• ‘A system of #global_apartheid’ : author #Harsha_Walia on why the border crisis is a myth

    The Canadian organizer says the actual crises are capitalism, war and the climate emergency, which drive mass migration.

    The rising number of migrant children and families seeking to cross the US border with Mexico is emerging as one of the most serious political challenges for Joe Biden’s new administration.

    That’s exactly what Donald Trump wants: he and other Republicans believe that Americans’ concerns about a supposed “border crisis” will help Republicans win back political power.

    But Harsha Walia, the author of two books about border politics, argues that there is no “border crisis,” in the United States or anywhere else. Instead, there are the “actual crises” that drive mass migration – such as capitalism, war and the climate emergency – and “imagined crises” at political borders, which are used to justify further border securitization and violence.

    Walia, a Canadian organizer who helped found No One Is Illegal, which advocates for migrants, refugees and undocumented people, talked to the Guardian about Border and Rule, her new book on global migration, border politics and the rise of what she calls “racist nationalism.” The conversation has been edited for length and clarity.

    Last month, a young white gunman was charged with murdering eight people, most of them Asian women, at several spas around Atlanta, Georgia. Around the same time, there was increasing political attention to the higher numbers of migrants and refugees showing up at the US-Mexico border. Do you see any connection between these different events?

    I think they are deeply connected. The newest invocation of a “border surge” and a “border crisis” is again creating the spectre of immigrants and refugees “taking over.” This seemingly race neutral language – we are told there’s nothing inherently racist about saying “border surge”– is actually deeply racially coded. It invokes a flood of black and brown people taking over a so-called white man’s country. That is the basis of historic immigrant exclusion, both anti-Asian exclusion in the 19th century, which very explicitly excluded Chinese laborers and especially Chinese women presumed to be sex workers, and anti-Latinx exclusion. If we were to think about one situation as anti-Asian racism and one as anti-Latinx racism, they might seem disconnected. But both forms of racism are fundamentally anti-immigrant. Racial violence is connected to the idea of who belongs and who doesn’t. Whose humanity is questioned in a moment of crisis. Who is scapegoated in a moment of crisis.

    How do you understand the rise of white supremacist violence, particularly anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim violence, that we are seeing around the world?

    The rise in white supremacy is a feedback loop between individual rightwing vigilantes and state rhetoric and state policy. When it comes to the Georgia shootings, we can’t ignore the fact that the criminalization of sex work makes sex workers targets. It’s not sex work itself, it’s the social condition of criminalization that creates that vulnerability. It’s similar to the ways in which border vigilantes have targeted immigrants: the Minutemen who show up at the border and harass migrants, or the kidnapping of migrants by the United Constitutional Patriots at gunpoint. We can’t dissociate that kind of violence from state policies that vilify migrants and refugees, or newspapers that continue to use the word “illegal alien”.

    National borders are often described as protecting citizens, or as protecting workers at home from lower-paid workers in other countries. You argue that borders actually serve a very different purpose.

    Borders maintain a massive system of global apartheid. They are preventing, on a scale we’ve never seen before, the free movement of people who are trying to search for a better life.

    There’s been a lot of emphasis on the ways in which Donald Trump was enacting very exclusionary immigration policies. But border securitization and border controls have been bipartisan practices in the United States. We saw the first policies of militarization at the border with Mexico under Bill Clinton in the late 90s.

    In the European context, the death of [three-year-old Syrian toddler] Alan Kurdi, all of these images of migrants drowning in the Mediterranean, didn’t actually lead to an immigration policy that was more welcoming. Billions of euros are going to drones in the Mediterranean, war ships in the Mediterranean. We’re seeing the EU making trade and aid agreements it has with countries in the Sahel region of Africa and the Middle East contingent on migration control. They are relying on countries in the global south as the frontiers of border militarization. All of this is really a crisis of immobility. The whole world is increasingly becoming fortified.

    What are the root causes of these ‘migration crises’? Why is this happening?

    What we need to understand is that migration is a form of reparations. Migration is an accounting for global violence. It’s not a coincidence that the vast number of people who are migrants and refugees in the world today are black and brown people from poor countries that have been made poor because of centuries of imperialism, of empire, of exploitation and deliberate underdevelopment. It’s those same fault lines of plunder around the world that are the fault lines of migration. More and more people are being forced out of their land because of trade agreements, mining extraction, deforestation, climate change. Iraq and Afghanistan have been for decades on the top of the UN list for displaced people and that has been linked to the US and Nato’s occupations of those countries.

    Why would governments have any interest in violence at borders? Why spend so much money on security and militarization?

    The border does not only serve to exclude immigrants and refugees, but also to create conditions of hyper exploitation, where some immigrants and refugees do enter, but in a situation of extreme precarity. If you’re undocumented, you will work for less than minimum wage. If you attempt to unionize, you will face the threat of deportation. You will not feel you can access public services, or in some cases you will be denied public services. Borders maintain racial citizenship and create a pool of hyper-exploitable cheapened labor. People who are never a full part of the community, always living in fear, constantly on guard.

    Why do you choose to put your focus on governments and their policies, rather than narratives of migrants themselves?

    Border deaths are presented as passive occurrences, as if people just happen to die, as if there’s something inherently dangerous about being on the move, which we know is not the case. Many people move with immense privilege, even luxury. It’s more accurate to call what is happening to migrants and refugees around the world as border killings. People are being killed by policies that are intended to kill. Literally, governments are hoping people will die, are deliberating creating conditions of death, in order to create deterrence.

    It is very important to hold the states accountable, instead of narratives where migrants are blamed for their own deaths: ‘They knew it was going to be dangerous, why did they move?’ Which to me mimics the very horrible tropes of survivors in rape culture.

    You live in Canada. Especially in the United States, many people think of Canada as this inherently nice place. Less racist, less violent, more supportive of refugees and immigrants. Is that the reality?

    It’s totally false. Part of the incentive of writing this second book was being on a book tour in the US and constantly hearing, ‘At least in Canada it can’t be as bad as in the US.’ ‘Your prime minister says refugees are welcome.’ That masks the violence of how unfree the conditions of migration are, with the temporary foreign worker program, which is a form of indentureship. Workers are forced to live in the home of their employer, if you’re a domestic worker, or forced to live in a labor camp, crammed with hundreds of people. When your labor is no longer needed, you’re deported, often with your wages unpaid. There is nothing nice about it. It just means Canada has perfected a model of exploitation. The US and other countries in Europe are increasingly looking to this model, because it works perfectly to serve both the state and capital interests. Capital wants cheapened labor and the state doesn’t want people with full citizenship rights.

    You wrote recently that ‘Escalating white supremacy cannot be dealt with through anti-terror or hate crime laws.’ Why?

    Terrorism is not a colorblind phenomena. The global war on terror for the past 20 years was predicated around deeply Islamophobic rhetoric that has had devastating impact on Black and Brown Muslims and Muslim-majority countries around the world. I think it is implausible and naive to assume that the national security infrastructure, or the criminal legal system, which is also built on racialized logics, especially anti-black racism – that we can somehow subvert these systems to protect racialized communities. It’s not going to work.

    One of the things that happened when the Proud Boys were designated as a terrorist organization in Canada is that it provided cover to expand this terror list that communities have been fighting against for decades. On the day the Proud Boys were listed, a number of other organizations were added which were part of the Muslim community. That was the concern that many of us had: will this just become an excuse to expand the terrorist list rather than dismantle it? In the long run, what’s going to happen? Even if in some miraculous world the Proud Boys and its members are dismantled, what’s going to happen to all the other organizations on the list? They’re still being criminalized, they’re still being terrorized, they’re still being surveilled.

    So if you don’t think the logics of national security or criminal justice will work, what do you think should be done about escalating white supremacist violence?

    I think that’s the question: what do we need to be doing? It’s not about one arm of the state, it’s about all of us. What’s happening in our neighborhoods, in our school systems, in the media? There’s not one simple fix. We need to keep each other safe. We need to make sure we’re intervening whenever we see racial violence, everything from not letting racist jokes off the hook to fighting for systemic change. Anti-war work is racial justice work. Anti-capitalist work is racial justice work.

    You advocate for ending border imperialism, and ending racial capitalism. Those are big goals. How do you break that down into things that one person can actually do?

    I actually found it harder before, because I would try things that I thought were simple and would change the world, and they wouldn’t. For me, understanding how violences are connected, and really understanding the immensity of the problem, was less overwhelming. It motivated me to think in bigger ways, to organize with other people. To understand this is fundamentally about radical, massive collective action. It can’t rely on one person or even one place.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/apr/07/us-border-immigration-harsha-walia
    #apartheid #inégalités #monde #migrations #frontières #réfugiés #capitalisme #guerres #conflits #climat #changement_climatique #crises #crise #fermeture_des_frontières #crises_frontalières #violence #racisme #discriminations #exclusion #anti-migrants #violence_raciale #suprématisme_blanc #prostitution #criminalisation #vulnérabilité #minutemen #militarisation_des_frontières #USA #Mexique #Etats-Unis #politique_migratoire #politiques_migratoires #Kurdi #Aylan_Kurdi #Alan_Kurdi #impérialisme #colonialisme #colonisation #mourir_aux_frontières #décès #morts

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Utviste 58 passasjerer fra én flyging til Torp – NRK Vestfold og Telemark – Lokale nyheter, TV og radio

    La Norvège ne rigole pas avec la fermeture des frontières et les règles très strictes pour l’entrée. en 2020 et 2021 so far, 7 600 personnes ont été interdites d’entrée sur le territoire norvégien, et renvoyées d’où elles venaient par le même avion avec lequel elles sont arrivées. Et quand c’était les avions du soir, les passagers étaient placés en hôtel de quarantaine sou surveillance pour être remise dans le premier avion retour le lendemain matin.
    https://www.nrk.no/vestfoldogtelemark/utviste-58-passasjerer-fra-en-flyging-til-torp-1.15414142

    Tall fra politiet viser en stor økning i antall bortvisninger i grensekontrollen. 600 er hittil i år sendt tilbake fra Gardermoen.

    I januar måtte 332 personer returnere til hjemlandet fra Torp, mens tallet for februar er 125.

    – Det at så mange ble bortvist i januar kommer nok delvis av endringer i regelverk og fordi mange som jobber i Norge var i hjemlandet på juleferie.

    Statistikk i forbindelse med koronaviruset – Politiet.no
    https://www.politiet.no/aktuelt-tall-og-fakta/tall-og-fakta/statistikk-i-forbindelse-med-koronaviruset

    I uke 9 ble 380 personer bortvist fra Norge. Det er 52 flere enn uken før. 60 av bortvisningene skyldtes manglende dokumentasjon på negativ Covid-19-test. For 294 personer var bortvisningsgrunnen at de ikke hadde rett til innreise som følge av innreiserestriksjoner. For de øvrige var det andre årsaker til bortvisningen.

    Så langt i år er 3094 personer bortvist fra Norge.

    #norvège #corona

  • International Mobility Restrictions and the Spread of Pandemics: New Data and Research

    Global Mobility and the Threat of Pandemics: Evidence from Three Centuries, Michael A. Clemens and Thomas Ginn, Center for Global Development

    Countries restrict the overall extent of international travel and migration to balance the expected costs and benefits of mobility. Given the ever-present threat of new, future pandemics, how should permanent restrictions on mobility respond? We find that in all cases, even a draconian 50 percent reduction in pre-pandemic international mobility is associated with 1–2 weeks later arrival and no detectable reduction in final mortality. The case for permanent limits on international mobility to reduce the harm of future pandemics is weak.

    The Airport Factor: Assessing the impact of aviation mobility on the spread of Covid-19, by Ettore Recchi and Alessandro Ferrara

    An ongoing research project at MPC (The Airport Factor) is assessing the impact of air travels on Covid-19 mortality in 430 sub-national regions of 39 countries in Europe, the Americas, Asia, Africa, and Oceania. Our early analyses find that the volume of pre-pandemic inbound air travelers (including from China) has no significant effect either on the number of Covid-19 casualties, or on the timing of the outbreaks in the first semester of 2020.

    Discussants:
    Ellen M. Immergut, Head of Department, Chair in Political Sciences, SPS, EUI
    Daniel Fernandes, Researcher, SPS

    Chair: Lenka Dražanová, MPC, RSCAS, EUI

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PmhBNNeURus&feature=youtu.be


    #covid-19 #coronavirus #frontières #pandémie #mobilité #mobilité_internationale #conférence #fermeture_des_frontières #restrictions #migrations

  • Les frontières se ferment donc la population étrangère augmente…

    À fin décembre 2020, 2’151’854 ressortissants étrangers résidaient en #Suisse. Le Secrétariat d’Etat aux migrations vient de révéler à ce sujet un drôle de paradoxe : alors qu’en 2020, l’#immigration a diminué de 2,6 % par rapport à 2019, la #population_étrangère a augmenté nettement plus rapidement qu’auparavant : +40’442 [+1.9%] en 2020 contre +30’243 [+1.5%] en 2019.

    Si la diminution de l’immigration durant cette année « COVID » s’explique aisément par les restrictions d’entrée mises en place par la Suisse et surtout par le manque de perspectives économiques liées à la pandémie, comment expliquer la croissance accélérée de la population étrangère ? La réponse est simple : de nombreuses personnes déjà présentes en Suisse ont renoncé à quitter le pays, tant et si bien que l’#émigration (les départs) a fortement diminué (-12.1%)[1]. On peut grosso modo considérer que 10’000 personnes étrangères ont ainsi décidé (ou été contraintes) de rester en Suisse l’an passé alors qu’elles seraient parties en temps normal. L’inquiétude de ne pouvoir revenir a joué un rôle, de même que les incertitudes sur les perspectives à l’étranger[2].

    Le solde migratoire de la Suisse (arrivées moins départs) a donc augmenté malgré les restrictions d’entrée !

    S’il surprend à première vue, ce paradoxe est bien connu des géographes et autres migratologues sous le nom de « #net_migration_bounce » (#rebond_du_solde_migratoire). Il avait été mis en évidence de manière spectaculaire il y quelques années par une étude sur les politiques de #visas de 34 pays. Il en ressortait que lorsqu’un pays d’immigration se montre très restrictif en matière d’entrées, ces dernières diminuent, certes, mais les personnes qui parviennent à obtenir le précieux sésame ne repartent plus, de peur de ne pas pouvoir entrer à nouveau[3]. Un résultat similaire ressort d’une étude sur les politiques d’immigration de la France, de l’Italie et de l’Espagne vis-à-vis des Sénégalais entre 1960 et 2010[4]. Ces derniers se sont avérés d’autant plus enclins à retourner au Sénégal que les politiques d’entrée en Europe ont été ouvertes. A l’inverse, le resserrement des conditions d’entrée a poussé les expatriés à le rester.

    L’année 2020 reste exceptionnelle, mais la leçon générale à tirer du paradoxe de la fermeture des frontières est que loin d’être statique, la population issue de la migration est – tout au moins pour partie – en constant mouvement. Il est loin le temps où une migration se faisait de manière définitive et pour toute une vie[5]. Beaucoup de gens arrivent, beaucoup de gens partent, et parfois reviennent ! C’est aussi cette réalité que les politiques d’accueil doivent prendre en compte.

    [1] Pour être complet, il y a lieu de tenir compte aussi des naturalisations et des décès (qui font diminuer la population étrangère) et des naissances (qui la font augmenter). L’évolution de ces facteurs a toutefois joué un rôle plus faible que le solde migratoire dans l’évolution de 2020.

    [2] Après le relâchement des contraintes de mobilité de la deuxième moitié 2020, le quatrième trimestre de l’année a d’ailleurs vu l’émigration reprendre son rythme habituel.

    [3] Czaika, M., and H. de Haas. 2017. The Effect of Visas on Migration Processes. International Migration Review 51 (4):893-926.

    [4] Flahaux, M.-L. 2017. The Role of Migration Policy Changes in Europe for Return Migration to Senegal. International Migration Review 51 (4):868-892.

    [5] On notera que dans des pays plus marqués par des migrations « traditionnelles » de longue durée et par moins de mobilité, le paradoxe que nous venons de relever pour la Suisse ne semble pas s’être manifesté. On peut faire l’hypothèses que ce soit le cas du Canada https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/closed-borders-halt-canada-s-population-growth-during-pandemic-1.150097

    https://blogs.letemps.ch/etienne-piguet/2021/02/05/les-frontieres-se-ferment-donc-la-population-etrangere-augmente

    #fermeture_des_frontières #migrations #démographie #paradoxe #solde_migratoire #frontières

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • #France : l’épidémie de #Covid-19 a fait plonger les demandes d’asile

    Selon des chiffres publiés ce jeudi par le ministère français de l’Intérieur, l’épidémie de Covid-19 a eu un impact tant sur les demandes d’asile que sur les expulsions.

    Après des années de hausse depuis la crise migratoire de 2015, le nombre de demandes d’asile en France a marqué une rupture nette en 2020 avec une #chute de 41%. « Une telle #baisse s’explique par la #crise_sanitaire de la Covid-19 et plus précisément par l’impact des confinements sur l’activité des #Guda (#Guichets_uniques_pour_demandeurs_d'asile) et sur la circulation des étrangers », a commenté le ministère de l’Intérieur en publiant ces chiffres provisoires.

    Ainsi, 81 669 premières demandes d’asile ont été formulées dans ces guichets en 2020, contre 138 420 (-41%) l’année précédente. Toutes situations confondues (réexamens, procédures Dublin etc.), 115 888 demandes ont été prises en compte l’an dernier, contre 177 822 en 2019.

    Cette baisse en France s’inscrit dans une tendance européenne, après plusieurs mois de fermeture des frontières extérieures de l’Union européenne : en Allemagne, le nombre de demandes d’asile a également chuté de 30%.

    Baisse des #expulsions

    La pandémie a eu des « conséquences importantes à la fois sur les flux (migratoires) entrant et sortant », a également observé la place Beauvau. Entre 2019 et 2020, les expulsions des personnes en situation irrégulière ont en effet baissé de moitié (-51,8%).

    Les statistiques de cette année où « tout a été déstabilisé par la Covid-19 » mettent également en évidence un effondrement de 80% du nombre de #visas délivrés : 712 311 contre 3,53 millions en 2019. Ce recul, poussé par l’effondrement des #visas_touristiques, s’explique essentiellement par la chute du nombre des visiteurs chinois. Ils étaient de loin les premiers détenteurs de visas pour la France en 2019 avec 757 500 documents, et sont passés en quatrième position avec seulement 71 451 visas délivrés en 2020.

    https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/29804/france-l-epidemie-de-covid-19-a-fait-plonger-les-demandes-d-asile?prev

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #chiffres #statistiques #2020 #demandes_d'asile #coronavirus #confinement #fermeture_des_frontières

    ping @karine4 @isskein

  • Senza stringhe

    La libertà di movimento è riconosciuta dalla nostra Costituzione; se questa sia un diritto naturale oppure no, bisogna allora riflettere su cosa effettivamente sia un diritto naturale. Tuttavia, essa è una parte imprescindibile della vita umana e coloro che migrano, ieri come oggi, hanno uno stimolo ben superiore all’appartenenza territoriale. Ogni giorno, ci sono due scenari paralleli e possibili che avvengono tra le montagne italo-francesi: coloro che raggiungono la meta e coloro che vengono respinti; il terzo scenario, fatale e tragico, è solamente intuibile.
    Eppure la frontiera è stata militarizzata ma qui continuano a passare: nonostante tutto, c’è porosità e c’è un passaggio. Prima che arrivasse il turismo privilegiato, l’alta valle compresa tra Bardonecchia, Oulx e Claviere ha da sempre vissuto la propria evoluzione dapprima con il Sentiero dei Mandarini e successivamente con la realizzazione della ferrovia cambiando la geografia del posto. Le frontiere diventano incomprensibili senza aver chiara l’origine dei vari cammini: la rotta balcanica, il Mar Mediterraneo centrale, i mercati del lavoro forzato e le richieste europee. Le frontiere si modellano, si ripetono e si diversificano ma presentano tutte una caratteristica isomorfa: la politica del consenso interno oltre che strutturale. In una valle come questa, caratterizzata dagli inverni rigidi e nevosi, dal 2015 non si arresta il tentativo di attraversare il confine tra i due stati sia per una necessità di viaggio, di orizzonte retorico, di ricongiungimento familiare ma soprattutto, dopo aver attraversando territori difficili o mari impossibili, per mesi o anni, non è di certo la montagna a fermare la mobilità che non segue logiche di tipo locale. Le mete finali, a volte, non sono precise ma vengono costruite in itinere e secondo la propria possibilità economica; per viaggiare hanno speso capitali enormi con la consapevolezza della restituzione alle reti di parentato, di vicinato e tutte quelle possibili.
    La valle si presenta frammentata geograficamente e ciò aumenta le difficoltà per raccogliere dei dati precisi in quanto le modalità di respingimento sono molto eterogenee, ci sono diversi valichi di frontiera: ci sono respingimenti che avvengono al Frejus e ci sono respingimenti che avvengono a Montgenèvre. Di notte, le persone respinte vengono portate al Rifugio Solidale di Oulx, sia dalla Croce Rossa sia dalla Polizia di stato italiana. Durante il giorno, invece, la Polizia di stato italiana riporta le persone in Italia e le lascia tra le strade di Oulx o a Bardonecchia. Dall’altra parte, ad Ovest del Monginevro, a Briançon è presente il Refuge Solidarie: solo con la collaborazione tra le associazioni italo-francesi si può avere una stima di quante sono state le persone accolte e dunque quante persone hanno raggiunto la meta intermedia, la Francia. Avere dei dati più precisi potrebbe essere utile per stimolare un intervento più strutturato da parte delle istituzioni perché in questo momento sul territorio sono presenti soprattutto le associazioni e ONG o individui singoli che stanno gestendo questa situazione, che stanno cercando di tamponare questa emergenza che neanche dovrebbe avere questo titolo.

    Non sono migranti ma frontiere in cammino.

    https://www.leggiscomodo.org/senza-stringhe

    #migrations #frontières #Italie #montagne #Alpes #Hautes-Alpes #reportage #photo-reportage #photographie #Briançon #Oulx #liberté_de_mouvement #liberté_de_circulation #militarisation_des_frontières #porosité #passage #fermeture_des_frontières #Claviere #Bardonecchia #chemin_de_fer #Sentiero_dei_Mandarini #Frejus #refoulements #push-backs #jour #nuit #Refuge_solidaire #casa_cantonniera #froid #hiver #Busson #PAF #maraude #solidarité #maraudes #Médecins_du_monde #no-tav
    #ressources_pédagogiques

    ajouté à la métaliste sur le Briançonnais :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733721#message886920

  • Le néo-populisme est un néo- libéralisme

    Comment être libéral et vouloir fermer les frontières ? L’histoire du néolibéralisme aide à comprendre pourquoi, en Autriche et en Allemagne, extrême droite et droite extrême justifient un tel grand écart : oui à la libre-circulation des biens et des richesses, non à l’accueil des migrants.

    https://aoc.media/analyse/2018/07/03/neo-populisme-neo-liberalisme

    –-> je re-signale ici un article publié dans AOC media qui date de 2018, sur lequel je suis tombée récemment, mais qui est malheureusement sous paywall

    #populisme #libéralisme #néo-libéralisme #néolibéralisme #fermeture_des_frontières #frontières #histoire #extrême_droite #libre-circulation #migrations #Allemagne #Autriche

    ping @karine4 @isskein

    • #Globalists. The End of Empire and the Birth of Neoliberalism

      Neoliberals hate the state. Or do they? In the first intellectual history of neoliberal globalism, #Quinn_Slobodian follows a group of thinkers from the ashes of the Habsburg Empire to the creation of the World Trade Organization to show that neoliberalism emerged less to shrink government and abolish regulations than to redeploy them at a global level.

