• The #Rohingya. A humanitarian emergency decades in the making

    The violent 2017 ouster of more than 700,000 Rohingya from Myanmar into Bangladesh captured the international spotlight, but the humanitarian crisis had been building for decades.

    In August 2017, Myanmar’s military launched a crackdown that pushed out hundreds of thousands of members of the minority Rohingya community from their homes in northern Rakhine State. Today, roughly 900,000 Rohingya live across the border in southern Bangladesh, in cramped refugee camps where basic needs often overwhelm stretched resources.

    The crisis has shifted from a short-term response to a protracted emergency. Conditions in the camps have worsened as humanitarian services are scaled back during the coronavirus pandemic. Government restrictions on refugees and aid groups have grown, along with grievances among local communities on the margins of a massive aid operation.

    The 2017 exodus was the culmination of decades of restrictive policies in Myanmar, which have stripped Rohingya of their rights over generations, denied them an identity, and driven them from their homes.

    Here’s an overview of the current crisis and a timeline of what led to it. A selection of our recent and archival reporting on the Rohingya crisis is available below.
    Who are the Rohingya?

    The Rohingya are a mostly Muslim minority in western Myanmar’s Rakhine State. Rohingya say they are native to the area, but in Myanmar they are largely viewed as illegal immigrants from neighbouring Bangladesh.

    Myanmar’s government does not consider the Rohingya one of the country’s 135 officially recognised ethnic groups. Over decades, government policies have stripped Rohingya of citizenship and enforced an apartheid-like system where they are isolated and marginalised.
    How did the current crisis unfold?

    In October 2016, a group of Rohingya fighters calling itself the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army, or ARSA, staged attacks on border posts in northern Rakhine State, killing nine border officers and four soldiers. Myanmar’s military launched a crackdown, and 87,000 Rohingya civilians fled to Bangladesh over the next year.

    A month earlier, Myanmar’s de facto leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, had set up an advisory commission chaired by former UN secretary-general Kofi Annan to recommend a path forward in Rakhine and ease tensions between the Rohingya and ethnic Rakhine communities.

    On 24 August 2017, the commission issued its final report, which included recommendations to improve development in the region and tackle questions of citizenship for the Rohingya. Within hours, ARSA fighters again attacked border security posts.

    Myanmar’s military swept through the townships of northern Rakhine, razing villages and driving away civilians. Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya fled to Bangladesh in the ensuing weeks. They brought with them stories of burnt villages, rape, and killings at the hands of Myanmar’s military and groups of ethnic Rakhine neighbours. The refugee settlements of southern Bangladesh now have a population of roughly 900,000 people, including previous generations of refugees.

    What has the international community said?

    Multiple UN officials, rights investigators, and aid groups working in the refugee camps say there is evidence of brutal levels of violence against the Rohingya and the scorched-earth clearance of their villages in northern Rakhine State.

    A UN-mandated fact-finding mission on Myanmar says abuses and rights violations in Rakhine “undoubtedly amount to the gravest crimes under international law”; the rights probe is calling for Myanmar’s top generals to be investigated and prosecuted for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes.

    The UN’s top rights official has called the military purge a “textbook case of ethnic cleansing”. Médecins Sans Frontières estimates at least 6,700 Rohingya were killed in the days after military operations began in August 2017.

    Rights groups say there’s evidence that Myanmar security forces were preparing to strike weeks and months before the August 2017 attacks. The evidence included disarming Rohingya civilians, arming non-Rohingya, and increasing troop levels in the area.
    What has Myanmar said?

    Myanmar has denied almost all allegations of violence against the Rohingya. It says the August 2017 military crackdown was a direct response to the attacks by ARSA militants.

    Myanmar’s security forces admitted to the September 2017 killings of 10 Rohingya men in Inn Din village – a massacre exposed by a media investigation. Two Reuters journalists were arrested while researching the story. In September 2018, the reporters were convicted of breaking a state secrets law and sentenced to seven years in prison. They were released in May 2019, after more than a year behind bars.

    Myanmar continues to block international investigators from probing rights violations on its soil. This includes barring entry to the UN-mandated fact-finding mission and the UN’s special rapporteurs for the country.
    What is the situation in Bangladesh’s refugee camps?

    The swollen refugee camps of southern Bangladesh now have the population of a large city but little of the basic infrastructure.

    The dimensions of the response have changed as the months and years pass: medical operations focused on saving lives in 2017 must now also think of everyday illnesses and healthcare needs; a generation of young Rohingya have spent another year without formal schooling or ways to earn a living; women (and men) reported sexual violence at the hands of Myanmar’s military, but today the violence happens within the cramped confines of the camps.

    The coronavirus has magnified the problems and aid shortfalls in 2020. The government limited all but essential services and restricted aid access to the camps. Humanitarian groups say visits to health centres have dropped by half – driven in part by fear and misunderstandings. Gender-based violence has risen, and already-minimal services for women and girls are now even more rare.

    The majority of Rohingya refugees live in camps with population densities of less than 15 square metres per person – far below the minimum international guidelines for refugee camps (30 to 45 square metres per person). The risk of disease outbreaks is high in such crowded conditions, aid groups say.

    Rohingya refugees live in fragile shelters in the middle of floodplains and on landslide-prone hillsides. Aid groups say seasonal monsoon floods threaten large parts of the camps, which are also poorly prepared for powerful cyclones that typically peak along coastal Bangladesh in May and October.

    The funding request for the Rohingya response – totalling more than $1 billion in 2020 – represents one of the largest humanitarian appeals for a crisis this year. Previous appeals have been underfunded, which aid groups said had a direct impact on the quality of services available.

    What’s happening in Rakhine State?

    The UN estimates that 470,000 non-displaced Rohingya still live in Rakhine State. Aid groups say they continue to have extremely limited access to northern Rakhine State – the flashpoint of 2017’s military purge. There are “alarming” rates of malnutrition among children in northern Rakhine, according to UN agencies.

    Rohingya still living in northern Rakhine face heavy restrictions on working, going to school, and accessing healthcare. The UN says remaining Rohingya and ethnic Rakhine communities continue to live in fear of each other.

    Additionally, some 125,000 Rohingya live in barricaded camps in central Rakhine State. The government created these camps following clashes between Rohingya and Rakhine communities in 2012. Rohingya there face severe restrictions and depend on aid groups for basic services.

    A separate conflict between the military and the Arakan Army, an ethnic Rakhine armed group, has brought new displacement and civilian casualties. Clashes displaced tens of thousands of people in Rakhine and neighbouring Chin State by early 2020, and humanitarian access has again been severely restricted. In February 2020, Myanmar’s government re-imposed mobile internet blackouts in several townships in Rakhine and Chin states, later extending high-speed restrictions until the end of October. Rights groups say the blackout could risk lives and make it even harder for humanitarian aid to reach people trapped by conflict. Amnesty International has warned of a looming food insecurity crisis in Rakhine.

    What’s next?

    Rights groups have called on the UN Security Council to refer Myanmar to the International Criminal Court to investigate allegations of committing atrocity crimes. The UN body has not done so.

    There are at least three parallel attempts, in three separate courts, to pursue accountability. ICC judges have authorised prosecutor Fatou Bensouda to begin an investigation into one aspect: the alleged deportation of the Rohingya, which is a crime against humanity under international law.

    Separately, the West African nation of The Gambia filed a lawsuit at the International Court of Justice asking the UN’s highest court to hold Myanmar accountable for “state-sponsored genocide”. In an emergency injunction granted in January 2020, the court ordered Myanmar to “take all measures within its power” to protect the Rohingya.

    And in a third legal challenge, a Rohingya rights group launched a case calling on courts in Argentina to prosecute military and civilian officials – including Aung San Suu Kyi – under the concept of universal jurisdiction, which pushes for domestic courts to investigate international crimes.

    Bangladesh and Myanmar have pledged to begin the repatriation of Rohingya refugees, but three separate deadlines have come and gone with no movement. In June 2018, two UN agencies signed a controversial agreement with Myanmar – billed as a first step to participating in any eventual returns plan. The UN, rights groups, and refugees themselves say Rakhine State is not yet safe for Rohingya to return.

    With no resolution in sight in Myanmar and bleak prospects in Bangladesh, a growing number of Rohingya women and children are using once-dormant smuggling routes to travel to countries like Malaysia.

    A regional crisis erupted in 2020 as multiple countries shut their borders to Rohingya boats, citing the coronavirus, leaving hundreds of people stranded at sea for weeks. Dozens are believed to have died.

    Bangladesh has raised the possibility of transferring 100,000 Rohingya refugees to an uninhabited, flood-prone island – a plan that rights groups say would effectively create an “island detention centre”. Most Rohingya refuse to go, but Bangladeshi authorities detained more than 300 people on the island in 2020 after they were rescued at sea.

    The government has imposed growing restrictions on the Rohingya as the crisis continues. In recent months, authorities have enforced orders barring most Rohingya from leaving the camp areas, banned the sale of SIM cards and cut mobile internet, and tightened restrictions on NGOs. Local community tensions have also risen. Aid groups report a rise in anti-Rohingya hate speech and racism, as well as “rapidly deteriorating security dynamics”.

    Local NGOs and civil society groups are pushing for a greater role in leading the response, warning that international donor funding will dwindle over the long term.

    And rights groups say Rohingya refugees themselves have had little opportunity to participate in decisions that affect their futures – both in Bangladesh’s camps and when it comes to the possibility of returning to Myanmar.

    https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/in-depth/myanmar-rohingya-refugee-crisis-humanitarian-aid-bangladesh
    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Birmanie #Myanmar #chronologie #histoire #génocide #Bangladesh #réfugiés_rohingya #Rakhine #camps_de_réfugiés #timeline #time-line #Arakan_Rohingya_Salvation_Army (#ARSA) #nettoyage_ethnique #justice #Cour_internationale_de_Justice (#CIJ)

  • Cast away : the UK’s rushed charter flights to deport Channel crossers

    Warning: this document contains accounts of violence, attempted suicides and self harm.

    The British government has vowed to clamp down on migrants crossing the Channel in small boats, responding as ever to a tabloid media panic. One part of its strategy is a new wave of mass deportations: charter flights, specifically targeting channel-crossers, to France, Germany and Spain.

    There have been two flights so far, on the 12 and 26 August. The next one is planned for 3 September. The two recent flights stopped in both Germany (Duesseldorf) and France (Toulouse on the 12, Clermont-Ferrand on the 26). Another flight was planned to Spain on 27 August – but this was cancelled after lawyers managed to get everyone off the flight.

    Carried out in a rush by a panicked Home Office, these mass deportations have been particularly brutal, and may have involved serious legal irregularities. This report summarises what we know so far after talking to a number of the people deported and from other sources. It covers:

    The context: Calais boat crossings and the UK-France deal to stop them.

    In the UK: Yarl’s Wood repurposed as Channel-crosser processing centre; Britannia Hotels; Brook House detention centre as brutal as ever.

    The flights: detailed timeline of the 26 August charter to Dusseldorf and Clermont-Ferrand.

    Who’s on the flight: refugees including underage minors and torture survivors.

    Dumped on arrival: people arriving in Germany and France given no opportunity to claim asylum, served with immediate expulsion papers.

    The legalities: use of the Dublin III regulation to evade responsibility for refugees.

    Is it illegal?: rushed process leads to numerous irregularities.

    “that night, eight people cut themselves”

    “That night before the flight (25 August), when we were locked in our rooms and I heard that I had lost my appeal, I was desperate. I started to cut myself. I wasn’t the only one. Eight people self-harmed or tried to kill themselves rather than be taken on that plane. One guy threw a kettle of boiling water on himself. One man tried to hang himself with the cable of the TV in his room. Three of us were taken to hospital, but sent back to the detention centre after a few hours. The other five they just took to healthcare [the clinic in Brook House] and bandaged up. About 5 in the morning they came to my room, guards with riot shields. On the way to the van, they led me through a kind of corridor which was full of people – guards, managers, officials from the Home Office. They all watched while a doctor examined me, then the doctor said – ‘yes, he’s fit to fly’. On the plane later I saw one guy hurt really badly, fresh blood on his head and on his clothes. He hadn’t just tried to stop the ticket, he really wanted to kill himself. He was taken to Germany.”

    Testimony of a deported person.

    The context: boats and deals

    Since the 1990s, tens of thousands of people fleeing war, repression and poverty have crossed the “short straits” between Calais and Dover. Until 2018, people without papers attempting to cross the Channel did so mainly by getting into lorries or on trains through the Channel Tunnel. Security systems around the lorry parks, tunnel and highway were escalated massively following the eviction of the big Jungle in 2016. This forced people into seeking other, ever more dangerous, routes – including crossing one of the world’s busiest waterways in small boats. Around 300 people took this route in 2018, a further 2000 in 2019 – and reportedly more than 5,000 people already by August 2020.

    These crossings have been seized on by the UK media in their latest fit of xenophobic scaremongering. The pattern is all too familiar since the Sangatte camp of 1999: right-wing media outlets (most infamously the Daily Mail, but also others) push-out stories about dangerous “illegals” swarming across the Channel; the British government responds with clampdown promises.

    Further stoked by Brexit, recent measures have included:

    Home Secretary Priti Patel announcing a new “Fairer Borders” asylum and immigration law that she promises will “send the left into meltdown”.

    A formal request from the Home Office to the Royal Navy to assist in turning back migrants crossing by boat (although this would be illegal).

    Negotiations with the French government, leading to the announcement on 13 August of a “joint operational plan” aimed at “completely cutting this route.”

    The appointment of a “Clandestine Channel Threat Commander” to oversee operations on both sides of the Channel.

    The concrete measures are still emerging, but notable developments so far include:

    Further UK payments to France to increase security – reportedly France demanded £30 million.

    French warships from the Naval base at Cherbourg patrolling off the coast of Calais and Dunkirk.

    UK Border Force Cutters and Coastal Patrol Vessels patrolling the British side, supported by flights from Royal Air Force surveillance planes.

    The new charter flight deportation programme — reportedly named “Operation Sillath” by the Home Office.

    For the moment, at least, the governments are respecting their minimal legal obligations to protect life at sea. And there has not been evidence of illegal “push backs” or “pull backs”: where the British “push” or the French “pull” boats back across the border line by force. When these boats are intercepted in French waters the travellers are taken back to France. If they make it into UK waters, Border Force pick them up and disembark them at Dover. They are then able to claim asylum in the UK.

    There is no legal difference in claiming asylum after arriving by boat, on a plane, or any other way. However, these small boat crossers have been singled out by the government to be processed in a special way seemingly designed to deny them the right to asylum in the UK.

    Once people are safely on shore the second part of Priti Patel’s strategy to make this route unviable kicks in: systematically obstruct their asylum claims and, where possible, deport them to France or other European countries. In practice, there is no way the Home Office can deport everyone who makes it across. Rather, as with the vast majority of immigration policy, the aim is to display toughness with a spectacle of enforcement – not only in an attempt to deter other arrivals, but perhaps, above all else, to play to key media audiences.

    This is where the new wave of charter flights come in. Deportations require cooperation from the destination country, and the first flight took place on 12 August in the midst of the Franco-British negotiations. Most recently, the flights have fed a new media spectacle in the UK: the Home Office attacking “activist lawyers” for doing their job and challenging major legal flaws in these rushed removals.

    The Home Office has tried to present these deportation flights as a strong immediate response to the Channel crossings. The message is: if you make it across, you’ll be back again within days. Again, this is more spectacle than reality. All the people we know of on the flights were in the UK for several months before being deported.

    In the UK: Yarl’s Wood repurposed

    Once on shore people are taken to one of two places: either the Kent Intake Unit, which is a Home Office holding facility (i.e., a small prefab cell complex) in the Eastern Docks of Dover Port; or the Dover police station. This police stations seems increasingly to be the main location, as the small “intake unit” is often at capacity. There used to be a detention centre in Dover where new arrivals were held, notorious for its run-down state, but this was closed in October 2015.

    People are typically held in the police station for no more than a day. The next destination is usually Yarl’s Wood, the Bedfordshire detention centre run by Serco. This was, until recently, a longer term detention centre holding mainly women. However, on 18 August the Home Office announced Yarl’s Wood been repurposed as a “Short Term Holding Facility” (SHTF) specifically to process people who have crossed the Channel. People stay usually just a few days – the legal maximum stay for a “short term” facility is seven days.

    Yarl’s Wood has a normal capacity of 410 prisoners. According to sources at Yarl’s Wood:

    “last week it was almost full with over 350 people detained. A few days later this number
    had fallen to 150, showing how quickly people are moving through the centre. As of Tuesday 25th of August there was no one in the centre at all! It seems likely that numbers will fluctuate in line with Channel crossings.”

    The same source adds:

    “There is a concern about access to legal aid in Yarl’s Wood. Short Term Holding Facility regulations do not require legal advice to be available on site (in Manchester, for example, there are no duty lawyers). Apparently the rota for duty lawyers is continuing at Yarl’s Wood for the time being. But the speed with which people are being processed now means that it is practically impossible to sign up and get a meeting with the duty solicitor before being moved out.”

    The Home Office conducts people’s initial asylum screening interviews whilst they are at Yarl’s Wood. Sometimes these are done in person, or sometimes by phone.

    This is a crucial point, as this first interview decides many people’s chance of claiming asylum in the UK. The Home Office uses information from this interview to deport the Channel crossers to France and Germany under the Dublin III regulation. This is EU legislation which allows governments to pass on responsibility for assessing someone’s asylum claim to another state. That is: the UK doesn’t even begin to look at people’s asylum cases.

