• EU: Frontex splashes out: millions of euros for new technology and equipment (19.06.2020)

      The approval of the new #Frontex_Regulation in November 2019 implied an increase of competences, budget and capabilities for the EU’s border agency, which is now equipping itself with increased means to monitor events and developments at the borders and beyond, as well as renewing its IT systems to improve the management of the reams of data to which it will have access.

      In 2020 Frontex’s #budget grew to €420.6 million, an increase of over 34% compared to 2019. The European Commission has proposed that in the next EU budget (formally known as the Multiannual Financial Framework or MFF, covering 2021-27) €11 billion will be made available to the agency, although legal negotiations are ongoing and have hit significant stumbling blocks due to Brexit, the COVID-19 pandemic and political disagreements.

      Nevertheless, the increase for this year has clearly provided a number of opportunities for Frontex. For instance, it has already agreed contracts worth €28 million for the acquisition of dozens of vehicles equipped with thermal and day cameras, surveillance radar and sensors.

      According to the contract for the provision of Mobile Surveillance Systems, these new tools will be used “for detection, identification and recognising of objects of interest e.g. human beings and/or groups of people, vehicles moving across the border (land and sea), as well as vessels sailing within the coastal areas, and other objects identified as objects of interest”. [1]

      Frontex has also published a call for tenders for Maritime Analysis Tools, worth a total of up to €2.6 million. With this, Frontex seeks to improve access to “big data” for maritime analysis. [2] The objective of deploying these tools is to enhance Frontex’s operational support to EU border, coast guard and law enforcement authorities in “suppressing and preventing, among others, illegal migration and cross-border crime in the maritime domain”.

      Moreover, the system should be capable of delivering analysis and identification of high-risk threats following the collection and storage of “big data”. It is not clear how much human input and monitoring there will be of the identification of risks. The call for tenders says the winning bidder should have been announced in May, but there is no public information on the chosen company so far.

      As part of a 12-month pilot project to examine how maritime analysis tools could “support multipurpose operational response,” Frontex previously engaged the services of the Tel Aviv-based company Windward Ltd, which claims to fuse “maritime data and artificial intelligence… to provide the right insights, with the right context, at the right time.” [3] Windward, whose current chairman is John Browne, the former CEO of the multinational oil company BP, received €783,000 for its work. [4]

      As the agency’s gathering and processing of data increases, it also aims to improve and develop its own internal IT systems, through a two-year project worth €34 million. This will establish a set of “framework contracts”. Through these, each time the agency seeks a new IT service or system, companies selected to participate in the framework contracts will submit bids for the work. [5]

      The agency is also seeking a ’Software Solution for EBCG [European Border and Coast Guard] Team Members to Access to Schengen Information System’, through a contract worth up to €5 million. [6] The Schengen Information System (SIS) is the EU’s largest database, enabling cooperation between authorities working in the fields of police, border control and customs of all the Schengen states (26 EU member states plus Iceland, Norway, Liechtenstein and Switzerland) and its legal bases were recently reformed to include new types of alert and categories of data. [7]

      This software will give Frontex officials direct access to certain data within the SIS. Currently, they have to request access via national border guards in the country in which they are operating. This would give complete autonomy to Frontex officials to consult the SIS whilst undertaking operations, shortening the length of the procedure. [8]

      With the legal basis for increasing Frontex’s powers in place, the process to build up its personnel, material and surveillance capacities continues, with significant financial implications.

      https://www.statewatch.org/news/2020/june/eu-frontex-splashes-out-millions-of-euros-for-new-technology-and-equipme

      #technologie #équipement #Multiannual_Financial_Framework #MFF #surveillance #Mobile_Surveillance_Systems #Maritime_Analysis_Tools #données #big_data #mer #Windward_Ltd #Israël #John_Browne #BP #complexe_militaro-industriel #Software_Solution_for_EBCG_Team_Members_to_Access_to_Schengen_Information_System #SIS #Schengen_Information_System

    • EU : Guns, guards and guidelines : reinforcement of Frontex runs into problems (26.05.2020)

      An internal report circulated by Frontex to EU government delegations highlights a series of issues in implementing the agency’s new legislation. Despite the Covid-19 pandemic, the agency is urging swift action to implement the mandate and is pressing ahead with the recruitment of its new ‘standing corps’. However, there are legal problems with the acquisition, registration, storage and transport of weapons. The agency is also calling for derogations from EU rules on staff disciplinary measures in relation to the use of force; and wants an extended set of privileges and immunities. Furthermore, it is assisting with “voluntary return” despite this activity appearing to fall outside of its legal mandate.