      Slobodian begins in Austria in the 1920s. Empires were dissolving and nationalism, socialism, and democratic self-determination threatened the stability of the global capitalist system. In response, Austrian intellectuals called for a new way of organizing the world. But they and their successors in academia and government, from such famous economists as Friedrich Hayek and Ludwig von Mises to influential but lesser-known figures such as Wilhelm Röpke and Michael Heilperin, did not propose a regime of laissez-faire. Rather they used states and global institutions—the League of Nations, the European Court of Justice, the World Trade Organization, and international investment law—to insulate the markets against sovereign states, political change, and turbulent democratic demands for greater equality and social justice.

      Far from discarding the regulatory state, neoliberals wanted to harness it to their grand project of protecting capitalism on a global scale. It was a project, Slobodian shows, that changed the world, but that was also undermined time and again by the inequality, relentless change, and social injustice that accompanied it.

      https://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674979529

      #livre #empire #WTO #capitalisme #Friedrich_Hayek #Ludwig_von_Mises #Wilhelm_Röpke #Michael_Heilperin #Etat #Etat-nation #marché #inégalités #injustice #OMC

    • Quinn Slobodian : « Le néolibéralisme est travaillé par un conflit interne »

      Pour penser les hybridations contemporaines entre néolibéralisme, #autoritarisme et #nationalisme, le travail d’historien de Quinn Slobodian, encore peu connu en France, est incontournable. L’auteur de Globalists nous a accordé un #entretien.

      L’élection de Trump, celle de Bolsonaro, le Brexit… les élites des partis de #droite participant au #consensus_néolibéral semblent avoir perdu le contrôle face aux pulsions nationalistes, protectionnistes et autoritaires qui s’expriment dans leur propre camp ou chez leurs concurrents les plus proches.

      Pour autant, ces pulsions sont-elles si étrangères à la #doctrine_néolibérale ? N’assisterait-on pas à une mutation illibérale voire nativiste de la #globalisation_néolibérale, qui laisserait intactes ses infrastructures et sa philosophie économiques ?

      Le travail de Quinn Slobodian, qui a accordé un entretien à Mediapart (lire ci-dessous), apporte un éclairage précieux à ces questions. Délaissant volontairement la branche anglo-américaine à laquelle la pensée néolibérale a souvent été réduite, cet historien a reconstitué les parcours de promoteurs du néolibéralisme ayant accompli, au moins en partie, leur carrière à #Genève, en Suisse (d’où leur regroupement sous le nom d’#école_de_Genève).

      Dans son livre, Globalists (Harvard University Press, 2018, non traduit en français), ce professeur associé au Wellesley College (près de Boston) décrit l’influence croissante d’un projet intellectuel né « sur les cendres de l’empire des Habsbourg » à la fin de la Première Guerre mondiale, et qui connut son apogée à la création de l’#Organisation_mondiale_du_commerce (#OMC) en 1995.

      À la suite d’autres auteurs, Slobodian insiste sur le fait que ce projet n’a jamais été réductible à un « #fondamentalisme_du_marché », opposé par principe à la #puissance_publique et au #droit. Selon lui, l’école de Genève visait plutôt un « #enrobage » ( encasement ) du #marché pour en protéger les mécanismes. L’objectif n’était pas d’aboutir à un monde sans #frontières et sans lois, mais de fabriquer un #ordre_international capable de « sauvegarder le #capital », y compris contre les demandes des masses populaires.

      Dans cette logique, la division du monde en unités étatiques a le mérite d’ouvrir des « voies de sortie » et des possibilités de mise en #concurrence aux acteurs marchands, qui ne risquent pas d’être victimes d’un Léviathan à l’échelle mondiale. Cela doit rester possible grâce à la production de #règles et d’#institutions, qui protègent les décisions de ces acteurs et soustraient l’#activité_économique à la versatilité des choix souverains.

      On l’aura compris, c’est surtout la #liberté de l’investisseur qui compte, plus que celle du travailleur ou du citoyen – Slobodian cite un auteur se faisant fort de démontrer que « le #libre_commerce bénéficie à tous, même sans liberté de migration et si les peuples restent fermement enracinés dans leurs pays ». Si la compétition politique peut se focaliser sur les enjeux culturels, les grandes orientations économiques doivent lui échapper.

      L’historien identifie dans son livre « trois #ruptures » qui ont entretenu, chez les néolibéraux qu’il a étudiés, la hantise de voir s’effondrer les conditions d’un tel ordre de marché. La guerre de 14-18 a d’abord interrompu le développement de la « première mondialisation », aboutissant au morcellement des empires de la Mitteleuropa et à l’explosion de revendications démocratiques et sociales.

      La #Grande_Dépression des années 1930 et l’avènement des fascismes ont constitué un #traumatisme supplémentaire, les incitant à rechercher ailleurs que dans la science économique les solutions pour « sanctuariser » la mobilité du capital. Les prétentions au #protectionnisme de certains pays du « Sud » les ont enfin poussés à s’engager pour des accords globaux de #libre_commerce.

      L’intérêt supplémentaire de Globalists est de nous faire découvrir les controverses internes qui ont animé cet espace intellectuel, au-delà de ses objectifs communs. Une minorité des néolibéraux étudiés s’est ainsi montrée sinon favorable à l’#apartheid en #Afrique_du_Sud, du moins partisane de droits politiques limités pour la population noire, soupçonnée d’une revanche potentiellement dommageable pour les #libertés_économiques.

      Le groupe s’est également scindé à propos de l’#intégration_européenne, entre ceux qui se méfiaient d’une entité politique risquant de fragmenter le marché mondial, et d’autres, qui y voyaient l’occasion de déployer une « Constitution économique », pionnière d’un « modèle de gouvernance supranationale […] capable de résister à la contamination par les revendications démocratiques » (selon les termes du juriste #Mestmäcker).

      On le voit, la recherche de Slobodian permet de mettre en perspective historique les tensions observables aujourd’hui parmi les acteurs du néolibéralisme. C’est pourquoi nous avons souhaité l’interroger sur sa vision des évolutions contemporaines de l’ordre politique et économique mondial.

      Dans votre livre, vous montrez que les néolibéraux donnent beaucoup d’importance aux #règles et peuvent s’accommoder des #frontières_nationales, là où cette pensée est souvent présentée comme l’ennemie de l’État. Pourriez-vous éclaircir ce point ?

      Quinn Slobodian : Quand on parle d’ouverture et de fermeture des frontières, il faut toujours distinguer entre les biens, l’argent ou les personnes. Mon livre porte surtout sur le #libre_commerce, et comment des #lois_supranationales l’ont encouragé. Mais si l’on parle des personnes, il se trouve que dans les années 1910-1920, des néolibéraux comme #von_Mises étaient pour le droit absolu de circuler.

      Après les deux guerres mondiales, cette conception ne leur est plus apparue réaliste, pour des raisons de #sécurité_nationale. #Hayek a par exemple soutenu l’agenda restrictif en la matière de #Margaret_Thatcher.

      Même si l’on met la question de l’immigration de côté, je persiste à souligner que les néolibéraux n’ont rien contre les frontières, car celles-ci exercent une pression nécessaire à la #compétitivité. C’est pourquoi l’existence simultanée d’une économie intégrée et de multiples communautés politiques n’est pas une contradiction pour eux. De plus, une « #gouvernance_multiniveaux » peut aider les dirigeants nationaux à résister aux pressions populaires. Ils peuvent se défausser sur les échelons de gouvernement qui leur lient les mains, plus facilement que si on avait un véritable #gouvernement_mondial, avec un face-à-face entre gouvernants et gouvernés.

      Cela pose la question du rapport entre néolibéralisme et #démocratie

      Les néolibéraux voient la démocratie de manière très fonctionnelle, comme un régime qui produit plutôt de la #stabilité. C’est vrai qu’ils ne l’envisagent qu’avec des contraintes constitutionnelles, lesquelles n’ont pas à être débordées par la volonté populaire. D’une certaine façon, la discipline que Wolfgang Schaüble, ex-ministre des finances allemand, a voulu imposer à la Grèce résulte de ce type de pensée. Mais c’est quelque chose d’assez commun chez l’ensemble des libéraux que de vouloir poser des bornes à la #démocratie_électorale, donc je ne voudrais pas faire de mauvais procès.

      Les élections européennes ont lieu le 26 mai prochain. Pensez-vous que l’UE a réalisé les rêves des « globalists » que vous avez étudiés ?

      C’est vrai que la #Cour_de_justice joue le rôle de gardienne des libertés économiques au centre de cette construction. Pour autant, les règles ne se sont pas révélées si rigides que cela, l’Allemagne elle-même ayant dépassé les niveaux de déficit dont il était fait si grand cas. Plusieurs craintes ont agité les néolibéraux : celle de voir se développer une #Europe_sociale au détriment de l’#intégration_négative (par le marché), ou celle de voir la #monnaie_unique empêcher la #concurrence entre #monnaies, sans compter le risque qu’elle tombe aux mains de gens trop peu attachés à la stabilité des prix, comme vous, les Français (rires).

      Plus profondément, les néolibéraux sceptiques se disaient qu’avec des institutions rendues plus visibles, vous créez des cibles pour la #contestation_populaire, alors qu’il vaut mieux des institutions lointaines et discrètes, produisant des règles qui semblent naturelles.

      Cette opposition à l’UE, de la part de certains néolibéraux, trouve-t-elle un héritage parmi les partisans du #Brexit ?

      Tout à fait. On retrouve par exemple leur crainte de dérive étatique dans le #discours_de_Bruges de Margaret Thatcher, en 1988. Celle-ci souhaitait compléter le #marché_unique et travailler à une plus vaste zone de #libre-échange, mais refusait la #monnaie_unique et les « forces du #fédéralisme et de la #bureaucratie ».

      Derrière ce discours mais aussi les propos de #Nigel_Farage [ex-dirigeant du parti de droite radicale Ukip, pro-Brexit – ndlr], il y a encore l’idée que l’horizon de la Grande-Bretagne reste avant tout le #marché_mondial. Sans préjuger des motivations qui ont mené les citoyens à voter pour le Brexit, il est clair que l’essentiel des forces intellectuelles derrière cette option partageaient des convictions néolibérales.

      « L’hystérie sur les populistes dramatise une situation beaucoup plus triviale »

      De nombreux responsables de droite sont apparus ces dernières années, qui sont à la fois (très) néolibéraux et (très) nationalistes, que l’on pense à Trump ou aux dirigeants de l’#Alternative_für_Deutschland (#AfD) en Allemagne. Sont-ils une branche du néolibéralisme ?

      L’AfD est née avec une plateforme ordo-libérale, attachée à la #stabilité_budgétaire en interne et refusant toute solidarité avec les pays méridionaux de l’UE. Elle joue sur l’#imaginaire de « l’#économie_sociale_de_marché », vantée par le chancelier #Erhard dans les années 1950, dans un contexte où l’ensemble du spectre politique communie dans cette nostalgie. Mais les Allemands tiennent à distinguer ces politiques économiques du néolibéralisme anglo-saxon, qui a encouragé la #financiarisation de l’économie mondiale.

      Le cas de #Trump est compliqué, notamment à cause du caractère erratique de sa prise de décision. Ce qui est sûr, c’est qu’il brise la règle néolibérale selon laquelle l’économie doit être dépolitisée au profit du bon fonctionnement de la concurrence et du marché. En ce qui concerne la finance, son agenda concret est complètement néolibéral.

      En matière commerciale en revanche, il est sous l’influence de conseillers qui l’incitent à une politique agressive, notamment contre la Chine, au nom de l’#intérêt_national. En tout cas, son comportement ne correspond guère à la généalogie intellectuelle de la pensée néolibérale.

      Vous évoquez dans votre livre « l’#anxiété » qui a toujours gagné les néolibéraux. De quoi ont-ils #peur aujourd’hui ?

      Je dirais qu’il y a une division parmi les néolibéraux contemporains, et que la peur de chaque camp est générée par celui d’en face. Certains tendent vers le modèle d’une intégration supranationale, avec des accords contraignants, que cela passe par l’OMC ou les méga-accords commerciaux entre grandes régions du monde.

      Pour eux, les Trump et les pro-Brexit sont les menaces contre la possibilité d’un ordre de marché stable et prospère, à l’échelle du globe. D’un autre côté figurent ceux qui pensent qu’une #intégration_supranationale est la #menace, parce qu’elle serait source d’inefficacités et de bureaucratie, et qu’une architecture institutionnelle à l’échelle du monde serait un projet voué à l’échec.

      Dans ce tableau, jamais la menace ne vient de la gauche ou de mouvement sociaux, donc.

      Pas vraiment, non. Dans les années 1970, il y avait bien le sentiment d’une menace venue du « Sud global », des promoteurs d’un nouvel ordre économique international… La situation contemporaine se distingue par le fait que la #Chine acquiert les capacités de devenir un acteur « disruptif » à l’échelle mondiale, mais qu’elle n’en a guère la volonté. On oublie trop souvent que dans la longue durée, l’objectif de l’empire chinois n’a jamais consisté à étendre son autorité au-delà de ses frontières.

      Aucun des auteurs que je lis n’est d’ailleurs inquiet de la Chine à propos du système commercial mondial. Le #capitalisme_autoritaire qu’elle incarne leur paraît tout à fait convenable, voire un modèle. #Milton_Friedman, dans ses derniers écrits, valorisait la cité-État de #Hong-Kong pour la grande liberté économique qui s’y déploie, en dépit de l’absence de réelle liberté politique.

      Le débat serait donc surtout interne aux néolibéraux. Est-ce qu’il s’agit d’un prolongement des différences entre « l’école de Genève » que vous avez étudiée, et l’« l’école de Chicago » ?

      Selon moi, le débat est un peu différent. Il rappelle plutôt celui que je décris dans mon chapitre sur l’intégration européenne. En ce sens, il oppose des « universalistes », partisans d’un ordre de marché vraiment global construit par le haut, et des « constitutionnalistes », qui préfèrent le bâtir à échelle réduite, mais de façon plus sûre, par le bas. L’horizon des héritiers de l’école de Chicago reste essentiellement borné par les États-Unis. Pour eux, « l’Amérique c’est le monde » !

      On dirait un slogan de Trump.

      Oui, mais c’est trompeur. Contrairement à certains raccourcis, je ne pense pas que Trump veuille un retrait pur et simple du monde de la part des États-Unis, encore moins un modèle autarcique. Il espère au contraire que les exportations de son pays s’améliorent. Et si l’on regarde les accords qu’il a voulu renégocier, quels sont les résultats ?

      Avec le Mexique, on a abouti à quelque chose de très proche de ce qui existait déjà. Dans le débat dont j’ai esquissé les contours, il serait plutôt du côté des constitutionnalistes, avec des accords de proximité qui s’élargiraient, mais garderaient la Chine à distance. De façon générale, l’hystérie sur les populistes au pouvoir me semble dramatiser une situation beaucoup plus triviale, qui oppose des stratégies quant à la réorganisation de l’économie mondiale.

      Est-ce que le rejet de la Chine s’inscrit dans la même logique que les positions hostiles à l’immigration de Hayek en son temps, et de Trump ou des pro-Brexit aujourd’hui ? En somme, y aurait-il certains pays, comme certains groupes, qui seraient soupçonnés d’être culturellement trop éloignés du libre marché ?

      On retrouve chez certains auteurs l’idée que l’homo œconomicus, en effet, n’est pas universel. Les règles du libre marché ne pourraient être suivies partout dans le monde. Cette idée d’une altérité impossible à accommoder n’est pas réservée à des ressentiments populaires. Elle existe dans le milieu des experts et des universitaires, qui s’appuient sur certains paradigmes scientifiques comme le #néo-institutionnalisme promu par des auteurs comme #Douglass_North. Cette perspective suppose qu’à un modèle socio-économique particulier, doivent correspondre des caractéristiques culturelles particulières.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/culture-idees/100319/quinn-slobodian-le-neoliberalisme-est-travaille-par-un-conflit-interne #WWI #première_guerre_mondiale

  • Le nombre de déplacés et de réfugiés dans le monde dépasse la barre des 80 millions (HCR)

    Le nombre de déplacés et de réfugiés dans le monde a dépassé le seuil de 80 millions à la mi-2020 alors que la pandémie de Covid-19 met en péril la protection des réfugiés, a indiqué mercredi l’Agence de l’ONU pour les réfugiés.

    Des millions de personnes ont déjà été forcées de fuir leur foyer du fait de la persécution, du conflit et des violations des droits humains. Et selon le Haut-Commissariat de l’ONU pour les réfugiés (HCR), la #pandémie du #coronavirus et les conflits existants ou nouveaux ont « dramatiquement affecté leurs conditions ».

    Ce chiffre de #80_millions de #déracinés risque de « continuer d’augmenter à moins que les dirigeants mondiaux ne stoppent les guerres », a déclaré le Haut-Commissaire Filippo Grandi.

    « Alors que les déplacements forcés ont doublé durant la dernière décennie, la communauté internationale échoue à maintenir la #paix », a ajouté M. Grandi, dans un communiqué.

    Au début de cette année, 79,5 millions de personnes étaient déracinées dans le monde. Parmi elles figuraient plus de 45 millions de déplacés internes, 29,6 millions de réfugiés et plus de 4 millions de demandeurs d’asile.

    « Aujourd’hui nous passons de nouveau un sombre jalon et cette hausse continuera sauf si les dirigeants mondiaux font cesser les #guerres », a fait valoir le chef du HCR.

    Impact sur les réfugiés des mesures prises pour freiner la propagation de la #Covid-19

    Malgré l’appel urgent lancé en mars par le Secrétaire général des Nations Unies en faveur d’un cessez-le-feu mondial pendant la pandémie, les conflits et les persécutions se poursuivent, déplore l’agence onusienne. De nouvelles personnes ont été contraintes de fuir leurs domiciles dans des pays comme la Syrie, le Mozambique, la Somalie la République démocratique du Congo (RDC) ou le Yémen.

    Des déplacements nouveaux et significatifs ont également été enregistrés à travers la région du Sahel central en Afrique, alors que les civils subissent des violences inqualifiables, y compris des viols et des exécutions. « Alors que les déplacements forcés ont doublé durant la dernière décennie, la communauté internationale échoue à maintenir la paix », a dit M. Grandi.

    Par ailleurs, le rapport souligne que certaines des mesures prises pour freiner la propagation de la Covid-19 ont rendu plus difficile l’accès des réfugiés à la #sécurité.

    Lors du pic de la première vague de la pandémie en avril dernier, 168 pays avaient fermé entièrement ou partiellement leurs frontières et 90 pays ne faisaient aucune exception pour les demandeurs d’asile.

    Pour les personnes déracinées, la pandémie de Covid-19 est finalement devenue « une crise supplémentaire de #protection » et de #moyens_de_subsistance au-delà de la situation d’urgence pour la santé publique à travers le monde.

    Selon l’agence onusienne basée à Genève, le virus a altéré tous les aspects de la vie humaine et a sévèrement aggravé les problèmes existants pour les personnes déracinées et les apatrides.

    Les nouvelles demandes d’asile ont diminué d’un tiers

    Mais depuis lors, avec le soutien et l’expertise du HCR, 111 pays ont trouvé des solutions pratiques pour garantir que leur régime d’asile est pleinement ou partiellement opérationnel, tout en veillant à prendre les mesures nécessaires pour lutter contre la propagation du virus.

    Malgré ces mesures, les nouvelles demandes d’asile ont diminué d’un tiers par rapport à la même période en 2019.

    De même, moins de solutions durables ont été trouvées pour les déplacés. Seulement plus de 822.000 personnes déracinées sont rentrées chez elles, dont la plupart – 635.000 – étaient des déplacés internes. Avec plus de 102.000 #rapatriements librement consentis au premier semestre 2020, les #retours de réfugiés ont chuté de 22% par rapport à 2019.

    Les voyages de réfugiés vers des pays de réinstallation ont été temporairement suspendus à cause des restrictions dues à la pandémie de Covid-19 entre mars et juin dernier. Par conséquent, seuls plus de 17.000 réfugiés ont été réinstallés durant le premier semestre de cette année, selon les statistiques gouvernementales, soit la moitié des réinstallations survenues par rapport à l’année dernière.

    https://news.un.org/fr/story/2020/12/1084102

    #statistiques #chiffres #asile #migrations #réfugiés #monde #2020 #dépacés_internes #IDPs #réinstallation #renvois #expulsions #fermeture_des_frontières

    ping @simplicissimus @reka @karine4 @isskein @_kg_

  • Francia tapona el tránsito de migrantes, que vuelven a dormir en la calle junto a la frontera de #Irún

    El incremento de entradas en el sur se empieza a notar ya en el paso fronterizo del norte, donde los controles policiales son permanentes

    Entrar a Europa por el sur es una odisea para miles y miles de migrantes año tras año. Pateras, mafias o concertinas son solamente algunos de los obstáculos con los que se encuentran y no todos consiguen su objetivo. Lo que muchos de ellos no esperan es que su aventura se trunque en otra frontera, en este caso la del norte de España. En el paso entre Irún y Hendaya, aparentemente un paradigma de las libertades del espacio Schengen, existe un muro invisible para quienes quieren emprender una nueva vida en Francia o en otro país europeo. Lleva ocurriendo al menos cinco años, justamente desde que Francia elevó la alerta antiterrorista por los atentados en París. En 2020, las restricciones a la movilidad motivadas por la pandemia solamente han hecho que se visibilice más la presencia policial allí donde el reino se convierte en república y ahora que crece el flujo migratorio los controles están yendo a más.

    El incremento de entradas registrado recientemente en Canarias o en Andalucía ya se está notando en las calles de la zona fronteriza, hasta el punto de que algunas personas duermen al raso. La red ciudadana Irungo Harrera Sarea, que ha atendido ya a 15.000 personas en los últimos dos años, ha instalado unas tiendas de campaña frente al albergue de Cruz Roja para denunciar que no hay alojamiento para todos los que lo necesitan. Ese albergue, en el que nadie quiere hacer comentarios, está ubicado en un polígono industrial sobre una loma de las afueras de Irún. Se llega allí gracias a unas huellas de color verde acompañadas del logotipo de la organización que han sido instaladas por los voluntarios de Irungo Harrera Sarea.

    En la zona hay un fuerte olor a pintura y se escucha el trajín de una empresa maderera cercana. Tras un contenedor verde en el que se lee «Madera Viernes» duermen todavía a mediodía varias personas. La tienda está cerrada pero les delata el calzado en la puerta, un gesto habitual de los musulmanes. Junto a las tiendas hay alguna mascarilla usada y cartones de leche como únicos víveres. No es una imagen nueva en Irún, ya que hace dos años era habitual que grupos de migrantes se apiñaran para descansar en el pequeño cobertizo del aparcamiento de motocicletas de la estación de trenes. Entonces como ahora los controles policiales franceses les impedían seguir el viaje. Se han hecho devoluciones en caliente en pleno corazón de Europa. Se han grabado imágenes de vehículos de las autoridades francesas entrando en territorio español para expulsar a migrantes interceptados. En paralelo, la Policía Nacional española ha desarticulado en estos años mafias que se valían de estas dificultades para lucrarse de quienes querían cruzar.

