• How Russia Hacked U.S. Politics With Instagram Marketing – Foreign Policy
    https://foreignpolicy.com/2018/12/17/how-russia-hacked-us-politics-with-instagram-marketing

    While the message itself was not aimed at swaying voters in any direction, researchers now believe it served another purpose for the Russian group: It boosted the reach of its account, likely won it new followers, and tried to establish the account’s bona fides as an authentic voice for the black community.

    That advertising pitch was revealed in a report released Monday by the Senate Intelligence Committee and produced by the cybersecurity firm New Knowledge. The report provides the most comprehensive look to date at the Kremlin’s attempt to boost Trump’s candidacy and offers a surprising insight regarding that campaign: Moscow’s operatives operated much like digital marketers, making use of Instagram to reach a huge audience.

    By blending marketing tactics with political messaging, the Internet Research Agency (IRA) established a formidable online presence in the run-up to the 2016 election (and later), generating 264 million total engagements—a measure of activity such as liking and sharing content—and building a media ecosystem across Facebook and Instagram.

    The authors of the report believe @blackstagram__ served as a vehicle for Kremlin propaganda targeting the American black community, skillfully adopting the language of Instagram, where viral marketing schemes exist side by side with artfully arranged photographs of toast.

    As Americans streamed to the polls on Nov. 8, 2016, @blackstagram__ offered its contribution to the Kremlin’s campaign to depress turnout, borrowing a line from a Michael Jackson song to tell African-Americans that their votes didn’t matter: “Think twice before you vote. All I wanna say is that they don’t really care about us. #Blacktivist #hotnews.”

    While the effect of the IRA’s coordinated campaign to depress voter turnout is difficult to assess, the evidence of the group’s online influence is stark. Of its 133 Instagram accounts, 12 racked up more than 100,000 followers—the typical threshold for being considered an online “influencer” in the world of digital marketing. Around 50 amassed more than 10,000 followers, making them what marketers call “micro-influencers.”

    These accounts made savvy use of hashtags, built relationships with real people, promoted merchandise, and targeted niche communities. The IRA’s most popular Instagram accounts included pages devoted to veterans’ issues (@american.veterans), American Christianity (@army_of_jesus), and feminism (@feminism_tag).

    In a measure of the agency’s creativity, @army_of_jesus appears to have been launched in 2015 as a meme account featuring Kermit the Frog. It then switched subjects and began exclusively posting memes related to the television show The Simpsons. By January 2016, the account had amassed a significant following and reached its final iteration with a post making extensive use of religious hashtags: ““#freedom #love #god #bible #trust #blessed #grateful.” It later posted memes comparing Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to Satan.

    “The Internet Research Agency operated like a digital marketing agency: develop a brand (both visual and voice), build presences on all channels across the entire social ecosystem, and grow an audience with paid ads as well as partnerships, influencers, and link-sharing,” the New Knowledge report concludes. “Instagram was perhaps the most effective platform.”

    #Instagram #Politique #USA #Russie #Médias_sociaux

  • How Russia Hacked U.S. Politics With Instagram Marketing – Foreign Policy
    https://foreignpolicy.com/2018/12/17/how-russia-hacked-us-politics-with-instagram-marketing

    The Internet Research Agency took to the photo-sharing network to boost Trump and depress voter turnout.

    Donald Trump as U.S. president, Kremlin operatives running a digital interference campaign in American politics scored a viral success with a post on Instagram.

    The post appeared on the account @blackstagram__, which was in fact being run by the Internet Research Agency, a Kremlin-linked troll farm that U.S. authorities say orchestrated an online campaign to boost Trump’s candidacy in 2016. It racked up 254,000 likes and nearly 7,000 comments—huge numbers for the Kremlin campaign.

    But oddly, the post contained no political content.

    Instead, it repurposed an ad for a women’s shoe, with a photo of women of different skin tones wearing the same strappy high heel in different colors. The caption pitched the shoes as a symbol of racial equality: “All the tones are nude! Get over it!

    While the message itself was not aimed at swaying voters in any direction, researchers now believe it served another purpose for the Russian group: It boosted the reach of its account, likely won it new followers, and tried to establish the account’s bona fides as an authentic voice for the black community.

