• IOM Organizes First Humanitarian #Charter Flight from Algeria to Niger

    This week (15/10), the International Organization for Migration (IOM) organized its first flight for voluntary return from the southern Algerian city of #Tamanrasset to Niger’s capital, #Niamey, carrying 166 Nigerien nationals, in close collaboration with the Governments of Algeria and Niger.

    This is the first movement of its kind for vulnerable Nigerien migrants through IOM voluntary return activities facilitated by the governments of Algeria and Niger and in close cooperation with Air Algérie. This flight was organized to avoid a long tiring journey for migrants in transit by using a shorter way to go home.

    For the first flight, 18 per cent of the returnees, including women and children were selected for their vulnerabilities, including medical needs.

    “The successful return of over 160 vulnerable Nigerien migrants through this inaugural voluntary return flight ensures, safe and humane return of migrants who are in need of assistance to get to their country of origin,” said Paolo Caputo, IOM’s Chief of Mission in Algeria. “This movement is the result of the combined efforts of both IOM missions and the Governments of Algeria and Niger.”

    IOM staff in Algeria provided medical assistance to more than 10 migrants prior to their flight and ensured that all their health needs were addressed during their travel and upon arrival in Niger.

    IOM also provides technical support to the Government of Niger in registering the returned Nigeriens upon arrival in Niger and deliver basic humanitarian assistance before they travel to their communities of origin.

    Since 2016, IOM missions in Niger and Libya have assisted over 7,500 Nigerien migrants with their return from Libya through voluntary humanitarian return operations.

    Upon arrival, the groups of Nigerien migrants returning with IOM-organized flights from both Algeria and Libya receive assistance, such as food and pocket money, to cover their immediate needs, including in-country onward transportation.

    After the migrants have returned to their communities of origin, IOM offers different reintegration support depending on their needs, skills and aspirations. This can include medical assistance, psychosocial support, education, vocational training, setting up an income generating activity, or support for housing and other basic needs.

    “This movement today represents a big step in the right direction for the dignified return of migrants in the region,” said Barbara Rijks, IOM’s Chief of Mission in Niger. “We are grateful for the financial support of the Governments of the United Kingdom and Italy who have made this possible,” she added.


    https://www.iom.int/news/iom-organizes-first-humanitarian-charter-flight-algeria-niger
    #IOM #OIM #Algérie #Niger #renvois #expulsions #retour_volontaire #retours_volontaires #migrations #asile #réfugiés #réfugiés_nigérians #Nigeria #Italie #UK #Angleterre #externalisation #frontières #charters_humanitaires

    Ajouté à cette métaliste sur les refoulements d’Algérie au Niger
    https://seenthis.net/messages/748397
    Ici il s’agit plutôt de migrants abandonnés dans le désert, alors que l’OIM parle de « dignified return », mais je me demande jusqu’à quel point c’est vraiment différent...

    signalé par @pascaline

    ping @karine4 @_kg_ @isskein

  • IOM Organizes First Humanitarian #Charter Flight from Algeria to Niger

    This week (15/10), the International Organization for Migration (IOM) organized its first flight for voluntary return from the southern Algerian city of #Tamanrasset to Niger’s capital, #Niamey, carrying 166 Nigerien nationals, in close collaboration with the Governments of Algeria and Niger.

    This is the first movement of its kind for vulnerable Nigerien migrants through IOM voluntary return activities facilitated by the governments of Algeria and Niger and in close cooperation with Air Algérie. This flight was organized to avoid a long tiring journey for migrants in transit by using a shorter way to go home.

    For the first flight, 18 per cent of the returnees, including women and children were selected for their vulnerabilities, including medical needs.

    “The successful return of over 160 vulnerable Nigerien migrants through this inaugural voluntary return flight ensures, safe and humane return of migrants who are in need of assistance to get to their country of origin,” said Paolo Caputo, IOM’s Chief of Mission in Algeria. “This movement is the result of the combined efforts of both IOM missions and the Governments of Algeria and Niger.”

    IOM staff in Algeria provided medical assistance to more than 10 migrants prior to their flight and ensured that all their health needs were addressed during their travel and upon arrival in Niger.

    IOM also provides technical support to the Government of Niger in registering the returned Nigeriens upon arrival in Niger and deliver basic humanitarian assistance before they travel to their communities of origin.

    Since 2016, IOM missions in Niger and Libya have assisted over 7,500 Nigerien migrants with their return from Libya through voluntary humanitarian return operations.

    Upon arrival, the groups of Nigerien migrants returning with IOM-organized flights from both Algeria and Libya receive assistance, such as food and pocket money, to cover their immediate needs, including in-country onward transportation.

    After the migrants have returned to their communities of origin, IOM offers different reintegration support depending on their needs, skills and aspirations. This can include medical assistance, psychosocial support, education, vocational training, setting up an income generating activity, or support for housing and other basic needs.

    “This movement today represents a big step in the right direction for the dignified return of migrants in the region,” said Barbara Rijks, IOM’s Chief of Mission in Niger. “We are grateful for the financial support of the Governments of the United Kingdom and Italy who have made this possible,” she added.


    https://www.iom.int/news/iom-organizes-first-humanitarian-charter-flight-algeria-niger
    #IOM #OIM #Algérie #Niger #renvois #expulsions #retour_volontaire #retours_volontaires #migrations #asile #réfugiés #réfugiés_nigérians #Nigeria #Italie #UK #Angleterre #externalisation #frontières

    Ajouté à cette métaliste sur les refoulements d’Algérie au Niger
    https://seenthis.net/messages/748397
    Ici il s’agit plutôt de migrants abandonnés dans le désert, alors que l’OIM parle de « dignified return », mais je me demande jusqu’à quel point c’est vraiment différent...

    signalé par @pascaline

    ping @karine4 @_kg_ @isskein

  • IOM Organizes First Humanitarian #Charter Flight from Algeria to Niger

    This week (15/10), the International Organization for Migration (IOM) organized its first flight for voluntary return from the southern Algerian city of #Tamanrasset to Niger’s capital, #Niamey, carrying 166 Nigerien nationals, in close collaboration with the Governments of Algeria and Niger.

    This is the first movement of its kind for vulnerable Nigerien migrants through IOM voluntary return activities facilitated by the governments of Algeria and Niger and in close cooperation with Air Algérie. This flight was organized to avoid a long tiring journey for migrants in transit by using a shorter way to go home.

    For the first flight, 18 per cent of the returnees, including women and children were selected for their vulnerabilities, including medical needs.

    “The successful return of over 160 vulnerable Nigerien migrants through this inaugural voluntary return flight ensures, safe and humane return of migrants who are in need of assistance to get to their country of origin,” said Paolo Caputo, IOM’s Chief of Mission in Algeria. “This movement is the result of the combined efforts of both IOM missions and the Governments of Algeria and Niger.”

    IOM staff in Algeria provided medical assistance to more than 10 migrants prior to their flight and ensured that all their health needs were addressed during their travel and upon arrival in Niger.

    IOM also provides technical support to the Government of Niger in registering the returned Nigeriens upon arrival in Niger and deliver basic humanitarian assistance before they travel to their communities of origin.

    Since 2016, IOM missions in Niger and Libya have assisted over 7,500 Nigerien migrants with their return from Libya through voluntary humanitarian return operations.

    Upon arrival, the groups of Nigerien migrants returning with IOM-organized flights from both Algeria and Libya receive assistance, such as food and pocket money, to cover their immediate needs, including in-country onward transportation.

    After the migrants have returned to their communities of origin, IOM offers different reintegration support depending on their needs, skills and aspirations. This can include medical assistance, psychosocial support, education, vocational training, setting up an income generating activity, or support for housing and other basic needs.

    “This movement today represents a big step in the right direction for the dignified return of migrants in the region,” said Barbara Rijks, IOM’s Chief of Mission in Niger. “We are grateful for the financial support of the Governments of the United Kingdom and Italy who have made this possible,” she added.


    https://www.iom.int/news/iom-organizes-first-humanitarian-charter-flight-algeria-niger
    #IOM #OIM #Algérie #Niger #renvois #expulsions #retour_volontaire #retours_volontaires #migrations #asile #réfugiés #réfugiés_nigérians #Nigeria #Italie #UK #Angleterre #externalisation #frontières

    Ajouté à cette métaliste sur les refoulements d’Algérie au Niger
    https://seenthis.net/messages/748397
    Ici il s’agit plutôt de migrants abandonnés dans le désert, alors que l’OIM parle de « dignified return », mais je me demande jusqu’à quel point c’est vraiment différent...

    signalé par @pascaline

    ping @karine4 @_kg_ @isskein

  • Dictators as 
Gatekeepers for Europe : 
Outsourcing EU border 
controls to Africa

    The USA is divided around the wall President Trump wants to build along the Mexican border. Europe has long answered this question at its own southern border: put up that wall but don’t make it look like one.

    Today the EU is trying to close as many deals as it can with African states, making it harder and harder for refugees to find protection and more dangerous for labour migrants to reach places where they can earn an income. But this is not the only effect: the more Europe tries to control migration from Africa, the harder it becomes for many Africans to move freely through their own continent, even within their own countries.

    Increasingly, the billions Europe pays for migration control are described as official development assistance (ODA), more widely known as development aid, supposedly for poverty relief and humanitarian assistance. The EU is spending billions buying African leaders as gatekeepers, including dictators and suspected war criminals. And the real beneficiaries are the military and technology corporations involved in the implementation.

    https://darajapress.com/publication/dictators-as-%e2%80%a8gatekeepers-for-europe-%e2%80%a8outsourcing-eu-bo
    #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #dictature #dictatures #Afrique #contrôles_frontaliers #fermeture_des_frontières #aide_au_développement #coopération_au_développement #développement #livre

    Ajouté à la métaliste autour de l’externalisation des frontières :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765340

    Et celle-ci sur le lien migrations et développement :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733358#message768701

    ping @karine4 @isskein @pascaline

    • Op-ed: The Birth Defect of EU Migration Diplomacy

      Prevention of migration to Europe, especially from Africa, was a priority of the previous Commission and, as it looks, likely to remain as such for the new Commission.

      This makes it increasingly difficult for refugees to find protection. And it is becoming increasingly dangerous for migrant workers to reach places where they can seek income. But that is not the only consequence. The more Europe tries to control migration, the more difficult it becomes for many Africans to move freely within their own continent, even within their own country.

      The EU investment is substantial. From the beginning of the millennium until 2015, the figure was around two billion euros. By 2020, at least another 15 billion euros will have been added. The EU will pay for the costs incurred by controlling migration itself: supplying detained refugees, jeeps or ships for the border police, deportations, reception camps. But it gives even more, in a sense as a premium: an extra portion of development aid for the coalition of the willing in matters of border protection.

      Some African states, such as Tunisia, therefore make it a punishable offence to leave for Europe without papers. Some save themselves such a law and imprison migrants just like that – for example Libya. Some set up border posts where there haven’t been any so far – Sudan, for example. Some introduce biometric passports that many of their citizens cannot afford – such as the Democratic Republic of Congo, which charges 185 dollars for one of the new so-called e-passports produced by a Belgian-Arab consortium. Some take back deportees from Europe, even if they are not their own citizens – for example Morocco. Some states block migration routes with soldiers – Egypt, for example. Some allow Frontex and European Police-Officers to come and help with this – Niger, for example. And some close the borders: not only for transit migrants, but also for their own citizens if they want to enter Europe irregularly – Algeria, for example.

      More and more often, the money paid in return for controlling migration is booked as Official Development Assistance (ODA). It is a misappropriation of funds that are there to alleviate poverty and hardship. It also contradicts the sense of development aid because labour migration is a blessing for poor countries. It brings money into the coffers of small traders and farmers. This mixture of development aid and migration control will increase. “Combating the root causes” is the new paradigm of development policy.

      Günter Nooke, Chancellor Angela Merkel’s Africa Commissioner, had an idea on what Africa’s future could look like. In October 2018 he proposed that African states should give up parts of their territory against payment so that the EU could settle refugees there: “Perhaps one or the other African head of government is prepared to give up a piece of territorial sovereignty in exchange for a lease and allow free development there for 50 years. Migrants could be settled there in special economic zones, supported by the World Bank or the EU or individual states.” Such statements are hardly beneficial neither in the formal relationship between Europe and Africa nor in broader segments of the public on the African continent.

      But the cordon sanitaire that the EU is trying to weave against undesirable migration is full of holes. The blueprint agreement with Turkey is crumbling. The number of arrivals in the Aegean islands is currently higher than at any other time since the EU-Turkey deal came into force. Boats from Libya keep leaving, arrivals in Morocco increases.

      The massive political pressure that had been built up for the African states to recognise for example the EU „Laissez Passers“ – passport replacement papers that the deportation country can simply issue itself – or otherwise contribute to increasing the deportations of those obliged to leave has had only a limited effect. And last February, the African Union made it clear that it will not accept transit EU asylum camps on African soil.

      Neither the transit regions nor the regions of origin will let themselves be used in the long term as reception camps or assistant EU border guards. The consequence of this is that the EU cannot solve its migration problem outside its own territory on the long run. The old Commission had consistently refused to accept this insight. The new Commission would now have the opportunity not to repeat this mistake.

      https://www.ecre.org/op-ed-the-birth-defect-of-eu-migration-diplomacy

  • #Soudan : les #milices #Janjawid garde-frontières ou #passeurs ?

    Dans un communiqué, les #Forces_de_soutien_rapide (#RSF), groupe paramilitaire servant de “garde-frontières” au Soudan, ont annoncé avoir arrêté 138 migrants africains, jeudi 19 septembre. Pour le spécialiste Jérôme Tubiana, cette annonce fait partie d’une stratégie : le Soudan cherche à attirer l’attention de l’Union européenne qui a arrêté de lui verser des fonds.

    Les Forces de soutien rapide (RSF), une organisation paramilitaire soudanaise, ont annoncé avoir arrêté, jeudi 19 septembre, 138 Africains qui souhaitaient pénétrer “illégalement” en Libye. Parmi eux, se trouvaient des dizaines de Soudanais mais aussi des Tchadiens et des Éthiopiens.

    "Le 19 septembre, une patrouille des RSF a arrêté 138 personnes de différentes nationalités qui essayaient de traverser illégalement la frontière avec la Libye", précise le communiqué.

    Une partie de ces migrants ont été incarcérés dans la zone désertique de #Gouz_Abudloaa, situé environ à 100 km au nord de Khartoum, comme ont pu le constater des journalistes escortés sur place par des RSF, mercredi 25 septembre. Dans le communiqué, les RSF assurent également avoir saisi six véhicules appartenant à des passeurs libyens chargés du transit des migrants.

    Le même jour, le Soudan a décidé de fermer ses #frontières avec la Libye et la Centrafrique pour des raisons de sécurité. Dans les faits, le pays souhaite mettre fin aux départs de rebelles soudanais vers la Libye, qui sont parfois rejoints par des migrants.

    Créées en 2013 par l’ex-président soudanais, Omar el-Béchir, les RSF assurent le maintien de l’ordre dans le pays. Trois ans après leur création, elles ont été dotées d’une mission supplémentaire : empêcher les migrants et les rebelles de franchir les frontières nationales. C’est ce que montrent notamment des chercheurs dans un rapport publié par un think tank néerlandais, Clingendael, publié en septembre 2018.

    Les Forces de soutien rapide, véritables gardes-frontières du Soudan

    Si le document pointe une politique soudanaise de surveillance des frontières "en grande partie assignée aux ‘forces de soutien rapide’ (RSF)", derrière cette appellation officielle, se cache une réalité plus sombre. Connue localement sous le nom de Janjawid, cette milice fait notamment l’objet d’une enquête du Conseil militaire de transition, qui dirige le Soudan depuis la destitution, le 11 avril, du président Omar el-Béchir.

    D’après les conclusions de l’enquête, rendues publiques samedi 27 juillet, les RSF auraient frappé et tiré sur des manifestants lors d’un sit-in, le 3 juin, à Khartoum, alors qu’ils étaient venus protester contre la politique d’Omar el-Béchir. Si d’après un groupe de médecins, 127 manifestants ont été tués, le commission d’enquête compte, de son côté, 87 morts. Cette répression violente avait provoqué, dans la foulée, un levé de boucliers à l’échelle internationale.

    Un groupe armé qui a bénéficié de fonds européens

    Certains RSF sont aussi accusés d’avoir commis des exactions dans la région du Darfour, à l’ouest du Soudan. Le rapport précise pourtant que, grâce aux fonds versés par l’Union européenne, ils “sont mieux équipés, mieux financés et déployés non seulement au Darfour, mais partout au Soudan". D’après ce document, "160 millions d’euros ont été alloués au Soudan" entre 2016 et 2017. Et, une partie de cet argent a été versé par Khartoum aux RSF. Leur chef, Hemeti, est d’ailleurs officiellement le numéro 2 du Conseil militaire de transition.

    Fin juillet, l’Union européenne a toutefois annoncé le gel de ses financements au Soudan. "L’Union européenne a pris peur. Elle a considéré que cette coopération avec le Soudan était mauvaise pour son image car, depuis plusieurs années, elle finançait un régime très violent envers les migrants et les civils", explique Jérôme Tubiana, chercheur spécialiste du Soudan et co-auteur du rapport néerlandais.

    Non seulement les passeurs demandent de l’argent aux migrants mais ce ne sont pas les seuls à leur en réclamer. "La milice Janjawid taxe les migrants, elle joue à un double-jeu", dénonce sur RFI, Clotilde Warin, journaliste chercheuse et co-auteure du rapport. "Les miliciens […] qui connaissent très bien la zone frontalière entre le Soudan, le Tchad et le Niger […] deviennent eux-mêmes des passeurs, ils utilisent les voitures de l’armée soudanaise, le fuel de l’armée soudanaise. C’est un trafic très organisé."

    "Les RSF profitent de leur contrôle de la route migratoire pour vendre les migrants à des trafiquants libyens", ajoute, de son côté, Jérôme Tubiana, qui estime que ces miliciens s’enrichissent plus sur le dos des migrants qu’ils ne les arrêtent.

    Annoncer l’arrestation d’un convoi est donc un moyen, pour les RSF, de faire du chantage à l’Europe. "Ils essayent de lui dire que si elle veut moins de migrants sur son territoire, elle doit apporter son soutien aux RSF car, ils sont les seuls à connaître cette région dangereuse", précise Jérôme Tubiana, ajoutant qu’Hemeti, fragilisé, est en recherche de soutiens politiques.

    Un membre des RSF, interrogé dans le cadre de l’enquête néerlandaise, reconnaît lui-même le rôle actif de la milice dans le trafic des migrants. "De temps en temps, nous interceptons des migrants et nous les transférons à Khartoum, afin de montrer aux autorités que nous faisons le travail. Nous ne sommes pas censés prendre l’argent des migrants, [nous ne sommes pas censés] les laisser s’échapper ou les emmener en Libye… Mais la réalité est assez différente…", lit-on dans le rapport.

    https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/19795/soudan-les-milices-janjawid-garde-frontieres-ou-passeurs?ref=tw_i
    #gardes-frontière #para-militaires #paramilitaires #fermeture_des_frontières #maintien_de_l'ordre #contrôles_frontaliers #surveillance_des_frontières #fonds_européen #Hemeti #armée #trafic_d'êtres_humains #armée_soudanaise #externalisation #externalisation_des_frontières

    ping @karine4 @isskein @pascaline

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation des frontières :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message804171

    • Une nouvelle de juillet 2019...

      EU suspends migration control projects in Sudan amid repression fears

      The EU has suspended projects targeting illegal migration in Sudan. The move comes amid fears they might have aided security forces responsible for violently repressing peaceful protests in the country, DW has learned.

      An EU spokesperson has confirmed to DW that a German-led project that organizes the provision of training and equipment to Sudanese border guards and police was “halted” in mid-March, while an EU-funded intelligence center in the capital, Khartoum, has been “on hold” since June. The EU made no public announcements at the time.

      The initiatives were paid for from a €4.5 billion ($5 billion) EU fund for measures in Africa to control migration and address its root causes, to which Germany has contributed over €160 million. Sudan is commonly part of migration routes for people aiming to reach Europe from across Africa.

      Critics had raised concerns that working with the Sudanese government on border management could embolden repressive state forces, not least the notorious Rapid Support Forces (RSF) militia, which is accused by Amnesty International of war crimes in Sudan’s Darfur region. An EU summary of the project noted that there was a risk that resources could be “diverted for repressive aims.”

      Support for police

      A wave of protest swept the country in December, with demonstrators calling for the ouster of autocratic President Omar al-Bashir. Once Bashir was deposed in April, a transitional military council, which includes the commander of the RSF as deputy leader, sought to restore order. Among various incidents of repression, the militia was blamed for a massacre on June 3 in which 128 protesters were reportedly killed.

      While the EU maintains it has provided neither funding nor equipment to the RSF, there is no dispute that Sudanese police, who also stand accused of brutally repressing the protests, received training under the programs.

      Dr. Lutz Oette, a human rights expert at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), told DW: “The suspension is the logical outcome of the change in circumstances but it exposes the flawed assumptions of the process as far as working with Sudan is concerned.”

      Oette said continuing to work with the Sudanese government would have been incompatible with the European Union’s positions on human rights, and counterproductive to the goal of tackling the root causes of migration.

      Coordination center

      The intelligence center, known as the Regional Operational Center in Khartoum (ROCK), was to allow the security forces of nine countries in the Horn of Africa to share intelligence about human trafficking and people smuggling networks.

      A spokesperson for the European Commission told DW the coordination center had been suspended since June “until the political/security situation is cleared,” with some of its staff temporarily relocated to Nairobi, Kenya. Training and some other activities under the Better Migration Management (BMM) program were suspended in mid-March “because they require the involvement of government counterparts to be carried out.” The EU declined to say whether the risk of support being provided to repressive forces had contributed to the decision.

      The spokesperson said other EU activities that provide help to vulnerable people in the country were continuing.

      An official EU document dated December 2015 noted the risk that the provision of equipment and training to security services and border guards could be “diverted for repressive aims” or subject to “criticism by NGOs and civil society for engaging with repressive governments on migration (particularly in Eritrea and Sudan).”

      ’Regular monitoring’

      The BMM program is being carried out by a coalition of EU states — France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom — and aid agencies led by the German development agency GIZ. It includes projects in 11 African countries under the auspices of the “Khartoum process,” an international cooperation initiative targeting illegal migration.

      The ROCK intelligence center, which an EU document shows was planned to be situated within a Sudanese police training facility, was being run by the French state-owned security company Civipol.

      The EU spokesperson said, “Sudan does not benefit from any direct EU financial support. No EU funding is decentralized or channeled through the Sudanese government.”

      “All EU-funded activities in Sudan are implemented by EU member states development agencies, the UN, international organizations and NGOs, who are closely scrutinized through strict and regular monitoring during projects’ implementation,” the spokesperson added.

      A spokesperson for GIZ said: “The participant lists of BMM’s training courses are closely coordinated with the [Sudanese government] National Committee for Combating Human Trafficking (NCCHT) to prevent RSF militiamen taking part in training activities.”

      The GIZ spokesperson gave a different explanation for the suspension to that of the EU, saying the program had been stopped “in order not to jeopardize the safety of [GIZ] employees in the country.” The spokesperson added: “Activities in the field of policy harmonization and capacity building have slowly restarted.”

      https://www.dw.com/en/eu-suspends-migration-control-projects-in-sudan-amid-repression-fears/a-49701408

      #police #Regional_Operational_Center_in_Khartoum (#ROCK) #Better_Migration_Management (#BMM) #processus_de_Khartoum

      Et ce subtil lien entre migrations et #développement :

      Sudan does not benefit from any direct EU financial support. No EU funding is decentralized or channeled through the Sudanese government.

      “All EU-funded activities in Sudan are implemented by EU member states development agencies, the UN, international organizations and NGOs, who are closely scrutinized through strict and regular monitoring during projects’ implementation,” the spokesperson added.

      #GIZ

      Ajouté à la métaliste #migrations et développement :
      https://seenthis.net/messages/733358

  • Turkey stops 300,000 irregular migrants en route to EU so far this year

    Turkey has prevented some 269,059 irregular migrants, the highest ever, from crossing into Europe in the first eight and a half months of this year.

    The country is located in between European and African continents and is often used as a junction point to enter the European countries.

    Each year thousands of illegal migrants, many of them fleeing war, hunger and poverty back in their home countries, take a dangerous route to cross into Europe for a better life.

    Some of the migrants reach Turkey on foot before eventually taking a dangerous journey across the Aegean to reach the Greek islands. People have lost their lives trying to make the journey of “hope” while many of them were rescued by Turkish security forces.

    Turkey continues to fight against irregular migration, particularly in the northwestern province of Edirne and the Aegean Sea.

    According to the migration authority’s most recent data, the authorities have intercepted some 269,059 irregular migrants between the period of Jan. 1 and Sept. 12. The number is expected to rise until the end of the year. Last year Turkey intercepted 268,003 illegal migrants. The number was 146,485 in 2015, 174,466 in 2016 and 175,752 in 2017 – meaning the number has almost doubled over the last three years.

    In all, Turkey stopped more than 1,530,677 illegal migrants in the last 15 years.

    The majority of the irregular migrants captured this were Afghans, some 117,437. They were followed by 43,204 Pakistanis and 29,796 Syrians.

    The country’s Thrace region has become a hot spot for irregular migrants.

    In Edirne, one of Turkey’s westernmost provinces, 73,978 irregular migrants have been captured this year. It is also worth mentioning that the number of terrorists captured in Edirne has increased by 70% compared to the last year. In the Aegean Sea, on the other hand, 31,642 migrants were captured. Meanwhile, 28 irregular migrants were killed in the sea while trying to reach Europe.

    Last year, 25,398 irregular migrants were captured in the Aegean while 65 lost their lives.

    https://www.dailysabah.com/politics/2019/09/18/turkey-stops-300000-irregular-migrants-en-route-to-eu-so-far-this-year
    #Turquie #EU #frontières #externalisation #asile #migrations #accord_UE-Turquie #réfugiés #Evros #îles #Mer_Egée #visualisation #infographie

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Le Niger, #nouvelle frontière de l’Europe et #laboratoire de l’asile

    Les politiques migratoires européennes, toujours plus restrictives, se tournent vers le Sahel, et notamment vers le Niger – espace de transit entre le nord et le sud du Sahara. Devenu « frontière » de l’Europe, environné par des pays en conflit, le Niger accueille un nombre important de réfugiés sur son sol et renvoie ceux qui n’ont pas le droit à cette protection. Il ne le fait pas seul. La présence de l’Union européenne et des organisations internationales est visible dans le pays ; des opérations militaires y sont menées par des armées étrangères, notamment pour lutter contre la pression terroriste à ses frontières... au risque de brouiller les cartes entre enjeux sécuritaires et enjeux humanitaires.

    On confond souvent son nom avec celui de son voisin anglophone, le Nigéria, et peu de gens savent le placer sur une carte. Pourtant, le Niger est un des grands pays du Sahel, cette bande désertique qui court de l’Atlantique à la mer Rouge, et l’un des rares pays stables d’Afrique de l’Ouest qui offrent encore une possibilité de transit vers la Libye et la Méditerranée. Environné par des pays en conflit ou touchés par le terrorisme de Boko Haram et d’autres groupes, le Niger accueille les populations qui fuient le Mali et la région du lac Tchad et celles évacuées de Libye.

    « Dans ce contexte d’instabilité régionale et de contrôle accru des déplacements, la distinction entre l’approche sécuritaire et l’approche humanitaire s’est brouillée », explique la chercheuse Florence Boyer, fellow de l’Institut Convergences Migrations, actuellement accueillie au Niger à l’Université Abdou Moumouni de Niamey. Géographe et anthropologue (affiliée à l’Urmis au sein de l’IRD, l’Institut de recherche pour le Développement), elle connaît bien le Niger, où elle se rend régulièrement depuis vingt ans pour étudier les migrations internes et externes des Nigériens vers l’Algérie ou la Libye voisines, au nord, et les pays du Golfe de Guinée, au sud et à l’ouest. Sa recherche porte actuellement sur le rôle que le Niger a accepté d’endosser dans la gestion des migrations depuis 2014, à la demande de plusieurs membres de l’Union européenne (UE) pris dans la crise de l’accueil des migrants.
    De la libre circulation au contrôle des frontières

    « Jusqu’à 2015, le Niger est resté cet espace traversé par des milliers d’Africains de l’Ouest et de Nigériens remontant vers la Libye sans qu’il y ait aucune entrave à la circulation ou presque », raconte la chercheuse. La plupart venaient y travailler. Peu tentaient la traversée vers l’Europe, mais dès le début des années 2000, l’UE, Italie en tête, cherche à freiner ce mouvement en négociant avec Kadhafi, déplaçant ainsi la frontière de l’Europe de l’autre côté de la Méditerranée. La chute du dictateur libyen, dans le contexte des révolutions arabes de 2011, bouleverse la donne. Déchirée par une guerre civile, la Libye peine à retenir les migrants qui cherchent une issue vers l’Europe. Par sa position géographique et sa relative stabilité, le Niger s’impose progressivement comme un partenaire de la politique migratoire de l’UE.

    « Le Niger est la nouvelle frontière de l’Italie. »

    Marco Prencipe, ambassadeur d’Italie à Niamey

    Le rôle croissant du Niger dans la gestion des flux migratoires de l’Afrique vers l’Europe a modifié les parcours des migrants, notamment pour ceux qui passent par Agadez, dernière ville du nord avant la traversée du Sahara. Membre du Groupe d’études et de recherches Migrations internationales, Espaces, Sociétés (Germes) à Niamey, Florence Boyer observe ces mouvements et constate la présence grandissante dans la capitale nigérienne du Haut-Commissariat des Nations-Unies pour les réfugiés (HCR) et de l’Organisation internationale des migrations (OIM) chargée, entre autres missions, d’assister les retours de migrants dans leur pays.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dlIwqYKrw7c

    « L’île de Lampedusa se trouve aussi loin du Nord de l’Italie que de la frontière nigérienne, note Marco Prencipe, l’ambassadeur d’Italie à Niamey, le Niger est la nouvelle frontière de l’Italie. » Une affirmation reprise par plusieurs fonctionnaires de la délégation de l’UE au Niger rencontrés par Florence Boyer et Pascaline Chappart. La chercheuse, sur le terrain à Niamey, effectue une étude comparée sur des mécanismes d’externalisation de la frontière au Niger et au Mexique. « Depuis plusieurs années, la politique extérieure des migrations de l’UE vise à délocaliser les contrôles et à les placer de plus en plus au sud du territoire européen, explique la postdoctorante à l’IRD, le mécanisme est complexe : les enjeux pour l’Europe sont à la fois communautaires et nationaux, chaque État membre ayant sa propre politique ».