    El Topo es como se llama al tren de cercanías de Euskotren que une Donostia con Irún y cuya última parada entra unos metros en suelo francés, hasta la estación de Hendaya, conocida históricamente por ser la que reunió a Hitler y a Franco en octubre de 1940. La de Belaskoenea es la parada más próxima a la Cruz Roja. Está en la trasera del cuartel de la Guardia Civil. De Belaskoenea a la puerta de entrada al Hexágono hay apenas tres paradas. Son Colón, Ficoba y Hendaya. Dos jóvenes de 17 años con mochila analizan las máquinas expendedoras. «¿Éste es el que va a Francia?», pregunta el que viste una cazadora con una gran bandera Noruega en el pecho. La pareja, que no quiere dar su nombre ni salir en imágenes pero que no miente sobre su edad, es de Guinea–Conakry. «Llegamos ayer», cuentan sobre su estancia en la zona fronteriza. Accedieron a su sueño por Ceuta. Tuvieron que saltar. El convencimiento de que les espera un seguro control policial al llegar a la terminal les desanima de gastarse los ahorros en un billete. Se dan media vuelta y optan por aprovechar una comida caliente en Cruz Roja.

    Más en el centro, en un rincón llamado Parque de las Sirenas, en la calle de la Aduana, las maletas a rebosar delatan a otro grupo amplio de migrantes. Uno de ellos enseña un folio arrugado con un billete de Alsa procedente de Sevilla. Expresan en francés que no quieren hablar mucho más sobre su situación. No lejos de allí, en el Paseo de Colón, otro grupo de tres veinteañeros valora sus posibilidades. A pocos metros, frente al Ayuntamiento y bajo unas pérgolas, es ya una tradición que Irungo Harrera Sarea atienda a los migrantes en una pequeña mesa plegables de madera.

    La ruta hacia Francia –una de ellas– lleva a Ficoba, el recinto ferial de Irún. Este viernes acoge la primera OPE para personas con discapacidad de Gipuzkoa. En una pequeña zona comercial aneja languidecen unos comercios pensados para vender tabaco y productos españoles baratos a clientes franceses que ya no existen. Desde aquí ya se ve el cartel de bienvenida a Francia al otro lado del puente de Santiago sobre el río Bidasoa. Una furgoneta de la Gendarmería para a todos y cada uno de los vehículos que pasan por ahí, como el viejo camión Scania matriculado en Murcia en 1989, aunque la Ertzaintza informa que la movilidad transfronteriza ha caído considerablemente en estas semanas de segundo estado de alarma. En el recientemente restaurado puente de la Avenida, otro control. Una pareja uniformados de la Policía Nacional se baja de su Kangoo para pedir salvoconducto a los pocos paseantes que quieren cruzar. Al otro lado espera un confinamiento total.

    Explican fuentes policiales españolas que la vigilancia es tal que incluso quienes consiguen colarse son perseguidos ya dentro de Francia. Esta semana uno grupo de migrantes ha sido interceptado cuando ya habían llegado a Burdeos, a 216 kilómetros de la muga. En Baiona, el albergue ha cerrado sus puertas por las restricciones del coronavirus. Desde Irungo Harrera Sarrera explican que el incremento de las entradas en el sur se traducirá próximamente en un mayor tapón en el norte. «Se va colapsando el sistema abajo y suben hacia arriba. En las próximas semanas esto irá a más», explica un portavoz de la organización, que recuerda que «ahora empieza el frío» y que otros años el problema de dormir en la calle ha sido menor porque el tapón se daba en los meses de verano.

    «A corto-medio plazo tenemos un drama humanitario a la vista. Francia nos devuelve a personas incluso a más de un centenar de kilómetros», coinciden desde el sindicato SUP de la Policía Nacional, que tiene comisaría en Irún, en cuyo exterior aparcan dos patrullas rotuladas como de «Fronteras». Desde el sindicato policial preguntan: «¿Qué capacidad tienen las ONG para seguir cubriendo las necesidades de estas personas?». «Instamos al Ministerio del Interior y a la Delegación del Gobierno en el País Vasco a que pongan medios para evitar que llegue ese momento. La inmigración no es un problema del País Vasco o de España, es europeo y tendría que tener una respuesta de nivel europeo», añaden. «Para nosotros, que tenemos papeles y somos blancos, es difícil pasar ahora mismo. Imagínate para ellos», razonan en Irungo Harrera Sarea.

    https://www.eldiario.es/euskadi/fronter_1_6448930.html

    #frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Pyrénées #France #Espagne #fermeture_des_frontières #Hendaya #mur_invisible (terme utilisé dans l’article) #Cruz_Roja #Ficoba

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • De l’utilité (ou pas) des frontières contemporaines ?

    Dans « Nos géographies », nous parlons ce soir des frontières que nous chercherons à définir avec #Michel_Foucher et #Anne-Laure_Amilhat-Szary (@mobileborders).

    Bien plus qu’un espace plus ou moins large séparant deux territoires, un objet juridique et politique, très symbolique, l’écho d’un passé lointain ou proche, nous verrons que la notion de frontière intangible, n’a pas toujours existé. Nous constaterons l’importance des progrès de la #géographie et de la #cartographie pour en préciser les contours.

    La #pandémie de la #Covid-19 et la fermeture concomitante d’une grande partie des frontières dans le monde viennent de replacer brutalement celles-ci sous les feux de l’actualité. La crise migratoire, précédant la crise sanitaire avait déjà amorcé ce mouvement de #repli. Certes, les frontières n’avaient pas disparu mais la #mondialisation des économies avec l’accélération des échanges et l’extraordinaire essor des transports, aériens, maritimes et terrestres ces dernières décennies ont largement contribué à les faire oublier, du moins, dans de nombreuses régions. Elles réapparaissent donc. Comment interpréter le phénomène ? Est-il souhaitable, est-il durable ? Que nous dit-il de l’état de nos sociétés ?

    Pour en parler ce soir nous sommes en compagnie de deux spécialistes, Michel Foucher, géographe et ancien diplomate, titulaire de la chaire de géopolitique appliquée au Collège d’études mondiales (FMSH, Paris) et Anne-Laure Amilhat-Szary, spécialiste de géographie politique, professeure de géographie à l’Université Grenoble-Alpes et directrice du laboratoire CNRS Pacte.

    https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/nos-geographies/les-frontieres

    #frontières #utilité #fermeture_des_frontières #crise_sanitaire

  • –-> Les autorités grecques arrêtent et poursuivent un réfugié afghan, le père d’un enfant mort noyé pendant la traversée depuis la Turquie, pour « #mise_en_danger de l’enfant. »
    https://twitter.com/EricFassin/status/1326088902839504903

    Greek authorities arrest father of dead migrant child

    Greek authorities have arrested a migrant whose son died while attempting to reach a Greek island from the nearby Turkish coast on suspicion of endangering a life, a crime that could carry a penalty of up to 10 years in prison.

    The 25-year-old man and his 6-year-old son, both Afghans, were among a total of 25 people who were found on the shores of the eastern Aegean island of Samos early Sunday. The coast guard said the body of the 6-year-old boy was found with one woman on a part of the coast that was particularly difficult to access, while the others were found in small groups elsewhere.

    According to the coast guard, the migrants said they had come across from the Turkish coast in a dinghy. Authorities said it was unclear what had happened to the boat, and exactly how the child had died.

    The coast guard said Monday a 23-year-old who had been identified as having driven the boat was arrested on suspicion of migrant smuggling, while the boy’s 25-year-old father was arrested on suspicion of violating endangerment laws. The endangerment of a person which leads to death can result in a prison sentence of up to 10 years.

    Greece is one of the most popular routes for people fleeing conflict and poverty in the Middle East, Asia and Africa and hoping to enter the European Union. The vast majority make their way to eastern Greek islands from the nearby Turkish coast.

    Although the distance is small, the journey is often perilous, with smugglers frequently using unseaworthy and vastly overcrowded boats and dinghies that sometimes capsize or sink.

    Although it is common for Greek authorities to arrest whoever is identified as having steered a migrant vessel to Greece, in the cases of shipwrecks it is rare for the surviving parents of children who die to be charged with criminal offences.

    “These charges are a direct attack on the right to seek asylum and it is outrageous that a grieving father is being punished for seeking safety for him and his child,” said Josie Naughton, founder of the aid organization Help Refugees/Choose Love.

    “Criminalizing people that are seeking safety and protection shows the failure of the European Union to find a solution to unsafe migration routes that forced thousands to risk their lives to seek protection,” Naughton said.

    Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/courts_law/greek-authorities-arrest-father-of-dead-migrant-child/2020/11/09/1b9ff304-229d-11eb-9c4a-0dc6242c4814_story.html

    #Grèce #réfugiés #asile #migrations #fermeture_des_frontières #décès #mort #responsabilité #honte #réfugiés_afghans #justice (sic) #père #parents

    Je ne sais pas quels tags utilisé pour cette nouvelle... on touche tellement le fonds...

    ping @kaparia

    • Grèce : le père de l’enfant mort en mer arrêté pour « #mise_en_danger_de_la_vie_d’autrui »

      Les autorités grecques ont arrêté le père de l’enfant mort lors de la traversée de la mer Égée sur une embarcation de fortune. Cet Afghan de 25 ans est accusé de « mise en danger de la vie d’autrui » et risque jusqu’à 10 ans de prison.

      Un Afghan de 25 ans, père de l’enfant de six ans dont le corps a été retrouvé dimanche en mer Égée, a été arrêté par les autorités grecques. Le père et son fils avaient embarqué sur une embarcation de fortune, composée de 23 autres personnes, depuis les côtes turques dans le but de rejoindre les îles grecques.

      Il risque jusqu’à 10 ans de prison. C’est à notre connaissance la première fois que le parent d’un enfant mort lors d’une traversée de la mer est inculpé. Cette arrestation, inédite, inquiètent les ONG.
      « Attaque directe contre le droit de demander l’asile »

      « Cette accusation est une attaque directe contre le droit de demander l’asile. Il est scandaleux qu’un père en deuil soit puni pour avoir cherché la sécurité pour lui et son enfant », a réagi à l’AFP Josie Naughton, fondatrice de l’organisation humanitaire Help Refugees / Choose love.

      « La criminalisation des personnes qui recherchent une protection montre l’échec de l’Union européenne à trouver une solution aux routes migratoires dangereuses », a ajouté la militante.

      Le Conseil européen pour les réfugiés et exilés a pour sa part estimé que « cette nouvelle tragédie montre la nécessité urgente de trouver des voies sûres et légales » permettant aux demandeurs d’asile de rejoindre l’Europe en toute sécurité.
      Un autre passager arrêté pour trafic de migrants

      Selon les autorités, le corps du petit garçon a été découvert sur une partie de la côte difficile d’accès, avec une femme rescapée à ses côtés.

      Les raisons de ce naufrage sont pour l’heure encore floues, ont affirmé les garde-côtes grecs, tout comme les circonstances ayant entraînées la mort de l’enfant de six ans.

      Les passagers de ce canot avaient dans un premier temps été portés disparus. Une partie d’entre eux ont été retrouvés dimanche sur les rives de l’île de Samos, Dix personnes ont été secourues non loin de l’île grecque et six autres ont réussi à rejoindre les côtes à la nage.

      Un jeune de 23 ans, identifié comme le capitaine du bateau, a quant à lui été arrêté pour trafic de migrants.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/28411/grece-le-pere-de-l-enfant-mort-en-mer-arrete-pour-mise-en-danger-de-la

  • France : Macron annonce un doublement des #forces_de_sécurité aux frontières

    Le président français Emmanuel Macron a annoncé jeudi un doublement des forces contrôlant les frontières de la France, de 2.400 à 4.800, pour lutter contre la menace terroriste, les trafics et l’immigration illégale.

    Le président français Emmanuel Macron a annoncé jeudi un doublement des forces contrôlant les frontières de la France, de 2.400 à 4.800, pour lutter contre la menace terroriste, les trafics et l’immigration illégale.

    Ce doublement a été décidé « en raison de l’intensification de la #menace » après les récents #attentats, dont celui de Nice (Sud-Est), a expliqué le chef de l’État à la frontière franco-espagnole, au #col_du_Perthus, où « quatre unités mobiles » sont « en cours de déploiement ».

    Accompagné du ministre de l’Intérieur Gérald Darmanin et du secrétaire d’Etat chargé des Affaires européennes Clément Beaune, Emmanuel Macron s’est également dit « favorable » à une refondation « en profondeur » des règles régissant l’#espace_Schengen de #libre_circulation en Europe, et à « un plus grand contrôle » des frontières.

    « Je porterai en ce sens des premières propositions au Conseil » européen de décembre, pour « repenser l’organisation » de #Schengen et « intensifier notre protection commune aux frontières avec une véritable #police_de_sécurité_aux_frontières_extérieures », a-t-il ajouté. Avec la « volonté d’aboutir sous la présidence française », au premier semestre 2022.

    Cette refondation doit rendre l’espace Schengen « plus cohérent », pour qu’il « protège mieux ses frontières communes », qu’il « articule mieux » les impératifs de responsabilité de protection de frontières et de « #solidarité » et que « la charge ne soit pas qu’aux pays de première entrée ».

    « La France est un des principaux pays d’arrivée d’#immigration_secondaire », lorsque les migrants #déboutés d’un pays tentent leur chance dans un autre en Europe, et « je souhaite profondément aussi qu’on change les règles du jeu », a-t-il dit.

    Il a également plaidé pour « intensifier » la lutte contre l’#immigration_clandestine et les réseaux de #trafiquants « qui, de plus en plus souvent, sont liés aux réseaux terroristes ».

    « Nous prendrons les lois qui sont nécessaires, si elles correspondent à des besoins identifiés », a-t-il ajouté, mais la situation « ne justifie pas de changer la Constitution », a-t-il assuré, face à des pressions de responsables politiques de droite et d’extrême droite.

    Arrivé à la mi-journée au col du Perthus, Emmanuel Macron s’est entretenu avec les policiers de la #police_aux_frontières (#PAF) qui contrôlent les véhicules entrant en France par l’autoroute ou la nationale qui le traversent. L’un d’eux lui a notamment fait la démonstration d’un drone surveillant les voies de passage et les sentiers frontaliers.

    Puis il a visité le Centre franco-espagnol de coopération policière et douanière, où sont affectées 24 personnes des deux pays à plein temps. « Nous partageons un espace de travail et de convivialité (...) La coopération marche très bien », lui a assuré un responsable espagnol.

    « Depuis 2017, la coordination entre les services de renseignement a été renforcée et confiée à la DGSI (sécurité intérieure, ndlr). Les moyens financiers, humains et technologiques ont été considérablement augmentés », a déclaré Emmanuel Macron dans un tweet posté durant sa visite.

    Quelque 35.000 véhicules passent tous les jours sur l’autoroute et la route qui franchissent le col, entre les villes du Perthus en France et de La Jonquera en Espagne.

    L’#Espagne est l’une des principales portes d’entrée des immigrés clandestins en France, qui arrivent par la côte en provenance d’Afrique du nord. Plus de 4.000 migrants ont été refusés ces trois derniers mois dans le département des #Pyrénées-Orientales, selon un responsable de la PAF. Une partie d’entre eux étaient des Algériens tentant d’entrer en France.

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/fil-dactualites/051120/france-macron-annonce-un-doublement-des-forces-de-securite-aux-frontieres

    #fermeture_des_frontières #frontières #France #terrorisme #migrations #immigration_illégale #militarisation_des_frontières

  • A l’horizon des migrations

    Bienvenue dans cette nouvelle édition de "Nos géographies". Dès demain, vendredi 2 octobre, et jusqu’à dimanche, la géographie tient son Festival international à Saint-Dié-des-Vosges. France Culture en parle avec nos deux invités, #François_Gemenne et #Lucie_Bacon, qui discuteront migrations.

    Une édition certes un peu différente des précédentes éditions, sans doute dans sa forme, mais tout aussi riche et variée autour d’un thème fort, les climats. Nous vous avons proposé la semaine dernière, les regards croisés de géographes sur l’épidémie de Covid-19, tels qu’ils ont été rassemblés et seront présentés dans ces journées. Ce soir, nous partons à l’horizon des migrations. Nos deux invités, François Gemenne et Lucie Bacon, par des voies différentes et à bonne distance des discours politiques si souvent réducteurs, explorent la diversité des parcours de migrants en prêtant attention à leur complexité. Pour l’un, à la transformation des frontières sous l’effet de la mondialisation et du changement climatique, pour l’autre, aux stratégies mises en place par les femmes et les hommes engagés sur une route semée d’obstacles, en rappelant aussi des vérités parfaitement vérifiables et pourtant obstinément inaudibles.

    Lucie Bacon, doctorante en géographie Laboratoire Migrinter (CNRS), Poitiers et Laboratoire Telemme, université Aix-Marseille. Elle achève une thèse : « La fabrique du parcours migratoire : la « route des Balkans » au prisme de la parole des migrants », un travail de terrain au plus près des intéressés.

    François Gemenne, spécialiste des questions de géopolitique de l’environnement, invité à Saint-Dié pour présenter son dernier livre au titre explicite : On a tous un ami noir. Pour en finir avec les polémiques stériles sur les migrations, (Fayard, 2020). Il a été directeur exécutif du programme de recherche interdisciplinaire « Politiques de la Terre » à Sciences Po (Médialab), et est par ailleurs chercheur qualifié du FNRS à l’Université de Liège (CEDEM).

    https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/nos-geographies/a-lhorizon-des-migrations

    A partir de la minute 44’24 François Gemenne parle de #réfugiés_climatiques / #réfugiés_environnementaux

    #paradigme_de_l'immobilité #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #im/mobilité #mobilité #idées_reçues #préjugés #frontières_ouvertes #fermeture_des_frontières #ouverture_des_frontières

    • On a tous un ami noir ; pour en finir avec les polémiques stériles sur les migrations

      Sans angélisme ni dogmatisme, ce livre apaisera le débat public sur le sujet de l’immigration, en l’éclairant de réflexions inédites : celles issues d’expériences étrangères, celles produites par la recherche et celles de l’auteur enfin, spécialiste de ces questions et lui-même étranger vivant en France depuis plus de douze ans. Pas une semaine ne s’écoule sans qu’éclate une nouvelle polémique sur les migrations : violences policières, voile dans l’espace public, discriminations, quotas, frontières... Les débats sur ces sujets sont devenus tendus, polarisés et passionnels, tandis que la parole raciste s’est libérée, relayée avec force par des activistes identitaires. Collectivement, on a accepté de penser les migrations à partir des questions posées par l’extrême-droite, en utilisant même son vocabulaire. Quant à nous, chercheurs, nous nous sommes souvent retrouvés réduits à devoir débusquer rumeurs et mensonges, qu’il s’agisse de dénoncer le mythe de l’appel d’air ou du grand remplacement. Nos sociétés resteront malades de ces questions tant qu’elles continueront à les envisager sous l’unique prisme des idéologies. C’est toute l’ambition de ce livre : montrer qu’il est possible de penser ces sujets de manière rationnelle et apaisée, en les éclairant de réflexions et de faits qui sont bien trop souvent absents des débats. En montrant, par exemple, que les passeurs sont les premiers bénéficiaires de la fermeture des frontières. Ou que la migration représente un investissement considérable pour ceux qui partent, alors qu’ils se retrouvent souvent décrits comme la « misère du monde ». Les questions d’identité collective doivent être des enjeux qui nous rassemblent, plutôt que des clivages qui nous opposent. À condition de reconnaître et d’affronter les problèmes structurels de racisme dans nos sociétés. Après tout, on a tous un ami noir.

      https://www.librairie-sciencespo.fr/livre/9782213712772-on-a-tous-un-ami-noir-pour-en-finir-avec-les-pole

      #livre #On_a_tous_un_ami_noir

    • Migrants : ouvrir les frontières, quelle idée ! Et pourtant...

      François Gemenne, enseignant et chercheur sur les politiques du climat et des migrations, vient de publier « On a tous un ami noir », chez Fayard. Un ouvrage en forme d’outil pour répondre aux idées trop vite convenues, dans le débat sur les migrations. Une manière depuis longtemps oubliée de penser cette épineuse question de société.

      https://www.lavoixdunord.fr/891788/article/2020-11-11/migrations-ouvrir-les-frontieres-quelle-idee

  • Refugee protection at risk

    Two of the words that we should try to avoid when writing about refugees are “unprecedented” and “crisis.” They are used far too often and with far too little thought by many people working in the humanitarian sector. Even so, and without using those words, there is evidence to suggest that the risks confronting refugees are perhaps greater today than at any other time in the past three decades.

    First, as the UN Secretary-General has pointed out on many occasions, we are currently witnessing a failure of global governance. When Antonio Guterres took office in 2017, he promised to launch what he called “a surge in diplomacy for peace.” But over the past three years, the UN Security Council has become increasingly dysfunctional and deadlocked, and as a result is unable to play its intended role of preventing the armed conflicts that force people to leave their homes and seek refuge elsewhere. Nor can the Security Council bring such conflicts to an end, thereby allowing refugees to return to their country of origin.

    It is alarming to note, for example, that four of the five Permanent Members of that body, which has a mandate to uphold international peace and security, have been militarily involved in the Syrian armed conflict, a war that has displaced more people than any other in recent years. Similarly, and largely as a result of the blocking tactics employed by Russia and the US, the Secretary-General struggled to get Security Council backing for a global ceasefire that would support the international community’s efforts to fight the Coronavirus pandemic

    Second, the humanitarian principles that are supposed to regulate the behavior of states and other parties to armed conflicts, thereby minimizing the harm done to civilian populations, are under attack from a variety of different actors. In countries such as Burkina Faso, Iraq, Nigeria and Somalia, those principles have been flouted by extremist groups who make deliberate use of death and destruction to displace populations and extend the areas under their control.

    In states such as Myanmar and Syria, the armed forces have acted without any kind of constraint, persecuting and expelling anyone who is deemed to be insufficiently loyal to the regime or who come from an unwanted part of society. And in Central America, violent gangs and ruthless cartels are acting with growing impunity, making life so hazardous for other citizens that they feel obliged to move and look for safety elsewhere.

    Third, there is mounting evidence to suggest that governments are prepared to disregard international refugee law and have a respect a declining commitment to the principle of asylum. It is now common practice for states to refuse entry to refugees, whether by building new walls, deploying military and militia forces, or intercepting and returning asylum seekers who are travelling by sea.

    In the Global North, the refugee policies of the industrialized increasingly take the form of ‘externalization’, whereby the task of obstructing the movement of refugees is outsourced to transit states in the Global South. The EU has been especially active in the use of this strategy, forging dodgy deals with countries such as Libya, Niger, Sudan and Turkey. Similarly, the US has increasingly sought to contain northward-bound refugees in Mexico, and to return asylum seekers there should they succeed in reaching America’s southern border.

    In developing countries themselves, where some 85 per cent of the world’s refugees are to be found, governments are increasingly prepared to flout the principle that refugee repatriation should only take place in a voluntary manner. While they rarely use overt force to induce premature returns, they have many other tools at their disposal: confining refugees to inhospitable camps, limiting the food that they receive, denying them access to the internet, and placing restrictions on humanitarian organizations that are trying to meet their needs.

    Fourth, the COVID-19 pandemic of the past nine months constitutes a very direct threat to the lives of refugees, and at the same time seems certain to divert scarce resources from other humanitarian programmes, including those that support displaced people. The Coronavirus has also provided a very convenient alibi for governments that wish to close their borders to people who are seeking safety on their territory.