    That advertising pitch was revealed in a report released Monday by the Senate Intelligence Committee and produced by the cybersecurity firm New Knowledge. The report provides the most comprehensive look to date at the Kremlin’s attempt to boost Trump’s candidacy and offers a surprising insight regarding that campaign: Moscow’s operatives operated much like digital marketers, making use of Instagram to reach a huge audience.

    By blending marketing tactics with political messaging, the Internet Research Agency (IRA) established a formidable online presence in the run-up to the 2016 election (and later), generating 264 million total engagements—a measure of activity such as liking and sharing content—and building a media ecosystem across Facebook and Instagram.

    That campaign sought to bring Russian political goals into the mainstream, exacerbate and inflame divisions in American society, and blur the line between truth and fiction, New Knowledge’s report concludes.

    Amid the intense discussion of Russian interference in the 2016 election, investigators probing that campaign had devoted relatively little attention to Instagram until now. But following their exposure in 2016 and early 2017, the IRA’s operatives shifted resources to Instagram, where their content often outperformed its postings on Facebook. (Instagram is owned by Facebook.)

    Of the 133 Instagram accounts created by the IRA, @blackstagram__ was arguably its most successful, with more than 300,000 followers. Its June 2017 ad for the shoe, made by Kahmune, was the most widely circulated post dreamed up by the Kremlin’s operatives—from a total of some 116,000. (The shoe continues to be marketed by Kahmune. Company officials did not respond to questions from Foreign Policy.)

    The authors of the report believe @blackstagram__ served as a vehicle for Kremlin propaganda targeting the American black community, skillfully adopting the language of Instagram, where viral marketing schemes exist side by side with artfully arranged photographs of toast.

    As Americans streamed to the polls on Nov. 8, 2016, @blackstagram__ offered its contribution to the Kremlin’s campaign to depress turnout, borrowing a line from a Michael Jackson song to tell African-Americans that their votes didn’t matter: “Think twice before you vote. All I wanna say is that they don’t really care about us. #Blacktivist #hotnews._

    Special counsel Robert Mueller and his team of investigators have secured indictments against the Internet Research Agency’s owner, Yevgeny Prigozhin, and a dozen of its employees.

    While the effect of the IRA’s coordinated campaign to depress voter turnout is difficult to assess, the evidence of the group’s online influence is stark. Of its 133 Instagram accounts, 12 racked up more than 100,000 followers—the typical threshold for being considered an online “_influencer” in the world of digital marketing. Around 50 amassed more than 10,000 followers, making them what marketers call “micro-influencers.”

    These accounts made savvy use of hashtags, built relationships with real people, promoted merchandise, and targeted niche communities. The IRA’s most popular Instagram accounts included pages devoted to veterans’ issues (@american.veterans), American Christianity (@army_of_jesus), and feminism (@feminism_tag).

    In a measure of the agency’s creativity, @army_of_jesus appears to have been launched in 2015 as a meme account featuring Kermit the Frog. It then switched subjects and began exclusively posting memes related to the television show The Simpsons. By January 2016, the account had amassed a significant following and reached its final iteration with a post making extensive use of religious hashtags: “#freedom #love #god #bible #trust #blessed #grateful. ” It later posted memes comparing Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to Satan.

    The Internet Research Agency operated like a digital marketing agency: develop a brand (both visual and voice), build presences on all channels across the entire social ecosystem, and grow an audience with paid ads as well as partnerships, influencers, and link-sharing,” the New Knowledge report concludes. “Instagram was perhaps the most effective platform.

    Monday’s report, which was published alongside another by researchers at the University of Oxford and the network analysis firm Graphika, is likely to increase scrutiny of social media platforms. The New Knowledge report accuses technology firms of possibly misleading Congress and says companies have not been sufficiently transparent in providing data related to the Russian campaign.