    From what we have seen, many of these Dublin III assessments were made in a rushed and irregular way. They often used only weak circumstantial evidence. Few people had any chance to access legal advice, or even interpreters to explain the process.

    We discuss Dublin III and these issues below in the Legal Framework section.
    In the UK: Britain’s worst hotels

    From Yarl’s Wood, people we spoke to were given immigration bail and sent to asylum accommodation. In the first instance this currently means a cheap hotel. Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, the Home Office ordered its asylum contractors (Mears, Serco) to shut their usual initial asylum accommodation and move people into hotels. It is not clear why this decision was made, as numerous accounts suggest the hotels are much worse as possible COVID incubators. The results of this policy have already proved fatal – we refer to the death of Adnan Olbeh in a Glasgow hotel in April.

    Perhaps the government is trying to prop up chains such as Britannia Hotels, judged for seven years running “Britain’s worst hotel chain” by consumer magazine Which?. Several people on the flights were kept in Britannia hotels. The company’s main owner, multi-millionaire Alex Langsam, was dubbed the “asylum king” by British media after winning previous asylum contracts with his slum housing sideline.

    Some of the deportees we spoke to stayed in hotel accommodation for several weeks before being moved into normal “asylum dispersal” accommodation – shared houses in the cheapest parts of cities far from London. Others were picked up for deportation directly from the hotels.

    In both cases, the usual procedure is a morning raid: Immigration Enforcement squads grab people from their beds around dawn. As people are in collaborating hotels or assigned houses, they are easy to find and arrest when next on the list for deportation.

    After arrest, people were taken to the main detention centres near Heathrow (Colnbrook and Harmondsworth) or Gatwick (particularly Brook House). Some stopped first at a police station or Short Term Holding Facility for some hours or days.

    All the people we spoke to eventually ended up in Brook House, one of the two Gatwick centres.
    “they came with the shields”

    “One night in Brook House, after someone cut himself, they locked everyone in. One man panicked and started shouting asking the guards please open the door. But he didn’t speak much English, he was shouting in Arabic. He said – ‘if you don’t open the door I will boil water in my kettle and throw it on my face.’ But they didn’t understand him, they thought he was threatening them, saying he would throw it at them. So they came with the shields, took him out of his room and put him into a solitary cell. When they put him in there they kicked him and beat him, they said ‘don’t threaten us again’.” Testimony of a deported person.

    Brook House

    Brook House remains notorious, after exposure by a whistleblower of routine brutality and humiliation by guards then working for G4S. The contract has since been taken over by Mitie’s prison division – branded as “Care and Custody, a Mitie company”. Presumably, many of the same guards simply transferred over.

    In any case, according to what we heard from the deported people, nothing much has changed in Brook House – viciousness and violence from guards remains the norm. The stories included here give just a few examples. See recent detainee testimonies on the Detained Voices blog for much more.
    “they only care that you don’t die in front of them”

    “I was in my room in Brook House on my own for 12 days, I couldn’t eat or drink, just kept thinking, thinking about my situation. I called for the doctors maybe ten times. They did come a couple of times, they took my blood, but they didn’t do anything else. They don’t care about your health or your mental health. They are just scared you will die there. They don’t care what happens to you just so long as you don’t die in front of their eyes. It doesn’t matter if you die somewhere else.” Testimony of a deported person.
    Preparing the flights

    The Home Office issues papers called “Removal Directions” (RDs) to those they intend to deport. These specify the destination and day of the flight. People already in detention should be given at least 72 hours notice, including two working days, which allows them to make final appeals.

    See the Right to Remain toolkit for detailed information on notice periods and appeal procedures.

    All UK deportation flights, both tickets on normal scheduled flights and chartered planes, are booked by a private contractor called Carlson Wagonlit Travel (CWT). The main airline used by the Home Office for charter flights is a charter company called Titan Airways.

    See this 2018 Corporate Watch report for detailed information on charter flight procedures and the companies involved. And this 2020 update on deportations overall.

    On the 12 August flight, legal challenges managed to get 19 people with Removal Directions off the plane. However, the Home Office then substituted 14 different people who were on a “reserve list”. Lawyers suspect that these 14 people did not have sufficient access to legal representation before their flight which is why they were able to be removed.

    Of the 19 people whose lawyers successfully challenged their attempted deportation, 12 would be deported on the next charter flight on 26 August. 6 were flown to Dusseldorf in Germany, and 6 to Clermont-Ferrand in France.

    Another flight was scheduled for the 27 August to Spain. However, lawyers managed to get everyone taken off, and the Home Office cancelled the flight. A Whitehall source was quoted as saying “there was 100% legal attrition rate on the flight due to unprecedented and organised casework barriers sprung on the government by three law firms.” It is suspected that the Home Office will continue their efforts to deport these people on future charter flights.

    Who was deported?

    All the people on the flights were refugees who had claimed asylum in the UK immediately on arrival at Dover. While the tabloids paint deportation flights as carrying “dangerous criminals”, none of these people had any criminal charges.

    They come from countries including Iraq, Yemen, Sudan, Syria, Afghanistan and Kuwait. (Ten further Yemenis were due to be on the failed flight to Spain. In June, the UK government said it will resume arms sales to Saudi Arabia to use in the bombardment of the country that has cost tens of thousands of lives).

    All have well-founded fears of persecution in their countries of origin, where there have been extensive and well-documented human rights abuses. At least some of the deportees are survivors of torture – and have been documented as such in the Home Office’s own assessments.

    One was a minor under 18 who was age assessed by the Home Office as 25 – despite them being in possession of his passport proving his real age. Unaccompanied minors should not legally be processed under the Dublin III regulation, let alone held in detention and deported.

    Many, if not all, have friends and families in the UK.

    No one had their asylum case assessed – all were removed under the Dublin III procedure (see Legal Framework section below).

    Timeline of the flight on 26 August

    Night of 25 August: Eight people due to be on the flight self-harm or attempt suicide. Others have been on hunger strike for more than a week already. Three are taken to hospital where they are hastily treated before being discharged so they can still be placed on the flight. Another five are simply bandaged up in Brook House’s healthcare facility. (See testimony above.)

    26 August, 4am onwards: Guards come to take deportees from their rooms in Brook House. There are numerous testimonies of violence: three or four guards enter rooms with shields, helmets, and riot gear and beat up prisoners if they show any resistance.

    4am onwards: The injured prisoners are taken by guards to be inspected by a doctor, in a corridor in front of officials, and are certified as “fit to fly”.

    5am onwards: Prisoners are taken one by one to waiting vans. Each is placed in a separate van with four guards. Vans are labelled with the Mitie “Care and Custody” logo. Prisoners are then kept sitting in the vans until everyone is loaded, which takes one to two hours.

    6am onwards: Vans drive from Brook House (near Gatwick Airport) to Stansted Airport. They enter straight into the airport charter flight area. Deportees are taken one by one from the vans and onto Titan’s waiting plane. It is an anonymous looking white Airbus A321-211 without the company’s livery, with the registration G-POWU. They are escorted up the steps with a guard on each side.

    On the plane there are four guards to each person: one seated on each side, one in the seat in front and one behind. Deportees are secured with restraint belts around their waists, so that their arms are handcuffed to the belts on each side. Besides the 12 deportees and 48 guards there are Home Office officials, Mitie managers, and two paramedics on the plane.

    7.48AM (BST): The Titan Airways plane (using flight number ZT311) departs Stansted airport.

    9.44AM (CEST): The flight lands in Dusseldorf. Six people are taken off the plane and are handed over to the German authorities.

    10.46AM (CEST): Titan’s Airbus takes off from Dusseldorf bound for Clermont-Ferrand, France with the remaining deportees.

    11.59AM (CEST): The Titan Airways plane (now with flight number ZT312) touches down at Clermont-Ferrand Auvergne airport and the remaining six deportees are disembarked from the plane and taken into the custody of the Police Aux Frontières (PAF, French border police).

    12:46PM (CEST): The plane leaves Clermont-Ferrand to return to the UK. It first lands in Gatwick, probably so the escorts and other officials get off, before continuing on to Stansted where the pilots finish their day.

    Dumped on arrival: Germany

    What happened to most of the deportees in Germany is not known, although it appears there was no comprehensive intake procedure by the German police. One deportee told us German police on arrival in Dusseldorf gave him a train ticket and told him to go to the asylum office in Berlin. When he arrived there, he was told to go back to his country. He told them he could not and that he had no money to stay in Berlin or travel to another country. The asylum office told him he could sleep on the streets of Berlin.

    Only one man appears to have been arrested on arrival. This was the person who had attempted suicide the night before, cutting his head and neck with razors, and had been bleeding throughout the flight.
    Dumped on arrival: France

    The deportees were taken to Clermont-Ferrand, a city in the middle of France, hundreds of kilometres away from metropolitan centres. Upon arrival they were subjected to a COVID nose swab test and then held by the PAF while French authorities decided their fate.

    Two were released around an hour and a half later with appointments to claim asylum in around one week’s time – in regional Prefectures far from Clermont-Ferrand. They were not offered any accommodation, further legal information, or means to travel to their appointments.

    The next person was released about another hour and a half after them. He was not given an appointment to claim asylum, but just provided with a hotel room for four nights.

    Throughout the rest of the day the three other detainees were taken from the airport to the police station to be fingerprinted. Beginning at 6PM these three began to be freed. The last one was released seven hours after the deportation flight landed. The police had been waiting for the Prefecture to decide whether or not to transfer them to the detention centre (Centre de Rétention Administrative – CRA). We don’t know if a factor in this was that the nearest detention centre, at Lyon, was full up.

    However, these people were not simply set free. They were given expulsion papers ordering them to leave France (OQTF: Obligation de quitter le territoire français), and banning them from returning (IRTF: Interdiction de retour sur le territoire français). These papers allowed them only 48 hours to appeal. The British government has said that people deported on flights to France have the opportunity to claim asylum in France. This is clearly not true.

    In a further bureaucratic contradiction, alongside expulsion papers people were also given orders that they must report to the Clermont-Ferrand police station every day at 10:00AM for the next 45 days (potentially to be arrested and detained at any point). They were told that if they failed to report, the police would consider them on the run.

    The Prefecture also reserved a place in a hotel many kilometres away from the airport for them for four nights, but not any further information or ways to receive food. They were also not provided any way to get to this hotel, and the police would not help them – stating that their duty finished once they gave the deportees their papers.

    “After giving me the expulsion papers the French policeman said ‘Now you can go to England.’” (Testimony of deported person)

    The PAF showed a general disregard for the health and well-being of the deportees who were in the custody throughout the day. One of the deportees had been in a wheel-chair throughout the day and was unable to walk due to the deep lacerations on his feet from self-harming. He was never taken to the hospital, despite the doctor’s recommendation, neither during the custody period nor after his release. In fact, the only reason for the doctor’s visit in the first place was to assess whether he was fit to be detained should the Prefecture decide that. The police kept him in his bloody clothes all day, and when they released him he did not have shoes and could barely walk. No crutches were given, nor did the police offer to help him get to the hotel. He was put out on the street having to carry all of his possessions in a Home Office issue plastic bag.
    “the hardest night of my life”

    “It was the hardest night of my life. My heart break was so great that I seriously thought of suicide. I put the razor in my mouth to swallow it; I saw my whole life pass quickly until the first hours of dawn. The treatment in detention was very bad, humiliating and degrading. I despised myself and felt that my life was destroyed, but it was too precious to lose it easily. I took the razor out from my mouth before I was taken out of the room, where four large-bodied people, wearing armour similar to riot police and carrying protective shields, violently took me to the large hall at the ground floor of the detention centre. I was exhausted, as I had been on hunger strike for several days. In a room next to me, one of the deportees tried to resist and was beaten so severely that blood dripping from his nose. In the big hall, they searched me carefully and took me to a car like a dangerous criminal, two people on my right and left, they drove for about two hours to the airport, there was a big passenger plane on the runway. […] That moment, I saw my dreams, my hopes, shattered in front of me when I entered the plane.”

    Testimony of deported person (from Detained Voices: https://detainedvoices.com/2020/08/27/brook-house-protestor-on-his-deportation-it-was-the-hardest-night-of).

    The Legal Framework: Dublin III

    These deportations are taking place under the Dublin III regulation. This is EU law that determines which European country is responsible for assessing a refugee’s asylum claim. The decision involves a number of criteria, the primary ones being ‘family unity’ and the best interests of children. Another criterion, in the case of people crossing borders without papers, is which country they first entered ‘irregularly’. In the law, this is supposed to be less important than family ties – but it is the most commonly used ground by governments seeking to pass on asylum applicants to other states. All the people we know of on these flights were “Dublined” because the UK claimed they had previously been in France, Germany or Spain.

    (See: House of Commons intro briefing; Right to Remain toolkit section:
    https://commonslibrary.parliament.uk/what-is-the-dublin-iii-regulation-will-it-be-affected-by-b
    https://righttoremain.org.uk/toolkit/dublin)

    By invoking the Dublin regulation, the UK evades actually assessing people’s asylum cases. These people were not deported because their asylum claims failed – their cases were simply never considered. The decision to apply Dublin III is made after the initial screening interview (now taking place in Yarl’s Wood). As we saw above, very few people are able to access any legal advice before these interviews are conducted and sometimes they are carried out by telephone or without adequate translation.

    Under Dublin III the UK must make a formal request to the other government it believes is responsible for considering the asylum claim to take the person back, and present evidence as to why that government should accept responsibility. Typically, the evidence provided is the record of the person’s fingerprints registered by another country on the Europe-wide EURODAC database.

    However, in the recent deportation cases the Home Office has not always provided fingerprints but instead relied on weak circumstantial evidence. Some countries have refused this evidence, but others have accepted – notably France.

    There seems to be a pattern in the cases so far where France is accepting Dublin III returns even when other countries have refused. The suspicion is that the French government may have been incentivised to accept ‘take-back’ requests based on very flimsy evidence as part of the recent Franco-British Channel crossing negotiations (France reportedly requested £30m to help Britain make the route ‘unviable’).

    In theory, accepting a Dublin III request means that France (or another country) has taken responsibility to process someone’s asylum claim. In practice, most of the people who arrived at Clermont-Ferrand on 26 August were not given any opportunity to claim asylum – instead they were issued with expulsion papers ordering them to leave France and Europe. They were also only given 48 hours to appeal these expulsions orders without any further legal information; a near impossibility for someone who has just endured a forceful expulsion and may require urgent medical treatment.

    Due to Brexit, the United Kingdom will no longer participate in Dublin III from 31 December 2020. While there are non-EU signatories to the agreement like Switzerland and Norway, it is unclear what arrangements the UK will have after that (as with basically everything else about Brexit). If there is no overall deal, the UK will have to negotiate numerous bilateral agreements with European countries. This pattern of expedited expulsion without a proper screening process established with France could be a taste of things to come.

    Conclusion: rushed – and illegal?

    Charter flight deportations are one of the most obviously brutal tools used by the UK Border Regime. They involve the use of soul-crushing violence by the Home Office and its contractors (Mitie, Titan Airways, Britannia Hotels, and all) against people who have already lived through histories of trauma.

    For these recent deportations of Channel crossers the process seems particularly rushed. People who have risked their lives in the Channel are scooped into a machine designed to deny their asylum rights and expel them ASAP – for the sake of a quick reaction to the latest media panic. New procedures appear to have been introduced off the cuff by Home Office officials and in under-the-table deals with French counterparts.

    As a result of this rush-job, there seem to be numerous irregularities in the process. Some have been already flagged up in the successful legal challenges to the Spanish flight on 27 August. The detention and deportation of boat-crossers may well be largely illegal, and is open to being challenged further on both sides of the Channel.

    Here we recap a few particular issues:

    The highly politicised nature of the expulsion process for small boat crossers means they are being denied access to a fair asylum procedure by the Home Office.

    The deportees include people who are victims of torture and of trafficking, as well as under-aged minors.

    People are being detained, rushed through screening interviews, and “Dublined” without access to legal advice and necessary information.

    In order to avoid considering asylum requests, Britain is applying Dublin III often just using flimsy circumstantial evidence – and France is accepting these requests, perhaps as a result of recent negotiations and financial arrangements.

    Many deportees have family ties in the UK – but the primary Dublin III criterion of ‘family unity’ is ignored.

    In accepting Dublin III requests France is taking legal responsibility for people’s asylum claims. But in fact it has denied people the chance to claim asylum, instead immediately issuing expulsion papers.

    These expulsion papers (‘Order to quit France’ and ‘Ban from returning to France’ or ‘OQTF’ and ‘IRTF’) are issued with only 48 hour appeal windows. This is completely inadequate to ensure a fair procedure – even more so for traumatised people who have just endured detention and deportation, then been dumped in the middle of nowhere in a country where they have no contacts and do not speak the language.