    Responding to this problem, UNHCR has provided governments with recommendations as to how they might uphold the principle of asylum while managing their borders effectively and minimizing any health risks associated with the cross-border movement of people. But it does not seem likely that states will be ready to adopt such an approach, and will prefer instead to introduce more restrictive refugee and migration policies.

    Even if the virus is brought under some kind of control, it may prove difficult to convince states to remove the restrictions that they have introduced during the COVD-19 emergency. And the likelihood of that outcome is reinforced by the fear that the climate crisis will in the years to come prompt very large numbers of people to look for a future beyond the borders of their own state.

    Fifth, the state-based international refugee regime does not appear well placed to resist these negative trends. At the broadest level, the very notions of multilateralism, international cooperation and the rule of law are being challenged by a variety of powerful states in different parts of the world: Brazil, China, Russia, Turkey and the USA, to name just five. Such countries also share a common disdain for human rights and the protection of minorities – indigenous people, Uyghur Muslims, members of the LGBT community, the Kurds and African-Americans respectively.

    The USA, which has traditionally acted as a mainstay of the international refugee regime, has in recent years set a particularly negative example to the rest of the world by slashing its refugee resettlement quota, by making it increasingly difficult for asylum seekers to claim refugee status on American territory, by entirely defunding the UN’s Palestinian refugee agency and by refusing to endorse the Global Compact on Refugees. Indeed, while many commentators predicted that the election of President Trump would not be good news for refugees, the speed at which he has dismantled America’s commitment to the refugee regime has taken many by surprise.

    In this toxic international environment, UNHCR appears to have become an increasingly self-protective organization, as indicated by the enormous amount of effort it devotes to marketing, branding and celebrity endorsement. For reasons that remain somewhat unclear, rather than stressing its internationally recognized mandate for refugee protection and solutions, UNHCR increasingly presents itself as an all-purpose humanitarian agency, delivering emergency assistance to many different groups of needy people, both outside and within their own country. Perhaps this relief-oriented approach is thought to win the favour of the organization’s key donors, an impression reinforced by the cautious tone of the advocacy that UNHCR undertakes in relation to the restrictive asylum policies of the EU and USA.

    UNHCR has, to its credit, made a concerted effort to revitalize the international refugee regime, most notably through the Global Compact on Refugees, the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework and the Global Refugee Forum. But will these initiatives really have the ‘game-changing’ impact that UNHCR has prematurely attributed to them?

    The Global Compact on Refugees, for example, has a number of important limitations. It is non-binding and does not impose any specific obligations on the countries that have endorsed it, especially in the domain of responsibility-sharing. The Compact makes numerous references to the need for long-term and developmental approaches to the refugee problem that also bring benefits to host states and communities. But it is much more reticent on fundamental protection principles such as the right to seek asylum and the notion of non-refoulement. The Compact also makes hardly any reference to the issue of internal displacement, despite the fact that there are twice as many IDPs as there are refugees under UNHCR’s mandate.

    So far, the picture painted by this article has been unremittingly bleak. But just as one can identify five very negative trends in relation to refugee protection, a similar number of positive developments also warrant recognition.

    First, the refugee policies pursued by states are not uniformly bad. Countries such as Canada, Germany and Uganda, for example, have all contributed, in their own way, to the task of providing refugees with the security that they need and the rights to which they are entitled. In their initial stages at least, the countries of South America and the Middle East responded very generously to the massive movements of refugees out of Venezuela and Syria.

    And while some analysts, including the current author, have felt that there was a very real risk of large-scale refugee expulsions from countries such as Bangladesh, Kenya and Lebanon, those fears have so far proved to be unfounded. While there is certainly a need for abusive states to be named and shamed, recognition should also be given to those that seek to uphold the principles of refugee protection.

    Second, the humanitarian response to refugee situations has become steadily more effective and equitable. Twenty years ago, it was the norm for refugees to be confined to camps, dependent on the distribution of food and other emergency relief items and unable to establish their own livelihoods. Today, it is far more common for refugees to be found in cities, towns or informal settlements, earning their own living and/or receiving support in the more useful, dignified and efficient form of cash transfers. Much greater attention is now given to the issues of age, gender and diversity in refugee contexts, and there is a growing recognition of the role that locally-based and refugee-led organizations can play in humanitarian programmes.

    Third, after decades of discussion, recent years have witnessed a much greater engagement with refugee and displacement issues by development and financial actors, especially the World Bank. While there are certainly some risks associated with this engagement (namely a lack of attention to protection issues and an excessive focus on market-led solutions) a more developmental approach promises to allow better long-term planning for refugee populations, while also addressing more systematically the needs of host populations.

    Fourth, there has been a surge of civil society interest in the refugee issue, compensating to some extent for the failings of states and the large international humanitarian agencies. Volunteer groups, for example, have played a critical role in responding to the refugee situation in the Mediterranean. The Refugees Welcome movement, a largely spontaneous and unstructured phenomenon, has captured the attention and allegiance of many people, especially but not exclusively the younger generation.

    And as has been seen in the UK this year, when governments attempt to demonize refugees, question their need for protection and violate their rights, there are many concerned citizens, community associations, solidarity groups and faith-based organizations that are ready to make their voice heard. Indeed, while the national asylum policies pursued by the UK and other countries have been deeply disappointing, local activism on behalf of refugees has never been stronger.

    Finally, recent events in the Middle East, the Mediterranean and Europe have raised the question as to whether refugees could be spared the trauma and hardship of making dangerous journeys from one country and continent to another by providing them with safe and legal routes. These might include initiatives such as Canada’s community-sponsored refugee resettlement programme, the ‘humanitarian corridors’ programme established by the Italian churches, family reunion projects of the type championed in the UK and France by Lord Alf Dubs, and the notion of labour mobility programmes for skilled refugee such as that promoted by the NGO Talent Beyond Boundaries.

    Such initiatives do not provide a panacea to the refugee issue, and in their early stages at least, might not provide a solution for large numbers of displaced people. But in a world where refugee protection is at such serious risk, they deserve our full support.

    http://www.against-inhumanity.org/2020/09/08/refugee-protection-at-risk

    #réfugiés #asile #migrations #protection #Jeff_Crisp #crise #crise_migratoire #crise_des_réfugiés #gouvernance #gouvernance_globale #paix #Nations_unies #ONU #conflits #guerres #conseil_de_sécurité #principes_humanitaires #géopolitique #externalisation #sanctuarisation #rapatriement #covid-19 #coronavirus #frontières #fermeture_des_frontières #liberté_de_mouvement #liberté_de_circulation #droits_humains #Global_Compact_on_Refugees #Comprehensive_Refugee_Response_Framework #Global_Refugee_Forum #camps_de_réfugiés #urban_refugees #réfugiés_urbains #banque_mondiale #société_civile #refugees_welcome #solidarité #voies_légales #corridors_humanitaires #Talent_Beyond_Boundaries #Alf_Dubs

    via @isskein
    ping @karine4 @thomas_lacroix @_kg_ @rhoumour

    –—
    Ajouté à la métaliste sur le global compact :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/739556

  • Lo spot anti frontalieri. Lo spot dell’Udc svizzera contro la libera circolazione

    Voici le texte, en italien:

    Vedo una natura bella e incontaminata.
    Vedo montagne grandi e imponenti.
    Abbiamo fiumi con acque trasparenti.
    La mia mamma mi dice sempre che viviamo nel Paese più bello del mondo.
    Lo so, dobbiamo proteggere il nostro paesaggio.
    Siamo liberi e non conosciamo guerre.
    Possiamo dire apertamente ciò che pensiamo.
    Io vado a scuola e stiamo ancora abbastanza bene.
    Il mio papà mi dice sempre che la nostra cultura è molto importante. Dobbiamo difenderla e promuoverla.
    Siamo un piccolo paese per il quale il nonno ha lavorato duramente.
    Quando sarò grande mi impegnerò anch’io come lui.
    Da sempre dobbiamo fare attenzione. Molta gente crede di poter approfittare del nostro Paese.
    Sempre più persnoe vogliono venire in Svizzera. E ciò, anche se non c’è posto per tutti.
    C’è sempre più gente sulle strade. Ci sono code e tante auto ovunque.
    Il papà ha da poco perso il suo lavoro.
    Giocare davanti a casa nel quartiere è diventato meno sicuro.
    Nella mia classe, ormai solo Sara e Giorgio sono svizzeri.
    Ogni giorno la televisione parla di ladri e criminali. E ho paura quando in inverno torno da sola da scuola.
    Dappertutto ci sono uomini che gironzolano in strada e alla stazione invece che lavorare.
    Il tram è sempre pieno e non posso mai sedermi.
    Non stiamo esagerando? Perché lasciamo andare così il nostro paese?
    E’ il momento di dire basta!
    Avete la responsabilità del nostro futuro e di quello della Svizzera.
    Per favore, pensate a noi.

    https://www.laprovinciadicomo.it/videos/video/lo-spot-anti-frontalieri_1047819_44
    #anti-migrants #UDC #Suisse #vidéo #campagne #libre_circulation #frontières #fermeture_des_frontières #migrations #extrême_droite #nationalisme #identité #paysage #géographie_culturelle #liberté #chômage #criminalité #stéréotypes #sécurité #trafic #responsabilité

    #vidéo publiée dans le cadre de la campagne de #votation «#oui_à_une_immigration_modérée»:


    https://www.udc.ch/campagnes/apercu/initiative-populaire-pour-une-immigration-moderee-initiative-de-limitation
    #initiative

    Site web de la campagne:


    https://www.initiative-de-limitation.ch

    #votations

    via @albertocampiphoto et @wizo

    ping @cede

    • A lire sur le site web de l’UDC...

      Iniziativa per la limitazione: chi si batte per il clima dovrebbe votare SI

      Chi si batte per il clima dovrebbe votare SI all’iniziativa per la limitazione. Sembra un paradosso, ma in realtà non è così: è in realtà una scelta molto logica e sensata. Vediamone il motivo.

      Dall’introduzione della piena libertà di circolazione delle persone nel 2007, un numero netto di circa 75.000 persone è immigrato in Svizzera ogni anno, di cui 50.000 stranieri dell’UE. Ognuna di queste persone ha bisogno di un appartamento, un mezzo di trasporto, usa servizi statali e consuma acqua ed elettricità. Allo stesso tempo, la Svizzera dovrebbe ridurre le emissioni di CO2, smettere di costruire sui terreni coltivati e tenere sotto controllo i costi sanitari.

      Per dare abitazione al circa 1 milione di immigrati abbiamo dovuto costruire nuove abitazioni su un’area grande come 57.000 campi da calcio. Si tratta di 407 milioni di metri quadrati di natura che sono stati ricoperti di cemento. Questo include circa 454.000 nuovi appartamenti.

      Un milione di immigrati significa anche 543.000 auto in più e 789 autobus in più sulle strade e 9 miliardi di chilometri percorsi in più. Se la Svizzera dovesse raggiungere davvero entro il 2030 la popolazione di 10 milioni di abitanti, sarà necessario un ulteriore aumento della rete stradale, in quanto sempre più auto saranno in circolazione, emettendo anche ulteriore C02. L’ufficio federale dello sviluppo territoriale prevede infatti che il numero di automobili in circolazione nel 2040 aumenterà ancora del 26%.

      L’immigrazione incontrollata ha conseguenze anche sul consumo di energia. Con la Strategia energetica 2050, la Svizzera ha deciso che entro la fine del 2035 il consumo di energia pro-capite deve diminuire del 43% rispetto al 2020. Ciò per compensare l’elettricità prodotta dalle centrali nucleari, che devono essere chiuse per motivi politici. Tra l’anno di riferimento 2000 e il 2018, il consumo di energia pro-capite è diminuito del 18,8%, soprattutto a causa del progresso tecnico (motori a combustione efficienti, nuova tecnologia edilizia, lampade a LED, apparecchi a basso consumo, produzione interna di energia solare, ecc.) Nello stesso periodo, tuttavia, il consumo totale di energia in Svizzera è diminuito solo dell’1,9%. In altre parole, gli effetti di risparmio di ogni singolo svizzero sono quasi completamente assorbiti dalla crescita della popolazione a causa dell’immigrazione incontrollata

      Secondo l’accordo sul clima di Parigi, la Svizzera dovrebbe ridurre le emissioni di C02 del 50% entro il 2030. Quando la Svizzera siglò il trattato, nel 1990, aveva però 6,5 milioni di abitanti. Con la libera circolazione delle persone, nel 2030 in Svizzera vivranno 10 milioni di persone, che consumano, si spostano e producono CO2. Anche supponendo un graduale rinuncio alle automobili e una netta riduzione di emissioni nel settore industriale, con una popolazione così grande sarà impossibile per una Svizzera con oltre 10 milioni di abitanti di raggiungere l’obbiettivo previsto dell’accordo di Parigi.

      È pertanto necessario che la Svizzera torni a gestire in modo autonomo la propria immigrazione. Una Svizzera da 10 milioni di abitanti non è sostenibile né dal punto di vista economico ne dal punto di vista climatico.

      https://www.iniziativa-per-la-limitazione.ch/artikel/iniziativa-per-la-limitazione-chi-si-batte-per-il-clim

      #climat #changement_climatique

    • C’était il y a 3 ans et déjà (encore, plutôt,…) l’UDC.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqvqq7Tt3pQ

      L’affiche du comité contre la naturalisation facilitée, représentant une femme voilée, a suscité une vaste polémique. Nous avons visité l’agence qui l’a conçue.
      Extrait du 26 minutes, une émission de la Radio Télévision Suisse, samedi 21 janvier 2017.

      #26_minutes, un faux magazine d’actualité qui passe en revue les faits marquants de la semaine écoulée, en Suisse et dans le monde, à travers des faux reportages et des interviews de vrais et de faux invités. Un regard décalé sur l’actualité, présenté par Vincent Veillon et Vincent Kucholl de l’ex-120 secondes.

  • Region in northwestern Bosnia sets up roadblocks to deter migrants

    Authorities in northeastern Bosnia have deployed police officers along a main transit highway to prevent migrants from entering their territory. The migrants are finding themselves trapped as neighboring regions are blocking them from walking back too.

    The local authorities in Krajino, in the northwestern part of Bosnia, have begun enforcing their decision to ban all new migrant arrivals and have set up roadblocks to prevent migrants who are headed to western Europe from entering their territory. The Krajino authorities allege that they are bearing the brunt of ongoing migration and that other parts of the country are failing to step in and help out.

    The deployment of police and the order to turn back all the migrants they encounter is an apparent violation of Bosnia’s human rights and immigration laws, AP reports.

    The roadblocks are set up on the main highway connecting Krajina to the rest of the country. Police in neighboring administrative regions of Bosnia in turn started blocking migrants from walking back, reports AP.
    Ali Razah, a Pakistani migrant, is one of hundreds trapped in the middle. He told AP that various police units had blocked him and other migrants from moving in any direction. “There is no food, no water, nothing and we are staying on the grass,” he said.

    Anti-migrant protests

    The Krajino region, on the border with Croatia, is a major transit point for migrants and refugees who aim to reach the European Union. The two towns Bihac and Velika Kladusa with their refugee and migrant camps are located in the region’s northwestern corner and have become a bottleneck for migrants — as Croatian authorities have sealed the border to the EU-member state and are reported to conduct pushbacks across the border using violence against the migrants.

    Recently, local residents of Velika Kladusa have repeatedly staged anti-migrant protests, accusing migrants of assaults and violence against the local population. On Monday August 17, hundreds of people reportedly blocked a road near a migrant reception center, complaining of harassment and increasing misbehavior by migrants in the city. The residents claim that cases of aggression and intimidation by migrants had multiplied, and that migrants from rival groups often fought or set fire to warehouses or dilapidated buildings where they they were staying.

    There are about 1,300 irregular migrants in Velika Kladusa, according to estimates by the authorities reported in the media, many of whom are sleeping rough in the surrounding area. In northwestern Bosnia-Herzegovina along the Croatian border there are more than 7,000 migrants, according to ANSA.

    Political infighting

    Most migrants enter Bosnia across the Drina River on the eastern border with Serbia. From there, they cross the country to reach Krajina.

    Bosnia since 1995 has been split along ethnic lines into two highly autonomous parts - the Serb-run Republika Srpska and the Bosniak-Croat Federation. Local authorities in Krajina have long accused Bosnia’s central government of not doing enough to resolve the crisis in Bosnia and of using the migration issue to fuel political infighting.

    So far, the Bosnian Serb hard-line leader Milorad Dodik has blocked efforts to deploy the army along the border with Serbia to stem the arrival of migrants, AP writes, and he is said to have used the migration issue to promote his Serbian-first position. He has repeatedly pressed for Serbs to separate from multi-ethnic Bosnia and unite with Serbia. Dodik refused to accommodate any migrants in the country’s autonomous Serb-run half and instead pushed them into Krajina.

    ’Closing borders is not a solution’

    Migrant aid groups working on the ground, however, stress that local authorities lack the willingness for practical solutions too. “The big problem is that we do not see a willingness from the different governments – international, national or local – to make a solution, to sit together with different groups and try to find a way to make the situation less hard for everyone,” a member of the NGO ’No Name Kitchen’ which helps migrants and refugees in Bosnia and Serbia told the Balkan Investigative Reporting Network Bosnia and Herzegovina (BIRN), reported the BalkanInsight, in light of growing tensions towards migrants.

    “Opening camps and closing borders is not a solution,” they told BIRN. “It is just a patch. So we have people in transit who have nowhere to go, no tents, no blankets… If they try to reach an EU country, it is common that they get pushed back and normally with violence. Camps paid for by EU money are full and renting a house is not allowed. At the same time, locals are exhausted,” ’No Name Kitchen’ told BIRN.

    https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/26832/region-in-northwestern-bosnia-sets-up-roadblocks-to-deter-migrants

    #militarisation_des_frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Balkans #route_des_Balkans #frontières #Bosnie #barrages_routiers #fermeture_des_frontières #Krajino

  • The Next Great Migration. The Beauty and Terror of Life on the Move

    The news today is full of stories of dislocated people on the move. Wild species, too, are escaping warming seas and desiccated lands, creeping, swimming, and flying in a mass exodus from their past habitats. News media presents this scrambling of the planet’s migration patterns as unprecedented, provoking fears of the spread of disease and conflict and waves of anxiety across the Western world. On both sides of the Atlantic, experts issue alarmed predictions of millions of invading aliens, unstoppable as an advancing tsunami, and countries respond by electing anti-immigration leaders who slam closed borders that were historically porous.

    But the science and history of migration in animals, plants, and humans tell a different story. Far from being a disruptive behavior to be quelled at any cost, migration is an ancient and lifesaving response to environmental change, a biological imperative as necessary as breathing. Climate changes triggered the first human migrations out of Africa. Falling sea levels allowed our passage across the Bering Sea. Unhampered by barbed wire, migration allowed our ancestors to people the planet, catapulting us into the highest reaches of the Himalayan mountains and the most remote islands of the Pacific, creating and disseminating the biological, cultural, and social diversity that ecosystems and societies depend upon. In other words, migration is not the crisis—it is the solution.

    Conclusively tracking the history of misinformation from the 18th century through today’s anti-immigration policies, The Next Great Migration makes the case for a future in which migration is not a source of fear, but of hope.

    https://www.bloomsbury.com/us/the-next-great-migration-9781635571998
    #adaptation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #mobilité #solution #problème #résilience #livre #changement_climatique #climat #réfugiés_environnementaux #migrations_environnementales #histoire #survie #crise #histoire_des_migrations

    ping @isskein @karine4 @_kg_ @reka

    • Climate migration is not a problem. It’s a solution.

      Climate migration is often associated with crisis and catastrophe, but #Sonia_Shah, author of “The Next Great Migration,” wants us to think differently about migration. On The World’s weekly look at climate change solutions, The Big Fix, Shah speaks to host Marco Werman about her reporting that considers how the world would be more resilient if people were given legal safe ways to move.

      https://www.pri.org/file/2020-08-21/climate-migration-not-problem-it-s-solution

      –—

      Sonia Shah parle aussi de #musique métissée, dont celle de #Mulatu_Astatke, qui n’aurait pas pu voir le jour sans la migrations de populations au cours de l’histoire :


      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mulatu_Astatke

      #immobilité #fermeture_des_frontières

    • Migration as Bio-Resilience : On Sonia Shah’s “The Next Great Migration”

      DURING THE UNUSUALLY frigid winter of 1949, a breeding pair of gray wolves crossed a frozen-over channel onto Michigan’s Isle Royale, a narrow spit of land just south of the US-Canadian maritime border in Lake Superior. Finding abundant prey, including moose, the pair had pups, starting a small lupine clan. Over the next almost 50 years, without access to the mainland, the clan grew increasingly inbred, with over half the wolves developing congenital spinal deformities and serious eye problems. As the wolf population declined — scientists even found one mother dead in her den, with seven unborn pups in her — the moose population came thundering back, gobbling up and trampling the forest’s buds and shoots. The ecosystem’s food chain now had a few broken links.

      The Isle Royale wolf population was saved, however, by a lone migrant. In 1997, a male wolf made his way to the island. Within a generation — wolf generations are a little less than five years — 56 percent of the young wolves carried the newcomer’s genes. In the years since, thanks to ongoing conservation efforts, more wolves have been brought to the island to provide enough genetic diversity not only to save the wolves but preserve the ecosystem’s new balance.

      This is just one of many examples of the bio-benefits of migratory species provided by Sonia Shah in her new book, The Next Great Migration. Hers is an original take on the oft-stultifying debate about immigration, most frequently argued over by unbending stalwarts on opposite extremes, or sometimes quibbled over by noncommittal centrists. There are now more displaced humans than ever — around one percent of the total human population — and the climate crises together with humanity’s ceaseless creep are driving an increasing number of nonhuman species to search for more welcoming climes. That half of the story is popularly understood: the world is on the move. What is less often acknowledged, and what Shah convincingly fills out, is its biological necessity. “Migration’s ecological function extends beyond the survival of the migrant itself,” she writes. “Wild migrants build the botanical scaffolding of entire ecosystems.” Besides spreading pollen and seeds — upon which the survival of many plants depend — migrants also transport genes, thus bringing genetic diversity. Migration is not only a human fact but a biological one.

      But the understanding of migration’s critical import — whether broadly biological or specifically human — has been a long time coming.

      “The idea that certain people and species belong in certain fixed places has had a long history in Western culture,” Shah writes. By its logic, “migration is by necessity a catastrophe, because it violates the natural order.” The so-called “natural order” is actually a construct that has been buoyed for millennia by a broad coalition of scientists, politicians, and other ideologically inflected cavillers. As for the word “migrant,” it didn’t even appear in the English language until the 17th century — when it was coined by Thomas Browne — and it took another hundred years before it was applied to humans. One important migrant-denialist, as Shah details, was Swedish-born naturalist Carl Linnaeus, most famous for formalizing binomial nomenclature, the modern system of classifying organisms as, say, Canis lupus or Homo sapiens.