    En novembre 2015, lors du sommet euro-africain de La Valette sur la migration, les autorités européennes lancent le Fonds fiduciaire d’urgence pour l’Afrique « en faveur de la stabilité et de la lutte contre les causes profondes de la migration irrégulière et du phénomène des personnes déplacées en Afrique ». Doté à ce jour de 4,2 milliards d’euros, le FFUA finance plusieurs types de projets, associant le développement à la sécurité, la gestion des migrations à la protection humanitaire.

    Le président nigérien considère que son pays, un des plus pauvres de la planète, occupe une position privilégiée pour contrôler les migrations dans la région. Le Niger est désormais le premier bénéficiaire du Fonds fiduciaire, devant des pays de départ comme la Somalie, le Nigéria et surtout l’Érythrée d’où vient le plus grand nombre de demandeurs d’asile en Europe.

    « Le Niger s’y retrouve dans ce mélange des genres entre lutte contre le terrorisme et lutte contre l’immigration “irrégulière”. »

    Florence Boyer, géographe et anthropologue

    Pour l’anthropologue Julien Brachet, « le Niger est peu à peu devenu un pays cobaye des politiques anti-migrations de l’Union européenne, (...) les moyens financiers et matériels pour lutter contre l’immigration irrégulière étant décuplés ». Ainsi, la mission européenne EUCAP Sahel Niger a ouvert une antenne permanente à Agadez en 2016 dans le but d’« assister les autorités nigériennes locales et nationales, ainsi que les forces de sécurité, dans le développement de politiques, de techniques et de procédures permettant d’améliorer le contrôle et la lutte contre les migrations irrégulières ».

    « Tout cela ne serait pas possible sans l’aval du Niger, qui est aussi à la table des négociations, rappelle Florence Boyer. Il ne faut pas oublier qu’il doit faire face à la pression de Boko Haram et d’autres groupes terroristes à ses frontières. Il a donc intérêt à se doter d’instruments et de personnels mieux formés. Le Niger s’y retrouve dans ce mélange des genres entre la lutte contre le terrorisme et la lutte contre l’immigration "irrégulière". »

    Peu avant le sommet de La Valette en 2015, le Niger promulgue la loi n°2015-36 sur « le trafic illicite de migrants ». Elle pénalise l’hébergement et le transport des migrants ayant l’intention de franchir illégalement la frontière. Ceux que l’on qualifiait jusque-là de « chauffeurs » ou de « transporteurs » au volant de « voitures taliban » (des 4x4 pick-up transportant entre 20 et 30 personnes) deviennent des « passeurs ». Une centaine d’arrestations et de saisies de véhicules mettent fin à ce qui était de longue date une source légale de revenus au nord du Niger. « Le but reste de bloquer la route qui mène vers la Libye, explique Pascaline Chappart. L’appui qu’apportent l’UE et certains pays européens en coopérant avec la police, les douanes et la justice nigérienne, particulièrement en les formant et les équipant, a pour but de rendre l’État présent sur l’ensemble de son territoire. »

    Des voix s’élèvent contre ces contrôles installés aux frontières du Niger sous la pression de l’Europe. Pour Hamidou Nabara de l’ONG nigérienne JMED (Jeunesse-Enfance-Migration-Développement), qui lutte contre la pauvreté pour retenir les jeunes désireux de quitter le pays, ces dispositifs violent le principe de la liberté de circulation adopté par les pays d’Afrique de l’Ouest dans le cadre de la Cedeao. « La situation des migrants s’est détériorée, dénonce-t-il, car si la migration s’est tarie, elle continue sous des voies différentes et plus dangereuses ». La traversée du Sahara est plus périlleuse que jamais, confirme Florence Boyer : « Le nombre de routes s’est multiplié loin des contrôles, mais aussi des points d’eau et des secours. À ce jour, nous ne disposons pas d’estimations solides sur le nombre de morts dans le désert, contrairement à ce qui se passe en Méditerranée ».

    Partenaire de la politique migratoire de l’Union européenne, le Niger a également développé une politique de l’asile. Il accepte de recevoir des populations en fuite, expulsées ou évacuées des pays voisins : les expulsés d’Algérie recueillis à la frontière, les rapatriés nigériens dont l’État prend en charge le retour de Libye, les réfugiés en lien avec les conflits de la zone, notamment au Mali et dans la région du lac Tchad, et enfin les personnes évacuées de Libye par le HCR. Le Niger octroie le statut de réfugié à ceux installés sur son sol qui y ont droit. Certains, particulièrement vulnérables selon le HCR, pourront être réinstallés en Europe ou en Amérique du Nord dans des pays volontaires.
    Une plateforme pour la « réinstallation »
    en Europe et en Amérique

    Cette procédure de réinstallation à partir du Niger n’a rien d’exceptionnel. Les Syriens réfugiés au Liban, par exemple, bénéficient aussi de l’action du HCR qui les sélectionne pour déposer une demande d’asile dans un pays dit « sûr ». La particularité du Niger est de servir de plateforme pour la réinstallation de personnes évacuées de Libye. « Le Niger est devenu une sorte de laboratoire de l’asile, raconte Florence Boyer, notamment par la mise en place de l’Emergency Transit Mechanism (ETM). »

    L’ETM, proposé par le HCR, est lancé en août 2017 à Paris par l’Allemagne, l’Espagne, la France et l’Italie — côté UE — et le Niger, le Tchad et la Libye — côté africain. Ils publient une déclaration conjointe sur les « missions de protection en vue de la réinstallation de réfugiés en Europe ». Ce dispositif se présente comme le pendant humanitaire de la politique de lutte contre « les réseaux d’immigration économique irrégulière » et les « retours volontaires » des migrants irréguliers dans leur pays effectués par l’OIM. Le processus s’accélère en novembre de la même année, suite à un reportage de CNN sur des cas d’esclavagisme de migrants en Libye. Fin 2017, 3 800 places sont promises par les pays occidentaux qui participent, à des degrés divers, à ce programme d’urgence. Le HCR annonce 6 606 places aujourd’hui, proposées par 14 pays européens et américains1.

    Trois catégories de personnes peuvent bénéficier de la réinstallation grâce à ce programme : évacués d’urgence depuis la Libye, demandeurs d’asile au sein d’un flux dit « mixte » mêlant migrants et réfugiés et personnes fuyant les conflits du Mali ou du Nigéria. Seule une minorité aura la possibilité d’être réinstallée depuis le Niger vers un pays occidental. Le profiling (selon le vocabulaire du HCR) de ceux qui pourront bénéficier de cette protection s’effectue dès les camps de détention libyens. Il consiste à repérer les plus vulnérables qui pourront prétendre au statut de réfugié et à la réinstallation.

    Une fois évacuées de Libye, ces personnes bénéficient d’une procédure accélérée pour l’obtention du statut de réfugié au Niger. Elles ne posent pas de problème au HCR, qui juge leur récit limpide. La Commission nationale d’éligibilité au statut des réfugiés (CNE), qui est l’administration de l’asile au Niger, accepte de valider la sélection de l’organisation onusienne. Les réfugiés sont pris en charge dans le camp du HCR à Hamdallaye, construit récemment à une vingtaine de kilomètres de la capitale nigérienne, le temps que le HCR prépare la demande de réinstallation dans un pays occidental, multipliant les entretiens avec les réfugiés concernés. Certains pays, comme le Canada ou la Suède, ne mandatent pas leurs services sur place, déléguant au HCR la sélection. D’autres, comme la France, envoient leurs agents pour un nouvel entretien (voir ce reportage sur la visite de l’Ofpra à Niamey fin 2018).

    Parmi les évacués de Libye, moins des deux tiers sont éligibles à une réinstallation dans un pays dit « sûr ».

    Depuis deux ans, près de 4 000 personnes ont été évacuées de Libye dans le but d’être réinstallées, selon le HCR (5 300 autres ont été prises en charge par l’OIM et « retournées » dans leur pays). Un millier ont été évacuées directement vers l’Europe et le Canada et près de 3 000 vers le Niger. C’est peu par rapport aux 50 800 réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile enregistrés auprès de l’organisation onusienne en Libye au 12 août 2019. Et très peu sur l’ensemble des 663 400 migrants qui s’y trouvent selon l’OIM. La guerre civile qui déchire le pays rend la situation encore plus urgente.

    Parmi les personnes évacuées de Libye vers le Niger, moins des deux tiers sont éligibles à une réinstallation dans un pays volontaire, selon le HCR. À ce jour, moins de la moitié ont été effectivement réinstallés, notamment en France (voir notre article sur l’accueil de réfugiés dans les communes rurales françaises).

    Malgré la publicité faite autour du programme de réinstallation, le HCR déplore la lenteur du processus pour répondre à cette situation d’urgence. « Le problème est que les pays de réinstallation n’offrent pas de places assez vite, regrette Fatou Ndiaye, en charge du programme ETM au Niger, alors que notre pays hôte a négocié un maximum de 1 500 évacués sur son sol au même moment. » Le programme coordonné du Niger ne fait pas exception : le HCR rappelait en février 2019 que, sur les 19,9 millions de réfugiés relevant de sa compétence à travers le monde, moins d’1 % sont réinstallés dans un pays sûr.

    Le dispositif ETM, que le HCR du Niger qualifie de « couloir de l’espoir », concerne seulement ceux qui se trouvent dans un camp accessible par l’organisation en Libye (l’un d’eux a été bombardé en juillet dernier) et uniquement sept nationalités considérées par les autorités libyennes (qui n’ont pas signé la convention de Genève) comme pouvant relever du droit d’asile (Éthiopiens Oromo, Érythréens, Iraquiens, Somaliens, Syriens, Palestiniens et Soudanais du Darfour).

    « Si les portes étaient ouvertes dès les pays d’origine, les gens ne paieraient pas des sommes astronomiques pour traverser des routes dangereuses. »

    Pascaline Chappart, socio-anthropologue

    En décembre 2018, des Soudanais manifestaient devant les bureaux d’ETM à Niamey pour dénoncer « un traitement discriminatoire (...) par rapport aux Éthiopiens et Somaliens » favorisés, selon eux, par le programme. La représentante du HCR au Niger a répondu à une radio locale que « la plupart de ces Soudanais [venaient] du Tchad où ils ont déjà été reconnus comme réfugiés et que, techniquement, c’est le Tchad qui les protège et fait la réinstallation ». C’est effectivement la règle en matière de droit humanitaire mais, remarque Florence Boyer, « comment demander à des réfugiés qui ont quitté les camps tchadiens, pour beaucoup en raison de l’insécurité, d’y retourner sans avoir aucune garantie ? ».

    La position de la France

    La question du respect des règles en matière de droit d’asile se pose pour les personnes qui bénéficient du programme d’urgence. En France, par exemple, pas de recours possible auprès de l’Ofpra en cas de refus du statut de réfugié. Pour Pascaline Chappart, qui achève deux ans d’enquêtes au Niger et au Mexique, il y a là une part d’hypocrisie : « Si les portes étaient ouvertes dès les pays d’origine, les gens ne paieraient pas des sommes astronomiques pour traverser des routes dangereuses par la mer ou le désert ». « Il est quasiment impossible dans le pays de départ de se présenter aux consulats des pays “sûrs” pour une demande d’asile », renchérit Florence Boyer. Elle donne l’exemple de Centre-Africains qui ont échappé aux combats dans leur pays, puis à la traite et aux violences au Nigéria, en Algérie puis en Libye, avant de redescendre au Niger : « Ils auraient dû avoir la possibilité de déposer une demande d’asile dès Bangui ! Le cadre législatif les y autorise. »

    En ce matin brûlant d’avril, dans le camp du HCR à Hamdallaye, Mebratu2, un jeune Érythréen de 26 ans, affiche un large sourire. À l’ombre de la tente qu’il partage et a décorée avec d’autres jeunes de son pays, il annonce qu’il s’envolera le 9 mai pour Paris. Comme tant d’autres, il a fui le service militaire à vie imposé par la dictature du président Issayas Afeworki. Mebratu était convaincu que l’Europe lui offrirait la liberté, mais il a dû croupir deux ans dans les prisons libyennes. S’il ne connaît pas sa destination finale en France, il sait d’où il vient : « Je ne pensais pas que je serais vivant aujourd’hui. En Libye, on pouvait mourir pour une plaisanterie. Merci la France. »

    Mebratu a pris un vol pour Paris en mai dernier, financé par l’Union européenne et opéré par l’#OIM. En France, la Délégation interministérielle à l’hébergement et à l’accès au logement (Dihal) confie la prise en charge de ces réinstallés à 24 opérateurs, associations nationales ou locales, pendant un an. Plusieurs départements et localités françaises ont accepté d’accueillir ces réfugiés particulièrement vulnérables après des années d’errance et de violences.

    Pour le deuxième article de notre numéro spécial de rentrée, nous nous rendons en Dordogne dans des communes rurales qui accueillent ces « réinstallés » arrivés via le Niger.

    http://icmigrations.fr/2019/08/30/defacto-10
    #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #Europe #UE #EU #sécuritaire #humanitaire #approche_sécuritaire #approche_humanitaire #libre_circulation #fermeture_des_frontières #printemps_arabe #Kadhafi #Libye #Agadez #parcours_migratoires #routes_migratoires #HCR #OIM #IOM #retour_au_pays #renvois #expulsions #Fonds_fiduciaire #Fonds_fiduciaire_d'urgence_pour_l'Afrique #FFUA #développement #sécurité #EUCAP_Sahel_Niger #La_Valette #passeurs #politique_d'asile #réinstallation #hub #Emergency_Transit_Mechanism (#ETM) #retours_volontaires #profiling #tri #sélection #vulnérabilité #évacuation #procédure_accélérée #Hamdallaye #camps_de_réfugiés #ofpra #couloir_de_l’espoir

    co-écrit par @pascaline

    ping @karine4 @_kg_ @isskein

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation des frontières :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765325

  • #Frontex : A harder border, sooner

    European leaders have already agreed to a massive boost for the border protection agency, Frontex. The incoming head of the European Commission, #Ursula_von_der_Leyen, wants to bring forward the expansion.

    Europe needs more people guarding its borders and sooner rather than later. Soon after she was elected in July, the European Commission’s next president, Ursula von der Leyen, declared that the reform of Europe’s border and coast guard agency should be brought forward three years, to 2024. The former German defense minister repeated the call during a visit this week to Bulgaria which shares a border with Turkey and counts Frontex as an ally.

    Expansion plans

    The European Commission announced in September 2018, two years after Frontex came into being as a functioning border and coast guard agency, that the organization would be expanded. Then president, Jean-Claude Juncker, proposed that 8,400 more border guards be recruited, in addition to the existing 1,500. “External borders must be protected more effectively,” Juncker said.

    In May this year, the European Commissioner for Migration, Dimitiris Avramopoulos, confirmed that 10,000 armed guards would be deployed by 2027 to patrol the EU’s land and sea borders and significantly strengthen the existing force.

    The EU guards would intercept new arrivals, stop unauthorized travel and accelerate the return of people whose asylum claim had failed, according to the IPS news agency. The guards would also be able to operate outside Europe, with the consent of the third country governments.

    “The agency will better and more actively support member states in the area of return in order to improve the European Union’s response to persisting migratory challenges,” Avramopoulos said.

    What does Frontex do?

    Frontex was set up in 2004 to support the EU control its external land, air and sea borders. In 2016 it was overhauled and in 2018 received a budget of 320 million euros. The agency coordinates the deployment of border guards, boats and helicopters where they are needed to tackle “migratory pressure.”

    Frontex assesses how ready each EU member state is to face challenges at its external borders. It coordinates a pool of border guards, provided by member states, to be deployed quickly at the external borders.

    The agency’s other main functions are to help with forced returns of migrants and organize voluntary departures from Europe. It also collects and shares information related to migrant smuggling, trafficking and terrorism.

    Misguided approach

    While the Frontex approach of strengthening border controls has been welcomed by many of Europe’s leaders, some say this law-and-order solution does not work. Instead, civil society, human rights groups and other critics say hardening borders simply forces migrants to switch to new and often more dangerous routes.

    As Frontex itself said earlier this year, there is no longer a “burning crisis” of migration in Europe (https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/18486/improved-chances-of-asylum-seekers-in-germany-entering-job-market?ref=), as the number of migrants and refugees reaching the continent has dropped dramatically. Yet the risks of dying in the attempt to reach Europe, especially in the Mediterranean, have risen for the past four consecutive years. Part of Frontex’ mandate is to save lives at sea, but critics (https://www.ecfr.eu/article/commentary_back_to_frontex_europes_misguided_migration_policy) say its raison d’etre is the protection of borders, not the protection of lives.

    Abuse claims

    In August, media reports claimed that Frontex border guards had tolerated violence against migrants and were themselves responsible for inhumane treatment of refugees and asylum seekers. Frontex denied that any of its officers had violated human rights (https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/18676/frontex-denies-involvement-in-human-rights-violations). A spokesperson for the European Commission, Mina Andreeva, said the allegations would be followed up.

    https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/19415/frontex-a-harder-border-sooner
    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #UE #EU #fermeture_des_frontières #renvois #expulsions #machine_à_expulser #déboutés #externalisation #externalisation_des_frontières #frontières_extérieures #retours_volontaires

    ping @karine4 @isskein @reka

  • Une conversation avec #Abdul_Aziz_Muhamat, lauréat du prix Martin Ennals 2019

    En février 2019, Abdul Aziz Muhamat, originaire du Soudan, recevait à 26 ans le prix Martin Ennals qui récompense chaque année les défenseurs des droits humains. Transféré sur l’île de Manus (Papouasie-Nouvelle-Guinée) en septembre 2013, en vertu de la politique offshore australienne, Aziz s’est battu dès le début de son incarcération pour faire connaître les souffrances de milliers de réfugiés enfermés comme lui et pour défendre leurs droits à une procédure d’asile et à la liberté. Aziz est un communicateur hors pairs. Il parle presque couramment le français en plus de l’anglais et de l’arabe. Il y a trois mois, la Suisse lui accordait l’asile et le statut de réfugié (1). Il vit maintenant à Genève où vous le croiserez peut-être. Son rêve immédiat est de trouver un logement. Il aimerait aussi poursuivre ses études universitaires interrompues au Soudan. Mais plus que tout, il est déterminé à obtenir la réinstallation des 550 personnes encore bloquées en Papouasie-Nouvelle-Guinée et sur l’île de Nauru (2).

    En revenant sur quelques événements marquants, j’ai cherché à comprendre comment Aziz a réussi à poursuivre son combat pour la liberté des personnes enfermées comme lui, malgré l’isolement et les mauvais traitements.

    Atterrir en enfer

    Aziz est né à Al-Genaïna, un grand village situé dans la région du Darfour à quelques kilomètres de la frontière tchadienne. Son père est un marchand de bétail renommé qui commerce au Tchad et en Libye. A 13 ans il part habiter à Khartoum pour ses études secondaires. En première année d’université il devient activiste politique au sein du mouvement Girifna dont les membres sont pourchassés par le régime en place l’obligeant à fuir le Soudan. Il décide de partir pour l’Indonésie en juillet 2013. Mais il ne peut pas y rester car la procédure auprès du HCR est bien trop longue et son visa ne permet pas l’attente.

    La seule option est la traversée vers l’Australie. Après une première tentative en août 2013 durant laquelle 5 personnes se noient, la deuxième lui permet d’atteindre les côtes après quatre nuits en mer. Malheureusement le bateau est intercepté par la marine australienne au large de Christmas Island. Là on lui explique que les personnes arrivant par bateau ne pourront jamais, quel que soit leur statut, s’installer en Australie. Ils seront donc tous transportés par avion vers Darwin puis vers l’île de Manus en Papouasie-Nouvelle-Guinée.

    “On nous a alignés pour nous informer que le cannibalisme était actif là-bas et qu’il y avait beaucoup de maladies et qu’il fallait absolument éviter de parler aux habitants sans quoi nous serions agressés.”

    Aziz atterrit à Manus en septembre 2013 où déjà plus de 800 requérants d’asile sont détenus (3). Il est enfermé dans le camp de Foxtrot sur la base navale historique de Lombrum. Son dortoir est un immense hangar de 122 lits datant de la seconde guerre mondiale où il fait plus de 40 degrés.

    “ L’endroit était sinistre, loin de tout, nous étions totalement isolés du monde et nous n’avions accès à rien. Ce sentiment m’a donné envie d’agir, il fallait créer un mouvement de solidarité.”

    Sa rencontre avec Behrouz Boochani, un journaliste kurde iranien, lui donne beaucoup d’espoir. Ils décident ensemble de réunir en secret les représentants des différents groupes linguistiques (4) afin d’améliorer la communication entre les détenus et se mettre d’accord sur les revendications à faire, la première étant le démarrage de la procédure d’asile.

    Il constate que tout le monde est très affecté par les conditions de détention. Les gens souffrent d’un sentiment d’abandon et d’un processus de déshumanisation. Ils sont devenus des numéros, appelés selon leurs matricules. On exige d’eux qu’ils fassent la queue en ligne pour tout, ils ne sont informés de rien et ne voient aucunes portes de sortie à leur enfer quotidien. Afin de venir en aide à ses compagnons, Aziz s’intéresse à la psychologie, demande à son psychiatre- en prétextant de fausses raisons – d’emprunter des articles de psychologie. Ses lectures lui donnent des outils pour éviter de sombrer et aussi pour aider les autres. Il devient conseiller et passe des heures à écouter les personnes découragées.

    “Je pressentais que j’allais rester des années là-bas. Il me fallait conserver la mémoire et aider mes camarades plus fragiles. Je voulais qu’ils continuent d’espérer et calmer ceux qui étaient impatients ou dépressifs. Je sentais que j’avais un impact très positif sur eux. Bien sûr, je leur faisaient croire que les choses iraient mieux, que la société civile finiraient par nous entendre mais en réalité je n’en savais rien. ”

    Informer le monde extérieur

    Si Abdul Aziz Muhamat était fumeur peut-être ne serait-il pas parvenu à contacter le monde extérieur aussi rapidement. Chaque semaine les détenus recevaient trois paquets de cigarettes, alors il trouve une idée : corrompre un gardien pour obtenir un téléphone mobile et menacer de le dénoncer en cas de refus. Marché conclu : il parvient à troquer cent paquets de cigarettes en échange d’un téléphone mobile.

    “Le jour où j’ai reçu ce téléphone je me suis enfermé dans les toilettes. En cherchant sur internet, je suis tombé sur l’organisation Refugee Action Coalition à Sydney et j’ai noté le nom de Ian Rintoul. Je lui envoie un mail en lui expliquant ma situation et il me répond tout de suite. Quand je lui ai dit que j’étais enfermé à Manus, il ne m’a pas cru, il a demandé des preuves. Ian Rintoul m’a dit que ce que je faisais était extrêmement dangereux, il avait vraiment peur pour moi. Mais je lui ai dit que notre situation était tellement grave que je prenais le risque. Autour de moi à Manus, personne n’a jamais su que je cachais un téléphone. Ian Rintoul a été d’une grande aide pour moi, il a su utiliser intelligemment les informations que je lui donnais afin de sensibiliser et mobiliser la société civile.”

    Dans le courant du mois de janvier 2014, Aziz et ses compagnons organisent une manifestation exigeant le démarrage de la procédure d’asile. Des rencontres houleuses ont lieu avec le service d’immigration et d’autres intervenants dont l’Organisation internationale des migrations, mais elles n’aboutissent à rien de concret. Par contre ils sont avertis : les personnes qui refusent de rentrer au pays d’origine resteront éternellement sur l’île et surtout ils ne seront jamais réinstallés.

    Ces nouvelles provoquent le désespoir. Un soir de février 2014, la tentative de fuite de quelques requérants met le feu aux poudres. La répression est violente et des habitants locaux en profite pour rentrer dans le camp et attaquer des personnes jusque dans leurs chambres. Reza Barati (iranien) décède de ses blessures alors que 150 autres personnes sont blessées.

    En Australie et dans le monde, les violences à Manus font la une de la presse, les langues se délient, l’incompréhension gagne du terrain, le sort des prisonniers de Manus et Nauru inquiète une frange grandissante de la population. En avril 2014, Aziz recommence son travail pour renforcer les liens entre les personnes et tenter d’unir les différents groupes. Il y parvient et lance en janvier 2015 avec 400 autres personnes, une grève de la faim de 14 jours afin de protester non seulement contre les conditions abjectes et inhumaines de détention mais aussi contre l’absence de procédure d’asile.

    “Le quinzième jour, ils sont venus à 6 heures du matin, ils m’ont arrêté en premier et m’ont envoyé dans une prison appelée “CIS” avec d’autres prisonniers de droit commun dont des auteurs de crimes graves. J’y ai passé un mois. Etonnamment j’ai été très très heureux, j’ai appris leur langue, j’enseignais l’anglais et les autres prisonniers m’appelaient enfin par mon nom. Je garde un excellent souvenir de cette période.”

    Trois mois d’isolement

    Au bout d’un mois, Aziz est immédiatement placé dans un autre lieu et cette fois c’est en isolement complet. Après un mois, il est interrogé par un psychiatre et un psychologue qui le trouvent encore trop…combatif. Leur rapport incite les autorités à décider la prolongation de l’isolement pendant un mois supplémentaire.

    “On ma donné une carte rouge signifiant que j’étais un criminel contre l’Etat et on m’a dit que j’allais être renvoyé au Soudan. Après un mois de prison et deux mois d’isolement complet j’étais très fragile. Mentalement je n’allais pas bien du tout. C’est ce que le psychiatre et le psychologue voulaient voir. Je ne devais pas essayer de me montrer fort. Au contraire je devais sembler résigné, soumis aux règles du centre. Ça a marché, ils ont vraiment eu l’impression que j’étais cassé et ils m’ont libéré le même jour, après m’avoir fait signer un contrat. Bien sûr, dès mon retour au centre, j’ai fait trois entretiens avec ABC, SBS et une autre chaîne en Australie (…) Ils étaient furieux. J’ai été placé sur une liste noir. Les autorités m’ont informé qu’ils feraient en sorte que je sois la dernière personne à quitter Manus.”

    De janvier 2016 à décembre 2017, Aziz parvient à envoyer près de 4000 messages vocaux pour témoigner de son expérience. On peut les écouter dans le podcast passionnant The Messenger produit et raconté par le journaliste Michael Green et qui a remporté de nombreux prix. Le podcast est une immersion totale.

    Manus, purgatoire tropical

    Le 26 avril 2016, la Cour suprême de Papouasie-Nouvelle-Guinée juge illégal et anticonstitutionnel l’accord permettant à l’Australie de placer en détention sur le territoire papouasien des demandeurs d’asile dont elle ne veut pas. Sous pression de la société civile en Australie après des attaques armées contre le camp de Manus en Avril 2017, les autorités australiennes annoncent en octobre 2017 leur fermeture sans proposer de vraies solutions, juste un déplacement des personnes dans d’autres lieux dangereux car ouverts. Le bras de fer durera 24 jours.

    Durant cette période il mène la protestation, coordonne l’aide sociale et l’assistance médicale et facilite les consultations téléphoniques avec des médecins. En novembre 2017, ils sont plus de 600 à être déplacés vers les centres de East Lorengau Refugee Transit Centre, West Lorengau Haus and Hillside Haus.

    En tout, Aziz est resté 5 ans et demi emprisonné à Manus. Pendant longtemps il a caché à sa famille où il se trouvait et il n’est pas le seul. Il pense tous les jours à ceux qui ont résisté avec lui : Behrouz Boochani, kurde iranien, Omar Jack (Soudan), Chaminda Kanapati (Sri Lanka) toujours à Manus, Amir (iranien) réinstallé en 2017 au Canada, Muhamat Darlawi (iranien), réinstallé la semaine dernière aux Etats-Unis et Muhamat Edar (soudanais) qui vient de recevoir sa décision de réinstallation aussi aux Etats-Unis.

    En mai 2019, la victoire de la coalition conservatrice lors des élections législatives australiennes a été une énorme déception pour les 500 personnes encore retenues sur les îles alors que les socialistes s’étaient engagés à accepter l’offre de réinstallation proposée par la Nouvelle-Zélande. Pour eux et pour tous les requérants d’asile et réfugiés dans le monde, Aziz a bien l’intention de poursuivre son travail d’information et de sensibilisation afin d’inciter les Etats à respecter la Convention relative au statut des réfugiés conclue à Genève le 28 juillet 1951.

    Pour conclure sur cette belle rencontre, laissez-moi partager avec vous les conseils d’Aziz sur la manière de survivre psychologiquement dans un camp. On ne sait jamais aujourd’hui, personne n’est à l’abris d’un tel traitement.

    “Dans mon expérience, le seul conseil que je te donne c’est de garder l’espoir. Il faut que tu résistes et en même temps essaye de t’exprimer contre les situations que tu détestes et contre les injustices ou les tortures. Ne penses pas aux conséquences de tes actes, oublie-les. Evite de dire que c’est impossible, il n’y a pas d’impossible, tout est possible, tu as seulement besoin de courage et de motivation et aussi il te faut un sentiment dans ton coeur qui te dirige et te dis que ce que tu fais pour les autres est aussi bon pour toi.”

    https://blogs.letemps.ch/jasmine-caye/2019/09/10/une-conversation-avec-abdul-aziz-muhamat-laureat-du-prix-martin-ennals
    #témoignage #Manus_island #Pacific_solution #Australie #réfugiés #asile #migrations #externalisation
    ping @reka
    via @forumasile

  • Europe Keeps Asylum Seekers at a Distance, This Time in Rwanda

    BRUSSELS — For three years, the European Union has been paying other countries to keep asylum seekers away from a Europe replete with populist and anti-migrant parties.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/08/world/europe/migrants-africa-rwanda.html?searchResultPosition=1

    #Asylum seekers #UE policies #Externalisation #Rwanda

  • L’UE choisit le #Rwanda pour relocaliser les #demandeurs d’asile

    L’Union européenne va conclure un accord avec le Rwanda pour tenir les demandeurs d’asile à l’écart de ses frontières. Déchirée sur la question des migrants, l’Europe poursuit une politique déjà expérimentée et critiquée, analyse The New York Times.