    This completely invalidates the Home Office’s argument that the people it deports will be able to access a fair asylum procedure in France.

    https://corporatewatch.org/cast-away-the-uks-rushed-charter-flights-to-deport-channel-crossers

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #UK #Angleterre #Dublin #expulsions #renvois #Royaume_Uni #vols #charter #France #Allemagne #Espagne #Home_Office #accord #témoignage #violence #Brexit #Priti_Patel #Royal_Navy #plan_opérationnel_conjoint #Manche #Commandant_de_la_menace_clandestine_dans_la_Manche #Cherbourg #militarisation_des_frontières #frontières #Calais #Dunkerque #navires #Border_Force_Cutters #avions_de_surveillance #Royal_Air_Force #Opération_Sillath #refoulements #push-backs #Douvres #Kent_Intake_Unit #Yarl’s_Wood #Bedfordshire #Serco #Short_Term_Holding_Facility (#SHTF) #hôtel #Mears #hôtels_Britannia #Alex_Langsam #Immigration_Enforcement_squads #Heathrow #Colnbrook #Harmondsworth #Gatwick #aéroport #Brook_Hous #G4S #Removal_Directions #Carlson_Wagonlit_Travel (#CWT) #privatisation #compagnies_aériennes #Titan_Airways #Clermont-Ferrand #Düsseldorf

    @karine4 —> il y a une section dédiée à l’arrivée des vols charter en France (à Clermont-Ferrand plus précisément) :
    Larguées à destination : la France

    ping @isskein

    • Traduction française :

      S’en débarrasser : le Royaume Uni se précipite pour expulser par vols charters les personnes qui traversent la Manche

      Attention : ce document contient des récits de violence, tentatives de suicide et automutilation.

      Le Royaume Uni s’attache à particulièrement réprimer les migrants traversant la Manche dans de petites embarcations, répondant comme toujours à la panique propagée par les tabloïds britanniques. Une partie de sa stratégie consiste en une nouvelle vague d’expulsions massives : des vols charters, ciblant spécifiquement les personnes traversant la Manche, vers la France, l’Allemagne et l’Espagne.

      Deux vols ont eu lieu jusqu’à présent, les 12 et 26 août. Le prochain est prévu pour le 3 septembre. Les deux vols récents ont fait escale à la fois en Allemagne (Düsseldorf) et en France (Toulouse le 12, Clermont-Ferrand le 26). Un autre vol était prévu pour l’Espagne le 27 août – mais il a été annulé après que les avocat-es aient réussi à faire descendre tout le monde de l’avion.

      Menées à la hâte par un Home Office en panique, ces déportations massives ont été particulièrement brutales, et ont pu impliquer de graves irrégularités juridiques. Ce rapport résume ce que nous savons jusqu’à présent après avoir parlé à un certain nombre de personnes expulsées et à d’autres sources. Il couvre :

      Le contexte : Les traversées en bateau de Calais et l’accord entre le Royaume-Uni et la France pour les faire cesser.
      Au Royaume-Uni : Yarl’s Wood reconverti en centre de traitement de personnes traversant la Manche ; Britannia Hotels ; le centre de détention de Brook House, toujours aussi brutal.
      Les vols : Calendrier détaillé du charter du 26 août vers Düsseldorf et Clermont-Ferrand.
      Qui est à bord du vol : Les personnes réfugiées, y compris des mineurs et des personnes torturées.
      Délaissé à l’arrivée : Les personnes arrivant en Allemagne et en France qui n’ont pas la possibilité de demander l’asile se voient délivrer immédiatement des documents d’expulsion.
      Les questions juridiques : Utilisation du règlement Dublin III pour se soustraire de la responsabilité à l’égard des réfugiés.
      Est-ce illégal ? : la précipitation du processus entraîne de nombreuses irrégularités.

      “cette nuit-là, huit personnes se sont automutilées”

      Cette nuit-là avant le vol (25 août), lorsque nous étions enfermés dans nos chambres et que j’ai appris que j’avais perdu en appel, j’étais désespéré. J’ai commencé à me mutiler. Je n’étais pas le seule. Huit personnes se sont automutilées ou ont tenté de se suicider plutôt que d’être emmenées dans cet avion. Un homme s’est jeté une bouilloire d’eau bouillante sur lui-même. Un homme a essayé de se pendre avec le câble de télé dans sa chambre. Trois d’entre nous ont été emmenés à l’hôpital, mais renvoyés au centre de détention après quelques heures. Les cinq autres ont été emmenés à l’infirmerie de Brook House où on leur a mis des pansements. Vers 5 heures du matin, ils sont venus dans ma chambre, des gardes avec des boucliers anti-émeutes. Sur le chemin pour aller au van, ils m’ont fait traverser une sorte de couloir rempli de gens – gardes, directeurs, fonctionnaires du Home Office. Ils ont tous regardé pendant qu’un médecin m’examinait, puis le médecin a dit : “oui, il est apte à voler”. Dans l’avion, plus tard, j’ai vu un homme très gravement blessé, du sang dégoulinant de sa tête et sur ses vêtements. Il n’avait pas seulement essayé d’arrêter le vol, il voulait vraiment se tuer. Il a été emmené en Allemagne.

      Témoignage d’une personne déportée.

      Le contexte : les bateaux et les accords

      Depuis les années 1990, des dizaines de milliers de personnes fuyant la guerre, la répression et la pauvreté ont franchi le “court détroit” entre Calais et Dover. Jusqu’en 2018, les personnes sans papiers qui tentaient de traverser la Manche le faisaient principalement en montant dans des camions ou des trains passant par le tunnel sous la Manche. Les systèmes de sécurité autour des parkings de camions, du tunnel et de l’autoroute ont été massivement renforcés après l’expulsion de la grande jungle en 2016. Cela a obligé les gens à chercher d’autres itinéraires, toujours plus dangereux, y compris en traversant l’une des voies navigables les plus fréquentées du monde à bord de petits bateaux. Environ 300 personnes ont emprunté cet itinéraire en 2018, 2000 autres en 2019 – et, selon les rapports, plus de 5000 personnes entre janvier et août 2020.

      Ces passages ont été relayés par les médias britanniques lors de leur dernière vague de publications xénophobiques et alarmistes. Le schéma n’est que trop familier depuis le camp Sangatte en 1999 : les médias de droite (le plus célèbre étant le Daily Mail, mais aussi d’autres) diffusent des articles abusifs sur les dangereux “illégaux” qui déferleraient à travers la Manche ; et le gouvernement britannique répond par des promesses de répression.

      Renforcé par le Brexit, les mesures et annonces récentes comprennent :

      Le ministre de l’intérieur, Priti Patel, annonce une nouvelle loi sur l’asile et l’immigration “plus juste” qui, promet-elle, “fera s’effondrer la gauche”.
      Une demande officielle du Home Office à la Royal Navy pour aider à refouler les migrants qui traversent par bateau (bien que cela soit illégal).
      Négociations avec le gouvernement français, qui ont abouti à l’annonce le 13 août d’un “plan opérationnel conjoint” visant “ à couper complètement cette route”.
      La nomination d’un “Commandant de la menace clandestine dans la Manche” pour superviser les opérations des deux côtés de la Manche.

      Les mesures concrètes se font encore attendre, mais les évolutions notables jusqu’à présent sont les suivantes :

      D’autres paiements du Royaume-Uni à la France pour accroître la sécurité – la France aurait demandé 30 millions de livres sterling.
      Des navires de guerre français de la base navale de Cherbourg patrouillant au large des côtes de Calais et de Dunkerque.
      Des Border Force Cutters (navires) et les patrouilleurs côtiers britanniques patrouillant du côté anglais soutenus par des avions de surveillance de la Royal Air Force.
      Le nouveau programme d’expulsion par vol charter – qui aurait été baptisé “Opération Sillath” par le ministère de l’intérieur.

      Pour l’instant, du moins, les gouvernements respectent leurs obligations légales minimales en matière de protection de la vie en mer. Et il n’y a pas eu de preuves de “push backs” (refoulement) ou de “pull backs” illégaux : où, de force, soit des bateaux britanniques “poussent”, soit des bateaux français “tirent” des bateaux vers l’un ou l’autre côté de la frontière. Lorsque ces bateaux sont interceptés dans les eaux françaises, les voyageurs sont ramenés en France. S’ils parviennent à entrer dans les eaux britanniques, la police aux frontières britannique les récupère et les débarque à Douvres. Ils peuvent alors demander l’asile au Royaume-Uni.

      Il n’y a pas de différence juridique entre demander l’asile après être arrivé par bateau, par avion ou de toute autre manière. Cependant, ces personnes traversant par petits bateaux ont été ciblées par le gouvernement pour être traitées d’une manière spéciale, semble-t-il conçue pour leur refuser le droit d’asile au Royaume-Uni.

      Une fois que les personnes sont à terre et en sécurité, le deuxième volet de la stratégie de Priti Patel visant à rendre cette voie non viable entre en jeu : systématiquement faire obstacle à leur demande d’asile et, si possible, les expulser vers la France ou d’autres pays européens. En pratique, il est impossible pour le Home Office d’expulser toutes les personnes qui réussissent à traverser. Il s’agit plutôt, comme dans la grande majorité des politiques d’immigration, de faire preuve de fermeté avec un spectacle de mise en vigueur – non seulement pour tenter de dissuader d’autres arrivant-es, mais peut-être surtout pour se mettre en scène devant les principaux médias.

      C’est là qu’intervient la nouvelle vague de vols charter. Les expulsions nécessitent la coopération du pays de destination, et le premier vol a eu lieu le 12 août en plein milieu des négociations franco-britanniques. Plus récemment, ces vols ont alimenté un nouveau spectacle médiatique au Royaume-Uni : le Home Office s’en prend aux “avocats militants” qui font leur travail en contestant les principales failles juridiques de ces renvois précipités.

      Le Home Office a tenté de présenter ces vols d’expulsion comme une réponse immédiate et forte aux traversées de la Manche. Le message est le suivant : si vous traversez la Manche, vous serez de retour dans les jours qui suivent. Là encore, il s’agit plus de spectacle que de réalité. Toutes les personnes que nous connaissons sur ces vols étaient au Royaume-Uni plusieurs mois avant d’être expulsées.

      Au Royaume-Uni : Yarl’s Wood réaffecté

      Une fois à terre en Angleterre, les personnes sont emmenées à l’un des deux endroits suivants : soit la Kent Intake Unit (Unité d’admission du Kent), qui est un centre de détention du ministère de l’intérieur (c’est-à-dire un petit complexe de cellules préfabriquées) dans les docks à l’est du port de Douvres ; soit le poste de police de Douvres. Ce poste de police semble être de plus en plus l’endroit principal, car la petite “unité d’admission” est souvent pleine. Il y avait autrefois un centre de détention à Douvres où étaient détenus les nouveaux arrivants, qui était connu pour son état de délabrement, mais a été fermé en octobre 2015.

      Les personnes sont généralement détenues au poste de police pendant une journée maximum. La destination suivante est généralement Yarl’s Wood, le centre de détention du Bedfordshire géré par Serco. Il s’agissait, jusqu’à récemment, d’un centre de détention à long terme qui accueillait principalement des femmes. Cependant, le 18 août, le ministère de l’intérieur a annoncé que Yarl’s Wood avait été réaménagé en “centre de détention de courte durée” (Short Term Holding Facility – SHTF) pour traiter spécifiquement les personnes qui ont traversé la Manche. Les personnes ne restent généralement que quelques jours – le séjour maximum légal pour un centre de “courte durée” est de sept jours.

      Yarl’s Wood a une capacité normale de 410 prisonniers. Selon des sources à Yarl’s Wood :

      “La semaine dernière, c’était presque plein avec plus de 350 personnes détenues. Quelques jours plus tard, ce nombre était tombé à 150, ce qui montre la rapidité avec laquelle les gens passent par le centre. Mardi 25 août, il n’y avait plus personne dans le centre ! Il semble probable que les chiffres fluctueront en fonction des traversées de la Manche.”

      La même source ajoute :

      “Il y a des inquiétudes concernant l’accès à l’aide juridique à Yarl’s Wood. La réglementation relative aux centres de détention provisoire n’exige pas que des conseils juridiques soient disponibles sur place (à Manchester, par exemple, il n’y a pas d’avocats de garde). Apparemment, le roulement des avocats de garde se poursuit à Yarl’s Wood pour l’instant. Mais la rapidité avec laquelle les personnes sont traitées maintenant signifie qu’il est pratiquement impossible de s’inscrire et d’obtenir un rendez-vous avec l’avocat de garde avant d’être transféré”.

      Le ministère de l’Intérieur mène les premiers entretiens d’évaluation des demandeurs d’asile pendant qu’ils sont à Yarl’s Wood. Ces entretiens se font parfois en personne, ou parfois par téléphone.

      C’est un moment crucial, car ce premier entretien détermine les chances de nombreuses personnes de demander l’asile au Royaume-Uni. Le ministère de l’intérieur utilise les informations issues de cet entretien pour expulser les personnes qui traversent la Manche vers la France et l’Allemagne en vertu du règlement Dublin III. Il s’agit d’une législation de l’Union Européenne (UE) qui permet aux gouvernements de transférer la responsabilité de l’évaluation de la demande d’asile d’une personne vers un autre État. Autrement dit, le Royaume-Uni ne commence même pas à examiner les demandes d’asile des personnes.

      D’après ce que nous avons vu, beaucoup de ces évaluations de Dublin III ont été faites de manière précipitée et irrégulière. Elles se sont souvent appuyées sur de faibles preuves circonstancielles. Peu de personnes ont eu la possibilité d’obtenir des conseils juridiques, ou même des interprètes pour expliquer le processus.

      Nous abordons Dublin III et les questions soulevées ci-dessous dans la section “Cadre juridique”.
      Au Royaume-Uni : les pires hôtels britanniques

      De Yarl’s Wood, les personnes à qui nous avons parlé ont été libérées sous caution (elles devaient respecter des conditions spécifiques aux personnes immigrées) dans des hébergement pour demandeurs d’asile. Dans un premier temps, cet hébergement signifie un hôtel à bas prix. En raison de l’épidémie du COVID-19, le Home Office a ordonné aux entreprises sous-traitantes (Mears, Serco) qui administrent habituellement les centres d’accueil pour demandeurs d’asile de fermer leurs places d’hébergement et d’envoyer les personnes à l’hôtel. Cette décision est loin d’être claire, du fait que de nombreux indicateurs suggèrent que les hôtels sont bien pires en ce qui concerne la propagation du COVID. Le résultat de cette politique s’est déjà avéré fatal – voir la mort d’Adnan Olbeh à l’hôtel Glasgow en avril.

      Peut-être le gouvernement essaie de soutenir des chaînes telles que Britannia Hotels, classée depuis sept ans à la suite comme la “pire chaîne d’hôtel britannique” par le magazine des consommateurs Which ?. Plusieurs personnes envoyées par charter avaient été placées dans des hôtels Britannia. Le principal propriétaire de cette chaîne, le multi-millionnaire Alex Langsam, a été surnommé « le roi de l’asile » par les médias britanniques après avoir remporté précédemment à l’aide de ses taudis d’autres contrats pour l’hébergement des demandeurs d’asile.

      Certaines des personnes déportées à qui nous avons parlé sont restées dans ce genre d’hôtels plusieurs semaines avant d’être envoyées dans des lieux de “dispersion des demandeurs d’asile” – des logements partagés situés dans les quartiers les plus pauvres de villes très éloignées de Londres. D’autres ont été mises dans l’avion directement depuis les hôtels.

      Dans les deux cas, la procédure habituelle est le raid matinal : Des équipes de mise-en-œuvre de l’immigration (Immigration Enforcement squads) arrachent les gens de leur lit à l’aube. Comme les personnes sont dans des hôtels qui collaborent ou assignées à des maisons, il est facile de les trouver et de les arrêter quand elles sont les prochains sur la liste des déportations.

      Après l’arrestation, les personnes ont été amenées aux principaux centres de détention près de Heathrow (Colnbrook et Harmondsworth) ou Gatwick (particulièrement Brook House). Quelques-unes ont d’abord été gardées au commissariat ou en détention pour des séjours de court terme pendant quelques heures ou quelques jours.

      Tous ceux à qui nous avons parlé ont finalement terminé à Brook House, un des deux centres de détention de Gatwick.
      « ils sont venus avec les boucliers »

      Une nuit, à Brook House, après que quelqu’un se soit mutilé, ils ont enfermé tout le monde. Un homme a paniqué et a commencé à crier en demandant aux gardes « S’il vous plaît, ouvrez la porte ». Mais il ne parlait pas bien anglais et criait en arabe. Il a dit : « Si vous n’ouvrez pas la porte je vais faire bouillir de l’eau dans ma bouilloire et me la verser sur le visage ». Mais ils ne l’ont pas compris, ils pensaient qu’il était en train de les menacer et qu’il était en train de dire qu’il allait jeter l’eau bouillante sur eux. Alors ils sont arrivés avec leurs boucliers, ils l’ont jeté hors de sa cellule et ils l’ont mis en isolement. Quand ils l’ont mis là-bas, ils lui ont donné des coups et ils l’ont battu, ils ont dit : « Ne nous menace plus jamais ». (Témoignage d’une personne déportée)

      Brook House

      Brook House reste tristement célèbre après les révélations d’un lanceur d’alerte sur les brutalités quotidiennes et les humiliations commises par les gardes qui travaillent pour G4S. Leur contrat a depuis été repris par la branche emprisonnement de Mitie – dont la devise est « Care and Custody, a Mitie company » (traduction : « Soins et détention, une entreprise Mitie »). Probablement que beaucoup des mêmes gardes sont simplement passés d’une entreprise à l’autre.

      Dans tous les cas, d’après ce que les personnes déportées nous ont dit, pas grand chose n’a changé à Brook House – le vice et la violence des gardes restent la norme. Les histoires rapportées ici en donnent juste quelques exemples. Vous pouvez lire davantage dans les récents témoignages de personnes détenues sur le blog Detained Voices.
      « ils s’assurent juste que tu ne meures pas devant eux »

      J’étais dans ma cellule à Brook House seul depuis 12 jours, je ne pouvais ni manger ni boire, juste penser, penser à ma situation. J’ai demandé un docteur peut-être dix fois. Ils sont venus plusieurs fois, ils ont pris mon sang, mais ils n’ont rien fait d’autre. Ils s’en foutent de ta santé ou de ta santé mentale. Ils ont juste peur que tu meures là. Ils s’en foutent de ce qui t’arrive du moment que tu ne meures pas devant leurs yeux. Et ça n’a pas d’importance pour eux si tu meurs ailleurs.
      Témoignage d’une personne déportée.