      Shah goes beyond Linnaeus’s contribution to taxonomy — which, notably, is itself subject to critique, as when essayist Anne Fadiman describes it as a “form of mental colonising and empire-building” — to illuminate his blinkered fealty to the dominant narratives of the day. More than just falling in line, he worked to cement the alleged differences between human populations — crudely exaggerating, for instance, features of “red,” “yellow,” “black,” or “white” skinned people. He sparred with competing theorists who were beginning to propose then-revolutionary ideas — for instance, that all humans originated in and migrated out of Africa. With the concept of the “Great Chain of Being,” he toadied to the reigning theological explanation for the world being as it was; this concept hierarchically categorized, in ascending order, matter, plants, animals, peasants, clergy, noblemen, kings, and, finally, God. To support his views, Linnaeus took a trip to northern Sweden where he “studied” the indigenous Sami people, all the while complaining of the climate and the locals not speaking Swedish. Robbing them of a few native costumes, he then freely fabricated stories about their culture and origins. He later tried to give credence to biological differences between Africans and Europeans by committing to the bizarre fantasy that black women had elongated labia minora, to which he referred using the Latin term sinus pudoris. The cultural backdrop to his explanations and speculations was the generally held view that migration was an anomaly, and that people and animals lived where they belonged and belonged where they lived — and always had.

      Ignorance — deliberate, political, or simply true and profound — of the realities of even animal migration went so far as pushing scientists to hatch myriad far-fetched theories to explain, for example, where migratory birds went in the winter. Leading naturalists at the time explained some birds’ seasonal disappearance by claiming that they hibernated in lakes — a theory first proposed by Aristotle — or hid in remote caves. Driving such assumptions was, in part, the idea of a stable and God-created “harmony of nature.” When some thinkers began to question such fixed stability, Linneaus doubled down, insisting that animals inhabited their specific climes, and remained there. The implication for humans was not only that they had not migrated from Africa, but that Africans — as well as Asians and Native Americans — were biologically distinct. This kind of racial essentialism was an important structural component of what would morph into race science or eugenics. Linnaeus divided Homo sapiens into Homo sapiens europaeus (white, serious, strong), Homo sapiens asiaticus (yellow, melancholy, greedy), Homo sapiens americanus (red, ill-tempered, subjugated), and Homo sapiens afer (black, impassive, lazy), as well as Homo caudatus (inhabitants of the Antarctic globe), and even Homo monstrosus (pygmies and Patagonian giants).

      “Scientific ideas that cast migration as a form of disorder were not obscure theoretical concerns confined to esoteric academic journals,” but, Shah writes, “theoretical ballast for today’s generation of anti-immigration lobbyists and policy makers.”

      Here Shah dredges up more vile fantasies, like that of the “Malphigian layer” in the late 17th century, which claimed that Africans had an extra layer of skin consisting of “a thick, fatty black liquid of unknown provenance.” While the Malphigian layer has been roundly dismissed, such invented differences between peoples continue to bedevil medical treatment: even today, black people are presumed to be able to tolerate more pain, and so it’s perhaps hardly surprising that more black women die in childbirth.

      The idea was “that people who lived on different continents were biologically foreign to one another, a claim that would fuel centuries of xenophobia and generations of racial violence.” Or, put more simply, Linnaeus and other believed: “We belong here. They belong there.”

      ¤

      “The classifications of species as either ‘native’ or ‘alien’ is one of the organizing principles of conservation,” Shah writes, quoting a 2007 scientific study in Progress in Human Geography. The implications of that dichotomous classification are harmful to humans and nonhumans alike, setting the stage for xenophobia and white anthropomorphism. As a case in point, the son of author and conservationist Aldo Leopold recommended in 1963, that US national parks “preserve, or where necessary […] recreate the ecologic scene as viewed by the first European visitors.” The idea of a pristine, pre-colonial era presumes an ahistorical falsehood: that humans and others left no trace, or that those traces could be undone and the ecologic scene returned to a static Eden. While many indigenous cultures certainly live less disruptively within their environment, in the case of both the Americas and Australia for example, the arrival of the first Homo sapiens heralded the swift extinction of scores of native species — in the Americas, woolly mammoths, giant sloths, saber-toothed tigers, camelops, and the dire wolf. Yet the pull toward preservation persists.

      In 1999, Bill Clinton established the National Invasive Species Council, which was tasked with repelling “alien species.” This move was an outgrowth of the relatively recently created disciplines of conservation biology, restoration biology, and even invasion biology. I recall being a boy in northern Ohio and hearing of the horror and devastation promised by the zebra mussel’s inexorable encroachment into the ecosystems of the Great Lakes. One invasion biologist, writes Shah, “calculated that wild species moving freely across the planet would ravage large swaths of ecosystems. The number of land animals would drop by 65 percent, land birds by 47 percent, butterflies by 35 percent, and ocean life by 58 percent.” And while the globe is certainly losing species to extinction, blaming mobility or migration is missing the mark, and buoying up the old “myth of a sedentary planet,” as she puts it.

      For millennia, humans had hardly any idea of how some species could spread. They had neither the perspective nor technology to understand that creepy-crawlies have creeped and crawled vast distances and always been on the move, which is not, in the big picture, a bad thing. Zebra mussels, for example, were not the only, or even the greatest, threat to native clams in the Great Lakes. Besides disrupting the local ecosystems, they also contributed to those ecosystems by filtering water and becoming a new source of food for native fish and fowl. Shah notes that Canadian ecologist Mark Vellend has found that “wild newcomers generally increase species richness on a local and regional level.” Since the introduction of European species to the Americas 400 years ago, biodiversity has actually increased by 18 percent. In other words, Shah writes, “nature transgresses borders all the time.”

      In her last chapter, “The Wall,” she tackles the immunological implications of migration. While first acknowledging that certain dangers do uncontrovertibly exist, such as Europeans bringing smallpox to the Americas, or Rome spreading malaria to the outer regions of its empire, she metaphorizes xenophobia as a fever dream. To be sure, wariness of foreign pathogens may make sense, but to guide foreign policy on such grounds or let wariness morph into discrimination or violent backlash becomes, like a fever that climbs beyond what the host organism needs, “a self-destructive reaction, leading to seizures, delirium, and collapse.” It’s like a cytokine storm in the COVID-19 era. As Shah told me, “the reflexive solution to contagion — border closures, isolation, immobility — is in fact antithetical to biological resilience on a changing planet.”

      ¤

      In 2017, a solo Mexican wolf loped through the Chihuahuan Desert, heading north, following a path that other wolves, as well as humans, have traveled for thousands of years. Scientists were especially interested in this lone wolf, known as M1425, because he represented a waning population of endangered Mexican wolves dispersing genes from a tiny population in Mexico to a slightly more robust population in the United States.

      Like the Isle Royale wolves, “[i]f the two wild populations of Mexican gray wolves can find and mate with each other, the exchange of genetic material could boost recovery efforts for both populations,” a New Mexico magazine reported. But the area where M1425 crossed the international boundary is now closed off by a border wall, and the Center for Biological Diversity counts 93 species directly threatened by the proposed expansion of the wall. This is what we should be worried about.

      https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/migration-as-bio-resilience-on-sonia-shahs-the-next-great-migration
      #bio-résilience #résilience

      signalé par @isskein

  • #CoronaCapitalism and the European #Border_Regime

    As the coronavirus pandemic continues to affect people’s lives all over the world, the violence against migrants and refugees has intensified. This article explores #CoronaCapitalism and the Border Regime in a European context. Corporate Watch uses the term “border regime” as a shorthand to mean all of the many different institutions, people, systems and processes involved in trying to control migrants.

    This article only shares the tip-of-the-iceberg of migrant experiences during the coronavirus pandemic and we know there are many other untold stories. If you would like to share your news or experiences, please contact us.

    Mass Containment Camps

    As the world descended into lockdowns in an attempt to prevent the spread of the virus, tens of thousands of people have been confined in camps in the Western Balkans and Greece, as well as smaller accommodation centres across Europe. New and existing camps were also essentially locked down and the movement of people in and out of camps began to be heavily controlled by police and/or the military.

    The Border Violence Monitoring Network (BVMN) has been trying to track what is happening across the Balkans. They write that in Bosnia-Herzegovina, “more than 5,000 people were detained in existing temporary refugee reception centres. They include about 500 unaccompanied minors and several hundred children with families. Persons in need of special care, patients, victims of torture, members of the LGBTQ population, persons diagnosed with mental disorders, and victims of domestic violence have also been locked down into ‘EU-funded’ camps.” Police officers guard the centres and emergency legislation enables them the right to ‘physically force persons trying to leave the centres to return.’

    120,000 people are locked down in containment camps across Greece and the Greek Islands. Disturbing accounts of refugee camps are ever-present but the pandemic has worsened already unbearable conditions. 17,000 refugees live at Moira Refugee Camp where there are 210 people per toilet and 630 people per shower. Coronavirus, uncertainty over suspended asylum applications and the terrible living conditions are all contributing to escalating violence.

    In detention centres in Drama and Athens in Greece, the BVMN report that, “Respondents describe a lack of basic amenities such as running water, showers, or soap. Cramped and overcrowded conditions, with up to 13 inmates housed in one caravan with one, usually non-functioning, toilet. Requests for better services are met with violence at the hands of officers and riot police. On top of this, there have been complaints that no special precautions for COVID-19 are being taken, residents inside told BVMN reporters that sick individuals are not isolated, and are dismissed as having ‘the flu’.”

    While movement restrictions were lifted for Greek residents on 4th May, lockdown is still extended for all camps and centres across Greece and the Islands. This decision triggered thousands of people to protest in Athens. Emergency legislation adopted at the start of March in Greece effectively suspended the registration of asylum applications and implied immediate deportation for those entering the Greek territory, without registration, to their countries of origin or to Turkey.

    Detention and the deportation regime

    While major country-wide lockdowns are an unusual form of restriction of movement, for decades European states have been locking people seeking safety in detention centres. Immigration Removal Centres are essentially prisons for migrants in which people are locked up without trial or time-limit. In the UK the detention system is mostly run for profit by private companies, as detailed in our UK Border Regime book.

    Despite preparing for a pandemic scenario in January 2020, it took public pressure and legal action before the British government released nearly 1000 people from detention centres. As of the end of May, 368 people were still locked up in the profit-making detention centres and many more are living in ‘accommodation centres’ where they have been unable to access coronavirus testing.

    During the pandemic, people have been revolting in several detention centres across France and Belgium. Residents at a refugee centre in Saxony-Anhalt in Germany went on a hunger strike in April to protest against a lack of disinfectant. Hunger strikes have also taken place at detention centres in Tunisia, Cyprus and France.

    Women in a police holding centre for migrants in Greece went on hunger strike in June. In a statement, they wrote: “We will continue the hunger strike until we are free from this captivity. They will either set us free or we shall die”.

    People staged a rooftop protest at a detention centre in Madrid at the start of the outbreak. This was before all the detention centres in Spain were, for the first time in their history, completely emptied. To put this into context, Spain had 6,473 detainees in 2019. Legal challenges have been leveraging the EU Returns Directive which allows detention pending deportation for up to 18 months, but stipulates that if “a reasonable prospect of removal no longer exists…detention ceases to be justified and the person concerned shall be released immediately”.

    With a worldwide reduction in flights, deportations became unfeasible, however, many are afraid that the deportation machine will restart as things “return to normal”.

    Worsening life in the ‘jungle’

    People living in squats and other improvised accommodation have also faced sweeping operations, with people being rounded up and taken to containment camps.

    For those that remained on the street, pandemic restrictions took their toll. In Greece, movement amidst the pandemic was permitted via letters and text messages. For people who did not have the right paperwork, they were fined 150 euros, sometimes multiple times.

    Similarly, in the French city of Calais, people who did not have the right paperwork were commonly denied access to shops and supermarkets, where they may have previously used the bathrooms or bought food to cook. With many volunteer groups unable to operate due to movement restrictions, the availability of food dramatically reduced overnight. Access to services such as showers, phone charging and healthcare also rapidly reduced.

    People in Calais also faced a rise in evictions: 45 evictions were recorded in the first two weeks of lockdown. These expulsions have continued throughout the pandemic. On Friday 10th July 2020, a major police raid in Calais forced more than 500 people onto buses to be taken to ‘reception centres’ across the region.

    In Amsterdam in the Netherlands, some migrants were forced to live in night shelters and made to leave during the daytime – facing constant risks of contracting COVID-19 and police harassment in the city. They protested “I would stay at home if I had one”.

    Many migrant solidarity groups working on the ground lost huge numbers of volunteers due to travel restrictions and health concerns. Access to material donations such as tents, which are commonly collected at the end of festivals, also reduced. A constant supply of these resources is needed because the police routinely take the migrants’ tents away.

    Militarisation of borders

    The pandemic has seen an increase in military forces at borders and camps, persistent police violence and the suspension of ‘rights’ or legal processes. Using ‘State of Emergency’ legislation, the health crisis has been effectively weaponised.

    In March at the beginning of the pandemic in Europe, FRONTEX, the European Border and Coast Guard Agency deployed an additional 100 guards at the Greek Land Border. This is in addition to the agency’s core of 10,000 officers working around Europe.

    In their 2020 Risk Analysis Report, FRONTEX wrote that “the closing of internal borders is binding border guard personnel, which some border authorities have long stopped planning for”. This illuminates a key complexity in border control. For years, Europe has shifted to policing the wider borders of the Schengen Area. As the virus spread between countries within that area, however, states have tried to shut down their own borders.

    Police forces and militaries have become increasingly mobilised to “protect these national borders”. In Slovenia, this meant the military was granted authority to ‘process civilians’ at the border through the government’s activation of Article 37a of the Defence Act. While in Serbia, the army was deployed around border camps to ensure mass containment. 400 new border guards were also dispatched to the Evros land border between Greece and Turkey in addition to an increase in fencing and surveillance technologies.

    Escalating Police Violence

    Although migrants are no strangers to police brutality, national states of emergency have enabled an escalation in police violence. In mid-April an open letter was published by the Eritrean community of the Calais jungle reporting escalating police brutality. It describes the actions of the CRS police (Compagnies républicaines de sécurité); the general guard of the French police, infamous for riot control and repression:

    “They don’t see us as human beings. They insult us with names such as monkey, bitch etc. And for the past few weeks, they have started to threaten our lives by beating us as soon as the opportunity arises. When for example they found a group of two or three people walking towards the food distribution, or in our tents, when we were sleeping. They accelerate in their vehicles while driving in our direction, as if they wanted to crush us. They also took people with them to places far from Calais, and beat them until they lost consciousness.”

    The statement continues with a chronological list of events whereby people were beaten up, hit, gassed, had their arms broken, and were struck on the head so hard they lost consciousness and were taken to hospital by ambulance.

    With fewer people on the streets during the pandemic, police evictions that were not previously possible due to street-level resistance became successful. This was evidenced in the eviction of the Gini occupation at the Polytechnic University in Exarchia, Greece, a location that the police have not dared enter for decades. Dozens of migrant families were rounded up and taken to a detention centre.

    Violent pushbacks across borders

    There has also been an increase in illegal and violent pushbacks. Pushbacks are the informal expulsion (without due process) of individuals or groups to another country. This commonly involves the violent removal of people across a border.

    For example, on April 22nd in North Macedonia, a group of people from Palestine, Morocco and Egypt were pushed back into Greece. Two men were approached by officers in army uniforms and forced onto a bus where officers began to beat them with batons and guns. So much force was used that one man’s arm was fractured. The other members of the small group were later found and abruptly woken by officers. One man was stamped on and kicked across his body and head. Their shoes were removed and they were told to walk the 2km back to the border where they were met with the other group that had been taken there.

    A group of 16 people in Serbia (including one minor) were told they were being taken to a new camp for COVID prevention. They were then forced into a van and driven for nine hours with no stops, toilet or water. They were released at a remote area of hills and told to leave and cross the border to North Macedonia by the officers with guns. When found attempting to cross again days later they were told by police officers, “Don’t come again, we will kill you”.

    In Croatia, police have also started tagging people that they have pushed back with orange spray paint.

    There are also reports that Greek authorities are pushing people back to Turkey. According to the Border Violence Monitoring Network, many people shared experiences of being beaten, robbed and detained before being driven to the border area where military personnel used boats to return them to Turkey across the Evros river. In mid April in Greece, approximately 50 people were taken from Diavata camp in the morning and removed to a nearby police station where they were ordered to lie on the ground – “Sleep here, don’t move”. They were then beaten with batons. Some were also attacked with electric tasers. They were held overnight in a detention space near the border, and beaten further by Greek military officers. The next day they were boated across the river to Turkey by authorities with military uniforms. Another group were taken to the river in the dark and ordered to strip to their underwear.

    As pushbacks continue, people are forced to take even more dangerous routes. In Romania in mid-April, a group were found drowning in the Danube River after their boat capsized. One person was found dead and eight are still missing, while the survivors suffered from hypothermia.

    Danger at Sea

    During the pandemic, increasing numbers of disturbing accounts have been shared by migrants experiencing violence at sea. Between mid March and mid May, Alarm Phone (a hotline for boat people in distress) received 28 emergency calls from the Aegean Sea.

    On the 29th April, a boat carrying 48 refugees from Afghanistan, Congo and Iran, including 18 children, tried to reach Lesvos Island in the early hours of the day. They were pushed back to Turkish waters:

    “We were very scared. We tried to continue towards Lesvos Island. It was only 20 minutes more driving to reach the Greek coast. The big boat let a highspeed boat down, which hunted us down. There were six masked men in black clothes. They stopped us and made many waves. With a long stick they took away our petrol and they broke our engine. They had guns and knives. Then they threw a rope to us and ordered us to fix it on our boat. Then they started pulling us back towards Turkey. After a while they stopped and cut the rope. They returned to the big boat and took distance from us. It was around 6am.

    Then two other boats of the Greek coastguard arrived which were white and grey and drove very fast towards us, starting to make circles around our boat. They created big waves which were pushing us in the direction of Turkish waters. Our boat was taking in water and the kids were screaming. Our boat started breaking from the bottom. We were taking out the water with our boots. We threw all our belongings in the sea to make our boat lighter. Many of us had no life vests. A pregnant lady fainted. The Greeks continued making waves for a long period. A Turkish coastguard boat arrived and stood aside watching and taking photos and videos for more than six hours. Only after 13:30 o’clock the Turkish coastguard boat finally saved us. We were brought to Çanakalle police station and detained for five days.”

    During two months of lockdown, civil monitoring ships (volunteers who monitor the Aegean sea for migrants arriving via boat) were not permitted. In Italy, ports were closed to rescue ships, with many feared lost at sea as a result. Allegations have also emerged that Greece has been using inflatable rafts to deport asylum seekers. These are rafts without motors or propellers that cannot be steered.

    The Maltese Army also hit the headlines after turning away a boat of migrants by gunpoint and giving them the GPS coordinates for Italy. This is after recent reports of sabotaging migrant vessels, and pushing back migrant boats to Libya resulting in 12 people dying. The Maltese government recently signed a deal with the Libyan government to “to coordinate operations against illegal migration”. This includes training the Libyan coastguards and funding for “reception camps”.

    The threat of the virus and worsening conditions have also contributed to a record number of attempts to cross the Channel. The courage and commitment to overcome borders is inspiring, and more successful crossings have taken place during the pandemic. Between March 23rd (when the UK coronavirus lockdown began) and May 11th at least 853 migrants managed to cross the Channel in dinghies and small boats.

    State Scapegoating and the empowerment of the far right

    Far-right politicians and fascist activists have used the pandemic as an opportunity to push for closed borders.

    The election of a new Far Right government in Slovenia in March brought with it the scapegoating of refugees as coronavirus vectors. News conglomerate, NOVA24, heavily publicised a fake news story that the first COVID-19 patient in Italy was a Pakistani person who came via the Balkan route.

    Meanwhile, Hungary’s Government led by Vicktor Orbán moved to deport resident Iranians after claiming they were responsible for the country’s first coronavirus outbreak.

    In Italy, Matteo Salvini, the populist leader of the opposition Lega party tried to blame the movement of migrants from Africa across the Mediterranean as a “major infection threat” shortly before the country was overwhelmed with the pandemic and its rising death toll.

    The racist scapegoating ignores data that proves that initially the virus was transmited predominatnly by tourists’ and business people’s globe-trotting in the service of global capitalism and the fact that those whose movement is restricted, controlled and perilous, who do not have the power and wealth, are the most likely to suffer from the worst effects of both the virus itself and the shut downs.

    The Aftermath of Asylum suspension

    Access to asylum has drastically shifted across Europe with the suspension of many face-to-face application processing centres and appeal hearings. This ‘legal limbo’ is having a severe impact on people’s lives.

    Many people remain housed in temporary accommodation like hotels while they wait for their claim to be processed. This accommodation is often overcrowded and social-distancing guidelines are impossible to follow there. One asylum seeker in South London even shared to The Guardian how two strangers were made to share his double bed for a week in one room. One of the people was later taken to hospital with coronavirus.

    Closed-conditions at Skellig Accomodation Centre, a former hotel in Cahersiveen, Co. Kerry, Ireland enabled the rapid spread of the virus between the 100 people living there. Misha, an asylum seeker confined there, said she watched in horror as people started falling sick around her.

    “We were sharing bedrooms with strangers. We were sharing the dining room. We were sharing the salt shakers. We were sharing the lobby. We were sharing everything. And if you looked at the whole situation, you cannot really say that it was fit for purpose.”

    People were ordered to stay inside, and meanwhile coronavirus testing was delayed. Protests took place inside and locals demonstrated in solidarity outside.

    Asylum seekers in Glasgow have been protesting their accommodation conditions provided by the Mears Group, who Corporate Watch profiled in 2019. Mears Group won a £1.15 billion contract to run the refugee accommodation system in Scotland, Northern Ireland and much of the north of England. Their profiteering, slum landlord conditions and involvement in mass evictions have been met with anger and resistance. The pandemic has only worsened the experiences of people forced to live in Mears’ accommodation through terrible sanitation and medical neglect. Read our 2020 update on the Mears Group here.

    In the UK, the Home Office put a hold on evictions of asylum seekers during lockdown. The Red Cross stated this spared 50,000 people from the threat of losing their accommodation. Campaigners and tenants fear what will happen post-corona and how many people will face destitution when the ban on evictions lifts this August.

    In addition, a face-to-face screening interview is still needed for new asylum claims. This creates an awful choice for asylum seekers between shielding from the virus (and facing destitution) or going to the interviews in order to access emergency asylum support and begin the formal process. While meagre, the £37.75 per week is essential for survival. One of the reasons the Home Office make face-to-face applications compulsory is because of biometric data harvesting e.g. taking fingerprints of asylum seekers. One asylum seeker with serious health problems has had to make three journeys from Glasgow to Liverpool in the midst of the pandemic to submit paperwork.

    Access to food and other support is also very difficult as many centres and support services are closed.

    Barriers to Healthcare

    It is widely recognised that systemic racism has led to the disproportionate deaths of Black, Asian and minority ethnic people throughout the pandemic. Research has shown Black people are four times more likely to die than white people, and Bangladeshi or Pakistani groups are three times more likely. Many people from these communities are migrants, and many work in the National Health Service and social care sector.

    Research by Patients not Passports, Medact, Migrants Organise and the New Economics Foundation has shown that many migrants are avoiding seeking healthcare. 57% of respondents in their research report that they have avoided seeking healthcare because of fears of being charged for NHS care, data sharing and other migration enforcement concerns. Most people are unaware that treatment for coronavirus is exempt from charging. They also often experience additional barriers including the absence of translation and interpretation services, digital exclusions, housing and long distances from care services.

    Undocumented migrants are incredibly precarious. A project worker interviewed for the Patients not Passports Report shared that:

    “One client lived in a care home where she does live-in care and she has been exposed to Corona but has stated that she will not seek treatment and would rather die there than be detained.”

    Elvis, an undocumented migrant from the Philippines, died at home with suspected coronavirus because he was so scared by the hostility of Government policies that he did not seek any help from the NHS.