    L’Union européenne s’apprête à conclure un accord financier avec le Rwanda pour que le pays accueille des demandeurs d’asile en provenance de Libye, afin qu’ils n’entrent pas sur le Vieux Continent. Un mécanisme dont l’UE est coutumière. Cette dernière, rappelle The New York Times, a déchiré le continent et entraîné une recrudescence du populisme en Europe :

    Depuis trois ans, et dans un contexte de montée des partis populistes hostiles aux migrants, l’Union européenne paye d’autres pays pour tenir à distance du continent les demandeurs d’asile

    https://www.courrierinternational.com/article/vu-des-etats-unis-lue-choisit-le-rwanda-pour-relocaliser-les-

    #Union européenne #Externalisation #Demande d’asile #Frontières #Rwanda #Populismes

  • Autre élément de la politique d’#externalisation des #frontières « made in USA ».
    Après le #Mexique : https://seenthis.net/messages/793063

    Le #Venezuela...

    EEUU aportará otros 120 millones de dólares en ayudas para hacer frente a la crisis migratoria venezolana

    EEUU aportará otros 120 millones de dólares en ayudas para hacer frente a la crisis migratoria venezolana

    Las autoridades de Estados Unidos aportarán 120 millones de dólares adicionales en asistencia humanitaria para ayudar a Latinoamérica a hacer frente al flujo de migrantes procedentes de Venezuela, según ha informado este miércoles el Departamento de Estado. Más de 4 millones de venezolanos salieron de su país en los últimos años huyendo de la crisis política y la escasez generalizada de alimentos y medicamentos. El subsecretario de Estado, John Sullivan, y el jefe de la Agencia de Es ...

    Leer más: https://www.europapress.es/internacional/noticia-eeuu-aportara-otros-120-millones-dolares-ayudas-hacer-frente-cri

    (c) 2019 Europa Press. Está expresamente prohibida la redistribución y la redifusión de este contenido sin su previo y expreso consentimiento.

    https://www.europapress.es/internacional/noticia-eeuu-aportara-otros-120-millones-dolares-ayudas-hacer-frente-cri

    #USA #Etats-Unis #asile #migrations #réfugiés

  • Réfugiés : du #Niger à la #Dordogne

    La France a adhéré en 2017 à l’#Emergency_Transit_Mechanism, programme humanitaire exceptionnel permettant à des réfugiés évacués d’urgence de #Libye (reconnus « particulièrement vulnérables ») d’être pris en charge dès le Niger, et réinstallés dans des #pays_sûrs. Comment cela passe-t-il aujourd’hui ?

    De nouveaux naufrages cette semaine au large de la Libye nous rappellent à quel point est éprouvant et risqué le périple de ceux qui tentent de rejoindre l’Europe après avoir fui leur pays. Partagée entre des élans contradictoires, compassion et peur de l’invasion, les pays de l’Union européenne ont durci leur politique migratoire, tout en assurant garantir le droit d’asile aux réfugiés. C’est ainsi que la #France a adhéré à l’Emergency Transit Mechanism (#ETM), imaginé par le #HCR fin 2017, avec une étape de transit au Niger.

    Le Haut-Commissariat des Nations unies pour les Réfugiés (HCR) réinstalle chaque années des réfugiés présents dans ses #camps (Liban, Jordanie, Tchad ou encore Niger) dans des pays dits ‘sûrs’ (en Europe et Amérique du Nord). La réinstallation est un dispositif classique du HCR pour des réfugiés « particulièrement vulnérables » qui, au vu de la situation dans leur pays, ne pourront pas y retourner.

    Au Niger, où se rend ce Grand Reportage, cette procédure est accompagnée d’un dispositif d’#évacuation_d’urgence des #prisons de Libye. L’Emergency Transit Mechanism (ETM) a été imaginé par le HCR fin 2017, avec une étape de #transit au Niger. Nouvelle frontière de l’Europe, pour certains, le pays participe à la #sélection entre migrants et réfugiés, les migrants étant plutôt ‘retournés’ chez eux par l’Organisation Internationale des Migrants (#OIM).

    Sur 660 000 migrants et 50 000 réfugiés (placés sous mandat HCR) présents en Libye, 6 600 personnes devraient bénéficier du programme ETM sur deux ans.

    La France s’est engagé à accueillir 10 000 réinstallés entre septembre 2017 et septembre 2019. 7 000 Syriens ont déjà été accueillis dans des communes qui se portent volontaires. 3 000 Subsahariens, dont une majorité évacués de Libye, devraient être réinstallés d’ici le mois de décembre.

    En Dordogne, où se rend ce Grand Reportage, des communes rurales ont fait le choix d’accueillir ces réfugiés souvent abîmés par les violences qu’ils ont subis. Accompagnés pendant un an par des associations mandatées par l’Etat, les réfugiés sont ensuite pris en charge par les services sociaux locaux, mais le rôle des bénévoles reste central dans leur installation en France.

    Comment tout cela se passe-t-il concrètement ? Quel est le profil des heureux élus ? Et quelle réalité les attend ? L’accompagnement correspond-il à leurs besoins ? Et parviennent-ils à s’intégrer dans ces villages français ?

    https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/grand-reportage/refugies-du-niger-a-la-dordogne
    #audio #migrations #asile #réfugiés #réinstallation #vulnérabilité #retour_volontaire #IOM #expulsions #renvois #externalisation #tri #rural #ruralité #accueil
    ping @isskein @pascaline @karine4 @_kg_ @reka

    Ajouté à cette métaliste sur l’externalisation :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765335

  • EU supports Bosnia and Herzegovina in managing migration with additional €10 million

    On 19 August 2019, the European Commission adopted a decision to allocate €10 million of additional funds to support Bosnia and Herzegovina addressing the increased presence of migrants and refugees. This additional allocation brings the total EU funding for migration to Bosnia and Herzegovina to €34 million since the beginning of 2018.

    The EU funds will be mainly used to set up additional temporary reception centres and provide basic services and protection, including food and accommodation, access to water sanitation and hygiene.

    The EU will also continue improving the capacity of Bosnia and Herzegovina’s authorities for identification, registration and referral of third-country nationals crossing the border and for border control and surveillance, thereby also contributing to the fight against and prevention of migrant smuggling, trafficking in human beings and other types of cross-border crimes. It will also help the authorities of Bosnia and Herzegovina with the voluntary return of migrants to their countries of origin.

    Background

    Nearly 36,000 refugees and migrants entered Bosnia and Herzegovina since January 2018, according to official estimates. Approximately 7,400 refugees and migrants in need of assistance are currently present in the country, mostly in the Una-Sana Canton. Approximately 4,100 are accommodated in EU-funded temporary reception centres.

    Since 2007, the European Union has been providing assistance to Bosnia and Herzegovina worth € 58.6 million in the area of migration and border management through the Instrument for pre-accession assistance. The country is also benefiting from the IPA regional programme ‘Support to Protection-Sensitive Migration Management’ worth up to €14.5 million.

    EU overall assistance already being implemented to Bosnia and Herzegovina since 2018 to cope with the increased migratory presence amounts to €24 million (€20.2 million from the Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance and €3.8 million of humanitarian aid). This supplementary allocation brings the total to €34 million. This is in addition to €24.6 million assistance the European Union has provided to Bosnia and Herzegovina in the area of asylum, migration and border management since 2007.

    http://europa.ba/?p=65185
    #EU #UE #Bosnie-Herzégovine #migrations #réfugiés #asile #aide_financière

    Aide à l’#accueil (dont #hébergement), mais évidemment aussi :

    The EU will also continue improving the capacity of Bosnia and Herzegovina’s authorities for identification, registration and referral of third-country nationals crossing the border and for border control and surveillance, thereby also contributing to the fight against and prevention of migrant smuggling, trafficking in human beings and other types of cross-border crimes.

    #contrôles_frontaliers #frontières #surveillance...
    Et aussi #identification #enregistrement...
    Encore une fois, donc, voici un bel exemple où sous couvert d’#aide_humanitaire, ce qu’on fait en réalité c’est... externaliser les contrôles frontaliers à un pays tiers... dans ce cas la Bosnie...
    Et #externalisation des procédures d’asile...

    J’ajoute à cette métaliste :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765335

    ping @isskein

  • #Frontex : repousser à tout prix

    Frontex, l’agence européenne de garde-frontières, suscite la controverse. A plusieurs reprises, elle s’est retrouvée sous le feu des critiques en raison de violations des #droits_humains aux #frontières_extérieures de l’UE. Ces méfaits, commis par des gardes-frontières à l’encontre de personnes en quête de protection, étaient connus de l’agence, comme l’attestent des documents internes.

    Dissuader, repousser, s’isoler – telle pourrait être la devise de l’Europe quand il s’agit de garder ses frontières, quitte à bafouer les droits humains. Aux frontières extérieures de l’UE, chaque jour draine son lot de violence, de misère et de mort. Frontex, l’agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côte, jouent à cet égard un rôle central.

    Récemment, des médias ont fait état d’un recours excessif à la force et de maltraitances à l’encontre des personnes cherchant protection aux frontières extérieures de l’UE. Ces informations ne surprennent pas : cela fait des années que des rapports signalent des refoulements à la frontière et d’autres violations des droits humains. L’OSAR condamne fermement ces violations massives des #droits_fondamentaux, qui privent les personnes en quête de protection d’une procédure d’asile. Or, demander l’asile est un droit humain et celui-ci s’applique à toute personne, peu importe comment elle est entrée dans le pays.
    Implication de la Suisse

    De par sa participation à Frontex, la Suisse est co-responsable des événements déplorables aux frontières extérieures de l’UE. Elle devrait mettre à profit sa coopération avec Frontex afin de promouvoir le respect des droits humains et d’établir des priorités en la matière. La Suisse doit œuvrer en faveur d’une surveillance des frontières conforme aux droits humains et de l’instauration de possibilités de recours en cas de violation. Il s’agit en effet de mettre en place un mécanisme de recours indépendant sur le plan institutionnel, qui soit facilement accessible aux victimes et qui soit en mesure de prendre des décisions juridiquement contraignantes. Dans les cas de décès survenus dans le cadre d’opérations de Frontex, des enquêtes doivent impérativement être ouvertes.

    En tant que membre de Schengen/Dublin, la Suisse est étroitement liée à la politique migratoire de l’UE. Depuis, 2009, elle est par ailleurs directement impliquée financièrement et opérationnellement dans Frontex. Le Corps suisse des gardes-frontières participe à des programmes de formation, à l’élaboration d’analyses de risques et à des opérations aux frontières extérieures de l’espace Schengen. Chaque année, une quarantaine de membres du Corps suisse des gardes-frontières sont déployés aux frontières extérieures de l’Europe. Des fonctionnaires suisses travaillent pour Frontex en Grèce, en Italie, en Bulgarie, en Croatie et en Espagne. L’année dernière, les gardes-frontières suisses, les policiers cantonaux et les employés du Secrétariat d’État aux migrations ont ainsi totalisé près de 1 500 journées d’intervention. Par ailleurs, la Suisse a apporté en 2018 un soutien financier à Frontex pour un montant total d’environ 14 millions de francs, soit environ six fois plus qu’il y a dix ans.
    Frontex : un développement incontrôlé

    Frontex a été créée en 2004 pour assurer et faciliter la coordination des opérations et soutenir les contrôles aux frontières. L’agence surveille et contrôle les frontières extérieures de l’UE en déployant des unités de police européennes. Ces dernières années, Frontex n’a cessé d’étendre ses activités aux frontières, devenant l’instrument central de la politique de repoussoir européenne. En mai 2019, elle a lancé sa première opération en dehors de l’UE, en Albanie. Frontex a connu une croissance massive et continue de croître. Au moment de sa création, son budget s’élevait à six millions d’euros. D’ici 2021, il devrait augmenter de 1,6 milliard d’euros. Le nombre de collaborateurs de Frontex travaillant pour la protection des frontières devrait à l’avenir passer de 1 500 à 10 000. Parallèlement, Frontex gagne en indépendance vis-à-vis des États membres de l’UE. Ainsi, ses fonctionnaires seront désormais autorisés à effectuer des contrôles aux frontières et à collecter des données personnelles de manière indépendante. L’OSAR estime que cette évolution est préoccupante. Frontex évolue en effet dans un domaine délicat en matière de droits humains. Or, elle n’est soumise à aucun contrôle indépendant quant au respect des droits humains et n’offre aucun recours en cas de violation.

    https://www.osar.ch/news/archives/2019/frontex-repousser-a-tout-prix.html
    #Suisse #externalisation #asile #réfugiés #contrôles_frontaliers

    La #contribution suisse à Frontex :

    En tant que membre de Schengen/Dublin, la Suisse est étroitement liée à la politique migratoire de l’UE. Depuis, 2009, elle est par ailleurs directement impliquée financièrement et opérationnellement dans Frontex. Le Corps suisse des gardes-frontières participe à des programmes de formation, à l’élaboration d’analyses de risques et à des opérations aux frontières extérieures de l’espace Schengen. Chaque année, une quarantaine de membres du Corps suisse des gardes-frontières sont déployés aux frontières extérieures de l’Europe. Des fonctionnaires suisses travaillent pour Frontex en Grèce, en Italie, en Bulgarie, en Croatie et en Espagne. L’année dernière, les gardes-frontières suisses, les policiers cantonaux et les employés du Secrétariat d’État aux migrations ont ainsi totalisé près de 1 500 journées d’intervention. Par ailleurs, la Suisse a apporté en 2018 un soutien financier à Frontex pour un montant total d’environ 14 millions de francs, soit environ six fois plus qu’il y a dix ans.

    #budget

    ping @albertocampiphoto @daphne @i_s_ @isskein

  • Peut-on contrôler les contrôles de #Frontex ?

    À la veille des élections européennes, Bruxelles s’est empressée de voter le renforcement de Frontex. Jamais l’agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes n’a été aussi puissante. Aujourd’hui, il est devenu presque impossible de vérifier si cette autorité respecte les #droits_fondamentaux des migrants, et si elle tente vraiment de sauver des vies en mer. Mais des activistes ne lâchent rien. Une enquête de notre partenaire allemand Correctiv.

    Berlin, le 18 juin 2017. Arne Semsrott écrit à Frontex, la police des frontières de l’UE. « Je souhaite obtenir la liste de tous les bateaux déployés par Frontex en Méditerranée centrale et orientale. »

    Arne Semsrott est journaliste et activiste spécialisé dans la liberté de l’information. On pourrait dire : « activiste de la transparence ».

    Trois semaines plus tard, le 12 juillet 2017, Luisa Izuzquiza envoie depuis Madrid une requête similaire à Frontex. Elle sollicite des informations sur un meeting entre le directeur de l’agence et les représentants de l’Italie, auquel ont également participé d’autres pays membres de l’UE. Luisa est elle aussi activiste pour la liberté de l’information.

    Cet été-là, Arne et Luisa sont hantés par la même chose : le conflit entre les sauveteurs en mer privés et la #surveillance officielle des frontières en Méditerranée, qu’elle soit assurée par Frontex ou par les garde-côtes italiens. En juillet dernier, l’arrestation de la capitaine allemande Carola Rackete a déclenché un tollé en Europe ; en 2017, c’était le bateau humanitaire allemand Iuventa, saisi par les autorités italiennes.

    Notre enquête a pour ambition de faire la lumière sur un grave soupçon, une présomption dont les sauveteurs parlent à mots couverts, et qui pèse sur la conscience de l’Europe : les navires des garde-frontières européens éviteraient volontairement les secteurs où les embarcations de réfugiés chavirent, ces zones de la Méditerranée où des hommes et des femmes se noient sous nos yeux. Est-ce possible ?

    Frontex n’a de cesse d’affirmer qu’elle respecte le #droit_maritime_international. Et les sauveteurs en mer n’ont aucune preuve tangible de ce qu’ils avancent. C’est bien ce qui anime Arne Semsrott et Luisa Izuzquiza : avec leurs propres moyens, ils veulent sonder ce qui se trame en Méditerranée, rendre les événements plus transparents. De fait, lorsqu’un bateau de réfugiés ou de sauvetage envoie un SOS, ou quand les garde-côtes appellent à l’aide, les versions diffèrent nettement une fois l’incident terminé. Et les personnes extérieures sont impuissantes à démêler ce qui s’est vraiment passé.

    Luisa et Arne refusent d’accepter cette réalité. Ils sont fermement convaincus que les informations concernant les mouvements et les positions des bateaux, les rapports sur la gestion et les opérations de Frontex, ou encore les comptes rendus des échanges entre gouvernements sur la politique migratoire, devraient être accessibles à tout un chacun. Pour pouvoir contrôler les contrôleurs. Ils se sont choisi un adversaire de taille. Ce texte est le récit de leur combat.

    Frontex ne veut pas entendre le reproche qui lui est fait de négliger les droits des migrants. Interviewé par l’émission « Report München », son porte-parole Krzysztof Borowski déclare : « Notre agence attache beaucoup d’importance au respect des droits humains. Il existe chez Frontex différents mécanismes permettant de garantir que les droits des individus sont respectés au cours de nos opérations. »

    En 2011, au moment où les « indignados » investissent les rues de Madrid, Luisa vit encore dans la capitale espagnole. Ébranlé par la crise économique, le pays est exsangue, et les « indignés » règlent leurs comptes avec une classe politique qu’ils accusent d’être corrompue, et à mille lieues de leurs préoccupations. Luisa se rallie à la cause. L’une des revendications phares du mouvement : exiger plus de transparence. Cette revendication, Luisa va s’y vouer corps et âme. « La transparence est cruciale dans une démocratie. C’est l’outil qui permet de favoriser la participation politique et de demander des comptes aux dirigeants », affirme-t-elle aujourd’hui.

    Luisa Izuzquiza vit à deux pas du bureau de l’organisation espagnole Access Info, qui lutte pour améliorer la transparence dans le pays. Début 2014, la jeune femme tente sa chance et va frapper à leur porte. On lui donne du travail.

    En 2015, alors que la population syrienne est de plus en plus nombreuse à se réfugier en Europe pour fuir la guerre civile, Luisa s’engage aussi pour lui venir en aide. Elle travaille comme bénévole dans un camp de réfugiés en Grèce, et finit par faire de la lutte pour la transparence et de son engagement pour les réfugiés un seul et même combat.

    Elle ne tardera pas à entendre parler de Frontex. À l’époque, l’agence de protection des frontières, qui siège à Varsovie, loin du tumulte de Bruxelles, n’est pas connue de grand monde. Luisa se souvient : « Frontex sortait du lot : le nombre de demandes était très faible, et les réponses de l’agence, très floues. Ils rédigeaient leurs réponses sans faire valoir le moindre argument juridique. »

    L’Union européenne étend la protection de ses frontières en toute hâte, et l’agence Frontex constitue la pierre angulaire de ses efforts. Depuis sa création en 2004, l’agence frontalière se développe plus rapidement que toute autre administration de l’UE. Au départ, Frontex bénéficie d’un budget de 6 millions d’euros. Il atteindra 1,6 milliard d’euros en 2021. Si l’agence employait à l’origine 1 500 personnes, son effectif s’élève désormais à 10 000 – 10 000 employés pouvant être détachés à tout moment pour assurer la protection des frontières. Frontex avait organisé l’expulsion de 3 500 personnes au cours de l’année 2015. En 2017, ce sont 13 000 personnes qui ont été reconduites aux frontières.

    Il est difficile de quantifier le pouvoir, à plus forte raison avec des chiffres. Mais l’action de Frontex a des conséquences directes sur la vie des personnes en situation de détresse. À cet égard, l’agence est sans doute la plus puissante administration ayant jamais existé au sein de l’UE.

    « Frontex a désormais le droit de se servir d’armes à feu »

    Et Frontex continue de croître, tout en gagnant de plus en plus d’indépendance par rapport aux États membres. L’agence achète des bateaux, des avions, des véhicules terrestres. Évolution récente, ses employés sont désormais habilités à mener eux-mêmes des contrôles aux frontières et à recueillir des informations personnelles sur les migrants. Frontex signe en toute autonomie des traités avec des pays tels que la Serbie, le Nigeria ou le Cap-Vert, et dépêche ses agents de liaison en Turquie. Si les missions de cette administration se cantonnaient initialement à l’analyse des risques ou des tâches similaires, elle est aujourd’hui active le long de toutes les frontières extérieures de l’UE, coordonnant aussi bien les opérations en Méditerranée que le traitement des réfugiés arrivant dans les États membres ou dans d’autres pays.

    Et pourtant, force est de constater que Frontex ne fait pas l’objet d’un véritable contrôle parlementaire. Le Parlement européen ne peut contrôler cette institution qu’indirectement – par le biais de la commission des budgets, en lui allouant tout simplement moins de fonds. « Il faut renforcer le contrôle parlementaire, déclare Erik Marquardt, député vert européen. L’agence Frontex a désormais le droit de se servir d’armes à feu. »

    En Europe, seul un petit vivier d’activistes lutte pour renforcer la liberté de l’information. Tôt ou tard, on finit par se croiser. Début 2016, l’organisation de Luisa Izuzquiza invite des militants issus de dix pays à un rassemblement organisé à Madrid. Arne Semsrott sera de la partie.

    Aujourd’hui, Arne a 31 ans et vit à Berlin. Une loi sur la liberté de l’information a été votée en 2006 outre-Rhin. Elle permet à chaque citoyen – et pas seulement aux journalistes – de solliciter des documents officiels auprès des ministères et des institutions fédérales. Arne travaille pour la plateforme « FragDenStaat » (« Demande à l’État »), qui transmet les demandes de la société civile aux administrations concernées.

    Dans le sillage du rassemblement de Madrid, Arne lance une « sollicitation de masse ». Le principe : des activistes invitent l’ensemble de la sphère publique à adresser à l’État des demandes relevant de la liberté de l’information, afin d’augmenter la pression sur ces institutions qui refusent souvent de fournir des documents alors même que la loi l’autorise.

    Arne Semsrott crée alors le mouvement « FragDenBundestag » (« Demande au Parlement »), et réussit à obtenir du Bundestag qu’il publie dorénavant les expertises de son bureau scientifique.

    « J’étais impressionnée qu’une telle requête puisse aboutir à la publication de ces documents », se souvient Luisa Izuzquiza. Elle écrit à Arne pour lui demander si ces expertises ont un lien avec la politique migratoire. Ils restent en contact.

    Les journalistes aussi commencent à soumettre des demandes en invoquant la liberté d’informer. Mais tandis qu’ils ont l’habitude de garder pour eux les dossiers brûlants, soucieux de ne pas mettre la puce à l’oreille de la concurrence, les activistes de la trempe de Luisa, eux, publient systématiquement leurs requêtes sur des plateformes telles que « Demande à l’État » ou « AsktheEU.org ». Et ce n’est pas tout : ils parviennent même à obtenir que des jugements soient prononcés à l’encontre d’institutions récalcitrantes. Jugements auxquels citoyennes et citoyens pourront dorénavant se référer. Ce sont les pionniers de la transparence.

    En septembre 2017, Luisa Izuzquiza et Arne Semsrott finissent par conjuguer leurs efforts : ils demandent à obtenir les positions des bateaux d’une opération Frontex en Méditerranée.

    Ce qu’ils veulent savoir : les équipes de l’agence de garde-côtes s’appliqueraient-elles à tourner en rond dans une zone de calme plat ? Éviteraient-elles à dessein les endroits où elles pourraient croiser des équipages en détresse qu’elles seraient forcées de sauver et de conduire jusqu’aux côtes de l’Europe ?

    Frontex garde jalousement les informations concernant ses navires. En prétextant que les passeurs pourraient échafauder de nouvelles stratégies si l’agence révélait trop de détails sur ses opérations.

    Frontex rejette leur demande. Les activistes font opposition.

    Arne Semsrott est en train de préparer une plainte au moment où son téléphone sonne. Au bout du fil, un employé de Frontex. « Il m’a dit que si nous retirions notre demande d’opposition, il se débrouillerait pour nous faire parvenir les informations qu’on réclamait », se rappelle Arne.

    Mais les deux activistes ne se laissent pas amadouer. Ils veulent qu’on leur livre ces informations par la voie officielle. Pour tenter d’obtenir ce que l’employé de l’agence, en leur proposant une « fuite », cherchait manifestement à éviter : un précédent juridique auquel d’autres pourront se référer à l’avenir. Ils portent plainte. C’est la toute première fois qu’une action en justice est menée contre Frontex pour forcer l’agence à livrer ses informations.

    Pendant que Luisa et Arne patientent devant la Cour de justice de l’Union européenne à Luxembourg, le succès les attend ailleurs : Frontex a inscrit à sa charte l’obligation de respecter les droits fondamentaux des migrants.

    Une « officière aux droits fondamentaux » recrutée par Frontex est censée s’en assurer. Elle n’a que neuf collaborateurs. En 2017, l’agence a dépensé 15 fois plus pour le travail médiatique que pour la garantie des droits humains. Même l’affranchissement des lettres lui a coûté plus cher.

    Mais la garante des droits humains chez Frontex sert quand même à quelque chose : elle rédige des rapports. L’ensemble des incidents déclarés par les équipes de Frontex aux frontières de l’Europe sont examinés par son service. Elle en reçoit une dizaine par an. L’officière en fait état dans ses « rapports de violation des droits fondamentaux ». Luisa Izuzquiza et Arne Semsrott vont tous les recevoir, un par un. Il y en a 600.

    Ces documents offrent une rare incursion dans la philosophie de l’agence européenne.

    Au printemps 2017, l’officière aux droits fondamentaux, qui rend directement compte au conseil d’administration de Frontex – lequel est notamment composé de membres du gouvernement allemand –, a ainsi fait état de conflits avec la police hongroise. Après avoir découvert dix réfugiés âgés de 10 à 17 ans dans la zone frontalière de Horgoš, petite ville serbe, les policiers auraient lancé leur chien sur les garçons. L’officière rapporte que trois d’entre eux ont été mordus.

    La police serait ensuite entrée sur le territoire serbe, avant d’attaquer les membres du petit groupe à la matraque et en utilisant des sprays au poivre. Quatre réfugiés auraient alors été interpellés et passés à tabac, jusqu’à perdre connaissance. Frontex, qui coopère avec la police frontalière hongroise, a attiré l’attention des autorités sur l’affaire – mais peine perdue.

    Ce genre de débordement n’est pas inhabituel. L’année précédente, l’officière rapportait le cas d’un Marocain arrêté et maltraité le 8 février 2016, toujours par des policiers hongrois, qui lui auraient en outre dérobé 150 euros. Frontex a transmis les déclarations « extrêmement crédibles » du Marocain aux autorités hongroises. Mais « l’enquête est ensuite interrompue », écrit la garante des droits de Frontex (lire ici, en anglais, le rapport de Frontex).

    Ses rapports documentent d’innombrables cas de migrants retrouvés morts par les agents chargés de surveiller les frontières, mais aussi des viols constatés dans les camps de réfugiés, ou encore des blessures corporelles commises par les policiers des pays membres.

    Luisa Izuzquiza et Arne Semsrott décident de rencontrer l’officière aux droits fondamentaux : elle est allemande, elle s’appelle Annegret Kohler et a été employée par intérim chez Frontex. Sa prédécesseure est en arrêt maladie. Luisa écrit à Annegret Kohler.

    Et, miracle, l’officière accepte de les rencontrer. Luisa est surprise. « Je croyais qu’elle était nouvelle à ce poste. Mais peut-être qu’elle n’a tout bonnement pas vérifié qui on était », dit la jeune femme.

    La même année, en janvier, les deux activistes se rendent à Varsovie. Les drames qui assombrissent la Méditerranée ont fait oublier Frontex : à l’origine, l’agence était surtout censée tenir à l’œil les nouvelles frontières orientales de l’UE, dont le tracé venait d’être redéfini. C’est le ministère de l’intérieur polonais qui offre à l’agence son quartier général de Varsovie, bien loin des institutions de Bruxelles et de Strasbourg, mais à quelques encablures des frontières de la Biélorussie, de l’Ukraine et de la Russie.

    Luisa Izuzquiza et Arne Semsrott ont rendez-vous avec Annegret Kohler au neuvième étage du gratte-ciel de Frontex, une tour de verre qui domine la place de l’Europe, en plein centre de Varsovie. C’est la première fois qu’ils rencontrent une employée de l’agence en chair et en os. « La discussion s’est avérée fructueuse, bien plus sincère que ce à quoi je m’attendais », se rappelle Luisa.

    Ils évoquent surtout la Hongrie. Annegret Kohler s’est cassé les dents sur la police frontalière de Victor Orbán. « Actuellement, je me demande quelle sorte de pression nous pouvons exercer sur eux », leur confie-t-elle au cours de la discussion.

    Luisa ne s’attendait pas à pouvoir parler si ouvertement avec Annegret Kohler. Celle-ci n’est accompagnée d’aucun attaché de presse, comme c’est pourtant le cas d’habitude.

    En réponse aux critiques qui lui sont adressées, Frontex brandit volontiers son « mécanisme de traitement des plaintes », accessible aux réfugiés sur son site Internet. Mais dans la pratique, cet outil ne pèse en général pas bien lourd.

    En 2018, alors que Frontex avait été en contact avec des centaines de milliers de personnes, l’agence reçoit tout juste dix plaintes. Rares sont ceux qui osent élever la voix. Les individus concernés refusent de donner leur nom, concède Annegret Kohler au fil de la discussion, « parce qu’ils craignent d’être cités dans des documents et de se voir ainsi refuser l’accès aux procédures de demande d’asile ».