      Préparation des vols

      Le Home Office délivre des papiers appelés « Instructions d’expulsion » (« Removal Directions » – Rds) aux personnes qu’ils ont l’intention de déporter. Y sont stipulés la destination et le jour du vol. Les personnes qui sont déjà en détention doivent recevoir ce papier au moins 72 heures à l’avance, incluant deux jours ouvrés, afin de leur permettre de faire un ultime appel de la décision.

      Voir Right to Remain toolkit pour des informations détaillés sur les délais légaux et sur les procédures d’appel.

      Tous les vols de déportation du Royaume Uni, les tickets qu’ils soient pour un avion de ligne régulier ou un vol charter sont réservés via une agence de voyage privée appelée Carlson Wagonlit Travel (CWT). La principale compagnie aérienne utilisée par le Home Office pour les vols charter est la compagnie de charter qui s’appelle Titan Airways.

      Voir 2018 Corporate Watch report pour les informations détaillées sur les procédures de vols charter et les compagnies impliquées. Et la mise-à-jour de 2020 sur les déportations en général.

      Concernant le vol du 12 août, des recours légaux ont réussi à faire sortir 19 personnes de l’avion qui avaient des Instructions d’expulsion ( Rds ). Cependant, le Home Office les a remplacées par 14 autres personnes qui étaient sur la « liste d’attente ». Les avocats suspectent que ces 14 personnes n’ont pas eu suffisamment accès à leur droit à être représentés par un-e avocat-e avant le vol, ce qui a permis qu’elles soient expulsés.

      Parmi les 19 personnes dont les avocat.es ont réussi à empêcher l’expulsion prévue, 12 ont finalement été déportées par le vol charter du 26 août : 6 personnes envoyées à Dusseldorf en Allemagne et 6 autres à Clermont-Ferrand en France.

      Un autre vol a été programmé le 27 août pour l’Espagne. Cependant les avocat-es ont réussi à faire retirer tout le monde, et le Home Office a annulé le vol. L’administration anglaise (Whitehall) a dit dans les médias : “le taux d’attrition juridique a été de 100 % pour ce vol en raison des obstacles sans précédent et organisés que trois cabinets d’avocats ont imposés au gouvernement.” Il y a donc de fortes chances que Home Office mettra tous ses moyens à disposition pour continuer à expulser ces personnes lors de prochains vols charters.

      Qui a été expulsé ?

      L’ensemble des personnes expulsées par avion sont des personnes réfugiées qui ont déposé leur demande d’asile au Royaume-Uni immédiatement après leur arrivée à Dover. La une des médias expose les personnes expulsées comme « de dangereux criminels », mais aucune d’entre elles n’a fait l’objet de poursuites.

      Ils viennent de différents pays dont l’Irak, le Yemen, le Soudan, la Syrie, l’Afghanistan et le Koweit. (Dix autres Yéménis devaient être expulsés par le vol annulé pour l’Espagne. Au mois de juin, le gouvernement du Royaume-Uni a annoncé la reprise des accords commerciaux de vente d’armes avec l’Arabie Saoudite qui les utilise dans des bombardements au Yemen qui ont déjà coûté la vie à des dizaines de milliers de personnes).

      Toutes ces personnes craignent à raison des persécution dans leurs pays d’origine – où les abus des Droits de l’Homme sont nombreux et ont été largement documentés. Au moins plusieurs des personnes expulsées ont survécu à la torture, ce qui a été documenté par le Home Office lui-même lors d’entretiens.

      Parmi eux, un mineur âgé de moins de 18 ans a été enregistré par le Home Office comme ayant 25 ans – alors même qu’ils étaient en possession de son passeport prouvant son âge réel. Les mineurs isolés ne devraient légalement pas être traités avec la procédure Dublin III, et encore moins être placés en détention et être expulsés.

      Beaucoup de ces personnes, si ce ne sont toutes, ont des ami-es et de la famille au Royaume-Uni.

      Aucune de leurs demandes d’asile n’a été évaluée – toutes ont été refusées dans le cadre de la procédure Dublin III (cf. Cadre Légal plus bas).

      Chronologie du vol du 26 août

      Nuit du 25 août : Huit des personnes en attente de leur expulsion se mutilent ou tentent de se suicider. D’autres personnes font une grève de la faim depuis plus d’une semaine. Trois d’entre elles sont amenées à l’hôpital, hâtivement prises en charge pour qu’elles puissent être placées dans l’avion. Cinq autres se sont simplement vus délivrer quelques compresses au service des soins du centre de détention de Brook House. (cf. le témoignage ci-dessus)

      26 août, vers 4 heure du matin : Les gardiens récupèrent les personnes expulsables dans leurs cellules. Il y a de nombreux témoignages de violence : trois ou quatre gardiens en tenue anti-émeute avec casques et boucliers s’introduisent dans les cellules et tabassent les détenus à la moindre résistance.

      vers 4 heure du matin : Les détenus blessés sont amenés par les gardiens pour être examinés par un médecin dans un couloir, face aux fonctionnaires, et sont jugés « apte à prendre l’avion ».

      vers 5 heure du matin : Les détenus sont amenés un par un dans les fourgons. Chacun est placé dans un fourgon séparé, entouré de quatre gardiens. Les fourgons portent le logo de l’entreprise Mitie « Care and Custody ». Les détenus sont gardés dans les fourgons le temps de faire monter tout le monde, ce qui prend une à deux heures.

      vers 6 heure du matin : Les fourgons vont du centre de détention de Brook House (près de l’Aéroport Gatwick) à l’Aéroport Stansted et entrent directement dans la zone réservée aux vols charters. Les détenus sont sortis un par un des fourgons vers l’avion de la compagnie aérienne Titan. Il s’agit d’un avion Airbus A321-211, avec le numéro d’enregistrement G-POWU, au caractère anonyme, qui ne porte aucun signe distinctif de la compagnie aérienne. Les détenus sont escortés en haut des escaliers avec un gardien de chaque côté.

      Dans l’avion quatre gardiens sont assignés à chaque personne : deux de part et d’autre sur les sièges mitoyens, un sur le siège devant et un sur le siège derrière. Les détenus sont maintenus avec une ceinture de restriction au niveau de leur taille à laquelle sont également attachées leurs mains par des menottes. En plus des 12 détenus et 48 gardiens, il y a des fonctionnaires du Home Office, des managers de Mitie, et deux personnels paramédicaux dans l’avion.

      7h58 (BST) : L’avion de la compagnie Titan (dont le numéro de vol est ZT311) décolle de l’Aéroport Stansted.

      9h44 (CEST) : Le vol atterrit à Dusseldorf. Six personnes sont sorties de l’avion, laissées aux mains des autorités allemandes.

      10h46 (CEST) : L’avion Titan décolle de Dusseldorf pour rejoindre Clermont-Ferrand avec le reste des détenus.

      11h59 (CEST) : L’avion (dont le numéro de vol est maintenant ZT312) atterrit à l’Aéroport de Clermont-Ferrand Auvergne et les six autres détenus sont débarqués et amenés aux douanes de la Police Aux Frontières (PAF).

      12h46 (CEST) : L’avion quitte Clermont-Ferrand pour retourner au Royaume-Uni. Il atterrit d’abord à l’Aéroport Gatwick, probablement pour déposer les gardiens et les fonctionnaires, avant de finir sa route à l’Aéroport Stansted où les pilotes achèvent leur journée.

      Larguées à destination : l’Allemagne

      Ce qu’il est arrivé aux personnes expulsées en Allemagne n’est pas connu, même s’il semblerait qu’il n’y ait pas eu de procédure claire engagée par la police allemande. Un des expulsés nous a rapporté qu’à son arrivée à Dusseldorf, la police allemande lui a donné un billet de train en lui disant de se rendre au bureau de la demande d’asile à Berlin. Une fois là-bas, on lui a dit de retourner dans son pays. Ce à quoi il a répondu qu’il ne pouvait pas y retourner et qu’il n’avait pas non plus d’argent pour rester à Berlin ou voyager dans un autre pays. Le bureau de la demande d’asile a répondu qu’il pouvait dormir dans les rues de Berlin.

      Un seul homme a été arrêté à son arrivée. Il s’agit d’une personne qui avait tenté de se suicider la veille en se mutilant à la tête et au coup au rasoir, et qui avait saigné tout au long du vol.
      Larguées à destination : la France

      Les expulsés ont été transportés à Clermont-Ferrand, une ville située au milieu de la France, à des centaines de kilomètres des centres métropolitains. Dès leur arrivée ils ont été testés pour le COVID par voie nasale et retenus par la PAF pendant que les autorités françaises décidaient de leur sort.

      Deux d’entre eux ont été libérés à peu près une heure et demi après, une fois donnés des rendez-vous au cours de la semaine suivante pour faire des demandes d’asile dans des Préfectures de région eloignées de Clermont-Ferrand. Il ne leur a été proposé aucun logement, ni information légale, ni moyen pour se déplacer jusqu’à leurs rendez-vous.

      La personne suivante a été libérée environ une heure et demi après eux. Il ne lui a pas été donné de rendez-vous pour demander l’asile, mais il lui a juste été proposé une chambre d’hotel pour quatre nuits.

      Pendant le reste de la journée, les trois autres détenus ont été emmenés de l’aéroport au commisariat pour prendre leurs empreintes. On a commencé à les libérer à partir de 18h. Le dernier a été libéré sept heures après que le vol de déportation soit arrivé. La police a attendu que la Préfecture décide de les transférer ou non au Centre de Rétention Administrative (CRA). On ne sait pas si la raison à cela était que le centre le plus proche, à Lyon, était plein.

      Cependant, ces personnes n’ont pas été simplement laissées libres. Il leur a été donné des ordres d’expulsion (OQTF : Obligation de quitter le territoire francais) et des interdictions de retour sur le territoire francais (IRTF). Ces document ne leur donnent que48h pour faire appel. Le gouverment britannique a dit que les personnes déportées par avion en France avaient la possibilité de demander l’asile en France. C’est clairement faux.

      Pour aller plus loin dans les contradictions bureaucratique, avec les ordres d’expulsion leurs ont été donnés l’ordre de devoir se présenter à la station de police de Clermont-Ferrand tous les jours à dix heures du matin dans les 45 prochains jours (pour potentiellement y être arrêtés et detenus à ces occasions). Ils leur a été dit que si ils ne s’y présentaient pas la police
      les considèrerait comme en fuite.

      La police a aussi réservé une place dans un hotel à plusieurs kilomètre de l’aéroport pour quatres nuits, mais sans aucune autre information ni aide pour se procurer de quoi s’alimenter. Il ne leur a été fourni aucun moyen de se rendre à cet hôtel et la police a refusé de les aider – disant que leur mission s’arretait à la délivrance de leurs documents d’expulsion.

      Après m’avoir donné les papiers d’expulsion, le policier francais a dit
      ‘Maintenant tu peux aller en Angleterre’.
      Temoignage de la personne expulsée

      La police aux frontières (PAF) a ignoré la question de la santé et du
      bien-être des personnes expulsées qui étaient gardées toute la journée.
      Une des personnes était en chaise roulante toute la journée et était
      incapable de marcher du fait des blessures profondes à son pied, qu’il
      s’était lui même infligées. Il n’a jamais été emmené à l’hôpital malgré les
      recommendations du médecin, ni durant la période de détention, ni après
      sa libération. En fait, la seule raison à la visite du médecin était initialement d’évaluer s’il était en mesure d’être detenu au cas où la Préfecture le déciderait. La police l’a laissé dans ses vêtements souillés de sang toute la journée et quand ils l’ont libéré il n’avait pas eu de chaussures et pouvait à peine marcher. Ni béquilles, ni aide pour rejoindre l’hotel ne lui ont été donnés par la police. Il a été laissé dans la rue, devant porter toutes ses
      affaires dans un sac en plastique du Home Office.
      “La nuit la plus dure de ma vie”

      Ce fut la nuit la plus dure de ma vie. Mon coeur était brisé si fort que j’ai sérieusement pensé au suicide. J’ai mis le rasoir dans ma bouche pour l’avaler ; j’ai vu ma vie entière passer rapidement jusqu’aux premières heures du jour. Le traitement en détention était très mauvais, humiliant et dégradant. Je me suis haï et je sentais que ma vie était détruite mais au même temps elle était trop précieuse pour la perdre si facilement. J’ai recraché le razoir de ma bouche avant d’être sorti de la chambre où quatre personnes à l’allure impossante, portant la même tenue de CRS et des boucliers de protéction, m’ont violemment emmené dans le grand hall au rez-de-chaussée du centre de détention. J’étais épuisé puisque j’avais fait une grève de la faim depuis plusieurs jours. Dans la chambre à côte de moi un des déportés a essayé de resister et a été battu si sévèrement que du sang a coulé de son nez. Dans le grand hall ils m’ont fouillé avec soin et m’ont escorté jusqu’à la voiture comme un dangerux criminel, deux personnes à ma gauche et à ma droite. Ils ont conduit environ deux heures jusqu’à l’aéroport, il y avait un grand avion sur la piste de décollage. […] A ce moment, j’ai vu mes rêves, mes espoirs, brisés devant moi en entrant dans l’avion.
      Temoignage d’une personne déportée (de Detained Voices)

      Le cade légal : Dublin III

      Ces expulsions se déroulent dans le cadre du règlement Dublin III. Il s’agit de la législation déterminant quel pays européen doit évaluer la demande d’asile d’une personne réfugiée. Cette décision implique un certain nombre de critères, l’un des principaux étant le regroupement familial et l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant. Un autre critère, dans le cas des personnes franchissant la frontières sans papiers, est le premier pays dans lequel ils entrent « irrégulièrement ». Dans cette loi, ce critère est supposé être moins important que les attaches familiales. Mais il est communément employé par les gouvernements cherchant à rediriger les demandes d’asile à d’autres Etats. Toutes les personnes que nous connaissions sur ces vols étaient « dublinés » car le Royaume-Uni prétendait qu’ils avaient été en France, en Allemagne ou en Espagne.

      (Voir : briefing à l’introduction du House of Commons ; Home Office staff handbook (manuel du personnel du ministère de l’intérieur ; section Dublin Right to remain .)

      En se référant au règlement Dublin, le Royaume-Uni évite d’examiner les cas de demande d’asile. Ces personnes ne sont pas expulsées parce que leur demande d’asile a été refusée. Leurs demandes ne sont simplement jamais examinées. La décision d’appliquer le règlement Dublin est prise après la premier entretien filmé ( à ce jour, au centre de détention de Yarl’s Wood). Comme nous l’avons vu plus haut, peu de personnes sont dans la capacité d’avoir accès à une assistance juridique avant ces entretiens, quelquefois menés par téléphone et sans traduction adéquate.

      Avec le Dublin III, le Royaume-Uni doit faire la demande formelle au gouvernement qu’il croit responsable d’examiner la demande d’asile, de reprendre le demandeur et de lui présenter la preuve à savoir pourquoi ce gouvernement devrait en accepter la responsabilité. Généralement, la preuve produite est le fichier des empreintes enregistrées par un autre pays sur la base de données EURODAC, à travers toute l’Europe.

      Cependant, lors des récents cas d’expulsion, le Home Office n’a pas toujours produit les empreintes, mais a choisi de se reposer sur de fragiles preuves circonstantielles. Certains pays ont refusé ce type de preuve, d’autres en revanche l’ont accepté, notamment la France.

      Il semble y avoir un mode de fonctionnement récurrent dans ces affaires où la France accepte les retours de Dublin III, quand bien même d’autres pays l’ont refusé. Le gouvernement français pourrait avoir été encouragé à accepter les « reprises/retours » fondés sur des preuves fragiles, dans le cadre des récentes négociations américano-britanniques sur la traversée de la Manche (La France aurait apparemment demandé 30 millions de livres pour aider la Grande-Bretagne à rendre la route non viable.)

      En théorie, accepter une demande Dublin III signifie que la France (ou tout autre pays) a pris la responsabilité de prendre en charge la demande d’asile d’un individu. Dans la pratique, la plupart des individus arrivés à Clermont-Ferrand le 26 août n’ont pas eu l’opportunité de demander l’asile. A la place, des arrêtés d’expulsion leur ont été adressés, leur ordonnant de quitter la France et l’Europe. On ne leur donne que 48h pour faire appel de l’ordre d’expulsion, sans plus d’information sur le dispositif légal. Ce qui apparaît souvent comme quasi impossible pour une personne venant d’endurer une expulsion forcée et qui pourrait nécessiter des soins médicaux urgents.

      Suite au Brexit, le Royaume-Uni ne participera pas plus au Dublin III à partir du 31 décembre 2020. Puisqu’il y a des signataires de cet accord hors Union-Européenne, comme la Suisse et la Norvège, le devenir de ces arrangements est encore flou (comme tout ce qui concerne le Brexit). S’il n’y a d’accord global, le Royaume-Uni devra négocier plusieurs accords bilatéraux avec les pays européens. Le schéma d’expulsion accéléré établi par la France sans processus d’évaluation adéquat de la demande d’asile pourrait être un avant-goût des choses à venir.
      Conclusion : expéditif – et illégal ?