  • A propos de John Perry Barlow, Seenthis, The Grateful Dead et The WELL
    https://www.well.com
    https://ia801502.us.archive.org/14/items/grateful_dead-2018/grateful_dead.jpeg?cnt=0
    En réponse à https://seenthis.net/messages/667401 d’ @arno

    Governments of the Industrial World, you weary giants of flesh and steel, I come from Cyberspace, the new home of Mind. On behalf of the future, I ask you of the past to leave us alone. You are not welcome among us. You have no sovereignty where we gather.

    Aujourd’hui les manifestes ne sont guere d’intérêt pour les jeunes. C’est la la conclusion que j’ai tiré de la rencontre avec des étudiants de la création multimedia à qui j’ai eu l’honneur d’enseigner les systèmes de publication sur internet. Du côté des militants politiques c’est pareil en ce qui concerne le choix et la maîtrise des logiciels pour leur publications.

    Nous, nous sommes les enfants du mariage entre les idées libertaires et les révolutions européennes à l’ère digitale. Nous avons grandi à une époque extraordinaire quand se croisaient le monde ancien et l’ère digitale post-communiste. Nous avons assisté et participé à ses guerres analogues, à ses luttes des classes, nous avons adopté ses modèles de liberté antagonistes et ses musiques bruyantes. Nous avons bâti les premières marches de l’échelle digitale avec JPB et ses amis. Nous avons connu l’époque quand l’internet consistait dans une centaine de serveurs nationaux et quelques milliers dans le reste du monde. C’était notre internet. Les admins étaient nos copains qui restaient au téléphone avec nous pendant des heures quand il fallait implémenter un changement de config important. Tout était encore à faire et il n’y avait que nous qui pouvaient le faire.

    Aujourd’hui #Seenthis est notre The WELL que nous utilison pour créer notre internet à nous. Voilà l’héritage de JPB.

    Bon, après ce discours il est temps d’écouter un des derniers concerts des Grateful Dead avec Jerry Garcia.

    Grateful Dead - The Spectrum - 3-17-95 - Full Show
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o9iJ21xbYqc

    The WELL
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_WELL

    The Whole Earth ’Lectronic Link, normally shortened to The WELL, is one of the oldest virtual communities in continuous operation. As of June 2012, it had 2,693 members.

    Home > The WELL
    https://www.well.com

    Why is conversation so treasured on The WELL? Why did members of this community band together to buy the site in 2012? Check out the story of The WELL.

    The Internet Age Began on August 9, 1995
    http://www.litkicks.com/AugustNine

    Two separate things happened on August 9, 1995, both by chance emerging from Northern California though they had little else in common. The first was a scheduled event: the initial public offering (IPO) by Netscape, a startup tech firm designed to make software to power the Internet.
    ...
    I remember walking through the hallway at work that morning, probably heading for a coffee refill, when I saw a clump of co-workers and magazine editors talking anxiously. I thought they were talking about the Netscape IPO, but they weren’t. “Jerry Garcia died,” one of the editors said to me. “We need to replace the front page and get a new headline up, stat.”

    Jerry Garcia. This one hit home.
    ...
    Nobody said “going viral” yet by the summer of 1995, but that’s exactly what Jerry Garcia’s death did, and it was pretty much the biggest anything had gone viral anywhere up to this point.
    ...
    The Grateful Dead’s influence on the evolving culture of the Internet has always been a godsend, and still is. When music-sharing became a way of life with the advent of Napster a few years later, and when online publishers began to give content away for free, many smart observers realized that the Grateful Dead (who had always allowed fans to freely create and share concert recordings) were the greatest success model in the world for a profitable long-term business cycle based on peer-to-peer sharing. The positive and peaceful philosophy the band had always stood for seemed to fit the Internet’s optimistic emerging culture as well.

    John Perry Barlow, Internet Pioneer, 1947-2018 | Electronic Frontier Foundation
    https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2018/02/john-perry-barlow-internet-pioneer-1947-2018

    Barlow knew that new technology could create and empower evil as much as it could create and empower good. He made a conscious decision to focus on the latter: "I knew it’s also true that a good way to invent the future is to predict it. So I predicted Utopia, hoping to give Liberty a running start before the laws of Moore and Metcalfe delivered up what Ed Snowden now correctly calls ’turn-key totalitarianism.’”