    Qui plus est, la plupart des réfugiés ignorent qu’ils ont le droit de se plaindre directement auprès de Frontex, notamment au sujet du processus d’expulsion par avion, également coordonné par l’agence frontalière. Il serait très difficile, toujours selon Kohler, de trouver le bon moment pour sensibiliser les migrants à ce mécanisme de traitement des plaintes : « À quel stade leur en parler ? Avant qu’ils soient reconduits à la frontière, à l’aéroport, ou une fois qu’on les a assis dans l’avion ? »

    Mais c’est bien l’avion qui serait le lieu le plus indiqué. Selon un rapport publié en mars 2019 par les officiers aux droits fondamentaux de Frontex, les employés de l’agence transgresseraient très fréquemment les normes internationales relatives aux droits humains lors de ces « vols d’expulsion » – mais aussi leurs propres directives. Ce document précise que des mineurs sont parfois reconduits aux frontières sans être accompagnés par des adultes, alors qu’une telle procédure est interdite. Le rapport fustige en outre l’utilisation des menottes : « Les bracelets métalliques n’ont pas été employés de manière réglementaire. La situation ne l’exigeait pas toujours. »

    La base juridique de l’agence Frontex lui permet de suspendre une opération lorsque des atteintes aux droits de la personne sont constatées sur place. Mais son directeur, Fabrice Leggeri, ne considère pas que ce soit nécessaire dans le cas de la Hongrie. Car la simple présence de l’agence suffirait à dissuader les policiers hongrois de se montrer violents, a-t-il répondu dans une lettre adressée à des organisations non gouvernementales qui réclamaient un retrait des équipes présentes en Hongrie. Sans compter qu’avoir des employés de Frontex sur place pourrait au moins permettre de documenter certains incidents.

    Même une procédure en manquement lancée par la Commission européenne contre la Hongrie et un jugement de la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme n’ont rien changé à la position de Frontex. Les lois hongroises en matière de demande d’asile et les expulsions pratiquées dans ce pays ont beau être contraires à la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme, l’agence n’accepte pas pour autant d’interrompre ses opérations sur place.

    Et les garde-frontières hongrois se déchaînent sous l’œil indifférent de Frontex.

    Surveiller pour renvoyer

    Le débat sur les sauvetages en Méditerranée et la répartition des réfugiés entre les pays membres constitue une épreuve de vérité pour l’UE. Les négociations censées mener à une réforme du système d’asile commun stagnent depuis des années. Le seul point sur lequel la politique européenne est unanime : donner à Frontex plus d’argent et donc plus d’agents, plus de bateaux, plus d’équipements.

    Voilà ce qui explique que l’UE, un mois avant le scrutin européen de mai 2019, ait voté en un temps record, via ses institutions, une réforme du règlement relatif à la base juridique de Frontex. Il aura fallu à la Commission, au Parlement et au Conseil à peine six mois pour s’accorder sur une ordonnance longue de 245 pages, déterminante pour les questions de politique sécuritaire et migratoire. Rappelons en comparaison que la réforme du droit d’auteur et le règlement général sur la protection des données, deux chantiers si ardemment controversés, n’avaient pu être adoptés qu’au bout de six ans, du début des concertations à leur mise en œuvre.

    « Au vu des nouvelles habilitations et du contrôle direct qu’exerce Frontex sur son personnel et ses équipements, il est plus important que jamais de forcer l’agence à respecter les lois », affirme Mariana Gkliati, chercheuse en droit européen à l’université de Leyde. « Petit à petit, le mandat des officiers aux droits fondamentaux s’est élargi, mais tant qu’ils n’auront pas à leur disposition suffisamment de personnel et de ressources, ils ne seront pas en mesure de remplir leur rôle. »

    Frontex récuse cette critique.

    « Le bureau des officiers aux droits fondamentaux a été considérablement renforcé au cours des dernières années. Cela va de pair avec l’élargissement de notre mandat, et il est bien évident que cette tendance ne fera que s’accroître au cours des années à venir, déclare Krzysztof Borowski, porte-parole de l’agence. Le bureau prend de l’ampleur à mesure que Frontex grandit. »

    Mais le travail des officiers aux droits fondamentaux s’annonce encore plus épineux. Car Frontex s’efforce de réduire le plus possible tout contact direct avec les migrants aux frontières extérieures de l’Europe. En suivant cette logique : si Frontex n’est pas présente sur place, personne ne pourra lui reprocher quoi que ce soit dans le cas où des atteintes aux droits humains seraient constatées. Ce qui explique que l’agence investisse massivement dans les systèmes de surveillance, et notamment Eurosur, vaste programme de surveillance aérienne.

    Depuis l’an dernier, Frontex, non contente de recevoir des images fournies par ses propres satellites de reconnaissance et par le constructeur aéronautique Airbus, en récolte aussi grâce à ses drones de reconnaissance.

    Eurosur relie Frontex à l’ensemble des services de garde-frontières des 28 États membres de l’UE. De concert avec l’élargissement d’autres banques de données européennes, comme celle de l’agence de gestion informatique eu-Lisa, destinée à collecter les informations personnelles de millions de voyageurs, l’UE met ainsi en place une banque de données qu’elle voudrait infaillible.

    Son but : aucun passage de frontière aux portes de l’Europe – et à plus forte raison en Méditerranée – ne doit échapper à Frontex. Or, la surveillance depuis les airs permet d’appréhender les réfugiés là où la responsabilité de Frontex n’est pas encore engagée. C’est du moins ce dont est persuadé Matthias Monroy, assistant parlementaire du député de gauche allemand Andrej Hunko, qui scrute depuis des années le comportement de Frontex en Méditerranée. « C’est là que réside à mon sens l’objectif de ces missions : fournir aux garde-côtes libyens des coordonnées permettant d’intercepter ces embarcations le plus tôt possible sur leur route vers l’Europe. »

    Autre exemple, cette fois-ci dans les Balkans : depuis mai 2019, des garde-frontières issus de douze pays de l’UE sont déployés dans le cadre d’une mission Frontex le long de la frontière entre l’Albanie et la Grèce – mais côté albanais. Ce qui leur permet de bénéficier de l’immunité contre toute poursuite civile et juridique en Grèce.

    Forte de ses nouvelles habilitations, Frontex pourrait bientôt poster ses propres agents frontaliers au Niger, en Tunisie ou même en Libye. L’agence collaborerait alors avec des pays où les droits humains ont une importance quasi nulle.

    Qu’à cela ne tienne : Luisa Izuzquiza va tout faire pour suivre cette évolution, en continuant à envoyer ses demandes d’information au contrôleur Frontex. Même s’il faut le contrôler jusqu’en Afrique. Et même si le combat doit être encore plus féroce.

    Mais de petits succès se font sentir : en mars 2016, l’UE négocie une solution avec la Turquie pour endiguer les flux de réfugiés en mer Égée. La Turquie se chargera de bloquer les migrants ; en contrepartie, l’UE lui promet des aides de plusieurs milliards d’euros pour s’occuper des personnes échouées sur son territoire.

    Cet accord entre l’UE et la Turquie a suscité de nombreuses critiques. Mais peut-être faut-il rappeler qu’il ne s’agit pas d’un accord en bonne et due forme, et que l’UE n’a rien signé. Ce que les médias ont qualifié de « deal » a simplement consisté en une négociation entre le Conseil de l’Europe, c’est-à-dire les États membres, et la Turquie. Le fameux accord n’existe pas, seul un communiqué officiel a été publié.

    Cela veut dire que les réfugiés expulsés de Grèce pour être ensuite acheminés vers la Turquie, en vertu du fameux « deal », n’ont presque aucun moyen de s’opposer à cet accord fantôme. Grâce à une demande relevant de la liberté de l’information, Luisa Izuzquiza est tout de même parvenue à obtenir l’expertise juridique sur laquelle s’est fondée la Commission européenne pour vérifier, par précaution, la validité légale de son « accord ». Ce qui s’est révélé avantageux pour les avocats de deux demandeurs d’asile ayant déposé plainte contre le Conseil de l’Europe.

    Luisa Izuzquiza et Arne Semsrott auront attendu un an et demi. En juillet dernier, l’heure a enfin sonné. Dans la « salle bleue » de la Cour de justice européenne, à Luxembourg, va avoir lieu la première négociation portant sur le volume d’informations que Frontex sera tenue de fournir au public sur son action.

    Il y a quelques années, Frontex rejetait encore les demandes relevant de la liberté de l’information sans invoquer aucun argument juridique. Ce jour-là, Frontex se présente au tribunal avec cinq avocats, secondés par un capitaine des garde-côtes finnois. « Il s’agit pour nous de sauver des vies humaines », plaide l’un des avocats à la barre, face au banc des juges, dans un anglais mâtiné d’accent allemand. Et justement, pour protéger des vies humaines, il est nécessaire de garder secrètes les informations qui touchent au travail de Frontex. L’avocat exige que la plainte soit rejetée.

    Après la séance de juillet, la Cour a maintenant quelques mois pour statuer sur l’issue de l’affaire. Si les activistes sortent vainqueurs, ils sauront quels bateaux l’agence Frontex a déployés en Méditerranée deux ans plus tôt, dans le cadre d’une mission qui n’existe plus. Dans le cas d’une décision défavorable à Frontex, l’agence redoute de devoir révéler des informations sur ses navires en activité, ce qui permettrait de suivre leurs mouvements. Mais rien n’est moins vrai. Car la flotte de Frontex a tout bonnement pour habitude de couper les transpondeurs permettant aux navires d’indiquer leur position et leur itinéraire par satellite.

    Mais c’est une autre question qui est en jeu face à la cour de Luxembourg : l’agence européenne devra-t-elle rendre des comptes à l’opinion publique, ou pourra-t-elle garder ses opérations sous le sceau du secret ? Frontex fait l’objet de nombreuses accusations, et il est très difficile de déterminer lesquelles d’entre elles sont justifiées.

    « Pour moi, les demandes relevant de la liberté de l’information constituent une arme contre l’impuissance, déclare Arne Semsrott. L’une des seules armes que les individus peuvent brandir contre la toute-puissance des institutions, même quand ils ont tout perdu. »

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/160819/peut-controler-les-controles-de-frontex
    #frontières #migrations #réfugiés #asile #sauvetage #Méditerranée #mer_Méditerranée #droits_humains #pouvoir #Serbie #Nigeria #Cap-Vert #externalisation #agents_de_liaison #Turquie #contrôle_parlementaire

    ping @karine4 @isskein @reka

  • Rwanda to receive over 500 migrants from Libya

    Rwanda and Libya are currently working out an evacuation plan for some hundreds of migrants being held in detention centres in the North African country, officials confirmed.

    Diyana Gitera, the Director General for Africa at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation told The New Times that Rwanda was working on a proposal with partners to evacuate refugees from Libya.

    She said that initially, Rwanda will receive 500 refugees as part of the commitment by President Paul Kagame in late 2017.

    President Kagame made this commitment after revelations that tens of thousands of different African nationalities were stranded in Libya having failed to make it across the Mediterranean Sea to European countries.

    “We are talking at this time of up to 500 refugees from Libya,” Gitera said, without revealing more details.

    She however added that the exact timing of when these would be brought will be confirmed later.

    It had earlier been said that Rwanda was ready to receive up to 30,000 immigrants under this arrangement.

    Rwanda’s intervention came amid harrowing revelations that the migrants, most of them from West Africa, are being sold openly in modern-day slave markets in Libya.

    The immigrants are expected to be received under an emergency plan being discussed with international humanitarian agencies and other partners.

    Gitera highlighted that the process was being specifically supported by the African Union (AU) with funding from European Union (EU) and the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR).

    The proposal comes as conflict in war-torn North African country deepens.

    The United Nations estimates almost 5,000 migrants are in detention centres in Libya, about 70 per cent of them refugees and asylum seekers, most of whom have been subjected to different forms of abuse.

    This is however against the backdrop of accusations against the EU over the plight of migrants.

    Already, thousands of the migrants have died over the past few years while trying to cross the Mediterranean Sea to European countries where they hope for better lives.

    Human rights groups have documented multiple cases of rape, torture and other crimes at the facilities, some of which are run by militias.

    Rwanda hopes to step in to rescue some of these struggling migrants in its capacity.

    The Government of Rwanda has been generously hosting refugees for over two decades and coordinates the refugee response with UNHCR, as well as providing land to establish refugee camps and ensuring camp management and security.

    Generally, Rwanda offers a favourable protection environment for refugees.

    They have the right to education, employment, cross borders, and access to durable solutions (resettlement, local integration and return) is unhindered.

    Camps like Gihembe, Kigeme, Kiziba, Mugombwa and Nyabiheke host thousands of refugees, especially from the Democratic Republic of Congo and Burundi where political instabilities have forced people to leave their countries.

    https://www.newtimes.co.rw/news/rwanda-receive-over-500-migrants-libya
    #Libye #évacuation #Rwanda #asile #migrations #réfugiés #union_africaine #plan_d'urgence #UE #EU #externalisation #Union_européenne #HCR #UNHCR

    via @pascaline

    • Europe Keeps Asylum Seekers at a Distance, This Time in Rwanda

      For three years, the European Union has been paying other countries to keep asylum seekers away from a Europe replete with populist and anti-migrant parties.

      It has paid Turkey billions to keep refugees from crossing to Greece. It has funded the Libyan Coast Guard to catch and return migrant boats to North Africa. It has set up centers in distant Niger to process asylum seekers, if they ever make it that far. Most don’t.

      Even as that arm’s-length network comes under criticism on humanitarian grounds, it is so overwhelmed that the European Union is seeking to expand it, as the bloc aims to buttress an approach that has drastically cut the number of migrants crossing the Mediterranean.

      It is now preparing to finish a deal, this time in Rwanda, to create yet another node that it hopes will help alleviate some of the mounting strains on its outsourcing network.
      Sign up for The Interpreter

      Subscribe for original insights, commentary and discussions on the major news stories of the week, from columnists Max Fisher and Amanda Taub.

      Critics say the Rwanda deal will deepen a morally perilous policy, even as it underscores how precarious the European Union’s teetering system for handling the migrant crisis has become.

      Tens of thousands of migrants and asylum seekers remain trapped in Libya, where a patchwork of militias control detention centers and migrants are sold as slaves or into prostitution, and kept in places so packed that there is not even enough floor space to sleep on.

      A bombing of a migrant detention center in July left 40 dead, and it has continued to operate in the months since, despite part of it having been reduced to rubble.

      Even as the system falters, few in the West seem to be paying much attention, and critics say that is also part of the aim — to keep a problem that has roiled European politics on the other side of Mediterranean waters, out of sight and out of mind.

      Screening asylum seekers in safe, remote locations — where they can qualify as refugees without undertaking perilous journeys to Europe — has long been promoted in Brussels as a way to dismantle smuggler networks while giving vulnerable people a fair chance at a new life. But the application by the European Union has highlighted its fundamental flaws: The offshore centers are too small and the pledges of refugee resettlement too few.

      European populists continue to flog the narrative that migrants are invading, even though the European Union’s migration policy has starkly reduced the number of new arrivals. In 2016, 181,376 people crossed the Mediterranean from North Africa to reach Italian shores. Last year, the number plummeted to 23,485.

      But the bloc’s approach has been sharply criticized by humanitarian and refugee-rights groups, not only for the often deplorable conditions of the detention centers, but also because few consigned to them have any real chance of gaining asylum.

      “It starts to smell as offshore processing and a backdoor way for European countries to keep people away from Europe, in a way that’s only vaguely different to how Australia manages it,” said Judith Sunderland, an expert with Human Rights Watch, referring to that country’s policy of detaining asylum seekers on distant Pacific islands.

      Such criticism first surfaced in Europe in 2016, when the European Union agreed to pay Turkey roughly $6 billion to keep asylum seekers from crossing to Greece, and to take back some of those who reached Greece.

      On the Africa front, in particular in the central Mediterranean, the agreements have come at a lower financial cost, but arguably at a higher moral one.
      Image
      A migrant detention center in Tripoli, Libya, in 2015.

      Brussels’ funding of the Libyan Coast Guard to intercept migrant boats before they reach international waters has been extremely effective, but has left apprehended migrants vulnerable to abuses in a North African country with scant central governance and at the mercy of an anarchic, at-war state of militia rule.

      A handful are resettled directly out of Libya, and a few thousand more are transferred by the United Nations refugee agency and its partner, the International Organization for Migration, to a processing center in Niger. Only some of those have a realistic shot at being granted asylum in Europe.

      With many European Union member states refusing to accept any asylum seekers, Brussels and, increasingly, President Emmanuel Macron of France have appealed to those willing to take in a few who are deemed especially vulnerable.

      As Italy has continued to reject migrant rescue vessels from docking at its ports, and threatened to impose fines of up to 1 million euros, about $1.1 million, on those who defy it, Mr. Macron has spearheaded an initiative among European Union members to help resettle migrants rescued in the Mediterranean. Eight nations have joined.

      But ultimately, it’s a drop in the bucket.

      An estimated half a million migrants live in Libya, and just 51,000 are registered with the United Nations refugee agency. Five thousand are held in squalid and unsafe detention centers.

      “European countries face a dilemma,” said Camille Le Coz, an expert with the Migration Policy Institute in Brussels. “They do not want to welcome more migrants from Libya and worry about creating pull factors, but at the same time they can’t leave people trapped in detention centers.”
      Editors’ Picks
      25 Years Later, It Turns Out Phoebe Was the Best Friend
      Following the Lead of the Diving Girl
      The Perfect Divorce

      The United Nations refugee agency and the International Organization for Migration, mostly using European Union funding, have evacuated about 4,000 people to the transit center in Niger over the past two years.

      Niger, a country that has long served as a key node in the migratory route from Africa to Europe, is home to some of the world’s most effective people-smugglers.

      The capacity of the center in Agadez, where smugglers also base their operations, is about 1,000. But it has at times held up to three times as many, as resettlement to Europe and North America has been slack.

      Fourteen countries — 10 from the European Union, along with Canada, Norway, Switzerland and the United States — have pledged to resettle about 6,600 people either directly from Libya or from the Niger facility, according to the United Nations refugee agency.

      It has taken two years to fulfill about half of those pledges, with some resettlements taking up to 12 months to process, a spokesman for the agency said.

      Some countries that made pledges, such as Belgium and Finland, have taken only a few dozen people; others, like the Netherlands, fewer than 10; Luxembourg has taken none, a review of the refugee agency’s data shows.

      Under the agreement with Rwanda, which is expected to be signed in the coming weeks, the east African country will take in about 500 migrants evacuated from Libya and host them until they are resettled to new homes or sent back to their countries of origin.

      It will offer a way out for a lucky few, but ultimately the Rwandan center is likely to run into the same delays and problems as the one in Agadez.

      “The Niger program has suffered from a lot of setbacks, hesitation, very slow processing by European and other countries, very low numbers of actual resettlements,” said Ms. Sunderland of Human Rights Watch. “There’s not much hope then that the exact same process in Rwanda would lead to dramatically different outcomes.”

      https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/08/world/europe/migrants-africa-rwanda.html

    • Vu des États-Unis.L’UE choisit le Rwanda pour relocaliser les demandeurs d’asile

      L’Union européenne va conclure un accord avec le Rwanda pour tenir les demandeurs d’asile à l’écart de ses frontières. Déchirée sur la question des migrants, l’Europe poursuit une politique déjà expérimentée et critiquée, analyse The New York Times.

      https://www.courrierinternational.com/article/vu-des-etats-unis-lue-choisit-le-rwanda-pour-relocaliser-les-

    • Le Rwanda, un nouveau #hotspot pour les migrants qui fuient l’enfer libyen

      Comme au Niger, le Haut-commissariat aux réfugiés de l’ONU va ouvrir un centre de transit pour accueillir 500 migrants détenus en Libye. D’autres contingents d’évacués pourront prendre le relais au fur et à mesure que les 500 premiers migrants auront une solution d’installation ou de rapatriement.

      Quelque 500 migrants actuellement enfermés en centres de détention en Libye vont être évacués vers le Rwanda dans les prochaines semaines, en vertu d’un accord signé mardi 10 septembre par le gouvernement rwandais, le Haut-commissariat aux réfugiés de l’ONU (HCR), et l’Union africaine (UA).

      Il s’agira principalement de personnes originaires de la corne de l’Afrique, toutes volontaires pour être évacuées vers le Rwanda. Leur prise en charge à la descente de l’avion sera effectuée par le HCR qui les orientera vers un centre d’accueil temporaire dédié.

      Situé à 60 km de Kigali, la capitale rwandaise, le centre de transit de Gashora a été établi en 2015 “pour faire face, à l’époque, à un afflux de migrants burundais” fuyant des violences dans leur pays, explique à InfoMigrants Elise Villechalane, représentante du HCR au Rwanda. D’une capacité de 338 places, l’édifice implanté sur un terrain de 26 hectares a déjà accueilli, au fil des années, un total de 30 000 Burundais. “Des travaux sont en cours pour augmenter la capacité et arriver à 500 personnes”, précise Elise Villechalane.

      Les premiers vols d’évacués devraient arriver dans les prochaines semaines et s’étaler sur plusieurs mois. Le HCR estime que le centre tournera à pleine capacité d’ici la fin de l’année. À l’avenir, d’autres contingents d’évacués pourront prendre le relais au fur et à mesure que les 500 premiers migrants quitteront les lieux.

      Certains réfugiés "pourraient recevoir l’autorisation de rester au Rwanda"

      “Une fois [les migrants] arrivés sur place, nous procéderons à leur évaluation [administrative] afin de trouver une solution au cas par cas”, poursuit Elise Villechalane. “En fonction de leur parcours et de leur vulnérabilité, il pourra leur être proposé une réinstallation dans un pays tiers, ou dans un pays où ils ont déjà obtenu l’asile avant de se rendre en Libye, mais aussi un retour volontaire dans leur pays d’origine quand les conditions pour un rapatriement dans la sécurité et la dignité sont réunies.”

      Dans des cas plus rares, et si aucune solution n’est trouvée, certains réfugiés "pourraient recevoir l’autorisation de rester au Rwanda", a indiqué Germaine Kamayirese, la ministre chargée des mesures d’Urgence, lors d’une déclaration à la presse à Kigali.

      Le Rwanda a décidé d’accueillir des évacués de Libye à la suite d’un discours du chef de l’État rwandais Paul Kagame le 23 novembre 2017, peu après la diffusion d’un document choc de CNN sur des migrants africains réduits en esclavage en Libye. “Le président a offert généreusement d’accueillir des migrants, ce qui a, depuis, été élargi pour inclure les réfugiés, les demandeurs d’asile et toutes les autres personnes spécifiées dans le mémorandum d’accord”, affirme Olivier Kayumba, secrétaire du ministère chargé de la Gestion des situations d’urgence, contacté par InfoMigrants.

      Le pays reconnaît, en outre, qu’il existe actuellement en Libye “une situation de plus en plus complexe et exceptionnelle conduisant à la détention et aux mauvais traitements de ressortissants de pays tiers”, continue Olivier Kayumba qui rappelle qu’en tant que signataire de la Convention de 1951 relative au statut des réfugiés, son pays s’est senti le devoir d’agir.

      Le Rwanda prêt à accueillir jusqu’à 30 000 africains évacués

      Plus de 149 000 réfugiés, principalement burundais et congolais, vivent actuellement au Rwanda qui compte une population de 12 millions d’habitants. “Les Rwandais sont habitués à vivre en harmonie avec les réfugiés”, ajoute Olivier Kayumba. “Grâce à la mise en place d’une stratégie d’inclusion, les enfants de réfugiés vont à l’école avec les locaux, les communautés d’accueil incluent aussi les réfugiés dans le système d’assurance maladie et d’accès à l’emploi.”

      Le gouvernement rwandais se dit prêt à accueillir jusqu’à 30 000 Africains évacués de Libye dans son centre de transit, mais uniquement par groupes de 500, afin d’éviter un engorgement du système d’accueil.

      "C’est un moment historique, parce que des Africains tendent la main à d’autres Africains", s’est réjouie Amira Elfadil, commissaire de l’Union africaine (UA) aux Affaires sociales, lors d’une conférence de presse. "Je suis convaincue que cela fait partie des solutions durables".

      L’UA espère désormais que d’autres pays africains rejoindront le Rwanda en proposant un soutien similaire aux évacués de Libye.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/19455/le-rwanda-un-nouveau-hotspot-pour-les-migrants-qui-fuient-l-enfer-liby

    • Signing of MoU between the AU, Government of Rwanda and UNHCR

      Signing of the MoU between the @_AfricanUnion, the Government of #Rwanda and the United Nations High Commissioner for @Refugees (UNHCR) to establish an Emergency Transit Mechanism #ETM in Rwanda for refugees and asylum-seekers stranded in #Libya

      https://twitter.com/_AfricanUnion/status/1171307373945937920?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E11
      Lien vers la vidéo:
      https://livestream.com/AfricanUnion/events/8813789/videos/196081645
      #Memorandum_of_understanding #signature #vidéo #MoU #Emergency_Transit_Mechanism #Union_africaine #UA

    • Le HCR, le Gouvernement rwandais et l’Union africaine signent un accord pour l’évacuation de réfugiés hors de la Libye

      Le Gouvernement rwandais, le HCR, l’Agence des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés, et l’Union africaine ont signé aujourd’hui un mémorandum d’accord qui prévoit de mettre en œuvre un dispositif pour évacuer des réfugiés hors de la Libye.

      Selon cet accord, le Gouvernement rwandais recevra et assurera la protection de réfugiés qui sont actuellement séquestrés dans des centres de détention en Libye. Ils seront transférés en lieu sûr au Rwanda sur une base volontaire.

      Un premier groupe de 500 personnes, majoritairement originaires de pays de la corne de l’Afrique, sera évacué. Ce groupe comprend notamment des enfants et des jeunes dont la vie est menacée. Après leur arrivée, le HCR continuera de rechercher des solutions pour les personnes évacuées.

      Si certains peuvent bénéficier d’une réinstallation dans des pays tiers, d’autres seront aidés à retourner dans les pays qui leur avait précédemment accordé l’asile ou à regagner leur pays d’origine, s’ils peuvent le faire en toute sécurité. Certains pourront être autorisés à rester au Rwanda sous réserve de l’accord des autorités compétentes.

      Les vols d’évacuation devraient commencer dans les prochaines semaines et seront menés en coopération avec les autorités rwandaises et libyennes. L’Union africaine apportera son aide pour les évacuations, fournira un soutien politique stratégique en collaborant avec la formation et la coordination et aidera à mobiliser des ressources. Le HCR assurera des prestations de protection internationale et fournira l’aide humanitaire nécessaire, y compris des vivres, de l’eau, des abris ainsi que des services d’éducation et de santé.

      Le HCR exhorte la communauté internationale à contribuer des ressources pour la mise en œuvre de cet accord.

      Depuis 2017, le HCR a évacué plus de 4400 personnes relevant de sa compétence depuis la Libye vers d’autres pays, dont 2900 par le biais du mécanisme de transit d’urgence au Niger et 425 vers des pays européens via le centre de transit d’urgence en Roumanie.

      Néanmoins, quelque 4700 personnes seraient toujours détenues dans des conditions effroyables à l’intérieur de centres de détention en Libye. Il est urgent de les transférer vers des lieux sûrs, de leur assurer la protection internationale, de leur fournir une aide vitale d’urgence et de leur rechercher des solutions durables.


      https://www.unhcr.org/fr/news/press/2019/9/5d778a48a/hcr-gouvernement-rwandais-lunion-africaine-signent-accord-levacuation-refugie

    • ‘Life-saving’: hundreds of refugees to be evacuated from Libya to Rwanda

      First group expected to leave dire detention centres in days, as UN denies reports that plan is part of EU strategy to keep refugees from Europe

      Hundreds of African refugees and asylum seekers trapped in Libyan detention centres will be evacuated to Rwanda under a “life-saving” agreement reached with Kigali and the African Union, the UN refugee agency said on Tuesday.

      The first group of 500 people, including children and young people from Somalia, Eritrea and Sudan, are expected to arrive in Rwanda over the coming days, out of 4,700 now estimated to be in custody in Libya, where conflict is raging. The measure is part of an “emergency transit mechanism”, to evacuate people at risk of harm in detention centres inside the county.

      Babar Baloch, UNHCR spokesman in Geneva, said the agreement was “a life-line” mechanism to allow those in danger to get to a place of safety.

      “This is an expansion of the humanitarian evacuation to save lives,” said Baloch. “The focus is on those trapped inside Libya. We’ve seen how horrible the conditions are and we want to get them out of harm’s way.”

      More than 50,000 people fleeing war and poverty in Africa remain in Libya, where a network of militias run overcrowded detention centres, and where there are reports that people have been sold as slaves or into prostitution.

      The UN denied reports the European Union were behind the agreement, as part of a strategy to keep migrants away from Europe. Vincent Cochetel, the special envoy for the UNHCR for the central Mediterranean, told Reuters the funding would mainly come from the EU, but also from the African Union which has received $20m (£16m) from Qatar to support the reintegration of African migrants. But he later said on Twitter that no funding had yet been received and that he was working on it “with partners” (https://twitter.com/cochetel/status/1171400370339373057).

      Baloch said: “We are asking for support from all of our donors, including the EU. The arrangement is between UNHCR, the African Union and Rwanda.”

      The EU has been criticised for funding the Libyan coastguard, who pick up escaped migrants from boats in the Mediterranean and send them back to centres where they face beatings, sexual violence and forced labour according to rights groups.

      In July, the bombing of a migrant detention centre in Tripoli left 44 people dead, leading to international pressure to find a safe haven for refugees.
      Fear and despair engulf refugees in Libya’s ’market of human beings’
      Read more

      Under the agreement, the government of Rwanda will receive and provide protection to refugees and asylum seekers in groups of about 50, who will be put up in a transit facility outside the capital of Kigali. After their arrival, the UNHCR will continue to pursue solutions for them. Some will be resettled to third countries, others helped to return to countries where asylum had previously been granted and others will stay in Rwanda. They will return to their homes if it is safe to do so.