      State-of-play report

      At the end of April 2020, Frontex circulated a report to EU government delegations in the Council outlining the state of play of the implementation of its new Regulation (“EBCG 2.0 Regulation”, in the agency and Commission’s words), especially relating to “current challenges”.[1] Presumably, this refers to the outbreak of a pandemic, though the report also acknowledges challenges created by the legal ambiguities contained in the Regulation itself, in particular with regard to the acquisition of weapons, supervisory and disciplinary mechanisms, legal privileges and immunities and involvement in “voluntary return” operations.

      The path set out in the report is that the “operational autonomy of the agency will gradually increase towards 2027” until it is a “fully-fledged and reliable partner” to EU and Schengen states. It acknowledges the impacts of unforeseen world events on the EU’s forthcoming budget (Multi-annual Financial Framework, MFF) for 2021-27, and hints at the impact this will have on Frontex’s own budget and objectives. Nevertheless, the agency is still determined to “continue increasing the capabilities” of the agency, including its acquisition of new equipment and employment of new staff for its standing corps.

      The main issues covered by the report are: Frontex’s new standing corps of staff, executive powers and the use of force, fundamental rights and data protection, and the integration into Frontex of EUROSUR, the European Border Surveillance System.

      The new standing corps

      Recruitment

      A new standing corps of 10,000 Frontex staff by 2024 is to be, in the words of the agency, its “biggest game changer”.[2] The report notes that the establishment of the standing corps has been heavily affected by the outbreak of Covid-19. According to the report, 7,238 individuals had applied to join the standing corps before the outbreak of the pandemic. 5,482 of these – over 75% – were assessed by the agency as eligible, with a final 304 passing the entire selection process to be on the “reserve lists”.[3]

      Despite interruptions to the recruitment procedure following worldwide lockdown measures, interviews for Category 1 staff – permanent Frontex staff members to be deployed on operations – were resumed via video by the end of April. 80 candidates were shortlisted for the first week, and Frontex aims to interview 1,000 people in total. Despite this adaptation, successful candidates will have to wait for Frontex’s contractor to re-open in order to carry out medical tests, an obligatory requirement for the standing corps.[4]

      In 2020, Frontex joined the European Defence Agency’s Satellite Communications (SatCom) and Communications and Information System (CIS) services in order to ensure ICT support for the standing corps in operation as of 2021.[5] The EDA describes SatCom and CIS as “fundamental for Communication, Command and Control in military operations… [enabling] EU Commanders to connect forces in remote areas with HQs and capitals and to manage the forces missions and tasks”.[6]

      Training

      The basic training programme, endorsed by the management board in October 2019, is designed for Category 1 staff. It includes specific training in interoperability and “harmonisation with member states”. The actual syllabus, content and materials for this basic training were developed by March 2020; Statewatch has made a request for access to these documents, which is currently pending with the Frontex Transparency Office. This process has also been affected by the novel coronavirus, though the report insists that “no delay is foreseen in the availability of the specialised profile related training of the standing corps”.

      Use of force

      The state-of-play-report acknowledges a number of legal ambiguities surrounding some of the more controversial powers outlined in Frontex’s 2019 Regulation, highlighting perhaps that political ambition, rather than serious consideration and assessment, propelled the legislation, overtaking adequate procedure and oversight. The incentive to enact the legislation within a short timeframe is cited as a reason that no impact assessment was carried out on the proposed recast to the agency’s mandate. This draft was rushed through negotiations and approved in an unprecedented six-month period, and the details lost in its wake are now coming to light.

      Article 82 of the 2019 Regulation refers to the use of force and carriage of weapons by Frontex staff, while a supervisory mechanism for the use of force by statutory staff is established by Article 55. This says:

      “On the basis of a proposal from the executive director, the management board shall: (a) establish an appropriate supervisory mechanism to monitor the application of the provisions on use of force by statutory staff, including rules on reporting and specific measures, such as those of a disciplinary nature, with regard to the use of force during deployments”[7]

      The agency’s management board is expected to make a decision about this supervisory mechanism, including specific measures and reporting, by the end of June 2020.