    For those that do try to access healthcare, issues such as not having enough phone credit or mobile data, not having wifi or laptops for video appointments, and simply not being able to navigate automated telephone and online systems because of language barriers and non-existent or poor translation, are having a very real impact on people’s ability to receive support. Fears of poor treatment because of people’s past experiences of discrimination and racism even if they access the services is another barrier.

    Exploiting Migrant Labour

    The exploitation of migrant labour has always been essential to sustaining capitalist economies. The pandemic generated contradictory responses from politicians and capitalists alike. Germany’s agricultural sector lobbied hard for opening the border after they were closed, leading the country to lift its ban and let in over 80,000 seasonal workers from Eastern Europe. Yet dilapidated living conditions and overcrowding are sparking new COVID-19 outbreaks, such as the 200 workers that contracted the virus at a slaughterhouse in western Germany.

    In mid May, the Italian government passed a law regularising undocumented migrants, whereby undocumented workers have been encouraged to apply for six-month legal residency permits. There are believed to be about 600,000 undocumented workers in Italy but only people doing ‘essential’ work during the pandemic can apply, mostly in the agricultural sector. Thousands of people live in makeshift encampments near fruit and vegetable farms with no access to running water or electricity.

    Working conditions carry risks of violence. On 18 May, five days after Italy’s regularisation law passed, a 33-year old Indian migrant working in a field outside of Rome was fired after asking his employer for a face mask for protection while at work. When the worker requested his daily wage, he was beaten up and thrown in a nearby canal.

    Conclusion

    The coronavirus crisis has exposed and intensified the brutality required to sustain capitalism – from systemic racism, to violent border controls, to slave labour for industrial agriculture, the list goes on. Despite extremely difficult conditions, undocumented migrants have formed strong movements of solidarity and collective struggle in many European countries. From revolts in detention centres to legal actions to empty them, people are continually resisting the border regime. As people reject a ‘return to normal’ post pandemic, the fall of the border regime must be part of a vision for freedom and liberation in a world beyond capitalism.

    https://corporatewatch.org/coronaborderregime
    #capitalisme #covid-19 #coronavirus #frontières #Europe #migrations #violence #asile #réfugiés #camps #camps_de_réfugiés #containment #rétention #campements #technologie #militarisation_des_frontières #Grèce #Turquie #violences_policières #police #refoulements #push-backs #Balkans #route_des_Balkans #santé #accès_aux_soins #travail #exploitation #pandémie #Frontex #confinement #grève_de_la_faim #fermeture_des_frontières

    ping @isskein @karine4 @rhoumour @_kg_ @thomas_lacroix

  • Fermeture des frontières | Les personnes en besoin de protection victimes des frontières verrouillées
    https://asile.ch/2020/08/17/fermeture-des-frontieres-les-personnes-en-besoin-de-protection-victimes-des-fr

    La fermeture des frontières est l’une des mesures les plus spectaculaires prises par le Conseil fédéral pendant le pic pandémique du Covid-19. Quelles en ont été les conséquences pour les réfugié-e-s et personnes en besoin de protection ? Avec l’état de nécessité, le Conseil fédéral a décidé de refouler les requérant-e-s d’asile à la frontière suisse […]

  • De la #conditionnalité_négative de l’#aide_au_développement...

    Post de Sara Prestianni sur FB :

    Italie - #Di_Maio, ministre des Affaires Etrangeres et de la Cooperation, applique la conditionnalité négative migration/développement en gelant les fonds pour le développement a la #Tunisie (6,5M€) si elle ne s’engage pas à geler les départs. Mais ces fonds ne servent-ils pas à atténuer la crise, qui est la cause des départs ?‬

    https://www.facebook.com/isabelle.saintsaens/posts/10222038342372629
    #Italie #développement #asile #migrations #réfugiés #conditionnalité_de_l'aide #fermeture_des_frontières #flux_migratoires

    –—

    ajouté à la métaliste du lien entre migrations et développement et plus précisément sur la conditionnalité de l’aide :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733358#message768701

    ping @_kg_

    • Deputato tunisino: «Prima di minacciare blocco, Di Maio pensi a accordi»

      «Il ministro degli Esteri Di Maio prima di minacciare il blocco dei fondi per la Tunisia dovrebbe pensare ai rapporti storici che ci sono tra l’Italia e la Tunisia e nello stesso tempo dovrebbe prima vedere prima cosa prevedono gli accordi presi in passato tra i due paesi». A parlare, in una intervista esclusiva all’Adnkronos, è Sami Ben Abdelaali, deputato tunisino ma che vive tra Palermo e Tunisi.

      Il deputato tunisino si dice «molto dispiaciuto» per le dichiarazioni rese oggi dal capo della Farnesina che chiede «di sospendere lo stanziamento di 6,5 milioni di euro» per la Tunisia «in attesa di un piano integrato più ampio proposto dalla viceministra del Re» e di «un risvolto nella collaborazione che abbiamo chiesto alle autorità tunisine in materia migratoria». Di Maio ha chiesto al comitato congiunto per la cooperazione allo sviluppo della Farnesina di rimandare la discussione sullo stanziamento di fondi della cooperazione in favore di Tunisi.

      «La collaborazione e la cooperazione tra due paesi è come il matrimonio - dice ancora Sami Ben Abdelaali -nella buona e nella cattiva sorte. Quando ci sono disagi in un paese bisogna intervenire con il dialogo e non minacciando di bloccare i fondi. Non è questa la condizione ottimale per i nostri rapporti». «Io sono davvero dispiaciuto per le parole espresse dal ministro Di Maio che non traducono i rapporti storici di cooperazione tra l’Italia e la Tunisia- dice ancora il politico sposato con una donna italiana- L’Italia ovviamente prima di pretendere che la Tunisia mantenga suoi impegni e i suoi accordi dovrebbe anche mantenere gli impegni presi nel 2011 nell’accordo tra governo italiano e governo tunisino. Perché dal 2017 l’Italia ha bloccato gli aiuti previsti nell’accordo, per l’acquisto di strumenti e tecnologici e per controllare le coste tunisine». «Addirittura ci sono oltre 30 milioni che dovrebbe pagare l’Italia nella tranche 2020-2022 e solo dal 2017 risultano 3 milioni di euro non pagati».

      Perché, come ricorda il deputato tunisino, «per controllare le coste tunisine ci vogliono uomini e mezzi e l’Italia non ha mantenuto i suoi impegni dal 2017. In più le condizioni climatiche ottimali hanno incoraggiato le persone a tornare in Italia, oppure persone rimpatriate o cittadini che hanno perso il lavoro. C’è un disagio sociale che ha fatto sì che la gente cerchi altre soluzioni».

      Il deputato tunisino poi parla della nuova rotta tunisina verso l’Italia. Nei giorni scorsi il Procuratore di Agrigento Luigi Patronaggio in una intervista all’Adnkronos aveva lanciato l’allarme sui flussi tunisini e aveva parlato di un «serio problema di ordine pubblico». «Il problema - dice Sami Ben Abdelaali -è che oggi c’è un governo ad interim e l’ambasciatore italiano a Tunisi sta facendo grandi sforzi per dialogare con le autorità competenti per affrontare questo flusso migratorio. Voglio anche ricordare che nei giorni scorsi la ministra dell’Interno Lamorgese è volata a Tunisi». «C’è un disagio sociale notevole, dovuto al coronavirus e alla disoccupazione che aumenta giornalmente - spiega ancora il politico - Per noi l’Italia è il nostro primo partner commerciale e non vogliamo perdere i rapporti con questo paese».

      Ma qual è la soluzione? «Rafforzare i controlli, ma prima di arrivare in Italia - dice - oggi controllare dalla Tunisia è complicato, bisogna controllare al confine delle acque internazionali. Bisogna aumentare la sicurezza e superare questa fase finché non nasca il nuovo governo con cui poi avviare delle interlocuzioni. E bisogna anche intervenire con aiuti concreti sui giovani, ad esempio, per bloccare l’immigrazione verso l’Italia, anche attraverso l’aiuto l’Unione europea».

      Sulla convocazione di Di Maio dell’ambasciatore tunisino per accelerare i rimpatri, il deputato dice: «Per il numero dei rimpatri l’accordo già c’è, bisogna intervenire con il governo. Appena intorno al 20 agosto si farà il nuovo governo si può provare a trovare delle soluzioni. Ma nel frattempo bisogna avviare i canali diplomatici». Per ci tiene a sottolineare: «I numeri dei flussi migratori di oggi non sono eccezionali, ricordo che in passato erano molto più alti».

      https://www.adnkronos.com/fatti/esteri/2020/07/31/deputato-tunisino-prima-minacciare-blocco-maio-pensi-accordi_TVw9cXKeB197

    • Migranti e Tunisia, le Ong danno lezioni a Di Maio e Conte. Ma le capiranno?

      Già nel 2016 le Ong di “Link 2007" dicendo: «“Agli Stati conviene prevenire piuttosto che rincorrere gli eventi e spendere molto di più per cercare di tamponare i conflitti e gli esodi»

      “Agli Stati conviene prevenire, spendendo quanto necessario, piuttosto che rincorrere gli eventi e spendere molto di più intervenendo per cercare di tamponare i conflitti, con le distruzioni, le indicibili sofferenze, i massacri, gli esodi di persone e le insicurezze e destabilizzazioni che essi provocano ovunque. L’Ue, gli Stati membri e le Istituzioni finanziarie e di sviluppo internazionali sono invitate a muoversi, finché si è ancora in tempo, per contenere le periodiche ribellioni in Tunisia, a pochi chilometri dall’Italia, e prevenire una possibile destabilizzazione del paese, sostenendone decisamente l’esemplare ma fragile democrazia, l’unica realizzata con le ‘primavere arabe. La Tunisia, il paese mediterraneo più vicino all’Italia, è oggi in bilico tra il rafforzamento del processo democratico e la destabilizzazione con prevedibili e devastanti conseguenze su migrazioni e terrorismo. Investire sulla Tunisia e i paesi limitrofi, anche sostenendo gli sforzi della società civile, è investire sul nostro futuro di stabilità e di pace. Un tracollo della Tunisia metterebbe infatti a rischio la stessa sicurezza e stabilità in Italia e in Europa, e non sarà a costo zero”.

      Sembrano considerazioni dell’oggi. Ma non è così. Perché questo argomentato grido d’allarme lanciato dalle Ong di “Link 2007” data 16 febbraio 2016. Sono trascorsi quattro anni e mezzo d’allora, si sono succeduti primi ministri, cambiate maggioranze, ma nessuno ha raccolto questi preziosi suggerimenti.

      “La via che le Ong di ‘Link 2007’ propongono è quella della costituzione, in tempi rapidi, di uno specifico Fondo internazionale formato da contributi della Commissione europea, degli Stati membri, di tutti i paesi interessati, delle Istituzioni finanziarie e di sviluppo europee e internazionali, comprese quelle arabe e islamiche, prendendo in considerazione la Tunisia insieme ai due paesi confinanti, Libia e Algeria. Un fondo fiduciario per la realizzazione di un ‘piano Marshall’, di cui l’Italia, data la vicinanza, potrebbe farsi promotrice. Per la sola Tunisia serviranno, secondo le stime di Link 2007 basate sul bilancio dello Stato, almeno 20 miliardi di euro all’anno per i prossimi cinque anni, finalizzati agli investimenti prioritari, con lo scopo di restringere la forbice delle disuguaglianze che pesano in particolare sulle regioni interne e le periferie urbane degradate, di ridurre drasticamente la disoccupazione e di attrarre nuovi capitali e investitori esterni. Senza interventi rapidi e significativi la Tunisia potrebbe vivere una nuova rivoluzione popolare: molto probabilmente distruttiva, questa volta, che metterebbe a rischio tutta l’area euro-mediterranea, a partire dalla vicina Italia”.

      Questa proposta è caduto nel vuoto, e oggi c’è un ministro degli Esteri che fa la voce grossa e decide di “punire” la Tunisia per un presunto lassismo nel contrastare il flusso di migranti verso le coste siciliane, bloccando i finanziamenti destinati alla cooperazione allo sviluppo destinati al Paese nordafricano.

      La situazione è rimasta esplosiva

      Ma torniamo a quel documento, assolutamente “profetico”. Per il presidente del Forum tunisino per i diritti economici e sociali, Abderrahman Hedhili, le proteste erano prevedibili: “Abbiamo segnalato che la situazione sociale sarebbe esplosa; l’esclusione sociale e le disparità regionali sono pesanti ma il governo non è riuscito a definire strategie e programmi per le regioni interne”. Il 15% della popolazione è disoccupata. La percentuale sale al 25% in regioni periferiche come quella di Kasserine e a tassi ben superiori per i giovani. Spesso il lavoro è legato ad intermediazioni corruttive. La situazione è ulteriormente peggiorata a causa degli attacchi terroristici del 2015 contro obiettivi turistici quali il museo del Bardo a Tunisi e il resort di Susa (Sousse): l’industria turistica con i suoi 400 mila lavoratori è stata pesantemente colpita. Le regioni costiere sono le più sviluppate: investimenti pubblici e privati si sono susseguiti nel tempo, anche per favorire il turismo, e in esse è localizzato l’80% delle industrie tunisine. Buono è quindi, in esse, il tasso di occupazione e di reddito medio. Nei governatorati centro meridionali lontani dalla costa, invece, la gente si sente abbandonata per la mancanza di investimenti produttivi e di servizi, dai trasporti ai servizi essenziali come l’acqua, la salute, l’istruzione.

      La realtà e le crescenti difficoltà

      “La realtà - proseguiva il report di Link 2007 - è che lo Stato non ha i fondi necessari per potere impegnarsi in un piano di sviluppo per creare lavoro e servizi essenziali. La mancanza di investitori, l’instabilità politica, il terrorismo stanno bloccando il paese costretto a contare, più che mai, sull’aiuto esterno. Come si dirà più avanti,servirebbe un ‘piano Marshall’ da 20 miliardi di euro per alcuni anni: quei fondi cioè che mancano al bilancio dello Stato per lanciare gli investimenti necessari. Un piano coordinato e finalizzato in particolare alle aree più depresse, all’occupazione e alla lotta alla corruzione. L’Europa, per la vicinanza e i legami storici, deve riuscire ad intervenire presto, molto di più rispetto al passato. Impegni limitati a qualche centinaia di milioni, spesso ripartiti su più anni, non corrispondono alla gravità della situazione e dei bisogni. La democrazia tunisina è reale, radicata, la sola ad essere sopravvissuta alle ‘primavere arabe’. Se sparisse o se cadesse sotto l’influenza di paesi spinti da valori lontani da quelli su cui è basata la nostra convivenza o di movimenti terroristici, la responsabilità non sarà solo del governo tunisino. L’esperienza della Tunisia è importante anche perché rappresenta la sintesi tra i valori occidentali e i valori islamici. Non si possono conservare i valori delle rivoluzioni e la democrazia solo con riconoscimenti internazionali, incontri, convegni, parole di amicizia e vicinanza. “La libertà c’è ma manca il pane” si sente ripetere in tutto il paese. Le ‘rivolte del pane’ rischiano di ripetersi ciclicamente, con conseguenze facilmente prevedibili. Occorre investire sulla Tunisia, con una cooperazione duratura, con una visione e una strategia di lungo periodo, con fondi strutturali e ampi investimenti nelle regioni più arretrate, favorendo l’occupazione e l’equità sociale e tra le regioni. Un paese che è riuscito a gestire con successo e in modo democratico la rivoluzione del 2011 doveva essere aiutato subito con ingenti risorse e continuare ad essere sostenuto senza interruzione. Nell’interesse del consolidamento del processo democratico tunisino ma anche nel nostro stesso interesse, italiano ed europeo. Una grave crisi in Tunisia potrebbe avere conseguenze deleterie anche per noi. L’impegno per la Tunisia è un impegno per noi stessi e la nostra stabilità. Investire sulla Tunisia e i paesi limitrofi è investire sul nostro futuro di stabilità e di pace. Non farlo significa danneggiare noi stessi. Limitare gli aiuti o ritardarli potrebbe avere un costo di gran lunga superiore in un futuro ravvicinato, non solo finanziariamente ma anche in conflitti, vite umane, distruzioni, consolidamento e diffusione del terrorismo, come la recente storia insegna. Un tracollo della Tunisia avrebbe anche conseguenze nefaste per la stessa sicurezza e stabilità europea. È dunque nel nostro interesse, italiano ed europeo, intervenire con investimenti adeguati e risoluti di cooperazione con la Tunisia. E occorre farlo subito”.

      Ma così non è stato.

      Quattro anni e mezzo dopo, Nino Sergi, presidente emerito di Intersos e policy advisor di Liink 2007), rivolge questo post al titolare della Farnesina: “Caro ministro Luigi Di Maio, non ci siamo proprio. Mi è difficile anche in questa occasione, chiamarla ministro, e per di più degli affari esteri e della cooperazione internazionale, dato che con le sue parole intende piuttosto presentarsi come capo-popolo, di quella parte di popolo che lei pensa di riuscire a conquistare. ‘Ci sono delle regole in Italia che vanno rispettate. Anche l’Europa deve rispondere concretamente,. Non c’è tempo da perdere’.

      Sul ‘non c’è tempo da perdere’ le ricordo che nei molti anni di sue responsabilità nel parlamento e nel governo, sul tema delle politiche migratorie lei ha perso tutto il tempo che ha avuto a disposizione. Sull’Europa che deve rispondere concretamente, le ho già scritto un post il 31 luglio: spero che qualcuno del suo staff glielo faccia vedere. Mi soffermo sul ‘ci sono delle regole che in Italia vanno rispettate’. Da chi, signor ministro? Stando al suo diktat, dal governo tunisino? Lei sembra esprimere una concezione delle relazioni internazionali dell’Italia ferma al periodo coloniale, in cui era chiaro chi decideva e chi obbediva. Le relazioni internazionali sono una cosa seria e delicatissima, soprattutto per un paese come il nostro, inserito in un Mediterraneo problematico e carico di tensioni. Occorre ‘fermare i fondi per la cooperazione se non c’è collaborazione con l’Italia, afferma con fermezza. Eh no. Le intese e gli impegni vanno onorati, pur nel dialogo politico per migliorarli. A meno di pensare arrogantemente di potere fare a meno di relazioni divenute preziose e indispensabili per il bene dell’Italia – Cooperazione e collaborazione – rimarca ancora Sergi – non significano più, da tempo, imposizione. Lo dicono le leggi italiane e le normative internazionali dal dopo-guerra in poi. Lo dice lei (lo ricorda’) ogni volta che presiede il Comitato congiunto, il Consiglio nazionale, il Comitato interministeriale per la cooperazione allo sviluppo; e ogni volta che incontra i suoi colleghi ministri dell’area mediterranea. Non imiti altri personaggi politici. Continui a fare il ministro degli esteri: stava imparando e stava dimostrando capacità. Non si distrugga per un po’ di effimero consenso. Sulla Tunisia, la sua situazione sociale e politica, la sua fragilità, le consiglio un breve studio della rete di Ong Link 2007: ‘Aiutare Tunisia per aiutare l’Europa’. E’ del 2016 ma rimane attuale. Se lo vorrà, siamo pronti a discuterne approfonditamente “.

      “Quella che sembrava un’uscita infelice del Ministro degli Esteri, si è invece rivelata essere la linea dell’intero governo, viste le dichiarazioni del Premier Conte e il silenzio degli esponenti PD. Tocca prendere atto che il Governo stia continuando ad appiattarsi su posizioni utili più al prossimo sondaggio che a rafforzare una visione strategica nel mediterraneo e nel Nord Africa – dice a Globalist Paolo Pezzati, Humanitarian Policy Advisor di Oxfam Italia-. La decisione di applicare una #condizionalità_negativa_migrazione-sviluppo con il blocco dei fondi per la cooperazione allo sviluppo qualora la Tunisia non si impegnasse nel blocco delle partenze - potrebbe rivelarsi un autogol di quelli che si ricordano nel tempo. In prima ragione perché la cooperazione ha come obiettivo , qualora negoziata con i partner e la società civile, quello di attaccare proprio le cause alla radice della migrazione che viene chiamata “economica”; e poi perché in un momento di difficoltà – si è dimesso il primo ministro, la crisi economica e sociale è acuta come non mai – e in un contesto geopolitico molto fluido nell’area dove Turchia ed Egitto stanno provando ad allargare la loro egemonia, di solito i partner si sostengono, non si puniscono. La soluzione – prosegue Pezzati - ancora una volta è data dalla combinazione dell’avvio di un nuovo dialogo con Tunisi per un piano strategico condiviso – con un impegno finanziario abbondantemente superiore ai 6,5 milioni - volto a sostenere il paese nord africano e dall’approvare finalmente una legge che superi la Bossi Fini, per istituire nuovi canali di ingresso regolari grazie alla quale finalmente l’Italia si organizzi nel decidere come gestire i flussi migratori invece che preoccuparsi solo come interromperli. Gli ingressi irregolari, gli arrivi con i barconi si contrastano aumentando i canali di ingresso regolari, non alzando muri in terra e in mare. Alla Camera giace la proposta di legge della Campagna ‘Ero Straniero’ che ha proprio questo obiettivo, i partiti della maggioranza cosa stanno aspettando?”.

      Ma discutere non sembra essere oggi nelle intenzioni di chi governa l’Italia. Oggi, per costoro, è tempo di esibire i muscoli (verbali) e di provare a fare la voce grossa con i più debole, il “ruggito del coniglio”. E così, ecco a voi il presidente del Consiglio che ieri, da Cerignola, veste i panni del commander in chief e proclama: «Non possiamo tollerare che si entri in Italia in modo irregolare, tanto più non possiamo tollerare che in questo momento in cui la comunità nazionale intera ha fatto tantissimi sacrifici questi risultati siano vanificati da migranti che tentano di sfuggire alla sorveglianza sanitaria». E ancora: «Non ce lo possiamo permettere, quindi dobbiamo essere duri, inflessibili – dice Conte -. Stiamo collaborando con le autorità tunisine, è quella la strada. Io stesso l’altro giorno ho scritto al presidente tunisino Kais Saied una lettera e sono contento che abbia fatto visita ai porti per rafforzare la sorveglianza costiera. Noi dobbiamo contrastare i traffici e l’incremento degli utili da parte dei gruppi criminali che alimentano questi traffici illeciti. Dobbiamo continuare in questa direzione, dobbiamo intensificare i rimpatri. Abbiamo fatto una riunione con i ministri competenti, Di Maio, Lamorgese, Guerini e De Micheli, stiamo lavorando per evitare che questi traffici continuino. Non si entra in Italia in questo modo e non possiamo permettere che la nostra comunità sia esposta a pericoli».

      Il nemico è stato inquadrato: è il migrante portatore di virus. Ai tempi del Conte I, l’equazione era migrante=criminale, invasore, parassita e, se islamico, terrorista. Col Conte II l’equazione è adattata all’emergenza virale. E questa vergogna la spacciano per “discontinuità”.

      https://www.globalist.it/world/2020/08/04/migranti-e-tunisia-le-ong-danno-lezioni-a-di-maio-e-conte-ma-le-capiranno-

  • Where Will Everyone Go ?

    ProPublica and The New York Times Magazine, with support from the Pulitzer Center, have for the first time modeled how climate refugees might move across international borders. This is what we found.

