• EU: Frontex splashes out: millions of euros for new technology and equipment (19.06.2020)

      The approval of the new #Frontex_Regulation in November 2019 implied an increase of competences, budget and capabilities for the EU’s border agency, which is now equipping itself with increased means to monitor events and developments at the borders and beyond, as well as renewing its IT systems to improve the management of the reams of data to which it will have access.

      In 2020 Frontex’s #budget grew to €420.6 million, an increase of over 34% compared to 2019. The European Commission has proposed that in the next EU budget (formally known as the Multiannual Financial Framework or MFF, covering 2021-27) €11 billion will be made available to the agency, although legal negotiations are ongoing and have hit significant stumbling blocks due to Brexit, the COVID-19 pandemic and political disagreements.

      Nevertheless, the increase for this year has clearly provided a number of opportunities for Frontex. For instance, it has already agreed contracts worth €28 million for the acquisition of dozens of vehicles equipped with thermal and day cameras, surveillance radar and sensors.

      According to the contract for the provision of Mobile Surveillance Systems, these new tools will be used “for detection, identification and recognising of objects of interest e.g. human beings and/or groups of people, vehicles moving across the border (land and sea), as well as vessels sailing within the coastal areas, and other objects identified as objects of interest”. [1]

      Frontex has also published a call for tenders for Maritime Analysis Tools, worth a total of up to €2.6 million. With this, Frontex seeks to improve access to “big data” for maritime analysis. [2] The objective of deploying these tools is to enhance Frontex’s operational support to EU border, coast guard and law enforcement authorities in “suppressing and preventing, among others, illegal migration and cross-border crime in the maritime domain”.

      Moreover, the system should be capable of delivering analysis and identification of high-risk threats following the collection and storage of “big data”. It is not clear how much human input and monitoring there will be of the identification of risks. The call for tenders says the winning bidder should have been announced in May, but there is no public information on the chosen company so far.

      As part of a 12-month pilot project to examine how maritime analysis tools could “support multipurpose operational response,” Frontex previously engaged the services of the Tel Aviv-based company Windward Ltd, which claims to fuse “maritime data and artificial intelligence… to provide the right insights, with the right context, at the right time.” [3] Windward, whose current chairman is John Browne, the former CEO of the multinational oil company BP, received €783,000 for its work. [4]

      As the agency’s gathering and processing of data increases, it also aims to improve and develop its own internal IT systems, through a two-year project worth €34 million. This will establish a set of “framework contracts”. Through these, each time the agency seeks a new IT service or system, companies selected to participate in the framework contracts will submit bids for the work. [5]

      The agency is also seeking a ’Software Solution for EBCG [European Border and Coast Guard] Team Members to Access to Schengen Information System’, through a contract worth up to €5 million. [6] The Schengen Information System (SIS) is the EU’s largest database, enabling cooperation between authorities working in the fields of police, border control and customs of all the Schengen states (26 EU member states plus Iceland, Norway, Liechtenstein and Switzerland) and its legal bases were recently reformed to include new types of alert and categories of data. [7]

      This software will give Frontex officials direct access to certain data within the SIS. Currently, they have to request access via national border guards in the country in which they are operating. This would give complete autonomy to Frontex officials to consult the SIS whilst undertaking operations, shortening the length of the procedure. [8]

      With the legal basis for increasing Frontex’s powers in place, the process to build up its personnel, material and surveillance capacities continues, with significant financial implications.

      https://www.statewatch.org/news/2020/june/eu-frontex-splashes-out-millions-of-euros-for-new-technology-and-equipme

      #technologie #équipement #Multiannual_Financial_Framework #MFF #surveillance #Mobile_Surveillance_Systems #Maritime_Analysis_Tools #données #big_data #mer #Windward_Ltd #Israël #John_Browne #BP #complexe_militaro-industriel #Software_Solution_for_EBCG_Team_Members_to_Access_to_Schengen_Information_System #SIS #Schengen_Information_System

    • EU : Guns, guards and guidelines : reinforcement of Frontex runs into problems (26.05.2020)

      An internal report circulated by Frontex to EU government delegations highlights a series of issues in implementing the agency’s new legislation. Despite the Covid-19 pandemic, the agency is urging swift action to implement the mandate and is pressing ahead with the recruitment of its new ‘standing corps’. However, there are legal problems with the acquisition, registration, storage and transport of weapons. The agency is also calling for derogations from EU rules on staff disciplinary measures in relation to the use of force; and wants an extended set of privileges and immunities. Furthermore, it is assisting with “voluntary return” despite this activity appearing to fall outside of its legal mandate.

      State-of-play report

      At the end of April 2020, Frontex circulated a report to EU government delegations in the Council outlining the state of play of the implementation of its new Regulation (“EBCG 2.0 Regulation”, in the agency and Commission’s words), especially relating to “current challenges”.[1] Presumably, this refers to the outbreak of a pandemic, though the report also acknowledges challenges created by the legal ambiguities contained in the Regulation itself, in particular with regard to the acquisition of weapons, supervisory and disciplinary mechanisms, legal privileges and immunities and involvement in “voluntary return” operations.

      The path set out in the report is that the “operational autonomy of the agency will gradually increase towards 2027” until it is a “fully-fledged and reliable partner” to EU and Schengen states. It acknowledges the impacts of unforeseen world events on the EU’s forthcoming budget (Multi-annual Financial Framework, MFF) for 2021-27, and hints at the impact this will have on Frontex’s own budget and objectives. Nevertheless, the agency is still determined to “continue increasing the capabilities” of the agency, including its acquisition of new equipment and employment of new staff for its standing corps.

      The main issues covered by the report are: Frontex’s new standing corps of staff, executive powers and the use of force, fundamental rights and data protection, and the integration into Frontex of EUROSUR, the European Border Surveillance System.

      The new standing corps

      Recruitment

      A new standing corps of 10,000 Frontex staff by 2024 is to be, in the words of the agency, its “biggest game changer”.[2] The report notes that the establishment of the standing corps has been heavily affected by the outbreak of Covid-19. According to the report, 7,238 individuals had applied to join the standing corps before the outbreak of the pandemic. 5,482 of these – over 75% – were assessed by the agency as eligible, with a final 304 passing the entire selection process to be on the “reserve lists”.[3]

      Despite interruptions to the recruitment procedure following worldwide lockdown measures, interviews for Category 1 staff – permanent Frontex staff members to be deployed on operations – were resumed via video by the end of April. 80 candidates were shortlisted for the first week, and Frontex aims to interview 1,000 people in total. Despite this adaptation, successful candidates will have to wait for Frontex’s contractor to re-open in order to carry out medical tests, an obligatory requirement for the standing corps.[4]

      In 2020, Frontex joined the European Defence Agency’s Satellite Communications (SatCom) and Communications and Information System (CIS) services in order to ensure ICT support for the standing corps in operation as of 2021.[5] The EDA describes SatCom and CIS as “fundamental for Communication, Command and Control in military operations… [enabling] EU Commanders to connect forces in remote areas with HQs and capitals and to manage the forces missions and tasks”.[6]

      Training

      The basic training programme, endorsed by the management board in October 2019, is designed for Category 1 staff. It includes specific training in interoperability and “harmonisation with member states”. The actual syllabus, content and materials for this basic training were developed by March 2020; Statewatch has made a request for access to these documents, which is currently pending with the Frontex Transparency Office. This process has also been affected by the novel coronavirus, though the report insists that “no delay is foreseen in the availability of the specialised profile related training of the standing corps”.

      Use of force

      The state-of-play-report acknowledges a number of legal ambiguities surrounding some of the more controversial powers outlined in Frontex’s 2019 Regulation, highlighting perhaps that political ambition, rather than serious consideration and assessment, propelled the legislation, overtaking adequate procedure and oversight. The incentive to enact the legislation within a short timeframe is cited as a reason that no impact assessment was carried out on the proposed recast to the agency’s mandate. This draft was rushed through negotiations and approved in an unprecedented six-month period, and the details lost in its wake are now coming to light.

      Article 82 of the 2019 Regulation refers to the use of force and carriage of weapons by Frontex staff, while a supervisory mechanism for the use of force by statutory staff is established by Article 55. This says:

      “On the basis of a proposal from the executive director, the management board shall: (a) establish an appropriate supervisory mechanism to monitor the application of the provisions on use of force by statutory staff, including rules on reporting and specific measures, such as those of a disciplinary nature, with regard to the use of force during deployments”[7]

      The agency’s management board is expected to make a decision about this supervisory mechanism, including specific measures and reporting, by the end of June 2020.

      The state-of-play report posits that the legal terms of Article 55 are inconsistent with the standard rules on administrative enquiries and disciplinary measures concerning EU staff.[8] These outline, inter alia, that a dedicated disciplinary board will be established in each institution including at least one member from outside the institution, that this board must be independent and its proceedings secret. Frontex insists that its staff will be a special case as the “first uniformed service of the EU”, and will therefore require “special arrangements or derogations to the Staff Regulations” to comply with the “totally different nature of tasks and risks associated with their deployments”.[9]

      What is particularly astounding about Frontex demanding special treatment for oversight, particularly on use of force and weapons is that, as the report acknowledges, the agency cannot yet legally store or transport any weapons it acquires.

      Regarding service weapons and “non-lethal equipment”,[10] legal analysis by “external experts and a regulatory law firm” concluded that the 2019 Regulation does not provide a legal basis for acquiring, registering, storing or transporting weapons in Poland, where the agency’s headquarters is located. Frontex has applied to the Commission for clarity on how to proceed, says the report. Frontex declined to comment on the status of this consultation and any indications of the next steps the agency will take. A Commission spokesperson stated only that it had recently received the agency’s enquiry and “is analysing the request and the applicable legal framework in the view of replying to the EBCGA”, without expanding further.

      Until Frontex has the legal basis to do so, it cannot launch a tender for firearms and “non-lethal equipment” (which includes batons, pepper spray and handcuffs). However, the report implies the agency is ready to do so as soon as it receives the green light. Technical specifications are currently being finalised for “non-lethal equipment” and Frontex still plans to complete acquisition by the end of the year.

      Privileges and immunities

      The agency is also seeking special treatment with regard to the legal privileges and immunities it and its officials enjoy. Article 96 of the 2019 Regulation outlines the privileges and immunities of Frontex officers, stating:

      “Protocol No 7 on the Privileges and Immunities of the European Union annexed to the Treaty on European Union (TEU) and to the TFEU shall apply to the Agency and its statutory staff.” [11]

      However, Frontex notes that the Protocol does not apply to non-EU states, nor does it “offer a full protection, or take into account a need for the inviolability of assets owned by Frontex (service vehicles, vessels, aircraft)”.[12] Frontex is increasingly involved in operations taking place on non-EU territory. For instance, the Council of the EU has signed or initialled a number of Status Agreements with non-EU states, primarily in the Western Balkans, concerning Frontex activities in those countries. To launch operations under these agreements, Frontex will (or, in the case of Albania, already has) agree on operational plans with each state, under which Frontex staff can use executive powers.[13] The agency therefore seeks an “EU-level status of forces agreement… to account for the partial absence of rules”.

      Law enforcement

      To implement its enhanced functions regarding cross-border crime, Frontex will continue to participate in Europol’s four-year policy cycle addressing “serious international and organised crime”.[14] The agency is also developing a pilot project, “Investigation Support Activities- Cross Border Crime” (ISA-CBC), addressing drug trafficking and terrorism.

      Fundamental rights and data protection

      The ‘EBCG 2.0 Regulation’ requires several changes to fundamental rights measures by the agency, which, aside from some vague “legal analyses” seem to be undergoing development with only internal oversight.

      Firstly, to facilitate adequate independence of the Fundamental Rights Officer (FRO), special rules have to be established. The FRO was introduced under Frontex’s 2016 Regulation, but has since then been understaffed and underfunded by the agency.[15] The 2019 Regulation obliges the agency to ensure “sufficient and adequate human and financial resources” for the office, as well as 40 fundamental rights monitors.[16] These standing corps staff members will be responsible for monitoring compliance with fundamental rights standards, providing advice and assistance on the agency’s plans and activities, and will visit and evaluate operations, including acting as forced return monitors.[17]

      During negotiations over the proposed Regulation 2.0, MEPs introduced extended powers for the Fundamental Rights Officer themselves. The FRO was previously responsible for contributing to Frontex’s fundamental rights strategy and monitoring its compliance with and promotion of fundamental rights. Now, they will be able to monitor compliance by conducting investigations; offering advice where deemed necessary or upon request of the agency; providing opinions on operational plans, pilot projects and technical assistance; and carrying out on-the-spot visits. The executive director is now obliged to respond “as to how concerns regarding possible violations of fundamental rights… have been addressed,” and the management board “shall ensure that action is taken with regard to recommendations of the fundamental rights officer.” [18] The investigatory powers of the FRO are not, however, set out in the Regulation.

      The state-of-play report says that “legal analyses and exchanges” are ongoing, and will inform an eventual management board decision, but no timeline for this is offered. [19] The agency will also need to adapt its much criticised individual complaints mechanism to fit the requirements of the 2019 Regulation; executive director Fabrice Leggeri’s first-draft decision on this process is currently undergoing internal consultations. Even the explicit requirement set out in the 2019 Regulation for an “independent and effective” complaints mechanism,[20] does not meet minimum standards to qualify as an effective remedy, which include institutional independence, accessibility in practice, and capacity to carry out thorough and prompt investigations.[21]

      Frontex has entered into a service level agreement (SLA) with the EU’s Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA) for support in establishing and training the team of fundamental rights monitors introduced by the 2019 Regulation. These monitors are to be statutory staff of the agency and will assess fundamental rights compliance of operational activities, advising, assisting and contributing to “the promotion of fundamental rights”.[22] The scope and objectives for this team were finalised at the end of March this year, and the agency will establish the team by the end of the year. Statewatch has requested clarification as to what is to be included in the team’s scope and objectives, pending with the Frontex Transparency Office.

      Regarding data protection, the agency plans a package of implementing rules (covering issues ranging from the position of data protection officer to the restriction of rights for returnees and restrictions under administrative data processing) to be implemented throughout 2020.[23] The management board will review a first draft of the implementing rules on the data protection officer in the second quarter of 2020.

      Returns

      The European Return and Reintegration Network (ERRIN) – a network of 15 European states and the Commission facilitating cooperation over return operations “as part of the EU efforts to manage migration” – is to be handed over to Frontex. [24] A handover plan is currently under the final stage of review; it reportedly outlines the scoping of activities and details of “which groups of returnees will be eligible for Frontex assistance in the future”.[25] A request from Statewatch to Frontex for comment on what assistance will be provided by the agency to such returnees was unanswered at the time of publication.

      Since the entry into force of its new mandate, Frontex has also been providing technical assistance for so-called voluntary returns, with the first two such operations carried out on scheduled flights (as opposed to charter flights) in February 2020. A total of 28 people were returned by mid-April, despite the fact that there is no legal clarity over what the definition “voluntary return” actually refers to, as the state-of-play report also explains:

      “The terminology of voluntary return was introduced in the Regulation without providing any definition thereof. This terminology (voluntary departure vs voluntary return) is moreover not in line with the terminology used in the Return Directive (EBCG 2.0 refers to the definition of returns provided for in the Return Directive. The Return Directive, however, does not cover voluntary returns; a voluntary return is not a return within the meaning of the Return Directive). Further elaboration is needed.”[26]

      On top of requiring “further clarification”, if Frontex is assisting with “voluntary returns” that are not governed by the Returns Directive, it is acting outside of its legal mandate. Statewatch has launched an investigation into the agency’s activities relating to voluntary returns, to outline the number of such operations to date, their country of return and country of destination.

      Frontex is currently developing a module dedicated to voluntary returns by charter flight for its FAR (Frontex Application for Returns) platform (part of its return case management system). On top of the technical support delivered by the agency, Frontex also foresees the provision of on-the-ground support from Frontex representatives or a “return counsellor”, who will form part of the dedicated return teams planned for the standing corps from 2021.[27]

      Frontex has updated its return case management system (RECAMAS), an online platform for member state authorities and Frontex to communicate and plan return operations, to manage an increased scope. The state-of-play report implies that this includes detail on post-return activities in a new “post-return module”, indicating that Frontex is acting on commitments to expand its activity in this area. According to the agency’s roadmap on implementing the 2019 Regulation, an action plan on how the agency will provide post-return support to people (Article 48(1), 2019 Regulation) will be written by the third quarter of 2020.[28]

      In its closing paragraph, related to the budgetary impact of COVID-19 regarding return operations, the agency notes that although activities will resume once aerial transportation restrictions are eased, “the agency will not be able to provide what has been initially intended, undermining the concept of the EBCG as a whole”.[29]

      EUROSUR

      The Commission is leading progress on adopting the implementing act for the integration of EUROSUR into Frontex, which will define the implementation of new aerial surveillance,[30] expected by the end of the year.[31] Frontex is discussing new working arrangements with the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the European Organisation for the Safety of Air Navigation (EUROCONTROL). The development by Frontex of the surveillance project’s communications network will require significant budgetary investment, as the agency plans to maintain the current system ahead of its planned replacement in 2025.[32] This investment is projected despite the agency’s recognition of the economic impact of Covid-19 on member states, and the consequent adjustments to the MFF 2021-27.

      Summary

      Drafted and published as the world responds to an unprecedented pandemic, the “current challenges” referred to in the report appear, on first read, to refer to the budgetary and staffing implications of global shut down. However, the report maintains throughout that the agency’s determination to expand, in terms of powers as well as staffing, will not be stalled despite delays and budgeting adjustments. Indeed, it is implied more than once that the “current challenges” necessitate more than ever that these powers be assumed. The true challenges, from the agency’s point of view, stem from the fact that its current mandate was rushed through negotiations in six months, leading to legal ambiguities that leave it unable to acquire or transport weapons and in a tricky relationship with the EU protocol on privileges and immunities when operating in third countries. Given the violence that so frequently accompanies border control operations in the EU, it will come as a relief to many that Frontex is having difficulties acquiring its own weaponry. However, it is far from reassuring that the introduction of new measures on fundamental rights and accountability are being carried out internally and remain unavailable for public scrutiny.

      Jane Kilpatrick

      Note: this article was updated on 26 May 2020 to include the European Commission’s response to Statewatch’s enquiries.

      It was updated on 1 July with some minor corrections:

      “the Council of the EU has signed or initialled a number of Status Agreements with non-EU states... under which” replaces “the agency has entered into working agreements with Balkan states, under which”
      “The investigatory powers of the FRO are not, however, set out in any detail in the Regulation beyond monitoring the agency’s ’compliance with fundamental rights, including by conducting investigations’” replaces “The investigatory powers of the FRO are not, however, set out in the Regulation”
      “if Frontex is assisting with “voluntary returns” that are not governed by the Returns Directive, it further exposes the haste with which legislation written to deny entry into the EU and facilitate expulsions was drafted” replaces “if Frontex is assisting with “voluntary returns” that are not governed by the Returns Directive, it is acting outside of its legal mandate”

      Endnotes

      [1] Frontex, ‘State of play of the implementation of the EBCG 2.0 Regulation in view of current challenges’, 27 April 2020, contained in Council document 7607/20, LIMITE, 20 April 2020, http://statewatch.org/news/2020/may/eu-council-frontex-ECBG-state-of-play-7607-20.pdf

      [2] Frontex, ‘Programming Document 2018-20’, 10 December 2017, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/feb/frontex-programming-document-2018-20.pdf

      [3] Section 1.1, state of play report

      [4] Jane Kilpatrick, ‘Frontex launches “game-changing” recruitment drive for standing corps of border guards’, Statewatch Analysis, March 2020, http://www.statewatch.org/analyses/no-355-frontex-recruitment-standing-corps.pdf

      [5] Section 7.1, state of play report

      [6] EDA, ‘EU SatCom Market’, https://www.eda.europa.eu/what-we-do/activities/activities-search/eu-satcom-market

      [7] Article 55(5)(a), Regulation (EU) 2019/1896 of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European Border and Coast Guard (Frontex 2019 Regulation), https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/en/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32019R1896

      [8] Pursuant to Annex IX of the EU Staff Regulations, https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:01962R0031-20140501

      [9] Chapter III, state of play report

      [10] Section 2.5, state of play report

      [11] Protocol (No 7), https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=uriserv:OJ.C_.2016.202.01.0001.01.ENG#d1e3363-201-1

      [12] Chapter III, state of play report

      [13] ‘Border externalisation: Agreements on Frontex operations in Serbia and Montenegro heading for parliamentary approval’, Statewatch News, 11 March 2020, http://statewatch.org/news/2020/mar/frontex-status-agreements.htm

      [14] Europol, ‘EU policy cycle – EMPACT’, https://www.europol.europa.eu/empact

      [15] ‘NGOs, EU and international agencies sound the alarm over Frontex’s respect for fundamental rights’, Statewatch News, 5 March 2019, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/mar/fx-consultative-forum-rep.htm; ‘Frontex condemned by its own fundamental rights body for failing to live up to obligations’, Statewatch News, 21 May 2018, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2018/may/eu-frontex-fr-rep.htm

      [16] Article 110(6), Article 109, 2019 Regulation

      [17] Article 110, 2019 Regulation

      [18] Article 109, 2019 Regulation

      [19] Section 8, state of play report

      [20] Article 111(1), 2019 Regulation

      [21] Sergio Carrera and Marco Stefan, ‘Complaint Mechanisms in Border Management and Expulsion Operations in Europe: Effective Remedies for Victims of Human Rights Violations?’, CEPS, 2018, https://www.ceps.eu/system/files/Complaint%20Mechanisms_A4.pdf

      [22] Article 110(1), 2019 Regulation

      [23] Section 9, state of play report

      [24] ERRIN, https://returnnetwork.eu

      [25] Section 3.2, state of play report

      [26] Chapter III, state of play report

      [27] Section 3.2, state of play report

      [28] ‘’Roadmap’ for implementing new Frontex Regulation: full steam ahead’, Statewatch News, 25 November 2019, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/nov/eu-frontex-roadmap.htm

      [29] State of play report, p. 19

      [30] Matthias Monroy, ‘Drones for Frontex: unmanned migration control at Europe’s borders’, Statewatch Analysis, February 2020, http://www.statewatch.org/analyses/no-354-frontex-drones.pdf

      [31] Section 4, state of play report

      [32] Section 7.2, state of play report
      Next article >

      Mediterranean: As the fiction of a Libyan search and rescue zone begins to crumble, EU states use the coronavirus pandemic to declare themselves unsafe

      https://www.statewatch.org/analyses/2020/eu-guns-guards-and-guidelines-reinforcement-of-frontex-runs-into-problem

      #EBCG_2.0_Regulation #European_Defence_Agency’s_Satellite_Communications (#SatCom) #Communications_and_Information_System (#CIS) #immunité #droits_fondamentaux #droits_humains #Fundamental_Rights_Officer (#FRO) #European_Return_and_Reintegration_Network (#ERRIN) #renvois #expulsions #réintégration #Directive_Retour #FAR (#Frontex_Application_for_Returns) #RECAMAS #EUROSUR #European_Aviation_Safety_Agency (#EASA) #European_Organisation_for_the_Safety_of_Air_Navigation (#EUROCONTROL)

    • Frontex launches “game-changing” recruitment drive for standing corps of border guards

      On 4 January 2020 the Management Board of the European Border and Coast Guard Agency (Frontex) adopted a decision on the profiles of the staff required for the new “standing corps”, which is ultimately supposed to be staffed by 10,000 officials. [1] The decision ushers in a new wave of recruitment for the agency. Applicants will be put through six months of training before deployment, after rigorous medical testing.

      What is the standing corps?

      The European Border and Coast Guard standing corps is the new, and according to Frontex, first ever, EU uniformed service, available “at any time…to support Member States facing challenges at their external borders”.[2] Frontex’s Programming Document for the 2018-2020 period describes the standing corps as the agency’s “biggest game changer”, requiring “an unprecedented scale of staff recruitment”.[3]

      The standing corps will be made up of four categories of Frontex operational staff:

      Frontex statutory staff deployed in operational areas and staff responsible for the functioning of the European Travel Information and Authorisation System (ETIAS) Central Unit[4];
      Long-term staff seconded from member states;
      Staff from member states who can be immediately deployed on short-term secondment to Frontex; and

      A reserve of staff from member states for rapid border interventions.

      These border guards will be “trained by the best and equipped with the latest technology has to offer”.[5] As well as wearing EU uniforms, they will be authorised to carry weapons and will have executive powers: they will be able to verify individuals’ identity and nationality and permit or refuse entry into the EU.

      The decision made this January is limited to the definition of profiles and requirements for the operational staff that are to be recruited. The Management Board (MB) will have to adopt a new decision by March this year to set out the numbers of staff needed per profile, the requirements for individuals holding those positions, and the number of staff needed for the following year based on expected operational needs. This process will be repeated annually.[6] The MB can then further specify how many staff each member state should contribute to these profiles, and establish multi-annual plans for member state contributions and recruitment for Frontex statutory staff. Projections for these contributions are made in Annexes II – IV of the 2019 Regulation, though a September Mission Statement by new European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen urges the recruitment of 10,000 border guards by 2024, indicating that member states might be meeting their contribution commitments much sooner than 2027.[7]

      The standing corps of Frontex staff will have an array of executive powers and responsibilities. As well as being able to verify identity and nationality and refuse or permit entry into the EU, they will be able to consult various EU databases to fulfil operational aims, and may also be authorised by host states to consult national databases. According to the MB Decision, “all members of the Standing Corps are to be able to identify persons in need of international protection and persons in a vulnerable situation, including unaccompanied minors, and refer them to the competent authorities”. Training on international and EU law on fundamental rights and international protection, as well as guidelines on the identification and referral of persons in need of international protection, will be mandatory for all standing corps staff members.

      The size of the standing corps

      The following table, taken from the 2019 Regulation, outlines the ambitions for growth of Frontex’s standing corps. However, as noted, the political ambition is to reach the 10,000 total by 2024.

      –-> voir le tableau sur le site de statewatch!

      Category 2 staff – those on long term secondment from member states – will join Frontex from 2021, according to the 2019 Regulation.[8] It is foreseen that Germany will contribute the most staff, with 61 expected in 2021, increasing year-by-year to 225 by 2027. Other high contributors are France and Italy (170 and 125 by 2027, respectively).

      The lowest contributors will be Iceland (expected to contribute between one and two people a year from 2021 to 2027), Malta, Cyprus and Luxembourg. Liechtenstein is not contributing personnel but will contribute “through proportional financial support”.

      For short-term secondments from member states, projections follow a very similar pattern. Germany will contribute 540 staff in 2021, increasing to 827 in 2027; Italy’s contribution will increase from 300 in 2021 to 458 in 2027; and France’s from 408 in 2021 to 624 in 2027. Most states will be making less than 100 staff available for short-term secondment in 2021.

      What are the profiles?

      The MB Decision outlines 12 profiles to be made available to Frontex, ranging from Border Guard Officer and Crew Member, to Cross Border Crime Detection Officer and Return Specialist. A full list is contained in the Decision.[9] All profiles will be fulfilled by an official of the competent authority of a member state (MS) or Schengen Associated Country (SAC), or by a member of Frontex’s own statutory staff.

      Tasks to be carried out by these officials include:

      border checks and surveillance;
      interviewing, debriefing* and screening arrivals and registering fingerprints;
      supporting the collection, assessment, analysis and distribution of information with EU member and non-member states;
      verifying travel documents;
      escorting individuals being deported on Frontex return operations;
      operating data systems and platforms; and
      offering cultural mediation

      *Debriefing consists of informal interviews with migrants to collect information for risk analyses on irregular migration and other cross-border crime and the profiling of irregular migrants to identify “modus operandi and migration trends used by irregular migrants and facilitators/criminal networks”. Guidelines written by Frontex in 2012 instructed border guards to target vulnerable individuals for “debriefing”, not in order to streamline safeguarding or protection measures, but for intelligence-gathering - “such people are often more willing to talk about their experiences,” said an internal document.[10] It is unknown whether those instructions are still in place.

      Recruitment for the profiles

      Certain profiles are expected to “apply self-safety and security practice”, and to have “the capacity to work under pressure and face emotional events with composure”. Relevant profiles (e.g. crew member) are required to be able to perform search and rescue activities in distress situations at sea borders.

      Frontex published a call for tender on 27 December for the provision of medical services for pre-recruitment examinations, in line with the plan to start recruiting operational staff in early 2020. The documents accompanying the tender reveal additional criteria for officials that will be granted executive powers (Frontex category “A2”) compared to those staff stationed primarily at the agency’s Warsaw headquarters (“A1”). Those criteria come in the form of more stringent medical testing.

      The differences in medical screening for category A1 and A2 staff lie primarily in additional toxicology screening and psychiatric and psychological consultations. [11] The additional psychiatric attention allotted for operational staff “is performed to check the predisposition for people to work in arduous, hazardous conditions, exposed to stress, conflict situations, changing rapidly environment, coping with people being in dramatic, injure or death exposed situations”.[12]

      Both A1 and A2 category provisional recruits will be asked to disclose if they have ever suffered from a sexually transmitted disease or “genital organ disease”, as well as depression, nervous or mental disorders, among a long list of other ailments. As well as disclosing any medication they take, recruits must also state if they are taking oral contraceptives (though there is no question about hormonal contraceptives that are not taken orally). Women are also asked to give the date of their last period on the pre-appointment questionnaire.

      “Never touch yourself with gloves”

      Frontex training materials on forced return operations obtained by Statewatch in 2019 acknowledge the likelihood of psychological stress among staff, among other health risks. (One recommendation contained in the documents is to “never touch yourself with gloves”). Citing “dissonance within the team, long hours with no rest, group dynamic, improvisation and different languages” among factors behind psychological stress, the training materials on medical precautionary measures for deportation escort officers also refer to post-traumatic stress disorder, the lack of an area to retreat to and body clock disruption as exacerbating risks. The document suggests a high likelihood that Frontex return escorts will witness poverty, “agony”, “chaos”, violence, boredom, and will have to deal with vulnerable persons.[13]

      For fundamental rights monitors (officials deployed to monitor fundamental rights compliance during deportations, who can be either Frontex staff or national officials), the training materials obtained by Statewatch focus on the self-control of emotions, rather than emotional care. Strategies recommended include talking to somebody, seeking professional help, and “informing yourself of any other option offered”. The documents suggest that it is an individual’s responsibility to prevent emotional responses to stressful situations having an impact on operations, and to organise their own supervision and professional help. There is no obvious focus on how traumatic responses of Frontex staff could affect those coming into contact with them at an external border or during a deportation. [14]

      The materials obtained by Statewatch also give some indication of the fundamental rights training imparted to those acting as deportation ‘escorts’ and fundamental rights monitors. The intended outcomes for a training session in Athens that took place in March 2019 included “adapt FR [fundamental rights] in a readmission operation (explain it with examples)” and “should be able to describe Non Refoulement principle” (in the document, ‘Session Fundamental rights’ is followed by ‘Session Velcro handcuffs’).[15] The content of the fundamental rights training that will be offered to Frontex’s new recruits is currently unknown.

      Fit for service?

      The agency anticipates that most staff will be recruited from March to June 2020, involving the medical examination of up to 700 applicants in this period. According to Frontex’s website, the agency has already received over 7,000 applications for the 700 new European Border Guard Officer positions.[16] Successful candidates will undergo six months of training before deployment in 2021. Apparently then, the posts are a popular career option, despite the seemingly invasive medical tests (especially for sexually active women). Why, for instance, is it important to Frontex to know about oral hormonal contraception, or about sexually transmitted infections?

      When asked by Statewatch if Frontex provides in-house psychological and emotional support, an agency press officer stated: “When it comes to psychological and emotional support, Frontex is increasing awareness and personal resilience of the officers taking part in our operations through education and training activities.” A ‘Frontex Mental Health Strategy’ from 2018 proposed the establishment of “a network of experts-psychologists” to act as an advisory body, as well as creating “online self-care tools”, a “psychological hot-line”, and a space for peer support with participation of psychologists (according to risk assessment) during operations.[17]

      One year later, Frontex, EASO and Europol jointly produced a brochure for staff deployed on operations, entitled ‘Occupational Health and Safety – Deployment Information’, which offers a series of recommendations to staff, placing the responsibility to “come to the deployment in good mental shape” and “learn how to manage stress and how to deal with anger” more firmly on the individual than the agency.[18] According to this document, officers who need additional support must disclose this by requesting it from their supervisor, while “a helpline or psychologist on-site may be available, depending on location”.

      Frontex anticipates this recruitment drive to be “game changing”. Indeed, the Commission is relying upon it to reach its ambitions for the agency’s independence and efficiency. The inclusion of mandatory training in fundamental rights in the six-month introductory education is obviously a welcome step. Whether lessons learned in a classroom will be the first thing that comes to the minds of officials deployed on border control or deportation operations remains to be seen.

      Unmanaged responses to emotional stress can include burnout, compassion-fatigue and indirect trauma, which can in turn decrease a person’s ability to cope with adverse circumstance, and increase the risk of violence.[19] Therefore, aside from the agency’s responsibility as an employer to safeguard the health of its staff, its approach to internal psychological care will affect not only the border guards themselves, but the people that they routinely come into contact with at borders and during return operations, many of whom themselves will have experienced trauma.

      Jane Kilpatrick

      Endnotes

      [1] Management Board Decision 1/2020 of 4 January 2020 on adopting the profiles to be made available to the European Border and Coast Guard Standing Corps, https://frontex.europa.eu/assets/Key_Documents/MB_Decision/2020/MB_Decision_1_2020_adopting_the_profiles_to_be_made_available_to_the_

      [2] Frontex, ‘Careers’, https://frontex.europa.eu/about-frontex/careers/frontex-border-guard-recruitment

      [3] Frontex, ‘Programming Document 2018-20’, 10 December 2017, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/feb/frontex-programming-document-2018-20.pdf

      [4] The ETIAS Central Unit will be responsible for processing the majority of applications for ‘travel authorisations’ received when the European Travel Information and Authorisation System comes into use, in theory in late 2022. Citizens who do not require a visa to travel to the Schengen area will have to apply for authorisation to travel to the Schengen area.

      [5] Frontex, ‘Careers’, https://frontex.europa.eu/about-frontex/careers/frontex-border-guard-recruitment

      [6] Article 54(4), Regulation (EU) 2019/1896 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 November 2019 on the European Border and Coast Guard and repealing Regulations (EU) No 1052/2013 and (EU) 2016/1624, https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/en/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32019R1896

      [7] ‘European Commission 2020 Work Programme: An ambitious roadmap for a Union that strives for more’, 29 January 2020, https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/IP_20_124; “Mission letter” from Ursula von der Leyen to Ylva Johnsson, 10 September 2019, https://ec.europa.eu/commission/sites/beta-political/files/mission-letter-ylva-johansson_en.pdf

      [8] Annex II, 2019 Regulation

      [9] Management Board Decision 1/2020 of 4 January 2020 on adopting the profiles to be made available to the European Border and Coast Guard Standing Corps, https://frontex.europa.eu/assets/Key_Documents/MB_Decision/2020/MB_Decision_1_2020_adopting_the_profiles_to_be_made_available_to_the_

      [10] ‘Press release: EU border agency targeted “isolated or mistreated” individuals for questioning’, Statewatch News, 16 February 2017, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2017/feb/eu-frontex-op-hera-debriefing-pr.htm

      [11] ‘Provision of Medical Services – Pre-Recruitment Examination’, https://etendering.ted.europa.eu/cft/cft-documents.html?cftId=5841

      [12] ‘Provision of medical services – pre-recruitment examination, Terms of Reference - Annex II to invitation to tender no Frontex/OP/1491/2019/KM’, https://etendering.ted.europa.eu/cft/cft-document.html?docId=65398

      [13] Frontex training presentation, ‘Medical precautionary measures for escort officers’, undated, http://statewatch.org/news/2020/mar/eu-frontex-presentation-medical-precautionary-measures-deportation-escor

      [14] Ibid.

      [15] Frontex, document listing course learning outcomes from deportation escorts’ training, http://statewatch.org/news/2020/mar/eu-frontex-deportation-escorts-training-course-learning-outcomes.pdf

      [16] Frontex, ‘Careers’, https://frontex.europa.eu/about-frontex/careers/frontex-border-guard-recruitment

      [17] Frontex, ‘Frontex mental health strategy’, 20 February 2018, https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/89c168fe-e14b-11e7-9749-01aa75ed71a1/language-en

      [18] EASO, Europol and Frontex, ‘Occupational health and safety’, 12 August 2019, https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/17cc07e0-bd88-11e9-9d01-01aa75ed71a1/language-en/format-PDF/source-103142015

      [19] Trauma Treatment International, ‘A different approach for victims of trauma’, https://www.tt-intl.org/#our-work-section

      https://www.statewatch.org/analyses/2020/frontex-launches-game-changing-recruitment-drive-for-standing-corps-of-b
      #gardes_frontières #staff #corps_des_gardes-frontières

    • Drones for Frontex: unmanned migration control at Europe’s borders (27.02.2020)

      Instead of providing sea rescue capabilities in the Mediterranean, the EU is expanding air surveillance. Refugees are observed with drones developed for the military. In addition to numerous EU states, countries such as Libya could also use the information obtained.

      It is not easy to obtain majorities for legislation in the European Union in the area of migration - unless it is a matter of upgrading the EU’s external borders. While the reform of a common EU asylum system has been on hold for years, the European Commission, Parliament and Council agreed to reshape the border agency Frontex with unusual haste shortly before last year’s parliamentary elections. A new Regulation has been in force since December 2019,[1] under which Frontex intends to build up a “standing corps” of 10,000 uniformed officials by 2027. They can be deployed not just at the EU’s external borders, but in ‘third countries’ as well.

      In this way, Frontex will become a “European border police force” with powers that were previously reserved for the member states alone. The core of the new Regulation includes the procurement of the agency’s own equipment. The Multiannual Financial Framework, in which the EU determines the distribution of its financial resources from 2021 until 2027, has not yet been decided. According to current plans, however, at least €6 billion are reserved for Frontex in the seven-year budget. The intention is for Frontex to spend a large part of the money, over €2 billion, on aircraft, ships and vehicles.[2]

      Frontex seeks company for drone flights

      The upgrade plans include the stationing of large drones in the central and eastern Mediterranean. For this purpose, Frontex is looking for a private partner to operate flights off Malta, Italy or Greece. A corresponding tender ended in December[3] and the selection process is currently underway. The unmanned missions could then begin already in spring. Frontex estimates the total cost of these missions at €50 million. The contract has a term of two years and can be extended twice for one year at a time.

      Frontex wants drones of the so-called MALE (Medium Altitude Long Endurance) class. Their flight duration should be at least 20 hours. The requirements include the ability to fly in all weather conditions and at day and night. It is also planned to operate in airspace where civil aircraft are in service. For surveillance missions, the drones should carry electro-optical cameras, thermal imaging cameras and so-called “daylight spotter” systems that independently detect moving targets and keep them in focus. Other equipment includes systems for locating mobile and satellite telephones. The drones will also be able to receive signals from emergency call transmitters sewn into modern life jackets.