      Évidemment, les expulsions par charter sont l’un des outils les plus manifestement brutaux employés par le régime frontalier du Royaume Uni. Elles impliquent l’emploi d’une violence moralement dévastatrice par le Home Office et ses entrepreneurs ((Mitie, Titan Airways, Britannia Hotels, et les autres) contre des personnes ayant déjà traversé des histoires traumatiques.

      Car les récentes expulsions de ceux qui ont traversé la Manche semblent particulièrement expéditives. Des personnes qui ont risqué le vie dans la Manche sont récupérées par une machine destinée à nier leur droit d’asile et à les expulser aussi vite que possible, pour satisfaire le besoin d’une réaction rapide à la dernière panique médiatique. De nouvelles procédures semblent avoir mises en place spontanément par des officiels du Ministère de l’Intérieur ainsi que des accords officieux avec leurs homologues français.

      En résultat de ce travail bâclé, il semble y avoir un certain nombre d’irrégularités dans la procédure. Certaines ont déjà été signalées dans des recours juridiques efficaces contre le vol vers l’Espagne du 27 août. La détention et l’expulsion des personnes qui ont traversé la Manche en bateau peut avoir été largement illégale et est susceptible d’être remise en cause plus profondément des deux côtés de la Manche.

      Ici, nous résumerons quelques enjeux spécifiques.

      La nature profondément politique du processus d’expulsion pour ces personnes qui ont fait la traversée sur de petits bateaux, ce qui signifie qu’on leur refuse l’accès à une procédure de demande d’asile évaluée par le Home Office.
      Les personnes réfugiées incluent des personnes victimes de torture, de trafic humain, aussi bien que des mineurs.
      Des individus sont détenus, précipités d’entretiens en entretiens, et « dublinés » sans la possibilité d’avoir accès à une assistance juridique et aux informations nécessaires.
      Afin d’éviter d’avoir à considérer des demandes d’asile, la Grande-Bretagne applique le règlement Dublin III, souvent en employant de faibles preuves circonstancielles – et la France accepte ces demandes, peut-être en conséquence des récentes négociations et arrangements financiers.
      De nombreuses personnes expulsées ont des attaches familiales au Royaume-Uni, mais le critère primordial du rapprochement familial du rêglement Dublin III est ignoré
      En acceptant les demandes Dublin, la France prend la responsabilité légale des demandes d’asile. Mais en réalité, elle prive ces personnes de la possibilité de demander l’asile, en leur assignant des papiers d’expulsion.
      Ces papiers d’expulsions (« Obligation de quitter le territoire français » and « Interdiction de retour sur le territoire français » ou OQTF et IRTF) sont assignées et il n’est possible de faire appel que dans les 48 heures qui suivent. C’est inadéquat pour assurer une procédure correcte, à plus forte raison pour des personnes traumatisées, passées par la détention, l’expulsion, larguées au milieu de nulle part, dans un pays où elles n’ont aucun contact et dont elles ne parlent pas la langue.
      Tout cela invalide complètement les arguments du Home Office qui soutient que les personnes qu’il expulse peuvent avoir accès à une procédure de demande d’asile équitable en France.

      https://calaismigrantsolidarity.wordpress.com/2020/08/31/sen-debarrasser-le-royaume-uni-se-precipite-pour-

  • La #Suisse découvre son « #colonialisme_sans_colonies »

    Les mouvements de contestation contre le racisme « #Black_Lives_Matter », nés aux États-Unis, essaiment en Suisse avec une vigueur surprenante. Pourquoi ?

    L’élément déclencheur a été une vidéo dévoilant la violence extrême d’un officier de police blanc ayant entraîné la mort de l’Afro-Américain George Floyd à la fin du mois de mai dans la ville de Minneapolis, aux États-Unis. Cette vidéo a été relayée sur les réseaux sociaux du monde entier et, à la mi-juin, des milliers de personnes – essentiellement des jeunes – sont descendues dans les rues, y compris dans les villes suisses, pour manifester contre le racisme. Sous le slogan « Black Lives Matter », les manifestations se sont déroulées la plupart du temps de manière pacifique et ont été tolérées par les autorités, moyennant le respect des restrictions en vigueur dans l’espace public pour endiguer le coronavirus.

    La vague de contestation déclenchée en Suisse par un événement international n’est pas étonnante en tant que telle. Ce qui est exceptionnel, c’est plutôt la manière dont le racisme ordinaire vis-à-vis des gens de couleur noire y est devenu un sujet d’actualité brûlant, alors que la Suisse n’a jamais été une puissance coloniale active, ni un pays dans lequel l’autorité publique s’exprime de manière manifestement discriminatoire contre les personnes n’ayant pas la peau blanche.

    « La Suisse n’est pas un îlot à l’abri des problèmes »

    « Il me semble que la génération des jeunes prend de plus en plus conscience que la Suisse n’est, sur ces questions, pas un îlot à l’abri des problèmes », relève l’historien Bernhard C. Schär. « C’est étonnant en réalité, ajoute-t-il, car ces sujets ne sont toujours guère abordés à l’école. » Bernhard C. Schär mène des recherches à l’EPF de Zurich et fait partie d’un groupe d’historiens qui s’efforcent de promouvoir une relecture critique de l’#histoire de la #Suisse_mondialisée.

    Cette vision souvent refoulée de la Suisse trouve toujours plus de résonance. Notamment parce qu’elle tient compte de la réalité : 40 % des personnes vivant en Suisse sont issues de l’immigration. Et 70 % des employés des entreprises suisses travaillent à l’étranger. « L’histoire de la Suisse ne se déroule pas, et ne s’est jamais déroulée, uniquement en Suisse et en Europe. » C’est la raison pour laquelle de moins en moins de personnes se reconnaîtraient dans un récit qui se concentrerait uniquement sur la Suisse dans ses frontières. L’approche plus ouverte du passé de la Suisse fait que l’on tombe automatiquement sur des traces de colonialisme et de #racisme.

    Les Suisses s’en rendent compte aussi dans leur vie quotidienne. D’après un rapport du Service national de lutte contre le racisme, 59 % d’entre eux considèrent le racisme comme un problème important, et 36 % des personnes issues de l’immigration vivant en Suisse ont subi des discriminations au cours des années analysées (entre 2013 et 2018), principalement dans un contexte professionnel ou lors de la recherche d’un emploi.

    À cela s’ajoute le fait que pour les jeunes Suisses, il est aujourd’hui normal d’avoir des camarades d’une autre couleur de peau. Et la « génération YouTube » approfondit aussi le sujet du racisme grâce aux médias sociaux. Les clips d’animateurs de télévision noirs américains comme Trevor Noah, né en Afrique du Sud d’un père suisse immigré, trouvent également un public en Suisse. Cela stimule le besoin de s’emparer de la brutale agression raciste ayant eu lieu aux États-Unis pour s’interroger sur la situation en Suisse, d’autant plus que le pays compte également des cas de violences policières. En 2018, par exemple, un homme noir est décédé à Lausanne d’un arrêt respiratoire après que des policiers l’ont plaqué au sol.

    Des #monuments contestés

    En Suisse, un grand nombre de monuments historiques sont susceptibles d’attiser les colères antiracistes. Par exemple, les statues érigées en l’honneur de pionniers de l’économie ou de scientifiques suisses dont les implications dans la pratique coloniale de l’exploitation ont longtemps été niées. Comme le négociant neuchâtelois #David_de_Pury, qui fit fortune à la cour portugaise au XVIIIe siècle notamment grâce au #trafic_d’esclaves et qui légua ses biens à la ville de #Neuchâtel où il a sa statue en bronze. Après les manifestations « Black Lives Matter », des militants antiracistes ont barbouillée celle-ci de peinture rouge sang et lancé une pétition pour qu’elle soit déboulonnée.

    Longtemps larvée, la controverse autour du brillant glaciologue Louis Agassiz, qui développa au XIXe siècle une théorie raciste avec laquelle les États-Unis légitimèrent la discrimination de leur population noire, a repris de l’ampleur. En Suisse, un sommet montagneux porte le nom du savant à la frontière entre les cantons de Berne et du Valais. Un comité emmené par l’historien Hans Fässler demande depuis 15 ans qu’il soit rebaptisé. Les trois communes concernées s’y opposent toutefois fermement.

    Des accusations sont également portées contre la figure d’Alfred Escher, pionnier de l’économie zurichois. Sa famille, largement ramifiée, possédait des plantations à Cuba, où travaillaient des esclaves. Et même Henri Dunant, qui fonda le Comité international de la Croix-Rouge, s’était livré avant cela à des activités coloniales. À Sétif, en Algérie, il avait fondé une société financière pour un producteur de céréales genevois, apprend-on dans l’ouvrage « Postkoloniale Schweiz » (La Suisse post-coloniale, non traduit), publié par des historiennes suisses.

    Ce même ouvrage montre que si de riches entrepreneurs profitèrent du « colonialisme sans colonies » de la Suisse, ce fut aussi le cas de citoyens des classes moyenne et inférieure de la société. Par exemple, les mercenaires qui se sont battus dans les colonies françaises au sein de la Légion étrangère. Vu sous cet angle, l’héritage de la contribution suisse au colonialisme, longtemps nié, devient un sujet allant bien au-delà de l’éventuel déboulonnage des statues.

    Alimenté par les mouvements de protestation, le débat sur la manière dont un racisme structurel d’État impacte la vie des Noirs aujourd’hui en Suisse est plus récent. La majorité des personnes qui s’expriment publiquement indiquent que le profilage racial – soit les contrôles au faciès et les soupçons de la police et des autorités fondés sur la couleur de la peau et des cheveux – fait partie de leur quotidien. Un rapport de l’ONU reproche à la Suisse d’en faire trop peu contre le profilage racial.

    L’artiste Mbene Mwambene, originaire du Malawi et vivant à Berne, dit que le racisme qu’il rencontre en Suisse est, contrairement aux États-Unis, plutôt « caché » et traversé par des stéréotypes contradictoires. D’une part, relate-t-il, on attend de lui qu’en tant qu’Africain, il sache très bien danser. D’autre part, il est souvent arrêté et fouillé pour vérifier qu’il ne détient pas de drogue.

    Les autorités policières suisses contestent avoir recours au profilage racial. Avant d’entrer en fonction, les policiers suivent en Suisse une formation de base de deux ans pendant laquelle ils sont confrontés aux questions des jugements de valeur et du respect des droits humains. Les contrôles au faciès sont un thème systématiquement abordé dans la formation des policiers, confirme par exemple le chef de la police saint-galloise Fredy Fässler (PS).

    Les intellectuels de couleur vivant en Suisse ont clairement contribué à la montée en puissance des débats sur le racisme en Suisse. Ils se sont fédérés et ont mis en avant des personnalités qui parviennent à faire entrer dans le débat public la réalité du racisme qu’elles subissent au quotidien. Des docteures en sciences comme l’anthropologue afro-suisse Serena Dankwa sont régulièrement interviewées par les médias publics. Un point central de l’argumentation de cette dernière trouve toujours plus d’écho : elle invite à reconnaître enfin le lien entre l’ancienne vision coloniale raciste de l’Afrique, toujours répandue y compris en Suisse, et les discriminations systématiques d’aujourd’hui, qui touchent toutes les personnes de couleur.

    –---

    David De Pury (1709–1786)

    L’ascension économique du Neuchâtelois David De Pury se fit au Portugal, où il se livra tout d’abord au commerce de diamants avec le Brésil avant de prendre part à la traite des esclaves à grande échelle. La compagnie de transport « Pernambuco e Paraiba », dont il était actionnaire, déporta entre 1761 et 1786 plus de 42 ?000 Africains capturés. En 1762, David De Pury fut appelé à la cour du roi du Portugal. Il légua son immense fortune à la ville de Neuchâtel. Celle-ci s’en servit pour construire les bâtiments qui lui confèrent aujourd’hui son caractère particulier.
    Louis Agassiz (1807–1873)

    Au début de sa carrière, le Fribourgeois Jean Louis Rodolphe Agassiz se consacra à l’étude des glaciers et des fossiles de poissons. Après son déménagement aux États-Unis (en 1846), il devient un professeur très en vue à l’université de Harvard. Ce qui pose problème, ce sont les théories racistes que Louis Agassiz développa et promut aux États-Unis. S’étant donné pour mission de prouver scientifiquement l’infériorité des esclaves noirs, il les décrivait comme une « race corrompue et dégénérée ». Il devint un défenseur véhément et influent de la ségrégation raciale.
    Alfred Escher (1819–1882)

    Le zurichois Alfred Escher, leader économique, pionnier du chemin de fer, fondateur du Crédit Suisse et politicien, eut une influence inégalée sur le développement de la Suisse au XIXe siècle (il est ici portraituré en tant que président du Conseil national en 1849). De son vivant déjà, sa famille fut accusée de profiter de l’esclavage. Les choses se sont clarifiées avec la publication de recherches historiques en 2017 : la famille Escher possédait une plantation de café à Cuba, où des esclaves surveillés par des chiens travaillaient 14 heures par jour.

    https://www.revue.ch/fr/editions/2020/05/detail/news/detail/News/la-suisse-decouvre-son-colonialisme-sans-colonies
    #colonialisme #colonisation #résistance #mémoire #Louis_Agassiz #Alfred_Escher #Cuba #esclavage #plantations #Henri_Dunant #Sétif #Algérie #mercenaires #Légion_étrangère #Brésil #diamants #Pernambuco_e_Paraiba #Crédit_Suisse #café

    –-
    Ajouté à la méaliste sur la Suisse coloniale :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/868109

    ping @cede

  • Le boom des logements vacants continue – Centre d’observation de la société
    http://www.observationsociete.fr/modes-de-vie/logement-modevie/le-boom-des-logements-vacants.html

    L’information ne va pas faire plaisir à tous ceux qui n’arrivent pas à trouver où se loger : le nombre de logements vacants a progressé de 1,9 à 3 millions entre 2006 et 2019 – une hausse de 55 % – selon les données du recensement de l’Insee. Leur part dans l’ensemble du parc de logements est passée de 6 à 8,4 %.

    #logement #propriété_privée

    • J’ai quitté y’a trois ans un 40m2 en me fâchant vivement avec le couple de propriétaires qui n’ont pas respecté le contrat ni les promesses qu’ils m’avaient faites. Bon, faut dire que si le plafond m’était tombé dessus c’est parce que je faisais cuire des patates sans couvercle, les chiottes qui fuyaient c’était aussi parce que je tirais trop fort au lieu de pousser, les parpaings sans isolant, bon on fera bientôt les travaux, la terrasse de 3m2 bétonnée sur la moitié de sa surface pour mieux la partager, la porte ballante sur la rue pour mieux permettre le carnage de notre appart par les cambrioleurs, un simple retard de quelques années. Et on touchait le plafond des chambres en levant la main, bref, on a réussi à partir.
      Est curieusement apparu ensuite sur la façade un grand tag « marchands de sommeil » qui a refusé d’être effacé pendant quelques mois. On n’était pas les seuls à leur en vouloir ceci dit.
      C’est sur que maintenant qu’il n’y a plus de locataires depuis trois ans (j’ai une copine qui vit à côté) ils ne peuvent plus raconter qu’ils n’ont pas de sous, ni le compte des charges, ni dénoncer quiconque à la CAF qui leur remboursait pourtant avec mon aide une part conséquente du crédit de leur maison principale type « Mon Oncle de Tati ».
      Bon, ok, je les déteste ces enflures de petits capitalistes de merde qui spéculent sur des taudis, mais pire que tout c’est bien la politique du #logement en france qui est pourrie.

    • @touti Il nous a fallu un recommandé AR pour que le nôtre se résigne à faire venir le plombier pour «  expertise  »  : l’eau giclait du mur depuis une semaine, on avait les pieds dans l’eau. Le plombier a pété le mur et révélé qu’une ancienne soudure avait lâché à l’intérieur du mur. Le proprio, les yeux exorbités  : «  c’est parce qu’ils ferment le robinet trop fort  !  ».

      Le plombier l’a envoyé chercher un truc dehors, puis nous a dit qu’il était choqué par la situation, qu’il n’avait jamais vu quelqu’un se permettre d’aussi mal se comporter et qu’il était de notre côté.

      C’était un pote au proprio, lequel a la réputation d’être gentil et serviable. Sauf que la relation proprio-locataire est une relation de domination et que le type défoule sur nous tout ce qui lui est refusé par la socialisation normale (où il est majoritairement considéré comme gentil, mais un peu limité, donc plutôt très dominé, d’où ses excès de flagornerie et serviabilité).

  • betrusted.io | A security enclave for humans
    https://betrusted.io

    Betrusted device concept Betrusted is not a phone: it is a secure enclave with auditable input and output surfaces. Betrusted relies on sharing your existing connectivity – such as your phone or cable modem – to access the Internet. Say you’re on the road and you want to securely message a friend. You would tether betrusted to your phone’s wifi, so that the phone is just an untrusted relay for encrypted messages coming too and from betrusted. The only place the decrypted messages will ever appear is on the trusted screen of a betrusted device. — Permalien

    #hardware #securité

  • A Guide to the Relentless Hardcore of Machine Girl | Bandcamp Daily
    https://daily.bandcamp.com/lists/machine-girl-guide

    There are two kinds of music that tend to be colloquially referred to as “hardcore”—as a noun—by fans: the aggressive, unrestrained sound of #hardcore_punk and its offshoots, and the fast and furious #breakbeats and bass of #hardcore_rave. The speed and weight of hardcore dance music has always had something in common with hardcore punk: both forms appeal to relatively niche audiences because of how physically overwhelming such speedy, intense music can be.

    https://machinegirl.bandcamp.com
    .​.​.because im young arrogant and hate everything you stand for​ Machine Girl
    https://machinegirl.bandcamp.com/album/because-im-young-arrogant-and-hate-everything-you-stand-for


    #Machine_Girl

  • European Police Malware Could Harvest GPS, Messages, Passwords, More
    https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/k7qjkn/encrochat-hack-gps-messages-passwords-data

    A document obtained by Motherboard provides more detail on the malware law enforcement deployed against Encrochat devices. The malware that French law enforcement deployed en masse onto Encrochat devices, a large encrypted phone network using Android phones, had the capability to harvest “all data stored within the device,” and was expected to include chat messages, geolocation data, usernames, passwords, and more, according to a document obtained by Motherboard. The document adds more (...)