      Cochetel said: “The government has said, ‘If you [UNHCR] think the people should stay long-term in Rwanda, no problem. If you think they should be reunited with their family, they should be resettled, no problem. You [UNHCR] decide on the solution.’”

      “Rwanda has said, ‘We’ll give them the space, we’ll give them the status, we’ll give them the residence permit. They will be legally residing in Rwanda as refugees.’”

      Rwanda, a country of 12 million, is the second African country to provide temporary refuge to migrants in Libya. It already supports around 150,000 refugees from neighbouring Democratic Republic of the Congo and Burundi.

      UNHCR has evacuated more than 2,900 refugees and asylum seekers out of Libya to Niger through an existing emergency transit mechanism. Almost 2,000 of them have been resettled, to countries in Europe, the US and Canada, the agency said, with the rest remaining in Niger.

      https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2019/sep/10/hundreds-refugees-evacuated-libya-to-rwanda?CMP=share_btn_fb

    • INTERVIEW-African refugees held captive in Libya to go to Rwanda in coming weeks - UNHCR

      Hundreds of African refugees trapped in Libyan detention centres will be evacuated to Rwanda within the next few weeks as part of increasingly urgent efforts to relocate people as conflict rages in north African nation, the United Nations said on Tuesday.

      Vincent Cochetel, special envoy for the central Mediterranean for the U.N. refugee agency (UNHCR), said 500 refugees will be evacuated to Rwanda in a deal signed with the small east African nation and the African Union on Tuesday.

      “The agreement with Rwanda says the number can be increased from 500 if they are satisfied with how it works,” Cochetel told the Thomson Reuters Foundation in an interview ahead of the official U.N. announcement.

      “It really depends on the response of the international community to make it work. But it means we have one more solution to the situation in Libya. It’s not a big fix, but it’s helpful.”

      Libya has become the main conduit for Africans fleeing war and poverty trying to reach Europe, since former leader Muammar Gaddafi was toppled in a NATO-backed uprising in 2011.

      People smugglers have exploited the turmoil to send hundreds of thousands of migrants on dangerous journeys across the central Mediterranean although the number of crossings dropped sharply from 2017 amid an EU-backed push to block arrivals.

      Many are picked up at sea by the EU-funded Libyan Coast Guard which sends them back, often to be detained in squalid, overcrowded centres where they face beatings, rape and forced labour, according to aid workers and human rights groups.

      According to the UNHCR, there are about 4,700 people from countries such as Eritrea, Somalia, Ethiopia and Sudan currently held in Libya’s detention centres, which are nominally under the government but often run by armed groups.

      A July air strike by opposition forces, which killed dozens of detainees in a centre in the Libyan capital Tripoli, has increased pressure on the international community to find a safe haven for the refugees and migrants.

      https://news.yahoo.com/interview-african-refugees-held-captive-100728525.html?guccounter=1&guce

    • Accueil de migrants évacués de Libye : « Un bon coup politique » pour le Rwanda

      Le Rwanda a signé il y a quelques jours à Addis-Abeba un accord avec le Haut-commissariat pour les réfugiés (HCR) et l’Union africaine (UA) en vue d’accueillir des migrants bloqués dans l’enfer des centres de détention libyens. Camille Le Coz, analyste au sein du think tank Migration Policy Institute, décrypte cette annonce.

      Cinq cent personnes vont être évacuées de Libye vers le Rwanda « dans quelques semaines », a précisé mardi Hope Tumukunde Gasatura, représentante permanente du Rwanda à l’UA, lors d’une conférence de presse à Addis-Abeba où avait lieu la signature de l’accord.

      RFI : Le Rwanda accueille déjà près de 150 000 réfugiés venus de RDC et du Burundi. Et ce n’est pas vraiment la porte à côté de la Libye. Sans compter que le régime de Paul Kagame est régulièrement critiqué pour ses violations des droits de l’homme. Alors comment expliquer que cet État se retrouve à prendre en charge des centaines de migrants ?

      Camille Le Coz : En fait, tout commence en novembre 2017 après la publication par CNN d’une vidéo révélant l’existence de marchés aux esclaves en Libye. C’est à ce moment-là que Kigali se porte volontaire pour accueillir des migrants bloqués en Libye. Mais c’est finalement vers l’Europe et le Niger, voisin de la Libye, que s’organisent ces évacuations. Ainsi, depuis 2017, près de 4 000 réfugiés ont été évacués de Libye, dont 2 900 au Niger. La plupart d’entre eux ont été réinstallés dans des pays occidentaux ou sont en attente de réinstallation. Mais du fait de la reprise des combats en Libye cet été, ce mécanisme est vite apparu insuffisant. L’option d’organiser des évacuations vers le Rwanda a donc été réactivée et a donné lieu à des discussions avec Kigali, le HCR, l’UA mais aussi l’UE sur les aspects financiers.

      Quel bénéfice le Rwanda peut-il tirer de cet accord ?

      Pour le Rwanda, faire valoir la solidarité avec les migrants africains en Libye est un bon coup politique, à la fois sur la scène internationale et avec ses partenaires africains. La situation des migrants en Libye est au cœur de l’actualité et les ONG et l’ONU alertent régulièrement sur les conditions effroyables pour les migrants sur place. Donc d’un point de vue politique, c’est très valorisant pour le Rwanda d’accueillir ces personnes.

      Que va-t-il se passer pour ces personnes quand elles vont arriver au Rwanda ?

      En fait, ce mécanisme soulève deux questions. D’une part, qui sont les migrants qui vont être évacués vers le Rwanda ? D’après ce que l’on sait, ce sont plutôt des gens de la Corne de l’Afrique et plutôt des gens très vulnérables, notamment des enfants. D’autre part, quelles sont les solutions qui vont leur être offertes au Rwanda ? La première option prévue par l’accord, c’est la possibilité pour ces personnes de retourner dans leur pays d’origine. La deuxième option, c’est le retour dans un pays dans lequel ces réfugiés ont reçu l’asile dans le passé. Cela pourrait par exemple s’appliquer à des Érythréens réfugiés en Éthiopie avant de partir vers l’Europe. Ces deux options demanderont néanmoins un suivi sérieux des conditions de retour : comment s’assurer que ces retours seront effectivement volontaires, et comment garantir la réintégration de ces réfugiés ? La troisième option, ce serait la possibilité pour certains de rester au Rwanda mais on ne sait pas encore sous quel statut. Enfin, ce que l’on ne sait pas encore, c’est si des États européens s’engageront à relocaliser certains de ces rescapés.

      Cet accord est donc une réplique de celui conclu avec le Niger, qui accueille depuis 2017 plusieurs milliers de réfugiés évacués de Tripoli ?

      L’approche est la même mais d’après ce que l’on sait pour l’instant, les possibilités offertes aux réfugiés évacués sont différentes : dans le cas du mécanisme avec le Niger, les pays européens mais également les États-Unis, le Canada, la Norvège et la Suisse s’étaient engagés à réinstaller une partie de ces réfugiés. Dans le cas du Rwanda, on n’a pas encore eu de telles promesses.

      Cet accord est-il la traduction de l’évolution de la politique migratoire européenne ?

      Aujourd’hui, près de 5 000 migrants et réfugiés sont dans des centres de détention en Libye où les conditions sont horribles. Donc la priorité, c’est de les en sortir. Les évacuations vers le Rwanda peuvent participer à la résolution de ce problème. Mais il reste entier puisque les garde-côtes libyens, financés par l’Europe, continuent d’intercepter des migrants qui partent vers l’Italie et de les envoyer vers ces centres de détention. En d’autres termes, cet accord apporte une réponse partielle et de court terme à un problème qui résulte très largement de politiques européennes.

      On entend parfois parler d’« externalisation des frontières » de l’Europe. En gros, passer des accords avec des pays comme le Rwanda permettrait aussi d’éloigner le problème des migrants des côtes européennes. Est-ce vraiment la stratégie de l’Union européenne ?

      Ces évacuations vers le Rwanda sont plutôt un mécanisme d’urgence pour répondre aux besoins humanitaires pressants de migrants et réfugiés détenus en Libye (lire encadré). Mais il est clair que ces dernières années, la politique européenne a consisté à passer des accords avec des pays voisins afin qu’ils renforcent leurs contrôles frontaliers. C’est le cas par exemple avec la Turquie et la Libye. En échange, l’Union européenne leur fournit une assistance financière et d’autres avantages économiques ou politiques. L’Union européenne a aussi mis une partie de sa politique de développement au service d’objectifs migratoires, avec la création d’un Fond fiduciaire d’urgence pour l’Afrique en 2015, qui vise notamment à développer la capacité des États africains à mettre en œuvre leur propre politique migratoire et à améliorer la gestion de leurs frontières. C’est le cas notamment au Niger où l’Union européenne a soutenu les autorités pour combattre les réseaux de passeurs et contrôler les passages vers la Libye.

      Justement, pour le Rwanda, y a-t-il une contrepartie financière ?

      L’accord est entre le HCR, l’UA et le Rwanda. Mais le soutien financier de l’Union européenne paraît indispensable pour la mise en œuvre de ce plan. Reste à voir comment cela pourrait se matérialiser. Est-ce que ce sera un soutien financier pour ces 500 personnes ? Des offres de relocalisation depuis le Rwanda ? Ou, puisque l’on sait que le Rwanda a signé le Pacte mondial sur les réfugiés, l’Union européenne pourrait-elle appuyer la mise en œuvre des plans d’action de Kigali dans ce domaine ? Ce pourrait être une idée.

      La commissaire de l’UA aux affaires sociales Amira El Fadil s’est dite convaincue que ce genre de partenariat pourrait constituer des solutions « durables ». Qu’en pensez-vous ?

      C’est un signe positif que des pays africains soient plus impliqués sur ce dossier puisque ces questions migratoires demandent une gestion coordonnée de part et d’autre de la Méditerranée. Maintenant, il reste à voir quelles solutions seront offertes à ces 500 personnes puisque pour l’instant, le plan paraît surtout leur proposer de retourner dans le pays qu’elles ont quitté. Par ailleurs, il ne faut pas perdre de vue que la plupart des réfugiés africains ne sont pas en Libye, mais en Afrique. Les plus gros contingents sont au Soudan, en Ouganda et en Éthiopie et donc, les solutions durables sont d’abord et avant tout à mettre en œuvre sur le continent.

      ■ Un geste de solidarité de la part du Rwanda, selon le HCR

      Avec notre correspondant à Genève, Jérémie Lanche

      D’après le porte-parole du HCR Babar Baloch, l’accueil par Kigali d’un premier contingent de réfugiés est une « bouée de sauvetage » pour tous ceux pris au piège en Libye. L’Union européenne, dont les côtes sont de plus en plus inaccessibles pour les candidats à l’exil, pourrait financer une partie de l’opération, même si rien n’est officiel. Mais pour le HCR, l’essentiel est ailleurs. La vie des migrants en Libye est en jeu, dit Babar Baloch :

      « Il ne faut pas oublier qu’il y a quelques semaines, un centre de détention [pour migrants] a été bombardé en Libye. Plus de 50 personnes ont été tuées. Mais même sans parler de ça, les conditions dans ces centres sont déplorables. Il faut donc sortir ceux qui s’y trouvent le plus rapidement possible. Et à part le Niger, le Rwanda est le deuxième pays qui s’est manifesté pour nous aider à sauver ces vies. »

      Les réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile doivent être logés dans des installations qui ont déjà servi pour accueillir des réfugiés burundais. Ceux qui le souhaitent pourront rester au Rwanda et y travailler selon Kigali. Les autres pourront être relocalisés dans des pays tiers voire dans leur pays d’origine s’ils le souhaitent. Le Rwanda se dit prêt à recevoir en tout dans ses centres de transit jusqu’à 30 000 Africains bloqués en Libye.

      "Depuis un demi-siècle, le Rwanda a produit beaucoup de réfugiés. Donc le fait qu’il y ait une telle tragédie, une telle détresse, de la part de nos frères et soeurs africains, cela nous interpelle en tant que Rwandais. Ce dont on parle, c’est un centre de transit d’urgence. Une fois [qu’ils seront] arrivés au Rwanda, le HCR va continuer à trouver une solution pour ces personnes. Certains seront envoyés au pays qui leur ont accordé asile, d’autres seront envoyés aux pays tiers et bien sûr d’autres pourront retourner dans leur pays si la situation sécuritaire le permet. Bien sûr, ceux qui n’auront pas d’endroits où aller pourront rester au Rwanda. Cela devra nécessiter bien sûr l’accord des autorités de notre pays." Olivier Nduhungirehe, secrétaire d’État en charge de la Coopération et de la Communauté est-africaine

      http://www.rfi.fr/afrique/20190912-accord-accueil-migrants-rwanda-libye-politique

    • ‘Maybe they can forget us there’: Refugees in Libya await move to Rwanda

      Hundreds in detention centres expected to be transferred under deal partly funded by EU

      Hundreds of refugees in Libya are expected to be moved to Rwanda in the coming weeks, under a new deal partly funded by the European Union.

      “This is an expansion of the humanitarian evacuation to save lives,” said Babar Baloch, from the United Nations Refugee Agency. “The focus is on those trapped inside Libya. We’ve seen how horrible the conditions are and we want to get them out of harm’s way.”

      Many of the refugees and migrants expected to be evacuated have spent years between detention centres run by Libya’s Department for Combatting Illegal Migration, and smugglers known for brutal torture and abuse, after fleeing war or dictatorships in their home countries.

      They have also been victims of the European Union’s hardening migration policy, which involves supporting the Libyan coast guard to intercept boats full of people who try to cross the Mediterranean Sea to Europe, returning those on board to indefinite detention in a Libya at war.
      Apprehension

      In Libyan capital Tripoli, refugees and migrants who spoke to The Irish Times by phone were apprehensive. They questioned whether they will be allowed to work and move freely in Rwanda, and asked whether resettlement spaces to other countries will be offered, or alternative opportunities to rebuild their lives in the long-term.

      “People want to go. We want to go,” said one detainee, with slight desperation, before asking if Rwanda is a good place to be. “Please if you know about Rwanda tell me.”

      “We heard about the evacuation plan to Rwanda, but we have a lot of questions,” said another detainee currently in Zintan detention centre, where 22 people died in eight months because of a lack of medical care and abysmal living conditions. “Maybe they can forget us there.”

      In a statement, UNHCR said that while some evacuees may benefit from resettlement to other countries or may be allowed to stay in Rwanda in the long term, others would be helped to go back to countries where they had previously been granted asylum, or to their home countries, if safe.

      The original group of evacuees is expected to include 500 volunteers.

      Rwanda’s government signed a memorandum of understanding with the United Nations Refugee Agency and the African Union on September 10th to confirm the deal.

      In 2017, a year-long investigation by Foreign Policy magazine found that migrants and refugees were being sent to Rwanda or Uganda from detention centres in Israel, and then moved illegally into third countries, where they had no rights or any chance to make an asylum claim.

      Officials working on the latest deal say they are trying to make sure this doesn’t happen again.

      “We are afraid, especially in terms of time,” said an Eritrean, who witnessed a fellow detainee burn himself to death in Triq al Sikka detention centre last year, after saying he had lost hope in being evacuated.

      “How long will we stay in Rwanda? Because we stayed in Libya more than two years, and have been registered by UNHCR for almost two years. Will we take similar time in Rwanda? It is difficult for asylum seekers.”

      https://www.irishtimes.com/news/world/africa/maybe-they-can-forget-us-there-refugees-in-libya-await-move-to-rwanda-1.

    • Le Rwanda accueille des premiers migrants évacués de Libye

      Le Rwanda a accueilli ce jeudi soir le premier groupe de réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile en provenance de Libye, dans le cadre d’un accord signé récemment entre ce pays, le Haut Commissariat aux réfugiés et l’Union africaine.

      L’avion affrété par le Haut Commissariat aux réfugiés a atterri à Kigali cette nuit. À son bord, 59 hommes et 7 femmes, en grande majorité Erythréens, mais aussi Somaliens et Soudanais. Le plus jeune migrant en provenance des centres de détention libyens est un bébé de 2 mois et le plus âgé un homme de 39 ans.

      Ils ont été accueillis en toute discrétion, très loin des journalistes qui n’ont pas eu accès à l’aéroport international de Kigali. « Ce ne sont pas des gens qui reviennent d’une compétition de football avec une coupe et qui rentrent joyeux. Non, ce sont des gens qui rentrent traumatisés et qui ont besoin d’une certaine dignité, de respect. Ils étaient dans une situation très chaotique », justifie Olivier Kayumba, secrétaire permanent du ministère en charge de la gestion des Urgences.

      Des bus les ont ensuite acheminés vers le site de transit de Gashora, à quelque 60 km au sud-est de Kigali. Une structure qui peut accueillir pour le moment un millier de personnes, mais dont la capacité peut être portée rapidement à 8 000, selon le responsable rwandais.

      Des ONG ont accusé le Rwanda d’avoir monté toute cette opération pour redorer l’image d’un régime qui viole les droits de l’homme. Olivier Kayumba balaie cette accusation. « Nous agissons pour des raisons humanitaires et par panafricanisme », explique-t-il. Selon les termes de l’accord, 500 migrants coincés dans les camps en Libye doivent être accueillis provisoirement au Rwanda, avant de trouver des pays d’accueil.


      http://www.rfi.fr/afrique/20190927-rwanda-accueille-premiers-migrants-evacues-libye

  • #CIVIPOL au #Soudan

    L’Union européenne a suspendu ses programmes liés au #contrôle_migratoire au Soudan, en raison de la situation politique. CIVIPOL était en charge des programmes coordonnés par la #France. Présentation.

    CIVIPOL est défini comme "l’opérateur de #coopération_technique_internationale du ministère de l’Intérieur". C’est une #société_anonyme dont 40% du capital son détenus par l’État et 60% par des acteurs privés comme #Airbus, #Safran, #Thalès et d’autres, ainsi que #Défense_Conseil_International, qui est la société privée équivalente de CIVIPOL pour le ministère de la défense.

    CIVIPOL a une action d’#expertise, de #conseil, de #formation. Elle est "financée quasi exclusivement par les bailleurs internationaux". Elle a aussi comme savoir-faire le "soutien à la filière des #industries_de_sécurité" : "Civipol soutient les acteurs de la filière des industries de sécurité. À travers le réseau international des salons #Milipol, Civipol permet aux États partenaires d’identifier, avec les industriels, les #solutions_technologiques les plus adaptées à leurs impératifs de protection. En proposant des offres intégrées issues de la filière européenne des industries de sécurité, Civipol contribue à la mise en place de #systèmes_opérationnels_interopérables au sein des États partenaires et, le cas échéant, avec les systèmes homologues européens."

    #CIVIPOL_Conseil, la société anonyme, est en effet associée dans #CIVIPOL_Groupe au Groupement d’Intérêt Économique Milipol, qui organise des #salons "de la sûreté et de la sécurité intérieure des États" à Paris, au Qatar et dans la zone Asie - Pacifique (on peut découvrir ici le message adressé par le ministre français de l’intérieur à l’ouverture du dernier salon).

    CIVIPOL a aussi racheté en 2016 la société #Transtec, qui a des activités de soutien, accompagnement, conseil, expertise, dans le domaine de la #gouvernance. Elle a par exemple mené deux programmes au Soudan, l’un « #Soutien_à_l'Analyse_Economique_et_à_la Planification_Sectorielle_à_l’Appui_de_la_République_du_Soudan » « afin de permettre à la délégation de l’UE au Soudan de mieux comprendre la situation économique du pays et de contribuer à une approche plus cohérente de la programmation de l’UE dans chaque secteur d’intervention » ; l’autre « #Programme_de_renforcement_des_capacités_des_organisations_de_la_société_civile_soudanaise », dont « l’objectif consistait à renforcer les capacités des bénéficiaires des #OSC locales dans le cadre du programme de l’#Instrument_Européen_pour_la_Démocratie_et_les_Droits_de_l'Homme (#IEDDH) afin d’améliorer leur gestion administrative et financière des projets financés par l’UE » (il ne s’agit donc pas de développer la démocratie, mais de permettre aux OSC – Organisations de la Société Civile – soudanaises de s’inscrire dans les programmes de financement de l’Union européenne.

    CIVIPOL intervient dans quatre programmes au Soudan, financés par l’Union européenne. L’un concernant le #terrorisme, « Lutte contre le blanchiment d’argent et le financement du terrorisme dans la grande Corne de l’Afrique (https://static.mediapart.fr/files/2019/07/26/lutte-contre-le-blanchiment-dargent-et-le-financement-du-terrorisme) », l’autre concernant l’application de la loi, « #Regional_law_enforcement_in_the_Greater_Horn_of_Africa_and_Yemen (https://static.mediapart.fr/files/2019/07/26/regional-law-enforcement-in-the-greater-horn-of-africa-and-yemen-rl) ». Notons que ces deux programmes concernent aussi le #Yémen, pays en proie à une guerre civile, et une intervention militaire extérieure par une coalition menée par l’Arabie saoudite, pays allié de la France et en partie armée par elle, coalition à laquelle participe plusieurs milliers de membres des #Forces_d’Action_Rapide soudanaises, ancienne milice de Janjawid, aussi reconvertie en garde-frontière dans le cadre de la politique de contrôle migratoire mise en place par le Soudan à la demande de l’Union européenne, Forces d’Action Rapide dont le chef est l’homme fort actuel de la junte militaire qui a succédé au dictateur Omar El-Béchir. CIVIPOL agit dans cette complexité.

    Les deux autres programmes concerne la politique de #contrôle_migratoire. L’un, sous l’intitulé de « #Meilleure_Gestion_des_Migrations (https://static.mediapart.fr/files/2019/07/26/better-migration-management-bmm.pdf) », implique différents intervenants pour le compte de plusieurs États membres de l’Union européenne et des agences de l’ONU, sous coordination allemande, l’#Allemagne cofinançant ce programme. « Dans cette contribution, CIVIPOL fournit des formations pour les unités spécialisés en charge de la lutte contre le trafic d’êtres humains, forme les agents de police dans les #zones_frontalières et aide les autorités chargées de la formation de la #police ». Compte-tenu du rôle des Forces d’Action Rapide, il semble difficile que CIVIPOL ne les ait pas croisées. Ce programme a été suspendu en mars 2019, l’Union européenne ayant donné une explication quelque peu sybilline : « because they require the involvement of government counterparts to be carried out » (« parce que leur mise en œuvre exige l’implication d’interlocuteurs gouvernementaux d’un niveau équivalent »).

    L’autre, mis en œuvre par CIVIPOL, est le #ROCK (#Centre_opérationnel_régional_d'appui_au_processus_de_Khartoum et à l’Initiative de la Corne de l’Afrique de l’Union africaine (https://static.mediapart.fr/files/2019/07/26/regional-operational-center-in-khartoum-in-support-of-the-khartoum-) – en anglais #Regional_Operational_Centre_in_Khartoum etc.) La stratégie du projet ROCK est de faciliter l’#échange_d'informations entre les services de police compétents. Ainsi, le projet consiste à mettre en place une plate-forme à Khartoum, le centre régional "ROCK", afin de rassembler les #officiers_de_liaison des pays bénéficiaires en un seul endroit pour échanger efficacement des #informations_policières. » Il a été suspendu en juin « until the political/security situation is cleared » (« jusqu’à ce que la situation politique/sécurtiaire soit clarifiée ») selon l’Union européenne.

    D’après la présentation qu’on peut télécharger sur le site de CIVIPOL, le premier « programme intervient en réponse aux besoins identifiés par les pays africains du #processus_Khartoum », tandis que le second a été « lancé dans le cadre du processus de Khartoum à la demande des pays de la #Corne_de_l'Afrique ». Il ne faut donc surtout pas penser qu’il puisse s’agir d’une forme d’externalisation des politiques migratoires européennes.

    Ces deux programmes concernent neuf pays africains. L’un d’eux est l’#Érythrée. Il n’est pas interdit de penser que les liens tissés ont pu faciliter la coopération entre autorités françaises et érythréennes qui a permis l’expulsion d’un demandeur d’asile érythréen de France en Érythrée le 6 juin dernier.

    https://blogs.mediapart.fr/philippe-wannesson/blog/260719/civipol-au-soudan
    #complexe_militaro-industriel #externalisation #contrôles_frontaliers #migrations #asile #réfugiés #suspension #Erythrée

  • Expulser au #Soudan, une vocation française

    Alors que l’Union européenne a suspendu ses programmes de contrôle migratoire au Soudan, la France continue de vouloir y expulser. Aujourd’hui à la manœuvre, la préfecture d’Indre-et-Loire. Appel à soutien.

    C’est fin juillet que la Deutsche Welle obtient confirmation que l’Union européenne a suspendu ses programmes de #contrôle_migratoire au Soudan, le soutien aux #gardes-frontières et à la police, coordonné par l’#Allemagne, dès mars, et le centre de renseignement (#ROCK : #Regional_Operation_Center in Khartoum) mené par la France, en juin, après la répression sanglante du 3 juin et des jours suivants.

    https://www.dw.com/en/eu-suspends-migration-control-projects-in-sudan-amid-repression-fears/a-49701408?maca=en-Twitter-sharing

    Si l’Union européenne a suspendu sa coopération avec le Soudan en matière migratoire, ce n’est pas le cas de la France, qui continue sa politique d’expulsion vers ce pays et donc la coopération avec les autorités soudanaises que cela suppose. Un ressortissant soudanais enfermé au centre de rétention de Rennes devait être expulsé le 22 juillet sur décision de la préfecture d’Indre-et-Loire. Il a refusé d’embarquer. Ramené au centre de rétention, il peut être expulsé à tout moment.

    https://larotative.info/la-prefete-d-indre-et-loire-tente-3377.html

    Voir aussi sur le fil twitter de la Cimade :

    https://twitter.com/lacimade

    Un appel à soutien a été lancé :

    « POUR SOUTENIR R. ENVOYEZ UN MAIL A LA PRÉFETE

    Recopiez ce courriel et adressez-le à :

    prefecture@indre-et-loire.gouv.fr

    Madame la Préfète d’Indre et Loire,

    Je vous écris pour vous demander d’interrompre les procédures d’éloignement d’un homme vers le Soudan actuellement au centre de rétention de Rennes. Il a déjà refusé d’embarquer dans l’avion.

    Vous vous apprêtez à renvoyer R. vers le Soudan où sa vie est gravement menacée.

    Le Soudan ne peut aujourd’hui être regardé comme un pays sûr vu l’instabilité politique actuelle et la violente répression qui a fait de nombreux morts ces derniers mois.

    En vertu du principe de non-refoulement, garanti par l’article 33 de la Convention de 1951 relative au statut des réfugiés, par l’article 3 de la Convention contre la torture et par l’article 19.2 de la Charte des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne, la France ne peut procéder au renvoi d’une personne vers un pays où sa vie sera en danger.

    Compte tenu de ces risques importants, je vous demande donc d’annuler l’ordre de quitter le territoire français de R. et de le libérer.

    Je vous prie d’agréer, Madame la Préfète, l’expression de mes salutations distinguées.

    Vous pouvez envoyer cette communication par mail à cette adresse :

    prefecture@indre-et-loire.gouv.fr »

    https://blogs.mediapart.fr/philippe-wannesson/blog/240719/expulser-au-soudan-une-vocation-francaise
    #renvois #expulsions #France #réfugiés_soudanais #asile #migrations #réfugiés #suspension #UE #EU #Europe #externalisation

  • Partners in crime ? The impacts of Europe’s outsourced migration controls on peace, stability and rights

    Migration into Europe has fallen since 2015, when more than one million people fleeing conflict and hardship attempted sea crossings. But deaths and disappearances in the central Mediterranean have shot up, exposing the ‘fight against migration’ as flawed and dangerous.

    While leaders in Europe and elsewhere claim that clamping down on migration saves lives by deterring people from undertaking dangerous journeys, the reality is that European governments’ outsourced migration policies are feeding into conflict and abuse – and reinforcing the drivers of migration.

    Drawing on extensive research, this report analyses the European Union’s and European governments’ outsourcing of migration controls in ‘partner’ countries such as Turkey, Libya and Niger. It explores who benefits from this system, exposes its risks and explains who bears the costs. It also provides recommendations for European leaders on how to move toward a humane model for migration that refocuses on EU commitments to human rights, conflict prevention and sustainable development.


    https://www.saferworld.org.uk/resources/publications/1217-partners-in-crime-the-impacts-of-europeas-outsourced-migration-c
    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #externalisation #frontières #paix #stabilité #droits #EU #UE #Europe #rapport #Turquie #Libye #Niger

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749

  • Aerei da pattugliamento e #radar. Ecco il piano segreto anti-sbarchi

    Si delinea la strategia del governo per dare supporto alle Guardie costiere di Libia e Tunisia.
    La Marina militare da sola non riesce a tenere sotto controllo il Mediterraneo e perciò si ricorrerà anche all’Aeronautica. Oltre le navi che già presidiano il mare a sud della Sicilia, saranno schierati aerei-radar, droni e aerei da pattugliamento. L’obiettivo sono i soliti barconi e barchini che partono da Libia e Tunisia. Questo il piano segreto di Matteo Salvini, condiviso dall’intero governo, per frenare le partenze dei clandestini e aiutare in maniera sostanziale le due Guardie costiere, quella libica e quella tunisina, le sole che possono operare nelle rispettive acque territoriali, ma non hanno una tecnologia all’altezza, occorre un salto di qualità. E a questo ci penseranno gli italiani con una rete di osservazione dal mare e dal cielo.

    https://www.lastampa.it/topnews/primo-piano/2019/07/09/news/aerei-da-pattugliamento-e-radar-nbsp-ecco-il-piano-segreto-anti-sbarchi-1.3
    #externalisation #asile #migrations #frontières #réfugiés #avions #miltiarisation_des_frontières #Méditerranée #Italie #Libye #gardes-côtes_libyens #gardes-côtes_tunisiens #Tunisie

    –----

    Ajouté à ces métalistes :
    1. Externalisation des contrôles frontaliers en #Libye :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/765324
    2. L’externalisation en #Tunisie (accords avec l’Italie notamment) :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765330

    • Commentaire de Sara Prestianni, reçu par email via la mailing-list Migreurop :

      A completer la proposition des 10 motovedette à offrir à la Libye, circulent aujourd’hui autre propositions qui ont été présenté par la presse comme “le secret contre les débarquements” : remplir le ciel de la Méditerranée avec des avion-radar, drones et avions de patrouilles pour aider les Gardes Cotes Libyens Tunisiens pour que ils puissent rejoindre les migrants en mer avant des ong afin que les migrants soient ramenés en Tunisie et Libye et pas en Italie. L’objectif déclaré est que tout bateau soit bloqué avant que il ne rentre en eaux internationales et encore moins nationales italiens.