      However, the Frontex drones will not be used primarily for sea rescue operations, but to improve capacities against unwanted migration. This assumption is also confirmed by the German non-governmental organisation Sea-Watch, which has been providing assistance in the central Mediterranean with various ships since 2015. “Frontex is not concerned with saving lives,” says Ruben Neugebauer of Sea-Watch. “While air surveillance is being expanded with aircraft and drones, ships urgently needed for rescue operations have been withdrawn”. Sea-Watch demands that situation pictures of EU drones are also made available to private organisations for sea rescue.

      Aircraft from arms companies

      Frontex has very specific ideas for its own drones, which is why there are only a few suppliers worldwide that can be called into question. The Israel Aerospace Industries Heron 1, which Frontex tested for several months on the Greek island of Crete[4] and which is also flown by the German Bundeswehr, is one of them. As set out by Frontex in its invitation to tender, the Heron 1, with a payload of around 250 kilograms, can carry all the surveillance equipment that the agency intends to deploy over the Mediterranean. Also amongst those likely to be interested in the Frontex contract is the US company General Atomics, which has been building drones of the Predator series for 20 years. Recently, it presented a new Predator model in Greece under the name SeaGuardian, for maritime observation.[5] It is equipped with a maritime surveillance radar and a system for receiving position data from larger ships, thus fulfilling one of Frontex’s essential requirements.

      General Atomics may have a competitive advantage, as its Predator drones have several years’ operational experience in the Mediterranean. In addition to Frontex, the European Union has been active in the central Mediterranean with EUNAVFOR MED Operation Sophia. In March 2019, Italy’s then-interior minister Matteo Salvini pushed through the decision to operate the EU mission from the air alone. Since then, two unarmed Predator drones operated by the Italian military have been flying for EUNAVFOR MED for 60 hours per month. Officially, the drones are to observe from the air whether the training of the Libyan coast guard has been successful and whether these navy personnel use their knowledge accordingly. Presumably, however, the Predators are primarily pursuing the mission’s goal to “combat human smuggling” by spying on the Libyan coast. It is likely that the new Operation EU Active Surveillance, which will use military assets from EU member states to try to enforce the UN arms embargo placed on Libya,[6] will continue to patrol with Italian drones off the coast in North Africa.

      Three EU maritime surveillance agencies

      In addition to Frontex, the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) and the European Fisheries Control Agency (EFCA) are also investing in maritime surveillance using drones. Together, the three agencies coordinate some 300 civil and military authorities in EU member states.[7] Their tasks include border, fisheries and customs control, law enforcement and environmental protection.

      In 2017, Frontex and EMSA signed an agreement to benefit from joint reconnaissance capabilities, with EFCA also involved.[8] At the time, EMSA conducted tests with drones of various sizes, but now the drones’ flights are part of its regular services. The offer is not only open to EU Member States, as Iceland was the first to take advantage of it. Since summer 2019, a long-range Hermes 900 drone built by the Israeli company Elbit Systems has been flying from Iceland’s Egilsstaðir airport. The flights are intended to cover more than half of the island state’s exclusive economic zone and to detect “suspicious activities and potential hazards”.[9]

      The Hermes 900 was also developed for the military; the Israeli army first deployed it in the Gaza Strip in 2014. The Times of Israel puts the cost of the operating contract with EMSA at €59 million,[10] with a term of two years, which can be extended for another two years. The agency did not conclude the contract directly with the Israeli arms company, but through the Portuguese firm CeiiA. The contract covers the stationing, control and mission control of the drones.

      New interested parties for drone flights

      At the request of the German MEP Özlem Demirel (from the party Die Linke), the European Commission has published a list of countries that also want to use EMSA drones.[11] According to this list, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Portugal and also Greece have requested unmanned flights for pollution monitoring this year, while Bulgaria and Spain want to use them for general maritime surveillance. Until Frontex has its own drones, EMSA is flying its drones for the border agency on Crete. As in Iceland, this is the long-range drone Hermes 900, but according to Greek media reports it crashed on 8 January during take-off.[12] Possible causes are a malfunction of the propulsion system or human error. The aircraft is said to have been considerably damaged.

      Authorities from France and Great Britain have also ordered unmanned maritime surveillance from EMSA. Nothing is yet known about the exact intended location, but it is presumably the English Channel. There, the British coast guard is already observing border traffic with larger drones built by the Tekever arms company from Portugal.[13] The government in London wants to prevent migrants from crossing the Channel. The drones take off from the airport in the small town of Lydd and monitor the approximately 50-kilometre-long and 30-kilometre-wide Strait of Dover. Great Britain has also delivered several quadcopters to France to try to detect potential migrants in French territorial waters. According to the prefecture of Pas-de-Calais, eight gendarmes have been trained to control the small drones[14].

      Information to non-EU countries

      The images taken by EMSA drones are evaluated by the competent national coastguards. A livestream also sends them to Frontex headquarters in Warsaw.[15] There they are fed into the EUROSUR border surveillance system. This is operated by Frontex and networks the surveillance installations of all EU member states that have an external border. The data from EUROSUR and the national border control centres form the ‘Common Pre-frontier Intelligence Picture’,[16] referring to the area of interest of Frontex, which extends far into the African continent. Surveillance data is used to detect and prevent migration movements at an early stage.

      Once the providing company has been selected, the new Frontex drones are also to fly for EUROSUR. According to the invitation to tender, they are to operate in the eastern and central Mediterranean within a radius of up to 250 nautical miles (463 kilometres). This would enable them to carry out reconnaissance in the “pre-frontier” area off Tunisia, Libya and Egypt. Within the framework of EUROSUR, Frontex shares the recorded data with other European users via a ‘Remote Information Portal’, as the call for tender explains. The border agency has long been able to cooperate with third countries and the information collected can therefore also be made available to authorities in North Africa. However, in order to share general information on surveillance of the Mediterranean Sea with a non-EU state, Frontex must first conclude a working agreement with the corresponding government.[17]

      It is already possible, however, to provide countries such as Libya with the coordinates of refugee boats. For example, the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea stipulates that the nearest Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre (MRCC) must be informed of actual or suspected emergencies. With EU funding, Italy has been building such a centre in Tripoli for the last two years.[18] It is operated by the military coast guard, but so far has no significant equipment of its own.

      The EU military mission “EUNAVFOR MED” was cooperating more extensively with the Libyan coast guard. For communication with European naval authorities, Libya is the first third country to be connected to European surveillance systems via the “Seahorse Mediterranean” network[19]. Information handed over to the Libyan authorities might also include information that was collected with the Italian military ‘Predator’ drones.

      Reconnaissance generated with unmanned aerial surveillance is also given to the MRCC in Turkey. This was seen in a pilot project last summer, when the border agency tested an unmanned aerostat with the Greek coast guard off the island of Samos.[20] Attached to a 1,000 metre-long cable, the airship was used in the Frontex operation ‘Poseidon’ in the eastern Mediterranean. The 35-meter-long zeppelin comes from the French manufacturer A-NSE.[21] The company specializes in civil and military aerial observation. According to the Greek Marine Ministry, the equipment included a radar, a thermal imaging camera and an Automatic Identification System (AIS) for the tracking of larger ships. The recorded videos were received and evaluated by a situation centre supplied by the Portuguese National Guard. If a detected refugee boat was still in Turkish territorial waters, the Greek coast guard informed the Turkish authorities. This pilot project in the Aegean Sea was the first use of an airship by Frontex. The participants deployed comparatively large numbers of personnel for the short mission. Pictures taken by the Greek coastguard show more than 40 people.

      Drones enable ‘pull-backs’

      Human rights organisations accuse EUNAVFOR MED and Frontex of passing on information to neighbouring countries leading to rejections (so-called ‘push-backs’) in violation of international law. People must not be returned to states where they are at risk of torture or other serious human rights violations. Frontex does not itself return refugees in distress who were discovered at sea via aerial surveillance, but leaves the task to the Libyan or Turkish authorities. Regarding Libya, the Agency since 2017 provided notice of at least 42 vessels in distress to Libyan authorities.[22]

      Private rescue organisations therefore speak of so-called ‘pull-backs’, but these are also prohibited, as the Israeli human rights lawyer Omer Shatz argues: “Communicating the location of civilians fleeing war to a consortium of militias and instructing them to intercept and forcibly transfer them back to the place they fled from, trigger both state responsibility of all EU members and individual criminal liability of hundreds involved.” Together with his colleague Juan Branco, Shatz is suing those responsible for the European Union and its agencies before the International Criminal Court in The Hague. Soon they intend to publish individual cases and the names of the people accused.

      Matthias Monroy

      An earlier version of this article first appeared in the German edition of Le Monde Diplomatique: ‘Drohnen für Frontex Statt sich auf die Rettung von Bootsflüchtlingen im Mittelmeer zu konzentrieren, baut die EU die Luftüberwachung’.

      Note: this article was corrected on 6 March to clarify a point regarding cooperation between Frontex and non-EU states.

      Endnotes

      [1] Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European Border and Coast Guard, https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/PE-33-2019-INIT/en/pdf

      [2] European Commission, ‘A strengthened and fully equipped European Border and Coast Guard’, 12 September 2018, https://ec.europa.eu/commission/sites/beta-political/files/soteu2018-factsheet-coast-guard_en.pdf

      [3] ‘Poland-Warsaw: Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) for Medium Altitude Long Endurance Maritime Aerial Surveillance’, https://ted.europa.eu/udl?uri=TED:NOTICE:490010-2019:TEXT:EN:HTML&tabId=1

      [4] IAI, ‘IAI AND AIRBUS MARITIME HERON UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEM (UAS) SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED 200 FLIGHT HOURS IN CIVILIAN EUROPEAN AIRSPACE FOR FRONTEX’, 24 October 2018, https://www.iai.co.il/iai-and-airbus-maritime-heron-unmanned-aerial-system-uas-successfully-complet

      [5] ‘ European Maritime Flight Demonstrations’, General Atomics, http://www.ga-asi.com/european-maritime-demo

      [6] ‘EU agrees to deploy warships to enforce Libya arms embargo’, The Guardian, 17 February 2020, https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/feb/17/eu-agrees-deploy-warships-enforce-libya-arms-embargo

      [7] EMSA, ‘Heads of EMSA and Frontex meet to discuss cooperation on European coast guard functions’, 3 April 2019, http://www.emsa.europa.eu/news-a-press-centre/external-news/item/3499-heads-of-emsa-and-frontex-meet-to-discuss-cooperation-on-european-c

      [8] Frontex, ‘Frontex, EMSA and EFCA strengthen cooperation on coast guard functions’, 23 March 2017, https://frontex.europa.eu/media-centre/news-release/frontex-emsa-and-efca-strengthen-cooperation-on-coast-guard-functions

      [9] Elbit Systems, ‘Elbit Systems Commenced the Operation of the Maritime UAS Patrol Service to European Union Countries’, 18 June 2019, https://elbitsystems.com/pr-new/elbit-systems-commenced-the-operation-of-the-maritime-uas-patrol-servi

      [10] ‘Elbit wins drone contract for up to $68m to help monitor Europe coast’, The Times of Israel, 1 November 2018, https://www.timesofisrael.com/elbit-wins-drone-contract-for-up-to-68m-to-help-monitor-europe-coast

      [11] ‘Answer given by Ms Bulc on behalf of the European Commission’, https://netzpolitik.org/wp-upload/2019/12/E-2946_191_Finalised_reply_Annex1_EN_V1.pdf

      [12] ‘Το drone της FRONTEX έπεσε, οι μετανάστες έρχονται’, Proto Thema, 27 January 2020, https://www.protothema.gr/greece/article/968869/to-drone-tis-frontex-epese-oi-metanastes-erhodai

      [13] Morgan Meaker, ‘Here’s proof the UK is using drones to patrol the English Channel’, Wired, 10 January 2020, https://www.wired.co.uk/article/uk-drones-migrants-english-channel

      [14] ‘Littoral: Les drones pour lutter contre les traversées de migrants sont opérationnels’, La Voix du Nord, 26 March 2019, https://www.lavoixdunord.fr/557951/article/2019-03-26/les-drones-pour-lutter-contre-les-traversees-de-migrants-sont-operation

      [15] ‘Frontex report on the functioning of Eurosur – Part I’, Council document 6215/18, 15 February 2018, http://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-6215-2018-INIT/en/pdf

      [16] European Commission, ‘Eurosur’, https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/what-we-do/policies/borders-and-visas/border-crossing/eurosur_en

      [17] Legal reforms have also given Frontex the power to operate on the territory of non-EU states, subject to the conclusion of a status agreement between the EU and the country in question. The 2016 Frontex Regulation allowed such cooperation with states that share a border with the EU; the 2019 Frontex Regulation extends this to any non-EU state.

      [18] ‘Helping the Libyan Coast Guard to establish a Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre’, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/E-8-2018-000547_EN.html

      [19] Matthias Monroy, ‘EU funds the sacking of rescue ships in the Mediterranean’, 7 July 2018, https://digit.site36.net/2018/07/03/eu-funds-the-sacking-of-rescue-ships-in-the-mediterranean

      [20] Frontex, ‘Frontex begins testing use of aerostat for border surveillance’, 31 July 2019, https://frontex.europa.eu/media-centre/news-release/frontex-begins-testing-use-of-aerostat-for-border-surveillance-ur33N8

      [21] ‘Answer given by Ms Johansson on behalf of the European Commission’, 7 January 2020, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/E-9-2019-002529-ASW_EN.html

      [22] ‘Answer given by Vice-President Borrell on behalf of the European Commission’, 8 January 2020, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/E-9-2019-002654-ASW_EN.html

      https://www.statewatch.org/analyses/2020/drones-for-frontex-unmanned-migration-control-at-europe-s-borders

      #drones

    • Monitoring “secondary movements” and “hotspots”: Frontex is now an internal surveillance agency (16.12.2019)

      The EU’s border agency, Frontex, now has powers to gather data on “secondary movements” and the “hotspots” within the EU. The intention is to ensure “situational awareness” and produce risk analyses on the migratory situation within the EU, in order to inform possible operational action by national authorities. This brings with it increased risks for the fundamental rights of both non-EU nationals and ethnic minority EU citizens.

      The establishment of a new ’standing corps’ of 10,000 border guards to be commanded by EU border agency Frontex has generated significant public and press attention in recent months. However, the new rules governing Frontex[1] include a number of other significant developments - including a mandate for the surveillance of migratory movements and migration “hotspots” within the EU.

      Previously, the agency’s surveillance role has been restricted to the external borders and the “pre-frontier area” – for example, the high seas or “selected third-country ports.”[2] New legal provisions mean it will now be able to gather data on the movement of people within the EU. While this is only supposed to deal with “trends, volumes and routes,” rather than personal data, it is intended to inform operational activity within the EU.

      This may mean an increase in operations against ‘unauthorised’ migrants, bringing with it risks for fundamental rights such as the possibility of racial profiling, detention, violence and the denial of access to asylum procedures. At the same time, in a context where internal borders have been reintroduced by numerous Schengen states over the last five years due to increased migration, it may be that he agency’s new role contributes to a further prolongation of internal border controls.

      From external to internal surveillance

      Frontex was initially established with the primary goals of assisting in the surveillance and control of the external borders of the EU. Over the years it has obtained increasing powers to conduct surveillance of those borders in order to identify potential ’threats’.

      The European Border Surveillance System (EUROSUR) has a key role in this task, taking data from a variety of sources, including satellites, sensors, drones, ships, vehicles and other means operated both by national authorities and the agency itself. EUROSUR was formally established by legislation approved in 2013, although the system was developed and in use long before it was subject to a legal framework.[3]

      The new Frontex Regulation incorporates and updates the provisions of the 2013 EUROSUR Regulation. It maintains existing requirements for the agency to establish a “situational picture” of the EU’s external borders and the “pre-frontier area” – for example, the high seas or the ports of non-EU states – which is then distributed to the EU’s member states in order to inform operational activities.[4]

      The new rules also provide a mandate for reporting on “unauthorised secondary movements” and goings-on in the “hotspots”. The Commission’s proposal for the new Frontex Regulation was not accompanied by an impact assessment, which would have set out the reasoning and justifications for these new powers. The proposal merely pointed out that the new rules would “evolve” the scope of EUROSUR, to make it possible to “prevent secondary movements”.[5] As the European Data Protection Supervisor remarked, the lack of an impact assessment made it impossible: “to fully assess and verify its attended benefits and impact, notably on fundamental rights and freedoms, including the right to privacy and to the protection of personal data.”[6]

      The term “secondary movements” is not defined in the Regulation, but is generally used to refer to journeys between EU member states undertaken without permission, in particular by undocumented migrants and applicants for internal protection. Regarding the “hotspots” – established and operated by EU and national authorities in Italy and Greece – the Regulation provides a definition,[7] but little clarity on precisely what information will be gathered.

      Legal provisions

      A quick glance at Section 3 of the new Regulation, dealing with EUROSUR, gives little indication that the system will now be used for internal surveillance. The formal scope of EUROSUR is concerned with the external borders and border crossing points:

      “EUROSUR shall be used for border checks at authorised border crossing points and for external land, sea and air border surveillance, including the monitoring, detection, identification, tracking, prevention and interception of unauthorised border crossings for the purpose of detecting, preventing and combating illegal immigration and cross-border crime and contributing to ensuring the protection and saving the lives of migrants.”

      However, the subsequent section of the Regulation (on ‘situational awareness’) makes clear the agency’s new internal role. Article 24 sets out the components of the “situational pictures” that will be visible in EUROSUR. There are three types – national situational pictures, the European situational picture and specific situational pictures. All of these should consist of an events layer, an operational layer and an analysis layer. The first of these layers should contain (emphasis added in all quotes):

      “…events and incidents related to unauthorised border crossings and cross-border crime and, where available, information on unauthorised secondary movements, for the purpose of understanding migratory trends, volume and routes.”

      Article 26, dealing with the European situational picture, states:

      “The Agency shall establish and maintain a European situational picture in order to provide the national coordination centres and the Commission with effective, accurate and timely information and analysis, covering the external borders, the pre-frontier area and unauthorised secondary movements.”

      The events layer of that picture should include “information relating to… incidents in the operational area of a joint operation or rapid intervention coordinated by the Agency, or in a hotspot.”[8] In a similar vein:

      “The operational layer of the European situational picture shall contain information on the joint operations and rapid interventions coordinated by the Agency and on hotspots, and shall include the mission statements, locations, status, duration, information on the Member States and other actors involved, daily and weekly situational reports, statistical data and information packages for the media.”[9]

      Article 28, dealing with ‘EUROSUR Fusion Services’, says that Frontex will provide national authorities with information on the external borders and pre-frontier area that may be derived from, amongst other things, the monitoring of “migratory flows towards and within the Union in terms of trends, volume and routes.”

      Sources of data

      The “situational pictures” compiled by Frontex and distributed via EUROSUR are made up of data gathered from a host of different sources. For the national situational picture, these are:

      national border surveillance systems;
      stationary and mobile sensors operated by national border agencies;
      border surveillance patrols and “other monitoring missions”;
      local, regional and other coordination centres;
      other national authorities and systems, such as immigration liaison officers, operational centres and contact points;
      border checks;
      Frontex;
      other member states’ national coordination centres;
      third countries’ authorities;
      ship reporting systems;
      other relevant European and international organisations; and
      other sources.[10]

      For the European situational picture, the sources of data are:

      national coordination centres;
      national situational pictures;
      immigration liaison officers;
      Frontex, including reports form its liaison officers;
      Union delegations and EU Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) missions;
      other relevant Union bodies, offices and agencies and international organisations; and
      third countries’ authorities.[11]

      The EUROSUR handbook – which will presumably be redrafted to take into account the new legislation – provides more detail about what each of these categories may include.[12]

      Exactly how this melange of different data will be used to report on secondary movements is currently unknown. However, in accordance with Article 24 of the new Regulation:

      “The Commission shall adopt an implementing act laying down the details of the information layers of the situational pictures and the rules for the establishment of specific situational pictures. The implementing act shall specify the type of information to be provided, the entities responsible for collecting, processing, archiving and transmitting specific information, the maximum time limits for reporting, the data security and data protection rules and related quality control mechanisms.” [13]

      This implementing act will specify precisely how EUROSUR will report on “secondary movements”.[14] According to a ‘roadmap’ setting out plans for the implementation of the new Regulation, this implementing act should have been drawn up in the last quarter of 2020 by a newly-established European Border and Coast Guard Committee sitting within the Commission. However, that Committee does not yet appear to have held any meetings.[15]

      Operational activities at the internal borders

      Boosting Frontex’s operational role is one of the major purposes of the new Regulation, although it makes clear that the internal surveillance role “should not lead to operational activities of the Agency at the internal borders of the Member States.” Rather, internal surveillance should “contribute to the monitoring by the Agency of migratory flows towards and within the Union for the purpose of risk analysis and situational awareness.” The purpose is to inform operational activity by national authorities.

      In recent years Schengen member states have reintroduced border controls for significant periods in the name of ensuring internal security and combating irregular migration. An article in Deutsche Welle recently highlighted:

      “When increasing numbers of refugees started arriving in the European Union in 2015, Austria, Germany, Slovenia and Hungary quickly reintroduced controls, citing a “continuous big influx of persons seeking international protection.” This was the first time that migration had been mentioned as a reason for reintroducing border controls.

      Soon after, six Schengen members reintroduced controls for extended periods. Austria, Germany, Denmark, Sweden and Norway cited migration as a reason. France, as the sixth country, first introduced border checks after the November 2015 attacks in Paris, citing terrorist threats. Now, four years later, all six countries still have controls in place. On November 12, they are scheduled to extend them for another six months.”[16]

      These long-term extensions of internal border controls are illegal (the upper limit is supposed to be two years; discussions on changes to the rules governing the reintroduction of internal border controls in the Schengen area are ongoing).[17] A European Parliament resolution from May 2018 stated that “many of the prolongations are not in line with the existing rules as to their extensions, necessity or proportionality and are therefore unlawful.”[18] Yves Pascou, a researcher for the European Policy Centre, told Deutsche Welle that: “"We are in an entirely political situation now, not a legal one, and not one grounded in facts.”

      A European Parliament study published in 2016 highlighted that:

      “there has been a noticeable lack of detail and evidence given by the concerned EU Member States [those which reintroduced internal border controls]. For example, there have been no statistics on the numbers of people crossing borders and seeking asylum, or assessment of the extent to which reintroducing border checks complies with the principles of proportionality and necessity.”[19]

      One purpose of Frontex’s new internal surveillance powers is to provide such evidence (albeit in the ideologically-skewed form of ‘risk analysis’) on the situation within the EU. Whether the information provided will be of interest to national authorities is another question. Nevertheless, it would be a significant irony if the provision of that information were to contribute to the further maintenance of internal borders in the Schengen area.

      At the same time, there is a more pressing concern related to these new powers. Many discussions on the reintroduction of internal borders revolve around the fact that it is contrary to the idea, spirit (and in these cases, the law) of the Schengen area. What appears to have been totally overlooked is the effect the reintroduction of internal borders may have on non-EU nationals or ethnic minority citizens of the EU. One does not have to cross an internal Schengen frontier too many times to notice patterns in the appearance of the people who are hauled off trains and buses by border guards, but personal anecdotes are not the same thing as empirical investigation. If Frontex’s new powers are intended to inform operational activity by the member states at the internal borders of the EU, then the potential effects on fundamental rights must be taken into consideration and should be the subject of investigation by journalists, officials, politicians and researchers.

      Chris Jones

      Endnotes

      [1] The new Regulation was published in the Official Journal of the EU in mid-November: Regulation (EU) 2019/1896 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 November 2019 on the European Border and Coast Guard and repealing Regulations (EU) No 1052/2013 and (EU) 2016/1624, https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/en/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32019R1896

      [2] Article 12, ‘Common application of surveillance tools’, Regulation (EU) No 1052/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 October 2013 establishing the European Border Surveillance System (Eurosur), https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32013R1052

      [3] According to Frontex, the Eurosur Network first came into use in December 2011 and in March 2012 was first used to “exchange operational information”. The Regulation governing the system came into force in October 2013 (see footnote 2). See: Charles Heller and Chris Jones, ‘Eurosur: saving lives or reinforcing deadly borders?’, Statewatch Journal, vol. 23 no. 3/4, February 2014, http://database.statewatch.org/article.asp?aid=33156

      [4] Recital 34, 2019 Regulation: “EUROSUR should provide an exhaustive situational picture not only at the external borders but also within the Schengen area and in the pre-frontier area. It should cover land, sea and air border surveillance and border checks.”

      [5] European Commission, ‘Proposal for a Regulation on the European Border and Coast Guard and repealing Council Joint Action no 98/700/JHA, Regulation (EU) no 1052/2013 and Regulation (EU) no 2016/1624’, COM(2018) 631 final, 12 September 2018, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2018/sep/eu-com-frontex-proposal-regulation-com-18-631.pdf

      [6] EDPS, ‘Formal comments on the Proposal for a Regulation on the European Border and Coast Guard’, 30 November 2018, p. p.2, https://edps.europa.eu/sites/edp/files/publication/18-11-30_comments_proposal_regulation_european_border_coast_guard_en.pdf

      [7] Article 2(23): “‘hotspot area’ means an area created at the request of the host Member State in which the host Member State, the Commission, relevant Union agencies and participating Member States cooperate, with the aim of managing an existing or potential disproportionate migratory challenge characterised by a significant increase in the number of migrants arriving at the external borders”

      [8] Article 26(3)(c), 2019 Regulation

      [9] Article 26(4), 2019 Regulation

      [10] Article 25, 2019 Regulation

      [11] Article 26, 2019 Regulation

      [12] European Commission, ‘Commission Recommendation adopting the Practical Handbook for implementing and managing the European Border Surveillance System (EUROSUR)’, C(2015) 9206 final, 15 December 2015, https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/sites/homeaffairs/files/what-we-do/policies/securing-eu-borders/legal-documents/docs/eurosur_handbook_annex_en.pdf

      [13] Article 24(3), 2019 Regulation

      [14] ‘’Roadmap’ for implementing new Frontex Regulation: full steam ahead’, Statewatch News, 25 November 2019, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/nov/eu-frontex-roadmap.htm

      [15] Documents related to meetings of committees operating under the auspices of the European Commission can be found in the Comitology Register: https://ec.europa.eu/transparency/regcomitology/index.cfm?do=Search.Search&NewSearch=1

      [16] Kira Schacht, ‘Border checks in EU countries challenge Schengen Agreement’, DW, 12 November 2019, https://www.dw.com/en/border-checks-in-eu-countries-challenge-schengen-agreement/a-51033603

      [17] European Parliament, ‘Temporary reintroduction of border control at internal borders’, https://oeil.secure.europarl.europa.eu/oeil/popups/ficheprocedure.do?reference=2017/0245(COD)&l=en

      [18] ‘Report on the annual report on the functioning of the Schengen area’, 3 May 2018, para.9, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/A-8-2018-0160_EN.html

      [19] Elpseth Guild et al, ‘Internal border controls in the Schengen area: is Schengen crisis-proof?’, European Parliament, June 2016, p.9, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2016/571356/IPOL_STU(2016)571356_EN.pdf

      https://www.statewatch.org/analyses/2019/monitoring-secondary-movements-and-hotspots-frontex-is-now-an-internal-s

      #mouvements_secondaires #hotspot #hotspots

  • OP-ed : La guerre faite aux migrants à la frontière grecque de l’Europe par #Vicky_Skoumbi

    La #honte de l’Europe : les #hotspots aux îles grecques
    Devant les Centres de Réception et d’Identification des îles grecques, devant cette ‘ignominie à ciel ouvert’ que sont les camps de Moria à Lesbos et de Vathy à Samos, nous sommes à court de mots ; en effet il est presque impossible de trouver des mots suffisamment forts pour dire l’horreur de l’enfermement dans les hot-spots d’hommes, femmes et enfants dans des conditions abjectes. Les hot-spots sont les Centres de Réception et d’Identification (CIR en français, RIC en anglais) qui ont été créés en 2015 à la demande de l’UE en Italie et en Grèce et plus particulièrement dans les îles grecques de Lesbos, Samos, Chios, Leros et Kos, afin d’identifier et enregistrer les personnes arrivantes. L’approche ‘hot-spots’ introduite par l’UE en mai 2015 était destinée à ‘faciliter’ l’enregistrement des arrivants en vue d’une relocalisation de ceux-ci vers d’autres pays européens que ceux de première entrée en Europe. Force est de constater que, pendant ces cinq années de fonctionnement, ils n’ont servi que le but contraire de celui initialement affiché, à savoir le confinement de personnes par la restriction géographique voire par la détention sur place.

    Actuellement, dans ces camps, des personnes vulnérables, fuyant la guerre et les persécutions, fragilisées par des voyages longs et éprouvants, parmi lesquels se trouvent des victimes de torture ou de naufrage, sont obligées de vivre dans une promiscuité effroyable et dans des conditions inhumaines. En fait, trois quart jusqu’à quatre cinquième des personnes confinées dans les îles grecques appartiennent à des catégories reconnues comme vulnérables, même aux yeux de critères stricts de vulnérabilité établis par l’UE et la législation grecque[1], tandis qu’un tiers des résidents des camps de Moria et de Vathy sont des enfants, qui n’ont aucun accès à un circuit scolaire. Les habitants de ces zones de non-droit que sont les hot-spots, passent leurs journées à attendre dans des files interminables : attendre pour la distribution d’une nourriture souvent avariée, pour aller aux toilettes, pour se laver, pour voir un médecin. Ils sont pris dans un suspens du temps, sans aucune perspective d’avenir de sorte que plusieurs d’entre eux finissent par perdre leurs repères au détriment de leur équilibre mental et de leur santé.

    Déjà avant l’épidémie de Covid 19, plusieurs organismes internationaux comme le UNHCR[2] avaient dénoncé les conditions indignes dans lesquelles étaient obligées de vivre les demandeurs d’asile dans les hot-spots, tandis que des ONG comme MSF[3] et Amnesty International[4] avaient à plusieurs reprises alerté sur le risque que représentent les conditions sanitaires si dégradées, en y pointant une situation propice au déclenchement des épidémies. De son côté, Jean Ziegler, dans son livre réquisitoire sorti en début 2020, désignait le camp de #Moria, le hot-spot de Lesbos, comme la ‘honte de l’Europe’[5].

    Début mars 2020, 43.000 personnes étaient bloquées dans les îles dont 20.000 à Moria et 7.700 à Samos pour une capacité d’accueil de 2.700 et 650 respectivement[6]. Avec les risques particulièrement accrus de contamination, à cause de l’impossibilité de respecter la distanciation sociale et les mesures d’hygiène, on aurait pu s’attendre à ce que des mesures urgentes de décongestion de ces camps soient prises, avec des transferts massifs vers la Grèce continentale et l’installation dans des logements touristiques vides. A vrai dire c’était l’évacuation complète de camps si insalubres qui s’imposait, mais étant donné la difficulté de trouver dans l’immédiat des alternatives d’hébergement pour 43.000 personnes, le transfert au moins des plus vulnérables à des structures plus petites offrant la possibilité d’isolement- comme les hôtels et autres logements touristiques vides dans le continent- aurait été une mesure minimale de protection. Au lieu de cela, le gouvernement Mitsotakis a décidé d’enfermer les résidents des camps dans les îles dans des conditions inhumaines, sans qu’aucune mesure d’amélioration des conditions sanitaires ne soit prévue[7].

    Car, les mesures prises le 17 mars par le gouvernement pour empêcher la propagation du virus dans les camps, consistaient uniquement en une restriction des déplacements au strict minimum nécessaire et même en deça de celui-ci : une seule personne par famille aura désormais le droit de sortir du camp pour faire des courses entre 7 heures et 19 heures, avec une autorisation fournie par la police, le nombre total de personnes ayant droit de sortir par heure restant limité. Parallèlement l’entrée des visiteurs a été interdite et celle des travailleurs humanitaires strictement limitée à ceux assurant des services vitaux. Une mesure supplémentaire qui a largement contribué à la détérioration de la situation des réfugiés dans les camps, a été la décision du ministère d’arrêter de créditer de fonds leur cartes prépayés (cash cards ) afin d’éviter toute sortie des camps, laissant ainsi les résidents des hot-spots dans l’impossibilité de s’approvisionner avec des produits de première nécessité et notamment de produits d’hygiène. Remarquez que ces mesures sont toujours en vigueur pour les hot-spots et toute autre structure accueillant des réfugiés et des migrants en Grèce, en un moment où toute restriction de mouvement a été déjà levée pour la population grecque. En effet, après une énième prolongation du confinement dans les camps, les mesures de restriction de mouvement ont été reconduites jusqu’au 5 juillet, une mesure d’autant plus discriminatoire que depuis cinq semaines déjà les autres habitants du pays ont retrouvé une entière liberté de mouvement. Etant donné qu’aucune donnée sanitaire ne justifie l’enfermement dans les hot-spots où pas un seul cas n’a été détecté, cette extension de restrictions transforme de facto les Centres de Réception et Identification (RIC) dans les îles en centres fermés ou semi-fermés, anticipant ainsi à la création de nouveaux centres fermés, à la place de hot-spots actuels –voir ici et ici. Il est fort à parier que le gouvernement va étendre de prolongation en prolongation le confinement de RIC pendant au moins toute la période touristique, ce qui risque de faire monter encore plus la tension dans les camps jusqu’à un niveau explosif.

    Ainsi les demandeurs d’asile ont été – et continuent toujours à être – obligés de vivre toute la période de l’épidémie, dans une très grande promiscuité et dans des conditions sanitaires qui suscitaient déjà l’effroi bien avant la menace du Covid-19[8]. Voyons de plus près quelles conditions de vie règnent dans ce drôle de ‘chez soi’, auquel le Ministre grec de la politique migratoire invitait les réfugiés à y passer une période de confinement sans cesse prolongée, en présentant le « Stay in camps » comme le strict équivalent du « Stay home », pour les citoyens grecs. Dans l’extension « hors les murs » du hotspot de Moria, vers l’oliveraie, repartie en Oliveraie I, II et III, il y a des quartiers où il n’existe qu’un seul robinet d’eau pour 1 500 personnes, ce qui rend le respect de règles d’hygiène absolument impossible. Dans le camp de Moria il n’y a qu’une seule toilette pour 167 personnes et une douche pour 242, alors que dans l’Oliveraie, 5 000 personnes n’ont aucun accès à l’électricité, à l’eau et aux toilettes. Selon le directeur des programmes de Médecins sans Frontières, Apostolos Veizis, au hot-spot de Samos à Vathy, il n’y a qu’une seule toilette pour 300 personnes, tandis que l’organisation MSF a installé 80 toilettes et elle fournit 60 000 litres d’eau par jour pour couvrir, ne serait-ce que partiellement- les besoins de résidents à l’extérieur du camp.

    Avec la restriction drastique de mouvement contre le Covid-19, non seulement les sorties du camp, même pour s’approvisionner ou pour aller consulter, étaient faites au compte-goutte, mais aussi les entrées, limitant ainsi dramatiquement les services que les ONG et les collectifs solidaires offraient aux réfugiés. La réduction du nombre des ONG et l’absence de solidaires a créé un manque cruel d’effectifs qui s’est traduit par une désorganisation complète de divers services et notamment de la distribution de la nourriture. Ainsi, dans le camp de Moria en pleine pandémie, ont eu lieu des scènes honteuses de bousculade effroyable où les réfugiés étaient obligés de se battre pour une portion de nourriture- voir la vidéo et l’article de quotidien grec Ephimérida tôn Syntaktôn. Ces scènes indignes ne sauraient que se multiplier dans la mesure où le gouvernement en imposant aux ONG un procédé d’enregistrement très complexe et coûteux a réussi à exclure plus que la moitié de celles qui s’activent dans les camps. Car, par le processus de ‘régulation’ d’un domaine censément opaque, imposé par la récente loi sur l’asile, n’ont réussi à passer que 18 ONG qui elles seules auront désormais droit d’entrée dans les hot-spots[9]. En fait, l’inscription des ONG dans le registre du Ministère s’avère un procédé plein d’embûches bureaucratiques. Qui plus est le Ministre peut décider à son gré de refuser l’inscription des organisations qui remplissent tous les critères requis, ce qui serait une ingérence flagrante du pouvoir dans le domaine humanitaire.

    Car, il faudrait aussi savoir que les réfugiés enfermés dans les camps se trouvent à la limite de la survie, après la décision du Ministère de leur couper, à partir du début mars, les aides –déjà très maigres, 90 euros par mois pour une personne seule- auxquelles ils avaient droit jusqu’à maintenant. En ce qui concerne la couverture sociale de santé, à partir de juillet dernier les demandeurs ne pouvaient plus obtenir un numéro de sécurité sociale et étaient ainsi privés de toute couverture santé. Après des mois de tergiversation et sous la pression des organismes internationaux, le gouvernement grec a enfin décidé de leur accorder un numéro provisoire de sécurité sociale, mais cette mesure reste pour l’instant en attente de sa pleine réalisation. Entretemps, l’exclusion des demandeurs d’asile du système national de santé a fait son effet : non seulement, elle a conduit à une détérioration significative de la santé des requérant, mais elle a également privé des enfants réfugiés de scolarisation, car, faute de carnet de vaccination à jour, ceux-ci ne pouvaient pas s’inscrire à l’école.

    En d’autres termes, au lieu de déployer pendant l’épidémie une politique de décongestion avec transferts massifs à des structures sécurisées, le gouvernement a traité les demandeurs d’asile comme porteurs virtuels du virus, à tenir coûte que coûte à l’écart de la société ; non seulement les réfugiés et les migrants n’ont pas été protégés par un confinement sécurisé, mais ils ont été enfermés dans des conditions sanitaires mettant leur santé et leur vie en danger. La preuve, si besoin est, ce sont les mesures prises par le gouvernement dans des structures d’accueil du continent où des cas de coronavirus ont été détectés ; par ex. la gestion catastrophique de la quarantaine dans une structure d’accueil hôtelière à Kranidi en Péloponnèse où une femme enceinte a été testée positive en avril. Dans cet hôtel géré par l’IOM qui accueille 470 réfugiés de l’Afrique sub-saharienne, après l’indentification de deux cas (une employée et une résidente), un dépistage généralisé a été effectué et le 21 avril 150 cas ont été détectés ; très probablement le virus a été ‘importé’ dans la structure par les contacts des réfugiés et du personnel avec les propriétaires de villas voisines installés dans la région pour la période de confinement et qui les employaient pour divers services. Après une quarantaine de trois semaines, trois nouveaux cas ont été détectés avec comme résultat que toutes les personnes testées négatives ont été placées en quarantaine avec celles testées positives au même endroit[10].