    #EncroChat #Android #smartphone #WiFi #spyware #GPS #géolocalisation #criminalité #hacking (...)

    ##criminalité ##surveillance

  • Ce malware utilisé par les gendarmes peut siphonner toutes les données d’un smartphone
    https://www.01net.com/actualites/ce-malware-utilise-par-les-gendarmes-peut-siphonner-toutes-les-donnees-d-un-s

    Pour infiltrer EncroChat, la messagerie chiffrée des criminels, les gendarmes ont utilisé un code malveillant particulièrement sophistiqué dont certains détails viennent de fuiter. On en sait davantage sur le malware que la Gendarmerie nationale a déployé sur les terminaux des utilisateurs d’EncroChat, cette messagerie sécurisée pour criminels qui a été démantelée en juillet dernier. Selon un document récupéré par Motherboard, ce code malveillant est capable de siphonner « toutes les données stockées sur (...)

    #EncroChat #smartphone #spyware #WiFi #GPS #criminalité #écoutes #hacking #surveillance

    ##criminalité

  • Machine-Readable Refugees

    Hassan (not his real name; other details have also been changed) paused mid-story to take out his wallet and show me his ID card. Its edges were frayed. The grainy, black-and-white photo was of a gawky teenager. He ran his thumb over the words at the top: ‘Jamhuri ya Kenya/Republic of Kenya’. ‘Somehow,’ he said, ‘no one has found out that I am registered as a Kenyan.’

    He was born in the Kenyan town of Mandera, on the country’s borders with Somalia and Ethiopia, and grew up with relatives who had escaped the Somali civil war in the early 1990s. When his aunt, who fled Mogadishu, applied for refugee resettlement through the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, she listed Hassan as one of her sons – a description which, if understood outside the confines of biological kinship, accurately reflected their relationship.

    They were among the lucky few to pass through the competitive and labyrinthine resettlement process for Somalis and, in 2005, Hassan – by then a young adult – was relocated to Minnesota. It would be several years before US Citizenship and Immigration Services introduced DNA tests to assess the veracity of East African refugee petitions. The adoption of genetic testing by Denmark, France and the US, among others, has narrowed the ways in which family relationships can be defined, while giving the resettlement process the air of an impartial audit culture.

    In recent years, biometrics (the application of statistical methods to biological data, such as fingerprints or DNA) have been hailed as a solution to the elusive problem of identity fraud. Many governments and international agencies, including the UNHCR, see biometric identifiers and centralised databases as ways to determine the authenticity of people’s claims to refugee and citizenship status, to ensure that no one is passing as someone or something they’re not. But biometrics can be a blunt instrument, while the term ‘fraud’ is too absolute to describe a situation like Hassan’s.

    Biometrics infiltrated the humanitarian sector after 9/11. The US and EU were already building centralised fingerprint registries for the purposes of border control. But with the start of the War on Terror, biometric fever peaked, most evidently at the borders between nations, where the images of the terrorist and the migrant were blurred. A few weeks after the attacks, the UNHCR was advocating the collection and sharing of biometric data from refugees and asylum seekers. A year later, it was experimenting with iris scans along the Afghanistan/Pakistan frontier. On the insistence of the US, its top donor, the agency developed a standardised biometric enrolment system, now in use in more than fifty countries worldwide. By 2006, UNHCR agents were taking fingerprints in Kenya’s refugee camps, beginning with both index fingers and later expanding to all ten digits and both eyes.

    Reeling from 9/11, the US and its allies saw biometrics as a way to root out the new faceless enemy. At the same time, for humanitarian workers on the ground, it was an apparently simple answer to an intractable problem: how to identify a ‘genuine’ refugee. Those claiming refugee status could be crossed-checked against a host country’s citizenship records. Officials could detect refugees who tried to register under more than one name in order to get additional aid. Biometric technologies were laden with promises: improved accountability, increased efficiency, greater objectivity, an end to the heavy-handed tactics of herding people around and keeping them under surveillance.

    When refugees relinquish their fingerprints in return for aid, they don’t know how traces of themselves can travel through an invisible digital architecture. A centralised biometric infrastructure enables opaque, automated data-sharing with third parties. Human rights advocates worry about sensitive identifying information falling into thehands of governments or security agencies. According to a recent privacy-impact report, the UNHCR shares biometric data with the Department of Homeland Security when referring refugees for resettlement in the US. ‘The very nature of digitalised refugee data,’ as the political scientist Katja Jacobsen says, ‘means that it might also become accessible to other actors beyond the UNHCR’s own biometric identity management system.’

    Navigating a complex landscape of interstate sovereignty, caught between host and donor countries, refugee aid organisations often hold contradictory, inconsistent views on data protection. UNHCR officials have long been hesitant about sharing information with the Kenyan state, for instance. Their reservations are grounded in concerns that ‘confidential asylum-seeker data could be used for non-protection-related purposes’. Kenya has a poor record of refugee protection. Its security forces have a history of harassing Somalis, whether refugees or Kenyan citizens, who are widely mistrusted as ‘foreigners’.

    Such well-founded concerns did not deter the UNHCR from sharing data with, funding and training Kenya’s Department of Refugee Affairs (now the Refugee Affairs Secretariat), which since 2011 has slowly and unevenly taken over refugee registration in the country. The UNHCR hasconducted joint verification exercises with the Kenyan government to weed out cases of double registration. According to the anthropologist Claire Walkey, these efforts were ‘part of the externalisation of European asylum policy ... and general burden shifting to the Global South’, where more than 80 per cent of the world’s refugees live. Biometrics collected for protection purposes have been used by the Kenyan government to keep people out. Tens of thousands of ethnic Somali Kenyan citizens who have tried to get a Kenyan national ID have been turned away in recent years because their fingerprints are in the state’s refugee database.

    Over the last decade, biometrics have become part of the global development agenda, allegedly a panacea for a range of problems. One of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals is to provide everyone with a legal identity by 2030. Governments, multinational tech companies and international bodies from the World Bank to the World Food Programme have been promoting the use of digital identity systems. Across the Global South, biometric identifiers are increasingly linked to voting, aid distribution, refugee management and financial services. Countries with some of the least robust privacy laws and most vulnerable populations are now laboratories for experimental tech.

    Biometric identifiers promise to tie legal status directly to the body. They offer seductively easy solutions to the problems of administering large populations. But it is worth asking what (and who) gets lost when countries and international bodies turn to data-driven, automated solutions. Administrative failures, data gaps and clunky analogue systems had posed huge challenges for people at the mercy of dispassionate bureaucracies, but also provided others with room for manoeuvre.

    Biometrics may close the gap between an ID and its holder, but it opens a gulf between streamlined bureaucracies and people’s messy lives, their constrained choices, their survival strategies, their hopes for a better future, none of which can be captured on a digital scanner or encoded into a database.

    https://www.lrb.co.uk/blog/2020/september/machine-readable-refugees
    #biométrie #identité #réfugiés #citoyenneté #asile #migrations #ADN #tests_ADN #tests_génétiques #génétique #nationalité #famille #base_de_donnée #database #HCR #UNHCR #fraude #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #iris #technologie #contrôle #réinstallation #protection_des_données #empreintes_digitales #identité_digitale

    ping @etraces @karine4
    via @isskein

  • Longtemps, les femmes à la tête d’entreprises sont restées en marge de l’histoire des femmes et de l’histoire du travail. Et pourtant…
    #histoire #genre #économie

    https://sms.hypotheses.org/20387

    Femmes entrepreneures du XVIIIème siècle

    Des femmes à la tête d’entreprises aux XVIIIe siècle ? L’histoire est méconnue et pendant – trop – longtemps, les entrepreneures sont restées en marge des recherches en histoire des femmes ou en histoire du travail. Pourtant, elles n’étaient pas si marginales qu’on ne l’a d’abord cru.

    Henri Hauser déclarait déjà en 1897 : « C’est une opinion assez généralement répandue que l’emploi des femmes dans l’industrie est une invention des temps modernes. On se figure volontiers que les siècles passés ont laissé exclusivement la femme à son rôle d’épouse et de mère ; c’est, dit-on, le régime capitaliste, c’est la liberté du travail et la machine, qui ont créé ces types nouveaux : l’ouvrière, la patronne, la jeune apprentie. Mais l’histoire constate qu’elle n’est en accord ni avec les faits, ni avec les textes. »

    Il a pourtant fallu attendre les années 1970 et l’avènement progressif d’une « histoire des femmes », dans la droite lignes des women studies américaines, pour que les historiens s’intéressent à la réalité du travail féminin. Il fallu attendre vingt ans de plus pour que commence à émerger une réflexion sur l’entrepreneuriat féminin sous toutes ses formes. Quittant la rhétorique de l’exclusion juridique et économique, les chercheurs ont alors mis en évidence l’existence de stratégies féminines qui confirment l’écart entre la norme et la pratique. Les études de cas se sont enfin multipliées, rendues possibles par la mobilisation de sources nouvelles (correspondance, actes notariés…) (...)

  • Possibility of Disinfection of SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) in Human Respiratory Tract by Controlled Ethanol Vapor Inhalation
    Tsumoru Shintake, arXiv:2003.12444 [physics.med-ph], le 15 mars 2020

    The author suggests that it may be possible to use alcoholic beverages of 16~20 v/v% concentration for this disinfection process, such as Whisky (1:1 hot water dilution) or Japanese Sake, because they are readily available and safe (non-toxic). By inhaling the alcohol vapor at 50~60∘C (122~140∘F) through the nose for one or two minutes, it will condense on surfaces inside the respiratory tract; mainly in the nasal cavity.

    #coronavirus #science #alcohol #humour ?

  • Des stérilisations massives de femmes migrantes sont dénoncées aux États-Unis | Le Club de Mediapart
    https://blogs.mediapart.fr/e-lopez/blog/150920/des-sterilisations-massives-de-femmes-migrantes-sont-denoncees-aux-e

    Divers groupes de défense et de soutien juridique des États-Unis ont déposé une plainte ce lundi 14 septembre contre le personnel embauché par le Service de lutte contre l’Immigration (Immigration and Customs Enforcement Service, ICE), non seulement pour avoir ignoré les protocoles visant à freiner la propagation du #COVID- 19 dans ses locaux, mais aussi pour avoir procédé à des #stérilisations massives et injustifiées de #femmes #migrantes #détenues.

    #stérilisations_forcées

  • Nations sur le papier
    https://laviedesidees.fr/Nations-sur-le-papier.html

    À propos de : Morgane Labbé, La Nationalité, une #Histoire de chiffres. Politique et #statistiques en #Europe centrale (1848-1919), Presses de Sciences Po. À partir du milieu du XIXe siècle, la statistique et ses dérivés permettent de renforcer l’État en quantifiant les populations des pays multiculturels comme l’Autriche-Hongrie ou la Russie. Coup de projecteur sur les usages politiques du chiffre.

    #nation #langue #Etat
    https://laviedesidees.fr/IMG/docx/20200916_nationssurlepapier.docx
    https://laviedesidees.fr/IMG/pdf/20200916_nationssurlepapier.pdf

  • Des célébrités américaines vont boycotter Instagram pour une journée
    https://www.lemonde.fr/pixels/article/2020/09/16/des-celebrites-americaines-vont-boycotter-instagram-pour-une-journee_6052373

    Kim Kardashian et ses 188 millions d’abonnés, Leonardo DiCaprio et ses 46 millions d’abonnés, mais aussi Kerry Washington, Sacha Baron Cohen… Plusieurs célébrités vont geler leur compte Instagram le temps d’une journée, mercredi 16 septembre, pour appeler Facebook, la maison mère, à mieux lutter sur ses plates-formes contre les contenus haineux et la désinformation, à moins de cinquante jours de l’élection présidentielle américaine, le 3 novembre.

    La pression d’enfer !

  • Giorgos Tsiakalos: “In Europe, a racist policy is being implemented”

    EU policy can rightly be called “Black lives don’t matter in the Mediterranean”

    In June 2020, recognized refugee families, most of which had just arrived in Athens from the Moria camp on the island of Lesvos, were unable to find housing and remained homeless for days, sleeping in Athens’ Victoria Square. June 1, 2020, marked the implementation of the Greek law which terminates the provision of shelter for 11,237 refugees and beneficiaries via the ESTIA housing program.

    “They arrived at Victoria Square, as others had come before them about five years ago. Back then we had said we were caught off guard. Now what do we say? I was there today”, wrote George Tsiakalos, Professor of Pedagogy at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, in a Facebook post dated June 14.

    George Tsiakalos, along with his wife, Sigrid Maria Muschik, have been providing support to these families not only in recent months, but continuously − since the early days of what became known as the “refugee crisis”.

    https://wearesolomon.com/mag/q-and-a/giorgos-tsiakalos-in-europe-a-racist-policy-is-being-implemented/?mc_cid=a5016dd865&mc_eid=3444239cea

    #greece #refugees #migrants #Moria #camps #Europe #Migration #borders #housing

  • #Briançon : « L’expulsion de Refuges solidaires est une vraie catastrophe pour le territoire et une erreur politique »

    Le nouveau maire a décidé de mettre l’association d’aide aux migrants à la porte de ses locaux. Dans la ville, la mobilisation citoyenne s’organise

    #Arnaud_Murgia, élu maire de Briançon en juin, avait promis de « redresser » sa ville. Il vient, au-delà même de ce qu’il affichait dans son programme, de s’attaquer brutalement aux structures associatives clefs du mouvement citoyen d’accueil des migrants qui transitent en nombre par la vallée haut-alpine depuis quatre ans, après avoir traversé la montagne à pied depuis l’Italie voisine.

    A 35 ans, Arnaud Murgia, ex-président départemental des Républicains et toujours conseiller départemental, a également pris la tête de la communauté de communes du Briançonnais (CCB) cet été. C’est en tant que président de la CCB qu’il a décidé de mettre l’association Refuges solidaires à la porte des locaux dont elle disposait par convention depuis sa création en juillet 2017. Par un courrier daté du 26 août, il a annoncé à Refuges solidaires qu’il ne renouvellerait pas la convention, arrivée à son terme. Et « mis en demeure » l’association de « libérer » le bâtiment situé près de la gare de Briançon pour « graves négligences dans la gestion des locaux et de leurs occupants ». Ultimatum au 28 octobre. Il a renouvelé sa mise en demeure par un courrier le 11 septembre, ajoutant à ses griefs l’alerte Covid pesant sur le refuge, qui l’oblige à ne plus accueillir de nouveaux migrants jusqu’au 19 septembre en vertu d’un arrêté préfectoral.
    « Autoritarisme mêlé d’idées xénophobes »

    Un peu abasourdis, les responsables de Refuges solidaires n’avaient pas révélé l’information, dans l’attente d’une rencontre avec le maire qui leur aurait peut être permis une négociation. Peine perdue : Arnaud Murgia les a enfin reçus lundi, pour la première fois depuis son élection, mais il n’a fait que réitérer son ultimatum. Refuges solidaires s’est donc résolu à monter publiquement au créneau. « M. Murgia a dégainé sans discuter, avec une méconnaissance totale de ce que nous faisons, gronde Philippe Wyon, l’un des administrateurs. Cette fin de non-recevoir est un refus de prise en compte de l’accueil humanitaire des exilés, autant que de la paix sociale que nous apportons aux Briançonnais. C’est irresponsable ! » La coordinatrice du refuge, Pauline Rey, s’insurge : « Il vient casser une dynamique qui a parfaitement marché depuis trois ans : nous avons accueilli, nourri, soigné, réconforté près de 11 000 personnes. Il est illusoire d’imaginer que sans nous, le flux d’exilés va se tarir ! D’autant qu’il est reparti à la hausse, avec 350 personnes sur le seul mois d’août, avec de plus en plus de familles, notamment iraniennes et afghanes, avec des bébés parfois… Cet hiver, où iront-ils ? »

    Il faut avoir vu les bénévoles, au cœur des nuits d’hiver, prendre en charge avec une énergie et une efficacité admirables les naufragés de la montagne épuisés, frigorifiés, gelés parfois, pour comprendre ce qu’elle redoute. Les migrants, après avoir emprunté de sentiers d’altitude pour échapper à la police, arrivent à grand-peine à Briançon ou sont redescendus parfois par les maraudeurs montagnards ou ceux de Médecins du monde qui les secourent après leur passage de la frontière. L’association Tous migrants, qui soutient ces maraudeurs, est elle aussi dans le collimateur d’Arnaud Murgia : il lui a sèchement signifié qu’il récupérerait les deux préfabriqués où elle entrepose le matériel de secours en montagne le 30 décembre, là encore sans la moindre discussion. L’un des porte-parole de Tous migrants, Michel Rousseau, fustige « une forme d’autoritarisme mêlée d’idées xénophobes : le maire désigne les exilés comme des indésirables et associe nos associations au désordre. Ses décisions vont en réalité semer la zizanie, puisque nous évitons aux exilés d’utiliser des moyens problématiques pour s’abriter et se nourrir. Ce mouvement a permis aux Briançonnais de donner le meilleur d’eux-mêmes. C’est une expérience très riche pour le territoire, nous n’avons pas l’intention que cela s’arrête ».