      The state-of-play report posits that the legal terms of Article 55 are inconsistent with the standard rules on administrative enquiries and disciplinary measures concerning EU staff.[8] These outline, inter alia, that a dedicated disciplinary board will be established in each institution including at least one member from outside the institution, that this board must be independent and its proceedings secret. Frontex insists that its staff will be a special case as the “first uniformed service of the EU”, and will therefore require “special arrangements or derogations to the Staff Regulations” to comply with the “totally different nature of tasks and risks associated with their deployments”.[9]

      What is particularly astounding about Frontex demanding special treatment for oversight, particularly on use of force and weapons is that, as the report acknowledges, the agency cannot yet legally store or transport any weapons it acquires.

      Regarding service weapons and “non-lethal equipment”,[10] legal analysis by “external experts and a regulatory law firm” concluded that the 2019 Regulation does not provide a legal basis for acquiring, registering, storing or transporting weapons in Poland, where the agency’s headquarters is located. Frontex has applied to the Commission for clarity on how to proceed, says the report. Frontex declined to comment on the status of this consultation and any indications of the next steps the agency will take. A Commission spokesperson stated only that it had recently received the agency’s enquiry and “is analysing the request and the applicable legal framework in the view of replying to the EBCGA”, without expanding further.

      Until Frontex has the legal basis to do so, it cannot launch a tender for firearms and “non-lethal equipment” (which includes batons, pepper spray and handcuffs). However, the report implies the agency is ready to do so as soon as it receives the green light. Technical specifications are currently being finalised for “non-lethal equipment” and Frontex still plans to complete acquisition by the end of the year.

      Privileges and immunities

      The agency is also seeking special treatment with regard to the legal privileges and immunities it and its officials enjoy. Article 96 of the 2019 Regulation outlines the privileges and immunities of Frontex officers, stating:

      “Protocol No 7 on the Privileges and Immunities of the European Union annexed to the Treaty on European Union (TEU) and to the TFEU shall apply to the Agency and its statutory staff.” [11]

      However, Frontex notes that the Protocol does not apply to non-EU states, nor does it “offer a full protection, or take into account a need for the inviolability of assets owned by Frontex (service vehicles, vessels, aircraft)”.[12] Frontex is increasingly involved in operations taking place on non-EU territory. For instance, the Council of the EU has signed or initialled a number of Status Agreements with non-EU states, primarily in the Western Balkans, concerning Frontex activities in those countries. To launch operations under these agreements, Frontex will (or, in the case of Albania, already has) agree on operational plans with each state, under which Frontex staff can use executive powers.[13] The agency therefore seeks an “EU-level status of forces agreement… to account for the partial absence of rules”.

      Law enforcement

      To implement its enhanced functions regarding cross-border crime, Frontex will continue to participate in Europol’s four-year policy cycle addressing “serious international and organised crime”.[14] The agency is also developing a pilot project, “Investigation Support Activities- Cross Border Crime” (ISA-CBC), addressing drug trafficking and terrorism.

      Fundamental rights and data protection

      The ‘EBCG 2.0 Regulation’ requires several changes to fundamental rights measures by the agency, which, aside from some vague “legal analyses” seem to be undergoing development with only internal oversight.

      Firstly, to facilitate adequate independence of the Fundamental Rights Officer (FRO), special rules have to be established. The FRO was introduced under Frontex’s 2016 Regulation, but has since then been understaffed and underfunded by the agency.[15] The 2019 Regulation obliges the agency to ensure “sufficient and adequate human and financial resources” for the office, as well as 40 fundamental rights monitors.[16] These standing corps staff members will be responsible for monitoring compliance with fundamental rights standards, providing advice and assistance on the agency’s plans and activities, and will visit and evaluate operations, including acting as forced return monitors.[17]

      During negotiations over the proposed Regulation 2.0, MEPs introduced extended powers for the Fundamental Rights Officer themselves. The FRO was previously responsible for contributing to Frontex’s fundamental rights strategy and monitoring its compliance with and promotion of fundamental rights. Now, they will be able to monitor compliance by conducting investigations; offering advice where deemed necessary or upon request of the agency; providing opinions on operational plans, pilot projects and technical assistance; and carrying out on-the-spot visits. The executive director is now obliged to respond “as to how concerns regarding possible violations of fundamental rights… have been addressed,” and the management board “shall ensure that action is taken with regard to recommendations of the fundamental rights officer.” [18] The investigatory powers of the FRO are not, however, set out in the Regulation.