    Exactement la même tactique a été adoptée dans les camps de Ritsona (au nord d’Athènes) et de Malakassa (à l’est d’Attique), où des cas ont été détectés. Au lieu d’isoler les porteurs du virus et d’effectuer un dépistage exhaustif de toute la population du camp, travailleurs compris, ce qui aurait pu permettre d’isoler tout porteur non-symptomatique, les camps avec tous leurs résidents ont été mis en quarantaine. Les autorités « ont imposé ces mesures sans prendre de dispositions nécessaires …pour isoler les personnes atteintes du virus à l’intérieur des camps, ont déclaré deux travailleurs humanitaires et un résident du camp. Dans un troisième cas, les autorités ont fermé le camp sans aucune preuve de la présence du virus à l’intérieur, simplement parce qu’elles soupçonnaient les résidents du camp d’avoir eu des contacts avec une communauté voisine de Roms où des gens avaient été testés positifs [11] » [il s’agit du camp de Koutsohero, près de Larissa, qui accueille 1.500 personnes][12].

    Un travailleur humanitaire a déclaré à Human Rights Watch : « Aussi scandaleux que cela puisse paraître, l’approche des autorités lorsqu’elles soupçonnent qu’il pourrait y avoir un cas de virus dans un camp consiste simplement à enfermer tout le monde dans le camp, potentiellement des milliers de personnes, dont certaines très vulnérables, et à jeter la clé, sans prendre les mesures appropriées pour retracer les contacts de porteurs du virus, ni pour isoler les personnes touchées ».

    Il va de soi qu’une telle tactique ne vise nullement à protéger les résidents de camp, mais à les isoler tous, porteurs et non-porteurs, ensemble, au risque de leur santé et de leur vie. Au fond, la stratégie du gouvernement a été simple : retrancher complètement les réfugiés du reste de la population, tout en les excluant de mesures de protection efficiantes. Bref, les réfugiés ont été abandonnés à leur sort, quitte à se contaminer les uns les autres, pourvu qu’ils ne soient plus en contact avec les habitants de la région.

    La gestion par les autorités de la quarantaine à l’ancien camp de Malakasa est également révélatrice de la volonté des autorités non pas de protéger les résidents des camps mais de les isoler à tout prix de la population locale. Une quarantaine a été imposée le 5 avril suite à la détection d’un cas. A l’expiration du délai réglementaire de deux semaines, la quarantaine n’a été que très partiellement levée. Pendant la durée de la quarantaine l’ancien camp de Malakasa abritant 2.500 personnes a été approvisionné en quantité insuffisante en nourriture de basse valeur nutritionnelle, et pratiquement pas du tout en médicaments et aliments pour bébés. Le 22 avril un nouveau cas a été détecté et la quarantaine a été de nouveau imposée à l’ensemble de 2.500 résidents du camp. Entretemps quelques tests de dépistage ont été faits par-ci et par-là, mais aucune mesure spécifique n’a été prise pour les cas détectés afin de les isoler du reste de la population du camp. Pendant cette nouvelle période de quarantaine, la seule mesure prise par les autorités a été de redoubler les effectifs de police à l’entrée du camp, afin d’empêcher toute sortie, et ceci à un moment critique où des produits de première nécessité manquaient cruellement dans le camp. Ni dépistage généralisé, ni visite d’équipes médicales spécialisées, ni non plus séparation spatiale stricte entre porteurs et non-porteurs du virus n’ont été mises en place. La quarantaine, avec une courte période d’allégement de mesures de restriction, dure déjà depuis deux mois et demi. Car, le 20 juin elle a été prolongée jusqu’au 5 juillet, transformant ainsi de facto les résidents du camp en détenus[13].

    La façon aussi dont ont été traités les nouveaux arrivants dans les îles depuis le début de la période du confinement et jusqu’à maintenant est également révélatrice de la volonté du gouvernement de ne pas faire le nécessaire pour assurer la protection des demandeurs d’asile. Non seulement ceux qui sont arrivés après le début mars n’ont pas été mis à l’abri pour y passer la période de quarantaine de 14 jours dans des conditions sécurisées, mais ils ont été systématiquement ‘confinés en plein air’ à la proximité de l’endroit où ils ont débarqué : les nouveaux arrivants, femmes enceintes et enfants compris, ont été obligés de vivre en plein air, exposés aux intempéries dans une zone circonscrite placée sous la surveillance de la police, pendant deux, trois voire quatre semaines et sans aucun accès à des infrastructures sanitaires. Le cas de 450 personnes arrivées début mars est caractéristique : après avoir été gardées en « quarantaine » dans une zone entourée de barrières au port de Mytilène, elles ont été enfermées pendant 13 jours dans des conditions inimaginables dans un navire militaire grec, où ils ont été obligés de dormir sur le sol en fer du navire, vivant littéralement les uns sur les autres, sans même qu’on ne leur fournisse du savon pour se laver les mains.

    Cet enfermement prolongé dans des conditions abjectes, en contre-pied du confinement sécurisé à la maison, que la plupart d’entre nous, citoyens européens, avons connu, transforme de fait les demandeurs en détenus et crée inévitablement des situations explosives avec une montée des incidents violents, des affrontements entre groupes ethniques, des départs d’incendies à Lesbos, à Chios et à Samos. Ne serait-ce qu’à Moria, et surtout dans l’Oliveraie qui entoure le camp officiel, dès la tombée de la nuit l’insécurité règne : depuis le début de l’année on y dénombre au moins 14 agressions à l’arme blanche qui ont fait quatre morts et 14 blessés[14]. Bref aux conditions de vie indignes et dangereuses pour la santé, il faudrait ajouter l’insécurité croissante, encore plus pesante pour les femmes, les personnes LGBT+ et les mineurs isolés.

    Affronté aux réactions des sociétés locales et à la pression des organismes internationaux, le gouvernement grec a fini par reconnaître la nécessité de la décongestion des îles par le biais du transfert de réfugiés et des demandeurs d’asile vulnérables au continent. Mais il s’en est rendu compte trop tard ; entretemps le discours haineux qui présente les migrants comme une menace pour la sécurité nationale voire pour l’identité de la nation, ce poison qu’elle-même a administré à la population, a fait son effet. Aujourd’hui, le ministre de la politique migratoire a été pris au piège de sa propre rhétorique xénophobe haineuse ; c’est au nom justement de celle-ci que les autorités régionales et locales (et plus particulièrement celles proches à la majorité actuelle), opposent un refus catégorique à la perspective d’accueillir dans leur région des réfugiés venant des hot-spots des îles. Des hôtels où des familles en provenance de Moria auraient dû être logées ont été en partie brûlés, des cars transportant des femmes et des enfants ont été attaqués à coup de pierres, des tenanciers d’établissements qui s’apprêtaient à les accueillir, ont reçu des menaces, la liste des actes honteux ne prend pas fin[15].

    Mais le ministre grec de la politique migratoire n’est jamais en court de moyens : il a un plan pour libérer plus que 10.000 places dans les structures d’accueil et les appartements en Grèce continentale. A partir du 1 juin, les autorités ont commencé à mettre dans la rue 11.237 réfugiés reconnus comme bénéficiaires de protection internationale, un mois après l’obtention de leur carte de réfugiés ! Evincés de leurs logements, ces réfugiés, femmes, enfants et personnes vulnérables compris, se retrouveront dans la rue et sans ressources, car ils n’ont plus le droit de recevoir les aides qui ne leur sont destinées que pendant les 30 jours qui suivent l’obtention de leur carte[16]. Cette décision du ministre Mitarakis a été mise sur le compte d’une politique moins accueillante, car selon lui, les aides, assez maigres, par ailleurs, constituaient un « appel d’air » trop attractif pour les candidats à l’exil ! Le comble de l’affaire est que tant le programme d’hébergement en appartements et hôtels ESTIA que les aides accordées aux réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile sont financées par l’UE et des organismes internationaux, et ne coûtent strictement rien au budget de l’Etat. Le désastre qui se dessine à l’horizon a déjà pointé son nez : une centaine de réfugiés dont une quarantaine d’enfants, transférés de Lesbos à Athènes, ont été abandonnés sans ressources et sans toit en pleine rue. Ils campent actuellement à la place Victoria, à Athènes.

    Le dernier cercle de l’enfer : les PROKEKA

    Au moment où est écrit cet article, les camps dans les îles fonctionnent cinq, six voire dix fois au-dessus de leur capacité d’accueil. 34.000 personnes sont actuellement entassées dans les îles, dont 30.220 confinées dans les conditions abjectes de hot-spots prévus pour accueillir 6 000 personnes au grand maximum ; 750 en détention dans les centres de détention fermés avant renvoi (PROΚEΚA), et le restant dans d’autres structures[17].

    Plusieurs agents du terrain ont qualifié à juste titre les camps de Moria à Lesbos et celui de Vathy à Samos[18] comme l’enfer sur terre. Car, comment désigner autrement un endroit comme Moria où les enfants – un tiers des habitants du camp- jouent parmi les ordures et les déjections et où plusieurs d’entre eux touchent un tel fond de désespoir qu’ils finissent par s’automutiler et/ou par commettre de tentatives de suicide[19], tandis que d’autres tombent dans un état de prostration et de mutisme ? Comment dire autrement l’horreur d’un endroit comme le camp de Vathy où femmes enceintes et enfants de bas âge côtoient des serpents, des rats et autres scorpions ?

    Cependant, il y a pire, en l’occurrence le dernier cercle de l’Enfer, les ‘Centres de Détention fermés avant renvoi’ (Pre-moval Detention Centers, PROKEKA en grec), l’équivalent grec des CRA (Centre de Rétention Administrative) en France[20]. Aux huit centres fermés de détention et aux postes de police disséminés partout en Grèce, plusieurs milliers de demandeurs d’asile et d’étrangers sans-papiers sont actuellement détenus dans des conditions terrifiantes. Privés même des droits les plus élémentaires de prisonniers, les détenus restent presque sans soins médicaux, sans contact régulier avec l’extérieur, sans droit de visite ni accès assuré à une aide judiciaire. Ces détenus qui sont souvent victimes de mauvais traitements de la part de leurs gardiens, n’ont pas de perspective de sortie, dans la mesure où, en vertu de la nouvelle loi sur l’asile, leur détention peut être prolongée jusqu’à 36 mois. Leur maintien en détention est ‘justifié’ en vue d’une déportation devenue plus qu’improbable – qu’il s’agisse d’une expulsion vers le pays d’origine ou d’une réadmission vers un tiers pays « sûr ». Dans ces conditions il n’est pas étonnant qu’en désespoir de cause, des détenus finissent par attenter à leur jours, en commettant des suicides ou des tentatives de suicide.

    Ce qui est encore plus alarmant est qu’à la fin 2018, à peu près 28% des détenus au sein de ces centres fermés étaient des mineurs[21]. Plus récemment et notamment fin avril dernier, Arsis dans un communiqué de presse du 27 avril 2020, a dénoncé la détention en tout point de vue illégale d’une centaine de mineurs dans un seul centre de détention, celui d’Amygdaleza en Attique. D’après les témoignages, c’est avant tout dans les préfectures et les postes de police où sont gardés plus que 28% de détenus que les conditions de détention virent à un cauchemar, qui rivalise avec celui dépeint dans le film Midnight Express. Les cellules des commissariats où s’entassent souvent des dizaines de personnes sont conçus pour une détention provisoire de quelques heures, les infrastructures sanitaires sont défaillantes, et il n’y a pas de cour pour la promenade quotidienne. Quant aux policiers, ils se comportent comme s’ ils étaient au-dessus de la loi face à des détenus livrés à leur merci : ils leur font subir des humiliations systématiques, des mauvais traitements, des violences voire des tortures.

    Plusieurs témoignages concordants dénoncent des conditions horribles dans les préfectures et les commissariats : les détenus peuvent être privés de nourriture et d’eau pendant des journées entières, plusieurs entre eux sont battus et peuvent rester entravés et ligotés pendant des jours, privés de soins médicaux, même pour des cas urgents. En mars 2017, Ariel Rickel (fondatrice d’Advocates Abroad) avait découvert dans le commissariat du hot-spot de Samos, un mineur de 15 ans, ligoté sur une chaise. Le jeune homme qui avait été violement battu par les policiers, avait eu des côtes cassées et une blessure ouverte au ventre ; il était resté dans cet état ligoté trois jours durant, et ce n’est qu’après l’intervention de l’ombudsman, sollicité par l’avocate, qu’il a fini par être libéré.[22] Le cas rapporté par Ariel Rickel à Valeria Hänsel n’est malheureusement pas exceptionnel. Car, ces conditions inhumaines de détention dans les PROKEKA ont été à plusieurs reprises dénoncées comme un traitement inhumain et dégradant par la Cour Européenne de droits de l’homme[23] et par le Comité Européen pour la prévention de la torture du Conseil de l’Europe (CPT).

    Il faudrait aussi noter qu’au sein de hot-spot de Lesbos et de Kos, il y a de tels centres de détention fermés, ‘de prison dans les prisons à ciel ouvert’ que sont ces camps. Un rapport récent de HIAS Greece décrit les conditions inhumaines qui règnent dans le PROKEKA de Moria où sont détenus en toute illégalité des demandeurs d’asile n’ayant commis d’autre délit que le fait d’être originaire d’un pays dont les ressortissants obtiennent en moyenne en UE moins de 25% de réponses positives à leurs demandes d’asile (low profile scheme). Il est évident que la détention d’un demandeur d’asile sur la seule base de son pays d’origine constitue une mesure de ségrégation discriminatoire qui expose les requérants à des mauvais traitements, vu la quasi inexistence de services médicaux et la très grande difficulté voire l’impossibilité d’avoir accès à l’aide juridique gratuite pendant la détention arbitraire. Ainsi, p.ex. des personnes ressortissant de pays comme le Pakistan ou l’Algérie, même si ils/elles sont LGBT+, ce qui les exposent à des dangers graves dans leur pays d’origine, seront automatiquement détenus dans le PROKEKA de Moria, étant ainsi empêchés d’étayer suffisamment leur demande d’asile, en faisant appel à l’aide juridique gratuite et en la documentant. Début avril, dans deux centres de détention fermés, celui au sein du camp de Moria et celui de Paranesti, près de la ville de Drama au nord de la Grèce, les détenus avaient commencés une grève de la faim pour protester contre la promiscuité effroyable et réclamer leur libération ; dans les deux cas les protestations ont été très violemment réprimées par les forces de l’ordre.

    La déclaration commune UE-Turquie

    Cependant il faudrait garder à l’esprit qu’à l’origine de cette situation infernale se trouve la décision de l’UE en 2016 de fermer ses frontières et d’externaliser en Turquie la prise en charge de réfugiés, tout en bloquant ceux qui arrivent à passer en Grèce. C’est bien l’accord UE-Turquie du 18 mars 2016[24] – en fait une Déclaration commune dépourvue d’un statut juridique équivalent à celui d’un accord en bonne et due forme- qui a transformé les îles grecques en prison à ciel ouvert. En fait, cette Déclaration est un troc avec la Turquie où celle-ci s’engageait non seulement à fermer ses frontières en gardant sur son sol des millions de réfugiés mais aussi à accepte les réadmissions de ceux qui ont réussi à atteindre l’Europe ; en échange une aide de 6 milliards lui serait octroyée afin de couvrir une partie de frais générés par le maintien de 3 millions de réfugiés sur son sol, tandis que les ressortissants turcs n’auraient plus besoin de visa pour voyager en Europe. En fait, comme le dit un rapport de GISTI, la nature juridique de la Déclaration du 18 mars a beau être douteuse, elle ne produit pas moins les « effets d’un accord international sans en respecter les règles d’élaboration ». C’est justement le statut douteux de cette déclaration commune, que certains analystes n’hésitent pas de désigner comme un simple ‘communiqué de presse’, qui a fait que la Cour Européenne a refusé de se prononcer sur la légalité, en se déclarant incompétente, face à un accord d’un statut juridique indéterminé.

    Or, dans le cadre de la mise en œuvre de cet accord a été introduite par l’article 60(4) de la loi grecque L 4375/2016, la procédure d’asile dite ‘accélérée’ dans les îles grecques (fast-track border procedure) qui non seulement réduisaient les garanties de la procédure au plus bas possible en UE, mais qui impliquait aussi comme corrélat l’imposition de la restriction géographique de demandeurs d’asile dans les îles de première arrivée. Celle-ci fut officiellement imposée par la décision 10464/31-5-2017 de la Directrice du Service d’Asile, qui instaurait la restriction de circulation des requérant, afin de garantir le renvoi en Turquie de ceux-ci, en cas de rejet de leurs demandes. Rappelons que ces renvois s’appuient sur la reconnaissance -tout à fait infondée-, de la Turquie comme ‘pays tiers sûr’. Même des réfugiés Syriens ont été renvoyés en Turquie dans le cadre de la mise en application de cette déclaration commune.

    La restriction géographique qui contraint les demandeurs d’asile de ne quitter sous aucun prétexte l’île où ils ont déposé leur demande, jusqu’à l’examen complet de celle-ci, conduit inévitablement au point où nous sommes aujourd’hui à savoir à ce surpeuplement inhumain qui non seulement crée une situation invivable pour les demandeurs, mais a aussi un effet toxique sur les sociétés locales. Déjà en mai 2016, François Crépeau, rapporteur spécial de NU aux droits de l’homme de migrants, soulignait que « la fermeture de frontières de pays au nord de la Grèce, ainsi que le nouvel accord UE-Turquie a abouti à une augmentation exponentielle du nombre de migrants irréguliers dans ce pays ». Et il ajoutait que « le grand nombre de migrants irréguliers bloqués en Grèce est principalement le résultat de la politique migratoire de l’UE et des pays membres de l’UE fondée exclusivement sur la sécurisation des frontières ».

    Gisti, dans un rapport sur les hotspots de Chios et de Lesbos notait également depuis 2016 que, étant donné l’accord UE-Turquie, « ce sont les Etats membres de l’UE et l’Union elle-même qui portent l’essentiel de la responsabilité́ des mauvais traitements et des violations de leurs droits subis par les migrants enfermés dans les hotspots grecs.

    La présence des agences européennes à l’intérieur des hotspots ne fait que souligner cette responsabilité ». On le verra, le rôle de l’EASO est crucial dans la décision finale du service d’asile grec. Quant au rôle joué par Frontex, plusieurs témoignages attestent sa pratique quotidienne de non-assistance à personnes en danger en mer voire sa participation à des refoulements illégaux. Remarquons que c’est bien cette déclaration commune UE-Turquie qui stipule que les demandeurs déboutés doivent être renvoyés en Turquie et à cette fin être maintenus en détention, d’où la situation actuelle dans les centres de détention fermés.

    Enfin la situation dans les hot-spots s’est encore plus aggravée, en raison de la décision du gouvernement Mitsotakis de geler pendant plusieurs mois tout transfert vers la péninsule grecque, bloquant ainsi même les plus vulnérables sur place. Sous le gouvernement précédent, ces derniers étaient exceptés de la restriction géographique dans les hot-spots. Mais à partir du juillet 2020 les transferts de catégories vulnérables -femmes enceintes, mineurs isolés, victimes de torture ou de naufrages, personnes handicapées ou souffrant d’une maladie chronique, victimes de ségrégations à cause de leur orientation sexuelle, – avaient cessé et n’avaient repris qu’au compte-goutte début janvier, plusieurs mois après leurs suspension.

    Le dogme de la ‘surveillance agressive’ des frontières

    Les refoulements groupés sont de plus en plus fréquents, tant à la frontière maritime qu’à la frontière terrestre. A Evros cette pratique était assez courante bien avant la crise à la frontière gréco-turque de mars dernier. Elle consistait non seulement à refouler ceux qui essayaient de passer la frontière, mais aussi à renvoyer en toute clandestinité ceux qui étaient déjà entrés dans le territoire grec. Les faits sont attestés par plusieurs témoignages récoltés par Human Rights 360 dans un rapport publié fin 2018 :The new normality : Continuous push-backs of third country nationals on the Evros river. Les « intrus » qui ont réussi à passer la frontière sont arrêtés et dépouillés de leur biens, téléphone portable compris, pour être ensuite déportés vers la Turquie, soit par des forces de l’ordre en tenue, soit par des groupes masqués et cagoulés difficiles à identifier. En effet, il n’est pas exclu que des patrouilles paramilitaires, qui s’activent dans la région en se prenant violemment aux migrants au vu et au su des autorités, soient impliquées à ses opérations. Les réfugiés peuvent être gardés non seulement dans des postes de police et de centres de détention fermés, mais aussi dans des lieux secrets, sans qu’ils n’aient la moindre possibilité de contact avec un avocat, le service d’asile, ou leurs proches. Par la suite ils sont embarqués de force sur des canots pneumatiques en direction de la Turquie.

    Cette situation qui fut dénoncée par les ONG comme instaurant une nouvelle ‘normalité’, tout sauf normale, s’est dramatiquement aggravée avec la crise à la frontière terrestre fin février et début mars dernier[25]. Non seulement la frontière fut hermétiquement fermée et des refoulements groupés effectués par la police anti-émeute et l’armée, mais, dans le cadre de la soi-disant défense de l’intégrité territoriale, il y a eu plusieurs cas où des balles réelles ont été tirées par les forces grecques contre les migrants, faisant quatre morts et plusieurs blessés[26].

    Cependant ces pratiques criminelles ne sont pas le seul fait des autorités grecques. Depuis le 13 mars dernier, des équipes d’Intervention Rapide à la Frontière de Frontex, les Rapid Border Intervention Teams (RABIT) ont été déployées à la frontière gréco-turque d’Evros, afin d’assurer la ‘protection’ de la frontière européenne. Leur intervention qui aurait dû initialement durer deux mois, a été entretemps prolongée. Ces équipes participent elles, et si oui dans quelle mesure, aux opérations de refoulement ? Il faudrait rappeler ici que, d’après plusieurs témoignages récoltés par le Greek Council for Refugees, les équipes qui opéraient les refoulements en 2017 et 2018 illégaux étaient déjà mixtes, composées des agents grecs et des officiers étrangers parlant soit l’allemand soit l’anglais. Il n’y a aucune raison de penser que cette coopération en bonne entente en matière de refoulement, entre forces grecques et celles de Frontex ait cessé depuis, d’autant plus que début mars la Grèce fut désignée par les dirigeants européens pour assurer la protection de l’Europe, censément menacée par les migrants à sa frontière.

    Plusieurs témoignages de réfugiés refoulés à la frontière d’Evros ainsi que des documents vidéo attestent l’existence d’un centre de détention secret destiné aux nouveaux arrivants ; celui-ci n’est répertorié nulle part et son fonctionnement ne respecte aucune procédure légale, concernant l’identification et l’enregistrement des arrivants. Ce centre, fonctionnant au noir, dont l’existence fut révélée par un article du 10 mars 2020 de NYT, se situe à la proximité de la frontière gréco-turque, près du village grec Poros. Les malheureux qui y échouent, restent détenus dans cette zone de non-droit absolu[27], car, non seulement leur existence n’est enregistrée nulle part mais le centre même n’apparaît sur aucun registre de camps et de centres de détention fermés. Au bout de quelques jours de détention dans des conditions inhumaines, les détenus dépouillés de leurs biens sont renvoyés de force vers la Turquie, tandis que plusieurs d’entre eux ont été auparavant battus par la police.

    La situation est aussi alarmante en mer Egée, où les rapports dénonçant des refoulements maritimes violents mettant en danger la vie de réfugiés, ne cessent de se multiplier depuis le début mars. D’après les témoignages il y aurait au moins deux modes opératoires que les garde-côtes grecs ont adoptés : enlever le moteur et le bidon de gasoil d’une embarcation surchargée et fragile, tout en la repoussant vers les eaux territoriaux turques, et/ou créer des vagues, en passant en grande vitesse tout près du bateau, afin d’empêcher l’embarcation de s’approcher à la côte grecque (voir l’incident du 4 juin dernier, dénoncé par Alarm Phone). Cette dernière méthode de dissuasion ne connaît pas de limites ; des vidéos montrent des incidents violents où les garde-côtes n’hésitent pas à tirer des balles réelles dans l’eau à côté des embarcations de réfugiés ou même dans leurs directions ; il y a même des vidéos qui montrent les garde-côtes essayant de percer le canot pneumatique avec des perches.

    Néanmoins, l’arsenal de garde-côtes grecs ne se limite pas à ces méthodes extrêmement dangereuses ; ils recourent à des procédés semblables à ceux employés en 2013 par l’Australie pour renvoyer les migrants arrivés sur son sol : ils obligent des demandeurs d’asile à embarquer sur des life rafts -des canots de survie qui se présentent comme des tentes gonflables flottant sur l’eau-, et ils les repoussent vers la Turquie, en les laissant dériver sans moteur ni gouvernail[28].

    Des incidents de ce type ne cessent de se multiplier depuis le début mars. Victimes de ce type de refoulement qui mettent en danger la vie des passagers, peuvent être même des femmes enceintes, des enfants ou même des bébés –voir la vidéo glaçante tournée sur un tel life raft le 25 mai dernier et les photographies respectives de la garde côtière turque.

    Ce mode opératoire va beaucoup plus loin qu’un refoulement illégal, car il arrive assez souvent que les personnes concernées aient déjà débarqué sur le territoire grec, et dans ce cas ils avaient le droit de déposer une demande d’asile. Cela veut dire que les garde-côtes grecs ne se contentent pas de faire des refoulements maritimes qui violent le droit national et international ainsi que le principe de non-refoulement de la convention de Genève[29]. Ioannis Stevis, responsable du média local Astraparis à Chios, avait déclaré au Guardian « En mer Egée nous pouvions voir se dérouler cette guerre non-déclarée. Nous pouvions apercevoir les embarcations qui ne pouvaient pas atteindre la Grèce, parce qu’elles en étaient empêchées. De push-backs étaient devenus un lot quotidien dans les îles. Ce que nous n’avions pas vu auparavant, c’était de voir les bateaux arriver et les gens disparaître ».

    Cette pratique illégale va beaucoup plus loin, dans la mesure où les garde-côtes s’appliquent à renvoyer en Turquie ceux qui ont réussi à fouler le sol grec, sans qu’aucun protocole ni procédure légale ne soient respectés. Car, ces personnes embarquées sur les life rafts, ne sont pas à strictement parler refoulées – et déjà le refoulement est en soi illégal de tout point de vue-, mais déportées manu militari et en toute illégalité en Turquie, sans enregistrement ni identification préalable. C’est bien cette méthode qui explique comment des réfugiés dont l’arrivée sur les côtes de Samos et de Chios est attestée par des vidéos et des témoignages de riverains, se sont évaporés dans la nature, n’apparaissant sur aucun registre de la police ou des autorités portuaires[30]. Malgré l’existence de documents photos et vidéos attestant l’arrivée des embarcations des jours où aucune arrivée n’a été enregistrée par les autorités, le ministre persiste et signe : pour lui il ne s’agirait que de la propagande turque reproduite par quelques esprits malveillants qui voudraient diffamer la Grèce. Néanmoins les photographies horodatées publiées sur Astraparis, dans un article intitulé « les personnes que nous voyons sur la côte Monolia à Chios seraient-ils des extraterrestres, M. le Ministre ? », constituent un démenti flagrant du discours complotiste du Ministre.

    Question cruciale : quelle est le rôle exact joué par Frontex dans ces refoulements ? Est-ce que les quelques 600 officiers de Frontex qui opèrent en mer Egée dans le cadre de l’opération Poséidon, y participent d’une façon ou d’une autre ? Ce qui est sûr est qu’il est quasi impossible qu’ils n’aient pas été de près ou de loin témoins des opérations de push-back. Le fait est confirmé par un article du Spiegel sur un incident du 13 mai, un push-back de 27 réfugiés effectué par la garde côtière grecque laquelle, après avoir embarqué les réfugiés sur un canot de sauvetage, a remorqué celui-ci en haute mer. Or, l’embarcation de réfugiés a été initialement repéré près de Samos par les hommes du bateau allemand Uckermark faisant partie des forces de Frontex, qui l’ont ensuite signalé aux officiers grecs ; le fait que cette embarcation ait par la suite disparu sans laisser de trace et qu’aucune arrivée de réfugiés n’ait été enregistrée à Samos ce jour-là, n’a pas inquiété outre-mesure les officiers allemands.

    Nous savons par ailleurs, grâce à l’attitude remarquable d’un équipage danois, que les hommes de Frontex reçoivent l’ordre de ne pas porter secours aux réfugiés navigant sur des canots pneumatiques, mais de les repousser ; au cas où les réfugiés ont déjà été secourus et embarqués à bord d’un navire de Frontex, celui-ci reçoit l’ordre de les remettre sur des embarcations peu fiables et à peine navigables. C’est exactement ce qui est arrivé début mars à un patrouilleur danois participant à l’opération Poséidon, « l’équipage a reçu un appel radio du commandement de Poséidon leur ordonnant de remettre les [33 migrants qu’ils avaient secourus] dans leur canot et de les remorquer hors des eaux grecques »[31], ordre, que le commandant du navire danois Jan Niegsch a refusé d’exécuter, estimant “que celui-ci n’était pas justifiable”, la manœuvre demandée mettant en danger la vie des migrants. Or, il n’y aucune raison de penser que l’ordre reçu -et fort heureusement non exécuté grâce au courage du capitaine Niegsch et du chargé de l’unité danoise de Frontex, Jens Moller- soit un ordre exceptionnel que les autres patrouilleurs de Frontex n’ont jamais reçu. Les officiers danois ont d’ailleurs confirmé que les garde-côtes grecs reçoivent des ordres de repousser les bateaux qui arrivent de Turquie, et ils ont été témoins de plusieurs opérations de push-back. Mais si l’ordre de remettre les réfugiés en une embarcation non-navigable émanait du quartier général de l’opération Poséidon, qui l’avait donc donné [32] ? Des officiers grecs coordonnant l’opération, ou bien des officiers de Frontex ?

    Remarquons que les prérogatives de Frontex ne se limitent pas à la surveillance et la ‘protection’ de la frontière européenne : dans une interview que Fabrice Leggeri avait donné en mars dernier à un quotidien grec, il a révélé que Frontex était en train d’envisager avec le gouvernement grec les modalités d’une action communes pour effectuer les retours forcés des migrants dits ‘irréguliers’ à leurs pays d’origine. « Je m’attends à ce que nous ayons bientôt un plan d’action en commun. D’après mes contacts avec les officiers grecs, j’ai compris que la Grèce est sérieusement intéressée à augmenter le nombre de retours », avait-il déclaré.

    Tout démontre qu’actuellement les sauvetages en mer sont devenus l’exception et les refoulements violents et dangereux la règle. « Depuis des années, Alarm Phone a documenté des opérations de renvois menées par des garde-côtes grecs. Mais ces pratiques ont considérablement augmenté ces dernières semaines et deviennent la norme en mer Égée », signale un membre d’Alarm Phone à InfoMigrants. De sorte que nous pouvons affirmer que le dogme du gouvernement Mitsotakis consiste en une inversion complète du principe du non-refoulement : ne laisser passer personne en refoulant coûte que coûte. D’ailleurs, ce nouveau dogme a été revendiqué publiquement par le ministre de Migration et de l’Asile Mitarakis, qui s’est vanté à plusieurs reprises d’avoir réussi à créer une frontière maritime quasi-étanche. Les quatre volets de l’approche gouvernementale ont été résumés ainsi par le ministre : « protection des frontières, retours forcés, centres fermés pour les arrivants, et internationalisation des frontières »[33]. Dans une émission télévisée du 13 avril, le même ministre a déclaré que la frontière était bien gardée, de sorte qu’aujourd’hui, les flux sont quasi nuls, et il a ajouté que “l’armée et des unités spéciaux, la marine nationale et les garde-côtes sont prêts à opérer pour empêcher les migrants en situation irrégulière d’entrer dans notre pays’’. Bref, des forces militaires sont appelées de se déployer sur le front de guerre maritime et terrestre contre les migrants. Voilà comment est appliqué le dogme de zéro flux dont se réclame le Ministre.

    Le Conseil de l’Europe a publié une déclaration très percutante à ce sujet le 19 juin. Sous le titre Il faut mettre fin aux refoulements et à la violence aux frontières contre les réfugiés, la commissaire aux droits de l’homme Dunja Mijatović met tous les états membres du Conseil de l’Europe devant leurs responsabilités, en premier lieu les états qui commettent de telles violations de droits des demandeurs d’asile. Loin de considérer que les refoulements et les violences à la frontière de l’Europe sont le seul fait de quelques états dont la plupart sont situés à la frontière externe de l’UE, la commissaire attire l’attention sur la tolérance tacite de ces pratiques illégales, voire l’assistance à celles-ci de la part de la plupart d’autres états membres. Est responsable non seulement celui qui commet de telles violations des droits mais aussi celui qui les tolère voire les encourage.

    Asile : ‘‘mission impossible’’ pour les nouveaux arrivants ?

    Actuellement en Grèce plusieurs dizaines de milliers de demandes d’asile sont en attente de traitement. Pour donner la pleine mesure de la surcharge d’un service d’asile qui fonctionne actuellement à effectifs réduits, il faudrait savoir qu’il y a des demandeurs qui ont reçu une convocation pour un entretien en…2022 –voir le témoignage d’un requérant actuellement au camp de Vagiohori. En février dernier il y avait 126.000 demandes en attente d’être examinées en première et deuxième instance. Entretemps, par des procédures expéditives, 7.000 demandes ont été traitées en mars et 15 000 en avril, avec en moyenne 24 jours par demande pour leur traitement[34]. Il devient évident qu’il s’agit de procédures expéditives et bâclées. En même temps le pourcentage de réponses négatives en première instance ne cesse d’augmenter ; de 45 à 50% qu’il était jusqu’à juillet dernier, il s’est élevé à 66% en février[35], et il a dû avoir encore augmenté entre temps.

    Ce qui est encore plus inquiétant est l’ambition affichée du Ministre de la Migration de réaliser 11000 déportations d’ici la fin de l’année. A Lesbos, à la réouverture du service d’asile, le 18 mai dernier, 1.789 demandeurs ont reçu une réponse négative, dont au moins 1400 en première instance[36]. Or, ces derniers n’ont eu que cinq jours ouvrables pour déposer un recours et, étant toujours confinés dans l’enceinte de Moria, ils ont été dans l’impossibilité d’avoir accès à une aide judiciaire. Ceux d’entre eux qui ont osé se déplacer à Mytilène, chef-lieu de Lesbos, pour y chercher de l’aide auprès du Legal Center of Lesbos ont écopé des amendes de 150€ pour violation de restrictions de mouvement[37] !

    Jusqu’à la nouvelle loi votée il y a six semaines au Parlement Hellénique, la procédure d’asile était un véritable parcours du combattant pour les requérants : un parcours plein d’embûches et de pièges, entaché par plusieurs clauses qui violent les lois communautaires et nationales ainsi que les conventions internationales. L’ancienne loi, entrée en vigueur seulement en janvier 2020, introduisait des restrictions de droits et un raccourcissement de délais en vue de procédures encore plus expéditives que celles dites ‘fast-track’ appliquées dans les îles (voir ci-dessous). Avant la toute nouvelle loi adoptée le 8 mai dernier, Gisti constatait déjà des atteintes au droit national et communautaire, concernant « en particulier le droit d’asile, les droits spécifiques qui doivent être reconnus aux personnes mineures et aux autres personnes vulnérables, et le droit à une assistance juridique ainsi qu’à une procédure de recours effectif »[38]. Avec la nouvelle mouture de la loi du 8 mai, les restrictions et la réduction de délais est telle que par ex. la procédure de recours devient vraiment une mission impossible pour les demandeurs déboutés, même pour les plus avertis et les mieux renseignés parmi eux. Les délais pour déposer une demande de recours se réduisent en peau de chagrin, alors que l’aide juridique au demandeur, de même que l’interprétariat en une langue que celui-ci maîtrise ne sont plus assurés, laissant ainsi le demandeur seul face à des démarches complexes qui doivent être faites dans une langue autre que la sienne[39]. De même l’entretien personnel du requérant, pierre angulaire de la procédure d’asile, peut être omis, si le service ne trouve pas d’interprète qui parle sa langue et si le demandeur vit loin du siège de la commission de recours, par ex. dans un hot-spot dans les îles ou loin de l’Attique. Le 13 mai, le ministre Mitarakis avait déclaré que 11.000 demandes ont été rejetées pendant les mois de mars et avril, et que ceux demandeurs déboutés « doivent repartir »[40], laissant entendre que des renvois massifs vers la Turquie pourraient avoir lieu, perspective plus qu’improbable, étant donné la détérioration grandissante de rapport entre les deux pays. Ces demandeurs déboutés ont été sommés de déposer un recours dans l’espace de 5 jours ouvrables après notification, sans assistance juridique et sous un régime de restrictions de mouvements très contraignant.

    En vertu de la nouvelle loi, les personnes déboutées peuvent être automatiquement placées en détention, la détention devenant ainsi la règle et non plus l’exception comme le stipule le droit européen. Ceci est encore plus vrai pour les îles. Qui plus est, selon le droit international et communautaire, la mesure de détention ne devrait être appliquée qu’en dernier ressort et seulement s’il y a une perspective dans un laps de temps raisonnable d’effectuer le renvoi forcé de l’intéressé. Or, aujourd’hui et depuis quatre mois, il n’y a aucune perspective de cet ordre. Car les chances d’une réadmission en Turquie ou d’une expulsion vers le pays d’origine sont pratiquement inexistantes, pendant la période actuelle. Si on tient compte que plusieurs dizaines de milliers de demandes restent en attente d’être traitées et que le pourcentage de rejet ne cesse d’augmenter, on voit avec effroi s’esquisser la perspective d’un maintien en détention de dizaines de milliers de personnes pour un laps de temps indéfini. La Grèce compte-t-elle créer de centres de détention pour des dizaines de milliers de personnes, qui s’apparenteraient par plusieurs traits à des véritables camps de concentration ? Le fera-t-elle avec le financement de l’UE ?

    Nous savons que le rôle de EASO, dont la présence en Grèce s’est significativement accrue récemment,[41] est crucial dans ces procédures d’asile : c’est cet organisme européen qui mène le pré-enregistrement de la demande d’asile et qui se prononce sur sa recevabilité ou pas. Jusqu’à maintenant il intervenait uniquement dans les îles dans le cadre de la procédure dite accélérée. Car, depuis la Déclaration de mars 2016, dans les îles est appliquée une procédure d’asile spécifique, dite procédure fast-track à la frontière (fast-track border procedure). Il s’agit d’une procédure « accélérée », qui s’applique dans le cadre de la « restriction géographique » spécifique aux hotspots »,[42] en application de l’accord UE-Turquie de mars 2016. Dans le cadre de cette procédure accélérée, c’est bien l’EASO qui se charge de faire le premier ‘tri’ entre les demandeurs en enregistrant la demande et en effectuant un premier entretien. La procédure ‘fast-track’ aurait dû rester une mesure exceptionnelle de courte durée pour faire face à des arrivées massives. Or, elle est toujours en vigueur quatre ans après son instauration, tandis qu’initialement sa validité n’aurait pas dû dépasser neuf mois – six mois suivis d’une prolongation possible de trois mois. Depuis, de prolongation en prolongation cette mesure d’exception s’est installée dans la permanence.