      Puisque la Marine ne suffirait pas à “garder sous contrôle la mer Méditerranée” le Gouvernement fait appelle donc appelle aussi à l’aéronautique militaire. Seront mis à disposition les avions Atr42 pour le patrouilles maritimes, les drones Predator, les avions radar G550 CAEW. L’ensemble des moyens aériens devront communiquer aux MRCC de compétence (qui dans la tete du Gouvernement sont celui libyen et tunisien”) pour que ils puissent intervenir.
      Selon le Ministre de l’Interieur Italien, Tunisie et Libye ne sont pas suffisamment équipées, elles n’ont pas de technologie à l’hauteur. Technologie qui sera donc fourni par l’Italie.

      Cela explique la grande satisfaction exprimée par Salvini à l’annonce de l’opération de interception mené par les Gardes Cotes Tunisiennes au large de Kerkennah. Mais dans son discours ne manque pas de les accuser “En Tunisie il y a des institutions libres, je ne comprends pas pourquoi ils ne contrôlent par leur frontières” déclare Salvini, ou encore “Puisque en Tunisie il y a un parlement et un Gouvernement qui reçoivent des milliers de euro par l’Europe, il faut que chacun faisse sa part”

      La Ministre de la Defense, Trenta, a donné son feu vert à ce qui a été définis “augmentation de la capacité de surveillance, repérage et intelligence”

      https://www.lastampa.it/topnews/primo-piano/2019/07/09/news/aerei-da-pattugliamento-e-radar-nbsp-ecco-il-piano-segreto-anti-sbarchi-1.3

      Face à un nombre très faible de arrivé (3000 en 6 mois), le constat du contexte libyen qui ne peut être considéré un port sure, la Tunisie non plus, la seule préoccupation du Gouvernement italien semble être celle de “sécher dans le temps” les ong, qui respectent le droit maritime ramèneraient les migrants dans un port sure (donc européen).

      Semblent bien loin le temps que l’Italie utilisait des forces militaires pour une mission de sauvetage, comme a été le cas pour Mare Nostrum en 2014 ….

  • EU-Egypt migration cooperation : where are human rights ?

    The new EuroMed Rights study “EU-Egypt migration cooperation: at the expense of human rights,” published today, maps EU and Member State cooperation with Egypt in migration and border management. The study highlights the impact of this cooperation on the rights of refugees and migrants in Egypt and offers concrete recommendations for action. This publication follows the second meeting of the Migration Dialogue between the European Union and Egypt, which took place in Cairo on 11 July.

    While Egypt does not constitute a major country of departure for migrant movement towards Europe, the report finds that attention towards EU-Egypt cooperation on migration is predominately driven by Egypt’s attempts to strengthen its image as a regional leader, gain European support for its counter-terrorism policy and obtain funds for its domestic projects. If EU-led cooperation programmes in Egypt have stalled, certain Member States have stepped up bilateral cooperation on migration, going so far as to increase deportations of Egyptians back to Egypt where they could face severe human rights violations.

    “EU support to Egypt on migration has served to reinforce Egypt’s policing capacities and harsh border management policies, legitimising and strengthening the violence of the authoritarian Egyptian regime,” said Wadih Al-Asmar, President of EuroMed Rights. “We urge the EU to consult independent NGOs, inside and outside Egypt, on migration cooperation, assess the human rights impact of EU-Egypt agreements and funding, report to the European Parliament on cooperation between Frontex and the Egyptian authorities, and reject any proposals for a readmission agreement with Egypt.”

    https://euromedrights.org/publication/eu-egypt-migration-cooperation-where-are-human-rights

    #droits_humains #Egypte #UE #EU #Europe #migrations #asile #réfugiés #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #Italie #Allemagne #externalisation #coopération

    –--------
    Reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop avec ce commentaire :

    Le dernier rapport d’EuroMed Droits (disponible en anglais, recommandations disponibles en arabe aussi) porte sur la coopération entre l’UE et l’Egypte relativement à la question dite de la « gestion des flux migratoires ». Peu documentée, cette coopération s’est pourtant intensifiée depuis la fin 2016 au niveau de la Commission européenne, mais aussi à l’appui notamment d’une coopération bilatérale fournie entre l’Egypte et l’Italie, d’une part, et l’Allemagne d’autre part. Le faible contrôle démocratique et le manque de transparence sur la réalité de cette coopération ajoute aux inquiétudes fortes d’une coopération qui ne fait ni guère cas de l’impact de cette coopération sur les droits humains (des personnes en migration et des Egyptien.nes).

    Le rapport met aussi en lumière des éléments d’analyse qui contredisent la thèse d’une « externalisation des politiques européennes » au sens classique du terme : les auteurs avancent que l’UE ne bénéficie que très peu d’une coopération qui, à l’inverse, profite véritablement à l’Egypte qui voit dans la coopération migratoire un canal de financement & de légitimité diplomatique fort utile, dans un contexte plus général de politique anti-terroriste qui s’accommode assez bien d’un amalgame politiquement utile entre migration irrégulière, criminalité transfrontalière et terrorisme.

    Au vu des enjeux en matière de droits humains particulièrement prégnant en Egypte, des recommandations sont émises aux institutions européennes, ainsi qu’aux autorités italiennes et égyptiennes pour tirer la sonnette d’alarme sur une coopération dangereuse qui se poursuit loin des regards.

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation, et plus précisément sur l’externalisation en Egypte :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message767801

  • USA : Dublin façon frontière Mexique/USA

    Faute d’accord avec le #Guatemala (pour l’instant bloqué du fait du recours déposé par plusieurs membres de l’opposition devant la Cour constitutionnelle) et le #Mexique les désignant comme des « #pays_sûr », les USA ont adopté une nouvelle réglementation en matière d’#asile ( « #Interim_Final_Rule » - #IFR), spécifiquement pour la #frontière avec le Mexique, qui n’est pas sans faire penser au règlement de Dublin : les personnes qui n’auront pas sollicité l’asile dans un des pays traversés en cours de route avant d’arriver aux USA verront leur demande rejetée.
    Cette règle entre en vigueur aujourd’hui et permet donc le #refoulement de toute personne « who enters or attempts to enter the United States across the southern border, but who did not apply for protection from persecution or torture where it was available in at least one third country outside the alien’s country of citizenship, nationality, or last lawful habitual residence through which he or she transited en route to the United States. »
    Lien vers le règlement : https://www.dhs.gov/news/2019/07/15/dhs-and-doj-issue-third-country-asylum-rule
    Plusieurs associations dont ACLU (association US) vont déposer un recours visant à le faire invalider.
    Les USA recueillent et échangent déjà des données avec les pays d’Amérique centrale et latine qu’ils utilisent pour débouter les demandeurs d’asile, par exemple avec le Salvador : https://psmag.com/social-justice/homeland-security-uses-foreign-databases-to-monitor-gang-activity

    Reçu via email le 16.07.2019 de @pascaline

    #USA #Etats-Unis #Dublin #Dublin_façon_USA #loi #Dublin_aux_USA #législation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #El_Salvador

    • Trump Administration Implementing ’3rd Country’ Rule On Migrants Seeking Asylum

      The Trump administration is moving forward with a tough new asylum rule in its campaign to slow the flow of Central American migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. Asylum-seeking immigrants who pass through a third country en route to the U.S. must first apply for refugee status in that country rather than at the U.S. border.

      The restriction will likely face court challenges, opening a new front in the battle over U.S. immigration policies.

      The interim final rule will take effect immediately after it is published in the Federal Register on Tuesday, according to the departments of Justice and Homeland Security.

      The new policy applies specifically to the U.S.-Mexico border, saying that “an alien who enters or attempts to enter the United States across the southern border after failing to apply for protection in a third country outside the alien’s country of citizenship, nationality, or last lawful habitual residence through which the alien transited en route to the United States is ineligible for asylum.”

      “Until Congress can act, this interim rule will help reduce a major ’pull’ factor driving irregular migration to the United States,” Homeland Security acting Secretary Kevin K. McAleenan said in a statement about the new rule.

      The American Civil Liberties Union said it planned to file a lawsuit to try to stop the rule from taking effect.

      “This new rule is patently unlawful and we will sue swiftly,” Lee Gelernt, deputy director of the ACLU’s national Immigrants’ Rights Project, said in a statement.

      Gelernt accused the Trump administration of “trying to unilaterally reverse our country’s legal and moral commitment to protect those fleeing danger.”

      The strict policy shift would likely bring new pressures and official burdens on Mexico and Guatemala, countries through which migrants and refugees often pass on their way to the U.S.

      On Sunday, Guatemala’s government pulled out of a meeting between President Jimmy Morales and Trump that had been scheduled for Monday, citing ongoing legal questions over whether the country could be deemed a “safe third country” for migrants who want to reach the U.S.

      Hours after the U.S. announced the rule on Monday, Mexican Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard said it was a unilateral move that will not affect Mexican citizens.

      “Mexico does not agree with measures that limit asylum and refugee status for those who fear for their lives or safety, and who fear persecution in their country of origin,” Ebrard said.

      Ebrard said Mexico will maintain its current policies, reiterating the country’s “respect for the human rights of all people, as well as for its international commitments in matters of asylum and political refuge.”

      According to a DHS news release, the U.S. rule would set “a new bar to eligibility” for anyone seeking asylum. It also allows exceptions in three limited cases:

      “1) an alien who demonstrates that he or she applied for protection from persecution or torture in at least one of the countries through which the alien transited en route to the United States, and the alien received a final judgment denying the alien protection in such country;

      ”(2) an alien who demonstrates that he or she satisfies the definition of ’victim of a severe form of trafficking in persons’ provided in 8 C.F.R. § 214.11; or,

      “(3) an alien who has transited en route to the United States through only a country or countries that were not parties to the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees, the 1967 Protocol, or the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.”

      The DHS release describes asylum as “a discretionary benefit offered by the United States Government to those fleeing persecution on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion.”

      The departments of Justice and Homeland Security are publishing the 58-page asylum rule as the Trump administration faces criticism over conditions at migrant detention centers at the southern border, as well as its “remain in Mexico” policy that requires asylum-seekers who are waiting for a U.S. court date to do so in Mexico rather than in the U.S.

      In a statement about the new rule, U.S. Attorney General William Barr said that current U.S. asylum rules have been abused, and that the large number of people trying to enter the country has put a strain on the system.

      Barr said the number of cases referred to the Department of Justice for proceedings before an immigration judge “has risen exponentially, more than tripling between 2013 and 2018.” The attorney general added, “Only a small minority of these individuals, however, are ultimately granted asylum.”

      https://www.npr.org/2019/07/15/741769333/u-s-sets-new-asylum-rule-telling-potential-refugees-to-apply-elsewhere

    • Le journal The New Yorker : Trump est prêt à signer un accord majeur pour envoyer à l’avenir les demandeurs d’asile au Guatemala

      L’article fait état d’un projet de #plate-forme_externalisée pour examiner les demandes de personnes appréhendées aux frontières US, qui rappelle à la fois une proposition britannique (jamais concrétisée) de 2003 de créer des processing centers extra-européens et la #Pacific_solution australienne, qui consiste à déporter les demandeurs d’asile « illégaux » de toute nationalité dans des pays voisins. Et l’article évoque la « plus grande et la plus troublante des questions : comment le Guatemala pourrait-il faire face à un afflux si énorme de demandeurs ? » Peut-être en demandant conseil aux autorités libyennes et à leurs amis européens ?

      –-> Message reçu d’Alain Morice via la mailling-list Migreurop.

      Trump Is Poised to Sign a Radical Agreement to Send Future Asylum Seekers to Guatemala

      Early next week, according to a D.H.S. official, the Trump Administration is expected to announce a major immigration deal, known as a safe-third-country agreement, with Guatemala. For weeks, there have been reports that negotiations were under way between the two countries, but, until now, none of the details were official. According to a draft of the agreement obtained by The New Yorker, asylum seekers from any country who either show up at U.S. ports of entry or are apprehended while crossing between ports of entry could be sent to seek asylum in Guatemala instead. During the past year, tens of thousands of migrants, the vast majority of them from Central America, have arrived at the U.S. border seeking asylum each month. By law, the U.S. must give them a chance to bring their claims before authorities, even though there’s currently a backlog in the immigration courts of roughly a million cases. The Trump Administration has tried a number of measures to prevent asylum seekers from entering the country—from “metering” at ports of entry to forcing people to wait in Mexico—but, in every case, international obligations held that the U.S. would eventually have to hear their asylum claims. Under this new arrangement, most of these migrants will no longer have a chance to make an asylum claim in the U.S. at all. “We’re talking about something much bigger than what the term ‘safe third country’ implies,” someone with knowledge of the deal told me. “We’re talking about a kind of transfer agreement where the U.S. can send any asylum seekers, not just Central Americans, to Guatemala.”

      From the start of the Trump Presidency, Administration officials have been fixated on a safe-third-country policy with Mexico—a similar accord already exists with Canada—since it would allow the U.S. government to shift the burden of handling asylum claims farther south. The principle was that migrants wouldn’t have to apply for asylum in the U.S. because they could do so elsewhere along the way. But immigrants-rights advocates and policy experts pointed out that Mexico’s legal system could not credibly take on that responsibility. “If you’re going to pursue a safe-third-country agreement, you have to be able to say ‘safe’ with a straight face,” Doris Meissner, a former commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, told me. Until very recently, the prospect of such an agreement—not just with Mexico but with any other country in Central America—seemed far-fetched. Yet last month, under the threat of steep tariffs on Mexican goods, Trump strong-armed the Mexican government into considering it. Even so, according to a former Mexican official, the government of Andrés Manuel López Obrador is stalling. “They are trying to fight this,” the former official said. What’s so striking about the agreement with Guatemala, however, is that it goes even further than the terms the U.S. sought in its dealings with Mexico. “This is a whole new level,” the person with knowledge of the agreement told me. “In my read, it looks like even those who have never set foot in Guatemala can potentially be sent there.”

      At this point, there are still more questions than answers about what the agreement with Guatemala will mean in practice. A lot will still have to happen before it goes into force, and the terms aren’t final. The draft of the agreement doesn’t provide much clarity on how it will be implemented—another person with knowledge of the agreement said, “This reads like it was drafted by someone’s intern”—but it does offer an exemption for Guatemalan migrants, which might be why the government of Jimmy Morales, a U.S. ally, seems willing to sign on. Guatemala is currently in the midst of Presidential elections; next month, the country will hold a runoff between two candidates, and the current front-runner has been opposed to this type of deal. The Morales government, however, still has six months left in office. A U.N.-backed anti-corruption body called the CICIG, which for years was funded by the U.S. and admired throughout the region, is being dismantled by Morales, whose own family has fallen under investigation for graft and financial improprieties. Signing an immigration deal “would get the Guatemalan government in the U.S.’s good graces,” Stephen McFarland, a former U.S. Ambassador to Guatemala, told me. “The question is, what would they intend to use that status for?” Earlier this week, after Morales announced that he would be meeting with Trump in Washington on Monday, three former foreign ministers of Guatemala petitioned the country’s Constitutional Court to block him from signing the agreement. Doing so, they said, “would allow the current president of the republic to leave the future of our country mortgaged, without any responsibility.”

      The biggest, and most unsettling, question raised by the agreement is how Guatemala could possibly cope with such enormous demands. More people are leaving Guatemala now than any other country in the northern triangle of Central America. Rampant poverty, entrenched political corruption, urban crime, and the effects of climate change have made large swaths of the country virtually uninhabitable. “This is already a country in which the political and economic system can’t provide jobs for all its people,” McFarland said. “There are all these people, their own citizens, that the government and the political and economic system are not taking care of. To get thousands of citizens from other countries to come in there, and to take care of them for an indefinite period of time, would be very difficult.” Although the U.S. would provide additional aid to help the Guatemalan government address the influx of asylum seekers, it isn’t clear whether the country has the administrative capacity to take on the job. According to the person familiar with the safe-third-country agreement, “U.N.H.C.R. [the U.N.’s refugee agency] has not been involved” in the current negotiations. And, for Central Americans transferred to Guatemala under the terms of the deal, there’s an added security risk: many of the gangs Salvadorans and Hondurans are fleeing also operate in Guatemala.

      In recent months, the squalid conditions at borderland detention centers have provoked a broad political outcry in the U.S. At the same time, a worsening asylum crisis has been playing out south of the U.S. border, beyond the immediate notice of concerned Americans. There, the Trump Administration is quietly delivering on its promise to redraw American asylum practice. Since January, under a policy called the Migration Protection Protocols (M.P.P.), the U.S. government has sent more than fifteen thousand asylum seekers to Mexico, where they now must wait indefinitely as their cases inch through the backlogged American immigration courts. Cities in northern Mexico, such as Tijuana and Juarez, are filling up with desperate migrants who are exposed to violent crime, extortion, and kidnappings, all of which are on the rise.This week, as part of the M.P.P., the U.S. began sending migrants to Tamaulipas, one of Mexico’s most violent states and a stronghold for drug cartels that, for years, have brutalized migrants for money and for sport.

      Safe-third-country agreements are notoriously difficult to enforce. The logistics are complex, and the outcomes tend not to change the harried calculations of asylum seekers as they flee their homes. These agreements, according to a recent study by the Migration Policy Institute, are “unlikely to hold the key to solving the crisis unfolding at the U.S. southern border.” The Trump Administration has already cut aid to Central America, and the U.S. asylum system remains in dire need of improvement. But there’s also little question that the agreement with Guatemala will reduce the number of people who reach, and remain in, the U.S. If the President has made the asylum crisis worse, he’ll also be able to say he’s improving it—just as he can claim credit for the decline in the number of apprehensions at the U.S. border last month. That was the result of increased enforcement efforts by the Mexican government acting under U.S. pressure.

      There’s also no reason to expect that the Trump Administration will abandon its efforts to force the Mexicans into a safe-third-country agreement as well. “The Mexican government thought that the possibility of a safe-third-country agreement with Guatemala had fallen apart because of the elections there,” the former Mexican official told me. “The recent news caught top Mexican officials by surprise.” In the next month, the two countries will continue immigration talks, and, again, Mexico will face mounting pressure to accede to American demands. “The U.S. has used the agreement with Guatemala to convince the Mexicans to sign their own safe-third-country agreement,” the former official said. “Its argument is that the number of migrants Mexico will receive will be lower now.”

      https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/trump-poised-to-sign-a-radical-agreement-to-send-future-asylum-seekers-to
      #externalisation

    • After Tariff Threat, Trump Says Guatemala Has Agreed to New Asylum Rules

      President Trump on Friday again sought to block migrants from Central America from seeking asylum, announcing an agreement with Guatemala to require people who travel through that country to seek refuge from persecution there instead of in the United States.

      American officials said the deal could go into effect within weeks, though critics vowed to challenge it in court, saying that Guatemala is itself one of the most dangerous countries in the world — hardly a refuge for those fleeing gangs and government violence.

      Mr. Trump had been pushing for a way to slow the flow of migrants streaming across the Mexican border and into the United States in recent months. This week, the president had threatened to impose tariffs on Guatemala, to tax money that Guatemalan migrants in the United States send back to family members, or to ban all travel from the country if the agreement were not signed.

      Joined in the Oval Office on Friday by Interior Minister Enrique Degenhart of Guatemala, Mr. Trump said the agreement would end what he has described as a crisis at the border, which has been overwhelmed by hundreds of thousands of families fleeing violence and persecution in El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala.
      Sign up for The Interpreter

      Subscribe for original insights, commentary and discussions on the major news stories of the week, from columnists Max Fisher and Amanda Taub.

      “These are bad people,” Mr. Trump told reporters after a previously unannounced signing ceremony. He said the agreement would “end widespread abuse of the system and the crippling crisis on our border.”

      Officials did not release the English text of the agreement or provide many details about how it would be put into practice along the United States border with Mexico. Mr. Trump announced the deal in a Friday afternoon Twitter post that took Guatemalan politicians and leaders at immigration advocacy groups by surprise.

      Kevin K. McAleenan, the acting secretary of homeland security, described the document signed by the two countries as a “safe third” agreement that would make migrants ineligible for protection in the United States if they had traveled through Guatemala and did not first apply for asylum there.

      Instead of being returned home, however, the migrants would be sent back to Guatemala, which under the agreement would be designated as a safe place for them to live.

      “They would be removable, back to Guatemala, if they want to seek an asylum claim,” said Mr. McAleenan, who likened the agreement to similar arrangements in Europe.
      Editors’ Picks
      Buying a Weekend House With Friends: Is It Really a Good Idea?
      Bob Dylan and the Myth of Boomer Idealism
      True Life: I Got Conned by Anna Delvey

      The move was the latest attempt by Mr. Trump to severely limit the ability of refugees to win protection in the United States. A new regulation that would have also banned most asylum seekers was blocked by a judge in San Francisco earlier this week.

      But the Trump administration is determined to do everything it can to stop the flow of migrants at the border, which has infuriated the president. Mr. Trump has frequently told his advisers that he sees the border situation as evidence of a failure to make good on his campaign promise to seal the border from dangerous immigrants.

      More than 144,200 migrants were taken into custody at the southwest border in May, the highest monthly total in 13 years. Arrests at the border declined by 28 percent in June after efforts in Mexico and the United States to stop migrants from Central America.

      Late Friday, the Guatemalan government released the Spanish text of the deal, which is called a “cooperative agreement regarding the examination of protection claims.” In an earlier statement announcing the agreement, the government had referred to an implementation plan for Salvadorans and Hondurans. It does not apply to Guatemalans who request asylum in the United States.

      By avoiding any mention of a “safe third country” agreement, President Jimmy Morales of Guatemala appeared to be trying to sidestep a recent court ruling blocking him from signing a deal with the United States without the approval of his country’s congress.

      Mr. Morales will leave office in January. One of the candidates running to replace him, the conservative Alejandro Giammattei, said that it was “irresponsible” for Mr. Morales to have agreed to an accord without revealing its contents first.

      “It is up to the next government to attend to this negotiation,” Mr. Giammattei wrote on Twitter. His opponent, Sandra Torres, had opposed any safe-third-country agreement when it first appeared that Mr. Morales was preparing to sign one.

      Legal groups in the United States said the immediate effect of the agreement will not be clear until the administration releases more details. But based on the descriptions of the deal, they vowed to ask a judge to block it from going into effect.

      “Guatemala can neither offer a safe nor fair and full process, and nobody could plausibly argue otherwise,” said Lee Gelernt, an American Civil Liberties Union lawyer who argued against other recent efforts to limit asylum. “There’s no way they have the capacity to provide a full and fair procedure, much less a safe one.”

      American asylum laws require that virtually all migrants who arrive at the border must be allowed to seek refuge in the United States, but the law allows the government to quickly deport migrants to a country that has signed a “safe third” agreement.

      But critics said that the law clearly requires the “safe third” country to be a truly safe place where migrants will not be in danger. And it requires that the country have the ability to provide a “full and fair” system of protections that can accommodate asylum seekers who are sent there. Critics insisted that Guatemala meets neither requirement.

      They also noted that the State Department’s own country condition reports on Guatemala warn about rampant gang activity and say that murder is common in the country, which has a police force that is often ineffective at best.

      Asked whether Guatemala is a safe country for refugees, Mr. McAleenan said it was unfair to tar an entire country, noting that there are also places in the United States that are not safe.

      In 2018, the most recent year for which data is available, 116,808 migrants apprehended at the southwest border were from Guatemala, while 77,128 were from Honduras and 31,636 were from El Salvador.

      “It’s legally ludicrous and totally dangerous,” said Eleanor Acer, the senior director for refugee protection at Human Rights First. “The United States is trying to send people back to a country where their lives would be at risk. It sets a terrible example for the rest of the world.”

      Administration officials traveled to Guatemala in recent months, pushing officials there to sign the agreement, according to an administration official. But negotiations broke down in the past two weeks after Guatemala’s Constitutional Court ruled that Mr. Morales needed approval from lawmakers to make the deal with the United States.

      The ruling led Mr. Morales to cancel a planned trip in mid-July to sign the agreement, leaving Mr. Trump fuming.

      “Now we are looking at the BAN, Tariffs, Remittance Fees, or all of the above,” Mr. Trump wrote on Twitter on July 23.

      Friday’s action suggests that the president’s threats, which provoked concern among Guatemala’s business community, were effective.

      https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/26/world/americas/trump-guatemala-asylum.html

    • Este es el acuerdo migratorio firmado entre Guatemala y Estados Unidos

      Prensa Libre obtuvo en primicia el acuerdo que Guatemala firmó con Estados Unidos para detener la migración desde el Triángulo Norte de Centroamérica.

      Estados Unidos y Guatemala firmaron este 26 de julio un “acuerdo de asilo”, después de que esta semana el presidente Donald Trump amenazara a Guatemala con imponer aranceles para presionar por la negociación del convenio.

      Según Trump, el acuerdo “va a dar seguridad a los demandantes de asilo legítimos y a va detener los fraudes y abusos en el sistema de asilo”.

      El acuerdo fue firmado en el Despacho Oval de la Casa Blanca entre Kevin McAleenan, secretario interino de Seguridad Nacional de los Estados Unidos, y Enrique Degenhart, ministro de Gobernación de Guatemala.

      “Hace mucho tiempo que hemos estado trabajando con Guatemala y ahora podemos hacerlo de la manera correcta”, dijo el mandatario estadounidense.

      Este es el contenido íntegro del acuerdo:

      ACUERDO ENTRE EL GOBIERNO DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS DE AMÉRICA Y EL GOBIERNO DE LA REPÚBLICA DE GUATEMALA RELATIVO A LA COOPERACIÓN RESPECTO AL EXAMEN DE SOLICITUDES DE PROTECCIÓN

      EL GOBIERNO DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS DE AMÉRICA Y EL GOBIERNO DE LA REPÚBLICA DE GUATEMALA, en lo sucesivo de forma individual una “Parte” o colectivamente “las Partes”,

      CONSIDERANDO que Guatemala norma sus relaciones con otros países de conformidad con principios, reglas y prácticas internacionales con el propósito de contribuir al mantenimiento de la paz y la libertad, al respeto y defensa de los derechos humanos, y al fortalecimiento de los procesos democráticos e instituciones internacionales que garanticen el beneficio mutuo y equitativo entre los Estados; considerando por otro lado, que Guatemala mantendrá relaciones de amistad, solidaridad y cooperación con aquellos Estados cuyo desarrollo económico, social y cultural sea análogo al de Guatemala, como el derecho de las personas a migrar y su necesidad de protección;

      CONSIDERANDO que en la actualidad Guatemala incorpora en su legislación interna leyes migratorias dinámicas que obligan a Guatemala a reconocer el derecho de toda persona a emigrar o inmigrar, por lo que cualquier migrante puede entrar, permanecer, transitar, salir y retornar a su territorio nacional conforme a su legislación nacional; considerando, asimismo, que en situaciones no previstas por la legislación interna se debe aplicar la norma que más favorezca al migrante, siendo que por analogía se le debería dar abrigo y cuidado temporal a las personas que deseen ingresar de manera legal al territorio nacional; considerando que por estos motivos es necesario promover acuerdos de cooperación con otros Estados que respeten los mismos principios descritos en la política migratoria de Guatemala, reglamentada por la Autoridad Migratoria Nacional;

      CONSIDERANDO que Guatemala es parte de la Convención sobre el Estatuto de los Refugiados de 1951, celebrada en Ginebra el 28 de julio de 1951 (la “Convención de 1951″) y del Protocolo sobre el Estatuto de los Refugiados, firmado en Nueva York el 31 de enero de 1967 (el “Protocolo de 1967′), del cual los Estados Unidos son parte, y reafirmando la obligación de las partes de proporcionar protección a refugiados que cumplen con los requisitos y que se encuentran físicamente en sus respectivos territorios, de conformidad con sus obligaciones según esos instrumentos y sujetos . a las respectivas leyes, tratados y declaraciones de las Partes;

      RECONOCIENDO especialmente la obligación de las Partes respecto a cumplir el principio de non-refoulement de no devolución, tal como se desprende de la Convención de 1951 y del Protocolo de 1967, así como la Convención contra la Tortura y Otros Tratos o Penas Crueles, Inhumanos o Degradantes, firmada en Nueva York el 10 de diciembre de 1984 (la “Convención contra la Tortura”), con sujeción a las respectivas reservas, entendimientos y declaraciones de las Partes y reafirmando sus respectivas obligaciones de fomentar y proteger los derechos humanos y las libertades fundamentales en consonancia con sus obligaciones en el ámbito internacional;

      RECONOCIENDO y respetando las obligaciones de cada Parte de conformidad con sus leyes y políticas nacionales y acuerdos y arreglos internacionales;

      DESTACANDO que los Estados Unidos de América y Guatemala ofrecen sistemas de protección de refugiados que son coherentes con sus obligaciones conforme a la Convención de 1951 y/o el Protocolo de 1967;

      DECIDIDOS a mantener el estatuto de refugio o de protección temporal equivalente, como medida esencial en la protección de los refugiados o asilados, y al mismo tiempo deseando impedir el fraude en el proceso de solicitud de refugio o asilo, acción que socava su legitimo propósito; y decididos a fortalecer la integridad del proceso oficial para solicitar el estatuto de refugio o asilo, así como el respaldo público a dicho proceso;

      CONSCIENTES de que la distribución de la responsabilidad relacionada con solicitudes de protección debe garantizar en la práctica que se identifique a las personas que necesitan protección y que se eviten las violaciones del principio básico de no devolución; y, por lo tanto, comprometidos con salvaguardar para cada solicitante del estatuto de refugio o asilo que reúna las condiciones necesarias el acceso a un procedimiento completo e imparcial para determinar la solicitud;

      ACUERDAN lo siguiente:

      ARTÍCULO 1

      A efectos del presente Acuerdo:

      1. “Solicitud de protección” significa la solicitud de una persona de cualquier nacionalidad, al gobierno de una de las Partes para recibir protección conforme a sus respectivas obligaciones institucionales derivadas de la Convención de 1951, del Protocolo de 1967 o de la Convención contra la Tortura, y de conformidad con las leyes y políticas respectivas de las Partes que dan cumplimiento a esas obligaciones internacionales, así como para recibir cualquier otro tipo de protección temporal equivalente disponible conforme al derecho migratorio de la parte receptora.