    La conseillère municipale d’opposition Aurélie Poyau (liste citoyenne, d’union de la gauche et écologistes), adjointe au maire sortant, l’assure : « Il va y avoir une mobilisation citoyenne, j’en suis persuadée. J’ose aussi espérer que des élus communautaires demanderont des discussions entre collectivités, associations, ONG et Etat pour que des décisions éclairées soient prises, afin de pérenniser l’accueil digne de ces personnes de passage chez nous. Depuis la création du refuge, il n’y a pas eu le moindre problème entre elles et la population. L’expulsion de Refuges solidaires est une vraie catastrophe pour le territoire et une erreur politique. »
    « Peine profonde »

    Ce mardi, au refuge, en application de l’arrêté préfectoral pris après la découverte de trois cas positif au Covid, Hamed, migrant algérien, se réveille après sa troisième nuit passée dans un duvet, sur des palettes de bois devant le bâtiment et confie : « Il faut essayer de ne pas fermer ce lieu, c’est très important, on a de bons repas, on reprend de l’énergie. C’est rare, ce genre d’endroit. » Y., jeune Iranien, est lui bien plus frais : arrivé la veille après vingt heures de marche dans la montagne, il a passé la nuit chez un couple de sexagénaires de Briançon qui ont répondu à l’appel d’urgence de Refuges solidaires. Il montre fièrement la photo rayonnante prise avec eux au petit-déjeuner. Nathalie, bénévole fidèle du refuge, soupire : « J’ai une peine profonde, je ne comprends pas la décision du maire, ni un tel manque d’humanité. Nous faisons le maximum sur le sanitaire, en collaboration avec l’hôpital, avec MDM, il n’y a jamais eu de problème ici. Hier, j’ai dû refuser l’entrée à onze jeunes, dont un blessé. Même si une partie a trouvé refuge chez des habitants solidaires, cela m’a été très douloureux. »

    Arnaud Murgia nous a pour sa part annoncé ce mardi soir qu’il ne souhaitait pas « s’exprimer publiquement, en accord avec les associations, pour ne pas créer de polémiques qui pénaliseraient une issue amiable »… Issue dont il n’a pourtant pas esquissé le moindre contour la veille face aux solidaires.

    https://www.liberation.fr/france/2020/09/16/briancon-l-expulsion-de-refuges-solidaires-est-une-vraie-catastrophe-pour

    #refuge_solidaire #expulsion #asile #migrations #réfugiés #solidarité #Hautes-Alpes #frontière_sud-alpine #criminalisation_de_la_solidarité #Refuges_solidaires #mise_en_demeure #Murgia

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur le Briançonnais :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733721

    ping @isskein @karine4 @_kg_

    • A Briançon, le nouveau maire LR veut fermer le refuge solidaire des migrants

      Depuis trois ans, ce lieu emblématique accueille de façon inconditionnelle et temporaire les personnes exilées franchissant la frontière franco-italienne par la montagne. Mais l’élection d’un nouveau maire Les Républicains, Arnaud Murgia, risque de tout changer.

      Briançon (Hautes-Alpes).– La nouvelle est tombée lundi, tel un coup de massue, après un rendez-vous très attendu avec la nouvelle municipalité. « Le maire nous a confirmé que nous allions devoir fermer, sans nous proposer aucune alternative », soupire Philippe, l’un des référents du refuge solidaire de Briançon. En 2017, l’association Refuges solidaires avait récupéré un ancien bâtiment inoccupé pour en faire un lieu unique à Briançon, tout près du col de Montgenèvre et de la gare, qui permet d’offrir une pause précieuse aux exilés dans leur parcours migratoire.

      Fin août, l’équipe du refuge découvrait avec effarement, dans un courrier signé de la main du président de la communauté de communes du Briançonnais, qui n’est autre qu’Arnaud Murgia, également maire de Briançon (Les Républicains), que la convention leur mettant les lieux à disposition ne serait pas renouvelée.

      Philippe avait pourtant pris les devants en juillet en adressant un courrier à Arnaud Murgia, en vue d’une rencontre et d’une éventuelle visite du refuge. « La seule réponse que nous avons eue a été ce courrier recommandé mettant fin à la convention », déplore-t-il, plein de lassitude.

      Contacté, le maire n’a pas souhaité s’exprimer mais évoque une question de sécurité dans son courrier, la jauge de 15 personnes accueillies n’étant pas respectée. « Il est en discussion avec les associations concernées afin de gérer au mieux cet épineux problème, et cela dans le plus grand respect des personnes en situation difficile », a indiqué son cabinet.

      Interrogée sur l’accueil d’urgence des exilés à l’avenir, la préfecture des Hautes-Alpes préfère ne pas « commenter la décision d’une collectivité portant sur l’affectation d’un bâtiment dont elle a la gestion ». « Dans les Hautes-Alpes comme pour tout point d’entrée sur le territoire national, les services de l’État et les forces de sécurité intérieure s’assurent que toute personne souhaitant entrer en France bénéficie du droit de séjourner sur notre territoire. »

      Sur le parking de la MJC de Briançon, mercredi dernier, Pauline se disait déjà inquiète. « Sur le plan humain, il ne peut pas laisser les gens à la rue comme ça, lâche-t-elle, en référence au maire. Il a une responsabilité ! » Cette ancienne bénévole de l’association, désormais salariée, se souvient des prémices du refuge.

      « Je revois les exilés dormir à même le sol devant la MJC. On a investi ces locaux inoccupés parce qu’il y avait un réel besoin d’accueil d’urgence sur la ville. » Trois ans plus tard et avec un total de 10 000 personnes accueillies, le besoin n’a jamais été aussi fort. L’équipe évoque même une « courbe exponentielle » depuis le mois de juin, graphique à l’appui. 106 personnes en juin, 216 en juillet, 355 en août.

      Une quarantaine de personnes est hébergée au refuge ce jour-là, pour une durée moyenne de deux à trois jours. La façade des locaux laisse apparaître le graffiti d’un poing levé en l’air qui arrache des fils barbelés. Pauline s’engouffre dans les locaux et passe par la salle commune, dont les murs sont décorés de dessins, drapeaux et mots de remerciement.

      De grands thermos trônent sur une table près du cabinet médical (tenu en partenariat avec Médecins du monde) et les exilés vont et viennent pour se servir un thé chaud. À droite, un bureau sert à Céline, la deuxième salariée chargée de l’accueil des migrants à leur arrivée.

      Prénom, nationalité, date d’arrivée, problèmes médicaux… « Nous avons des fiches confidentielles, que nous détruisons au bout d’un moment et qui nous servent à faire des statistiques anonymes que nous rendons publiques », précise Céline, tout en demandant à deux exilés de patienter dans un anglais courant. Durant leur séjour, la jeune femme leur vient en aide pour trouver les billets de train les moins chers ou pour leur procurer des recharges téléphoniques.

      « Depuis plusieurs mois, le profil des exilés a beaucoup changé, note Philippe. On a 90 % d’Afghans et d’Iraniens, alors que notre public était auparavant composé de jeunes hommes originaires d’Afrique de l’Ouest. » Désormais, ce sont aussi des familles, avec des enfants en bas âge, qui viennent chercher refuge en France en passant par la dangereuse route des Balkans.

      Dehors, dans la cour, deux petites filles jouent à se courir après, riant aux éclats. Selon Céline, l’aînée n’avait que huit mois quand ses parents sont partis. La deuxième est née sur la route.

      « Récemment, je suis tombée sur une famille afghane avec un garçon âgé de trois ans lors d’une maraude au col de Montgenèvre. Quand j’ai félicité l’enfant parce qu’il marchait vite, presque aussi vite que moi, il m’a répondu : “Ben oui, sinon la police va nous arrêter” », raconte Stéphanie Besson, coprésidente de l’association Tous migrants, qui vient de fêter ses cinq ans.

      L’auteure de Trouver refuge : histoires vécues par-delà les frontières n’a retrouvé le sourire que lorsqu’elle l’a aperçu, dans la cour devant le refuge, en train de s’amuser sur un mini-tracteur. « Il a retrouvé toute son innocence l’espace d’un instant. C’est pour ça que ce lieu est essentiel : la population qui passe par la montagne aujourd’hui est bien plus vulnérable. »

      Vers 16 heures, Pauline s’enfonce dans les couloirs en direction du réfectoire, où des biologistes vêtus d’une blouse blanche, dont le visage est encombré d’une charlotte et d’un masque, testent les résidents à tour de rôle. Un migrant a été positif au Covid-19 quelques jours plus tôt et la préfecture, dans un arrêté, a exigé la fermeture du refuge pour la journée du 10 septembre.

      Deux longues rangées de tables occupent la pièce, avec, d’un côté, un espace cuisine aménagé, de l’autre, une porte de secours donnant sur l’école Oronce fine. Là aussi, les murs ont servi de cimaises à de nombreux exilés souhaitant laisser une trace de leur passage au refuge. Dans un coin de la salle, des dizaines de matelas forment une pile et prennent la place des tables et des chaises, le soir venu, lorsque l’affluence est trop importante.

      « On a dû aménager deux dortoirs en plus de ceux du premier étage pour répondre aux besoins actuels », souligne Pauline, qui préfère ne laisser entrer personne d’autre que les exilés dans les chambres pour respecter leur intimité. Vers 17 heures, Samia se lève de sa chaise et commence à couper des concombres qu’elle laisse tomber dans un grand saladier.

      Cela fait trois ans que cette trentenaire a pris la route avec sa sœur depuis l’Afghanistan. « Au départ, on était avec notre frère, mais il a été arrêté en Turquie et renvoyé chez nous. On a décidé de poursuivre notre chemin malgré tout », chuchote-t-elle, ajoutant que c’est particulièrement dur et dangereux pour les femmes seules. Son regard semble triste et contraste avec son sourire.

      Évoquant des problèmes personnels mais aussi la présence des talibans, les sœurs expliquent avoir dû quitter leur pays dans l’espoir d’une vie meilleure en Europe. « Le refuge est une vraie chance pour nous. On a pu se reposer, dormir en toute sécurité et manger à notre faim. Chaque jour, je remercie les personnes qui s’en occupent », confie-t-elle en dari, l’un des dialectes afghans.

      Samia ne peut s’empêcher de comparer avec la Croatie, où de nombreux exilés décrivent les violences subies de la part de la police. « Ils ont frappé une des femmes qui était avec nous, ont cassé nos téléphones et ont brûlé une partie de nos affaires », raconte-t-elle.

      Ici, depuis des années, la police n’approche pas du refuge ni même de la gare, respectant dans une sorte d’accord informel la tranquillité des lieux et des exilés. « Je n’avais encore jamais vu de policiers aux alentours mais, récemment, deux agents de la PAF [police aux frontières] ont raccompagné une petite fille qui s’était perdue et ont filmé l’intérieur du refuge avec leur smartphone », assure Céline.

      À 18 heures, le repas est servi. Les parents convoquent les enfants, qui rappliquent en courant et s’installent sur une chaise. La fumée de la bolognaise s’échappe des assiettes, tandis qu’un joli brouhaha s’empare de la pièce. « Le dîner est servi tôt car on tient compte des exilés qui prennent le train du soir pour Paris, à 20 heures », explique Pauline.

      Paul*, 25 ans, en fait partie. C’est la deuxième fois qu’il vient au refuge, mais il a fait trois fois le tour de la ville de nuit pour pouvoir le retrouver. « J’avais une photo de la façade mais impossible de me rappeler l’emplacement », sourit-il. L’Ivoirien aspire à « une vie tranquille » qui lui permettrait de réaliser tous « les projets qu’il a en tête ».

      Le lendemain, une affiche collée à la porte d’entrée du refuge indique qu’un arrêté préfectoral impose la fermeture des lieux pour la journée. Aucun nouvel arrivant ne peut entrer.

      Pour Stéphanie Besson, la fermeture définitive du refuge aurait de lourdes conséquences sur les migrants et l’image de la ville. « Briançon est un exemple de fraternité. La responsabilité de ceux qui mettront fin à ce jeu de la fraternité avec des mesures politiques sera immense. »

      Parmi les bénévoles de Tous migrants, des professeurs, des agriculteurs, des banquiers et des retraités … « On a des soutiens partout, en France comme à l’étranger. Mais il ne faut pas croire qu’on tire une satisfaction de nos actions. Faire des maraudes une routine me brise, c’est une honte pour la France », poursuit cette accompagnatrice en montagne.

      Si elle se dit inquiète pour les cinq années à venir, c’est surtout pour l’énergie que les acteurs du tissu associatif vont devoir dépenser pour continuer à défendre les droits des exilés. L’association vient d’apprendre que le local qui sert à entreposer le matériel des maraudeurs, mis à disposition par la ville, va leur être retiré pour permettre l’extension de la cour de l’école Oronce fine.

      Contactée, l’inspectrice de l’Éducation nationale n’a pas confirmé ce projet d’agrandissement de l’établissement. « On a aussi une crainte pour la “maisonnette”, qui appartient à la ville, et qui loge les demandeurs d’asile sans hébergement », souffle Stéphanie.

      « Tout s’enchaîne, ça n’arrête pas depuis un mois », lâche Agnès Antoine, bénévole à Tous migrants. Cela fait plusieurs années que la militante accueille des exilés chez elle, souvent après leur passage au refuge solidaire, en plus de ses trois grands enfants.

      Depuis trois ans, Agnès héberge un adolescent guinéen inscrit au lycée, en passe d’obtenir son titre de séjour. « Il a 18 ans aujourd’hui et a obtenu les félicitations au dernier trimestre », lance-t-elle fièrement, ajoutant que c’est aussi cela qui l’encourage à poursuivre son engagement.

      Pour elle, Arnaud Murgia est dans un positionnement politique clair : « le rejet des exilés » et « la fermeture des frontières » pour empêcher tout passage par le col de Montgenèvre. « C’est illusoire ! Les migrants sont et seront toujours là, ils emprunteront des parcours plus dangereux pour y arriver et se retrouveront à la rue sans le refuge, qui remplit un rôle social indéniable. »

      Dans la vallée de Serre Chevalier, à l’abri des regards, un projet de tourisme solidaire est porté par le collectif d’architectes Quatorze. Il faut longer la rivière Guisane, au milieu des chalets touristiques de cette station et des montagnes, pour apercevoir la maison Bessoulie, au village du Bez. À l’intérieur, Laure et David s’activent pour tenir les délais, entre démolition, récup’ et réaménagement des lieux.

      « L’idée est de créer un refuge pour de l’accueil à moyen et long terme, où des exilés pourraient se former tout en côtoyant des touristes », développe Laure. Au rez-de-chaussée de cette ancienne auberge de jeunesse, une cuisine et une grande salle commune sont rénovées. Ici, divers ateliers (cuisine du monde, low tech, découverte des routes de l’exil) seront proposés.

      À l’étage, un autre espace commun est aménagé. « Il y a aussi la salle de bains et le futur studio du volontaire en service civique. » Un premier dortoir pour deux prend forme, près des chambres réservées aux saisonniers. « On va repeindre le lambris et mettre du parquet flottant », indique la jeune architecte.

      Deux autres dortoirs, l’un pour trois, l’autre pour quatre, sont prévus au deuxième étage, pour une capacité d’accueil de neuf personnes exilées. À chaque fois, un espace de travail est prévu pour elles. « Elles seront accompagnées par un gestionnaire présent à l’année, chargé de les suivre dans leur formation et leur insertion. »

      « C’est un projet qui donne du sens à notre travail », poursuit David en passant une main dans sa longue barbe. Peu sensible aux questions migratoires au départ, il découvre ces problématiques sur le tas. « On a une conscience architecturale et on compte tout faire pour offrir les meilleures conditions d’accueil aux exilés qui viendront. » Reste à déterminer les critères de sélection pour le public qui sera accueilli à la maison Bessoulie à compter de janvier 2021.

      Pour l’heure, le maire de la commune, comme le voisinage, ignore la finalité du projet. « Il est ami avec Arnaud Murgia, alors ça nous inquiète. Comme il y a une station là-bas, il pourrait être tenté de “protéger” le tourisme classique », confie Philippe, du refuge solidaire. Mais le bâtiment appartient à la Fédération unie des auberges de jeunesse (Fuaj) et non à la ville, ce qui est déjà une petite victoire pour les acteurs locaux. « Le moyen et long terme est un échelon manquant sur le territoire, on encourage donc tous cette démarche », relève Stéphanie Besson.

      Aurélie Poyau, élue de l’opposition, veut croire que le maire de Briançon saura prendre la meilleure décision pour ne pas entacher l’image de la ville. « En trois ans, il n’y a jamais eu aucun problème lié à la présence des migrants. Arnaud Murgia n’a pas la connaissance de cet accueil propre à la solidarité montagnarde, de son histoire. Il doit s’intéresser à cet élan », note-t-elle.

      Son optimisme reste relatif. Deux jours plus tôt, l’élue a pris connaissance d’un courrier adressé par la ville aux commerçants du marché de Briançon leur rappelant que la mendicité était interdite. « Personne ne mendie. On sait que ça vise les bénévoles des associations d’aide aux migrants, qui récupèrent des invendus en fin de marché. Mais c’est du don, et voilà comment on joue sur les peurs avec le poids des mots ! »

      Vendredi, avant la réunion avec le maire, un arrêté préfectoral est déjà venu prolonger la fermeture du refuge jusqu’au 19 septembre, après que deux nouvelles personnes ont été testées positives au Covid-19. Une décision que respecte Philippe, même s’il ne lâchera rien par la suite, au risque d’aller jusqu’à l’expulsion. Est-elle évitable ?