    La procédure accélérée qui, au détriment du respect des droits des réfugiés, aurait pu aboutir à un raccourcissement significatif de délais d’attente très longs, n’a même pas réussi à obtenir ce résultat : une partie des réfugiés arrivés à Samos en août 2019, avaient reçu une notification de rendez-vous pour l’entretien d’asile (et d’admissibilité) pour 2021 voire 2022[43] ! Mais si les procédures fast-track ne raccourcissent pas les délais d’attente, elles raccourcissent drastiquement et notamment à une seule journée le temps que dispose un requérant pour qu’il se prépare et consulte si besoin un conseiller juridique qui pourrait l’assister durant la procédure[44]. Dans le cas d’un rejet de la demande en première instance, le demandeur débouté ne dispose que de cinq jours après la notification de la décision négative pour déposer un recours en deuxième instance. Bref, le raccourcissement très important de délais introduits par la procédure accélérée n’affectait jusqu’à maintenant que les réfugiés qui sont dans l’impossibilité d’exercer pleinement leurs droits, et non pas le service qui pouvait imposer un temps interminable d’attente entre les différentes étapes de la procédure.

    Cependant l’implication d’EASO dépasse et de loin le pré-enregistrement, car ce sont bien ses fonctionnaires qui, suite à un entretien de l’intéressé, dit « interview d’admission », établissent le dossier qui sera transmis aux autorités grecques pour examen[45]. Or, nous savons par la plainte déposée contre l’EASO par les avocats de l’ONG European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights (ECCHR), en 2017, que les agents d’EASO ne consacrait à l’interrogatoire du requérant que 15 minutes en moyenne,[46] et ceci bien avant que ne monte en flèche la pression exercée par le gouvernement actuel pour accélérer encore plus les procédures. La même plainte dénonçait également le fait que la qualité de l’interprétation n’était point assurée, dans la mesure où, au lieu d’employer des interprètes professionnels, cet organisme européen faisait souvent recours à des réfugiés, pour faire des économies. A vrai dire, l’EASO, après avoir réalisé un entretien, rédige « un avis (« remarques conclusives ») et recommande une décision à destination des services grecs de l’asile, qui vont statuer sur la demande, sans avoir jamais rencontré » les requérants[47]. Mais, même si en théorie la décision revient de plein droit au Service d’Asile grec, en pratique « une large majorité des recommandations transmises par EASO aux services grecs de l’asile est adoptée par ces derniers »[48]. Or, depuis 2018 les compétences d’EASO ont été étendues à tout le territoire grec, ce qui veut dire que les officiers grecs de cet organisme européen ont le droit d’intervenir même dans le cadre de la procédure régulière d’asile et non plus seulement dans celui de la procédure accélérée. Désormais, avec le quadruplication des effectifs en Grèce continentale prévue pour 2020, et le dédoublement de ceux opérant dans les îles, l’avis ‘consultatif’ de l’EASO va peser encore plus sur les décisions finales. De sorte qu’on pourrait dire, que le constat que faisait Gisti, bien avant l’extension du domaine d’intervention d’EASO, est encore plus vrai aujourd’hui : l’UE, à travers ses agences, exerce « une forme de contrôle et d’ingérence dans la politique grecque en matière d’asile ». Si avant 2017, l’entretien et la constitution du dossier sur la base duquel le service grec d’asile se prononce étaient faits de façon si bâclée, que va—t-il se passer maintenant avec l’énorme pression des autorités pour des procédures fast-track encore plus expéditives, qui ne respectent nullement les droits des requérants ? Enfin, une fois la nouvelle loi mise en vigueur, les fonctionnaires européens vont-ils rédiger leurs « remarques conclusives » en fonction de celle-ci ou bien en respectant la législation européenne ? Car la première comporte des clauses qui ne respectent point la deuxième.

    La suspension provisoire de la procédure d’asile et ses effets à long terme

    Début mars, afin de dissuader les migrants qui se rassemblaient à la frontière gréco-turque d’Evros, le gouvernement grec a décidé de suspendre provisoirement la procédure d’asile pendant la durée d’un mois[49]. L’acte législatif respectif stipule qu’à partir du 1 mars et jusqu’au 30 du même mois, ceux qui traversent la frontière n’auront plus le droit de déposer une demande d’asile. Sans procédure d’identification et d’enregistrement préalable ils seront automatiquement maintenus en détention jusqu’à leur expulsion ou leur réadmission en Turquie. Après une cohorte de protestations de la part du Haut-Commissariat, des ONG, et même d’Ylva Johansson, commissaire aux affaires internes de l’UE, la procédure d’asile suspendue a été rétablie début avril et ceux qui sont arrivés pendant la durée de sa suspension ont rétroactivement obtenu le droit de demander la protection internationale. « Le décret a cessé de produire des effets juridiques à la fin du mois de mars 2020. Cependant, il a eu des effets très néfastes sur un nombre important de personnes ayant besoin de protection. Selon les statistiques du HCR, 2 927 personnes sont entrées en Grèce par voie terrestre et maritime au cours du mois de mars[50]. Ces personnes automatiquement placées en détention dans des conditions horribles, continuent à séjourner dans des établissements fermés ou semi-fermés. Bien qu’elles aient finalement été autorisées à exprimer leur intention de déposer une demande d’asile auprès du service d’asile, elles sont de fait privées de toute aide judiciaire effective. La plus grande partie de leurs demandes d’asile n’a cependant pas encore été enregistrée. Le préjudice causé par les conditions de détention inhumaines est aggravé par les risques sanitaires graves, voire mortels, découlant de l’apparition de la pandémie COVID-19, qui n’ont malheureusement pas conduit à un réexamen de la politique de détention en Grèce ».[51]

    En effet, les arrivants du mois de mars ont été jusqu’à il y a peu traités comme des criminels enfreignant la loi et menaçant l’intégrité du territoire grec ; ils ont été dans un premier temps mis en quarantaine dans des conditions inconcevables, gardés par la police en zones circonscrites, sans un abri ni la moindre infrastructure sanitaire. Après une période de quarantaine qui la plupart du temps durait plus longtemps que les deux semaines réglementaires, ceux qui sont arrivés pendant la suspension de la procédure, étaient transférés, en vue d’une réadmission en Turquie, à Malakassa en Attique, où un nouveau camp fermé, dit ‘le camp de tentes’, fut créé à proximité de de l’ancien camp avec les containeurs.

    700 d’entre eux ont été transférés au camp fermé de Klidi, à Serres, au nord de la Grèce, construit sur un terrain inondable au milieu de nulle part. Ces deux camps fermés présentent des affinités troublantes avec des camps de concentration. Les conditions de vie inhumaines au sein de ces camps s’aggravaient encore plus par le risque de contamination accru du fait de la très grande promiscuité et des conditions sanitaires effrayantes (coupures d’eau sporadiques à Malakassa, manque de produits d’hygiène, et approvisionnement en eau courante seulement deux heures par jour à Klidi)[52]. Or, après le rétablissement de la procédure d’asile, les 2.927 personnes arrivées en mars, ont obtenu–au moins en théorie- le droit de déposer une demande, mais n’ont toujours ni l’assistance juridique nécessaire, ni interprètes, ni accès effectif au service d’asile. Celui-ci a rouvert depuis le 18 mars, mais fonctionne toujours à effectif réduit, et est submergé par les demandes de renouvellement des cartes. Actuellement les réfugiés placés en détention sont toujours retenus dans les même camps qui sont devenus des camps semi-fermés sans pour autant que les conditions de vie dégradantes et dangereuses pour la santé des résidents aient vraiment changé. Ceci est d’autant plus vrai que le confinement de réfugiés et de demandeurs d’asile a été prolongé jusqu’au 5 juillet, ce qui ne leur permet de circuler que seulement avec une autorisation de la police, tandis que la population grecque est déjà tout à fait libre de ses mouvements. Dans ces conditions, il est pratiquement impossible d’accomplir des démarches nécessaires pour le dépôt d’une demande bien documentée.

    Refugee Support Aegean a raison de souligner que « les répercussions d’une violation aussi flagrante des principes fondamentaux du droit des réfugiés et des droits de l’homme ne disparaissent pas avec la fin de validité du décret, les demandeurs d’asile concernés restant en détention arbitraire dans des conditions qui ne sont aucunement adaptées pour garantir leur vie et leur dignité. Le décret de suspension crée un précédent dangereux pour la crédibilité du droit international et l’intégrité des procédures d’asile en Grèce et au-delà ».

    Cependant, nous ne pouvons pas savoir jusqu’où pourrait aller cette escalade d’horreurs. Aussi inimaginable que cela puisse paraître , il y a pire, même par rapport au camp fermé de Klidi à Serres, que Maria Malagardis, journaliste à Libération, avait à juste titre désigné comme ‘un camp quasi-militaire’. Car les malheureux arrêtés à Evros fin février et début mars, ont été jugés en procédure de flagrant délit, et condamnés pour l’exemple à des peines de prison de quatre ans ferme et des amendes de 10.000 euros -comme quoi, les autorités grecques peuvent revendiquer le record en matière de peine pour entrée irrégulière, car même la Hongrie de Orban, ne condamne les migrants qui ont osé traverser ses frontières qu’à trois ans de prison. Au moins une cinquantaine de personnes ont été condamnées ainsi pour « entrée irrégulière dans le territoire grec dans le cadre d’une menace asymétrique portant sur l’intégrité du pays », et ont été immédiatement incarcérées. Et il est fort à parier qu’aujourd’hui, ces personnes restent toujours en prison, sans que le rétablissement de la procédure ait changé quoi que ce soit à leur sort.

    Eriger l’exception en règle

    Qui plus est la suspension provisoire de la procédure laisse derrière elle des marques non seulement aux personnes ayant vécu sous la menace de déportation imminente, et qui continuent à vivre dans des conditions indignes, mais opère aussi une brèche dans la validité universelle du droit international et de la Convention de Genève, en créant un précédent dangereux. Or, c’est justement ce précédent que M. Mitarakis veut ériger en règle européenne en proposant l’introduction d’une clause de force majeure dans la législation européenne de l’asile[53] : dans le débat pour la création d’un système européen commun pour l’asile, le Ministre grec de la politique migratoire a plaidé pour l’intégration de la notion de force majeure dans l’acquis européen : celle-ci permettrait de contourner la législation sur l’asile dans des cas où la sécurité territoriale ou sanitaire d’un pays serait menacée, sans que la violation des droits de requérants expose le pays responsable à des poursuites. Pour convaincre ses interlocuteurs, il a justement évoqué le cas de la suspension par le gouvernement de la procédure pendant un mois, qu’il compte ériger en paradigme pour la législation communautaire. Cette demande fut réitérée le 5 juin dernier, par une lettre envoyée par le vice-ministre des Migrations et de l’Asile, Giorgos Koumoutsakos, au vice-président Margaritis Schinas et au commissaire aux affaires intérieures, Ylva Johansson. Il s’agit de la dite « Initiative visant à inclure une clause d’état d’urgence dans le Pacte européen pour les migrations et l’asile », une initiative cosignée par Chypre et la Bulgarie. Par cette lettre, les trois pays demandent l’inclusion au Pacte européen d’une clause qui « devrait prévoir la possibilité d’activer les mécanismes d’exception pour prévenir et répondre à des situations d’urgence, ainsi que des déviations [sous-entendu des dérogations au droit européen] dans les modes d’action si nécessaire ».[54] Nous le voyons, la Grèce souhaite, non seulement poursuivre sa politique de « surveillance agressive » des frontières et de violation des droits de migrants, mais veut aussi ériger ces pratiques de tout point de vue illégales en règle d’action européenne. Il nous faudrait donc prendre la mesure de ce que laisse derrière elle la fracture dans l’universalité de droit d’asile opérée par la suspension provisoire de la procédure. Même si celle-ci a été bon an mal an rétablie, les effets de ce geste inédit restent toujours d’actualité. L’état d’exception est en train de devenir permanent.

    Une rhétorique de la haine

    Le discours officiel a changé de fond en comble depuis l’arrivée au pouvoir du gouvernement Mitsotakis. Des termes, comme « clandestins » ont fait un retour en force, accompagnés d’une véritable stratégie de stigmatisation visant à persuader la population que les arrivants ne sont point des réfugiés mais des immigrés économiques censés profiter du laxisme du gouvernement précédent pour envahir le pays et l’islamiser. Cette rhétorique haineuse qui promeut l’image des hordes d’étrangers envahisseurs menaçant la nation et ses traditions, ne cesse d’enfler malgré le fait qu’elle soit démentie d’une façon flagrante par les faits : les arrivants, dans leur grande majorité, ne veulent pas rester en Grèce mais juste passer par celle-ci pour aller ailleurs en Europe, là où ils ont des attaches familiales, communautaires etc. Ce discours xénophobe aux relents racistes dont le paroxysme a été atteint avec la mise en avant de l’épouvantail du ‘clandestin’ porteur du virus venant contaminer et décimer la nation, a été employé d’une façon délibérée afin de justifier la politique dite de la « surveillance agressive » des frontières grecques. Il sert également à légitimer la transformation programmée des actuels CIR (RIC en anglais) en centres fermés ‘contrôlés’, où les demandeurs n’auront qu’un droit de sortie restreint et contrôlé par la police. Le ministre Mitarakis a déjà annoncé la transformation du nouveau camp de Malakasa, où étaient détenus ceux qui sont arrivés pendant la durée de la suspension d’asile, un camp qui était censé s’ouvrir après la fin de validité du décret, en camp fermé ‘contrôlé’ où toute entrée et sortie seraient gérées par la police[55].

    Révélateur des intentions du gouvernement grec, est le projet du Ministre de la politique migratoire d’étendre les compétences du Service d’Asile bien au-delà de la protection internationale, et notamment aux …expulsions ! D’après le quotidien grec Ephimérida tôn Syntaktôn, le ministre serait en train de prospecter pour la création de trois nouvelles sections au sein du Service d’Asile : Coordination de retours forcés depuis le continent et retours volontaires, Coordination des retours depuis les îles, Appels et exclusions. Bref, le Service d’Asile grec qui a déjà perdu son autonomie, depuis qu’il a été attaché au Secrétariat général de la politique de l’Immigration du Ministère, risque de devenir – et cela serait une première mondiale- un service d’asile et d’expulsions. Voilà comment se met en œuvre la consolidation du rôle de la Grèce en tant que « bouclier de l’Europe », comme l’avait désigné début mars Ursula von der Leyden. Voilà ce qu’est en train d’ériger l’Europe qui soutient et finance la Grèce face à des personnes persécutées fuyant de guerres et de conflits armés : un mur fait de barbelés, de patrouilles armés jusqu’aux dents et d’une flotte de navires militaires. Quant à ceux qui arrivent à passer malgré tout, ils seront condamnés à rester dans les camps de la honte.

    Que faire ?

    Certaines analyses convoquent la position géopolitique de la Grèce et le rapport de forces dans l’UE, afin de présenter cette situation intolérable comme une fatalité dont on ne saurait vraiment échapper. Mais face à l’ignominie, dire qu’il n’y aurait rien ou presque à faire, serait une excuse inacceptable. Car, même dans le cadre actuel, des solutions il y en a et elles sont à portée de main. La déclaration commune UE-Turquie mise en application le 20 mars 2016, n’est plus respectée par les différentes parties. Déjà avant février 2020, l’accord ne fut jamais appliqué à la lettre, autant par les Européens qui n’ont pas fait les relocalisations promises ni respecté leurs engagements concernant la procédure d’intégration de la Turquie en UE, que par la Turquie qui, au lieu d’employer les 6 milliards qu’elle a reçus pour améliorer les conditions de vie des réfugiés sur son sol, s’est servi de cet argent pour construire un mur de 750 km dans sa frontière avec la Syrie, afin d’empêcher les réfugiés de passer. Cependant ce sont les récents développements de mars 2020 et notamment l’afflux organisé par les autorités turques de réfugiés à la frontière d’Evros qui ont sonné le glas de l’accord du 18 mars 2016. Dans la mesure où cet accord est devenu caduc, avec l’ouverture de frontières de la Turquie le 28 février dernier, il n’y plus aucune obligation officielle du gouvernement grec de continuer à imposer le confinement géographique dans les îles des demandeurs d’asile. Leur transfert sécurisé vers la péninsule pourrait s’effectuer à court terme vers des structures hôtelières de taille moyenne dont plusieurs vont rester fermées cet été. L’appel international Évacuez immédiatement les centres d’accueil – louez des logements touristiques vides et des maisons pour les réfugiés et les migrants ! qui a déjà récolté 11.500 signatures, détaille un tel projet. Ajoutons, que sa réalisation pourrait profiter aussi à la société locale, car elle créerait des postes de travail en boostant ainsi l’économie de régions qui souvent ne dépendent que du tourisme pour vivre.

    A court et à moyen terme, il faudrait qu’enfin les pays européens honorent leurs engagements concernant les relocalisations et se mettent à faciliter au lieu d’entraver le regroupement familial. Quelques timides transferts de mineurs ont été déjà faits vers l’Allemagne et le Luxembourg, mais le nombre d’enfants concernés est si petit que nous pouvons nous pouvons nous demander s’il ne s’agirait pas plutôt d’une tentative de se racheter une conscience à peu de frais. Car, sans un plan large et équitable de relocalisations, le transfert massif de requérants en Grèce continentale, risque de déplacer le problème des îles vers la péninsule, sans améliorer significativement les conditions de vie de réfugiés.

    Si les requérants qui ont déjà derrière eux l’expérience traumatisante de Moria et de Vathy, sont transférés à un endroit aussi désolé et isolé de tout que le camp de Nea Kavala (au nord de la Grèce) qui a été décrit comme un Enfer au Nord de la Grèce, nous ne faisons que déplacer géographiquement le problème. Toute la question est de savoir dans quelles conditions les requérants seront invités à vivre et dans quelles conditions les réfugiés seront transférés.

    Les solutions déjà mentionnées sont réalisables dans l’immédiat ; leur réalisation ne se heurte qu’au fait qu’elles impliquent une politique courageuse à contre-pied de la militarisation actuelle des frontières. C’est bien la volonté politique qui manque cruellement dans la mise en œuvre d’un plan d’urgence pour l’évacuation des hot-spots dans les îles. L’Europe-Forteresse ne saurait se montrer accueillante. Tant du côté grec que du côté européen la nécessité de créer des conditions dignes pour l’accueil de réfugiés n’entre nullement en ligne de compte.

    Car, même le financement d’un tel projet est déjà disponible. Début mars l’UE s’est engagé de donner à la Grèce 700 millions pour qu’elle gère la crise de réfugiés, dont 350 millions sont immédiatement disponibles. Or, comme l’a révélé Ylva Johansson pendant son intervention au comité LIBE du 2 avril dernier, les 350 millions déjà libérés doivent principalement servir pour assurer la continuation et l’élargissement du programme d’hébergement dans le continent et le fonctionnement des structures d’accueil continentales, tandis que 35 millions sont destinés à assurer le transfert des plus vulnérables dans des logements provisoires en chambres d’hôtel. Néanmoins la plus grande somme (220 millions) des 350 millions restant est destinée à financer de nouveaux centres de réception et d’identification dans les îles (les dits ‘multi-purpose centers’) qui vont fonctionner comme des centres semi-fermés où toute sortie sera règlementée par la police. Les 130 millions restant seront consacrés à financer le renforcement des contrôles – et des refoulements – à la frontière terrestres et maritime, avec augmentation des effectifs et équipement de la garde côtière, de Frontex, et des forces qui assurent l’étanchéité des frontières terrestres. Il aurait suffi de réorienter la somme destinée à financer la construction des centres semi-fermés dans les îles, et de la consacrer au transfert sécurisé au continent pour que l’installation des requérants et des réfugiés en hôtels et appartements devienne possible.

    Mais que faire pour stopper la multiplication exponentielle des refoulements à la frontière ? Si Frontex, comme Fabrice Leggeri le prétend, n’a aucune implication dans les opérations de refoulement, si ses agents n’y participent pas de près ou de loin, alors ces officiers doivent immédiatement exercer leur droit de retrait chaque fois qu’ils sont témoins d’un tel incident ; ils pouvaient même recevoir la directive de ne refuser d’appliquer tout ordre de refoulement, comme l’avait fait début mars le capitaine danois Jan Niegsch. Dans la mesure où non seulement les témoignages mais aussi des documents vidéo et des audio attestent l’existence de ces pratiques en tous points illégales, les instances européennes doivent mettre une condition sine qua non à la poursuite du financement de la Grèce pour l’accueil de migrants : la cessation immédiate de ces types de pratiques et l’ouverture sans délai d’une enquête indépendante sur les faits dénoncés. Si l’Europe ne le fait pas -il est fort à parier qu’elle n’en fera rien-, elle se rend entièrement responsable de ce qui se passe à nos frontières.

    Car,on le voit, l’UE persiste dans la politique de la restriction géographique qui oblige réfugiés et migrants à rester sur les îles pour y attendre la réponse définitive à leur demande, tandis qu’elle cautionne et finance la pratique illégale des refoulements violents à la frontière. Les intentions d’Ylva Johansson ont beau être sincères : une politique qui érige la Grèce en ‘bouclier de l’Europe’, ne saurait accueillir, mais au contraire repousser les arrivants, même au risque de leur vie.

    Quant au gouvernement grec, force est de constater que sa politique migratoire du va dans le sens opposé d’un large projet d’hébergement dans des structures touristiques hors emploi actuellement. Révélatrice des intentions du gouvernement actuel est la décision du ministre Mitarakis de fermer 55 à 60 structures hôtelières d’accueil parmi les 92 existantes d’ici fin 2020. Il s’agit de structures fonctionnant dans le continent qui offrent un niveau de vie largement supérieur à celui des camps. Or, le ministre invoque un argument économique qui ne tient pas la route un seul instant, pour justifier cette décision : pour lui, les structures hôtelières seraient trop coûteuses. Mais ce type de structure n’est pas financé par l’Etat grec mais par l’IOM, ou par l’UE, ou encore par d’autres organismes internationaux. La fermeture imminente des hôtels comme centres d’accueil a une visée autre qu’économique : il faudrait retrancher complètement les requérants et les réfugiés de la société grecque, en les obligeant à vivre dans des camps semi-fermés où les sorties seront limitées et contrôlées. Cette politique d’enfermement vise à faire sentir tant aux réfugiés qu’à la population locale que ceux-ci sont et doivent rester un corps étranger à la société grecque ; à cette fin il vaut mieux les exclure et les garder hors de vue.

    Qui plus est la fermeture de deux tiers de structures hôtelières actuelles ne pourra qu’aggraver encore plus le manque de places en Grèce continentale, rendant ainsi quasiment impossible la décongestion des îles. Sauf si on raisonne comme le Ministre : le seul moyen pour créer des places est de chasser les uns – en l’occurrence des familles de réfugiés reconnus- pour loger provisoirement les autres. La preuve, les mesures récentes de restrictions drastiques des droits aux allocations et à l’hébergement des réfugiés, reconnus comme tels, par le service de l’asile. Ceux-ci n’ont le droit de séjourner aux appartements loués par l’UNHCR dans le cadre du programme ESTIA, et aux structures d’accueil que pendant un mois (et non pas comme auparavant six) après l’obtention de leur titre, et ils ne recevront plus que pendant cette période très courte les aides alloués aux réfugiés qui leur permettraient de survivre pendant leur période d’adaptation, d’apprentissage de la langue, de formation etc. Depuis la fin du mois de mai, les autorités ont entrepris de mettre dans la rue 11.237 personnes, dont la grande majorité de réfugiés reconnus, afin de libérer des places pour la supposée imminente décongestion des îles. Au moins 10.000 autres connaîtront le même sort en juillet, car en ce moment le délai de grâce d’un mois aura expiré pour eux aussi. Ce qui veut dire que le gouvernement grec non seulement impose des conditions de vie inhumaines et de confinements prolongés aux résidants de hot-spots et aux détenus en PROKEKA (les CRA grecs), mais a entrepris à réduire les familles de réfugiés ayant obtenu la protection internationale en sans-abri, errant sans toit ni ressources dans les villes.

    La dissuasion par l’horreur

    De tout ce qui précède, nous pouvons aisément déduire que la stratégie du gouvernement grec, une stratégie soutenue par les instances européennes et mise en application en partie par des moyens que celles-ci mettent à la disposition de celui-là, consiste à rendre la vie invivable aux réfugiés et aux demandeurs d’asile vivant dans le pays. Qui plus est, dans le cadre de cette politique, la dérogation systématique aux règles du droit et notamment au principe de non-refoulement, instauré par la Convention de Genève est érigée en principe régulateur de la sécurisation des frontières. Le maintien de camps comme Moria à Lesbos et Vathy à Samos témoignent de la volonté de créer des lieux terrifiants d’une telle notoriété sinistre que l’évocation même de leurs noms puisse avoir un effet de dissuasion sur les candidats à l’exil. On ne saurait expliquer autrement la persistance de la restriction géographique de séjour dans les îles de dizaines de milliers de requérants dans des conditions abjectes.

    Nous savons que l’Europe déploie depuis plusieurs années en Méditerranée centrale la politique de dissuasion par la noyade, une stratégie qui a atteint son summum avec la criminalisation des ONG qui essaient de sauver les passagers en péril ; l’autre face de cette stratégie de la terreur se déploie à ma frontière sud-est, où l’Europe met en œuvre une autre forme de dissuasion, celle effectuée par l’horreur des hot-spots. Aux crimes contre l’humanité qui se perpétuent en toute impunité en Méditerranée centrale, entre la Libye et l’Europe, s’ajoutent d’autres crimes commis à la frontière grecque[56]. Car il s’agit bien de crimes : poursuivre des personnes fuyant les guerres et les conflits armés par des opérations de refoulement particulièrement violentes qui mettent en danger leurs vies est un crime. Obliger des personnes dont la plus grande majorité est vulnérable à vivoter dans des conditions si indignes et dégradantes en les privant de leurs droits, est un acte criminel. Ceux qui subissent de tels traitement n’en sortent pas indemnes : leur santé physique et mentale en est marquée. Il est impossible de méconnaître qu’un séjour – et qui plus est un séjour prolongé- dans de telles conditions est une expérience traumatisante en soi, même pour des personnes bien portantes, et à plus forte raison pour celles et ceux qui ont déjà subi des traumatismes divers : violences, persécutions, tortures, viols, naufrages, pour ne pas mentionner les traumas causés par des guerres et de conflits armés.

    Gisti, dans son rapport récent sur le hotspot de Samos, soulignait que loin « d’être des centres d’accueil et de prise en charge des personnes en fonction de leurs besoins, les hotspots grecs, à l’image de celui de Samos, sont en réalité des camps de détention, soustraits au regard de la société civile, qui pourraient n’avoir pour finalité que de dissuader et faire peur ». Dans son rapport de l’année dernière, le Conseil Danois pour les réfugiés (Danish Refugee Council) ne disait pas autre chose : « le système des hot spots est une forme de dissuasion »[57]. Que celle-ci se traduise par des conditions de vie inhumaines où des personnes vulnérables sont réduites à vivre comme des bêtes[58], peu importe, pourvu que cette horreur fonctionne comme un repoussoir. Néanmoins, aussi effrayant que puisse être l’épouvantail des hot-spots, il n’est pas sûr qu’il puisse vraiment remplir sa fonction de stopper les ‘flux’. Car les personnes qui prennent le risque d’une traversée si périlleuse ne le font pas de gaité de cœur, mais parce qu’ils n’ont pas d’autre issue, s’ils veulent préserver leur vie menacée par la guerre, les attentats et la faim tout en construisant un projet d’avenir.

    Quoi qu’il en soit, nous aurions tort de croire que tout cela n’est qu’une affaire grecque qui ne nous atteint pas toutes et tous, en tout cas pas dans l’immédiat. Car, la stratégie de « surveillance agressive » des frontières, de dissuasion par l’imposition de conditions de vie inhumaines et de dérogation au droit d’asile pour des raisons de « force majeure », est non seulement financée par l’UE, mais aussi proposée comme un nouveau modèle de politique migratoire pour le cadre européen commun de l’asile en cours d’élaboration. La preuve, la récente « Initiative visant à inclure une clause d’état d’urgence dans le Pacte européen pour les migrations et l’asile » lancée par la Grèce, la Bulgarie et Chypre.

    Il devient clair, je crois, que la stratégie du gouvernement grec s’inscrit dans le cadre d’une véritable guerre aux migrants que l’UE non seulement cautionne mais soutient activement, en octroyant les moyens financiers et les effectifs nécessaires à sa réalisation. Car, les appels répétés, par ailleurs tout à fait justifiés et nécessaires, de la commissaire Ylva Johansson[59] et de la commissaire au Conseil de l’Europe Dunja Mijatović[60] de respecter les droits des demandeurs d’asile et de migrants, ne servent finalement que comme moyen de se racheter une conscience, devant le fait que cette guerre menée contre les migrants à nos frontières est rendue possible par la présence entre autres des unités RABIT à Evros et des patrouilleurs et des avions de Frontex et de l’OTAN en mer Egée. La question à laquelle tout citoyen européen serait appelé en son âme et conscience à répondre, est la suivante : sommes-nous disposés à tolérer une telle politique qui instaure un état d’exception permanent pour les réfugiés ? Car, comment désigner autrement cette ‘situation de non-droit absolu’[61] dans laquelle la Grèce sous la pression et avec l’aide active de l’Europe maintient les demandeurs d’asile ? Sommes-nous disposés à la financer par nos impôts ?

    Car le choix de traiter une partie de la population comme des miasmes à repousser coûte que coûte ou à exclure et enfermer, « ne saurait laisser intacte notre société tout entière. Ce n’est pas une question d’humanisme, c’est une question qui touche aux fondements de notre vivre-ensemble : dans quel type de société voulons-nous vivre ? Dans une société qui non seulement laisse mourir mais qui fait mourir ceux et celles qui sont les plus vulnérables ? Serions-nous à l’abri dans un monde transformé en une énorme colonie pénitentiaire, même si le rôle qui nous y est réservé serait celui, relativement privilégié, de geôliers ? [62] » La commissaire aux droits de l’homme au Conseil de l’Europe, avait à juste titre souligné que les « refoulements et la violence aux frontières enfreignent les droits des réfugiés et des migrants comme ceux des citoyens des États européens. Lorsque la police ou d’autres forces de l’ordre peuvent agir impunément de façon illégale et violente, leur devoir de rendre des comptes est érodé et la protection des citoyens est compromise. L’impunité d’actes illégaux commis par la police est une négation du principe d’égalité en droit et en dignité de tous les citoyens... »[63]. A n’importe quel moment, nous pourrions nous aussi nous trouver du mauvais côté de la barrière.

    Il serait plus que temps de nous lever pour dire haut et fort :

    Pas en notre nom ! Not in our name !

    https://migration-control.info/?post_type=post&p=63932
    #guerre_aux_migrants #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Grèce #îles #Evros #frontières #hotspot #Lesbos #accord_UE-Turquie #Vathy #Samos #covid-19 #coronavirus #confinement #ESTIA #PROKEKA #rétention #détention_administrative #procédure_accélérée #asile #procédure_d'asile #EASO #Frontex #surveillance_des_frontières #violence #push-backs #refoulement #refoulements #décès #mourir_aux_frontières #morts #life_rafts #canots_de_survie #life-raft #Mer_Egée #Méditerranée #opération_Poséidon #Uckermark #Klidi #Serres

    ping @isskein

  • EU pays for surveillance in Gulf of Tunis

    A new monitoring system for Tunisian coasts should counter irregular migration across the Mediterranean. The German Ministry of the Interior is also active in the country. A similar project in Libya has now been completed. Human rights organisations see it as an aid to „#pull_backs“ contrary to international law.

    In order to control and prevent migration, the European Union is supporting North African states in border surveillance. The central Mediterranean Sea off Malta and Italy, through which asylum seekers from Libya and Tunisia want to reach Europe, plays a special role. The EU conducts various operations in and off these countries, including the military mission „#Irini“ and the #Frontex mission „#Themis“. It is becoming increasingly rare for shipwrecked refugees to be rescued by EU Member States. Instead, they assist the coast guards in Libya and Tunisia to bring the people back. Human rights groups, rescue organisations and lawyers consider this assistance for „pull backs“ to be in violation of international law.

    With several measures, the EU and its member states want to improve the surveillance off North Africa. Together with Switzerland, the EU Commission has financed a two-part „#Integrated_Border_Management Project“ in Tunisia. It is part of the reform of the security sector which was begun a few years after the fall of former head of state Ben Ali in 2011. With one pillar of this this programme, the EU wants to „prevent criminal networks from operating“ and enable the authorities in the Gulf of Tunis to „save lives at sea“.

    System for military and border police

    The new installation is entitled „#Integrated_System_for_Maritime_Surveillance“ (#ISMariS) and, according to the Commission (https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/E-9-2020-000891-ASW_EN.html), is intended to bring together as much information as possible from all authorities involved in maritime and coastal security tasks. These include the Ministry of Defence with the Navy, the Coast Guard under the Ministry of the Interior, the National Guard, and IT management and telecommunications authorities. The money comes from the #EU_Emergency_Trust_Fund_for_Africa, which was established at the Valletta Migration Summit in 2015. „ISMariS“ is implemented by the Italian Ministry of the Interior and follows on from an earlier Italian initiative. The EU is financing similar projects with „#EU4BorderSecurity“ not only in Tunisia but also for other Mediterranean countries.

    An institute based in Vienna is responsible for border control projects in Tunisia. Although this #International_Centre_for_Migration_Policy_Development (ICMPD) was founded in 1993 by Austria and Switzerland, it is not a governmental organisation. The German Foreign Office has also supported projects in Tunisia within the framework of the #ICMPD, including the establishment of border stations and the training of border guards. Last month German finally joined the Institute itself (https://www.andrej-hunko.de/start/download/dokumente/1493-deutscher-beitritt-zum-international-centre-for-migration-policy-development/file). For an annual contribution of 210,000 euro, the Ministry of the Interior not only obtains decision-making privileges for organizing ICMPD projects, but also gives German police authorities the right to evaluate any of the Institute’s analyses for their own purposes.

    It is possible that in the future bilateral German projects for monitoring Tunisian maritime borders will also be carried out via the ICMPD. Last year, the German government supplied the local coast guard with equipment for a boat workshop. In the fourth quarter of 2019 alone (http://dipbt.bundestag.de/doc/btd/19/194/1919467.pdf), the Federal Police carried out 14 trainings for the national guard, border police and coast guard, including instruction in operating „control boats“. Tunisia previously received patrol boats from Italy and the USA (https://migration-control.info/en/wiki/tunisia).

    Vessel tracking and coastal surveillance

    It is unclear which company produced and installed the „ISMariS“ surveillance system for Tunisia on behalf of the ICPMD. Similar facilities for tracking and displaying ship movements (#Vessel_Tracking_System) are marketed by all major European defence companies, including #Airbus, #Leonardo in Italy, #Thales in France and #Indra in Spain. However, Italian project management will probably prefer local companies such as Leonardo. The company and its spin-off #e-GEOS have a broad portfolio of maritime surveillance systems (https://www.leonardocompany.com/en/sea/maritime-domain-awareness/coastal-surveillance-systems).

    It is also possible to integrate satellite reconnaissance, but for this the governments must conclude further contracts with the companies. However, „ISMariS“ will not only be installed as a Vessel Tracking System, it should also enable monitoring of the entire coast. Manufacturers promote such #Coastal_Surveillance_Systems as a technology against irregular migration, piracy, terrorism and smuggling. The government in Tunisia has defined „priority coastal areas“ for this purpose, which will be integrated into the maritime surveillance framework.

    Maritime „#Big_Data

    „ISMariS“ is intended to be compatible with the components already in place at the Tunisian authorities, including coastguard command and control systems, #radar, position transponders and receivers, night vision equipment and thermal and optical sensors. Part of the project is a three-year maintenance contract with the company installing the „ISMariS“.

    Perhaps the most important component of „ISMariS“ for the EU is a communication system, which is also included. It is designed to improve „operational cooperation“ between the Tunisian Coast Guard and Navy with Italy and other EU Member States. The project description mentions Frontex and EUROSUR, the pan-European surveillance system of the EU Border Agency, as possible participants. Frontex already monitors the coastal regions off Libya and Tunisia (https://insitu.copernicus.eu/FactSheets/CSS_Border_Surveillance) using #satellites (https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/E-8-2018-003212-ASW_EN.html) and an aerial service (https://digit.site36.net/2020/06/26/frontex-air-service-reconnaissance-for-the-so-called-libyan-coast-guar).

    #EUROSUR is now also being upgraded, Frontex is spending 2.6 million Euro (https://ted.europa.eu/udl?uri=TED:NOTICE:109760-2020:TEXT:EN:HTML) on a new application based on artificial intelligence. It is to process so-called „Big Data“, including not only ship movements but also data from ship and port registers, information on ship owners and shipping companies, a multi-year record of previous routes of large ships and other maritime information from public sources on the Internet. The contract is initially concluded for one year and can be extended up to three times.

    Cooperation with Libya

    To connect North African coastguards to EU systems, the EU Commission had started the „#Seahorse_Mediterranean“ project two years after the fall of North African despots. To combat irregular migration, from 2013 onwards Spain, Italy and Malta have trained a total of 141 members of the Libyan coast guard for sea rescue. In this way, „Seahorse Mediterranean“ has complemented similar training measures that Frontex is conducting for the Coastal Police within the framework of the EU mission #EUBAM_Libya and the military mission #EUNAVFOR_MED for the Coast Guard of the Tripolis government.

    The budget for „#Seahorse_Mediterranean“ is indicated by the Commission as 5.5 million Euro (https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/E-9-2020-000892-ASW_EN.html), the project was completed in January 2019. According to the German Foreign Office (http://dipbt.bundestag.de/doc/btd/19/196/1919625.pdf), Libya has signed a partnership declaration for participation in a future common communication platform for surveillance of the Mediterranean. Tunisia, Algeria and Egypt are also to be persuaded to participate. So far, however, the governments have preferred unilateral EU support for equipping and training their coastguards and navies, without having to make commitments in projects like „Seahorse“, such as stopping migration and smuggling on the high seas.

    https://digit.site36.net/2020/06/28/eu-pays-for-surveillance-in-gulf-of-tunis

    #Golfe_de_Tunis #surveillance #Méditerranée #asile #migrations #réfugiés #militarisation_des_frontières #surveillance_des_frontières #Tunisie #externalisation #complexe_militaro-industriel #Algérie #Egypte #Suisse #EU #UE #Union_européenne #Trust_Fund #Emergency_Trust_Fund_for_Africa #Allemagne #Italie #gardes-côtes #gardes-côtes_tunisiens #intelligence_artificielle #IA #données #Espagne #Malte #business

    ping @reka @isskein @_kg_ @rhoumour @karine4

    –—

    Ajouté à cette métaliste sur l’externalisation des frontières :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765330

    Et celle-ci sur le lien entre développement et contrôles frontaliers :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733358#message768701

  • FRA and Frontex to work together on developing fundamental rights monitors

    Today, the EU Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA) and the European Border and Coast Guard Agency (Frontex) signed an agreement on developing Frontex’s fundamental rights monitors. Under this agreement, FRA will provide advice and expertise to help set up effective fundamental rights monitoring during Frontex’s operations at EU borders.