      The state-of-play report says that “legal analyses and exchanges” are ongoing, and will inform an eventual management board decision, but no timeline for this is offered. [19] The agency will also need to adapt its much criticised individual complaints mechanism to fit the requirements of the 2019 Regulation; executive director Fabrice Leggeri’s first-draft decision on this process is currently undergoing internal consultations. Even the explicit requirement set out in the 2019 Regulation for an “independent and effective” complaints mechanism,[20] does not meet minimum standards to qualify as an effective remedy, which include institutional independence, accessibility in practice, and capacity to carry out thorough and prompt investigations.[21]

      Frontex has entered into a service level agreement (SLA) with the EU’s Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA) for support in establishing and training the team of fundamental rights monitors introduced by the 2019 Regulation. These monitors are to be statutory staff of the agency and will assess fundamental rights compliance of operational activities, advising, assisting and contributing to “the promotion of fundamental rights”.[22] The scope and objectives for this team were finalised at the end of March this year, and the agency will establish the team by the end of the year. Statewatch has requested clarification as to what is to be included in the team’s scope and objectives, pending with the Frontex Transparency Office.

      Regarding data protection, the agency plans a package of implementing rules (covering issues ranging from the position of data protection officer to the restriction of rights for returnees and restrictions under administrative data processing) to be implemented throughout 2020.[23] The management board will review a first draft of the implementing rules on the data protection officer in the second quarter of 2020.

      Returns

      The European Return and Reintegration Network (ERRIN) – a network of 15 European states and the Commission facilitating cooperation over return operations “as part of the EU efforts to manage migration” – is to be handed over to Frontex. [24] A handover plan is currently under the final stage of review; it reportedly outlines the scoping of activities and details of “which groups of returnees will be eligible for Frontex assistance in the future”.[25] A request from Statewatch to Frontex for comment on what assistance will be provided by the agency to such returnees was unanswered at the time of publication.

      Since the entry into force of its new mandate, Frontex has also been providing technical assistance for so-called voluntary returns, with the first two such operations carried out on scheduled flights (as opposed to charter flights) in February 2020. A total of 28 people were returned by mid-April, despite the fact that there is no legal clarity over what the definition “voluntary return” actually refers to, as the state-of-play report also explains:

      “The terminology of voluntary return was introduced in the Regulation without providing any definition thereof. This terminology (voluntary departure vs voluntary return) is moreover not in line with the terminology used in the Return Directive (EBCG 2.0 refers to the definition of returns provided for in the Return Directive. The Return Directive, however, does not cover voluntary returns; a voluntary return is not a return within the meaning of the Return Directive). Further elaboration is needed.”[26]

      On top of requiring “further clarification”, if Frontex is assisting with “voluntary returns” that are not governed by the Returns Directive, it is acting outside of its legal mandate. Statewatch has launched an investigation into the agency’s activities relating to voluntary returns, to outline the number of such operations to date, their country of return and country of destination.

      Frontex is currently developing a module dedicated to voluntary returns by charter flight for its FAR (Frontex Application for Returns) platform (part of its return case management system). On top of the technical support delivered by the agency, Frontex also foresees the provision of on-the-ground support from Frontex representatives or a “return counsellor”, who will form part of the dedicated return teams planned for the standing corps from 2021.[27]

      Frontex has updated its return case management system (RECAMAS), an online platform for member state authorities and Frontex to communicate and plan return operations, to manage an increased scope. The state-of-play report implies that this includes detail on post-return activities in a new “post-return module”, indicating that Frontex is acting on commitments to expand its activity in this area. According to the agency’s roadmap on implementing the 2019 Regulation, an action plan on how the agency will provide post-return support to people (Article 48(1), 2019 Regulation) will be written by the third quarter of 2020.[28]

      In its closing paragraph, related to the budgetary impact of COVID-19 regarding return operations, the agency notes that although activities will resume once aerial transportation restrictions are eased, “the agency will not be able to provide what has been initially intended, undermining the concept of the EBCG as a whole”.[29]

      EUROSUR

      The Commission is leading progress on adopting the implementing act for the integration of EUROSUR into Frontex, which will define the implementation of new aerial surveillance,[30] expected by the end of the year.[31] Frontex is discussing new working arrangements with the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the European Organisation for the Safety of Air Navigation (EUROCONTROL). The development by Frontex of the surveillance project’s communications network will require significant budgetary investment, as the agency plans to maintain the current system ahead of its planned replacement in 2025.[32] This investment is projected despite the agency’s recognition of the economic impact of Covid-19 on member states, and the consequent adjustments to the MFF 2021-27.