    A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace | Electronic Frontier Foundation
    https://www.eff.org/cyberspace-independence

    by John Perry Barlow, Davos, Switzerland, February 8, 1996

    John Perry Barlow
    https://archive.org/search.php?query=John%20Perry%20Barlow

    The Grateful Dead
    https://archive.org/search.php?query=%22Grateful%20Dead%22

    Jerry Garcia Band
    https://archive.org/search.php?query=subject%3A%22Jerry+Garcia+Band%22

    #internet #musique

    • un manifeste d’une naïveté confondante, et qui ne veut strictement rien dire.

      Justement, tu en fais ce que tu veux ;-)

      You are not welcome among us. You have no sovereignty where we gather.

      Là par contre ce n’est pas dépourvu de sens ; en plus c’est du rock’n’roll, JPB sur son ranch en train de traire les vaches, et qu’il refuse que le gouvernement s’y mêle, c’est une belle image allégorique pour la liberté, non ?

      Autrement c’est vrai l’histoire avec le néoibéralisme, mais bof, pas la peine de tout prendre trop sérieusement. On sait que le vieux était un peu réac, mais son manifeste c’était un beau texte, un truc sentimental quoi.

      Oui, oui, je sais, la CIA payait des écrivains pour qu’ils arrêtent de dire des choses contre les #USA, etc. - mais tu ne critiques pas Bach parce qu’il était religieux, pas vrai ?

      L’ironie de l’histoire c’est qu’aujourd’hui les vaches sont télécommandées par internet ;-)

    • Le rôle joué par l’évangélisme internet dans la victoire du néo-libéralisme est toujours incompris par beaucoup de gens à gauche.

      Coup d’État contre Allende, Chicago Boys, 1973.
      Margaret Thatcher, première Ministre en 1979.
      Milton Friedman, prix Nobel d’économie en 1979.
      Ronald Reagan élu en 1981.
      Georges Stigler, prix Nobel d’économie en 1982.
      Tournant de la rigueur de Mitterrand en 1983
      etc.

      Quand commence l’« évangélisme internet » ?

      Plus sérieusement, comme je l’écrivais dans mon message sur le sujet :
      https://seenthis.net/messages/667401
      dans mon souvenir l’« évangélisme internet » en France était critique de l’espace libertarien américain (même si, à l’époque, ce n’était pas un courant très connu en France). Pour notre petite chapelle, c’est peut-être aussi pour ça qu’on a voulu faire notre propre Manifeste, et pas s’aligner sur une traduction de la Déclaration de Barlow.

      Et paradoxalement, j’ai toujours ressenti que ceux qui agitaient le chiffon route du « libéral libertaire » pour sauver « nos valeurs », l’utilisaient justement pour flinguer la possibilité d’un usage progressiste et social de la liberté d’expression, tout en renforçant l’usage purement mercantile du Net.

    • Qu’il repose en paix.

      Ses propes acolytes ne le laisseront pas reposer longtemps avant de le sortir de sa tombe pour en faire leur zombie pour les basses besognes idéologiques. A ce stade il ne restera pas grand chose du hippie et le « farmer » réactionnaire brandira so revolver pour éliminer tous les défenseur d’un réseau libre au service des peuples du monde.

  • The Internet Age Began on August 9, 1995
    http://www.litkicks.com/AugustNine

    Two separate things happened on August 9, 1995, both by chance emerging from Northern California though they had little else in common. The first was a scheduled event: the initial public offering (IPO) by Netscape, a startup tech firm designed to make software to power the Internet.
    ...
    I remember walking through the hallway at work that morning, probably heading for a coffee refill, when I saw a clump of co-workers and magazine editors talking anxiously. I thought they were talking about the Netscape IPO, but they weren’t. “Jerry Garcia died,” one of the editors said to me. “We need to replace the front page and get a new headline up, stat.”

    #USA #internet #grateful_dead #histoire

  • How an Army of Deadheads (And Their LSD) Invented Silicon Valley | WIRED
    https://www.wired.com/2016/04/heads-jesse-jarnow-excerpt

    The Internet is a far-off unsettled place in the ’80s, more a collection of various text-based technologies that don’t add up to much in most places. But, yet, here are these Deadheads, new kinds of citizens.