    “It is essential that the EU, its Member States and agencies do their utmost to protect people’s fundamental rights. Fundamental rights monitoring of operations at the land and sea borders can help ensure that rights violations do not occur. The fundamental rights monitors are an important preventive tool and FRA will provide its fundamental rights expertise to help establish them. The vacancy notices should be published as soon as possible so the monitors can be deployed”, said FRA’s director Michael O’Flaherty.

    Under this agreement, the Fundamental Rights Agency will help develop a comprehensive manual for the future Fundamental Rights Monitors.

    To guarantee independence, the monitors should work under the overall supervision of the Frontex #Fundamental_Rights_Officer (#FRO) and be able to monitor all Frontex activities.

    FRA and Frontex have already developed the terms of reference of the future monitors, after thoroughly assessing the qualifications needed for their profile. Frontex should publish the vacancy notices as soon as possible.

    https://fra.europa.eu/en/news/2020/fra-and-frontex-work-together-developing-fundamental-rights-monitors
    #Frontex #FRA #droits_humains #collaboration #frontières #asile #migrations #Agency_for_Fundamental_Rights #accord

    ping @isskein @karine4 @reka

    • Frontex and FRA agree to establish fundamental rights monitors

      Today, Frontex, the European Border and Coast Guard Agency and the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA) have agreed to work together to establish fundamental rights monitors, design their training programme and integrate them into Frontex activities.

      “The establishment of the new monitors is another step to make our activities even more transparent and promote fundamental rights throughout all our activities. We are committed to ensuring the highest standards in all that we do. And Fundamental rights are an essential component of effective border management.” said Frontex Executive Director Fabrice Leggeri. “The Fundamental Rights Agency is a key partner for us in this task,” he added.

      “It is essential that the EU, its Member States and agencies do their utmost to protect people’s fundamental rights. Fundamental rights monitoring of operations at the land and sea borders can help ensure that rights violations do not occur. The fundamental rights monitors are an important preventive tool and FRA will provide its fundamental rights expertise to help establish them. The vacancy notices should be published as soon as possible so the monitors can be deployed,” said FRA’s director Michael O’Flaherty.

      In a ceremony that took place online, the two directors signed a Service Level Agreement in the virtual presence of Didier Reynders, Commissioner for Justice, Juan Fernando López Aguilar, the Chair of LIBE Committee in the European Parliament and Georgios Koumoutsakos, Alternate Minister, Greek Ministry for Migration. Other participants included high-level representatives from Germany and the European Parliament, as well as the Chair of Frontex Consultative Forum on fundamental rights.

      The main tasks of the Frontex fundamental rights monitors will be to make sure all operational activities are in line with fundamental rights framework, monitor all types of operations and contribute to Frontex training activities.

      The monitors will be integrated with the agency’s Fundamental Rights Office. The Frontex Fundamental Rights Officer will oversee their work and assign them to particular operations.

      By the end of the year, Frontex and FRA plan to establish a team of as many as 40 fundamental rights monitors. They will undergo enhanced fundamental rights training before they take up their duties next year, when Frontex will deploy the first members of the European Border and Coast Guard standing corps.

      https://frontex.europa.eu/media-centre/news-release/frontex-and-fra-agree-to-establish-fundamental-rights-monitors-OBabL6
      #monitoring

  • Aucun drone israélien ne vole pour Frontex après un crash
    Matthias Monroy, le 26 juin 2020
    https://agencemediapalestine.fr/blog/2020/07/02/aucun-drone-israelien-ne-vole-pour-frontex-apres-un-crash

    Selon la Commission, c’était un « atterrissage difficile » alors que les détecteurs du drone venaient d’afficher des « informations inattendues ». L’aéronef s’est alors écarté de la piste, ce qui, comme l’ont rapporté les médias grecs, a conduit à des dommages considérables. La Commission confirme que le fuselage, les ailes et les détecteurs ont bien été endommagés, mais qu’il n’y a eu « ni victime ni dégâts sur la piste ». Le Hermes 900 était apparemment dirigé par des pilotes du constructeur Elbit.

    Mais, mauvaises nouvelles :

    Avant la fin de cette année, Frontex veut déployer ses propres drones en Méditerranée et ainsi se rendre indépendante de l’EMSA. Leur endurance devra être d’au moins 20 heures, les vols devront avoir lieu dans tous les espaces aériens, dans toutes les conditions météorologiques, et de jour comme de nuit. L’Agence des frontières évalue actuellement des propositions faites dans le cadre d’appels d’offres européens, le contrat devrait être attribué prochainement. Probablement qu’Elbit s’est porté candidat pour le contrat, l’un de ses concurrents les plus sérieux étant probablement Israel Aerospace Industries avec son Heron 1, qui viendrait lui aussi d’Israël.

    #drones #Frontex #Europe #israel #collaboration #guerre #migrants #complicité #Elbit #embargo #boycott

  • Asylum Outsourced : McKinsey’s Secret Role in Europe’s Refugee Crisis

    In 2016 and 2017, US management consultancy giant #McKinsey was at the heart of efforts in Europe to accelerate the processing of asylum applications on over-crowded Greek islands and salvage a controversial deal with Turkey, raising concerns over the outsourcing of public policy on refugees.

    The language was more corporate boardroom than humanitarian crisis – promises of ‘targeted strategies’, ‘maximising productivity’ and a ‘streamlined end-to-end asylum process.’

    But in 2016 this was precisely what the men and women of McKinsey&Company, the elite US management consultancy, were offering the European Union bureaucrats struggling to set in motion a pact with Turkey to stem the flow of asylum seekers to the continent’s shores.

    In March of that year, the EU had agreed to pay Turkey six billion euros if it would take back asylum seekers who had reached Greece – many of them fleeing fighting in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan – and prevent others from trying to cross its borders.

    The pact – which human rights groups said put at risk the very right to seek refuge – was deeply controversial, but so too is the previously unknown extent of McKinsey’s influence over its implementation, and the lengths some EU bodies went to conceal that role.

    According to the findings of this investigation, months of ‘pro bono’ fieldwork by McKinsey fed, sometimes verbatim, into the highest levels of EU policy-making regarding how to make the pact work on the ground, and earned the consultancy a contract – awarded directly, without competition – worth almost one million euros to help enact that very same policy.

    The bloc’s own internal procurement watchdog later deemed the contract “irregular”.

    Questions have already been asked about McKinsey’s input in 2015 into German efforts to speed up its own turnover of asylum applications, with concerns expressed about rights being denied to those applying.

    This investigation, based on documents sought since November 2017, sheds new light on the extent to which private management consultants shaped Europe’s handling of the crisis on the ground, and how bureaucrats tried to keep that role under wraps.

    “If some companies develop programs which then turn into political decisions, this is a political issue of concern that should be examined carefully,” said German MEP Daniel Freund, a member of the European Parliament’s budget committee and a former Head of Advocacy for EU Integrity at Transparency International.

    “Especially if the same companies have afterwards been awarded with follow-up contracts not following due procedures.”

    Deal too important to fail

    The March 2016 deal was the culmination of an epic geopolitical thriller played out in Brussels, Ankara and a host of European capitals after more than 850,000 people – mainly Syrians, Iraqis and Afghans – took to the Aegean by boat and dinghy from Turkey to Greece the previous year.

    Turkey, which hosts some 3.5 million refugees from the nine-year-old war in neighbouring Syria, committed to take back all irregular asylum seekers who travelled across its territory in return for billions of euros in aid, EU visa liberalisation for Turkish citizens and revived negotiations on Turkish accession to the bloc. It also provided for the resettlement in Europe of one Syrian refugee from Turkey for each Syrian returned to Turkey from Greece.

    The EU hailed it as a blueprint, but rights groups said it set a dangerous precedent, resting on the premise that Turkey is a ‘safe third country’ to which asylum seekers can be returned, despite a host of rights that it denies foreigners seeking protection.

    The deal helped cut crossings over the Aegean, but it soon became clear that other parts were not delivering; the centrepiece was an accelerated border procedure for handling asylum applications within 15 days, including appeal. This wasn’t working, while new movement restrictions meant asylum seekers were stuck on Greek islands.

    But for the EU, the deal was too important to be derailed.

    “The directions from the European Commission, and those behind it, was that Greece had to implement the EU-Turkey deal full-stop, no matter the legal arguments or procedural issue you might raise,” said Marianna Tzeferakou, a lawyer who was part of a legal challenge to the notion that Turkey is a safe place to seek refuge.

    “Someone gave an order that this deal will start being implemented. Ambiguity and regulatory arbitrage led to a collapse of procedural guarantees. It was a political decision and could not be allowed to fail.”

    Enter McKinsey.

    Action plans emerge simultaneously

    Fresh from advising Germany on how to speed up the processing of asylum applications, the firm’s consultants were already on the ground doing research in Greece in the summer of 2016, according to two sources working with the Greek asylum service, GAS, at the time but who did not wish to be named.

    Documents seen by BIRN show that the consultancy was already in “initial discussions” with an EU body called the ‘Structural Reform Support Service’, SRSS, which aids member states in designing and implementing structural reforms and was at the time headed by Dutchman Maarten Verwey. Verwey was simultaneously EU coordinator for the EU-Turkey deal and is now the EU’s director general of economic and financial affairs, though he also remains acting head of SRSS.

    Asked for details of these ‘discussions’, Verwey responded that the European Commission – the EU’s executive arm – “does not hold any other documents” concerning the matter.

    Nevertheless, by September 2016, McKinsey had a pro bono proposal on the table for how it could help out, entitled ‘Supporting the European Commission through integrated refugee management.’ Verwey signed off on it in October.

    Minutes of management board meetings of the European Asylum Support Office, EASO – the EU’s asylum agency – show McKinsey was tasked by the Commission to “analyse the situation on the Greek islands and come up with an action plan that would result in an elimination of the backlog” of asylum cases by April 2017.

    A spokesperson for the Commission told BIRN: “McKinsey volunteered to work free of charge to improve the functioning of the Greek asylum and reception system.”

    Over the next 12 weeks, according to other redacted documents, McKinsey worked with all the major actors involved – the SRSS, EASO, the EU border agency Frontex as well as Greek authorities.

    At bi-weekly stakeholder meetings, McKinsey identified “bottlenecks” in the asylum process and began to outline a series of measures to reduce the backlog, some of which were already being tested in a “mini-pilot” on the Greek island of Chios.

    At a first meeting in mid-October, McKinsey consultants told those present that “processing rates” of asylum cases by the EASO and the Greek asylum service, as well as appeals bodies, would need to significantly increase.

    By December, McKinsey’s “action plan” was ready, involving “targeted strategies and recommendations” for each actor involved.

    The same month, on December 8, Verwey released the EU’s own Joint Action Plan for implementing the EU-Turkey deal, which was endorsed by the EU’s heads of government on December 15.

    There was no mention of any McKinsey involvement and when asked about the company’s role the Commission told BIRN the plan was “a document elaborated together between the Commission and the Greek authorities.”

    However, buried in the EASO’s 2017 Annual Report is a reference to European Council endorsement of “the consultancy action plan” to clear the asylum backlog.

    Indeed, the similarities between McKinsey’s plan and the EU’s Joint Action Plan are uncanny, particularly in terms of increasing detention capacity on the islands, “segmentation” of cases, ramping up numbers of EASO and GAS caseworkers and interpreters and Frontex escort officers, limiting the number of appeal steps in the asylum process and changing the way appeals are processed and opinions drafted.

    In several instances, they are almost identical: where McKinsey recommends introducing “overarching segmentation by case types to increase speed and quality”, for example, the EU’s Joint Action Plan calls for “segmentation by case categories to increase speed and quality”.

    Much of what McKinsey did for the SRSS remains redacted.

    In June 2019, the Commission justified the non-disclosure on the basis that the information would pose a “risk” to “public security” as it could allegedly “be exploited by third parties (for example smuggling networks)”.

    Full disclosure, it argued, would risk “seriously undermining the commercial interests” of McKinsey.

    “While I understand that there could indeed be a private and public interest in the subject matter covered by the documents requested, I consider that such a public interest in transparency would not, in this case, outweigh the need to protect the commercial interests of the company concerned,” Martin Selmayr, then secretary-general of the European Commission, wrote.

    SRSS rejected the suggestion that the fact that Verwey refused to fully disclose the McKinsey proposal he had signed off on in October 2016 represented a possible conflict of interest, according to internal documents obtained during this investigation.

    Once Europe’s leaders had endorsed the Joint Action Plan, EASO was asked to “conclude a direct contract with McKinsey” to assist in its implementation, according to EASO management board minutes.

    ‘Political pressure’

    The contract, worth 992,000 euros, came with an attached ‘exception note’ signed on January 20, 2017, by EASO’s Executive Director at the time, Jose Carreira, and Joanna Darmanin, the agency’s then head of operations. The note stated that “due to the time constraints and the political pressure it was deemed necessary to proceed with the contract to be signed without following the necessary procurement procedure”.

    The following year, an audit of EASO yearly accounts by the European Court of Auditors, ECA, which audits EU finances, found that “a single pre-selected economic operator” had been awarded work without the application of “any of the procurement procedures” laid down under EU regulations, designed to encourage transparency and competition.

    “Therefore, the public procurement procedure and all related payments (992,000 euros) were irregular,” it said.

    The auditor’s report does not name McKinsey. But it does specify that the “irregular” contract concerned the EASO’s hiring of a consultancy for implementation of the action plan in Greece; the amount cited by the auditor exactly matches the one in the McKinsey contract, while a spokesman for the EASO indirectly confirmed the contracts concerned were one and the same.

    When asked about the McKinsey contract, the spokesman, Anis Cassar, said: “EASO does not comment on specifics relating to individual contracts, particularly where the ECA is concerned. However, as you note, ECA found that the particular procurement procedure was irregular (not illegal).”

    “The procurement was carried under [sic] exceptional procurement rules in the context of the pressing requests by the relevant EU Institutions and Member States,” said EASO spokesman Anis Cassar.

    McKinsey’s deputy head of Global Media Relations, Graham Ackerman, said the company was unable to provide any further details.

    “In line with our firm’s values and confidentiality policy, we do not publicly discuss our clients or details of our client service,” Ackerman told BIRN.

    ‘Evaluation, feedback, goal-setting’

    It was not the first time questions had been asked of the EASO’s procurement record.

    In October 2017, the EU’s fraud watchdog, OLAF, launched a probe into the agency (https://www.politico.eu/article/jose-carreira-olaf-anti-fraud-office-investigates-eu-asylum-agency-director), chiefly concerning irregularities identified in 2016. It contributed to the resignation in June 2018 of Carreira (https://www.politico.eu/article/jose-carreira-easo-under-investigation-director-of-eu-asylum-agency-steps-d), who co-signed the ‘exception note’ on the McKinsey contract. The investigation eventually uncovered wrongdoings ranging from breaches of procurement rules to staff harassment (https://www.politico.eu/article/watchdog-finds-misconduct-at-european-asylum-support-office-harassment), Politico reported in November 2018.

    According to the EASO, the McKinsey contract was not part of OLAF’s investigation. OLAF said it could not comment.

    McKinsey’s work went ahead, running from January until April 2017, the point by which the EU wanted the backlog of asylum cases “eliminated” and the burden on overcrowded Greek islands lifted.

    Overseeing the project was a steering committee comprised of Verwey, Carreira, McKinsey staff and senior Greek and European Commission officials.

    The details of McKinsey’s operation are contained in a report it submitted in May 2017.

    The EASO initially refused to release the report, citing its “sensitive and restrictive nature”. Its disclosure, the agency said, would “undermine the protection of public security and international relations, as well as the commercial interests and intellectual property of McKinsey & Company.”

    The response was signed by Carreira.

    Only after a reporter on this story complained to the EU Ombudsman, did the EASO agree to disclose several sections of the report.

    Running to over 1,500 pages, the disclosed material provides a unique insight into the role of a major private consultancy in what has traditionally been the realm of public policy – the right to asylum.

    In the jargon of management consultancy, the driving logic of McKinsey’s intervention was “maximising productivity” – getting as many asylum cases processed as quickly as possible, whether they result in transfers to the Greek mainland, in the case of approved applications, or the deportation of “returnable migrants” to Turkey.

    “Performance management systems” were introduced to encourage speed, while mechanisms were created to “monitor” the weekly “output” of committees hearing the appeals of rejected asylum seekers.

    Time spent training caseworkers and interviewers before they were deployed was to be reduced, IT support for the Greek bureaucracy was stepped up and police were instructed to “detain migrants immediately after they are notified of returnable status,” i.e. as soon as their asylum applications were rejected.

    Four employees of the Greek asylum agency at the time told BIRN that McKinsey had access to agency staff, but said the consultancy’s approach jarred with the reality of the situation on the ground.

    Taking part in a “leadership training” course held by McKinsey, one former employee, who spoke on condition of anonymity, told BIRN: “It felt so incompatible with the mentality of a public service operating in a camp for asylum seekers.”

    The official said much of what McKinsey was proposing had already been considered and either implemented or rejected by GAS.

    “The main ideas of how to organise our work had already been initiated by the HQ of GAS,” the official said. “The only thing McKinsey added were corporate methods of evaluation, feedback, setting goals, and initiatives that didn’t add anything meaningful.”

    Indeed, the backlog was proving hard to budge.

    Throughout successive “progress updates”, McKinsey repeatedly warned the steering committee that productivity “levels are insufficient to reach target”. By its own admission, deportations never surpassed 50 a week during the period of its contract. The target was 340.

    In its final May 2017 report, McKinsey touted its success in “reducing total process duration” of the asylum procedure to a mere 11 days, down from an average of 170 days in February 2017.

    Yet thousands of asylum seekers remained trapped in overcrowded island camps for months on end.

    While McKinsey claimed that the population of asylum seekers on the island was cut to 6,000 by April 2017, pending “data verification” by Greek authorities, Greek government figures put the number at 12,822, just around 1,500 fewer than in January when McKinsey got its contract.

    The winter was harsh; organisations working with asylum seekers documented a series of accidents in which a number of people were harmed or killed, with insufficient or no investigation undertaken by Greek authorities (https://www.proasyl.de/en/news/greek-hotspots-deaths-not-to-be-forgotten).

    McKinsey’s final report tallied 40 field visits and more than 200 meetings and workshops on the islands. It also, interestingly, counted 21 weekly steering committee meetings “since October 2016” – connecting McKinsey’s 2016 pro bono work and the 2017 period it worked under contract with the EASO. Indeed, in its “project summary”, McKinsey states it was “invited” to work on both the “development” and “implementation” of the action plan in Greece.

    The Commission, however, in its response to this investigation, insisted it did not “pre-select” McKinsey for the 2017 work or ask EASO to sign a contract with the firm.

    Smarting from military losses in Syria and political setbacks at home, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan tore up the deal with the EU in late February this year, accusing Brussels of failing to fulfil its side of the bargain. But even before the deal’s collapse, 7,000 refugees and migrants reached Greek shores in the first two months of 2020, according to the United Nations refugee agency.

    German link

    This was not the first time that the famed consultancy firm had left its mark on Europe’s handling of the crisis.

    In what became a political scandal (https://www.focus.de/politik/deutschland/bamf-skandal-im-news-ticker-jetzt-muessen-sich-seehofer-und-cordt-den-fragen-d), the German Federal Office for Migration and Refugees, according to reports, paid McKinsey more than €45 million (https://www.augsburger-allgemeine.de/politik/Millionenzahlungen-Was-hat-McKinsey-beim-Bamf-gemacht-id512950) to help clear a backlog of more than 270,000 asylum applications and to shorten the asylum process.

    German media reports said the sum included 3.9 million euros for “Integrated Refugee Management”, the same phrase McKinsey pitched to the EU in September 2016.

    The parallels don’t end there.

    Much like the contract McKinsey clinched with the EASO in January 2017, German media reports have revealed that more than half of the sum paid to the consultancy for its work in Germany was awarded outside of normal public procurement procedures on the grounds of “urgency”. Der Spiegel (https://www.spiegel.de/wirtschaft/unternehmen/fluechtlinge-in-deutschland-mckinsey-erhielt-mehr-als-20-millionen-euro-a-11) reported that the firm also did hundreds of hours of pro bono work prior to clinching the contract. McKinsey denied that it worked for free in order to win future federal contracts.

    Again, the details were classified as confidential.

    Arne Semsrott, director of the German transparency NGO FragdenStaat, which investigated McKinsey’s work in Germany, said the lack of transparency in such cases was costing European taxpayers money and control.

    Asked about German and EU efforts to keep the details of such outsourcing secret, Semsrott told BIRN: “The lack of transparency means the public spending more money on McKinsey and other consulting firms. And this lack of transparency also means that we have a lack of public control over what is actually happening.”

    Sources familiar with the decision-making in Athens identified Solveigh Hieronimus, a McKinsey partner based in Munich, as the coordinator of the company’s team on the EASO contract in Greece. Hieronimus was central in pitching the company’s services to the German government, according to German media reports (https://www.spiegel.de/spiegel/print/d-147594782.html).

    Hieronimus did not respond to BIRN questions submitted by email.

    Freund, the German MEP formerly of Transparency International, said McKinsey’s role in Greece was a cause for concern.

    “It is not ideal if positions adopted by the [European] Council are in any way affected by outside businesses,” he told BIRN. “These decisions should be made by politicians based on legal analysis and competent independent advice.”

    A reporter on this story again complained to the EU Ombudsman in July 2019 regarding the Commission’s refusal to disclose further details of its dealings with McKinsey.

    In November, the Ombudsman told the Commission that “the substance of the funded project, especially the work packages and deliverable of the project[…] should be fully disclosed”, citing the principle that “the public has a right to be informed about the content of projects that are financed by public money.” The Ombudsman rejected the Commission’s argument that partial disclosure would undermine the commercial interests of McKinsey.

    Commission President Ursula von Der Leyen responded that the Commission “respectfully disagrees” with the Ombudsman. The material concerned, she wrote, “contains sensitive information on the business strategies and the commercial relations of the company concerned.”

    The president of the Commission has had dealings with McKinsey before; in February, von der Leyen testified before a special Bundestag committee concerning contracts worth tens of millions of euros that were awarded to external consultants, including McKinsey, during her time as German defence minister in 2013-2019.

    In 2018, Germany’s Federal Audit Office said procedures for the award of some contracts had not been strictly lawful or cost-effective. Von der Leyen acknowledged irregularities had occurred but said that much had been done to fix the shortcomings (https://www.ft.com/content/4634a3ea-4e71-11ea-95a0-43d18ec715f5).

    She was also questioned about her 2014 appointment of Katrin Suder, a McKinsey executive, as state secretary tasked with reforming the Bundeswehr’s system of procurement. Asked if Suder, who left the ministry in 2018, had influenced the process of awarding contracts, von der Leyen said she assumed not. Decisions like that were taken “way below my pay level,” she said.

    In its report, Germany’s governing parties absolved von der Leyen of blame, Politico reported on June 9 (https://www.politico.eu/article/ursula-von-der-leyen-german-governing-parties-contracting-scandal).

    The EU Ombudsman is yet to respond to the Commission’s refusal to grant further access to the McKinsey documents.

    https://balkaninsight.com/2020/06/22/asylum-outsourced-mckinseys-secret-role-in-europes-refugee-crisis
    #accord_UE-Turquie #asile #migrations #réfugiés #externalisation #privatisation #sous-traitance #Turquie #EU #UE #Union_européenne #Grèce #frontières #Allemagne #EASO #Structural_Reform_Support_Service (#SRSS) #Maarten_Verwey #Frontex #Chios #consultancy #Joint_Action_Plan #Martin_Selmayr #chronologie #Jose_Carreira #Joanna_Darmanin #privatisation #management #productivité #leadership_training #îles #Mer_Egée #Integrated_Refugee_Management #pro_bono #transparence #Solveigh_Hieronimus #Katrin_Suder

    ping @_kg_ @karine4 @isskein @rhoumour @reka

  • Migration : Frontex enregistre 1.250 passages illégaux en Méditerranée
    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#frontex#traversee#Mediterranee

    https://www.panorapost.com/post.php?id=27104

    Le nombre de passages frontaliers illégaux détectés sur les principales routes migratoires européennes a rebondi en mai après une baisse record le mois précédent due à la pandémie de Covid-19, a annoncé lundi l’agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes (Frontex).

  • Frontex bientôt sur les frontières du #Monténégro et de la #Serbie

    1er juin - 8h : L’Union européenne a approuvé, mardi 26 mai, un #accord passé avec le Monténégro et la Serbie, prévoyant le déploiement de la #mission_Frontex sur les frontières de ces deux pays. Il s’agit d’aider le Monténégro et la Serbie, candidats à l’intégrer, à « mieux gérer les flux migratoires ». Le déploiement de #Frontex sera effectif dès juillet au Monténégro, tandis qu’une date doit encore être fixée pour la Serbie.

    https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Les-dernieres-infos-Refugies-Balkans-Bosnie-Herzegovine-un-nouvea

    #Balkans #route_des_balkans #militarisation_des_frontières #frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés

    –---

    Voir aussi :

    2018 :
    « Come il Montenegro si prepara a un’emergenza che non c’è »
    https://seenthis.net/messages/712376

    2019 :
    European Border and Coast Guard : Agreement reached on operational cooperation with Montenegro
    https://seenthis.net/messages/758359

    À partir de 22 mai 2019, Frontex déploiera des équipes conjointes à la frontière grecque avec des agents albanais. La Commission européenne a passé des accords semblables avec la Macédoine du Nord, la Serbie, le Monténégro et la Bosnie-Herzégovine, qui devraient également entrer en vigueur.
    https://seenthis.net/messages/782260

    ping @isskein @reka @karine4

  • Frontex expects more migrants will try to enter EU from Turkey - Info-Migrants
    The European Union border agency Frontex expects a large number of migrants to attempt to cross the border from Turkey into Greece after Turkey lifts coronavirus restrictions. Turkey closed its borders in mid-March as a measure against the pandemic.

    #Covid-19#Turquie#Gréce#frontière#FRONTEX#politique#migrant#migration#réfugié#territoire

    https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/24629/frontex-expects-more-migrants-will-try-to-enter-eu-from-turkey

  • [Via Vicky Skoumbi, via Migreurop]

    Les structures d’accueil et d’identification aux îles ne vont pas être déplacées !

    Tout indique que le camp de Moria à Lesbos va s’étendre, au lieu de fermer , tandis que l’avenir de VIAL à Chios, qui pourrait être délocalisé, reste dans le vague.

    Le ministère de l’Immigration a décidé de charger directement un évaluateur agréé afin de déterminer la valeur des loyers, pour la location de terres sur les îles accueillant des réfugiés, afin de créer des centres d’accueil et d’identification des demandeurs d’asile (ou bien d’étendre des structures d’accueil déjà existantes, cela reste à déterminer. -

    Malgré le fait que les hot-spots existent et fonctionnent dans toutes les îles depuis 2016 (en Moria depuis 2012), le ministre Notis Mitarakis et le secrétaire général M. Logothetis ont décidé d’allouer le montant de 18.600 euros, afin qu’un expert évalue le montant des loyers que le ministère doit payer dans les structures qui fonctionnent déjà, et ceci au moment où les communautés locales demandent d’urgence leur fermeture. Cela soulève plusieurs questions mais aussi de nouvelles données, notamment à Moria qui, comme tout montre qu’au lieu de fermer va s’étendre, tandis qu’à Chios tout reste dans le vague.

    La mission confiée à l’expert certifié Styliani Avgerikou concerne spécifiquement les zones : postes de Zervos Samos, Pyli Kos, Lepida Leros, zones des îles de Lesvos (zone Moria) et Chios, les zones à Chios n’étant pas clairement défini, ce qui laisse ouverte la possibilité de la délocalisation du hot-spot de VIAL et et celui en construction à Chalkios dans une autre zone.

    Le travail progresse

    Un nouveau centre est en cours de construction à Samos, et les travaux - qui ont commencé sous le gouvernement de SYRIZA - ont beaucoup progressé ; il ne reste que la connexion aux réseaux d’électricité et d’évacuation d’eaux usées.

    La conception du ministère Pour Leros et Kos le ministère a prévu l’expansion des installations existantes à Lepida et Pyli respectivement, tandis que le futur du camp de Moria et de celui de Vial à Chios restent dans le flou ; et c’est justement cela le point épineux pour le gouvernement actuel, car les affrontements violents de la population locale avec les forces de l’ordre essayant d’imposer manu militari de nouvelles structures géantes aux positions de Karava à Lesbos et à Aepos à Chios sont loin d’être oubliés.

    En ce qui concerne Lesbos, le gouvernement a l’intention d’étendre la Moria en plaçant une clôture autour de l’oliveraie où les tentes ont été installées, tandis qu’à Chios la situation est encore plus compliquée, car au bureau de vote ministériel, les habitants de Chalkios attendent de tenir sa promesse de campagne et fermer VIAL.

    A Chios, le ministère a récemment loué les anciennes installations de la maison d’édition « Alithia », un journal local, sous prétexte de construire un espace de quarantaine temporaire, tandis que l’accord comprenait également une condition qui permet au ministère de louer l’espace à un autre usage si les conditions l’exigent. Une condition qui a été dénoncée par presque toutes les factions du conseil municipal comme révélatrice de la volonté du ministère d’y créer une nouvelle structure.

    La question se pose alors de savoir si le ciblage par le ministère est la délocalisation quasi-partielle du hot-spot de VIAL et Chalkios aux anciennes installations d’Alithia, ce qui pourrait susciter des réactions vives de riverains, qui s’y opposent fermement. A défaut d’une telle délocalisation, le ministère devrait soit trouver un nouvel espace, soit étendre le hot-spot déjà existant de VIAL dans les champs déjà occupés.

    L’intervention urgente des unités RABIT de Frontex va être prolongée

    https://www.stonisi.gr/post/8991/to-kyt-morias-epekteinetai-kai-zhteitai-ki-allh-frontex

    Le gouvernement a demandé la prolongation de l’opération d’intervention rapide de Frontex à Evros et dans la mer Égée jusqu’en juillet avec une demande officielle à la police et aux garde-côtes européens. Selon un haut fonctionnaire du ministère de la Protection du citoyen (allias Ministère de l’Ordre Publique), la demande respective a été déposée mardi dernier et mercredi, un dirigeant de l’organisation européenne a confirmé, s’adressant à « Kathimerini », que « nous sommes en pourparlers avec les autorités grecques pour prolonger l’opération d’un mois supplémentaire ».

    Officiellement, Varsovie (siège de Frontex) n’a pas répondu à la demande grecque, mais des sources compétentes ont révélé que la direction de l’organisation avait oralement accepté la demande de maintien des gardes-frontières européens aux frontières terrestres et maritimes de la Grèce. - Turquie jusqu’au 6 juillet.

    La demande initiale à l’organisation pour le développement de l’équipe d’intervention rapide (RABIT) de Frontex, a été déposée le 1er mars, suite à une décision en urgence du Conseil gouvernemental d’Affaires étrangères et de Défense, deux jours après le début de la récente crise avec la Turquie. Vingt-quatre heures plus tard, le directeur de Frontex, Fabrice Leggeri, avait officiellement accepté la demande grecque, soulignant que "compte tenu de la situation qui se développe rapidement à la frontière extérieure de la Grèce avec la Turquie, ma décision est d’accepter la demande d’intervention des unités RABIT déposée par la Grèce.

    Au cours de la période qui a suivi, 100 gardes-frontières européens ont été déployés à Kastanies, à Evros. Selon l’accord initial, l’opération rapide aurait dû durer deux mois et devrait s’achever le 6 mai. Cependant, comme un responsable de Frontex l’a déclaré à « K » hier, « avec les autorités grecques, nous avons évalué la situation à la frontière et décidé de prolonger l’opération, initialement pour un mois, jusqu’au 6 juin ».

    La nouvelle demande à l’organisme de prolonger l’opération jusqu’en juillet a été faite suite à des évaluations et des analyses faites par des policiers et des gardes-côtes, qui ont conclu que la levée progressive de la quarantaine en Turquie, la baisse des niveaux d’eau à Evros et l’amélioration les conditions météorologiques dans la mer Égée entraîneront une nouvelle augmentation de la pression migratoire. En fait, la Garde côtière exigerait non seulement le maintien des forces existantes dans la mer Égée orientale, mais également leur augmentation avec 6 patrouilleurs supplémentaires.

    https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/koinonia/243250_oi-domes-sta-nisia-den-pane-poythena

    #Covid-19 #Migration #Migrant #Balkans #Grèce #Camp #Îlesgrecques #Hotspot #Frontex

  • Appel à l’annulation d’un contrat entre l’#UE et des entreprises israéliennes pour la surveillance des migrants par drones

    Les contrats de l’UE de 59 millions d’euros avec des entreprises militaires israélienne pour s’équiper en drones de guerre afin de surveiller les demandeurs d’asile en mer sont immoraux et d’une légalité douteuse.
    L’achat de #drones_israéliens par l’UE encourage les violations des droits de l’homme en Palestine occupée, tandis que l’utilisation abusive de tout drone pour intercepter les migrants et les demandeurs d’asile entraînerait de graves violations en Méditerranée, a déclaré aujourd’hui Euro-Mediterranean Human Rights Monitor dans un communiqué.
    L’UE devrait immédiatement résilier ces #contrats et s’abstenir d’utiliser des drones contre les demandeurs d’asile, en particulier la pratique consistant à renvoyer ces personnes en #Libye, entravant ainsi leur quête de sécurité.

    L’année dernière, l’Agence européenne des garde-frontières et des garde-côtes basée à Varsovie, #Frontex, et l’Agence européenne de sécurité maritime basée à Lisbonne, #EMSA, ont investi plus de 100 millions d’euros dans trois contrats pour des drones sans pilote. De plus, environ 59 millions d’euros des récents contrats de drones de l’UE auraient été accordés à deux sociétés militaires israéliennes : #Elbit_Systems et #Israel_Aerospace_Industries, #IAI.

    L’un des drones que Frontex a obtenu sous contrat est le #Hermes_900 d’Elbit, qui a été expérimenté sur la population mise en cage dans la #bande_de_Gaza assiégée lors de l’#opération_Bordure_protectrice de 2014. Cela montre l’#investissement de l’UE dans des équipements israéliens dont la valeur a été démontrée par son utilisation dans le cadre de l’oppression du peuple palestinien et de l’occupation de son territoire. Ces achats de drones seront perçus comme soutenant et encourageant une telle utilisation expérimentale de la #technologie_militaire par le régime répressif israélien.

    « Il est scandaleux pour l’UE d’acheter des drones à des fabricants de drones israéliens compte tenu des moyens répressifs et illégaux utilisés pour opprimer les Palestiniens vivant sous occupation depuis plus de cinquante ans », a déclaré le professeur Richard Falk, président du conseil d’administration d’Euromed-Monitor.

    Il est également inacceptable et inhumain pour l’UE d’utiliser des drones, quelle que soit la manière dont ils ont été obtenus pour violer les droits fondamentaux des migrants risquant leur vie en mer pour demander l’asile en Europe.

    Les contrats de drones de l’UE soulèvent une autre préoccupation sérieuse car l’opération Sophia ayant pris fin le 31 mars 2020, la prochaine #opération_Irini a l’intention d’utiliser ces drones militaires pour surveiller et fournir des renseignements sur les déplacements des demandeurs d’asile en #mer_Méditerranée, et cela sans fournir de protocoles de sauvetage aux personnes exposées à des dangers mortels en mer. Surtout si l’on considère qu’en 2019 le #taux_de_mortalité des demandeurs d’asile essayant de traverser la Méditerranée a augmenté de façon spectaculaire, passant de 2% en moyenne à 14%.

    L’opération Sophia utilise des navires pour patrouiller en Méditerranée, conformément au droit international, et pour aider les navires en détresse. Par exemple, la Convention des Nations Unies sur le droit de la mer (CNUDM) stipule que tous les navires sont tenus de signaler une rencontre avec un navire en détresse et, en outre, de proposer une assistance, y compris un sauvetage. Étant donné que les drones ne transportent pas d’équipement de sauvetage et ne sont pas régis par la CNUDM, il est nécessaire de s’appuyer sur les orientations du droit international des droits de l’homme et du droit international coutumier pour guider le comportement des gouvernements.

    Euro-Med Monitor craint que le passage imminent de l’UE à l’utilisation de drones plutôt que de navires en mer Méditerranée soit une tentative de contourner le #droit_international et de ne pas respecter les directives de l’UE visant à sauver la vie des personnes isolées en mer en situation critique. Le déploiement de drones, comme proposé, montre la détermination de l’UE à dissuader les demandeurs d’asile de chercher un abri sûr en Europe en facilitant leur capture en mer par les #gardes-côtes_libyens. Cette pratique reviendrait à aider et à encourager la persécution des demandeurs d’asile dans les fameux camps de détention libyens, où les pratiques de torture, d’esclavage et d’abus sexuels sont très répandues.

    En novembre 2019, l’#Italie a confirmé qu’un drone militaire appartenant à son armée s’était écrasé en Libye alors qu’il était en mission pour freiner les passages maritimes des migrants. Cela soulève de sérieuses questions quant à savoir si des opérations de drones similaires sont menées discrètement sous les auspices de l’UE.

    L’UE devrait décourager les violations des droits de l’homme contre les Palestiniens en s’abstenant d’acheter du matériel militaire israélien utilisé dans les territoires palestiniens occupés. Elle devrait plus généralement s’abstenir d’utiliser des drones militaires contre les demandeurs d’asile civils et, au lieu de cela, respecter ses obligations en vertu du droit international en offrant un refuge sûr aux réfugiés.

    Euro-Med Monitor souligne que même en cas d’utilisation de drones, les opérateurs de drones de l’UE sont tenus, en vertu du droit international, de respecter les #droits_fondamentaux à la vie, à la liberté et à la sécurité de tout bateau de migrants en danger qu’ils rencontrent. Les opérateurs sont tenus de signaler immédiatement tout incident aux autorités compétentes et de prendre toutes les mesures nécessaires pour garantir que les opérations de recherche et de sauvetage soient menées au profit des migrants en danger.

