ce sont les réfugiés, les basanés et les musulmans qui sont visés, mais il y a eu d’autres boucs émissaires par le passé.

    La Hongrie a ouvert la danse, mais elle n’est pas la seule, il y a eu aussi l’Autriche, la Bulgarie et la Macédoine du Nord en 2016, quand Gruevski était au pouvoir, et maintenant, malheureusement, c’est au tour de la Serbie. La xénophobie des dirigeants de ces États se voit clairement dans leurs discours. La barrière en question n’inquiète toutefois pas outre mesure les dirigeants macédoniens, car ils savent que rien de tout cela n’empêche réellement les migrations, et que ce ne sont pas des barbelés qui vont maintenir les réfugiés de notre côté de la frontière. Surtout pas maintenant qu’ils ont été habitués aux déportations de masse.

    D.K. : Certains disent que cette barrière pourrait couvrir la totalité de la frontière serbo-macédonienne, soit presque 150 km. Cela peut-il freiner les migrations ?

    J.R. : Tout d’abord, il est physiquement impossible d’installer une telle barrière dans les montagnes. À quoi bon couper tant d’arbres, détruire la nature ? Cette barrière ne s’étendra que dans les plaines, comme dans beaucoup d’autres pays. Là où, de toute façon, il n’y a déjà pas grand monde qui passe. La majorité des voies migratoires empruntent des routes de montagnes, qu’il est physiquement difficile de contrôler. C’est d’ailleurs pour cela que beaucoup de migrants entrent en Macédoine du Nord, parce qu’ils peuvent passer par les montagnes. Quant aux autres, ils coupent tout simplement les barbelés.

    “Ceinte de barbelés, l’Europe du XXIe siècle mène une politique hypocrite.”

    D.K. : Les pays des Balkans acceptent-ils de jouer le rôle de chien de garde de l’UE ? Il n’y a aucun pourtant aucune demande officielle de Bruxelles pour la construction de barrières physiques...

    J.R. : L’UE n’a jamais demandé officiellement la construction de barbelés. Ce sont certains de ses États membres ayant pris la responsabilité de « défendre » l’Europe qui ont imposé cette pratique, et offert des barbelés aux pays d’Europe du Sud-Est. C’est ainsi que la route des Balkans a été bloquée en mars 2016, sur la décision de l’Autriche, parce que l’Allemagne commençait soi-disant à refouler les réfugiés, et pas du fait d’une décision officielle des institutions européennes. De même, l’accord entre l’UE et la Turquie, survenu à la même période, a d’abord été signé par un pays de l’UE, qui a ensuite convaincu les autres de faire de même. Ceci étant, les barbelés facilitent le travail des patrouilles de Frontex, l’agence de l’Union européenne chargée du contrôle et de la gestion des frontières extérieures de l’espace Schengen. La position de l’UE n’est donc pas unifiée, d’où l’impression que cette Europe du XXIe siècle, ceinte de barbelés, mène une politique hypocrite et refuse d’assumer ses responsabilités.

    https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/refugies-balkans-chiens-de-garde-UE
    #réfugiés #asile #migrations #Balkans #route_des_Balkans #externalisation #murs #barrière_frontalière #frontières

    –—

    sur le mur entre Serbie et Macédoine :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/872957