      2. “Solicitante de protección” significa cualquier persona que presenta una solicitud de protección en el territorio de una de las partes.

      3. “Sistema para determinar la protección” significa el conjunto de políticas, leyes, prácticas administrativas y judiciales que el gobierno de cada parte emplea para decidir respecto de las solicitudes de protección.

      4. “Menor no acompañado” significa un solicitante de protección que no ha cumplido los dieciocho (18) años de edad y cuyo padre, madre o tutor legal no está presente ni disponible para proporcionar atención y custodia presencial en los Estados Unidos de América o en Guatemala, donde se encuentre el menor no acompañado.

      5. En el caso de la inmigración a Guatemala, las políticas respecto de leyes y migración abordan el derecho de las personas a entrar, permanecer, transitar y salir de su territorio de conformidad con sus leyes internas y los acuerdos y arreglos internacionales, y permanencia migratoria significa permanencia por un plazo de tiempo autorizado de acuerdo al estatuto migratorio otorgado a las personas.

      ARTÍCULO 2

      El presente Acuerdo no aplica a los solicitantes de protección que son ciudadanos o nacionales de Guatemala; o quienes, siendo apátridas, residen habitualmente en Guatemala.

      ARTÍCULO 3

      1. Para garantizar que los solicitantes de protección trasladados a Guatemala por los Estados Unidos tengan acceso a un sistema para determinar la protección, Guatemala no retornará ni expulsará a solicitantes de protección en Guatemala, a menos que el solicitante abandone la ‘solicitud o que esta sea denegada a través de una decisión administrativa.

      2. Durante el proceso de traslado, las personas sujetas al presente Acuerdo serán responsabilidad de los Estados Unidos hasta que finalice el proceso de traslado.

      ARTÍCULO 4

      1. La responsabilidad de determinar y concluir en su territorio solicitudes de protección recaerá en los Estados Unidos, cuando los Estados Unidos establezcan que esa persona:

      a. es un menor no acompañado; o

      b. llegó al territorio de los Estados Unidos:

      i. con una visa emitida de forma válida u otro documento de admisión válido, que no sea de tránsito, emitido por los Estados Unidos; o

      ii. sin que los Estados Unidos de América le exigiera obtener una visa.

      2. No obstante el párrafo 1 de este artículo, Guatemala evaluará las solicitudes de protección una por una, de acuerdo a lo establecido y autorizado por la autoridad competente en materia migratoria en sus políticas y leyes migratorias y en su territorio, de las personas que cumplen los requisitos necesarios conforme al presente Acuerdo, y que llegan a los Estados Unidos a un puerto de entrada o entre puertos de entrada, en la fecha efectiva del presente Acuerdo o posterior a ella. Guatemala evaluará la solicitud de protección, conforme al plan de implementación inicial y los procedimientos operativos estándar a los que se hace referencia en el artículo 7, apartados 1 y 5.

      3. Las Partes aplicarán el presente Acuerdo respecto a menores no acompañados de conformidad con sus respectivas leyes nacionales,

      4. Las Partes contarán con procedimientos para garantizar que los traslados de los Estados Unidos a Guatemala de las personas objeto del presente Acuerdo sean compatibles con sus obligaciones, leyes nacionales e internacionales y políticas migratorias respectivas.

      5. Los Estados Unidos tomarán la decisión final de que una persona satisface los requisitos para una excepción en virtud de los artículos 4 y 5 del presente Acuerdo.

      ARTÍCULO 5

      No obstante cualquier disposición del presente Acuerdo, cualquier parte podrá, según su propio criterio, examinar cualquier solicitud de protección que se haya presentado a esa Parte cuando decida que es de su interés público hacerlo.

      ARTÍCULO 6

      Las Partes podrán:

      1. Intercambiar información cuando sea necesario para la implementación efectiva del presente Acuerdo con sujeción a las leyes y reglamentación nacionales. Dicha información no será divulgada por el país receptor excepto de conformidad con sus leyes y reglamentación nacionales.

      2. Las Partes podrán intercambiar de forma habitual información respecto á leyes, reglamentación y prácticas relacionadas con sus respectivos sistemas para determinar la protección migratoria.

      ARTÍCULO 7

      1. Las Partes elaborarán procedimientos operativos estándar para asistir en la implementación del presente Acuerdo. Estos procedimientos incorporarán disposiciones para notificar por adelantado, a Guatemala, el traslado de cualquier persona conforme al presente Acuerdo. Los Estados Unidos colaborarán con Guatemala para identificar a las personas idóneas para ser trasladadas al territorio de Guatemala.

      2. Los procedimientos operativos incorporarán mecanismos para solucionar controversias que respeten la interpretación e implementación de los términos del presente Acuerdo. Los casos no previstos que no puedan solucionarse a través de estos mecanismos serán resueltos a través de la vía diplomática.

      3. Los Estados Unidos prevén cooperar para fortalecer las capacidades institucionales de Guatemala.

      4. Las Partes acuerdan evaluar regularmente el presente Acuerdo y su implementación, para subsanar las deficiencias encontradas. Las Partes realizarán las evaluaciones conjuntamente, siendo la primera dentro de un plazo máximo de tres (3) meses a partir de la fecha de entrada en operación del Acuerdo y las siguientes evaluaciones dentro de los mismos plazos. Las Partes podrán invitar, de común acuerdo, a otras organizaciones pertinentes con conocimientos especializados sobre el tema a participar en la evaluación inicial y/o cooperar para el cumplimiento del presente Acuerdo.

      5. Las Partes prevén completar un plan de implementación inicial, que incorporará gradualmente, y abordará, entre otros: a) los procedimientos necesarios para llevar a cabo el traslado de personas conforme al presente Acuerdo; b) la cantidad o número de personas a ser trasladadas; y c) las necesidades de capacidad institucional. Las Partes planean hacer operativo el presente Acuerdo al finalizarse un plan de implementación gradual.

      ARTÍCULO 8

      1. El presente Acuerdo entrará en vigor por medio de un canje de notas entre las partes en el que se indique que cada parte ha cumplido con los procedimientos jurídicos nacionales necesarios para que el Acuerdo entre en vigor. El presente Acuerdo tendrá una vigencia de dos (2) años y podrá renovarse antes de su vencimiento a través de un canje de notas.

      2. Cualquier Parte podrá dar por terminado el presente Acuerdo por medio de una notificación por escrito a la otra Parte con tres (3) meses de antelación.

      3. Cualquier parte podrá, inmediatamente después de notificar a la otra parte por escrito, suspender por un periodo inicial de hasta tres (3) meses la implementación del presente Acuerdo. Esta suspensión podrá extenderse por periodos adicionales de hasta tres (3) meses por medio de una notificación por escrito a la otra parte. Cualquier parte podrá, con el consentimiento por escrito de la otra, suspender cualquier parte del presente Acuerdo.

      4. Las Partes podrán, por escrito y de mutuo acuerdo, realizar cualquier modificación o adición al presente Acuerdo. Estas entrarán en vigor de conformidad con los procedimientos jurídicos pertinentes de cada Parte y la modificación o adición constituirá parte integral del presente Acuerdo.

      5. Ninguna disposición del presente Acuerdo deberá interpretarse de manera que obligue a las Partes a erogar o comprometer fondos.

      EN FE DE LO CUAL, los abajo firmantes, debidamente autorizados por sus respectivos gobiernos, firman el presente Acuerdo.

      HECHO el 26 de julio de 2019, por duplicado en los idiomas inglés y español, siendo ambos textos auténticos.

      POR EL GOBIERNO DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS DE AMÉRICA: Kevin K. McAleenan, Secretario Interino de Seguridad Nacional.

      POR EL GOBIERNO DE LA REPÚBLICA DE GUATEMALA: Enrique A. Degenhart Asturias, Ministro de Gobernación.

      https://www.prensalibre.com/guatemala/migrantes/este-es-el-acuerdo-migratorio-firmado-entre-guatemala-y-estados-unidos

    • Washington signe un accord sur le droit d’asile avec le Guatemala

      Sous la pression du président américain, le Guatemala devient un « pays tiers sûr », où les migrants de passage vers les Etats-Unis doivent déposer leurs demandes d’asile.

      Sous la pression de Donald Trump qui menaçait de lui infliger des sanctions commerciales, le Guatemala a accepté vendredi 26 juillet de devenir un « pays tiers sûr » pour contribuer à réduire le nombre de demandes d’asile aux Etats-Unis. L’accord, qui a été signé en grande pompe dans le bureau ovale de la Maison blanche, en préfigure d’autres, a assuré le président américain, qui a notamment cité le Mexique.

      Faute d’avoir obtenu du Congrès le financement du mur qu’il souhaitait construire le long de la frontière avec le Mexique, Donald Trump a changé de stratégie en faisant pression sur les pays d’Amérique centrale pour qu’ils l’aident à réduire le flux de migrants arrivant aux Etats-Unis, qui a atteint un niveau record sous sa présidence.

      Une personne qui traverse un « pays tiers sûr » doit déposer sa demande d’asile dans ce pays et non dans son pays de destination. Sans employer le terme « pays tiers sûr », le gouvernement guatémaltèque a précisé dans un communiqué que l’accord conclu avec les Etats-Unis s’appliquerait aux réfugiés originaires du Honduras et du Salvador.

      Contreparties pour les travailleurs agricoles

      S’adressant à la presse devant la Maison blanche, le président américain a indiqué que les ouvriers agricoles guatémaltèques auraient en contrepartie un accès privilégié aux fermes aux Etats-Unis.

      Le président guatémaltèque Jimmy Morales devait signer l’accord de « pays tiers sûr » la semaine dernière mais il avait été contraint de reculer après que la Cour constitutionnelle avait jugé qu’il ne pouvait pas prendre un tel engagement sans l’accord du Parlement, ce qui avait provoqué la fureur de Donald Trump.

      Invoquant la nécessité d’éviter des « répercussions sociales et économiques », le gouvernement guatémaltèque a indiqué qu’un accord serait signé dans les prochains jours avec Washington pour faciliter l’octroi de visas de travail agricole temporaires aux ressortissants guatémaltèques. Il a dit espérer que cette mesure serait ultérieurement étendue aux secteurs de la construction et des services.

      Les Etats-Unis sont confrontés à une flambée du nombre de migrants qui cherchent à franchir sa frontière sud, celle qui les séparent du Mexique. En juin, les services de police aux frontières ont arrêté 104 000 personnes qui cherchaient à entrer illégalement aux Etats-Unis. Ils avaient été 144 000 le mois précédent.

      https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2019/07/27/washington-signe-un-accord-sur-le-droit-d-asile-avec-le-guatemala_5493979_32
      #agriculture #ouvriers_agricoles #travail #fermes

    • Migrants, pressions sur le Mexique

      Sous la pression des États-Unis, le Mexique fait la chasse aux migrants sur son territoire, et les empêche d’avancer vers le nord. Au mois de juin, les autorités ont arrêté près de 24 000 personnes sans papiers.

      Debout sur son radeau, Edwin maugrée en regardant du coin de l’œil la vingtaine de militaires de la Garde Nationale mexicaine postés sous les arbres, côté mexicain. « C’est à cause d’eux si les affaires vont mal », bougonne le jeune Guatémaltèque en poussant son radeau à l’aide d’une perche. « Depuis qu’ils sont là, plus personne ne peut passer au Mexique ».

      Les eaux du fleuve Suchiate, qui sépare le Mexique du Guatemala, sont étrangement calmes depuis le mois de juin. Fini le ballet incessant des petits radeaux de fortune, où s’entassaient, pêle-mêle, villageois, commerçants et migrants qui se rendaient au Mexique. « Mais ça ne change rien, les migrants traversent plus loin », sourit le jeune homme.

      La stratégie du président américain Donald Trump pour contraindre son voisin du sud à réduire les flux migratoires en direction des États-Unis a mis le gouvernement mexicain aux abois : pour éviter une nouvelle fois la menace de l’instauration de frais de douanes de 5 % sur les importations mexicaines, le gouvernement d’Andrés Manuel López Obrador a déployé dans l’urgence 6 500 éléments de la Garde Nationale à la frontière sud du Mexique.
      Des pots-de-vin lors des contrôles

      Sur les routes, les opérations de contrôle sont partout. « Nous avons été arrêtés à deux reprises par l’armée », explique Natalia, entourée de ses garçons de 11 ans, 8 ans et 3 ans. Cette Guatémaltèque s’est enfuie de son village avec son mari et ses enfants, il y a dix jours. Son époux, témoin protégé dans le procès d’un groupe criminel, a été menacé de mort. « Au premier contrôle, nous leur avons donné 1 500 pesos (NDLR, 70 €), au deuxième 2 500 pesos (118 €), pour qu’ils nous laissent partir », explique la mère de famille, assise sous le préau de l’auberge du Père César Augusto Cañaveral, l’une des deux auberges qui accueillent les migrants à Tapachula.

      Conçu pour 120 personnes, l’établissement héberge actuellement plus de 300 personnes, dont une centaine d’enfants en bas âge. « On est face à une politique anti-migratoire de plus en plus violente et militarisée, se désole le Père Cañaveral. C’est devenu une véritable chasse à l’homme dehors, alors je leur dis de sortir le moins possible pour éviter les arrestations ». Celles-ci ont en effet explosé depuis l’ultimatum du président des États-Unis : du 1er au 24 juin, l’Institut National de Migration (INM) a arrêté près de 24 000 personnes en situation irrégulière, soit 1 000 personnes détenues par jour en moyenne, et en a expulsé plus de 17 000, essentiellement des Centraméricains. Du jamais vu.
      Des conditions de détention « indignes »

      À Tapachula, les migrants arrêtés sont entassés dans le centre de rétention Siglo XXI. À quelques mètres de l’entrée de cette forteresse de béton, Yannick a le regard vide et fatigué. « Il y avait tellement de monde là-dedans que ma fille y est tombée malade », raconte cet Angolais âgé de 33 ans, sa fille de 3 ans somnolant dans ses bras. « Ils viennent de nous relâcher car ils ne vont pas nous renvoyer en Afrique, ajoute-il. Heureusement, car à l’intérieur on dort par terre ». « Les conditions dans ce centre sont indignes », dénonce Claudia León Aug, coordinatrice du Service jésuite des réfugiés pour l’Amérique latine, qui a visité à plusieurs reprises le centre de rétention Siglo XXI. « La nourriture est souvent avariée, les enfants tombent malades, les bébés n’ont droit qu’à une seule couche par jour, et on a même recensé des cas de tortures et d’agressions ».

      Tapachula est devenu un cul-de-sac pour des milliers de migrants. Ils errent dans les rues de la ville, d’hôtel en d’hôtel, ou louent chez l’habitant, faute de pouvoir avancer vers le nord. Les compagnies de bus, sommées de participer à l’effort national, demandent systématiquement une pièce d’identité en règle. « On ne m’a pas laissé monter dans le bus en direction de Tijuana », se désole Elvis, un Camerounais de 34 ans qui rêve de se rendre au Canada.

      Il sort de sa poche un papier tamponné par les autorités mexicaines, le fameux laissez-passer que délivrait l’Institut National de Migration aux migrants extra-continentaux, pour qu’ils traversent le Mexique en 20 jours afin de gagner la frontière avec les États-Unis. « Regardez, ils ont modifié le texte, maintenant il est écrit que je ne peux pas sortir de Tapachula », accuse le jeune homme, dépité, avant de se rasseoir sur le banc de la petite cour de son hôtel décati dans la périphérie de Tapachula. « La situation est chaotique, les gens sont bloqués ici et les autorités ne leur donnent aucune information, pour les décourager encore un peu plus », dénonce Salvador Lacruz, coordinateur au Centre des Droits humains Centro Fray Matías de Córdova.
      Explosion du nombre des demandes d’asile au Mexique

      Face à la menace des arrestations et des expulsions, de plus en plus de migrants choisissent de demander l’asile au Mexique. Dans le centre-ville de Tapachula, la Commission mexicaine d’aide aux réfugiés (COMAR), est prise d’assaut dès 4 heures du matin par les demandeurs d’asile. « On m’a dit de venir avec tous les documents qui prouvent que je suis en danger de mort dans mon pays », explique Javier, un Hondurien de 34 ans qui a fait la queue une partie de la nuit pour ne pas rater son rendez-vous.

      Son fils de 9 ans est assis sur ses genoux. « J’ai le certificat de décès de mon père et celui de mon frère. Ils ont été assassinés pour avoir refusé de donner de l’argent aux maras », explique-t-il, une pochette en plastique dans les mains. « Le prochain sur la liste, c’est moi, c’est pour ça que je suis parti pour les États-Unis, mais je vois que c’est devenu très difficile, alors je me pose ici, ensuite, on verra ».

      Les demandes d’asile au Mexique ont littéralement explosé : 31 000 pour les six premiers mois de 2019, c’est trois fois plus qu’en 2018 à la même période, et juin a été particulièrement élevé, avec 70 % de demandes en plus par rapport à janvier. La tendance devrait se poursuivre du fait de la décision prise le 15 juillet dernier par le président américain, que toute personne « entrant par la frontière sud des États-Unis » et souhaitant demander l’asile aux États-Unis le fasse, au préalable, dans un autre pays, transformant ainsi le Mexique, de facto, en « pays tiers sûr ».

      « Si les migrants savent que la seule possibilité de demander l’asile aux États-Unis, c’est de l’avoir obtenu au Mexique, ils le feront », observe Salvador Lacruz. Mais si certains s’accrochent à Tapachula, d’autres abandonnent. Jesús Roque, un Hondurien de 21 ans, « vient de signer » comme disent les migrants centraméricains en référence au programme de retour volontaire mis en place par le gouvernement mexicain. « C’est impossible d’aller plus au nord, je rentre chez moi », lâche-t-il.

      Comme lui, plus de 35 000 personnes sont rentrées dans leur pays, essentiellement des Honduriens et des Salvadoriens. À quelques mètres, deux femmes pressent le pas, agacées par la foule qui se presse devant les bureaux de la COMAR. « Qu’ils partent d’ici, vite ! », grogne l’une. Le mur tant désiré par Donald Trump s’est finalement érigé au Mexique en quelques semaines. Dans les esprits aussi.

      https://www.la-croix.com/Monde/Ameriques/Le-Mexique-verrouille-frontiere-sud-2019-08-01-1201038809

    • US Move Puts More Asylum Seekers at Risk. Expanded ‘#Remain_in_Mexico’ Program Undermines Due Process

      The Trump administration has drastically expanded its “Remain in Mexico” program while undercutting the rights of asylum seekers at the United States southern border, Human Rights Watch said today. Under the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP) – known as the “Remain in Mexico” program – asylum seekers in the US are returned to cities in Mexico where there is a shortage of shelter and high crime rates while awaiting asylum hearings in US immigration court.

      Human Rights Watch found that asylum seekers face new or increased barriers to obtaining and communicating with legal counsel; increased closure of MPP court hearings to the public; and threats of kidnapping, extortion, and other violence while in Mexico.

      “The inherently inhumane ‘Remain in Mexico’ program is getting more abusive by the day,” said Ariana Sawyer, assistant US Program researcher at Human Rights Watch. “The program’s rapid growth in recent months has put even more people and families in danger in Mexico while they await an increasingly unfair legal process in the US.”

      The United States will begin sending all Central American asylum-seeking families to Mexico beginning the week of September 29, 2019 as part of the most recent expansion of the “Remain in Mexico” program, the Department of Homeland Security acting secretary, Kevin McAleenan, announced on September 23.

      Human Rights Watch concluded in a July 2019 report that the MPP program has had serious rights consequences for asylum seekers, including high – if not insurmountable – barriers to due process on their asylum claims in the United States and threats and physical violence in Mexico. Human Rights Watch recently spoke to seven asylum seekers, as well as 26 attorneys, migrant shelter operators, Mexican government officials, immigration court workers, journalists, and advocates. Human Rights Watch also observed court hearings for 71 asylum seekers in August and analyzed court filings, declarations, photographs, and media reports.

      “The [MPP] rules, which are never published, are constantly changing without advance notice,” said John Moore, an asylum attorney. “And so far, every change has had the effect of further restricting the already limited access we attorneys have with our clients.”

      Beyond the expanded program, which began in January, the US State Department has also begun funding a “voluntary return” program carried out by the United Nations-affiliated International Organization for Migration (IOM). The organization facilitates the transportation of asylum seekers forced to wait in Mexico back to their country of origin but does not notify US immigration judges. This most likely results in negative judgments against asylum seekers for not appearing in court, possibly resulting in a ban of up to 10 years on entering the US again, when they could have withdrawn their cases without penalty.

      Since July, the number of people being placed in the MPP program has almost tripled, from 15,079 as of June 24, to 40,033 as of September 7, according to the Mexican National Institute of Migration. The Trump administration has increased the number of asylum seekers it places in the program at ports of entry near San Diego and Calexico, California and El Paso, Texas, where the program had already been in place. The administration has also expanded the program to Laredo and Brownsville, Texas, even as the overall number of border apprehensions has declined.

      As of early August, more than 26,000 additional asylum seekers were waiting in Mexican border cities on unofficial lists to be processed by US Customs and Border Protection as part the US practice of “metering,” or of limiting the number of people who can apply for asylum each day by turning them back from ports of entry in violation of international law.

      In total, more than 66,000 asylum seekers are now in Mexico, forced to wait months or years for their cases to be decided in the US. Some have given up waiting and have attempted to cross illicitly in more remote and dangerous parts of the border, at times with deadly results.

      As problematic as the MPP program is, seeking asylum will likely soon become even more limited. On September 11, the Supreme Court temporarily allowed the Trump administration to carry out an asylum ban against anyone entering the country by land after July 16 who transited through a third country without applying for asylum there. This could affect at least 46,000 asylum seekers, placed in the MPP program or on a metering list after mid-July, according to calculations based on data from the Mexican National Institute of Migration. Asylum seekers may still be eligible for other forms of protection, but they carry much higher eligibility standards and do not provide the same level of relief.

      Human Rights Watch contacted the Department of Homeland Security and the US Justice Department’s Executive Office for Immigration Review with its findings and questions regarding the policy changes and developments but have not to date received a response. The US government should immediately cease returning asylum seekers to Mexico and instead ensure them meaningful access to full and fair asylum proceedings in US immigration courts, Human Rights Watch said. Congress should urgently act to cease funding the MPP program. The US should manage asylum-seeker arrivals through a genuine humanitarian response that includes fair determinations of an asylum seeker’s eligibility to remain in the US. The US should simultaneously pursue longer-term efforts to address the root causes of forced displacement in Central America.

      “The Trump administration seems intent on making the bad situation for asylum seekers even worse by further depriving them of due process rights,” Sawyer said. “The US Congress should step in and put an end to these mean-spirited attempts to undermine and destroy the US asylum system.”

      New Concerns over the MPP Program

      Increased Barriers to Legal Representation

      Everyone in the MPP has the right to an attorney at their own cost, but it has been nearly impossible for asylum seekers forced to remain in Mexico to get legal representation. Only about 1.3 percent of participants have legal representation, according to the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse at Syracuse University, a research center that examined US immigration court records through June 2019. In recent months, the US government has raised new barriers to obtaining representation and accessing counsel.

      When the Department of Homeland Security created the program, it issued guidance that:

      in order to facilitate access to counsel for aliens subject to return to Mexico under the MPP who will be transported to their immigration court hearings, [agents] will depart from the [port of entry] with the alien at a time sufficient to ensure arrival at the immigration court not later than one hour before his or her scheduled hearing time in order to afford the alien the opportunity to meet in-person with his or her legal representative.

      However, according to several attorneys Human Rights Watch interviewed in El Paso, Texas, and as Human Rights Watch observed on August 12 to 15 in El Paso Immigration Court, the Department of Homeland Security and the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR), which manages the immigration court, have effectively barred attorneys from meeting with clients for the full hour before their client’s hearing begins. Rather than having free access to their clients, attorneys are now required to wait in the building lobby on a different level than the immigration court until the court administrator notifies security guards that attorneys may enter.

      As Human Rights Watch has previously noted, one hour is insufficient for adequate attorney consultation and preparation. Still, several attorneys said that this time in court was crucial. Immigration court is often the only place where asylum seekers forced to wait in Mexico can meet with attorneys since lawyers capable of representing them typically work in the US. Attorneys cannot easily travel to Mexico because of security and logistical issues. For MPP participants without attorneys, there are now also new barriers to getting basic information and assistance about the asylum application process.

      Human Rights Watch observed in May a coordinated effort by local nongovernmental organizations and attorneys in El Paso to perform know-your-rights presentations for asylum seekers without an attorney and to serve as “Friend of the Court,” at the judge’s discretion. The Executive Office for Immigration Review has recognized in the context of unaccompanied minors that a Friend of the Court “has a useful role to play in assisting the court and enhancing a respondent’s comprehension of proceedings.”

      The agency’s memos also say that, “Immigration Judges and court administrators remain encouraged to facilitate pro bono representation” because pro bono attorneys provide “respondents with welcome legal assistance and the judge with efficiencies that can only be realized when the respondent is represented.”

      To that end, immigration courts are encouraged to support “legal orientations and group rights presentations” by nonprofit organizations and attorneys.

      One of the attorneys involved in coordinating the various outreach programs at the El Paso Immigration Court said, however, that on June 24 the agency began barring all contact between third parties and asylum seekers without legal representation in both the courtroom and the lobby outside. This effectively ended all know-your-rights presentations and pro bono case screenings, though no new memo was issued. Armed guards now prevent attorneys in the US from interacting with MPP participants unless the attorneys have already filed official notices that they are representing specific participants.

      On July 8, the agency also began barring attorneys from serving as “Friend of the Court,” several attorneys told Human Rights Watch. No new memo has been issued on “Friend of the Court” either.

      In a July 16 email to an attorney obtained by Human Rights Watch, an agency spokesman, Rob Barnes, said that the agency shut down “Friend of the Court” and know-your-rights presentations to protect asylum seekers from misinformation after it “became aware that persons from organizations not officially recognized by EOIR...were entering EOIR space in El Paso.

      However, most of the attorneys and organizations now barred from performing know-your-rights presentations or serving as “Friend of the Court” in El Paso are listed on a form given to asylum seekers by the court of legal service providers, according to a copy of the form given to Human Rights Watch and attorneys and organizations coordinating those services.

      Closure of Immigration Court Hearings to the Public

      When Human Rights Watch observed court hearings in El Paso on May 8 to 10, the number of asylum seekers who had been placed in the MPP program and scheduled to appear in court was between 20 and 24 each day, with one judge hearing all of these cases in a single mass hearing. At the time, those numbers were considered high, and there was chaos and confusion as judges navigated a system that was never designed to provide hearings for people being kept outside the US.

      When Human Rights Watch returned to observe hearings just over three months later, four judges were hearing a total of about 250 cases a day, an average of over 60 cases for each judge. Asylum seekers in the program, who would previously have been allowed into the US to pursue their claims at immigration courts dispersed around the country, have been primarily funneled through courts in just two border cities, causing tremendous pressures on these courts and errors in the system. Some asylum seekers who appeared in court found their cases were not in the system or received conflicting instructions about where or when to appear.

      One US immigration official said the MPP program had “broken the courts,” Reuters reported.

      The Executive Office for Immigration Review has stated that immigration court hearings are generally supposed to be open to the public. The regulations indicate that immigration judges may make exceptions and limit or close hearings if physical facilities are inadequate; if there is a need to protect witnesses, parties, or the public interest; if an abused spouse or abused child is to appear; or if information under seal is to be presented.

      In recent weeks, however, journalists, attorneys, and other public observers have been barred from these courtrooms in El Paso by court administrators, security guards, and in at least one case, by a Department of Homeland Security attorney, who said that a courtroom was too full to allow a Human Rights Watch researcher entry.

      Would-be observers are now frequently told by the court administrator or security guards that there is “no room,” and that dockets are all “too full.”

      El Paso Immigration Court Administrator Rodney Buckmire told Human Rights Watch that hundreds of people receive hearings each day because asylum seekers “deserve their day in court,” but the chaos and errors in mass hearings, the lack of access to attorneys and legal advice, and the lack of transparency make clear that the MPP program is severely undermining due process.

      During the week of September 9, the Trump administration began conducting hearings for asylum seekers returned to Mexico in makeshift tent courts in Laredo and Brownsville, where judges are expected to preside via videoconference. At a September 11 news conference, DHS would not commit to allowing observers for those hearings, citing “heightened security measures” since the courts are located near the border. Both attorneys and journalists have since been denied entry to these port courts.

      Asylum Seekers Describe Risk of Kidnapping, Other Crimes

      As the MPP has expanded, increasing numbers of asylum seekers have been placed at risk of kidnapping and other crimes in Mexico.

      Two of the northern Mexican states to which asylum seekers were initially being returned under the program, Baja California and Chihuahua, are among those with the most homicides and other crimes in the country. Recent media reports have documented ongoing harm to asylum seekers there, including rape, kidnapping, sexual exploitation, assault, and other violent crimes.

      The program has also been expanded to Nuevo Laredo and Matamoros, both in the Mexican state of Tamaulipas, which is on the US State Department’s “do not travel” list. The media and aid workers have also reported that migrants there have experienced physical violence, sexual assault, kidnapping, and other abuses. There have been multiple reports in 2019 alone of migrants being kidnapped as they attempt to reach the border by bus.