    L’UE devrait en outre imposer des mesures de #transparence et de #responsabilité plus strictes sur les pratiques de Frontex, notamment en créant un comité de contrôle indépendant pour enquêter sur toute violation commise et prévenir de futures transgressions. Enfin, l’UE devrait empêcher l’extradition ou l’expulsion des demandeurs d’asile vers la Libye – où leur vie serait gravement menacée – et mettre fin à la pratique des garde-côtes libyens qui consiste à arrêter et capturer des migrants en mer.

    http://www.france-palestine.org/Appel-a-l-annulation-d-un-contrat-entre-l-UE-et-des-entreprises-is
    #Europe #EU #drones #Israël #surveillance #drones #migrations #asile #réfugiés #Méditerranée #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #militarisation_des_frontières #complexe_militaro-industriel #business #armée #droits_humains #sauvetage

    ping @etraces @reka @nepthys @isskein @karine4

  • Le business de l’#enfermement d’étrangers

    On estime à envi­ron quatre mil­lions le nombre de per­sonnes sans-papiers en Europe. Ces deux der­nières décen­nies, des dizaines de lieux d’en­fer­me­ment d’é­tran­gers, pour rai­sons admi­nis­tra­tives, ont été construits à tra­vers le conti­nent. En Belgique, on les appelle « centres fer­més », et une per­sonne peut y être déte­nue jus­qu’à 8 mois. De nom­breuses révoltes s’y suc­cèdent, à l’ins­tar de celles que l’Italie connaît depuis 2009. La crise sani­taire du Covid-19 les remet au devant de la scène : pour les condi­tions de déten­tion qui y règnent, l’ab­sur­di­té du main­tien de leur acti­vi­té alors que les fron­tières sont fer­mées (les mesures d’« éloi­gne­ment » ren­dues dès lors presque impos­sibles), mais aus­si pour les nou­velles émeutes qui y éclatent, en réac­tion à cette vio­lence poli­tique et ins­ti­tu­tion­nelle que rien ne semble vou­loir sus­pendre. Les centres fer­més, au cœur d’un nou­veau mar­ché ? ☰ Par Yanna Oiseau

    La pra­tique d’en­fer­me­ment d’é­tran­gers en Europe ne date pas des der­nières décen­nies : loin s’en faut. Le XXe siècle abonde en exemples. En France, l’his­toire de l’ins­ti­tu­tion de l’en­fer­me­ment a ain­si connu un tour­nant avec les camps de réfu­giés espa­gnols, fuyant la guerre civile des années 1930. Cette expé­rience sera déter­mi­nante pour les auto­ri­tés fran­çaises et leurs pra­tiques concen­tra­tion­naires durant la Seconde Guerre mon­diale : les mêmes lieux seront uti­li­sés et les logiques qui y auront été inau­gu­rées — comp­tage, fichage, ges­tion —, reprises1. En 1988, alors qu’au­cune loi belge n’au­to­ri­sait ni n’en­ca­drait l’en­fer­me­ment pour des rai­sons admi­nis­tra­tives, des étran­gers étaient déte­nus dans une ancienne base militaire2, tout près de l’aé­ro­port inter­na­tio­nal de Zaventem. La créa­tion offi­cielle des « centres fer­més » n’au­ra lieu qu’en 1993.

    On compte aujourd’­hui six struc­tures d’en­fer­me­ment d’é­tran­gers sur le ter­ri­toire belge, pou­vant déte­nir simul­ta­né­ment 700 per­sonnes der­rière des murs dou­blés de bar­be­lés. 8 000 per­sonnes se ver­raient ain­si enfer­mées, chaque année, dans ce pays qui défi­nit la déten­tion non comme une sanc­tion mais un moyen d’exécuter une mesure d’expulsion. Si ces struc­tures n’ont pas le carac­tère légal d’une pri­son — l’en­fer­me­ment n’in­ter­vient pas suite à une déci­sion judi­ciaire mais pour de simples rai­sons admi­nis­tra­tives —, elles en ont l’ap­pa­rence, la logique et le fonc­tion­ne­ment. En 2018, de fortes mobi­li­sa­tions citoyennes et asso­cia­tives, sous le slo­gan « On enferme pas un enfant. Point. », avaient per­mis la fer­me­ture de l’u­ni­té fami­liale nou­vel­le­ment amé­na­gée afin de réor­ga­ni­ser offi­ciel­le­ment l’en­fer­me­ment d’en­fants — une pra­tique que l’État belge avait aban­don­née en 2008 suite à une condam­na­tion de la Cour euro­péenne des droits de l’Homme. En mai 2017, le gou­ver­ne­ment belge a adop­té le pro­jet « mas­ter­plan de centres fer­més » de Théo Francken — un membre du par­ti natio­na­liste fla­mand N‑VA, notam­ment connu pour ses pro­pos racistes —, alors en poste au secré­ta­riat à l’a­sile et à la migra­tion, qui pré­voyait de dou­bler la capa­ci­té de réten­tion d’é­tran­gers d’i­ci à 2021. C’est dans cette pers­pec­tive qu’un centre fer­mé non mixte pour femmes a ouvert à #Holsbeek, en Flandres, le 7 mai 2019.

    Évolution des dispositifs d’enfermement

    Les pra­tiques d’ar­res­ta­tion et d’en­fer­me­ment, mais aus­si de trai­te­ment des arri­vées d’exi­lés, de migrants ou de réfu­giés — autre­ment dit de ces nou­velles figures de l’immigré3 —, ne cessent de bou­ger. Le fonc­tion­ne­ment des centres fer­més, tout comme ce qui peut s’y dérou­ler, est caché à la popu­la­tion : les visites sont très stric­te­ment contrô­lées (même les avo­cats n’en voient qu’une par­tie) ; les télé­phones munis d’un appa­reil pho­to sont confisqués4, etc. Deux col­lec­tifs de lutte contre les expul­sions et pour la régu­la­ri­sa­tion de tous les sans-papiers, la Coordination contre les rafles et les expul­sions pour la régu­la­ri­sa­tion (CRER) et Getting the Voice Out (GVO), très actifs, per­mettent d’en savoir plus. La CRER, née en 2001 suite à une grande rafle d’Équatoriens à Bruxelles, vise à appor­ter un sou­tien logis­tique aux luttes menées par les col­lec­tifs de sans-papiers. Ce groupe compte aujourd’­hui plu­sieurs dizaines de per­sonnes, les­quelles vont rendre visite à des déte­nus afin de leur appor­ter un sou­tien moral comme maté­riel. Il concentre ain­si une série d’in­for­ma­tions sur ce qui se déroule dans ces lieux. Avec les mili­tants de GVO (dont le site Internet dif­fuse régu­liè­re­ment des témoi­gnages de per­sonnes déte­nues), ils orga­nisent des actions : mani­fes­ta­tions, blo­cages, ras­sem­ble­ments devant les centres fer­més, etc. Cette expé­rience de ter­rain leur donne une vue sur un temps rela­ti­ve­ment long et leur per­met de témoi­gner de l’é­vo­lu­tion du fonc­tion­ne­ment interne des centres fer­més ain­si que des méthodes de répres­sion employées.

    Nous avons lon­gue­ment pu dis­cu­ter avec deux membres de ces groupes. Ils nous ont fait part des chan­ge­ments de pra­tiques dans ces lieux, en par­ti­cu­lier dans la ges­tion et la répres­sion des actions de résis­tance. Tous deux expliquent que des grèves de la faim col­lec­tives, par exemple, étaient mon­naie cou­rante il y a plu­sieurs années. Elles avaient le temps de gagner l’aile entière de l’é­ta­blis­se­ment, de se déployer sur plu­sieurs jours avant d’être répri­mées ; les contacts que la CRER entre­te­nait avec les déte­nus d’a­lors en attestent. En revanche, nous disent-ils, « main­te­nant, celui qui ose juste dire qu’il va faire une grève de la faim, ou qu’il veut mettre le feu, est immé­dia­te­ment mis au cachot ». Les embryons de luttes col­lec­tives se voient sans délai étouf­fés — sépa­ra­tion des groupes, mise en cel­lule d’i­so­le­ment, trans­fert de per­sonnes vers un autre centre fer­mé —, relé­guant tou­jours plus les per­sonnes vers des stra­té­gies indi­vi­duelles. Quant aux échecs de ten­ta­tives d’ex­pul­sion, elles ne semblent plus « cachées » aux autres déte­nus : « Jusqu’à récem­ment, lorsque l’expul­sion d’une per­sonne depuis le centre fer­mé échouait — du fait de la résis­tance de la per­sonne concer­née, de son refus d’embarquer, de la mobi­li­sa­tion des pas­sa­gers du vol ou d’une action de blo­cage à l’aé­ro­port —, elle n’é­tait pas rame­née dans le même éta­blis­se­ment d’en­fer­me­ment, mais on la trans­fé­rait dans un autre centre. » L’objectif sem­blait être de ne sur­tout pas encou­ra­ger la résis­tance des autres, ni leurs espoirs d’empêcher une expul­sion par la lutte. Actuellement, en revanche, les per­sonnes seraient rame­nées dans le même centre. Cette nou­velle manière de faire est-elle due à une perte de marge de manœuvre liée à un taux d’oc­cu­pa­tion trop éle­vé, ou bien relève-t-elle d’un chan­ge­ment tac­tique ?

    Les deux mili­tants de pour­suivre : si la mise en cel­lule d’i­so­le­ment reste, elle, une pra­tique cou­rante, son usage bouge lui aus­si. « Avant, ils ciblaient beau­coup les lea­ders ou les per­sonnes sup­po­sées telles, et les met­taient en iso­le­ment ou les dépla­çaient de centre. Aujourd’hui ça ne répond plus à cette logique ; on voit que c’est aléa­toire, comme s’ils pio­chaient dans le groupe sans cri­tère pré­cis. » L’aléatoire peut être une stra­té­gie de ges­tion propre, effi­cace à des fins d’in­ti­mi­da­tion col­lec­tive, pou­vant aller jus­qu’à téta­ni­ser toute résis­tance, voire ter­ro­ri­ser, tant la déli­mi­ta­tion de la « zone de dan­ger » n’est plus per­cep­tible. Cette tech­nique est cou­rante dans tous les lieux de pri­va­tion de liber­té, où les mau­vais trai­te­ments sont légion5. Lorsque les pra­tiques oppres­sives échappent au sens, à la com­pré­hen­sion, cela ren­force le sen­ti­ment que les pou­voirs qui les orga­nisent sont d’une grande puis­sance. Les arres­ta­tions, les amendes et les pro­cès pour l’exemple — pour les per­sonnes sans titre de séjour, tout comme celles leur venant en aide — découlent de cette même logique.

    L’actualité des pro­cès en Belgique illustre un autre aspect de ces poli­tiques visant à dis­sua­der et décou­ra­ger toute contes­ta­tion : ce n’est plus l’acte d’un indi­vi­du, dans un contexte déter­mi­né et spé­ci­fique, qui est condam­né, visé, répri­mé, mais la poten­tia­li­té même de s’op­po­ser à une poli­tique gou­ver­ne­men­tale. Les pro­cès poli­tiques sur ce sujet sont nom­breux, et ceux visant Cedric Herrou, par­ti­cu­liè­re­ment média­ti­sés, ont très rapi­de­ment mon­tré la ligne à ne pas fran­chir… Dès 2017, lors d’un pro­cès en appel, l’a­vo­cat géné­ral avan­çait qu’une qua­li­fi­ca­tion d’aide huma­ni­taire (soit une non péna­li­sa­tion) ne pou­vait s’ap­pli­quer « quand l’aide s’inscrit dans une contes­ta­tion glo­bale de la loi6 ». Par ailleurs, les témoi­gnages col­lec­tés par ces deux col­lec­tifs révèlent que les vio­lences, mau­vais trai­te­ments et sévices per­pé­trés par la police contre les exi­lés en pré­ca­ri­té de séjour seraient en nette aug­men­ta­tion — avec une sys­té­ma­ti­sa­tion des nuits au cachot avant libé­ra­tion le len­de­main.

    Dans un article paru en 2016, Olivier Clochard, cher­cheur au CNRS et membre du réseau Migreurop, fait état des dif­fé­rentes moda­li­tés de lutte à l’in­té­rieur de plu­sieurs lieux de déten­tion pour étran­gers, à tra­vers l’Europe. Il écrit ain­si : « Par diverses mani­fes­ta­tions, les indi­vi­dus tentent donc de résis­ter à l’assignation à vivre enfer­més en com­met­tant dif­fé­rentes actions ou en inter­pel­lant autant qu’ils le peuvent les acteurs qui les entourent et ceux situés à l’extérieur (asso­cia­tions, média­teurs, jour­na­listes, cher­cheurs, etc.), sus­cep­tibles de dénon­cer et de faire évo­luer leur situa­tion, qu’ils consi­dèrent comme injuste. » Faire savoir, mais aus­si arti­cu­ler les luttes, pour décu­pler leur force. En Belgique, la CRER et GVO orga­nisent régu­liè­re­ment des actions devant un centre fer­mé : elles visent non seule­ment à « faire voir » , en ame­nant des gens devant ces lieux sou­vent excen­trés, loin des regards ; à mani­fes­ter un refus contre cette poli­tique d’en­fer­me­ment ; à démon­trer un sou­tien et une lutte com­mune avec les per­sonnes enfer­mées. Et ça n’est pas sans effets sur les détenus7. Depuis quelque temps, ces ins­ti­tu­tions mettent en place de nou­velles mesures : les déte­nus sont dépla­cés d’aile afin de les empê­cher de voir la mobi­li­sa­tion depuis leurs fenêtres. « Ils orga­nisent même par­fois des tour­nois de baby­foot, mettent de la musique très fort pour que les per­sonnes dedans n’en­tendent pas notre pré­sence devant », s’in­digne un des deux mili­tants. Les pos­si­bi­li­tés d’al­liances, à l’in­té­rieur de ces espaces comme avec l’ex­té­rieur, sont métho­di­que­ment empê­chées. Mais si les luttes de l’in­té­rieur semblent tou­jours plus mar­quées de déses­poir, elles ne cessent de démon­trer leur force et leur per­sé­vé­rance — à l’ins­tar des per­sonnes qui par­viennent à com­mu­ni­quer avec l’ex­té­rieur, témoi­gner, ras­sem­bler des infor­ma­tions, pré­ve­nir des expul­sions à venir, envoyer des pho­tos de ce qui se pro­duit entre ces murs8…

    Moins d’arrivées et plus de #camps

    Depuis 2016, le nombre de per­sonnes en demande d’a­sile a consi­dé­ra­ble­ment dimi­nué en Belgique, pour reve­nir aux pro­por­tions connues depuis le début des années 2000. Sur les 20 der­nières années, 20 à 25 000 demandes d’a­sile y ont été enre­gis­trées chaque année : seule l’an­née 2015 (trom­peu­se­ment appe­lée « crise migra­toire »9 dans toute l’Europe) a vu près de 45 000 per­sonnes y deman­der pro­tec­tion. En 2017, les demandes d’a­sile avaient chu­té de près de 61 %, à l’ins­tar du nombre d’ar­ri­vées dans toute l’Europe, qui avait dimi­nué de moi­tié10. Plus encore, le nombre de « fran­chis­se­ments illé­gaux » des fron­tières euro­péennes est pas­sé de 2,3 mil­lions, en 2015 et 2016, à « 150 114, le niveau le plus bas depuis cinq ans ».

    Mais on ne trouve de cette réa­li­té aucun écho dans les dis­cours et mesures poli­tiques belges. Tous les indi­ca­teurs de sur­face laissent pen­ser le contraire. En pre­mier lieu, l’al­lon­ge­ment des délais d’at­tente pour enre­gis­trer une demande d’a­sile en 2019 : il faut comp­ter entre quatre à six mois pour pou­voir intro­duire une demande d’a­sile ultérieure11 à l’Office des étran­gers, soit la toute pre­mière étape d’une pro­cé­dure déjà longue — l’ar­gu­ment avan­cé étant que l’of­fice est débor­dé. Les centres d’ac­cueil pour per­sonnes en demande d’a­sile sont pleins à cra­quer : « On était déjà six, par­fois huit par chambre. Maintenant, ils ont ajou­té un étage aux lits super­po­sés, et dans cer­taines chambres il y a même des lits de camps : c’est du délire », nous révé­lait un deman­deur d’a­sile au cours d’un échange. Les condi­tions de vie dans ces lieux étaient pour­tant déjà bien dif­fi­ciles, du fait d’une pro­mis­cui­té très impor­tante, d’une concen­tra­tion de per­sonnes sur un mode « ghet­toï­sa­tion » et d’un contrôle social quo­ti­dien stricte et sou­vent infantilisant12.

    Pour ne citer qu’un autre point : la pré­sence tou­jours plus visible de per­sonnes au parc Maximilien ou autour de la gare du Nord à Bruxelles13 ne manquent pas de don­ner une sur-visi­bi­li­té au phé­no­mène. En Belgique comme ailleurs, les regrou­pe­ments de per­sonnes en des lieux géo­gra­phiques pré­cis — de par, notam­ment, les fer­me­tures de fron­tières ou l’in­suf­fi­sance orga­ni­sée de l’« accueil » des deman­deurs d’a­sile — servent de leviers à la mise en scène tou­jours plus obs­cène d’un pro­blème construit de toutes pièces : la soi-disant arri­vée mas­sive et incon­trô­lable de migrants14. Les tra­jec­toires d’exil sont deve­nues plus dif­fi­ciles au fil des ans, du fait, notam­ment, de l’aug­men­ta­tion des dis­po­si­tifs d’en­fer­me­ment, de police et de blo­cages aux fron­tières via l’a­gence #Frontex dont le bud­get et les attri­buts ne cessent d’aug­men­ter. Un très grand nombre de per­sonnes ne vivent pas ici leur pre­mier enfer­me­ment : elles ont été déte­nues dans plu­sieurs camps, plu­sieurs espaces, tout au long du che­min, où elles ont vécu sévices et mau­vais trai­te­ments. Qu’il s’a­gisse de camps d’at­tente « avant d’être admis sur le ter­ri­toire » ou « avant d’être expul­sé »15, ils ne cessent d’aug­men­ter, alors que les chiffres d’ar­ri­vées, eux, dimi­nuent.

    L’enfermement des étrangers : nouveau business ?

    Le gou­ver­ne­ment de Charles Michel16 avait déci­dé, en mai 2017, de dou­bler la capa­ci­té de déten­tion en Belgique en construi­sant trois nou­veaux centres fer­més d’ici 2021 — por­tant le total des places à 1 066, répar­ties sur huit sites. La France avait pour sa part déjà dou­blé la sienne entre 2003 et 2008. L’argument poli­tique avan­cé pour jus­ti­fier l’en­fer­me­ment d’é­tran­gers est celui d’une mesure de der­nier recours, visant à aug­men­ter l’ef­fec­ti­vi­té de l’ex­pul­sion du ter­ri­toire de per­sonnes en situa­tion dite irrégulière17 Dans son rap­port « La déten­tion des migrants dans l’Union euro­péenne : un busi­ness flo­ris­sant », en date de 2016, Lydie Arbogast, elle aus­si membre du réseau Migreurop, démontre que cela ne se véri­fie nul­le­ment dans les faits. Non seule­ment plu­sieurs États de l’Union euro­péenne auraient sys­té­ma­ti­que­ment recours à l’en­fer­me­ment, mais les chiffres révé­le­raient un faible taux d’ex­pul­sions effec­tives. Il fau­drait éga­le­ment ajou­ter à cela que bon nombre d’entre elles, en ver­tu des accords Dublin, se font à des­ti­na­tion de l’État euro­péen jugé res­pon­sable de la demande d’a­sile. Concrètement, cela revient à dire que des cen­taines de per­sonnes sont régu­liè­re­ment expul­sées de la Belgique vers la France (ou inver­se­ment), et qu’elles ne man­que­ront pas de refaire le che­min dans l’autre sens, pour des rai­sons diverses et légi­times.

    La réa­li­té s’a­vère bien loin des inten­tions poli­tiques affi­chées ; pour en avoir un aper­çu, cepen­dant, rien d’é­vident : les chiffres des expul­sions demeurent pour le moins opaques18. De même, il existe très peu de com­mu­ni­ca­tion quant à la dimen­sion finan­cière de ces « poli­tiques de retour for­cé » : ce rap­port y pal­lie. Il montre de manière édi­fiante l’im­pli­ca­tion gran­dis­sante de socié­tés pri­vées : « […] de leur construc­tion à leur admi­nis­tra­tion en pas­sant par les acti­vi­tés liées à leur inten­dance (res­tau­ra­tion, blan­chis­se­rie, ménage, etc.), les camps d’étrangers repré­sentent une source de pro­fits pour de nom­breuses entre­prises. » Des mil­liards d’eu­ros cir­cu­le­raient dans ces nou­veaux mar­chés. Une dif­fé­rence de ges­tion public/privé appa­raît dans les pays euro­péens : du Royaume-Uni, dont le sys­tème de déten­tion est qua­si tota­le­ment pri­va­ti­sé (sur le modèle car­cé­ral éta­su­nien), à la France ou la Belgique, où la ges­tion reste sous auto­ri­té publique mais avec une #sous-trai­tance consé­quente de ser­vices et une forte délé­ga­tion aux ONG de l’ac­com­pa­gne­ment social et juri­dique.

    En Belgique, la somme for­fai­taire allouée par l’État par jour de déten­tion est pas­sée de 40,80 euros en 2007 à 192 euros, 10 ans plus tard19. L’idéologie néo­li­bé­rale, appe­lant de tous ses vœux les pri­va­ti­sa­tions, sait exis­ter sous diverses formes ; quoi­qu’il arrive, elle porte en elle la logique du « moindre coût réel pour le plus de béné­fices ». Tout cela ne peut que pro­duire plus d’en­fer­me­ments, dans des condi­tions tou­jours plus dégra­dantes : leurs effets délé­tères ne feront que s’a­jou­ter à ceux de la pri­va­tion de liber­té. Ces dis­po­si­tifs de déten­tion ne sont d’ailleurs qu’une par­tie (sans doute cen­trale) de ce mar­ché : il fau­drait ajou­ter à cela le busi­ness des expulsions20 — un élu de gauche, du Parti du tra­vail de Belgique (PTB), s’é­ton­nait du coût exor­bi­tant de cer­tains tickets d’a­vion. En 2018, l’État belge a ain­si dépen­sé 88,4 mil­lions d’eu­ros dans cette poli­tique de retour forcé21. Les paral­lèles avec l’u­ni­vers car­cé­ral sont nom­breux, en par­ti­cu­lier, ici, avec ce qu’Angela Davis appelle le « com­plexe péni­ten­tiaire indus­triel ». Le mar­ché de l’en­fer­me­ment, et les gains qui en découlent, ne peuvent que deve­nir le moteur à l’ex­pan­sion de ces lieux — les lois et jus­ti­fi­ca­tions poli­tiques affé­rentes ne man­que­ront pas d’être créées, et leur forme évo­lue­ra.

    Ce 2 avril 2020, un énième scan­dale a écla­té en Belgique : alors que des ral­lon­ge­ments des délais de jus­tice étaient accor­dés du fait de l’im­pact de la crise sani­taire actuelle dans le trai­te­ment des dos­siers, seules les pro­cé­dures concer­nant les étran­gers et les déte­nus étaient exclues de cet accord. Ni les entraves à l’ac­cès réel à la jus­tice en ces temps de para­ly­sie géné­ra­li­sée, ni le faible poids de la ques­tion migra­toire en des temps de crise glo­bale n’ont eu rai­son de la per­pé­tua­tion de ces pra­tiques racistes. Il y eut bien des appels22 à la libé­ra­tion de toutes les per­sonnes enfer­mées pour rai­son admi­nis­tra­tive, ou encore une demande de sus­pen­sion des expul­sions ; mais aucune n’a abou­ti. C’est que la machine à pro­duire des sans-papiers ne manque pas de four­nir une force de tra­vail des plus asser­vis­sables, en ce qu’elle consti­tue l’ar­ché­type moderne d’une « armée de réserve du capi­tal » — en atteste le virage poli­tique dras­tique ita­lien, où il serait ques­tion de régu­la­ri­ser 200 000 per­sonnes afin de relan­cer la pro­duc­tion agri­cole, for­te­ment impac­tée par la crise du coro­na­vi­rus. En Belgique, on estime à 150 000 les per­sonnes en situa­tion de séjour irré­gu­lière, dont un très grand nombre le sont depuis plu­sieurs années. Une force de tra­vail exploi­table à mer­ci, un levier pour exploi­ter plus encore l’en­semble des tra­vailleurs. Si un mar­ché peut se créer dans l’in­ter­valle, l’oc­ca­sion ne sera pas man­quée. Mais la lutte, elle aus­si, se pour­suit par­tout : la semaine pas­sée les col­lec­tifs de sans-papiers de Belgique et de France l’ont encore rappelé23.

    https://www.revue-ballast.fr/le-business-de-lenfermement-detrangers
    #business #asile #migrations #réfugiés #détention_administrative #rétention #sans-papiers #Belgique #France #centres_fermés #privatisation

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Monitoring being pitched to fight Covid-19 was tested on refugees

    The pandemic has given a boost to controversial data-driven initiatives to track population movements

    In Italy, social media monitoring companies have been scouring Instagram to see who’s breaking the nationwide lockdown. In Israel, the government has made plans to “sift through geolocation data” collected by the Shin Bet intelligence agency and text people who have been in contact with an infected person. And in the UK, the government has asked mobile operators to share phone users’ aggregate location data to “help to predict broadly how the virus might move”.

    These efforts are just the most visible tip of a rapidly evolving industry combining the exploitation of data from the internet and mobile phones and the increasing number of sensors embedded on Earth and in space. Data scientists are intrigued by the new possibilities for behavioural prediction that such data offers. But they are also coming to terms with the complexity of actually using these data sets, and the ethical and practical problems that lurk within them.

    In the wake of the refugee crisis of 2015, tech companies and research consortiums pushed to develop projects using new data sources to predict movements of migrants into Europe. These ranged from broad efforts to extract intelligence from public social media profiles by hand, to more complex automated manipulation of big data sets through image recognition and machine learning. Two recent efforts have just been shut down, however, and others are yet to produce operational results.

    While IT companies and some areas of the humanitarian sector have applauded new possibilities, critics cite human rights concerns, or point to limitations in what such technological solutions can actually achieve.

    In September last year Frontex, the European border security agency, published a tender for “social media analysis services concerning irregular migration trends and forecasts”. The agency was offering the winning bidder up to €400,000 for “improved risk analysis regarding future irregular migratory movements” and support of Frontex’s anti-immigration operations.

    Frontex “wants to embrace” opportunities arising from the rapid growth of social media platforms, a contracting document outlined. The border agency believes that social media interactions drastically change the way people plan their routes, and thus examining would-be migrants’ online behaviour could help it get ahead of the curve, since these interactions typically occur “well before persons reach the external borders of the EU”.

    Frontex asked bidders to develop lists of key words that could be mined from platforms like Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube. The winning company would produce a monthly report containing “predictive intelligence ... of irregular flows”.

    Early this year, however, Frontex cancelled the opportunity. It followed swiftly on from another shutdown; Frontex’s sister agency, the European Asylum Support Office (EASO), had fallen foul of the European data protection watchdog, the EDPS, for searching social media content from would-be migrants.

    The EASO had been using the data to flag “shifts in asylum and migration routes, smuggling offers and the discourse among social media community users on key issues – flights, human trafficking and asylum systems/processes”. The search covered a broad range of languages, including Arabic, Pashto, Dari, Urdu, Tigrinya, Amharic, Edo, Pidgin English, Russian, Kurmanji Kurdish, Hausa and French.

    Although the EASO’s mission, as its name suggests, is centred around support for the asylum system, its reports were widely circulated, including to organisations that attempt to limit illegal immigration – Europol, Interpol, member states and Frontex itself.

    In shutting down the EASO’s social media monitoring project, the watchdog cited numerous concerns about process, the impact on fundamental rights and the lack of a legal basis for the work.

    “This processing operation concerns a vast number of social media users,” the EDPS pointed out. Because EASO’s reports are read by border security forces, there was a significant risk that data shared by asylum seekers to help others travel safely to Europe could instead be unfairly used against them without their knowledge.

    Social media monitoring “poses high risks to individuals’ rights and freedoms,” the regulator concluded in an assessment it delivered last November. “It involves the use of personal data in a way that goes beyond their initial purpose, their initial context of publication and in ways that individuals could not reasonably anticipate. This may have a chilling effect on people’s ability and willingness to express themselves and form relationships freely.”

    EASO told the Bureau that the ban had “negative consequences” on “the ability of EU member states to adapt the preparedness, and increase the effectiveness, of their asylum systems” and also noted a “potential harmful impact on the safety of migrants and asylum seekers”.

    Frontex said that its social media analysis tender was cancelled after new European border regulations came into force, but added that it was considering modifying the tender in response to these rules.
    Coronavirus

    Drug shortages put worst-hit Covid-19 patients at risk
    European doctors running low on drugs needed to treat Covid-19 patients
    Big Tobacco criticised for ’coronavirus publicity stunt’ after donating ventilators

    The two shutdowns represented a stumbling block for efforts to track population movements via new technologies and sources of data. But the public health crisis precipitated by the Covid-19 virus has brought such efforts abruptly to wider attention. In doing so it has cast a spotlight on a complex knot of issues. What information is personal, and legally protected? How does that protection work? What do concepts like anonymisation, privacy and consent mean in an age of big data?
    The shape of things to come

    International humanitarian organisations have long been interested in whether they can use nontraditional data sources to help plan disaster responses. As they often operate in inaccessible regions with little available or accurate official data about population sizes and movements, they can benefit from using new big data sources to estimate how many people are moving where. In particular, as well as using social media, recent efforts have sought to combine insights from mobile phones – a vital possession for a refugee or disaster survivor – with images generated by “Earth observation” satellites.

    “Mobiles, satellites and social media are the holy trinity of movement prediction,” said Linnet Taylor, professor at the Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology and Society in the Netherlands, who has been studying the privacy implications of such new data sources. “It’s the shape of things to come.”

    As the devastating impact of the Syrian civil war worsened in 2015, Europe saw itself in crisis. Refugee movements dominated the headlines and while some countries, notably Germany, opened up to more arrivals than usual, others shut down. European agencies and tech companies started to team up with a new offering: a migration hotspot predictor.

    Controversially, they were importing a concept drawn from distant catastrophe zones into decision-making on what should happen within the borders of the EU.

    “Here’s the heart of the matter,” said Nathaniel Raymond, a lecturer at the Yale Jackson Institute for Global Affairs who focuses on the security implications of information communication technologies for vulnerable populations. “In ungoverned frontier cases [European data protection law] doesn’t apply. Use of these technologies might be ethically safer there, and in any case it’s the only thing that is available. When you enter governed space, data volume and ease of manipulation go up. Putting this technology to work in the EU is a total inversion.”
    “Mobiles, satellites and social media are the holy trinity of movement prediction”

    Justin Ginnetti, head of data and analysis at the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre in Switzerland, made a similar point. His organisation monitors movements to help humanitarian groups provide food, shelter and aid to those forced from their homes, but he casts a skeptical eye on governments using the same technology in the context of migration.

    “Many governments – within the EU and elsewhere – are very interested in these technologies, for reasons that are not the same as ours,” he told the Bureau. He called such technologies “a nuclear fly swatter,” adding: “The key question is: What problem are you really trying to solve with it? For many governments, it’s not preparing to ‘better respond to inflow of people’ – it’s raising red flags, to identify those en route and prevent them from arriving.”
    Eye in the sky

    A key player in marketing this concept was the European Space Agency (ESA) – an organisation based in Paris, with a major spaceport in French Guiana. The ESA’s pitch was to combine its space assets with other people’s data. “Could you be leveraging space technology and data for the benefit of life on Earth?” a recent presentation from the organisation on “disruptive smart technologies” asked. “We’ll work together to make your idea commercially viable.”

    By 2016, technologists at the ESA had spotted an opportunity. “Europe is being confronted with the most significant influxes of migrants and refugees in its history,” a presentation for their Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems Programme stated. “One burning issue is the lack of timely information on migration trends, flows and rates. Big data applications have been recognised as a potentially powerful tool.” It decided to assess how it could harness such data.

    The ESA reached out to various European agencies, including EASO and Frontex, to offer a stake in what it called “big data applications to boost preparedness and response to migration”. The space agency would fund initial feasibility stages, but wanted any operational work to be jointly funded.

    One such feasibility study was carried out by GMV, a privately owned tech group covering banking, defence, health, telecommunications and satellites. GMV announced in a press release in August 2017 that the study would “assess the added value of big data solutions in the migration sector, namely the reduction of safety risks for migrants, the enhancement of border controls, as well as prevention and response to security issues related with unexpected migration movements”. It would do this by integrating “multiple space assets” with other sources including mobile phones and social media.

    When contacted by the Bureau, a spokeswoman from GMV said that, contrary to the press release, “nothing in the feasibility study related to the enhancement of border controls”.

    In the same year, the technology multinational CGI teamed up with the Dutch Statistics Office to explore similar questions. They started by looking at data around asylum flows from Syria and at how satellite images and social media could indicate changes in migration patterns in Niger, a key route into Europe. Following this experiment, they approached EASO in October 2017. CGI’s presentation of the work noted that at the time EASO was looking for a social media analysis tool that could monitor Facebook groups, predict arrivals of migrants at EU borders, and determine the number of “hotspots” and migrant shelters. CGI pitched a combined project, co-funded by the ESA, to start in 2019 and expand to serve more organisations in 2020.
    The proposal was to identify “hotspot activities”, using phone data to group individuals “according to where they spend the night”

    The idea was called Migration Radar 2.0. The ESA wrote that “analysing social media data allows for better understanding of the behaviour and sentiments of crowds at a particular geographic location and a specific moment in time, which can be indicators of possible migration movements in the immediate future”. Combined with continuous monitoring from space, the result would be an “early warning system” that offered potential future movements and routes, “as well as information about the composition of people in terms of origin, age, gender”.

    Internal notes released by EASO to the Bureau show the sheer range of companies trying to get a slice of the action. The agency had considered offers of services not only from the ESA, GMV, the Dutch Statistics Office and CGI, but also from BIP, a consulting firm, the aerospace group Thales Alenia, the geoinformation specialist EGEOS and Vodafone.

    Some of the pitches were better received than others. An EASO analyst who took notes on the various proposals remarked that “most oversell a bit”. They went on: “Some claimed they could trace GSM [ie mobile networks] but then clarified they could do it for Venezuelans only, and maybe one or two countries in Africa.” Financial implications were not always clearly provided. On the other hand, the official noted, the ESA and its consortium would pay 80% of costs and “we can get collaboration on something we plan to do anyway”.

    The features on offer included automatic alerts, a social media timeline, sentiment analysis, “animated bubbles with asylum applications from countries of origin over time”, the detection and monitoring of smuggling sites, hotspot maps, change detection and border monitoring.

    The document notes a group of services available from Vodafone, for example, in the context of a proposed project to monitor asylum centres in Italy. The proposal was to identify “hotspot activities”, using phone data to group individuals either by nationality or “according to where they spend the night”, and also to test if their movements into the country from abroad could be back-tracked. A tentative estimate for the cost of a pilot project, spread over four municipalities, came to €250,000 – of which an unspecified amount was for “regulatory (privacy) issues”.

    Stumbling blocks

    Elsewhere, efforts to harness social media data for similar purposes were proving problematic. A September 2017 UN study tried to establish whether analysing social media posts, specifically on Twitter, “could provide insights into ... altered routes, or the conversations PoC [“persons of concern”] are having with service providers, including smugglers”. The hypothesis was that this could “better inform the orientation of resource allocations, and advocacy efforts” - but the study was unable to conclude either way, after failing to identify enough relevant data on Twitter.

    The ESA pressed ahead, with four feasibility studies concluding in 2018 and 2019. The Migration Radar project produced a dashboard that showcased the use of satellite imagery for automatically detecting changes in temporary settlement, as well as tools to analyse sentiment on social media. The prototype received positive reviews, its backers wrote, encouraging them to keep developing the product.

    CGI was effusive about the predictive power of its technology, which could automatically detect “groups of people, traces of trucks at unexpected places, tent camps, waste heaps and boats” while offering insight into “the sentiments of migrants at certain moments” and “information that is shared about routes and motives for taking certain routes”. Armed with this data, the company argued that it could create a service which could predict the possible outcomes of migration movements before they happened.

    The ESA’s other “big data applications” study had identified a demand among EU agencies and other potential customers for predictive analyses to ensure “preparedness” and alert systems for migration events. A package of services was proposed, using data drawn from social media and satellites.

    Both projects were slated to evolve into a second, operational phase. But this seems to have never become reality. CGI told the Bureau that “since the completion of the [Migration Radar] project, we have not carried out any extra activities in this domain”.

    The ESA told the Bureau that its studies had “confirmed the usefulness” of combining space technology and big data for monitoring migration movements. The agency added that its corporate partners were working on follow-on projects despite “internal delays”.

    EASO itself told the Bureau that it “took a decision not to get involved” in the various proposals it had received.

    Specialists found a “striking absence” of agreed upon core principles when using the new technologies

    But even as these efforts slowed, others have been pursuing similar goals. The European Commission’s Knowledge Centre on Migration and Demography has proposed a “Big Data for Migration Alliance” to address data access, security and ethics concerns. A new partnership between the ESA and GMV – “Bigmig" – aims to support “migration management and prevention” through a combination of satellite observation and machine-learning techniques (the company emphasised to the Bureau that its focus was humanitarian). And a consortium of universities and private sector partners – GMV among them – has just launched a €3 million EU-funded project, named Hummingbird, to improve predictions of migration patterns, including through analysing phone call records, satellite imagery and social media.

    At a conference in Berlin in October 2019, dozens of specialists from academia, government and the humanitarian sector debated the use of these new technologies for “forecasting human mobility in contexts of crises”. Their conclusions raised numerous red flags. They found a “striking absence” of agreed upon core principles. It was hard to balance the potential good with ethical concerns, because the most useful data tended to be more specific, leading to greater risks of misuse and even, in the worst case scenario, weaponisation of the data. Partnerships with corporations introduced transparency complications. Communication of predictive findings to decision makers, and particularly the “miscommunication of the scope and limitations associated with such findings”, was identified as a particular problem.

    The full consequences of relying on artificial intelligence and “employing large scale, automated, and combined analysis of datasets of different sources” to predict movements in a crisis could not be foreseen, the workshop report concluded. “Humanitarian and political actors who base their decisions on such analytics must therefore carefully reflect on the potential risks.”

    A fresh crisis

    Until recently, discussion of such risks remained mostly confined to scientific papers and NGO workshops. The Covid-19 pandemic has brought it crashing into the mainstream.

    Some see critical advantages to using call data records to trace movements and map the spread of the virus. “Using our mobile technology, we have the potential to build models that help to predict broadly how the virus might move,” an O2 spokesperson said in March. But others believe that it is too late for this to be useful. The UK’s chief scientific officer, Patrick Vallance, told a press conference in March that using this type of data “would have been a good idea in January”.

    Like the 2015 refugee crisis, the global emergency offers an opportunity for industry to get ahead of the curve with innovative uses of big data. At a summit in Downing Street on 11 March, Dominic Cummings asked tech firms “what [they] could bring to the table” to help the fight against Covid-19.

    Human rights advocates worry about the longer term effects of such efforts, however. “Right now, we’re seeing states around the world roll out powerful new surveillance measures and strike up hasty partnerships with tech companies,” Anna Bacciarelli, a technology researcher at Amnesty International, told the Bureau. “While states must act to protect people in this pandemic, it is vital that we ensure that invasive surveillance measures do not become normalised and permanent, beyond their emergency status.”

    More creative methods of surveillance and prediction are not necessarily answering the right question, others warn.