    Take, for example, Gumby. Gumby is an appropriately heady figure among the early Deadhead digerati. “He basically bounced between MIT and the AI lab at Stanford,” remembers dead.dis@sail mailing list founder Paul Martin. “He was just a good hacker who hadn’t actually had any training in any of the AI stuff, but would really work hard at swinging code and making something work.”

    Gumby is connected and on the go, reaching for a new form of digital harmony. “Gumby was the kind of person who was back and forth, you couldn’t just call him on the phone,” Paul Martin says. “You just had no idea where he was going to be that week, and email was a way around that problem.” Once, when working in Austin in the mid-1980s, Gumby departs for Dead tour, the whole tour.

    In each city, Gumby connects with a head at a local computer lab. Never a partier, Gumby’s postshow routine involves going immediately to a terminal and posting a set list. The tour happens to end in Austin, where he’s living at the time, and he happens to go into work that day, where he encounters his boss.

    “We haven’t seen you much,” the boss man says. “Well, I’ve been thinking,” he half bluffs.

    “Thinking about what?” and Gumby spells it out on the whiteboard. Without really working at it, he’d untangled the whole problem in his head over the previous weeks, following the Dead, listening to the Dead, breathing the Dead. The Dead’s long jams, either experienced live or on tape, are good for thinking, Garcia’s solos unfolding with crystal themes and unexpected variations.

    #grateful_dead #histoire #internet #USA #musique

  • Jerry Garcia’s Free Market | Opinion | The Harvard Crimson
    http://www.thecrimson.com/article/1994/7/19/jerry-garcias-free-market-pbib-just
    1994 - le rêve d’un capitalisme pur et sain.

    I just returned from a convention of young capitalists in Washington. They came from all over the nation and from a number of foriegn lands to Fitzgerald Kennedy stadium on the banks of the Potomac river to hold a workshop on how lassiez-faire capitalism can be an efficient, benevolent, happy way to spend a life.

    Jerry Garcia was the keynote speaker, or vocalist, as the case may be.

    The gathering, of course, was a two-night stand by the Grateful Dead, who are currently out on their annual summer tour
    ...
    But the Deadhead was hungry. Fortunately, he had many options down in the parking lot. Other Deadheads, in need of gas money to the next shows in Pittsburgh, had gone to Safeway and bought bagels, cream cheese and sandwich material. Tabouli, falafels and other exotic delights were made to order by chefs who made up in love what they lacked in equipment. But in the end the Deadhead was sold by the faded blue in a young woman’s washedout eyes while she mouthed “One grilled cheese sandwich, just for you.” Sure, the ingredients weren’t worth more than 20 cents, but the profits would be all be poured right into the gas tank of the rusting VW Bus behind her makeshift kitchen. You could hear it in her soft, “Thanks a lot, man.”

    Drugs could easily be purchased, and the dealers would gladly give a sample of the goods to anyone who looked like they were seriously interested. Beer flowed freely as well, with service “Wait, I’ll reach way down here so you get the coldest one we got, buddy” figured into a markup that would be standard at any bar.

    People shared what they had with those who had not. They passed bowls, ballons, set lists and stories.

    Clothing could be purchased as well. Most of the shirts were so original and beautiful they made the Deadhead want to buy them all, from the simplest peace symbol to the intricate fusion of Sesame Street characters and the Shakedown Street album cover. And only 15 dollars, half of what you would pay for a garment commemortating your presence at one of the Eagles premium rehersal sessions that are passing for concerts this summer.

    There was no effort to crack down on “unlicensed” merchandise, nor was there any effort to check for health violations in the Hibachis framed in blue tapestries on an rickety table. No one was getting rich, they were just getting to the next show and feeding and clothing fellow humans in the process. Unrestrained capitalism, without fetter or regulation turns ugly when loosed upon industrial production.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QV-2EJnfzjY

    Grateful Dead - Dark Star / The Other One / Dark Star / Wharf Rat / St Stephen, Recorded Live: 12/31/1978 - Winterland (San Francisco, CA)

    #USA #économie #musique #capitalisme #internet #histoire #grateful_dead