    #climate #climate_refugee #migration #international_migration #map

    ping @cdb_77

    https://features.propublica.org/climate-migration/model-how-climate-refugees-move-across-continents

  • Covid-19, la #frontiérisation aboutie du #monde

    Alors que le virus nous a rappelé la condition de commune humanité, les frontières interdisent plus que jamais de penser les conditions du cosmopolitisme, d’une société comme un long tissu vivant sans couture à même de faire face aux aléas, aux menaces à même d’hypothéquer le futur. La réponse frontalière n’a ouvert aucun horizon nouveau, sinon celui du repli. Par Adrien Delmas, historien et David Goeury, géographe.

    La #chronologie ci-dessus représente cartographiquement la fermeture des frontières nationales entre le 20 janvier et le 30 avril 2020 consécutive de la pandémie de Covid-19, phénomène inédit dans sa célérité et son ampleur. Les données ont été extraites des déclarations gouvernementales concernant les restrictions aux voyages, les fermetures des frontières terrestres, maritimes et aériennes et des informations diffusées par les ambassades à travers le monde. En plus d’omissions ou d’imprécisions, certains biais peuvent apparaitre notamment le décalage entre les mesures de restriction et leur application.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=64&v=mv-OFB4WfBg&feature=emb_logo

    En quelques semaines, le nouveau coronavirus dont l’humanité est devenue le principal hôte, s’est propagé aux quatre coins de la planète à une vitesse sans précédent, attestant de la densité des relations et des circulations humaines. Rapidement deux stratégies politiques se sont imposées : fermer les frontières nationales et confiner les populations.

    Par un processus de #mimétisme_politique global, les gouvernements ont basculé en quelques jours d’une position minimisant le risque à des politiques publiques de plus en plus drastiques de contrôle puis de suspension des mobilités. Le recours systématique à la fermeture d’une limite administrative interroge : n’y a-t-il pas, comme répété dans un premier temps, un décalage entre la nature même de l’#épidémie et des frontières qui sont des productions politiques ? Le suivi de la diffusion virale ne nécessite-t-il un emboîtement d’échelles (famille, proches, réseaux de sociabilité et professionnels…) en deçà du cadre national ?

    Nous nous proposons ici de revenir sur le phénomène sans précédent d’activation et de généralisation de l’appareil frontalier mondial, en commençant par retrouver la chronologie précise des fermetures successives. Bien que resserrée sur quelques jours, des phases se dessinent, pour aboutir à la situation présente de fermeture complète.

    Il serait vain de vouloir donner une lecture uniforme de ce phénomène soudain mais nous partirons du constat que le phénomène de « frontiérisation du monde », pour parler comme Achille Mbembe, était déjà à l’œuvre au moment de l’irruption épidémique, avant de nous interroger sur son accélération, son aboutissement et sa réversibilité.

    L’argument sanitaire

    Alors que la présence du virus était attestée, à partir de février 2020, dans les différentes parties du monde, la fermeture des frontières nationales s’est imposée selon un principe de cohérence sanitaire, le risque d’importation du virus par des voyageurs était avéré. Le transport aérien a permis au virus de faire des sauts territoriaux révélant un premier archipel économique liant le Hubei au reste du monde avant de se diffuser au gré de mobilités multiples.

    Pour autant, les réponses des premiers pays touchés, en l’occurrence la Chine et la Corée du Sud, se sont organisées autour de l’élévation de barrières non-nationales : personnes infectées mises en quarantaine, foyers, ilots, ville, province etc. L’articulation raisonnée de multiples échelles, l’identification et le ciblage des clusters, ont permis de contrôler la propagation du virus et d’en réduire fortement la létalité. A toutes ces échelles d’intervention s’ajoute l’échelle mondiale où s‘est organisée la réponse médicale par la recherche collective des traitements et des vaccins.

    Face à la multiplication des foyers de contamination, la plupart des gouvernements ont fait le choix d’un repli national. La fermeture des frontières est apparue comme une modalité de reprise de contrôle politique et le retour aux sources de l’État souverain. Bien que nul dirigeant ne peut nier avoir agi « en retard », puisque aucun pays n’est exempt de cas de Covid-19, beaucoup d’États se réjouissent d’avoir fermé « à temps », avant que la vague n’engendre une catastrophe.

    L’orchestration d’une réponse commune concertée notamment dans le cadre de l’OMS est abandonnée au profit d’initiatives unilatérales. La fermeture des frontières a transformé la pandémie en autant d’épidémies nationales, devenant par là un exemple paradigmatique du nationalisme méthodologique, pour reprendre les termes d’analyse d’Ulrich Beck.

    S’impose alors la logique résidentielle : les citoyens présents sur un territoire deviennent comptables de la diffusion de l’épidémie et du maintien des capacités de prise en charge par le système médical. La dialectique entre gouvernants et gouvernés s’articule alors autour des décomptes quotidiens, de chiffres immédiatement comparés, bien que pas toujours commensurables, à ceux des pays voisins.

    La frontiérisation du monde consécutive de la pandémie de coronavirus ne peut se résumer à la seule somme des fermetures particulières, pays par pays. Bien au contraire, des logiques collectives se laissent entrevoir. A défaut de concertation, les gouvernants ont fait l’expérience du dilemme du prisonnier.

    Face à une opinion publique inquiète, un chef de gouvernement prenait le risque d’être considéré comme laxiste ou irresponsable en maintenant ses frontières ouvertes alors que les autres fermaient les leurs. Ces phénomènes mimétiques entre États se sont démultipliés en quelques jours face à la pandémie : les États ont redécouvert leur maîtrise biopolitique via les mesures barrières, ils ont défendu leur rationalité en suivant les avis de conseils scientifiques et en discréditant les approches émotionnelles ou religieuses ; ils ont privilégié la suspension des droits à grand renfort de mesures d’exception. Le risque global a alors légitimé la réaffirmation d’une autorité nationale dans un unanimisme relatif.

    Chronologie de la soudaineté

    La séquence vécue depuis la fin du mois janvier de l’année 2020 s’est traduite par une série d’accélérations venant renforcer les principes de fermeture des frontières. Le développement de l’épidémie en Chine alarme assez rapidement la communauté internationale et tout particulièrement les pays limitrophes.

    La Corée du Nord prend les devants dès le 21 janvier en fermant sa frontière avec la Chine et interdit tout voyage touristique sur son sol. Alors que la Chine développe une stratégie de confinement ciblé dès le 23 janvier, les autres pays frontaliers ferment leurs frontières terrestres ou n’ouvrent pas leurs frontières saisonnières d’altitude comme le Pakistan.

    Parallèlement, les pays non frontaliers entament une politique de fermeture des routes aériennes qui constituent autant de points potentiels d’entrée du virus. Cette procédure prend des formes différentes qui relèvent d’un gradient de diplomatie. Certains se contentent de demander aux compagnies aériennes nationales de suspendre leurs vols, fermant leur frontière de facto (Algérie, Égypte, Maroc, Rwanda, France, Canada, entre autres), d’autres privilégient l’approche plus frontale comme les États-Unis qui, le 2 février, interdisent leur territoire au voyageurs ayant séjournés en Chine.

    La propagation très rapide de l’épidémie en Iran amène à une deuxième tentative de mise en quarantaine d’un pays dès le 20 février. Le rôle de l’Iran dans les circulations terrestres de l’Afghanistan à la Turquie pousse les gouvernements frontaliers à fermer les points de passage. De même, le gouvernement irakien étroitement lié à Téhéran finit par fermer la frontière le 20 février. Puis les voyageurs ayant séjourné en Iran sont à leur tour progressivement considérés comme indésirables. Les gouvernements décident alors de politiques d’interdiction de séjour ciblées ou de mises en quarantaine forcées par la création de listes de territoires à risques.

    Le développement de l’épidémie en Italie amène à un changement de paradigme dans la gestion de la crise sanitaire. L’épidémie est dès lors considérée comme effectivement mondiale mais surtout elle est désormais perçue comme incontrôlable tant les foyers de contamination potentiels sont nombreux.

    La densité des relations intra-européennes et l’intensité des mobilités extra-européennes génèrent un sentiment d’anxiété face au risque de la submersion, le concept de « vague » est constamment mobilisé. Certains y ont lu une inversion de l’ordre migratoire planétaire. Les pays aux revenus faibles ou limités décident de fermer leurs frontières aux individus issus des pays aux plus hauts revenus.

    Les derniers jours du mois de février voient des gouvernements comme le Liban créer des listes de nationalités indésirables, tandis que d’autres comme Fiji décident d’un seuil de cas identifiés de Covid-19. Les interdictions progressent avec le Qatar et l’Arabie Saoudite qui ferment leur territoire aux Européens dès le 9 mars avant de connaître une accélération le 10 mars.

    Les frontières sont alors emportées dans le tourbillon des fermetures.

    La Slovénie débute la suspension de la libre circulation au sein de l’espace Schengen en fermant sa frontière avec l’Italie. Elle est suivie par les pays d’Europe centrale (Tchéquie, Slovaquie). En Afrique et en Amérique, les relations avec l’Union européenne sont suspendues unilatéralement. Le Maroc ferme ses frontières avec l’Espagne dès le 12 mars. Ce même jour, les États-Unis annonce la restriction de l’accès à son territoire aux voyageurs issu de l’Union européenne. La décision américaine est rapidement élargie au monde entier, faisant apparaitre l’Union européenne au cœur des mobilités planétaires.

    En quelques jours, la majorité des frontières nationales se ferment à l’ensemble du monde. Les liaisons aériennes sont suspendues, les frontières terrestres sont closes pour éviter les stratégies de contournements.

    Les pays qui échappent à cette logique apparaissent comme très minoritaires à l’image du Mexique, du Nicaragua, du Laos, du Cambodge ou de la Corée du Sud. Parmi eux, certains sont finalement totalement dépendants de leurs voisins comme le Laos et le Cambodge prisonniers des politiques restrictives du Vietnam et de la Thaïlande.

    Au-delà de ces gouvernements qui résistent à la pression, des réalités localisées renseignent sur l’impossible fermeture des frontières aux mobilités quotidiennes. Ainsi, malgré des discours de fermeté, exception faite de la Malaisie, des États ont maintenus la circulation des travailleurs transfrontaliers.

    Au sein de l’espace Schengen, la Slovénie maintient ses relations avec l’Autriche, malgré sa fermeté vis-à-vis de l’Italie. Le 16 mars, la Suisse garantit l’accès à son territoire aux salariés du Nord de l’Italie et du Grand Est de la France, pourtant les plus régions touchées par la pandémie en Europe. Allemagne, Belgique, Norvège, Finlande, Espagne font de même.

    De l’autre côté de l’Atlantique, malgré la multiplication des discours autoritaires, un accord est trouvé le 18 mars avec le Canada et surtout le 20 mars avec le Mexique pour maintenir la circulation des travailleurs. Des déclarations conjointes sont publiées le 21 mars. Partout, la question transfrontalière oblige au bilatéralisme. Uruguay et Brésil renoncent finalement à fermer leur frontière commune tant les habitants ont développé un « mode de vie binational » pour reprendre les termes de deux gouvernements. La décision unilatérale du 18 mars prise par la Malaisie d’interdire à partir du 20 mars tout franchissement de sa frontière prend Singapour de court qui doit organiser des modalités d’hébergement pour plusieurs dizaines de milliers de travailleurs considérés comme indispensables.

    Ces fermetures font apparaitre au grand jour la qualité des coopérations bilatérales.

    Certains États ferment d’autant plus facilement leur frontière avec un pays lorsque préexistent d’importantes rivalités à l’image de la Papouasie Nouvelle Guinée qui ferme immédiatement sa frontière avec l’Indonésie pourtant très faiblement touchée par la pandémie. D’autres en revanche, comme la Tanzanie refusent de fermer leurs frontières terrestres pour maintenir aux États voisins un accès direct à la mer.

    Certains observateurs se sont plu à imaginer des basculements dans les rapports de pouvoirs entre l’Afrique et l’Europe notamment. Après ces fermetures soudaines, le bal mondial des rapatriements a commencé, non sans de nombreuses fausses notes.

    L’accélération de la frontiérisation du monde

    La fermeture extrêmement rapide des frontières mondiales nous rappelle ensuite combien les dispositifs nationaux étaient prêts pour la suspension complète des circulations. Comme dans bien des domaines, la pandémie s’est présentée comme un révélateur puissant, grossissant les traits d’un monde qu’il est plus aisé de diagnostiquer, à présent qu’il est suspendu.

    Ces dernières années, l’augmentation des mobilités internationales par le trafic aérien s’est accompagnée de dispositifs de filtrage de plus en plus drastiques notamment dans le cadre de la lutte contre le terrorisme. Les multiples étapes de contrôle articulant dispositifs administratifs dématérialisés pour les visas et dispositifs de plus en plus intrusifs de contrôle physique ont doté les frontières aéroportuaires d’une épaisseur croissante, partageant l’humanité en deux catégories : les mobiles et les astreints à résidence.

    En parallèle, les routes terrestres et maritimes internationales sont restées actives et se sont même réinventées dans le cadre des mobilités dites illégales. Or là encore, l’obsession du contrôle a favorisé un étalement de la frontière par la création de multiples marches frontalières faisant de pays entiers des lieux de surveillance et d’assignation à résidence avec un investissement continu dans les dispositifs sécuritaires.

    L’épaisseur des frontières se mesure désormais par la hauteur des murs mais aussi par l’exploitation des obstacles géophysiques : les fleuves, les cols, les déserts et les mers, où circulent armées et agences frontalières. À cela s’est ajouté le pistage et la surveillance digitale doublés d’un appareil administratif aux démarches labyrinthiques faites pour ne jamais aboutir.

    Pour décrire ce phénomène, Achille Mbembe parlait de « frontiérisation du monde » et de la mise en place d’un « nouveau régime sécuritaire mondial où le droit des ressortissants étrangers de franchir les frontières d’un autre pays et d’entrer sur son territoire devient de plus en plus procédural et peut être suspendu ou révoqué à tout instant et sous n’importe quel prétexte. »

    La passion contemporaine pour les murs relève de l’iconographie territoriale qui permet d’appuyer les représentations sociales d’un contrôle parfait des circulations humaines, et ce alors que les frontières n’ont jamais été aussi polymorphes.

    Suite à la pandémie, la plupart des gouvernements ont pu mobiliser sans difficulté l’ingénierie et l’imaginaire frontaliers, en s’appuyant d’abord sur les compagnies aériennes pour fermer leur pays et suspendre les voyages, puis en fermant les aéroports avant de bloquer les frontières terrestres.

    Les réalités frontalières sont rendues visibles : la Norvège fait appel aux réservistes et retraités pour assurer une présence à sa frontière avec la Suède et la Finlande. Seuls les pays effondrés, en guerre, ne ferment pas leurs frontières comme au sud de la Libye où circulent armes et combattants.

    Beaucoup entretiennent des fictions géographiques décrétant des frontières fermées sans avoir les moyens de les surveiller comme la France en Guyane ou à Mayotte. Plus que jamais, les frontières sont devenues un rapport de pouvoir réel venant attester des dépendances économiques, notamment à travers la question migratoire, mais aussi symboliques, dans le principe de la souveraineté et son autre, à travers la figure de l’étranger. Classe politique et opinion publique adhèrent largement à une vision segmentée du monde.

    Le piège de l’assignation à résidence

    Aujourd’hui, cet appareil frontalier mondial activé localement, à qui l’on a demandé de jouer une nouvelle partition sanitaire, semble pris à son propre piège. Sa vocation même qui consistait à décider qui peut se déplacer, où et dans quelles conditions, semble égarée tant les restrictions sont devenues, en quelques jours, absolues.

    Le régime universel d’assignation à résidence dans lequel le monde est plongé n’est pas tant le résultat d’une décision d’ordre sanitaire face à une maladie inconnue, que la simple activation des dispositifs multiples qui préexistaient à cette maladie. En l’absence d’autres réponses disponibles, ces fermetures se sont imposées. L’humanité a fait ce qu’elle savait faire de mieux en ce début du XXIe siècle, sinon la seule chose qu’elle savait faire collectivement sans concertation préalable, fermer le monde.

    L’activation de la frontière a abouti à sa consécration. Les dispositifs n’ont pas seulement été activés, ils ont été renforcés et généralisés. Le constat d’une entrave des mobilités est désormais valable pour tous, et la circulation est devenue impossible, de fait, comme de droit. Pauvres et riches, touristes et hommes d’affaires, sportifs ou diplomates, tout le monde, sans exception aucune, fait l’expérience de la fermeture et de cette condition dans laquelle le monde est plongé.

    Seuls les rapatriés, nouveau statut des mobilités en temps de pandémie, sont encore autorisés à rentrer chez eux, dans les limites des moyens financiers des États qu’ils souhaitent rejoindre. Cette entrave à la circulation est d’ailleurs valable pour ceux qui la décident. Elle est aussi pour ceux qui l’analysent : le témoin de ce phénomène n’existe pas ou plus, lui-même pris, complice ou victime, de cet emballement de la frontiérisation.

    C’est bien là une caractéristique centrale du processus en cours, il n’y a plus de point de vue en surplomb, il n’y a plus d’extérieur, plus d’étranger, plus de pensée du dehors. La pensée est elle-même confinée. Face à la mobilisation et l’emballement d’une gouvernementalité de la mobilité fondée sur l’entrave, l’abolition pure et simple du droit de circuler, du droit d’être étranger, du droit de franchir les frontières d’un autre pays et d’entrer sur son territoire n’est plus une simple fiction.

    Les dispositifs de veille de ces droits, bien que mis à nus, ne semblent plus contrôlables et c’est en ce sens que l’on peut douter de la réversibilité de ces processus de fermeture.

    Réversibilité

    C’est à l’aune de ce constat selon lequel le processus de frontiérisation du monde était à déjà l’œuvre au moment de l’irruption épidémique que l’on peut interroger le caractère provisoire de la fermeture des frontières opérée au cours du mois de mars 2020.

    Pourquoi un processus déjà enclenché ferait machine arrière au moment même où il accélère ? Comme si l’accélération était une condition du renversement. Tout se passe plutôt comme si le processus de frontiérisation s’était cristallisé.

    La circulation internationale des marchandises, maintenue au pic même de la crise sanitaire, n’a pas seulement permis l’approvisionnement des populations, elle a également rappelé que, contrairement à ce que défendent les théories libérales, le modèle économique mondial fonctionne sur l’axiome suivant : les biens circulent de plus en plus indépendamment des individus.

    Nous venons bien de faire l’épreuve du caractère superflu de la circulation des hommes et des femmes, aussi longtemps que les marchandises, elles, circulent. Combien de personnes bloquées de l’autre côté d’une frontière, dans l’impossibilité de la traverser, quand le moindre colis ou autre produit traverse ?

    Le réseau numérique mondial a lui aussi démontré qu’il était largement à même de pallier à une immobilité généralisée. Pas de pannes de l’Internet à l’horizon, à l’heure où tout le monde est venu y puiser son travail, ses informations, ses loisirs et ses sentiments.

    De là à penser que les flux de data peuvent remplacer les flux migratoires, il n’y qu’un pas que certains ont déjà franchi. La pandémie a vite fait de devenir l’alliée des adeptes de l’inimitié entre les nations, des partisans de destins et de développement séparés, des projets d’autarcie et de démobilité.

    Alors que le virus nous a rappelé la condition de commune humanité, les frontières interdisent plus que jamais de penser les conditions du cosmopolitisme, d’une société comme un long tissu vivant sans couture à même de faire face aux aléas, aux zoonoses émergentes, au réchauffement climatique, aux menaces à même d’hypothéquer le futur.

    La réponse frontalière n’a ouvert aucun horizon nouveau, sinon celui du repli sur des communautés locales, plus petites encore, formant autant de petites hétérotopies localisées. Si les étrangers que nous sommes ou que nous connaissons se sont inquiétés ces dernières semaines de la possibilité d’un retour au pays, le drame qui se jouait aussi, et qui continue de se jouer, c’est bien l’impossibilité d’un aller.

    https://blogs.mediapart.fr/adrien-delmas/blog/280520/covid-19-la-frontierisation-aboutie-du-monde
    #frontières #fermeture_des_frontières #migrations #covid-19 #coronavirus #immobilité #mobilité #confinement #cartographie #vidéo #animation #visualisation #nationalisme_méthodologique #ressources_pédagogiques #appareil_frontalier_mondial #cohérence_sanitaire #crise_sanitaire #transport_aérien #Hubei #clusters #échelle #repli_national #contrôle_politique #Etat-nation #unilatéralisme #multilatéralisme #dilemme_du_prisonnier #mesures_barrière #rationalité #exceptionnalité #exceptionnalisme #autorité_nationale #soudaineté #routes_aériennes #Iran #Italie #Chine #vague #nationalités_indésirables #travailleurs_étrangers #frontaliers #filtrage #contrôles_frontaliers #contrôle #surveillance #marches_frontalières #assignation_à_résidence #pistage #surveillance_digitale #circulations #imaginaire_frontalier #ingénierie_frontalière #compagnies_aériennes #frontières_terrestres #aéroports #fictions_géographiques #géographie_politique #souveraineté #partition_sanitaire #rapatriés #gouvernementalité #droit_de_circuler #liberté_de_circulation #liberté_de_mouvement #réversibilité #irréversibilité #provisoire #définitif #cristallisation #biens #marchandises #immobilité_généralisée #cosmopolitisme #réponse_frontalière

    ping @mobileborders @karine4 @isskein @thomas_lacroix @reka

    • Épisode 1 : Liberté de circulation : le retour des frontières

      Premier temps d’une semaine consacrée aux #restrictions de libertés pendant la pandémie de coronavirus. Arrêtons-nous aujourd’hui sur une liberté entravée que nous avons tous largement expérimentée au cours des deux derniers mois : celle de circuler, incarnée par le retour des frontières.

      https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/cultures-monde/droits-et-libertes-au-temps-du-corona-14-liberte-de-circulation-le-ret

    • #Anne-Laure_Amilhat-Szary (@mobileborders) : « Nous avons eu l’impression que nous pouvions effectivement fermer les frontières »

      En Europe, les frontières rouvrent en ordre dispersé, avec souvent le 15 juin pour date butoir. Alors que la Covid-19 a atteint plus de 150 pays, la géographe Anne-Laure Amilhat-Szary analyse les nouveaux enjeux autour de ces séparations, nationales mais aussi continentales ou sanitaires.

      https://www.franceculture.fr/geopolitique/anne-laure-amilhat-szary-nous-avons-eu-limpression-que-nous-pouvions-e

    • « Nous sommes très loin d’aller vers un #repli à l’intérieur de #frontières_nationales »
      Interview avec Anne-Laure Amilhat-Szary (@mobileborders)

      Face à la pandémie de Covid-19, un grand nombre de pays ont fait le choix de fermer leurs frontières. Alors que certains célèbrent leurs vertus prophylactiques et protectrices, et appellent à leur renforcement dans une perspective de démondialisation, nous avons interrogé la géographe Anne-Laure Amilhat Szary, auteure notamment du livre Qu’est-ce qu’une frontière aujourd’hui ? (PUF, 2015), sur cette notion loin d’être univoque.

      Usbek & Rica : Avec la crise sanitaire en cours, le monde s’est soudainement refermé. Chaque pays s’est retranché derrière ses frontières. Cette situation est-elle inédite ? À quel précédent historique peut-elle nous faire penser ?