    “The single largest determinant of Covid-19 mortality is healthcare system capacity,” said Sean McDonald, a senior fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation, who studied the use of phone data in the west African Ebola outbreak of 2014-5. “But governments are focusing on the pandemic as a problem of people management rather than a problem of building response capacity. More broadly, there is nowhere near enough proof that the science or math underlying the technologies being deployed meaningfully contribute to controlling the virus at all.”

    Legally, this type of data processing raises complicated questions. While European data protection law - the GDPR - generally prohibits processing of “special categories of personal data”, including ethnicity, beliefs, sexual orientation, biometrics and health, it allows such processing in a number of instances (among them public health emergencies). In the case of refugee movement prediction, there are signs that the law is cracking at the seams.
    “There is nowhere near enough proof that the science or math underlying the technologies being deployed meaningfully contribute to controlling the virus at all.”

    Under GDPR, researchers are supposed to make “impact assessments” of how their data processing can affect fundamental rights. If they find potential for concern they should consult their national information commissioner. There is no simple way to know whether such assessments have been produced, however, or whether they were thoroughly carried out.

    Researchers engaged with crunching mobile phone data point to anonymisation and aggregation as effective tools for ensuring privacy is maintained. But the solution is not straightforward, either technically or legally.

    “If telcos are using individual call records or location data to provide intel on the whereabouts, movements or activities of migrants and refugees, they still need a legal basis to use that data for that purpose in the first place – even if the final intelligence report itself does not contain any personal data,” said Ben Hayes, director of AWO, a data rights law firm and consultancy. “The more likely it is that the people concerned may be identified or affected, the more serious this matter becomes.”

    More broadly, experts worry that, faced with the potential of big data technology to illuminate movements of groups of people, the law’s provisions on privacy begin to seem outdated.

    “We’re paying more attention now to privacy under its traditional definition,” Nathaniel Raymond said. “But privacy is not the same as group legibility.” Simply put, while issues around the sensitivity of personal data can be obvious, the combinations of seemingly unrelated data that offer insights about what small groups of people are doing can be hard to foresee, and hard to mitigate. Raymond argues that the concept of privacy as enshrined in the newly minted data protection law is anachronistic. As he puts it, “GDPR is already dead, stuffed and mounted. We’re increasing vulnerability under the colour of law.”

    https://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/stories/2020-04-28/monitoring-being-pitched-to-fight-covid-19-was-first-tested-o
    #cobaye #surveillance #réfugiés #covid-19 #coronavirus #test #smartphone #téléphones_portables #Frontex #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #Shin_Bet #internet #big_data #droits_humains #réseaux_sociaux #intelligence_prédictive #European_Asylum_Support_Office (#EASO) #EDPS #protection_des_données #humanitaire #images_satellites #technologie #European_Space_Agency (#ESA) #GMV #CGI #Niger #Facebook #Migration_Radar_2.0 #early_warning_system #BIP #Thales_Alenia #EGEOS #complexe_militaro-industriel #Vodafone #GSM #Italie #twitter #détection #routes_migratoires #systèmes_d'alerte #satellites #Knowledge_Centre_on_Migration_and_Demography #Big_Data for_Migration_Alliance #Bigmig #machine-learning #Hummingbird #weaponisation_of_the_data #IA #intelligence_artificielle #données_personnelles

    ping @etraces @isskein @karine4 @reka

    signalé ici par @sinehebdo :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/849167

  • Frontières européennes et #Covid-19 : la commission des affaires européennes du Sénat sensible à l’inquiétude du directeur exécutif de #Frontex

    Jeudi 9 avril 2020

    La commission des affaires européennes du Sénat a entendu, le 8 avril
    2020, par audioconférence, Fabrice LEGGERI, directeur exécutif de
    Frontex, agence européenne chargée de la sécurité des frontières
    extérieures de l’Union européenne (UE).

    Les sénateurs ont interrogé le directeur sur la façon dont Frontex avait
    adapté ses missions à la #fermeture_des_frontières européennes et à la
    période de #confinement actuelle, sur l’évolution récente des #flux_migratoires, sur la situation à la frontière gréco-turque, et enfin sur les moyens alloués à Frontex pour remplir ses missions, en particulier mettre en place le corps européen de 10 000 gardes-frontières et gardes-côtes annoncé pour 2027.

    Fabrice LEGGERI a indiqué que Frontex devait actuellement gérer une
    double #crise : sanitaire, avec les #contrôles imposés par l’épidémie de
    Covid-19, et géopolitique, avec la pression migratoire qu’exerce la
    Turquie sur l’Union européenne en ne régulant plus le flux migratoire à
    la frontière, au mépris de l’accord conclu en 2016. Fin février-début
    mars, 20 000 migrants hébergés en Turquie se sont ainsi présentés aux
    frontières terrestres et maritimes grecques : moins de 2 000 – et non
    pas 150 000 comme allégué par les autorités turques – les ont franchies,
    dans un contexte parfois violent tout à fait inédit. Les autorités
    grecques ont été très réactives, et, avec l’appui de l’UE, la situation
    est aujourd’hui maîtrisée. En dépit du confinement, Frontex a déployé
    900 de ses garde-frontières équipés de protections sanitaires sur le
    terrain, dont 600 en Grèce, priorité du moment pour assurer la
    protection des frontières extérieures européennes.

    Le directeur exécutif a insisté sur le risque budgétaire qui pèse
    lourdement sur Frontex. Alors que cette agence devait se voir allouer 11
    milliards d’euros sur les années 2021 à 2027, les Présidences
    finlandaise puis croate du Conseil de l’UE ont proposé de réduire ce
    budget de moitié. Fabrice LEGGERI a qualifié cette situation de
    « catastrophique » : non seulement, la création du corps européen ne
    serait pas financée, alors que 7 000 candidatures ont été reçues pour
    700 postes à pourvoir au 1er janvier prochain, mais l’agence ne pourrait
    pas renforcer sa contribution au retour effectif des étrangers en
    situation irrégulière vers leur pays d’origine, question pourtant
    essentielle pour la crédibilité de la politique migratoire de l’Union
    européenne.

    Fabrice LEGGERI a indiqué que les flux migratoires avaient logiquement
    diminué dans le contexte actuel de confinement de la majorité de la
    population mondiale, mais qu’il était trop tôt pour évaluer l’effet de
    l’épidémie sur leur évolution de moyen terme. Des sorties de crise à des dates différentes selon les régions du monde devront en tout cas
    conduire à renforcer les contrôles sanitaires aux frontières extérieures
    de l’Europe pour ne pas relancer l’épidémie quand elle sera en voie de
    résorption dans l’UE.

    Le président #Jean_BIZET a déclaré : « Vouloir une Europe qui protège tout en assurant la libre circulation, qui plus est dans un contexte
    d’épidémie, requiert des moyens : il faut absolument sécuriser le #budget de Frontex pour les prochaines années ».

    http://www.senat.fr/presse/cp20200409.html
    #coronavirus #crise_sanitaire #contrôles_frontaliers #crise_géopolitique #pression_migratoire #Turquie #EU #UE #Union_européenne #accord_UE-Turquie #Grèce #frontières #migrations #asile #réfugiés #gardes-frontières #frontières_extérieures #risque_budgétaire

    –----

    –-> commentaire reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 10.04.2020 :

    D’après ce communiqué du Sénat, la pandémie cause des inquiétudes
    à Frontex.
    Mais apparemment ça ne concerne pas la santé des migrants bloqués aux frontières européennes.

    ping @thomas_lacroix @luciebacon

    • Refoulés, détenus, tués…. Quand la Turquie a annoncé l’ouverture de ses frontières, la réponse de la Grèce a été sanglante. Retour sur des violences terribles aux frontières de l’Union européenne.

      Depuis le 27 février, des milliers de personnes se sont dirigées vers la frontière gréco-turque sur l’incitation des autorités turques qui ont même facilité leurs déplacements. Certains demandeurs d’asile et leurs familles vivant en Turquie ont même abandonné leur logement et dépensé tout leur argent pour entreprendre ce périple.

      Cependant, les autorités grecques ont entravé les personnes tentant de franchir la frontière en renforçant les contrôles et en faisant intervenir la police et l’armée qui ont utilisé des gaz lacrymogènes, des canons à eau, des balles en caoutchouc et des balles réelles.
      Deux morts, une disparue

      Dans le cadre de ces violences, au moins deux hommes ont été tués et une femme est portée disparue.

      Muhammad Gulzari, un Pakistanais de 43 ans, a été touché à la poitrine alors qu’il tentait de passer en Grèce au point de passage de la frontière de Pazarkule/Kastanies, et a été déclaré mort dans un hôpital turc le 4 mars. Au cours de ce même événement, cinq autres personnes ont été blessées par balles. Un Syrien de 22 ans, Muhammad al Arab, est également mort dans le secteur.

      Une troisième personne, Fatma [N.D.L.R : nom modifié] originaire de Syrie, est portée disparue et présumée morte. Fatma et son époux ont été séparés de leurs six enfants alors qu’ils tentaient de traverser le fleuve Evros/Meriç, pour entrer en Grèce. Ahmed [N.D.L.R : nom modifié] témoigne que son épouse a disparu et est présumée morte : des soldats grecs ont tiré dans sa direction alors qu’elle tentait de rejoindre leurs enfants, sur la rive grecque du fleuve.

      Selon le témoignage d’Ahmed, il a ensuite été détenu par les autorités grecques, tout comme leurs enfants, pendant quatre ou cinq heures. Pendant leur détention, ils ont été déshabillés et dépouillés de leurs affaires. Ils ont ensuite été ramenés au fleuve et placés dans une embarcation en bois qui les a reconduits, avec d’autres, sur la rive turque. Bien qu’il ait engagé des avocats dans les deux pays pour découvrir ce qui était arrivé à sa femme, Ahmed ne sait toujours pas ce qui s’est passé.

      Coups de matraques, détentions, vols

      Des réfugiés et migrants ont témoigné que les gardes-frontières les ont frappés à coups de matraques, détenus sur des sites dans la zone frontalière pendant des périodes allant de quelques heures à plusieurs jours et renvoyés en Turquie à bord d’embarcations, sur le fleuve Evros/Meriç, par groupes. Ils ont aussi pris leur argent – dans certains cas des milliers de dollars, soit toutes leurs économies – et leur seul espoir de démarrer une nouvelle vie en Europe.

      J’ai traversé le fleuve et ai marché sur le territoire grec pendant quatre jours et quatre nuits, avant de me faire attraper. Ils m’ont conduit dans un endroit où ils m’ont frappé et ont pris mon téléphone et mon argent, 2 000 Lires [environ 275 euros], c’est tout ce que j’avais. Ils m’ont ramené en Turquie en me faisant traverser le fleuve et m’ont laissé là, sans manteau ni chaussures.

      Toujours aucune possibilité de demander l’asile

      En réaction aux actions de la Turquie, la Grèce a renforcé ses capacités de patrouille en mer, avec 52 vaisseaux supplémentaires chargés d’empêcher les arrivées sur les îles et des ressources supplémentaires de Frontex (l’Agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes).

      En parallèle, la Grèce a suspendu la possibilité de demander l’asile pendant un mois, en violation flagrante du droit international et européen. Si cette mesure a cessé d’être en vigueur le 2 avril, les personnes en quête de sécurité ne peuvent toujours pas solliciter l’asile. En effet, les activités du Service d’asile grec sont suspendues jusqu’au 13 mars en raison du COVID-19.

      Dans les îles de la mer Égée, toutes les personnes arrivées après le 1er mars 2020 étaient détenues de manière arbitraire dans des installations portuaires et d’autres zones, sans pouvoir demander l’asile et risquant d’être renvoyées en Turquie ou vers des pays « d’origine ou de transit ».

      Sur la seule île de Lesbos, environ 500 personnes arrivées par la mer, dont plus de 200 mineurs, ont été retenues pendant plus de 10 jours sur un navire de la marine grecque, habituellement utilisé pour transporter des tanks et autres véhicules militaires.

      Toutes les personnes détenues sur les îles ont finalement été transférées vers des centres de rétention plus grands, en Grèce continentale, le 20 mars, où elles sont détenues dans l’attente des décisions de renvoi et sans pouvoir demander l’asile.

      La Grèce doit changer rapidement de cap et autoriser tous les nouveaux arrivants à bénéficier de procédures d’asile et de services élémentaires. Elle doit transférer les personnes qui se trouvent dans les centres de rétention et les camps insalubres vers des structures sûres et adaptées. La propagation rapide du COVID-19 ne fait qu’en souligner l’urgence.

      #frontex #europe #assassin

      Il y a deux actions faciles de proposées par AI https://www.amnesty.fr/actions-mobilisation/grece-protegeons-les-refugies-du-covid-19-
      un mail et pour celleux qui ont touiter un message sur le réseau

    • La frontière gréco-turque a vu affluer un nombre considérable de migrantEs, du fait d’un chantage du régime turc en direction de l’Union Européenne. Le “coronavirus”, là aussi agit comme un révélateur, en même temps qu’il menace.
      http://www.kedistan.net/2020/03/19/frontiere-europeenne-rester-retourner
      http://www.kedistan.net/2020/03/28/evacuation-migrants-frontiere-grece-turquie
      https://www.amnesty.org/en/get-involved/take-action/greece-refugees-coronavirus-covid-19
      #kedistan

    • Greece quarantines Ritsona migrant camp after finding 20 corona cases

      A migrant camp north of the Greek capital Athens has been placed under quarantine after 20 asylum seekers there tested positive for the novel coronavirus.

      The developments occurred after a 19-year-old female migrant from the camp gave birth in hospital in Athens, where she was found to be infected. Authorities then conducted tests on a total of 63 people also staying at the government-run Ritsona camp outside Athens, deciding to place the facility under quarantine after nearly a third of the tests came back positive. Meanwhile, health officials will continue to conduct tests on residents of the camp.

      The infections observed at Ritsona camp are now the first known cases among thousands of asylum seekers living across Greece, with most staying in overcrowded camps mainly on the Aegean islands. The Ritsona camp, however, is located on the Greek mainland, roughly 75 kilometers northeast of Athens, housing about 3,000 migrants.

      Quarantine and isolation at Ritsona

      The Greek migration ministry said that none of the confirmed cases at Ritsona had showed any symptoms thus far. However, in a bid to protect others, movement in and out of the Ritsona camp, will be restricted for at least 14 days; police forces will monitor the implementation of the measures.

      According to the Reuters news agency, the camp has also created an isolation area for those coronavirus patients who might still develop symptoms.

      ’Ticking health bomb’

      Greece recorded its first coronavirus case in late February, reporting more than 1,400 cases so far and 50 deaths. The country’s official population is 11 million. Compared to other EU countries at the forefront of the migration trend into Europe such as Italy and Spain, Greece has thus far kept its corona case numbers relatively low.

      However, with more than 40,000 refugees and migrant presently stuck in refugee camps on the Greek islands alone, the Greek government has described the current situation as a “ticking health bomb.”

      Aid organisations stress that conditions in the overcrowded camps are inhumane, calling for migrants to be evacuated from the Greek islands. Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis that Greece was ready to “protect” its islands, where no case has been recorded so far, while adding that he expects the EU to do more to help improve overall conditions in migrant camps and to assist relocate people to other EU countries.

      “Thank God, we haven’t had a single case of Covid-19 on the island of Lesbos or any other island,” Mitsotakis told CNN. “The conditions are far from being ideal but I should also point out that Greece is dealing with this problem basically on its own. (…) We haven’t had as much support from the European Union as we want.”

      https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/23826/greece-quarantines-ritsona-migrant-camp-after-finding-20-corona-cases

      #camp_de_réfugiés #asile #migrations #Athènes #coronavirus

    • Greece quarantines camp after migrants test coronavirus positive

      Greece has quarantined a migrant camp after 23 asylum seekers tested positive for the coronavirus, authorities said on Thursday, its first such facility to be hit since the outbreak of the disease.

      Tests were conducted after a 19-year-old female migrant living in the camp in central Greece was found infected after giving birth at an Athens hospital last week. She was the first recorded case among thousands of asylum seekers living in overcrowded camps across Greece.

      None of the confirmed cases showed any symptoms, the ministry said, adding that it was continuing its tests.

      Authorities said 119 of 380 people on board a ferry which authorities said had been prevented from docking in Turkey and was now anchored off Athens, had tested positive for the virus.

      Greece recorded its first coronavirus case at the end of February. It has reported 1,425 cases and 53 deaths, excluding the cases on the ferry.

      It is the gateway to Europe for people fleeing conflicts and poverty in the Middle East and beyond, with more than a million passing through Greece during the migrant crisis of 2015-2016.

      Any movement in and out of the once-open Ritsona camp, which is 75 km (45 miles) northeast of Athens and hosts hundreds of people, will be restricted for 14 days, the ministry said. Police would monitor movements.

      The camp has an isolation area for coronavirus patients should the need arise, sources have said.

      Aid agencies renewed their call for more concerted action at the European level to tackle the migration crisis.

      “It is urgently needed to evacuate migrants out of the Greek islands to EU countries,” said Leila Bodeux, policy and advocacy officer for Caritas Europa, an aid agency.

      EU Home Affairs Commissioner Ylva Johansson said it was a stark “warning signal” of what might happen if the virus spilled over into less organised facilities on the Greek islands.

      “(This) may result in a massive humanitarian crisis. This is a danger both for refugees hosted in certain countries outside the EU and for those living in unbearable conditions on the Greek islands,” she said during a European Parliament debate conducted by video link.

      More than 40,000 asylum-seekers are stuck in overcrowded refugee camps on the Greek islands, in conditions which the government itself has described as a “ticking health bomb”.

      Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis has said Greece is ready to protect its islands, where no case has been recorded so far, but urged the EU to provide more help.

      “The conditions are far from ideal but I should also point out that Greece is dealing with this problem basically on its own... We haven’t had as much support from the European Union as we wanted,” he told CNN.

      https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-greece-camp/greece-quarantines-camp-after-migrants-test-coronavirus-positive-idUSKBN21K

    • EU : Athens can handle Covid outbreak at Greek camp

      The European Commission says Greece will be able to manage a Covid-19 outbreak at a refugee camp near Athens.

      “I think they can manage,” Ylva Johansson, the European Commissioner for home affairs, told MEPs on Thursday (2 April).

      The outbreak is linked to the Ritsona camp of some 2,700 people who are all now under quarantine.

      At least 23 have been tested positive without showing any symptoms. Greek authorities had identified the first case after a woman from the camp gave birth at a hospital earlier this week.

      “This development confirms the fact that this fast-moving virus does not discriminate and can affect both migrant and local communities,” Gianluca Rocco, who heads the International Organization for Migration (IOM) in Greece, said in a statement.

      Another six cases linked to local residents have also been identified on the Greek islands.

      Notis Mitarachi, Greece’s minister of migration and asylum, said there are no confirmed cases of the disease in any of the island refugee camps.

      “We have only one affected camp, that is on the mainland, very close to Athens where 20 people have tested positive,” he said.

      Over 40,000 migrants, refugees and asylum seekers are stuck on the islands. Of those, some 20,000 are in Moria, a camp on Lesbos island that is designed to house only 3,000.

      It is unlikely conditions will improve any time soon with Mitarachi noting major changes will only take place before the year’s end. He said the construction of new camps on the mainland first have to be completed.

      “We do not have rooms in the mainland,” he said, when pressed on why there have been no mass evacuations from the islands.

      He placed some of the blame on the EU-Turkey deal, noting anyone transferred to the mainland cannot be returned to Turkey. Turkey has since the start of March refused to accept any returns given the coronavirus pandemic.

      Despite the deal, Mitarachi noted 10,000 people had still been transferred to the mainland so far this year. He also insisted all measures are being taken to ensure the safety of the Greek island camp refugees.

      In reality, Moria has one functioning faucet per 1,300 people. A lockdown also has been imposed, making any notions of social distancing impossible.

      He said all new arrivals from Turkey are separated and kept away from the camps. Special health units will also be dispatched into the camps to test for cases, he said.

      Mitarachi is demanding other EU states help take in people, to ease the pressure.

      Eight EU states had in early March pledged to take in 1,600 unaccompanied minors. The Commission says it expects the first relocations to take place before Easter at the latest.
      The money

      Greece has also been earmarked some €700m of EU funds to help in the efforts.

      The first €350m has already been divided up.

      Around €190m will go to paying rental accommodation for 25,000 beds on the mainland and provide cash assistance to 90,000 people under the aegis of the UN refugee agency (UNHCR).

      Another €100m will go to 31 camps run by the International Organization for Migration. Approximately €25m will go to help families and kids on the islands through the UNHCR.

      And €35m is set to help relocate others out of the camps and into hotels.

      The remaining €350m will go to building five new migrant centres (€220m), help pay for returns (€10m), support the Greek asylum service (€50m), enforce borders (€50m), and give an additional €10m each to Frontex and the EU’s asylum agency, Easo.

      https://euobserver.com/coronavirus/147973

      –-----

      Avec ce commentaire de Marie Martin, reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 03.04.2020 :

      Des informations intéressantes issues de l’article de Nikolak Nielsen, paru dans EuObserver aujourd’hui sur les fonds de l’UE dédiés à l’accueil et aux transferts depuis les hotspots.

      C’est assez paradoxal de voir la #Commissaire_européenne affirmer que le Grèce pourra gérer un éruption du Covid19, laissant presque penser à un esseulement de la Grèce.

      En vérité, l’article indique, chiffres à l’appui, que plusieurs actions sont financées (700M euros dédiés dont 190M pour le UNHCR afin de payer des hébergements à hauteur de 25 000 lits sur la péninsule et de l’assistance financières à 90 000 personnes réfugiées).
      Ces #financements s’ajoutent aux engagements début mars membres de relocaliser des mineurs isolés dans d’autres pays de l’UE (8 Etats membres).

      Toutefois, si l’UE ne fait donc pas « rien », les limites habituelles au processus peuvent être invoquées avec raison : #aide_d'urgence qui va essentiellement au #HCR et à l’#OIM (100M pour l’OIM et les 31 camps qu’elle gère et 25M d’aide pour les familles et les enfants dispatchés sur les îles, via le UNHCR), 35M serviront à soutenir la relocalisation hors des camps dans des #hôtels.

      Le reste des financements octroyés s’intègrent dans la logique de gestion des #hotspots :

      350M euros serviront à construire 5 nouveaux centres
      10M pour financer les retours
      50M pour soutenir l’administration grecque dédiée à l’asile (sans précision s’il s’agit de soutien à l’aide juridique pour les demandeurs d’asile, d’aide en ressources humaines pour l’administration et l’examen des demandes, ou du soutien matériel dû dans le cadre de l’accueil des demandeurs d’asile)
      10M pour #Frontex
      10M pour #EASO

      #retour #aide_au_retour #renvois #expulsions #argent #aide_financière #IOM

  • Non aux drones tueurs israéliens pour contrôler les #frontières_européennes

    A l’occasion de la journée de la Terre et des 2 ans du début de la Grande Marche du Retour à Gaza, une large coalition européenne d’ONG, syndicats, associations de migrants etc. lancent ce lundi 30 mars une pétition pour dire STOP aux #drones_israéliens pour surveiller les frontières de l’Union européenne et contrôler l’entrée de migrants sur son territoire.

    Israël utilise la pandémie comme un écran de fumée pour accélérer l’annexion de facto en Cisjordanie et accroître la répression. Le COVID19 se répand dans la bande de Gaza assiégée, avec seulement 200 kits de dépistage et 40 lits de soins intensifs pour 2 millions de personnes. Toute réponse effective est impossible. Pendant ce temps, l’UE continue de fermer les frontières et emprisonne littéralement les migrants dans des camps surpeuplés.

    Mobilisons-nous où que nous soyons, en ligne : Nous avons besoin de solidarité, pas de militarisation ni de drones tueurs israéliens !

    Depuis novembre 2018, l’Agence européenne pour la sécurité maritime (#EMSA) a loué, par l’intermédiaire de la compagnie portugaise #CeiiA, deux drones #Hermes_900, appelés encore « #drones_tueurs » et fabriqués par la plus grande entreprise militaire d’Israël, #Elbit_Systems. Selon le contrat de #location pour deux ans, pour un montant de 59 millions d’euros, les drones sont utilisés principalement pour mettre en place les politiques répressives anti-immigration de l’Union européenne. Les experts condamnent ce changement vers la surveillance aérienne en tant qu’il constitue une abrogation de la responsabilité de sauver des vies. Pire encore, les drones tueurs d’Elbit assistent #Frontex et les autorités nationales en #Grèce, où migrants et réfugiés ont été ciblés en mer à balles réelles.

    Elbit Systems développe ses drones avec la collaboration de l’#armée_israélienne et promeut sa technologie en tant que « testée sur le terrain » — sur les Palestiniens. L’entreprise fournit 85% des drones utilisés par Israël dans ses assauts militaires répétés et son inhumain siège permanent de Gaza. Les drones Hermes ont tué les quatre enfants jouant sur la plage pendant l’attaque d’Israël sur Gaza en 2014.

    Ces drones peuvent tuer mais ne peuvent sauver des vies.

    https://plateforme-palestine.org/Non-aux-drones-tueurs-israeliens-pour-controler-les-frontieres
    #Israël #drones #contrôles_frontaliers #EU #UE #Europe #surveillance #complexe_militaro-industriel #pétition #frontières #migrations #asile #réfugiés #militarisation_des_frontières

    ping @etraces @isskein @karine4 @fil @mobileborders

  • Contre l’#exception, faire problème commun
    de #Sarah_Mekdjian

    #Biopolitiques_différentielles
    Alors que le #confinement, désormais sous #surveillance_policière depuis le 16 mars 2020 en France, doit protéger de la propagation de la #maladie, l’#enfermement continue de tuer, et de creuser les lignes d’une #biopolitique_différentielle, fondée sur la pénalisation des vies. Dans les #prisons italiennes, les parloirs ont été supprimés, les mutineries flambent. Sept détenus seraient morts dans ces insurrections.

    En France, des détenus qui ont eu des parloirs avec des personnes venues de zones dites dangereuses ont été placés en #isolement. #Punition et #protection se conjuguent. A #Fresnes, une des prisons les plus surpeuplées de France, les premiers cas de #contamination apparaissent, avec une première mort d’un prisonnier évacué. Les #masques sont progressivement distribués aux #personnels_pénitentiaires, même chose pour la #police qui surveille dans les centres de #rétention_administrative. Ce qui n’est pas le cas pour les détenus, ni les retenus.
    La lettre écrite par les retenus du centre de rétention administrative (#CRA) de #Lesquin à proximité de Lille est un cri d’alerte : suite au cas d’une personne contaminée à l’intérieur du CRA le vendredi 13 mars 2020, et à son évacuation, les policiers de la #police_aux_frontières (#PAF) portent des masques et des gants, les retenus non. Elles et ils ont décidé de ne plus fréquenter les lieux collectifs, notamment le #réfectoire. « Nous ne mangeons donc plus depuis trois jours pour beaucoup d’entre nous ». Les auteurs de la lettre, reproduite ici, poursuivent en montrant combien la suppression des visites des proches et soutiens, l’absence de l’association qui enregistre les demandes d’asile, informe, apporte des soutiens, isole encore davantage. « De nombreuses audiences du juge des libertés et de la détention sont reportées, or c’est à l’occasion de ces audiences que nous pouvons être libérés ». « Pour notre survie et le respect de nos droits, nous exigeons la liberté immédiate de toutes les personnes enfermées au CRA de Lesquin et dans tous les centres de rétention ! ».

    Exacerbation du gradient différentiel d’exposition aux risques

    L’#enfermement, par la détention et la rétention, devient, en temps de confinement, #isolement_des_foules : l’isolement ne protège pas, mais expose à la #mort, à une #gouvernementalité qui précisément crée un #différentiel_normatif, depuis celles et ceux qui peuvent se confiner pour se protéger de l’exposition aux risques, et celles et ceux qui sont isolés contre leur gré, en tant que population surpeuplée. Il ne s’agit pas d’une situation d’exception, mais de l’exacerbation de situations structurelles d’#isolement - #surpeuplement qui s’intègrent à une biopolitique différentielle.
    L’image de policiers de la PAF masqués et gantés dans les CRA, en cette période de coronavirus, qui surveillent des personnes isolées et exposées au risque, rappelle celle des policiers masqués et gantés de #FRONTEX qui, dans les avions, hors période de pandémie, expulsent des personnes menottées. Les politiques logistiques immunitaires au service d’un contrôle et d’une hyperexploitation de la force de travail sont désormais renforcées.
    Sur les îles grecques, machines internes de l’externalisation frontalière européenne (d’autant plus depuis que la Turquie a en partie refusé cette externalisation), les camps dits de réfugiés isolent des foules, exposées aux risques, réels, du coronavirus et de nombreuses autres maladies, tout comme d’une très grande pauvreté, chacun de ces éléments se renforçant mutuellement. Médecins sans frontières, partie prenante des dispositifs humanitaires de l’#encampement, appelle, à une évacuation urgente de ces #camps, sans demander une transformation radicale de la biopolitique qui crée la possibilité même de ces camps. Une coordinatrice médicale de Médecins sans frontières en #Grèce, précise : « Dans certaines parties du camp de #Moria, il n’y a qu’un seul point d’eau pour 1 300 personnes et pas de savon. Des familles de cinq ou six personnes doivent dormir dans des espaces ne dépassant pas 3m². Cela signifie que les mesures recommandées comme le lavage fréquent des mains et la distanciation sociale pour prévenir la propagation du virus sont tout simplement impossibles ». Il n’y a pas de distanciation sociale possible parmi les foules concentrées et isolées. On pourrait même dire que l’encampement des personnes étrangères permet, en partie, une meilleure acceptation du confinement. Autrement dit, puisqu’il y a des situations « pires », notamment dans les camps, dans les prisons, dans les CRA, pourquoi se plaindre du confinement sous surveillance policière décidé au nom de la « protection » et de la « sécurité » de celles et ceux, par ailleurs, qui peuvent se confiner ?
    A #Grenoble, alors que l’Université est fermée « au public », mais très ouverte aux grands vents néolibéraux de l’enseignement numérique, le #Patio_solidaire, squat occupé depuis deux ans par des personnes la plupart en situation de demande d’asile, dans les locaux désaffectés d’anciens laboratoires de droit, est un oublié de la fermeture : les jours passent tous comme des dimanches, personne ne circule plus sur le campus. Il manque du savon, des denrées alimentaires, le manque est structurel, il est encore renforcé désormais. Le confinement de celles et ceux qui sont autorisé.e.s à l’être renforce nécessairement l’isolement de celles et ceux qui étaient déjà la cible des politiques immunitaires logistiques. L’idée ici n’est pas d’opposer des situations, ni de relativiser la nécessité du confinement. Il s’agit de relever combien les biopolitiques différentielles sont encore exacerbées par ces temps de #pandémie. Il n’y a pas l’#extérieur d’un côté, l’#intérieur de l’autre, mais un gradient, plus ou moins létal, allant du confinement à l’isolement, avec des modalités graduelles d’exposition aux risques, de contrôle, et des boucles de renforcement.

    Pas de mesures d’exception, mais faire problème commun

    Plusieurs textes insistent sur le fait que le confinement permettrait peut-être de faire #problème_commun, et précisément de faire insister qu’il n’y a pas d’un côté les uns, de l’autre, les autres : comprendre, prendre avec soi, ce que signifie être enfermé, détenu, retenu, ciblé par les politiques immunitaires structurelles, depuis précisément la situation présentée comme exceptionnelle du confinement.
    La pandémie de coronavirus permettra-t-elle effectivement que les luttes contre la pénalisation des vies et contre les biopolitiques différentielles soient entendues ? Il est très probable qu’elles ne le soient pas. Ou qu’elles le soient, en partie précisément au nom de l’exception de la situation de la pandémie du coronavirus, ce qui renforcerait, dans le même temps, le gradient différentiel de normes préexistants à la pandémie. Pour illustrer les risques de l’exception, les appels et décisions de libération de retenu.e.s en CRA sont exemplaires.
    Ainsi, depuis le 17 mars 2020, plusieurs décisions de cours d’appel ont ordonné la libération de personnes retenues, en invoquant les conditions sanitaires actuelles exceptionnelles, qui impliquent notamment la suppression des vols qui permettraient les expulsions. Voici par exemple l’extrait de décision de la cour d’appel de Lille, en date du 17 mars 2020, qui acte la non-prolongation de la retenue administrative d’une personne :

    Cette décision va dans le sens de l’argumentaire d’une pétition ayant circulé largement sur les réseaux sociaux dès le 16 mars et demandant la libération des personnes étrangères retenues en centre de rétention :
    « Avec la pandémie en cours de plus en plus de pays adoptent des mesures de protection. Les frontières se ferment et il n’existe plus de perspective de renvoi. Dans ce contexte, la rétention ne se justifie plus ».

    S’il l’on peut se réjouir des décisions de justice amenant à la libération de retenu.e.s, par ailleurs décisions, aux cas par cas et à la demande des avocat.e.s, il semble également important de préciser qu’avoir recours à l’argument d’exception tend à renforcer l’idée de normes, et notamment sous-jacente, la norme de personnes étrangères privées de liberté et expulsables en raison de l’absence de titres de séjour, de refus de leurs demandes d’asile.
    Quand les vols seront rétablis, la rétention pourrait-elle donc « normalement » reprendre ? On peut imaginer que pour beaucoup l’appel à l’argument d’exception soit d’abord stratégique, mais il est aussi particulièrement problématique, dans un contexte où la crise sanitaire renforce les replis nationalistes, qui vont de la recherche d’origines nationales, mais aussi ethniques, voire raciales au coronavirus, avec de nombreux discours et actes racistes prononcés à l’égard de la Chine et des ressortissant.e.s chinois.e.s ou assimilés comme tels, jusqu’au traitement différentiel des personnes étrangères en relation à l’exposition aux risques.

    Ainsi, faire problème commun ne peut pas simplement tenir dans le fait de vivre le confinement, et d’appeler à des mesures exceptionnelles, en temps d’exception.

    Précisément il n’y pas d’exception, il y a une accentuation, accélération, exacerbation de tout ce qui est déjà là, déjà présent. En appeler à l’exception, c’est renforcer encore le gradient normatif différentiel qui neutralise toutes transformations radicales. Le renforcement des #luttes face à l’exacerbation généralisée de ce qui existait avant la pandémie est aussi en cours.

    https://lundi.am/Contre-l-exception-faire-probleme-commun
    #biopolitique

  • Bulgaria is not changing its push-back policy at its border to Turkey

    On the 27th of February 2020 the Turkish government announced migrants will no longer be stopped on the Turkish side of the borders to Greece and Bulgaria. Following this statement thousands of migrants are moving on to Edirne, which is located in the three country border region. For this they used buses (non-stop), organized by the Turkish government, some took taxis. While during the night many people tried to cross the Turkish-Greek border, 60 migrants have been pushed back at the Bulgarian-Turkish border on the following morning.

    The practice of pushing people back to Turkey has not changed so far. During the last days the Greek border is much worse when it comes to the number of people who have been pushed back in only in a short while, but for Greece and Bulgaria this push back practice is not new. While in the past asylum seekers and Bulgarian government officials have both admitted that the Bulgarian border fence could be easily crossed, the Bulgarian authorities have a bad reputation, regarding their behavior towards migrants. The Bulgarian Defence Minister Krassimir Karakachanov just stated that the bulgarian army is ready at any time.

    Media reported that FRONTEX installed 60 additional staff members to the already existing 50 ones at the Bulgarian-Turkish border. This raises the question of whether FRONTEX will only watch the Bulgarian authorities while they go on with their push-back practice in the upcoming days. Until now, the number of crossing incidents around the Turkish-Bulgarian border near Kapıkule/Kapitan Andreevo seem much lower in comparison to the Greek-Turkish border around Pazarkule/Kastanies – both border crossings are only about 10 km away from each other.

    Meanwhile in the whole border region thousands of people, including families, are waiting in the border region under critical weather conditions. Bordermonitoring Bulgaria calls the Bulgarian authorities and FRONTEX to stop the push back practice, which is against international law and the Non-refoulement principle.

    https://bulgaria.bordermonitoring.eu/2020/03/02/bulgaria-is-not-changing-its-push-back-policy-at-its-borde
    #frontières #Turquie #Bulgarie #asile #migrations #réfugiés #push-back #refoulements #refoulement #Frontex

  • Sådan foregår bevogtningen af EU’s yderste grænser : Dansk patruljebåd beordret til at sætte flygtninge tilbage i vandet

    Dansk Frontex-mandskab nægtede at adlyde kontroversiel ordre i livsfarligt farvand.

    Gråmalede skrog hugger i fortøjningerne. Bølgeskvulp slår over betonmolen, der skærmer havnen på den græske ø Kos mod det åbne vand.

    En stiv kuling folder dannebrogsflagene i agterenden af de danske patruljebåde ud. De to fartøjer udgør Danmarks bidrag til EU’s grænse- og kystvagtsagentur, Frontex.

    Siden juni sidste år har de håndteret flere end 1.800 flygtninge og migranter i primitive gummibåde, der krydser det smalle farvand mellem Tyrkiet og Kos. Men det er slut nu.

    Siden Tyrkiet i sidste uge åbnede grænserne mod EU, er de danske patruljebåde blevet trukket tilbage. Nu agerer de i stedet øjne og ører for den græske kystvagt, der tager sig af selve håndteringen af de primitive og overfyldte gummibåde.

    Det fortæller den danske operationsleder under en briefing for forsvarsminister Trine Bramsen (S), der i går besøgte de 17 danskere ved Frontex-missionen på Kos.

    Her gør han det klart, at de lokale græske myndigheder lige nu håndterer flygtninge- og migrantbådene anderledes, end hvad de danske retningslinjer tillader.

    – Vores bidrag kommer ikke til at lave handlinger, manøvrer eller andet, der er til fare for liv og helbred, forklarer operationsleder Jens Møller fra Rigspolitiet bagefter.

    Han hentyder til videoklip af græske patruljebåde, der sejler tæt på de overfyldte migrantbåde, for at få dem til at vende om. Eller migrantbåde, der bliver slæbt eller puffet tilbage på den tyrkiske side af søgrænsen.

    Travlhed siden krise brød ud

    Betjente fra Rigspolitiet bemander sammen med besætninger fra Forsvaret de to patruljebåde. Siden sidste uge har de skruet kraftigt op for operationerne.

    – Før var opgaven at hjælpe med at samle op og bringe ind til land. Nu er forholdsordren, at vi skal fungere som øjne og så vidt muligt spotte eventuelle migrantbåde på afstand, forklarer han.

    – Ser vi nogle migrantbåde, skal vi melde til ‘Hellenic Coast Guard’ (Den græske kystvagt, red.) som kommer og håndterer dem.

    Både operationsleder Jens Møller samt orlogskaptajn Jan Niegsch, der leder den militære besætning, bekræfter, at den græske kystvagt har ordre til at forsøge at forhindre migrantbådene i at passere søgrænsen mellem Tyrkiet og Grækenland.

    – Det gør de på den måde, som de vurderer at være den rette, siger Jens Møller diplomatisk.