      Jennifer Harbury, a human rights attorney and activist doing volunteer work with asylum-seekers on both sides of the border, collected sworn declarations that they had been victims of abuse from three asylum seekers who had been placed in the MPP program and bused by Mexican immigration authorities to Monterrey, Mexico, two and a half hours from the border. Human Rights Watch examined these declarations, in which asylum seekers reported robbery, extortion, and kidnapping, including by Mexican police.

      Expansion to Mexican Cities with Even Fewer Protections

      Harbury, who recently interviewed hundreds of migrants in Mexico, described asylum seekers sent to Nuevo Laredo as “fish in a barrel” because of their vulnerability to criminal organizations. She said that many of the asylum seekers she interviewed said they had been kidnapped or subjected to an armed assault at least once since they reached the border.

      Because Mexican officials are in many cases reportedly themselves involved in crimes against migrants, and because nearly 98 percent of crimes in Mexico go unsolved, crimes committed against migrants routinely go unpunished.

      In Matamoros, asylum seekers have no meaningful shelter access, said attorneys with Lawyers for Good Government (L4GG) who were last there from August 22 to 26. Instead, more than 500 asylum seekers were placed in an encampment in a plaza near the port of entry to the US, where they were sleeping out in the open, despite temperatures of over 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Henriette Vinet-Martin, a lawyer with the group, said she saw a “nursing mother sleeping on cardboard with her baby” and that attorneys also spoke to a woman in the MPP program there who said she had recently miscarried in a US hospital while in Customs and Border Protection custody. The attorneys said some asylum seekers had tents, but many did not.

      Vinet-Martin and Claire Noone, another lawyer there as part of the L4GG project, said they found children with disabilities who had been placed in the MPP program, including two children with Down Syndrome, one of them eight months old.

      Human Rights Watch also found that Customs and Border Protection continues to return asylum seekers with disabilities or other chronic health conditions to Mexico, despite the Department of Homeland Security’s initial guidance that no one with “known physical/mental health issues” would be placed in the program. In Ciudad Juárez, Human Rights Watch documented six such cases, four of them children. In one case, a 14-year-old boy had been placed in the program along with his mother and little brother, who both have intellectual disabilities, although the boy said they have family in the US. He appeared to be confused and distraught by his situation.

      The Mexican government has taken some steps to protect migrants in Ciudad Juárez, including opening a large government-operated shelter. The shelter, which Human Rights Watch visited on August 22, has a capacity of 3,000 migrants and is well-stocked with food, blankets, sleeping pads, personal hygiene kits, and more. At the time of the visit, the shelter held 555 migrants, including 230 children, primarily asylum seekers in the MPP program.

      One Mexican government official said the government will soon open two more shelters – one in Tijuana with a capacity of 3,000 and another in Mexicali with a capacity of 1,500.

      Problems Affecting the ‘Assisted Voluntary Return’ Program

      In October 2018, the International Organization for Migration began operating a $1.65 million US State Department-funded “Assisted Voluntary Return” program to assist migrants who have decided or felt compelled to return home. The return program originally targeted Central Americans traveling in large groups through the interior of Mexico. However, in July, the program began setting up offices in Ciudad Juárez, Tijuana, and Mexicali focusing on asylum seekers forced to wait in those cities after being placed in the MPP program. Alex Rigol Ploettner, who heads the International Organization for Migration office in Ciudad Juárez, said that the organization also provides material support such as bunk beds and personal hygiene kits to shelters, which the organization asks to refer interested asylum seekers to the Assisted Voluntary Return program. Four shelter operators in Ciudad Juárez confirmed these activities.

      As of late August, Rigol Ploettner said approximately 500 asylum seekers in the MPP program had been referred to Assisted Voluntary Return. Of those 500, he said, about 95 percent were found to be eligible for the program.

      He said the organization warns asylum seekers that returning to their home country may cause them to receive deportation orders from the US in absentia, meaning they will most likely face a ban on entering the US of up to 10 years.

      The organization does not inform US immigration courts that they have returned asylum seekers, nor are asylum seekers assisted in withdrawing their petition for asylum, which would avoid future penalties in the US.

      “For now, as the IOM, we don’t have a direct mechanism for withdrawal,” Rigol Ploettner said. Human Rights Watch is deeply concerned about the failure to notify the asylum courts when people who are on US immigration court dockets return home and the negative legal consequences for asylum seekers. These concerns are heightened by the environment in which the Assisted Voluntary Return Program is operating. Asylum seekers in the MPP are in such a vulnerable situation that it cannot be assumed that decisions to return home are based on informed consent.

      https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/09/25/us-move-puts-more-asylum-seekers-risk

      via @pascaline

    • Sweeping Language in Asylum Agreement Foists U.S. Responsibilities onto El Salvador

      Amid a tightening embrace of Trump administration policies, last week El Salvador agreed to begin taking asylum-seekers sent back from the United States. The agreement was announced on Friday but details were not made public at the time. The text of the agreement — which The Intercept requested and obtained from the Department of Homeland Security — purports to uphold international and domestic obligations “to provide protection for eligible refugees,” but immigration experts see the move as the very abandonment of the principle of asylum. Aaron Reichlin-Melnick, policy analyst at American Immigration Council, called the agreement a “deeply cynical” move.

      The agreement, which closely resembles one that the U.S. signed with Guatemala in July, implies that any asylum-seeker who is not from El Salvador could be sent back to that country and forced to seek asylum there. Although officials have said that the agreements would apply to people who passed through El Salvador or Guatemala en route, the text of the agreements does not explicitly make that clear.

      “This agreement is so potentially sweeping that it could be used to send an asylum-seeker who never transited El Salvador to El Salvador,” said Eleanor Acer, senior director of refugee protection at the nonprofit organization Human Rights First.

      DHS did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

      The Guatemalan deal has yet to take effect, as Guatemala’s Congress claims to need to ratify it first. DHS officials are currently seeking a similar arrangement with Honduras and have been pressuring Mexico — under threats of tariffs — to crack down on U.S.-bound migration.

      The agreement with El Salvador comes after the Supreme Court recently upheld the Trump administration’s most recent asylum ban, which requires anyone who has transited through another country before reaching the border to seek asylum there first, and be denied in that country, in order to be eligible for asylum in the U.S. Meanwhile, since January, more than 42,000 asylum-seekers who filed their claims in the U.S. before the ban took effect have been pushed back into Mexico and forced to wait there — where they have been subjected to kidnapping, rape, and extortion, among other hazards — as the courts slowly weigh their eligibility.

      Reichlin-Melnick called the U.S.-El Salvador deal “yet another sustained attack at our system of asylum protections.” It begins by invoking the international Refugee Convention and the principle of non-refoulement, which is the crux of asylum law — the guarantee not to return asylum-seekers to a country where they would be subjected to persecution or death. Karen Musalo, law professor at U.C. Hastings Center for Gender and Refugee Studies, called that invocation “Orwellian.”

      “The idea that El Salvador is a safe country for asylum-seekers when it is one of the major countries sending asylum-seekers to the U.S., a country with one of the highest homicide and femicide rates in the world, a place in which gangs have control over large swathes of the country, and the violence is causing people to flee in record numbers … is another absurdity that is beyond the pale,” Musalo said.

      “El Salvador is not a country that is known for having any kind of protection for its own citizens’ human rights,” Musalo added. “If they can’t protect their own citizens, it’s absolutely absurd to think that they can protect people that are not their citizens.”

      “They’ve looked at all of the facts,” Reichlin-Melnick said. “And they’ve decided to create their own reality.”

      Last week, the Salvadoran newspaper El Faro reported that the country’s agency that reviews asylum claims only has a single officer. Meanwhile, though homicide rates have gone down in recent months — since outsider president Nayib Bukele took office in June — September has already seen an increase in homicides. Bukele’s calculus in accepting the agreement is still opaque to Salvadoran observers (Guatemala’s version was deeply unpopular in that country), but he has courted U.S. investment and support. The legal status of nearly 200,000 Salvadorans with temporary protected status in the U.S. is also under threat from the administration. This month also saw the symbolic launch of El Salvador’s Border Patrol — with U.S. funding and support. This week, Bukele, who has both sidled up to Trump and employed Trumpian tactics, will meet with the U.S. president in New York to discuss immigration.

      Reichlin-Melnick noted that the Guatemalan and Salvadoran agreements, as written, could bar people not only from seeking asylum, but also from two other protections meant to fulfill the non-refoulement principle: withholding of removal (a stay on deportation) and the Convention Against Torture, which prevents people from being returned to situations where they may face torture. That would mean that these Central American cooperation agreements go further than the recent asylum ban, which still allows people to apply for those other protections.

      Another major difference between the asylum ban and these agreements is that with the asylum ban, people would be deported to their home countries. If these agreements go into effect, the U.S. will start sending people to Guatemala or El Salvador, regardless of where they may be from. In the 1980s, the ACLU documented over 100 cases of Salvadorans who were harmed or killed after they were deported from the U.S. After this agreement goes into effect, it will no longer be just Salvadorans who the U.S. will be sending into danger.

      https://theintercept.com/2019/09/23/el-salvador-asylum-agreement

    • La forteresse Trump ou le pari du mur

      Plus que sur le mur promis pendant sa campagne, Donald Trump semble fonder sa #politique_migratoire sur une #pression_commerciale sur ses voisins du sud, remettant en cause les #échanges économiques mais aussi culturels avec le Mexique. Ce mur ne serait-il donc que symbolique ?
      Alors que l’administration américaine le menaçait de #taxes_douanières et de #guerre_commerciale, le Mexique d’Andres Lopez Obrador a finalement concédé de freiner les flux migratoires.

      Après avoir accepté un #accord imposé par Washington, Mexico a considérablement réduit les flux migratoires et accru les #expulsions. En effet, plus de 100 000 ressortissants centre-américains ont été expulsés du Mexique vers le #Guatemala dans les huit premiers mois de l’année, soit une hausse de 63% par rapport à l’année précédente selon les chiffres du Guatemala.

      Par ailleurs, cet été le Guatemala a conclu un accord de droit d’asile avec Washington, faisant de son territoire un « #pays_sûr » auprès duquel les demandeurs d’asiles ont l’obligation d’effectuer les premières démarches. Le Salvador et le #Honduras ont suivi la voie depuis.

      Et c’est ainsi que, alors qu’il rencontrait les plus grandes difficultés à obtenir les financements pour le mur à la frontière mexicaine, Donald Trump mise désormais sur ses voisins pour externaliser sa politique migratoire.

      Alors le locataire de la Maison Blanche a-t-il oublié ses ambitions de poursuivre la construction de cette frontière de fer et de béton ? Ce mur n’était-il qu’un symbole destiné à montrer à son électorat son volontarisme en matière de lutte contre l’immigration ? Le retour de la campagne est-il susceptible d’accélérer les efforts dans le domaine ?

      D’autre part, qu’en est-il de la situation des migrants sur le terrain ? Comment s’adaptent-ils à cette nouvelle donne ? Quelles conséquences sur les parcours migratoires des hommes, des femmes et des enfants qui cherchent à gagner les Etats-Unis ?

      On se souvient de cette terrible photo des cadavres encore enlacés d’un père et de sa petite fille de 2 ans, Oscar et Valeria Alberto, originaires du Salvador, morts noyés dans les eaux tumultueuses du Rio Bravo en juin dernier alors qu’ils cherchaient à passer aux Etats-Unis.

      Ce destin tragique annonce-t-il d’autres drames pour nombre de candidats à l’exil qui, quelques soient les politiques migratoires des Etats, iront au bout de leur vie avec l’espoir de l’embellir un peu ?

      https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/cultures-monde/les-frontieres-de-la-colere-14-la-forteresse-trump-ou-le-pari-du-mur

      #Mexique #symbole #barrières_frontalières #USA #Etats-Unis #renvois #push-back #refoulements

    • Mexico sends asylum seekers south — with no easy way to return for U.S. court dates

      The exhausted passengers emerge from a sleek convoy of silver and red-streaked buses, looking confused and disoriented as they are deposited ignominiously in this tropical backwater in southernmost Mexico.

      There is no greeter here to provide guidance on their pending immigration cases in the United States or on where to seek shelter in a teeming international frontier town packed with marooned, U.S.-bound migrants from across the globe.

      The bus riders had made a long and perilous overland trek north to the Rio Grande only to be dispatched back south to Mexico’s border with Central America — close to where many of them had begun their perilous journeys weeks and months earlier. At this point, some said, both their resources and sense of hope had been drained.

      “We don’t know what we’re going to do next,” said Maria de Los Angeles Flores Reyes, 39, a Honduran accompanied by her daughter, Cataren, 9, who appeared petrified after disembarking from one of the long-distance buses. “There’s no information, nothing.”

      The two are among more than 50,000 migrants, mostly Central Americans, whom U.S. immigration authorities have sent back to Mexico this year to await court hearings in the United States under the Trump administration’s Remain in Mexico program.

      Immigration advocates have assailed the program as punitive, while the White House says it has worked effectively — discouraging many migrants from following up on asylum cases and helping to curb what President Trump has decried as a “catch and release” system in which apprehended migrants have been freed in U.S. territory pending court proceeding that can drag on for months or years.

      The ever-expanding ranks pose a growing dilemma for Mexican authorities, who, under intense pressure from the White House, had agreed to accept the returnees and provide them with humanitarian assistance.

      As the numbers rise, Mexico, in many cases, has opted for a controversial solution: Ship as many asylum seekers as possible more than 1,000 miles back here in the apparent hope that they will opt to return to Central America — even if that implies endangering or foregoing prospective political asylum claims in U.S. immigration courts.

      Mexican officials, sensitive to criticism that they are facilitating Trump’s hard-line deportation agenda, have been tight-lipped about the shadowy busing program, under which thousands of asylum-seekers have been returned here since August. (Mexican authorities declined to provide statistics on just how many migrants have been sent back under the initiative.)

      In a statement, Mexico’s immigration agency called the 40-hour bus rides a “free, voluntary and secure” alternative for migrants who don’t want to spend months waiting in the country’s notoriously dangerous northern border towns.

      Advocates counter that the program amounts to a barely disguised scheme for encouraging ill-informed migrants to abandon their ongoing petitions in U.S. immigration court and return to Central America. Doing so leaves them to face the same conditions that they say forced them to flee toward the United States, and, at the same time, would undermine the claims that they face persecution at home.

      “Busing someone back to your southern border doesn’t exactly send them a message that you want them to stay in your country,” said Maureen Meyer, who heads the Mexico program for the Washington Office on Latin America, a research and advocacy group. “And it isn’t always clear that the people on the buses understand what this could mean for their cases in the United States.”

      Passengers interviewed on both ends of the bus pipeline — along the northern Mexican border and here on the southern frontier with Guatemala — say that no Mexican official briefed them on the potential legal jeopardy of returning home.

      “No one told us anything,” Flores Reyes asked after she got off the bus here, bewildered about how to proceed. “Is there a safe place to stay here until our appointment in December?”

      The date is specified on a notice to appear that U.S. Border Patrol agents handed her before she and her daughter were sent back to Mexico last month after having been detained as illegal border-crossers in south Texas. They are due Dec. 16 in a U.S. immigration court in Harlingen, Texas, for a deportation hearing, according to the notice, stamped with the capital red letters MPP — for Migrant Protection Protocols, the official designation of Remain in Mexico.

      The free bus rides to the Guatemalan border are strictly a one-way affair: Mexico does not offer return rides back to the northern border for migrants due in a U.S. immigration court, typically several months later.

      Beti Suyapa Ortega, 36, and son Robinson Javier Melara, 17, in a Mexican immigration agency waiting room in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico.

      “At this point, I’m so frightened I just want to go home,” said Beti Suyapa Ortega, 36, from Honduras, who crossed the border into Texas intending to seek political asylum and surrendered to the Border Patrol.

      She, along with her son, 17, were among two dozen or so Remain in Mexico returnees waiting recently for a southbound bus in a spartan office space at the Mexican immigration agency compound in Nuevo Laredo, across the Rio Grande from Laredo, Texas.

      Ortega and others said they were terrified of venturing onto the treacherous streets of Nuevo Laredo — where criminal gangs control not only drug trafficking but also the lucrative enterprise of abducting and extorting from migrants.

      “We can’t get out of here soon enough. It has been a nightmare,” said Ortega, who explained that she and her son had been kidnapped and held for two weeks and only released when a brother in Atlanta paid $8,000 in ransom. “I can never come back to this place.”

      The Ortegas, along with a dozen or so other Remain in Mexico returnees, left later that evening on a bus to southern Mexico. She said she would skip her date in U.S. immigration court, in Laredo — an appointment that would require her to pass through Nuevo Laredo and expose herself anew to its highly organized kidnapping and extortion gangs.

      The Mexican government bus service operates solely from the northern border towns of Nuevo Laredo and Matamoros, officials say. Both are situated in hyper-dangerous Tamaulipas state, a cartel hub on the Gulf of Mexico that regularly ranks high nationwide in homicides, “disappearances” and the discovery of clandestine graves.

      The long-haul Mexican busing initiative began in July, after U.S. immigration authorities began shipping migrants with court cases to Tamaulipas. Earlier, Remain in Mexico had been limited to sending migrants with U.S. court dates back to the northern border towns of Tijuana, Mexicali and Ciudad Juarez.

      At first, the buses left migrants departing from Tamaulipas state in the city of Monterrey, a relatively safe industrial center four hours south of the U.S. border. But officials there, including the state governor, complained about the sudden influx of hundreds of mostly destitute Central Americans. That’s when Mexican authorities appear to have begun busing all the way back to Ciudad Hidalgo, along Mexico’s border with Guatemala.

      A separate, United Nations-linked program has also returned thousands of migrants south from two large cities on the U.S. border, Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez.

      The packed buses arrive here two or three times a week, with no apparent set schedule.

      On a recent morning, half a dozen, each ferrying more than 40 migrants, came to a stop a block from the Rodolfo Robles international bridge that spans the Suchiate River, the dividing line between Mexico and Guatemala. Part of the fleet of the Omnibus Cristobal Colon long-distance transport company, the buses displayed windshield signs explaining they were “in the service” of Mexico’s national immigration agency.

      The migrants on board had begun the return journey south in Matamoros, across from Brownsville, Texas, after having been sent back there by U.S. immigration authorities.

      Many clutched folders with notices to appear in U.S. immigration court in Texas in December.

      But some, including Flores Reyes, said they were terrified of returning to Matamoros, where they had been subjected to robbery or kidnapping. Nor did they want to return across the Rio Grande to Texas, if it required travel back through Matamoros.

      Flores Reyes said kidnappers held her and her daughter for a week in Matamoros before they managed to escape with the aid of a fellow Honduran.

      The pair later crossed into Texas, she said, and they surrendered to the U.S. Border Patrol. On Sept. 11, they were sent back to Matamoros with a notice to appear Dec. 16 in immigration court in Harlingen.

      “When they told us they were sending us back to Matamoros I became very upset,” Flores Reyes said. “I can’t sleep. I’m still so scared because of what happened to us there.”

      Fearing a second kidnapping, she said, she quickly agreed to take the transport back to southern Mexico.

      Christian Gonzalez, 23, a native of El Salvador who was also among those recently returned here, said he had been mugged in Matamoros and robbed of his cash, his ID and his documents, among them the government notice to appear in U.S. immigration court in Texas in December.

      “Without the paperwork, what can I do?” said an exasperated Gonzalez, a laborer back in Usulutan province in southeastern El Salvador. “I don’t have any money to stay here.”

      He planned to abandon his U.S. immigration case and return to El Salvador, where he said he faced threats from gangs and an uncertain future.

      Standing nearby was Nuvia Carolina Meza Romero, 37, accompanied by her daughter, Jessi, 8, who clutched a stuffed sheep. Both had also returned on the buses from Matamoros. Meza Romero, too, was in a quandary about what do, but seemed resigned to return to Honduras.

      “I can’t stay here. I don’t know anyone and I don’t have any money,” said Meza Romero, who explained that she spent a week in U.S. custody in Texas after crossing the Rio Grande and being apprehended on Sept. 2.

      Her U.S. notice to appear advised her to show up on Dec. 3 in U.S. immigration court in Brownsville.

      “I don’t know how I would even get back there at this point,” said Meza Romero, who was near tears as she stood with her daughter near the border bridge.

      Approaching the migrants were aggressive bicycle taxi drivers who, for a fee of the equivalent of about $2, offered to smuggle them back across the river to Guatemala on rafts made of planks and inner tubes, thus avoiding Mexican and Guatemalan border inspections.

      Opting to cross the river were many bus returnees from Matamoros, including Meza Romero, her daughter and Gonzalez, the Salvadoran.

      But Flores Reyes was hesitant to return to Central America and forfeit her long-sought dream of resettling in the United States, even if she had to make her way back to Matamoros on her own.

      “Right now, we just need to find some shelter,” Flores Reyes said as she ambled off in search of some kind of lodging, her daughter holding her mother’s arm. “We have an appointment on Dec. 16 on the other side. I plan to make it. I’m not ready to give up yet.”

      https://www.latimes.com/world-nation/story/2019-10-15/buses-to-nowhere-mexico-transports-migrants-with-u-s-court-dates-to-its-far

      –---------

      Commentaire de @pascaline via la mailing-list Migreurop :

      Outre le dispositif d’expulsion par charter de l’OIM (https://seenthis.net/messages/730601) mis en place à la frontière nord du Mexique pour les MPPs, le transfert et l’abandon des demandeurs d’asile MPPS à la frontière avec le Guatemala, par les autorités mexicaines est présentée comme une façon de leur permettre d’échapper à la dangerosité des villes frontalières du Nord tout en espérant qu’ils choississent de retourner par eux-mêmes « chez eux »...

  • Eritrea in caduta libera sui diritti umani

    L’Eritrea di #Isaias_Afewerki è oggi uno dei peggiori regimi al mondo. Dove la guerra con l’Etiopia è usata per giustificare un servizio militare a tempo indeterminato. E dove avere un passaporto è quasi un miraggio. Gli ultimi attacchi sono stati rivolti agli ospedali cattolici.

    Il rispetto dei diritti umani in Eritrea è solo un ricordo che si perde nei tempi. La lista di violazioni è lunga e gli esempi recenti non mancano. L’ultima mossa del regime di Isaias Afewerki, al potere dal 1991, è stata quella di ordinare la chiusura dei centri sanitari gestiti dalla Chiesa cattolica nel paese, responsabile di una quarantina tra ospedali e scuole in zone rurali che garantiscono sanità e istruzione alle fette più povere della popolazione. Ebbene, qualche giorno fa in questi luoghi si sono presentati militari armati che hanno sfondato porte e cacciato fuori malati, vecchi e bambini. E preteso l’esproprio coatto degli immobili.

    Il 29 aprile, quattro vescovi avevano chiesto di aprire un dialogo con il governo per cercare una soluzione alla crescente povertà e mancanza di futuro per il popolo. Mentre il 13 giugno sono stati arrestati cinque preti ortodossi ultrasettantenni.

    Daniela Kravetz, responsabile dei rapporti tra Nazioni Unite e Africa, ha riportato che il 17 maggio «trenta cristiani sono stati arrestati durante un incontro di preghiera, mentre qualche giorno prima erano finiti in cella 141 fedeli, tra cui donne e bambini». L’Onu chiede ora che «con urgenza il Governo eritreo torni a permettere la libera scelta di espressione religiosa».

    Guerra Eritrea-Etiopia usata come scusa per il servizio militare a tempo indeterminato

    L’ex colonia italiana ha ottenuto di fatto l’indipendenza dall’Etiopia nel 1991, dopo un conflitto durato trent’anni. E nonostante la recente distensione tra Asmara e Addis Abeba, la guerra tra le due nazioni continua a singhiozzo lungo i confini.

    Sono ancora i rapporti con la vicina Etiopia, del resto, ad essere usati dal dittatore Afewerki per giustificare l’imposizione del servizio militare a tempo indeterminato. I ragazzi, infatti, sono arruolati verso i 17 anni e il servizio militare può durare anche trent’anni, con paghe miserabili e strazianti separazioni. Le famiglie si vedono portare via i figli maschi senza conoscerne la destinazione e i ragazzi spesso non tornano più.

    Le città sono prevalentemente abitate da donne, anziani e bambini. E per chi si oppone le alternative sono la prigione, se non la tortura. Uno dei sistemi più usati dai carcerieri è la cosiddetta Pratica del Gesù, che consiste nell’appendere chi si rifiuta di collaborare, con corde legate ai polsi, a due tronchi d’albero, in modo che il corpo assuma la forma di una croce. A volte restano appesi per giorni, con le guardie che di tanto in tanto inumidiscono le labbra con l’acqua.

    Eritrea: storia di un popolo a cui è vietato viaggiare

    l passaporto, che solo i più cari amici del regime ottengono una volta raggiunta la maggiore età, per la popolazione normale è un miraggio. Il prezioso documento viene consegnato alle donne quando compiono 40 anni e agli uomini all’alba dei 50. A quell’età si spera che ormai siano passate forza e voglia di lasciare il paese.

    Oggi l’Eritrea è un inferno dove tutti spiano tuttti. Un paese sospettoso e nemico d chiunque, diventato sotto la guida di Afewerki uno dei regimi più totalitari al mondo, dove anche parlare al telefono è rischioso.

    E pensare che negli anni ’90, quando l’Eritrea si separò dall’Etiopia, era vista come la speranza dell’Africa. Un paese attivo, pieno di potenziale, che si era liberato da solo senza chiedere aiuto a nessuno. Il mondo si aspettava che diventasse la Taiwan del Corno d’Africa, grazie anche a una cultura economica che gli altri stati se la sognavano.

    L’Ue investe in Etiopia ed Eritrea

    L’Unione europea sta per erogare 312 milioni di euro di aiuti al Corno d’Africa per la costruzione di infrastrutture che consentiranno di far transitare merci dall’Etiopia al mare, attraversando quindi l’Eritrea. Una decisione su cui ha preso posizione Reportes sans frontières, che chiede la sospensione di questo finanziamento ad un paese che, si legge in una nota, «continua a violare i diritti umani, la libertà di espressione e e di informazione e detiene arbitrariamente, spesso senza sottoporli ad alcun processo, decine di prigionieri politici, tra cui molti giornalisti».

    Cléa Kahn-Sriber, responsabile di Reporter sans frontières in Africa, ha dichiarato essere «sbalorditivo che l’Unione europea sostenga il regime di Afeweki con tutti questi aiuti senza chiedere nulla in cambio in materia di diritti umani e libertà d’espressione. Il regime ha più giornalisti in carcere di qualsiasi altro paese africano. Le condizioni dei diritti umani sono assolutamente vergognose».

    La Fondazione di difesa dei Diritti umani per l’Eritrea con sede in Olanda e composta da eritrei esiliati sta intraprendendo azioni legali contro l’Unione europea. Secondo la ricercatrice universitaria eritrea Makeda Saba, «l’Ue collaborerà e finanzierà la #Red_Sea_Trading_Corporation, interamente gestita e posseduta dal governo, società che il gruppo di monitoraggio dell’Onu su Somalia ed Eritrea definisce coinvolta in attività illegali e grigie nel Corno d’africa, compreso il traffico d’armi, attraverso una rete labirintica multinazionale di società, privati e conti bancari». Un bel pasticcio, insomma.

    Pericoloso lasciare l’Eritrea: il ruolo delle ambasciate

    Chi trova asilo in altre nazioni vive spiato e minacciato dai propri connazionali. Lo ha denunciato Amnesty International, secondo cui le nazioni dove i difensori dei diritti umani eritrei corrono i maggiori rischi sono Kenya, Norvegia, Olanda, Regno Unito, Svezia e Svizzera. Nel mirino del potere eritreo ora c’è anche un prete candidato al Nobel per la pace nel 2015, Mussie Zerai.

    «I rappresentanti del governo eritreo nelle ambasciate impiegano tutte le tattiche per impaurire chi critica l’amministrazione del presidente Afewerki, spiano, minacciano di morte. Chi è scappato viene considerato traditore della patria, sovversivo e terrorista».

    In aprile il ministro dell’Informazione, #Yemane_Gebre_Meskel, e gli ambasciatori di Giappone e Kenia hanno scritto su Twitter post minacciosi contro gli organizzatori e i partecipanti ad una conferenza svoltasi a Londra dal titolo “Costruire la democrazia in Eritrea”. Nel tweet, #Meskel ha definito gli organizzatori «collaborazionisti».

    Non va meglio agli esiliati in Kenya. Nel 2013, a seguito del tentativo di registrare un’organizzazione della società civile chiamata #Diaspora_eritrea_per_l’Africa_orientale, l’ambasciata eritrea ha immediatamente revocato il passaporto del presidente e co-fondatore, #Hussein_Osman_Said, organizzandone l’arresto in Sud Sudan. L’accusa? Partecipare al terrorismo, intento a sabotare il governo in carica.

    Amnesty chiede quindi «che venga immediatamente sospeso l’uso delle ambasciate all’estero per intimidire e reprimere le voci critiche».

    Parlando delle ragioni che hanno scatenato l’ultimo atto di forza contro gli ospedali, padre Zerai ha detto che «il regime si è giustificato facendo riferimento a una legge del 1995, secondo cui le strutture sociali strategiche come ospedali e scuole devono essere gestite dallo stato».

    Tuttavia, questa legge non era mai stata applicata e non si conoscono i motivi per cui all’improvviso è cominciata la repressione. Padre Zerai la vede così: «La Chiesa cattolica eritrea è indipendente e molto attiva nella società, offre supporto alle donne, sostegno ai poveri e ai malati di Aids ed è molto ascoltata». A preoccupare il padre, e non solo lui, sono ora «il silenzio dell’Unione europea e della comunità internzionale. Siamo davati a crimini gravissimi e il mondo tace».

    https://www.osservatoriodiritti.it/2019/07/04/eritrea-news-etiopia-guerra
    #droits_humains #Erythrée #COI #Afewerki #service_militaire #guerre #Ethiopie #religion #passeport #torture #totalitarisme #dictature #externalisation #UE #EU #aide_au_développement #coopération_au_développement #répression #Eglise_catholique