      « Évidemment, les cas Covid sont un argument de plus pour le maire, qui mélange tout. Mais nous lui avons signifié que nous n’arrêterons pas d’accueillir les personnes exilées de passage dans le Briançonnais, même après le délai de deux mois qu’il nous a imposé pour quitter les lieux », prévient Philippe. « On va organiser une riposte juridique et faire pression sur l’État pour qu’il prenne ses responsabilités », conclut Agnès.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/160920/briancon-le-nouveau-maire-lr-veut-fermer-le-refuge-solidaire-des-migrants?

      @sinehebdo : c’est l’article que tu as signalé, mais avec tout le texte, j’efface donc ton signalement pour ne pas avoir de doublons

    • Lettre d’information Tous Migrants. Septembre 2020

      Edito :

      Aylan. Moria. Qu’avons-nous fait en cinq ans ?

      Un petit garçon en exil, échoué mort sur une plage de la rive nord de la Méditerranée. Le plus grand camp de migrants en Europe ravagé par les flammes, laissant 12.000 personnes vulnérables sans abri.

      Cinq ans presque jour pour jour sont passés entre ces deux « occasions », terribles, données à nos dirigeants, et à nous, citoyens européens, de réveiller l’Europe endormie et indigne de ses principes fondateurs. De mettre partout en acte la fraternité et la solidarité, en mer, en montagne, aux frontières, dans nos territoires. Et pourtant, si l’on en juge par la situation dans le Briançonnais, la fraternité et la solidarité ne semblent jamais avoir été aussi menacées qu’à présent...

      Dénoncer, informer, alerter, protéger. Il y a cinq ans, le 5 septembre 2015, se mettait en route le mouvement Tous Migrants. C’était une première manifestation place de l’Europe à Briançon, sous la bannière Pas en notre nom. Il n’y avait pas encore d’exilés dans nos montagnes (10.000 depuis sont passés par nos chemins), mais des morts par centaines en Méditerranée... Que de chemin parcouru depuis 2015, des dizaines d’initiatives par an ont été menées par des centaines de bénévoles, des relais médiatiques dans le monde entier, que de rencontres riches avec les exilés, les solidaires, les journalistes, les autres associations...

      Mais hormis quelques avancées juridiques fortes de symboles - tels la consécration du principe de fraternité par le Conseil Constitutionnel, ou l’innocentement de Pierre, maraudeur solidaire -, force est de constater que la situation des droits fondamentaux des exilés n’a guère progressé. L’actualité internationale, nationale et locale nous en livre chaque jour la preuve glaçante, de Lesbos à Malte, de Calais à Gap et Briançon. Triste ironie du sort, cinq ans après la naissance de Tous Migrants, presque jour pour jour, le nouveau maire à peine élu à Briançon s’est mis en tête de faire fermer le lieu d’accueil d’urgence et d’entraver les maraudes... Quelles drôles d’idées. Comme des relents d’Histoire.

      Comment, dès lors, ne pas se sentir des Sisyphe*, consumés de l’intérieur par un sentiment tout à la fois d’injustice, d’impuissance, voire d’absurdité ? En se rappelant simplement qu’en cinq ans, la mobilisation citoyenne n’a pas faibli. Que Tous Migrants a reçu l’année dernière la mention spéciale du Prix des Droits de l’Homme. Que nous sommes nombreux à rester indignés.

      Alors, tant qu’il y aura des hommes et des femmes qui passeront la frontière franco-italienne, au péril de leur vie à cause de lois illégitimes, nous poursuivrons le combat. Pour eux, pour leurs enfants... pour les nôtres.

      Marie Dorléans, cofondatrice de Tous Migrants

      Reçue via mail, le 16.09.2020

    • Briançon bientôt comme #Vintimille ?

      Le nombre de migrants à la rue à Vintimille représente une situation inhabituelle ces dernières années. Elle résulte, en grande partie, de la fermeture fin juillet d’un camp humanitaire situé en périphérie de la ville et géré par la Croix-Rouge italienne. Cette fermeture décrétée par la préfecture d’Imperia a été un coup dur pour les migrants qui pouvaient, depuis 2016, y faire étape. Les différents bâtiments de ce camp de transit pouvaient accueillir quelque 300 personnes - mais en avait accueillis jusqu’à 750 au plus fort de la crise migratoire. Des sanitaires, des lits, un accès aux soins ainsi qu’à une aide juridique pour ceux qui souhaitaient déposer une demande d’asile en Italie : autant de services qui font désormais partie du passé.

      « On ne comprend pas », lâche simplement Maurizio Marmo. « Depuis deux ans, les choses s’étaient calmées dans la ville. Il n’y avait pas de polémique, pas de controverse. Personne ne réclamait la fermeture de ce camp. Maintenant, voilà le résultat. Tout le monde est perdant, la ville comme les migrants. »

      https://seenthis.net/messages/876523

    • Aide aux migrants : les bénévoles de Briançon inquiets pour leurs locaux

      C’est un non-renouvellement de convention qui inquiète les bénévoles venant en aide aux migrants dans le Briançonnais. Celui de l’occupation de deux préfabriqués, situés derrière le Refuge solidaire, par l’association Tous migrants. Ceux-ci servent à entreposer du matériel pour les maraudeurs – des personnes qui apportent leur aide aux réfugiés passant la frontière italo-française à pied dans les montagnes – et à préparer leurs missions.

      La Ville de Briançon, propriétaire des locaux, n’a pas souhaité renouveler cette convention, provoquant l’ire de certains maraudeurs.


      https://twitter.com/nos_pas/status/1298504847273197569

      Le maire de Briançon Arnaud Murgia se défend, lui, de vouloir engager des travaux d’agrandissement de la cour de l’école Oronce-Fine. “La Ville de Briançon a acquis le terrain attenant à la caserne de CRS voilà déjà plusieurs années afin de réaliser l’agrandissement et la remise à neuf de la cour de l’école municipale d’Oronce-Fine”, fait-il savoir par son cabinet.

      Une inquiétude qui peut s’ajouter à celle des bénévoles du Refuge solidaire. Car la convention liant l’association gérant le lieu d’hébergement temporaire de la rue Pasteur, signée avec la communauté de communes du Briançonnais (présidée par Arnaud Murgia), est caduque depuis le mois de juin dernier.

      https://www.ledauphine.com/politique/2020/08/28/hautes-alpes-briancon-aide-aux-migrants-les-benevoles-inquiets-pour-leur

      #solidarité_montagnarde

  • Mirage de l’excellence et naufrage de la recherche publique | AOC media - Analyse Opinion Critique
    https://aoc.media/analyse/2020/09/15/le-mirage-de-lexcellence-menera-t-il-au-naufrage-de-la-recherche-publique

    C’est pourtant l’orientation que semble prendre le projet de LPPR, qui s’inscrit dans la continuité d’un entêtement à faire entrer dans le moule néolibéral de la compétitivité la manière de gérer et de faire de la recherche publique, c’est à dire une recherche tournée vers le bien commun. Cela équivaut à imposer à des champions du 100m haies de porter des palmes sous prétexte qu’on nage mieux avec. Une fausse bonne idée, comme on va le voir.

    L’idéologie actuelle de la recherche se définit par l’excellence et la compétitivité. Le Président Macron le rappelle régulièrement : il nous faut retenir les talents, attirer ceux qui sont loin, faire revenir ceux qui sont partis afin d’avoir les laboratoires les plus performants face à la concurrence internationale. Il faut un système d’évaluation qui permette « la bonne différenciation et l’accélération de notre excellence en matière de recherche » (voir l’intervention du Président lors des 80 ans du CNRS, à 40’). Telle une religion, cette idéologie s’étend à tout dans l’enseignement supérieur et la recherche (ESR).

    Ainsi depuis quelques années, tout nouveau venu dans ce monde doit s’appeler « excellent » : les Idex (Investissements d’excellence), les Labex (laboratoire d’excellence), les Equipex (Equipement d’excellence), etc. Comme naguère les « ix » dans Astérix, les « ex » doivent dans l’ESR conclure le nom de chacun des protagonistes ; et sur les excellents l’argent pleuvra, sous forme de subventions, projets financés, bourses, etc. À terme, à l’horizon des réformes type Parcoursup à venir, des universités d’excellence pourront sans doute surpayer leurs professeurs (excellents) en faisant payer leurs étudiants (excellents), et les autres pourront gérer tranquillement leur délabrement matériel, financier, intellectuel.

    Pour preuve de rigueur intellectuelle, cette politique a prévu les critères externes de son évaluation, pour autant qu’elle n’en soit pas le symptôme : l’excellence des mesures qu’elle préconise doit être validée par la progression des ESR français dans le classement de Shanghaï, pot-pourri scientometrique qui agrège de manière arbitraire une série d’indicateurs « standards » de la production scientifique.

    Curieusement, le système actuel de la recherche excellente avait déjà été rêvé par le physicien théoricien Leo Szilard, père de nombreuses choses dont d’importantes théories de l’information ; pour lui c’était plutôt un cauchemar.

    Également écrivain, il imaginait dans un texte des années 50, un milliardaire, Mark Gable, posant la question suivante : « le progrès scientifique va trop vite, comment le ralentir ? »

    La réponse que lui apportait son interlocuteur est on ne peut plus actuelle :
    « Eh bien, je pense que cela ne devrait pas être très difficile. En fait, je pense que ce serait assez facile. Vous pourriez créer une fondation, avec une dotation annuelle de trente millions de dollars. Les chercheurs qui ont besoin de fonds pourraient demander des subventions, à condition d’avoir des arguments convaincants. Ayez dix comités, chacun composé de douze scientifiques, nommés pour traiter ces demandes. Sortez les scientifiques les plus actifs des laboratoires et faites-en des membres de ces comités. Et nommez les meilleurs chercheurs du domaine comme présidents avec des salaires de cinquante mille dollars chacun. Ayez aussi une vingtaine de prix de cent mille dollars chacun pour les meilleurs articles scientifiques de l’année. C’est à peu près tout ce que vous auriez à faire. Vos avocats pourraient facilement préparer une charte pour la fondation … »

    Devant l’incrédulité de Mark Gable sur la capacité de ce dispositif à retarder le progrès scientifique, son interlocuteur poursuivait :
    « Ça devrait être évident. Tout d’abord, les meilleurs scientifiques seraient retirés de leurs laboratoires et siégeraient dans des comités chargés de traiter les demandes de financement. Deuxièmement, les scientifiques ayant besoin de fonds se concentreraient sur des problèmes qui seraient considérés comme prometteurs et conduiraient avec une quasi-certitude à des résultats publiables. Pendant quelques années, il pourrait y avoir une forte augmentation de la production scientifique ; mais en s’attaquant à l’évidence, la science s’assècherait très vite. La science deviendrait quelque chose comme un jeu de société. Certaines choses seraient considérées comme intéressantes, d’autres non. Il y aurait des modes. Ceux qui suivraient la mode recevraient des subventions. Ceux qui ne le feraient n’en auraient pas, et très vite, ils apprendraient à suivre la mode. »

    Szilard avait mille fois raison, et nous voulons appuyer sur un seul point de sa démonstration : la détection de l’ « excellence » du chercheur. Nous soutenons que c’est aujourd’hui une vaste fadaise, fadaise sur laquelle on construit l’ESR de demain.

    Quel est donc ce problème fondamental ? Pensons un instant au football. L’attaquant, Lionel Messi ou Cristiano Ronaldo, marque un but. On le célèbre, il a fait gagner son équipe. Mais quel était exactement son apport causal ? Parfois, il aura simplement poussé du bout du pied un ballon qui se trouvait être au bon endroit – et s’il l’était, au bon endroit, ce fut justement à cause de trois ou quatre de ses coéquipiers. Mais marquer le but est bien l’épreuve décisive qui sépare l’équipe gagnante de l’équipe perdante, et ultimement les premiers des derniers du classement. L’attaquant, statistiquement le plus à même de marquer des buts, remporte donc les lauriers : de fait, le « ballon d’or » de l’UEFA récompense le plus souvent des attaquants. Ce prix repose sur ce qu’on appelle parfois une « fiction utile » : on fait comme si l’apport de tous les autres n’était pas si déterminant, et on concentre toute la grandeur sur le vecteur final de la victoire, afin de pouvoir distinguer et célébrer certains joueurs (et fournir au Mercato une échelle de prix).

    On retrouve en science un phénomène analogue : qui exactement a découvert la structure de l’ADN ? Crick et Watson, qui eurent le Nobel ? Rosalind Franklin qui a révélé les premières contraintes auxquelles devait se soumettre tout modèle de l’ADN, mais décéda 4 ans avant ce Nobel sans avoir pu cosigner les articles phares (possiblement écartée de la signature parce que c’était une femme) ? Que dire même des premiers chercheurs qui conçurent des modèles de la molécule, comme Linus Pauling (certes deux fois Nobel pour d’autre travaux) ? Comme le ballon d’or, le Nobel efface la contribution causale des autres acteurs.

    De tels dispositifs résolvent ainsi la question du crédit intellectuel, qui pourrait se formuler de la sorte : « à qui doit-on une idée ? » Mais ils la résolvent en la dissolvant, de la même manière que le ballon d’or dissout les innombrables contributions qui sous-tendent les centaines de buts de Messi. Pour la science, « l’excellence », mesurée au h-index ou un autre de ses substituts, récompensée par des dispositifs qui vont de la subvention post-doctorale au prix Nobel (peut-être moins sensible, justement, à l’excellence du h-index, mais représentant pour le présent propos un bon exemple didactique), est donc exactement le même type de fiction utile : le « publiant » apparaît seul auteur d’une masse de contributions à la science, comme Lionel Messi semble, lorsqu’il reçoit sa récompense, avoir porté tout seul des centaines de fois un ballon dans les filets adverses.

    Par ailleurs, si pour publier beaucoup, il est plus facile de viser des thématiques en vogue, comme l’indiquait déjà Szilard, alors il y aura sur-inflation de publications sur ces questions et pénurie sur le reste, ces voies intéressantes mais dans lesquelles on se risquera peu. Pour le dire à la manière des écologues, le système de l’excellence donne une prime à l’exploitation (creuser toujours le même filon, on est sûr d’avoir un certain rendement, même si il diminue) au détriment de l’exploration (aller voir d’autres sillons au risque de ne rien trouver). L’exploration induit une perte de temps (se familiariser avec de nouveaux sujets, etc.), laquelle se paye en nombre de publications et ainsi diminue les chances de remporter la compétition.

    #Science #Evaluation #Recherche_scientifique #Revues_scientifiques #Publications_scientifiques #H-index

  • Hera: Europas Raumfahrtbehörde ESA startet Projekt zur Asteroiden-A...
    https://diasp.eu/p/11652580

    Hera: Europas Raumfahrtbehörde ESA startet Projekt zur Asteroiden-Abwehr

    Einschläge von Asteroiden können verheerende Folgen haben. Nun plant die ESA ihre erste Mission zur Abwehr – zusammen mit dem Satellitenbauer OHB aus Bremen. Hera: Europas Raumfahrtbehörde ESA startet Projekt zur Asteroiden-Abwehr #Asteroid #Asteroidenabwehr #Dart #ESA #Hera #didymos

  • En Espagne, 655 rues rendent hommage au franquisme

    Alors que le gouvernement espagnol a publié mardi un projet de loi sur la mémoire du franquisme, Mediapart s’est penché sur le répertoire des rues d’Espagne : 68 d’entre elles portent encore le nom de Franco, et plusieurs centaines rendent hommage à la dictature.

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/150920/en-espagne-655-rues-rendent-hommage-au-franquisme#xtor=CS7-1047
    #toponymie #toponymie_politique #Espagne #noms_de_rue #Franco #Franquisme #hommage #mémoire

  • Whistleblower : There Were Mass Hysterectomies at ICE Facility
    https://lawandcrime.com/high-profile/like-an-experimental-concentration-camp-whistleblower-complaint-alleges

    The full statement : U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) does not comment on matters presented to the Office of the Inspector General, which provides independent oversight and accountability within the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ICE takes all allegations seriously and defers to the OIG regarding any potential investigation and/or results. That said, in general, anonymous, unproven allegations, made without any fact-checkable specifics, should be treated with the (...)

    #ICE #DHS #violence #femmes #santé

    ##santé

  • Staggering Number of Hysterectomies Happening at ICE Facility, Whistleblower Says
    https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/93578d/staggering-number-of-hysterectomies-happening-at-ice-facility-whistleblower-sa

    A whistleblower complaint filed Monday by several legal advocacy groups accuses a detention center of performing a staggering number of hysterectomies on immigrant women, as well as failing to follow procedures meant to keep both detainees and employees safe from the coronavirus.

    The complaint, filed on behalf of several detained immigrants and a nurse named Dawn Wooten, details several accounts of recent “jarring medical neglect” at the Irwin County Detention Center in Ocilla, Georgia, which is run by the private prison company LaSalle South Corrections and houses people incarcerated by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). In interviews with Project South, a Georgia nonprofit, multiple women said that hysterectomies were stunningly frequent among immigrants detained at the facility.

    “When I met all these women who had had surgeries, I thought this was like an experimental concentration camp,” said one woman, who said she’d met five women who’d had hysterectomies after being detained between October and December 2019. The woman said that immigrants at Irwin are often sent to see one particular gynecologist outside of the facility. “It was like they’re experimenting with their bodies.”