      Anne-Laure Amilhat Szary : On peut, semble-t-il, trouver trace d’un dernier grand épisode de confinement en 1972 en Yougoslavie, pendant une épidémie de variole ramenée par des pèlerins de La Mecque. 10 millions de personnes avaient alors été confinées, mais au sein des frontières nationales… On pense forcément aux grands confinements historiques contre la peste ou le choléra (dont l’efficacité est vraiment questionnée). Mais ces derniers eurent lieu avant que l’État n’ait la puissance régulatrice qu’on lui connaît aujourd’hui. Ce qui change profondément désormais, c’est que, même confinés, nous restons connectés. Que signifie une frontière fermée si l’information et la richesse continuent de circuler ? Cela pointe du doigt des frontières aux effets très différenciés selon le statut des personnes, un monde de « frontiérités » multiples plutôt que de frontières établissant les fondements d’un régime universel du droit international.

      Les conséquences juridiques de la fermeture des frontières sont inédites : en supprimant la possibilité de les traverser officiellement, on nie l’urgence pour certains de les traverser au péril de leur vie. Le moment actuel consacre en effet la suspension du droit d’asile mis en place par la convention de Genève de 1951. La situation de l’autre côté de nos frontières, en Méditerranée par exemple, s’est détériorée de manière aiguë depuis début mars.

      Certes, les populistes de tous bords se servent de la menace que représenteraient des frontières ouvertes comme d’un ressort politique, et ça marche bien… jusqu’à ce que ces mêmes personnes prennent un vol low-cost pour leurs vacances dans le pays voisin et pestent tant et plus sur la durée des files d’attentes à l’aéroport. Il y a d’une part une peur des migrants, qui pourraient « profiter » de Schengen, et d’autre part, une volonté pratique de déplacements facilités, à la fois professionnels et de loisirs, de courte durée. Il faut absolument rappeler que si le coronavirus est chez nous, comme sur le reste de la planète, c’est que les frontières n’ont pas pu l’arrêter ! Pas plus qu’elles n’avaient pu quelque chose contre le nuage de Tchernobyl. L’utilité de fermer les frontières aujourd’hui repose sur le fait de pouvoir soumettre, en même temps, les populations de différents pays à un confinement parallèle.

      Ne se leurre-t-on pas en croyant assister, à la faveur de la crise sanitaire, à un « retour des frontières » ? N’est-il pas déjà à l’œuvre depuis de nombreuses années ?

      Cela, je l’ai dit et écrit de nombreuses fois : les frontières n’ont jamais disparu, on a juste voulu croire à « la fin de la géographie », à l’espace plat et lisse de la mondialisation, en même temps qu’à la fin de l’histoire, qui n’était que celle de la Guerre Froide.

      Deux choses nouvelles illustrent toutefois la matérialité inédite des frontières dans un monde qui se prétend de plus en plus « dématérialisé » : 1) la possibilité, grâce aux GPS, de positionner la ligne précisément sur le terrain, de borner et démarquer, même en terrain difficile, ce qui était impossible jusqu’ici. De ce fait, on a pu régler des différends frontaliers anciens, mais on peut aussi démarquer des espaces inaccessibles de manière régulière, notamment maritimes. 2) Le retour des murs et barrières, spectacle de la sécurité et nouvel avatar de la frontière. Mais attention, toute frontière n’est pas un mur, faire cette assimilation c’est tomber dans le panneau idéologique qui nous est tendu par le cadre dominant de la pensée contemporaine.

      La frontière n’est pas une notion univoque. Elle peut, comme vous le dites, se transformer en mur, en clôture et empêcher le passage. Elle peut être ouverte ou entrouverte. Elle peut aussi faire office de filtre et avoir une fonction prophylactique, ou bien encore poser des limites, à une mondialisation débridée par exemple. De votre point de vue, de quel type de frontières avons-nous besoin ?

      Nous avons besoin de frontières filtres, non fermées, mais qui soient véritablement symétriques. Le problème des murs, c’est qu’ils sont le symptôme d’un fonctionnement dévoyé du principe de droit international d’égalité des États. À l’origine des relations internationales, la définition d’une frontière est celle d’un lieu d’interface entre deux souverainetés également indépendantes vis-à-vis du reste du monde.

      Les frontières sont nécessaires pour ne pas soumettre le monde à un seul pouvoir totalisant. Il se trouve que depuis l’époque moderne, ce sont les États qui sont les principaux détenteurs du pouvoir de les fixer. Ils ont réussi à imposer un principe d’allégeance hiérarchique qui pose la dimension nationale comme supérieure et exclusive des autres pans constitutifs de nos identités.

      Mais les frontières étatiques sont bien moins stables qu’on ne l’imagine, et il faut aujourd’hui ouvrir un véritable débat sur les formes de frontières souhaitables pour organiser les collectifs humains dans l’avenir. Des frontières qui se défassent enfin du récit sédentaire du monde, pour prendre véritablement en compte la possibilité pour les hommes et les femmes d’avoir accès à des droits là où ils vivent.

      Rejoignez-vous ceux qui, comme le philosophe Régis Debray ou l’ancien ministre socialiste Arnaud Montebourg, font l’éloge des frontières et appellent à leur réaffirmation ? Régis Débray écrit notamment : « L’indécence de l’époque ne provient pas d’un excès mais d’un déficit de frontières »…

      Nous avons toujours eu des frontières, et nous avons toujours été mondialisés, cette mondialisation se réalisant à l’échelle de nos mondes, selon les époques : Mer de Chine et Océan Indien pour certains, Méditerranée pour d’autres. À partir des XII-XIIIe siècle, le lien entre Europe et Asie, abandonné depuis Alexandre le Grand, se développe à nouveau. À partir du XV-XVIe siècle, c’est l’âge des traversées transatlantiques et le bouclage du monde par un retour via le Pacifique…

      Je ne suis pas de ces nostalgiques à tendance nationaliste que sont devenus, pour des raisons différentes et dans des trajectoires propres tout à fait distinctes, Régis Debray ou Arnaud Montebourg. Nous avons toujours eu des frontières, elles sont anthropologiquement nécessaires à notre constitution psychologique et sociale. Il y en a même de plus en plus dans nos vies, au fur et à mesure que les critères d’identification se multiplient : frontières de race, de classe, de genre, de religion, etc.

      Nos existences sont striées de frontières visibles et invisibles. Pensons par exemple à celles que les digicodes fabriquent au pied des immeubles ou à l’entrée des communautés fermées, aux systèmes de surveillance qui régulent l’entrée aux bureaux ou des écoles. Mais pensons aussi aux frontières sociales, celles d’un patronyme étranger et racialisé, qui handicape durablement un CV entre les mains d’un.e recruteur.e, celles des différences salariales entre femmes et hommes, dont le fameux « plafond de verre » qui bloque l’accès aux femmes aux fonctions directoriales. Mais n’oublions pas les frontières communautaires de tous types sont complexes car mêlant à la fois la marginalité choisie, revendiquée, brandie comme dans les « marches des fiertés » et la marginalité subie du rejet des minorités, dont témoigne par exemple la persistance de l’antisémitisme.

      La seule chose qui se transforme en profondeur depuis trente ans et la chute du mur de Berlin, c’est la frontière étatique, car les États ont renoncé à certaines des prérogatives qu’ils exerçaient aux frontières, au profit d’institutions supranationales ou d’acteurs privés. D’un côté l’Union Européenne et les formes de subsidiarité qu’elle permet, de l’autre côté les GAFAM et autres géants du web, qui échappent à la fiscalité, l’une des raisons d’être des frontières. Ce qui apparaît aussi de manière plus évidente, c’est que les États puissants exercent leur souveraineté bien au-delà de leurs frontières, à travers un « droit d’ingérence » politique et militaire, mais aussi à travers des prérogatives commerciales, comme quand l’Arabie Saoudite négocie avec l’Éthiopie pour s’accaparer ses terres en toute légalité, dans le cadre du land grabbing.

      Peut-on croire à l’hypothèse d’une démondialisation ? La frontière peut-elle être précisément un instrument pour protéger les plus humbles, ceux que l’on qualifie de « perdants de la mondialisation » ? Comment faire en sorte qu’elle soit justement un instrument de protection, de défense de certaines valeurs (sociales notamment) et non synonyme de repli et de rejet de l’autre ?

      Il faut replacer la compréhension de la frontière dans une approche intersectionnelle : comprendre toutes les limites qui strient nos existences et font des frontières de véritables révélateurs de nos inégalités. Conçues comme des instruments de protection des individus vivant en leur sein, dans des périmètres où l’Etat détenteur du monopole exclusif de la violence est censé garantir des conditions de vie équitables, les frontières sont désormais des lieux qui propulsent au contraire les personnes au contact direct de la violence de la mondialisation.

      S’il s’agit de la fin d’une phase de la mondialisation, celle de la mondialisation financière échevelée, qui se traduit par une mise à profit maximalisée des différenciations locales dans une mise en concurrence généralisée des territoires et des personnes, je suis pour ! Mais au vu de nos technologies de communication et de transports, nous sommes très loin d’aller vers un repli à l’intérieur de frontières nationales. Regardez ce que, en période de confinement, tous ceux qui sont reliés consomment comme contenus globalisés (travail, culture, achats, sport) à travers leur bande passante… Regardez qui consomme les produits mondialisés, du jean à quelques euros à la farine ou la viande produite à l’autre bout du monde arrivant dans nos assiettes moins chères que celle qui aurait été produite par des paysans proches de nous… Posons-nous la question des conditions dans lesquelles ces consommateurs pourraient renoncer à ce que la mondialisation leur offre !

      Il faut une approche plus fine des effets de la mondialisation, notamment concernant la façon dont de nombreux phénomènes, notamment climatiques, sont désormais établis comme étant partagés - et ce, sans retour possible en arrière. Nous avons ainsi besoin de propositions politiques supranationales pour gérer ces crises sanitaires et environnementales (ce qui a manqué singulièrement pour la crise du Cocid-19, notamment l’absence de coordination européenne).

      Les frontières sont des inventions humaines, depuis toujours. Nous avons besoin de frontières comme repères dans notre rapport au monde, mais de frontières synapses, qui font lien en même temps qu’elles nous distinguent. De plus en plus de personnes refusent l’assignation à une identité nationale qui l’emporterait sur tous les autres pans de leur identité : il faut donc remettre les frontières à leur place, celle d’un élément de gouvernementalité parmi d’autres, au service des gouvernants, mais aussi des gouvernés. Ne pas oublier que les frontières devraient être d’abord et avant tout des périmètres de redevabilité. Des espaces à l’intérieur desquels on a des droits et des devoirs que l’on peut faire valoir à travers des mécanismes de justice ouverts.

      https://usbeketrica.com/article/on-ne-va-pas-vers-repli-a-interieur-frontieres-nationales

  • Borders in Times of Pandemic

    A pandemic is never just a pandemic. Over the past few weeks, it has become evident how the spread and impact of the novel Coronavirus is profoundly shaped by social and political practices – such as tourism and travel – institutions – such as governments and their advisors – and structures – such as inequalities along the lines of class, race and gender. All of these are part of systems that are historically variable and subject to human agency. The international border regime is one such system. While it is an obvious truth that the virus’s spread does not respect any borders, governments across the world have resorted to closing their borders, more or less explicitly likening the threat of the virus to the “threat” of “uncontrolled” migration.

    This kind of disaster nationalism – the nationalist impulse to circle the wagons in the face of a transnational challenge – could be countered by insisting that we are witnessing a pandemic in the literal sense, i.e., a health crisis that affects not just a part of the population, but all (pan) people (demos), thus highlighting the inefficiency of the border regime. But this insistence that humanity itself is the subject of the pandemic only tells half the truth as the precarity and vulnerability the pandemic imposes on people is distributed in a radically unequal fashion. The virus hits workers in underpaid jobs, in supermarkets, hospitals, delivery services, and informal care, as well as the homeless and the imprisoned in an intensified form. This is even more true for refugees and irregularized migrants. The catastrophic effects of the pandemic are thus especially harsh at the border, in a form that is intensified by the border.

    Refugee camps – hosting millions of Palestinians, Sudanese, Rohingya, Syrians, and many more in a camp archipelago that barely touches Europe and North America – are the crucible of this crisis just as much as they condense the structural violence of the border regime more generally. Take the camps at the borders of the European Union in Greece, where over 40,000 people – mostly from Syria and Afghanistan – are confined under unimaginable hygienic conditions, without the ability to wash their hands, let alone practice social distancing or access any reliable medical help. This is neither a natural condition nor an accidental byproduct of an otherwise well-functioning border regime. It is the direct effect of political decisions taken by the EU and its member states (and in a similar way, the EU, together with the US, has played a crucial role in producing the conditions that these refugees are seeking to flee).

    Instead of evacuating the camps in which the first Covid-19 cases were reported, the Greek government – deserted by its fellow EU member states – has now placed them under lockdown. Germany, the largest and richest EU member, has made it clear that it will take in no more than 400 children, but even that will only happen once others do their “fair share” – a “fair share” that stands in a grotesque relation to the number of refugees currently hosted in countries such as Turkey (3.7m) and Pakistan (1.4m). Unfortunately, this declaration of complete moral bankruptcy does not come as a surprise, but continues an EU record that has been especially dismal since the “summer of migration” in 2015, when the mass political agency of refugees – and especially their march from the Budapest train station to the Austrian and then on to the German border – forced politicians to open the borders. This opening lasted only very briefly, and the subsequent strategy of closure has been aimed at preventing a renewed opening at all costs, thus paving the way for the current resurgence of disaster nationalism. (It is precisely for this reason that European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen has referred to Greece as the “shield” of Europe – suggesting the urgent need to repel an imminent threat.)

    The indifference toward the suffering of refugees at the EU’s borders, or rather the EU’s exercise of its “power to make live and let die,” fits well with the logic of disaster nationalism that the hollow rhetoric of solidarity barely manages to disguise: every state is on its own, the virus is “othered” as a foreign threat or “invasion,” and the closing of borders intensifies the “border spectacle” that is supposed to assure citizens that their government has everything under control.

    Of course, the illegitimacy of the border regime, especially in its catastrophic effects on refugees in camps in Greece and elsewhere, needs to be publicly exposed. Indeed, this illegitimacy is overdetermined and goes beyond the incontrovertible fact that in its current form it violates international law and creates a permanent humanitarian catastrophe. From a normative perspective, the injustice-generating and injustice-preserving, freedom-restricting, and undemocratic character of the existing border regime has also been rigorously demonstrated – both in philosophical argument and in daily political contestations by refugee and migrant movements themselves.

    Nevertheless, insisting on this illegitimacy is insufficient as it underestimates the complexity of the border as a social institution, as well as the powerful forces of naturalization that make borders seem like part of the natural make-up of our world, especially for those who are exempt from borders’ daily terror. The normative case against borders, at least in the form in which they currently exist, thus needs to be supplanted by a critical theory of the border. Because critical theory, still grappling with its legacy of methodological nationalism, at least in the Frankfurt School tradition, has had little to say on these issues in the past, we need to turn to critical migration studies, which build on the knowledge generated in practices of migration themselves. Three lessons in particular (distilled from the work of Etienne Balibar, Sandro Mezzadra, Nicholas de Genova and others) stand out:

    1) Borders do not simply have a derived or secondary status – as if they were just drawing the line between preexisting entities and categories of people – but are essentially productive, generative, and constitutive, e.g., of the differences between citizens and migrants, and between different categories of migrants (refugees, economic migrants, expats, etc.) and their corresponding forms of mobility and immobility.

    2) Borders are no longer exclusively or primarily “at the border,” at the “limits” of the state’s territory, but have proliferated in the interior as well as the exterior of the political community and been diffused into “borderscapes” in which particular categories of people, such as irregularized migrants, never really cross the border or manage to leave it behind.

    3) Borders do not simply enable the exclusion of non-citizens and migrants and the inclusion of citizens and guests. Instead their porosity and imperfection is part of their functionality and design, enabling a form of differential inclusion and selection that does not just block irregular migration but filters it, including in ways that are in keeping with the demands of contemporary labor markets (especially in areas deemed essential in times of crisis such as care and agriculture).

    One implication of these lessons is that a border is never just a border – a gate to be opened or closed at will, although such gates do of course exist and can remain closed with fatal consequences. This becomes especially apparent in times of a pandemic in which governments race to close their borders as if this would stop a virus that has already exposed this way of thinking about borders as naïve and fetishistic. The reality of the border regime, and the way in which it contributes to making the pandemic into a catastrophe for the most vulnerable on our planet, confront us with what in the end amounts to a simple choice: we can either affirm this regime and continue to naturalize it, thus sliding down the slippery slope toward a struggle of all against all, or we can contribute to the manifold struggles by refugees and migrants alike to denaturalize and politicize the border regime, to expose its violence, and to make it less catastrophic.

    https://ctjournal.org/2020/04/09/borders-in-times-of-pandemic-2

    #frontières #pandémie #coronavirus #covid-19 #nationalisme #disaster_nationalism #crise_sanitaire #border_regime #régime_frontalier #camps_de_réfugiés #fermeture_des_frontières #invasion #border_spectacle #spectacle_frontalier #justice #nationalisme_méthodologique

    ping @isskein @karine4 @mobileborders @rhoumour @_kg_

    ping @mobileborders

    • What does the COVID-19 crisis mean for #aspiring_migrants who are planning to leave home?

      In late April 2020, I decided to document the experiences of aspiring nurse migrants from the Philippines, where the government had imposed a one-month quarantine in many parts of the country. With two colleagues based in Manila, we recruited interviewees through Facebook, and then spoke to Filipino nurses “stranded” in different provinces within the Philippines – all with pending contracts in the UK, Singapore, Germany, and Saudi Arabia.

      Initially, we thought that our project would help paint a broader picture of how #COVID-19 creates an “unprecedented” form of immobility for health workers (to borrow the language of so many news reports and pundits in the media). True enough, our interviewees’ stories were marked with the loss of time, money, and opportunity.

      Lost time, money, opportunity

      Most striking was the case of Mabel in Cebu City. Mabel began to worry about her impending deployment to the UK when the Philippine government cancelled all domestic trips to Manila, where her international flight was scheduled to depart. Her Manila-based agency tried to rebook her flight to leave from Cebu to the UK. Unfortunately, the agency had taken Mabel’s passport when processing her papers, which is a common practice among migration agencies, and there was no courier service that could deliver it to her in time. Eventually, Mabel’s British employers put her contract on hold because the UK had gone on lockdown as well.

      As nurses grapple with disrupted plans, recruitment agencies offer limited support. Joshua, a nurse from IloIlo, flew to Manila with all his belongings, only to find out that his next flight to Singapore was postponed indefinitely. His agent refunded his placement fee but provided no advice on what to do next. “All they said was, ‘Umuwi ka nalang’ (Just go home),” Joshua recalled. “I told them that I’m already here. I resigned from my job…Don’t tell me to go home.” With 10 other nurses, Joshua asked the agency to appeal for financial assistance from their employer in Singapore. “We signed a contract. Aren’t we their employees already?” They received no response from either party.

      Mabel and Joshua’s futile efforts to get through the closing of both internal and international borders reflects the unique circumstances of the pandemic. However, as we spoke to more interviewees about their interrupted migration journeys, I couldn’t help but wonder: how different is pandemic-related immobility from the other forms of immobility that aspiring nurse migrants have faced in the past?

      Pandemic as just another form of immobility?

      Again, Mabel’s story is illuminating. Even before she applied to the UK, Mabel was no stranger to cancelled opportunities. In 2015, she applied to work as a nurse in Manitoba, Canada. Yet, after passing the necessary exams, Mabel was told that Manitoba’s policies had changed and her work experiences were no longer regarded to be good enough for immigration. Still hoping for a chance to leave, Mabel applied to an employer in Quebec instead, devoting two years to learn French and prepare for the language exam. However, once again, her application was withdrawn because recruiters decided to prioritize nurses with “more experience.”

      One might argue that the barriers to mobility caused by the pandemic is incomparable to the setbacks created by shifting immigration policies. However, in thinking through Mabel’s story and that of our other interviewees, it seems that the emotional distress experienced in both cases are not all that different.

      As migration scholars now reflect more deeply on questions of immobility, it might be useful to consider how the experiences of immobility are differentiated. Immobility is not a single thing. How does a virus alter aspiring migrants’ perception about their inability to leave the country? As noted in a previous blog post from Xiao Ma, the COVID-19 pandemic may bring about new regimes of immobility, different from the immigration regimes that have blocked nurses’ plans in the past. It might also lead to more intense moral judgments on those who do eventually leave.

      April, a nurse bound for Saudi Arabia, recounted a conversation with a neighbor who found out that she was a “stranded” nurse. Instead of commiserating, the neighbor told April, “Dito ka nalang muna. Kailangan ka ng Pilipinas” (Well you should stay here first. Your country needs you). April said she felt a mixture of annoyance and pity. “I feel sorry for Filipino patients. I do want to serve…But I also need to provide for my family.”

      Now, my collaborators and I realized that our ongoing research must also work to differentiate pandemic-related immobility from the barriers that nurse migrants have faced in the past. For our interviewees, the pandemic seems more unpredictable and limits the options they can take. For now, all of our interviewees have been resigned to waiting at home, in the hope of borders opening up once again.

      Immobility among migration scholars

      More broadly, perhaps this is also a time to reflect on our own immobility as scholars whose travels for field work and conferences have been put on hold. Having the university shut down and international activity frozen is truly unprecedented. However, in some ways, many scholars have long experienced other forms of immobility as well.

      While the COVID-19 crisis had forced me to cancel two conferences in the last two months, one of my Manila-based collaborators has never attended an academic event beyond Asia because his applications for tourist visas have always been rejected (twice by the Canadian embassy, once by the US embassy). Another friend, a Filipino PhD student, had to wait two months for approval to conduct research in Lebanon, prompting her to write a “back-up proposal” for her dissertation in case her visa application was declined.

      Browsing through social media, it is interesting for me to observe an increasing number of American and British scholars ruminating on their current “immobility.” Living in this moment of pandemic, I can understand that it is tempting to think of our current constraints as exceptional. However, we also need to pause and consider how immobility is not a new experience for many others.

      #immobilité #Philippines #infirmières #migrations #fermeture_des_frontières #travailleurs_étrangers #futurs_migrants

      @sinehebdo —> nouveau mot

      #aspiring_migrants (qui peut ressembler un peu à #candidats_à_l'émigration qu’on a déjà, mais c’est pas tout à fait cela quand même... #futurs_migrants ?)
      #vocabulaire #mots #terminologie #agences #contrat #travail #coronavirus #stranded #blocage

    • Les chercheurs distinguent les personnes qui asiprent à migrer, c’est-à-dire qui déclare la volonté de partir, des personnes qui ont entamé des démarches effectives pour partir au cours des dernières semaines (demande de visa, envoi de CV, demande d’un crédit bancaire, etc.). Les enquêtes montrent que la différence entre les deux groupes est quantitativement très importante.

  • COVID-19 at the borders of Europe

    Webinar with :

    #Karen_Mets - Senior Advocacy Adviser - Asylum and Migration, Save the Children
    #Sara_Prestianni – Program Officer Asylum and Migration, Euromed Rights
    #Vicky_Skoumbi – Editor αληthεια Magazine and Director of the Greece Programme, Collège de Philosophie de Paris
    #Alexandra_Embiricos- Policy and Legal Associate, UNHCR EU Representation

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n6PvSXftKIg&feature=youtu.be


    #webinaire #séminaire #conférence #frontières #Europe #asile #migrations #réfugiés #covid-19 #coronavirus #frontières_européennes #Italie #Grèce #hotspots #Malte #ports #fermeture_des_ports #fermeture_des_frontières #Méditerranée #quarantaine

    ping @karine4 @isskein @luciebacon @thomas_lacroix @mobileborders @_kg_