    Siden fredag har den tyrkiske kystvagt, der plejede at stoppe otte ud af ti migrantbåde, ikke vist sig, siger han.
    Har dokumenteret risikabel adfærd

    De danske søfolk og betjente fortæller, at de på afstand har set episoder, hvor græske patruljebåde sejler tæt på de overfyldte gummibåde, for at få dem til at vende om.

    Men det er risikabelt at stoppe en gummibåd med magt, siger orlogskaptajn Jan Niegsch.

    – Hvis den vil frem, så sejler den videre, og hvis man prøver at forhindre den, så kan man ende med en situation, hvor det bliver en søredning i stedet. De både er ikke bygget til at sejle på havet.

    Derfor er de danske besætninger nu begyndt at dokumentere, hvad de oplever, når de på afstand observerer Hellenic Coast Guard.

    – Hvis vi bevidner noget, som vi mener er i strid med reglerne, så dokumenterer vi det og melder det bagud i vores system. I første omgang bagud til Frontex, siger Jens Møller.
    Danskere fik kontroversiel ordre

    Flere af besætningsmedlemmerne fortæller, at det handler om reglerne for godt sømandsskab og forpligtelsen til at hjælpe folk i havsnød.

    Netop derfor har det hidtil været proceduren, at de danske både flytter flygtninge og migranter fra gummibådene og i sikkerhed på fordækket af søværnets patruljebåde.

    Ganske enkelt af rettidig omhu. Strøm- og vindforhold gør farvandet lumsk. Et enkelt hul i de simple gummibåde kan betyde, at de synker, og panik bryder ud med hjerteskærende scener til følge.

    Bagefter har de som oftest sejlet passagererne, der kan være ældre mennesker, kvinder samt børn helt ned til toårs-alderen, ind til havnen på Kos. De fleste er dog yngre mænd, fortæller de.

    Krisen ved EU’s yderste grænser fik forleden en dansk patruljebåd til at nægte at parere en ordre fra ’Operation Poseidons’ kommandocentral.

    Besætningen havde netop bjærget 33 flygtninge og migranter ombord på fordækket, da ordren kom på radioen.

    ’Sæt dem tilbage i vandet og slæb dem over søgrænsen’.
    Nægtede at adlyde hovedkvarter

    Besætningen vurderede, at det ville være forbundet med livsfare at udføre ordren. I første omgang, når de formentlig skulle trække pistolerne eller bruge fysisk magt for at få de lettede flygtninge til at klatre tilbage i den primitive gummibåd. En gummibåd, der ifølge et besætningsmedlem ikke var i ’sødygtig stand’.

    Operationsleder Jens Møller bekræfter episoden.

    – Fartøjschefen vurderede, at det ikke var forsvarligt. Så blev ordren omstødt, og de blev bragt til Kos havn.

    Inde på land gav operationsleder Jens Møller fartøjschefen ret. Besætningen på patruljebåden skulle ikke adlyde ordren fra den lokale, græske Frontex-leder.

    – Er det forbundet med fare at sætte dem tilbage i gummibåden, så kan vi ikke stå inde for at gøre det. Det var, hvad jeg gav mandskabet besked på, til jeg fik verificeret, at den ordre blev omstødt, beskriver han.

    Minister tilfreds med reaktion

    Siden flygtningekrisen brød ud sidste fredag, har det ikke været muligt at søge asyl i Grækenland. I stedet bliver de 1.702 migranter, der ifølge græske oplysninger har krydset søvejen til øerne siden fredag, tilbageholdt. Formentlig for at blive transporteret tilbage til Tyrkiet.

    Selv om presset på grænserne belaster Frontex-landene, der nu vil skrue op for indsatsen, er forsvarsminister Trine Bramsen tilfreds med, at besætningen ikke adlød ordren.

    – De løste opgaven ud fra det mandat, de har fået med, konstaterer hun.

    Onsdag tilbød hun desuden at støtte Frontex med et Challenger-overvågningsfly i 30 dage samt telte, tæpper og generatorer fra Beredskabsstyrelsen.

    https://www.dr.dk/nyheder/indland/saadan-foregaar-bevogtningen-af-eus-yderste-graenser-dansk-patruljebaad-beordret-

    –-> commentaire sur twitter

    According to Danish Broadcasting Danish Frontex staff refused orders from ’Operation Poseidon’s centre of command to put 33 rescued people back in their rubber boat and drag them outside Greek territorial waters.

    https://twitter.com/rspaegean/status/1235885384363659264

    #Frontex #résistance #gardes-frontière #migrations #asile #réfugiés #témoignage #désobéissance #ordres #refus_d'obéir

    –------------

    Ajouté à cette métaliste de #témoignages de #forces_de_l'ordre, #CRS, #gardes-frontière, qui témoignent de leur métier. Pour dénoncer ce qu’ils/elles font et leurs collègues font, ou pas.
    https://seenthis.net/messages/723573

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Bruxelles crée un #programme pour le retour volontaire de 5000 migrants

    Ylva Johansson, la commissaire aux affaires intérieures, a annoncé l’instauration d’un dispositif permettant le retour volontaire de 5000 migrants de Grèce vers leur pays d’origine. Avec 2000 euros par personne en guise de #mesure_incitative. Un article d’Euroefe.

    Lors d’une déclaration conjointe avec le ministre grec des Migrations, Notis Mitarakis, Ylva Johansson a précisé que la Commission européenne financerait ce programme afin d’aider à décongestionner les #îles surpeuplées de la mer Égée.

    Le dispositif, destiné aux personnes arrivées avant le premier janvier, ne donnera qu’un mois aux candidats pour se porter volontaires. Il sera géré en coopération avec l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (#OIM) et #Frontex, l’agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes.

    Notis Mitarakis a souligné que cette initiative venait s’ajouter aux 10000 transferts que le gouvernement grec s’était engagé à effectuer vers la Grèce continentale durant le premier trimestre 2020.

    https://www.euractiv.fr/section/migrations/news/bruxelles-cree-un-programme-pour-le-retour-volontaire-de-5000-migrants
    #UE #EU #retour_volontaire #migrations #asile #réfugiés #Europe #IOM #Grèce #hotspots

  • Migrants : des #enregistrements attestent de la #collaboration entre #UE et #gardes-côtes_libyens

    Pour la première fois, des conversations captées au-dessus de la Méditerranée illustrent la #coopération cynique entre les États européens et Tripoli, destinée à bloquer les traversées de migrants. Obtenues par The Guardian et le collectif The Migration Newsroom, dont Mediapart est partenaire, ces enregistrements de 2019 font entendre les conséquences, en pleine mer, d’une politique qui interroge jusqu’au patron de Frontex, d’après des courriers confidentiels.

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/120320/migrants-des-enregistrements-attestent-de-la-collaboration-entre-ue-et-gar
    #EU #Frontex #union_européenne #frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Libye #externalisation

    Ajouté à cette métaliste sur l’externalisation, et plus précisément avec la Libye :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765324

  • Hidden infrastructures of the European border regime : the #Poros detention facility in Evros, Greece

    This blog post and the research it draws on date before the onset of the current border spectacle in Evros of February/March 2020. Obviously, the situation in Evros region has changed dramatically. Our research however underlines that the Greek state has always resorted to extra-legal methods of border and migration control in the Evros region. Particularly the violent and illegal pushback practices which have persisted for decades in Evros region have now been elevated to official government policy.

    The region of Evros at the Greek-Turkish border was the scene of many changes in the European and Greek border regimes since 2010. The most well-known was the deployment of the Frontex RABIT force in October of that year; while it concluded in 2011, Frontex has had a permanent presence in Evros ever since. In 2011, the then government introduced the ‘Integrated Program for Border Management and Combating Illegal Immigration’ (European Migration Network, 2012), which reflected EU and domestic processes of the Europeanisation of border controls (European Migration Network, 2012; Ilias et al., 2019). The program stipulated a number of measures which impacted the border regime in Evros: the construction of a 12.5km fence along the section of the Greek Turkish border which did not coincide with the Evros river (after which the region takes its name); the expansion of border surveillance technologies and capacities in the area; and the establishment of reception centres where screening procedures would be undertaken (European Migration Network, 2012; Ilias et al., 2019). In this context, one of the measures taken was the establishment of a screening centre in South Evros, near the village of Poros, 46km away from the city of Alexandroupoli – the main urban centre in the area.

    The operation of the Centre for the First Management of Illegal Immigration is documented in Greek (Ministry for Public Order and Citizen Protection, 2013a) and EU official documents (European Parliament, 2012; European Migration Network, 2013), reports by the EU’s Fundamental Rights Agency (2011), NGOs (Pro Asyl, 2012) and activists (CloseTheCamps, 2012), media articles (To Vima, 2012) and research (Düvell, 2012; Schaub, 2013) between 2011 and 2015.

    Yet, during our fieldwork in the area in 2018, none of our respondents mentioned it. Nor could we find any recent research, reports or official documents after 2015 referring to it. It was only a tip from someone we collaborate with that reminded us of the existence of the Poros facility. We found its ‘disappearance’ from public view intriguing. Through fieldwork, document analysis and queries to the Greek authorities, we constructed a genealogy of the Poros centre, from its inception in 2011 to its ambivalent present. Our findings not only highlight the shifting nature of local assemblages of the European border regime, but also raise questions on such ‘hidden’ infrastructures, and the implications of their use for the rights of the people who cross the border.

    A genealogy of Poros

    The Poros centre was originally a military facility, used for border surveillance. In 2012, it was transferred to the Hellenic Police, the civilian authority responsible for migration control and border management, and was formally designated a Centre for the First Management of Illegal Immigration, similar to the more well-known First Reception Centre in Fylakio, in North Evros. The refurbishment and expansion of the old facilities and purchase of necessary equipment were financed through the External borders fund of the European Union (Alexandroupoli Police Directorate, 2011). Visits by the European Commissioner for Home Affairs, Cecilia Malmström (To Vima, 2012), the then executive director of Frontex, Ilkka Laitinen (Ministry for Public Order and Citizen Protection, 2013b), and a delegation of the LIBE committee of the European Parliament (2012) illustrated the embeddedness of the centre in the European border regime. The Commission’s report on the implementation of the Greek National Action Plan on Migration Management and Asylum Reform specifically refers the Poros centre as a facility that could be used for screening procedures and vulnerability assessments (European Commission, 2012).

    The Poros facility was indeed used as a screening and identification centre, activities that fell under both border management and the Greek framework for reception procedures introduced in 2011. While official documents of the Greek Government suggest that the centre started operating in 2012 (Council of Europe, 2012), a media article (Alexandroupoli Online, 2011) and a report by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (2011) provide evidence that it was already operational the year before, as an informal reception centre. When the centre became the main screening facility for South Evros in 2012 (European Parliament, 2012), screening, identification and debriefing procedures at the time were carried out both by Hellenic Police personnel and Frontex officers deployed in the area (Council of Europe, 2012).

    One of the very few research sources referring to Poros, a PhD thesis by Laurence Pillant (2017) provides a detailed description of the space and the activities carried out in the old wooden building and the white containers (image 3), visible in the stills from the video we took in December 2020 (image 4). A mission of Medecins sans frontiers, indicated in Pillant’s diagram, provided health screening in 2012 (European Migration Network, 2013).

    The organisation and function of the centre at the time is also documented in a number of mundane administrative acts which we located through diavgeia.gov.gr, a website storing Greek public administration decisions. Containers were bought to create space for the screening and identification procedures (Regional Police Directorate of Macedonia and Thrace, 2012). A local company was awarded contracts for the cleaning of the facilities (Regional Police Directorate of Macedonia and Thrace, 2013). The last administrative documents we were able to locate concerned the establishment of a committee of local police officers to procure services for emptying the cesspit of the centre (Regional Police Directorate of Macedonia and Thrace, 2015) – not all buildings in the area are linked to the local sewage system. This is the point when the administrative trail for Poros goes cold. No documents were found in diavgeia.gov.gr after January 2015.

    So what happened to the Poros Centre?

    After 2015, we found a mere five online references to the centre, despite extensive searches of sources such as official documents, research or reports by human rights bodies and NGOs. A 2016 newspaper article mentioned that arrested migrants were led there for screening (Ta Nea, 2016). A 2018 article in a local online news outlet mentioned a case of malaria in the village of Poros (Evros News, 2018a), while in another article (Evros News, 2018b), the president of the village council blamed a case of malaria in the village on the lack of health screening in the centre. An account of activities of the municipal council of Alexandroupoli referred to fixing an electrical fault in the centre in May 2019 (Municipality of Alexandroupoli, 2019). Τhe Global Detention Project (2019) also refers to Poros as a likely detention place.

    These sources suggested that the centre might be operational in some capacity, yet they raised more questions than they answered. If the centre has been in operation since 2015, why is there such an absence of official sources referring to it? Equally surprising was the absence of administrative acts related to the Poros centre in diavgeia.gov.gr, in contrast to all other facilities in the area where migrants are detained, such as the Fylakio Reception and Identification Centre and the pre-removal centres and police stations. It was conceivable, of course, that the centre fell into disuse. Since the deployment of Frontex and the border control measures taken under the Integrated Plan, entries through the Greek-Turkish land border decreased significantly – from 54,974 in 2011 to 3,784 in 2016 (Hellenic Police, 2020), and screening procedures were transferred to Fylakio, fully operational since 2013 (Reception and Identification Service, 2020).

    Trying to find answers to our questions, we contacted the Hellenic Police. An email we sent in January 2020 was never answered. In early February, following a series of phone calls, we obtained some answers to our questions. The police officer who answered the phone call did not seem to have heard of the centre and wanted to ask other departments for more information, as well as the First Reception and Identification Service, now responsible for screening procedures. The next day, he said it is occasionally used as a detention facility, when there is a high number of apprehended people that cannot be detained in police cells. According to the police officer, they are detained there for one or two days, until they can be transferred to the Reception and Identification Centre of Fylakio for reception procedures, or detention in the pre-removal detention centre adjacent to it. At the same time, he stated that he was told that Poros has been closed for a long time.

    This contradictory information could be down to the distance between the central police directorate in Athens and the area of Evros – it is not unlikely that local arrangements are not known in the central offices. Yet, it was also at odds both with the description of the use of the centre that our informant himself gave us – using the present tense in Greek –, with what the local media articles suggest, and with what we saw on site. Stills from the video taken during fieldwork in December 2020 suggest that the Poros centre is not disused, although no activity could be observed on the day. The cars and vans parked outside did not seem abandoned or rusting. The main building and the containers appeared to be in a good condition. A bright red cloth, maybe a canvas bag, was hanging outside one of them. The rubbish bins were full, but the black bags and other objects in them did not seem as they have been left in the open for a long time (image 4).

    The police officer also asked, however, how we had heard of Poros – a question that alerted us to both the obscure nature of the facility and the sensitivity of our query.
    A hidden infrastructure of pushbacks?

    The Poros centre, at one level, illustrates how the function of such border facilities can change over time, as the local border regime adapts and responds to migratory movements. Fylakio has become the main reception and detention centre in Evros, and between 2015 and 2017, the Aegean islands became the main point of entry into Greece and the European Union. Yet, our findings raised a lot of significant questions regarding the new function of Poros, given the increase in migratory movements in the area since 2018.

    While we obtained official confirmation that the Poros centre is now used for temporary detention and not screening, it remains the case that there are no official documents – including any administrative acts on diavgeia.gov.gr – that confirm its use as a temporary closed detention centre. Equally, we did not manage to obtain any information about how the facility is funded from the Hellenic Police. Our respondent did not know, and another departments we called did not want to share any information about the centre. It also became evident in the course of our research that most of our contacts in Greece – NGOS and journalists – had never heard of the facility or had no recent information about it. We found no evidence to suggest that Greek and European human rights bodies or NGOs which monitor detention facilities have visited the Poros centre after 2015. A mission of the Council of Europe (2019), for example, visited several detention facilities in Evros in April 2018 but the Poros centre was not listed among them. Similarly, the Fundamental Rights Officer of Frontex, in a partly joined mission with the Fundamental Rights Agency, visited detention facilities in South Evros in 2019, the operational area where the Poros centre is located. However, the centre is not mentioned in the report on that visit (Frontex, 2019).

    The dearth of information and absence of monitoring of the facility means that it is unclear whether the facility provides adequate conditions for detention. While our Hellenic police informant stated that detention there lasts for one or two days, there is no outside gate at the Poros centre, just a rather flimsy looking wire fence. Does this mean that detainees are kept inside the main building or containers the whole time they are detained there? We also do not know if detainees have access to phones, legal assistance or healthcare, which the articles in the local press suggest that is absent from the Poros centre. Equally, in the absence of inspections by human rights bodies, we are unaware of the standards of hygiene inside the facilities, or if there is sufficient food available. Administrative acts archived in diavgeia.gov.gr normally offer some answers to such questions but, as we mentioned above, we could find none. In short, it appears that Poros is used as an informal detention centre, hidden from public view.

    The obscurity surrounding the facility, in the context of the local border regime, is extremely worrying. Many NGOs and journalists have documented widespread pushback practices (Arsis et al., 2018; Greek Council for Refugees, 2018; Koçulu, 2019), evidenced through migrant testimonies (Mobile Info Team 2019) and, more recently, videos (Forensic Architecture, 2019a; 2019b). Despite denials by the Hellenic Police and the Greek government, European and international international human rights bodies (Council of Europe, 2019; Committee Against torture 2019) have accepted these testimonies as credible. We have no firm evidence that the Poros facility may be one of the many ‘informal’ detention places migrant testimonies implicated in pushbacks. Yet, the centre is located no further than two kilometres from the Greek-Turkish border, and the layout of the area is similar to the location of a pushback captured on camera and analysed by Forensic Architecture (2019a): near a dirt road with direct access to the Evros River. Black cars and white vans (images 5 and 6), without police insignia and some without number plates, such as those in the Poros centre, have been mentioned in testimonies of pushbacks (Arsis et al., 2018). Objects looking like inflatable boats are visible in our video stills. While there might be other explanations for their presence (used for patrolling the river or confiscated from migrants crossing the river) they are also used during pushbacks operations, and their presence in a detention centre seems odd.

    These uncertainties, and the tendency of security bodies to avoid revealing information on spaces of detention, are not unusual. However, the obscurity surrounding the Poros centre, located in an area of the European border where detention have long attracted criticism and there is considerable evidence of illegal and violent border control practices, should be a concern for all.

    https://www.respondmigration.com/blog-1/border-regime-poros-detention-facility-evros-greece
    #Evros #détention #rétention #détention_administrative #Grèce #refoulement #push-back #push-backs #invisibilité #invisibilisation #Centre_for_the_First_Management_of_Illegal_Immigration #Fylakio #Frontex

    Ce centre, selon ce que le chercheur·es écrivent, est ouvert depuis 2012... or... pas entendu parler de lui avec @albertocampiphoto quand on a été sur place... alors qu’on a vraiment sillonnée la (relativement petite) région pendant 1 mois !

    Donc pas mention de ce centre dans la #carte qu’on a publiée notamment sur @visionscarto :


    https://visionscarto.net/evros-mur-inutile

    ping @reka @karine4

    • En fait, en regardant mieux « notre » carte je me rends compte que peut-être le centre que nous avons identifié comme « #Feres » est en réalité le centre que les auteur·es appellent Poros... les deux localités sont à moins de 5 km l’une de l’autre.
      J’ai écrit aux auteur·es...

      Réponse de Bernd Kasparek, 12.03.2020 :

      Since we have been in front of Poros detention centre, we are certain that it is a distinct entity from the Feres police station, which, as you rightly observe, is also often implicated in reports about push-backs.

      Réponse de Lena Karamanidou le 13.03.2020 :

      Feres is located here: https://goo.gl/maps/gQn15Hdfwo4f3cno6​ , and it’s a much more modern facility (see photo, complete with ubiquitous military van!). However, ​I’m not entirely certain when the new Feres station was built - I think there was an older police station, but then both police and border guard functions were transfered to the new building. Something for me to check in obscure news items and databases!

    • ‘We Are Like Animals’ : Inside Greece’s Secret Site for Migrants

      The extrajudicial center is one of several tactics Greece is using to prevent a repeat of the 2015 migration crisis.


      The Greek government is detaining migrants incommunicado at a secret extrajudicial location before expelling them to Turkey without due process, one of several hard-line measures taken to seal the borders to Europe that experts say violate international law.

      Several migrants said in interviews that they had been captured, stripped of their belongings, beaten and expelled from Greece without being given a chance to claim asylum or speak to a lawyer, in an illegal process known as refoulement. Meanwhile, Turkish officials said that at least three migrants had been shot and killed while trying to enter Greece in the past two weeks.

      The Greek approach is the starkest example of European efforts to prevent a reprise of the 2015 migration crisis in which more than 850,000 undocumented people passed relatively easily through Greece to other parts of Europe, roiling the Continent’s politics and fueling the rise of the far right.

      If thousands more refugees reach Greece, Greek officials fear being left to care for them for years, with little support from other members in the European Union, exacerbating social tensions and further fraying a strained economy. Tens of thousands of migrants already live in squalor on several Greek islands, and many Greeks feel they have been left to shoulder a burden created by wider European indifference.

      The Greek government has defended its actions as a legitimate response to recent provocations by the Turkish authorities, who have transported thousands of migrants to the Greek-Turkish border since late February and have encouraged some to charge and dismantle a border fence.

      The Greek authorities have denied reports of deaths along the border. A spokesman for the Greek government, Stelios Petsas, did not comment on the existence of the site, but said that Greece detained and expelled migrants in accordance with local law. An act passed March 3, by presidential decree, suspended asylum applications for a month and allowed immediate deportations.

      But through a combination of on-the-ground reporting and forensic analysis of satellite imagery, The Times has confirmed the existence of the secret center in northeastern Greece.

      Presented with diagrams of the site and a description of its operations, François Crépeau, a former U.N. Special Rapporteur on the human rights of migrants, said it was the equivalent of a domestic “black site,” since detainees are kept in secret and without access to legal recourse.

      Using footage supplied to several media outlets, The Times has also established that the Greek Coast Guard, nominally a lifesaving institution, fired shots in the direction of migrants onboard a dinghy that was trying to reach Greek shores early this month, beat them with sticks and sought to repel them by driving past them at high speed, risking tipping them into water.

      Forensic analysis of videos provided by witnesses also confirmed the death of at least one person — a Syrian factory worker — after he was shot on the Greek-Turkish border.
      A Secret Site

      When Turkish officials began to bus migrants to the Greek border on Feb. 28, a Syrian Kurd named Somar al-Hussein had a seat on one of the first coaches.

      Turkey already hosts more refugees than any other country — over four million, mostly Syrians — and fears that it may be forced to admit another million because of a recent surge in fighting in northern Syria. To alleviate this pressure, and to force Europe to do more to help, it has weaponized refugees like Mr. al-Hussein by shunting them toward the Continent.

      Mr. al-Hussein, a trainee software engineer, spent that night in the rain on the bank of the Evros River, which divides western Turkey from eastern Greece. Early the next morning, he reached the Greek side in a rubber dinghy packed with other migrants.

      But his journey ended an hour later, he said in a recent interview. Captured by Greek border guards, he said, he and his group were taken to a detention site. Following the group’s journey on his mobile phone, he determined that the site was a few hundred yards east of the border village of Poros.

      The site consisted principally of three red-roofed warehouses set back from a farm road and arranged in a U-shape. Hundreds of other captured migrants waited outside. Mr. al-Hussein was taken indoors and crammed into a room with dozens of others.

      His phone was confiscated to prevent him from making calls, he said, and his requests to claim asylum and contact United Nations officials were ignored.

      “To them, we are like animals,” Mr. al-Hussein said of the Greek guards.

      After a night without food or drink, on March 1 Mr. al-Hussein and dozens of others were driven back to the Evros River, where Greek police officers ferried them back to the Turkish side in a small speedboat.

      Mr. al-Hussein was one of several migrants to provide similar accounts of extrajudicial detentions and expulsions, but his testimony was the most detailed.

      By cross-referencing drawings, descriptions and satellite coordinates that he provided, The Times was able to locate the detention center — in farmland between Poros and the river.

      A former Greek official familiar with police operations confirmed the existence of the site, which is not classified as a detention facility but is used informally during times of high migration flows.

      On Friday, three Times journalists were stopped at a roadblock near the site by uniformed police officers and masked special forces officers.

      The site’s existence was also later confirmed by Respond, a Sweden-based research group.

      Mr. Crépeau, now a professor of international law at McGill University, said the center represented a violation of the right to seek asylum and “the prohibition of cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment, and of European Union law.”
      Violence at Sea

      Hundreds of miles to the south, in the straits of the Aegean Sea between the Turkish mainland and an archipelago of Greek islands, the Greek Coast Guard is also using force.

      On March 2, a Coast Guard ship violently repelled an inflatable dinghy packed with migrants, in an incident that Turkish officials captured on video, which they then distributed to the press.

      The footage shows the Coast Guard vessel and an unmarked speedboat circling the dinghy. A gunman on one boat shot at least twice into waters by the dinghy, with what appeared to be a rifle, before men from both vessels shoved and struck the dinghy with long black batons.

      It is not clear from the footage whether the man was firing live or non-lethal rounds.

      Mr. Petsas, the government spokesman, did not deny the incident, but said the Coast Guard did not fire live rounds.

      The larger Greek boat also sought to tip the migrants into the water by driving past them at high speed.
      Forensic analysis by The Times shows that the incident took place near the island of Kos after the migrants had clearly entered Greek waters.

      “The action of Greek Coast Guard ships trying to destabilize the refugees’ fragile dinghies, thus putting at risk the life and security of their passengers, is also a violation,” said Mr. Crépeau, the former United Nations official.
      A Killing on Land

      The most contested incident concerns the lethal shooting of Mohammed Yaarub, a 22-year-old Syrian from Aleppo who tried to cross Greece’s northern land border with Turkey last week.

      The Greek government has dismissed his death as “fake news” and denied that anyone has died at the border during the past week.

      An analysis of videos, coupled with interviews with witnesses, confirmed that Mr. Yaarub was killed on the morning of March 2 on the western bank of the Evros River.

      Mr. Yaarub had lived in Turkey for five years, working at a shoe factory, according to Ali Kamal, a friend who was traveling with him. The two friends crossed the Evros on the night of March 1 and camped with a large group of migrants on the western bank of the river.

      By a cartographical quirk, they were still in Turkey: Although the river mostly serves as the border between the two countries, this small patch of land is one of the few parts of the western bank that belongs to Turkey rather than Greece.

      Mr. Kamal last saw his friend alive around 7:30 a.m. the next morning, when the group began walking to the border. The two men were separated, and soon Greek security forces blocked them, according to another Syrian man who filmed the aftermath of the incident and was later interviewed by The Times. He asked to remain anonymous because he feared retribution.

      During the confrontation, Mr. Yaarub began speaking to the men who were blocking their path and held up a white shirt, saying that he came in peace, the Syrian man said.

      Shortly afterward, Mr. Yaarub was shot.

      There is no known video of the moment of impact, but several videos captured his motionless body being carried away from the Greek border and toward the river.

      Several migrants who were with Mr. Yaarub at the time of his death said a Greek security officer had shot him.

      Using video metadata and analyzing the position of the sun, The Times confirmed that he was shot around 8:30 a.m., matching a conclusion reached by Forensic Architecture, an investigative research group.

      Video shows that it took other migrants about five minutes to ferry Mr. Yaarub’s body back across the river and to a car. He was then taken to an ambulance and later a Turkish hospital.

      An analysis of other footage shot elsewhere on the border showed that Greek security forces used lethal and non-lethal ammunition in other incidents that day, likely fired from a mix of semiautomatic and assault rifles.
      E.U. Support for Greece

      Mr. Petsas, the government spokesman, defended Greece’s tough actions as a reasonable response to “an asymmetrical and hybrid attack coming from a foreign country.”

      Besides ferrying migrants to the border, the Turkish police also fired tear-gas canisters in the direction of Greek security forces and stood by as migrants dismantled part of a border fence, footage filmed by a Times journalist showed.

      Before this evidence of violence and secrecy had surfaced, Greece won praise from leaders of the European Union, who visited the border on March 3.

      “We want to express our support for all you did with your security services for the last days,” said Charles Michel, the president of the European Council, the bloc’s top decision-making body.

      The European Commission, the bloc’s administrative branch, said that it was “not in a position to confirm or deny” The Times’s findings, and called on the Greek justice system to investigate.

      https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/10/world/europe/greece-migrants-secret-site.html

      https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/10/world/europe/greece-migrants-secret-site.html

      #Mohammed_Yaarub #décès #mourir_aux_frontières

    • Grécia nega existência de centro de detenção “secreto” onde os migrantes são tratados “como animais”

      New York Times citou vários migrantes que dizem ter sido roubados e agredidos pelos guardas fronteiriços, antes de deportados para a Turquia. Erdogan compara gregos aos nazis.

      Primeiro recusou comentar, mas pouco mais de 24 horas depois o Governo da Grécia refutou totalmente a notícia do New York Times. Foi esta a sequência espaçada da reacção de Atenas ao artigo do jornal norte-americano, publicado na terça-feira, que deu conta da existência de um centro de detenção “secreto”, perto da localidade fronteiriça de Poros, onde muitos dos milhares de migrantes que vieram da Turquia, nos últimos dias, dizem ter sido roubados, despidos e agredidos, impedidos de requerer asilo ou de contactar um advogado, e deportados, logo de seguida, pelos guardas fronteiriços gregos.
      Mais populares

      Coronavírus: Meninos, isto não são umas férias – Opinião de Bárbara Wong
      Coronavírus
      Coronavírus: o que comprar sem levar o supermercado para casa
      i-album
      Festival
      Cores e mais cores: o Holi e “o triunfo do bem sobre o mal” na Índia

      “Para eles somos como animais”, acusou Somar al-Hussein, sírio, um dos migrantes entrevistados pelo diário nova-iorquino, que entrou na Grécia através do rio Evros e que diz ter sido alvo de tratamento abusivo no centro de detenção “secreto”.

      “Não há nenhum centro de detenção secreto na Grécia”, garantiu, no entanto, esta quarta-feira, Stelios Petsas, porta-voz do executivo grego. “Todas as questões relacionadas com a protecção e a segurança das fronteiras são transparentes. A Constituição está a ser aplicada e não há nada de secreto”, insistiu.

      Com jornalistas no terreno, impedidos de entrar no local por soldados gregos, o New York Times entrevistou diversos migrantes que dizem ter sido ali alvo de tratamento desumano, analisou imagens de satélite, informou-se junto de um centro de estudos sueco sobre migrações que opera na zona e falou com um antigo funcionário grego familiarizado com as operações policiais fronteiriças. Informação que diz ter-lhe permitido confirmar a existência do centro.

      https://www.publico.pt/2020/03/11/mundo/noticia/grecia-nega-existencia-centro-detencao-secreto-onde-migrantes-sao-tratados-a

      #paywall

    • Greece : Rights watchdogs report spike in violent push-backs on border with Turkey

      A Balkans-based network of human rights organizations says that the number of migrants pushed back from Greece into Turkey has spiked in recent weeks. The migrants allegedly reported beatings and violent collective expulsions from inland detention spaces to Turkey on boats across the Evros River.

      Greek officers “forcefully pushed [people] in the van while the policemen were kicking them with their legs and shouting at them.” Then, the migrants were detained, forced to sign untranslated documents and pushed back across the Evros River at night. Over the next few days, Turkish authorities returned them to Greece, but then they were pushed back again.

      This account from 50 Afghans, Pakistanis, Syrians and Algerians aged between 15 and 35 years near the town of Edirne at the Greek-Turkish border was one of at least seven accounts a network of Balkans-based human rights watchdogs says it received from refugees over the course of six weeks, between March and late April.

      The collection of reports (https://www.borderviolence.eu/press-release-documented-pushbacks-from-centres-on-the-greek-mainland), published last week by the Border Violence Monitoring Network (BVMN), with help from its members Mobile Info Team (MIT) and Wave Thessaloniki, consists of “first-hand testimonies and photographic evidence” which the network says shows “violent collective expulsions” of migrants and refugees. According to the network, the number of individuals who were pushed back in groups amount to 194 people.
      https://twitter.com/mobileinfoteam/status/1257632384348020737?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E12

      Without exception, according to the report, all accounts come from people staying in the refugee camp in Diavata and the Drama Paranesti pre-removal detention center. They included Afghans, Pakistanis, Algerians and Moroccans, as well as Bangladeshi, Tunisian and Syrian nationals.

      In the case of Diavata, according to the report, migrants said police took them away, telling them they would receive a document known as “Khartia” to regularize their stay temporarily. The Diavata camp is located near the northern Greek city of Thessaloniki.

      Instead, the migrants were “beaten, robbed and detained before being driven to the border area where military personnel used boats to return them to Turkey across the Evros River,” they said. Another large group reported that they were taken from detention in Drama Paranesti, also located in northern Greece, some 80 kilometers from the border with Turkey, and expelled in the same way.

      While such push-backs from Greece into Turkey are not new, the network of NGOs says the latest incidents are somewhat different: “Rarely have groups been removed from inner-city camps halfway across the territory or at such a scale from inland detention spaces,” Simon Campbell of the Border Violence Monitoring Network told InfoMigrants.

      “Within the existing closure of the Greek asylum office and restriction measures due to COVID-19, the repression of asylum seekers and wider transit community looks to have reached a zenith in these cases,” Campbell said.

      Although Greece last month lifted a controversial temporary ban on asylum applications imposed in response to an influx of refugees from Turkey, all administrative services to the public by the Greek Asylum Service were suspended on March 13.

      The suspension, which the Asylum Service said serves to “control the spread of COVID-19” pandemic, will continue at least through May 15.

      https://twitter.com/GreekAsylum/status/1248651007489433600?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E12

      Reports of violence and torture

      The accounts in the report by the network of NGOs describe a range of violent actions toward migrants, from electricity tasers and water immersion to beatings with batons.

      According to one account, some 50 people were taken from Diavata camp to a nearby police station, where they were ordered to lie on the ground and told to “sleep here, don’t move.” Then they were beaten with batons, while others were attacked with tasers.

      They were held overnight in a detention space near the border, and beaten further by Greek military officers. The next day, they were boated across the river to Turkey by authorities with ’military uniform, masks, guns, electric [taser].’"

      Another group reported that they were “unloaded in the dark” next to the Evros River and “ordered to strip to their underwear.” Greek authorities allegedly used batons and their fists to hit some members of the group.

      Alexandra Bogos, advocacy officer with the Mobile Info Team, told InfoMigrants they were concerned about the “leeway afforded for these push-backs from the inner mainland to take place.”

      Bogos said they reached out to police departments after they learned about the arrests, but police felt “unencumbered” and continued transporting the people to the Greek-Turkish border. “On one occasion, we reached out and asked specifically for information about one individual. The answer was: ’He does not appear in our system’,” Bogos said.

      https://twitter.com/juliahahntv/status/1246165904406261773?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E12

      An Amnesty report (https://www.amnesty.org/en/documents/eur01/2077/2020/en) from April about unlawful push-backs, beatings and arbitrary detention echoes the accusations in the report by the network of NGOs.

      History of forcible rejections

      Over the past three years, violent push-backs have been documented in several reports. Last November, German news magazine Spiegel reported that between 2017 and 2018 Greece illegally deported 60,000 migrants to Turkey. The process involved returning asylum seekers without assessing their status. Greece dismissed the accusations.

      In 2018, the Greek Refugee Council and other NGOs published a report containing testimonies from people who said they had been beaten, sometimes by masked men, and sent back to Turkey (https://www.gcr.gr/en/news/press-releases-announcements/item/1028-the-new-normality-continuous-push-backs-of-third-country-nationals-on-the-e).

      UN refugee agency UNHCR and the European Human Rights Commissioner called on Greece to investigate the claims. In late 2018, another report by Human Rights Watch (HRW), also based on testimonies of migrants, said that violent push-backs were continuing (https://www.hrw.org/news/2018/12/18/greece-violent-pushbacks-turkey-border).

      It is often unclear who is carrying out the push-backs because they often wear masks and cannot be easily identified. In the HRW report, they are described as paramilitaries. Eyewitnesses interviewed by HRW said the perpetrators “looked like police officers or soldiers, as well as some unidentified masked men.”

      Simon Campbell of the Border Violence Monitoring Network said the reports he receives also regularly describe “military uniforms,” which “suggests it is the Greek army carrying out the push-backs,” he told InfoMigrants.

      Last week, the Spiegel published an investigation into the killing of Pakistani Muhammad Gulzar (https://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/greek-turkish-border-the-killing-of-muhammad-gulzar-a-7652ff68-8959-4e0d-910), who was shot at the Greek-Turkish border on March 4. “Evidence overwhelmingly suggests that the bullet came from a Greek firearm,” the authors wrote.

      Violations of EU and international law

      Push-backs are prohibited by Greek and EU law as well as international treaties and agreements. They also violate the principle of non-refoulement, which means the forcible return of a person to a country where they are likely to be subject to persecution.

      In March, Jürgen Bast, professor for European law at the University of Gießen in Germany, called the action of Greek security forces an “open breach of the law” on German TV magazine Monitor.

      Greece is not the only country accused of violating EU laws at the bloc’s external border: On top of the 100 additional border guards the European border and coast guard agency Frontex deployed to the Greek border with Turkey in March, Germany sent 77 police officers to help with border security.
      Professor Bast called Berlin’s involvement a “complete political joint responsibility” of the German government. “All member states of the European Union...including the Commission...have decided to ignore the validity of European law,” he told Monitor.

      In response to a request for comment from InfoMigrants, a spokesperson for EU border and coast guard agency Frontex would confirm neither the reports by the three NGOs nor the existence of systematic push-backs from Greece to Turkey.

      “Frontex has not received any reports of such violations from the officers involved in its activities in Greece,” the spokesperson said, adding that its officers’ job is to “support member states and to ensure the rule of law.”

      Coronavirus used as a pretext?

      On the afternoon of May 5, as the network of NGOs published their report on push-backs, police reportedly rounded up 26-year-old Pakistani national Sheraz Khan outside the Diavata refugee camp. After sending the Mobile Info Team (MIT) a message telling them “Police caught us,” he tried calling the NGO twice, but the connection failed both times.

      MIT’s Alexandra Bogos told InfoMigrants that Khan has not been heard of since and he has not returned to the camp. “We have strong reasons to believe that he may have been pushed back to Turkey,” Bogos said.

      A day later, the police arrived in the morning and “started removing tents and structures set up in an overflow area” outside the Diavata camp.

      Simon Campbell of the Border Violence Monitoring Network said the restrictive measures taken as a response to the coronavirus pandemic have been used to remove those who have crossed the border.

      “COVID-19 has been giving the Greek authorities a blank cheque to act with more impunity,” Campbell told InfoMigrants. “When Covid-19 restrictions lift, will we have already seen this more expansive push-back practice entrenched, and will it persist beyond the lockdown?”

      https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/24620/greece-rights-watchdogs-report-spike-in-violent-push-backs-on-border-w