      Summary

      Drafted and published as the world responds to an unprecedented pandemic, the “current challenges” referred to in the report appear, on first read, to refer to the budgetary and staffing implications of global shut down. However, the report maintains throughout that the agency’s determination to expand, in terms of powers as well as staffing, will not be stalled despite delays and budgeting adjustments. Indeed, it is implied more than once that the “current challenges” necessitate more than ever that these powers be assumed. The true challenges, from the agency’s point of view, stem from the fact that its current mandate was rushed through negotiations in six months, leading to legal ambiguities that leave it unable to acquire or transport weapons and in a tricky relationship with the EU protocol on privileges and immunities when operating in third countries. Given the violence that so frequently accompanies border control operations in the EU, it will come as a relief to many that Frontex is having difficulties acquiring its own weaponry. However, it is far from reassuring that the introduction of new measures on fundamental rights and accountability are being carried out internally and remain unavailable for public scrutiny.

      Jane Kilpatrick

      Note: this article was updated on 26 May 2020 to include the European Commission’s response to Statewatch’s enquiries.

      It was updated on 1 July with some minor corrections:

      “the Council of the EU has signed or initialled a number of Status Agreements with non-EU states... under which” replaces “the agency has entered into working agreements with Balkan states, under which”
      “The investigatory powers of the FRO are not, however, set out in any detail in the Regulation beyond monitoring the agency’s ’compliance with fundamental rights, including by conducting investigations’” replaces “The investigatory powers of the FRO are not, however, set out in the Regulation”
      “if Frontex is assisting with “voluntary returns” that are not governed by the Returns Directive, it further exposes the haste with which legislation written to deny entry into the EU and facilitate expulsions was drafted” replaces “if Frontex is assisting with “voluntary returns” that are not governed by the Returns Directive, it is acting outside of its legal mandate”

      Endnotes

      [1] Frontex, ‘State of play of the implementation of the EBCG 2.0 Regulation in view of current challenges’, 27 April 2020, contained in Council document 7607/20, LIMITE, 20 April 2020, http://statewatch.org/news/2020/may/eu-council-frontex-ECBG-state-of-play-7607-20.pdf

      [2] Frontex, ‘Programming Document 2018-20’, 10 December 2017, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/feb/frontex-programming-document-2018-20.pdf

      [3] Section 1.1, state of play report

      [4] Jane Kilpatrick, ‘Frontex launches “game-changing” recruitment drive for standing corps of border guards’, Statewatch Analysis, March 2020, http://www.statewatch.org/analyses/no-355-frontex-recruitment-standing-corps.pdf

      [5] Section 7.1, state of play report

      [6] EDA, ‘EU SatCom Market’, https://www.eda.europa.eu/what-we-do/activities/activities-search/eu-satcom-market

      [7] Article 55(5)(a), Regulation (EU) 2019/1896 of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European Border and Coast Guard (Frontex 2019 Regulation), https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/en/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32019R1896

      [8] Pursuant to Annex IX of the EU Staff Regulations, https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:01962R0031-20140501

      [9] Chapter III, state of play report

      [10] Section 2.5, state of play report

      [11] Protocol (No 7), https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=uriserv:OJ.C_.2016.202.01.0001.01.ENG#d1e3363-201-1

      [12] Chapter III, state of play report

      [13] ‘Border externalisation: Agreements on Frontex operations in Serbia and Montenegro heading for parliamentary approval’, Statewatch News, 11 March 2020, http://statewatch.org/news/2020/mar/frontex-status-agreements.htm

      [14] Europol, ‘EU policy cycle – EMPACT’, https://www.europol.europa.eu/empact

      [15] ‘NGOs, EU and international agencies sound the alarm over Frontex’s respect for fundamental rights’, Statewatch News, 5 March 2019, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/mar/fx-consultative-forum-rep.htm; ‘Frontex condemned by its own fundamental rights body for failing to live up to obligations’, Statewatch News, 21 May 2018, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2018/may/eu-frontex-fr-rep.htm

      [16] Article 110(6), Article 109, 2019 Regulation

      [17] Article 110, 2019 Regulation

      [18] Article 109, 2019 Regulation

      [19] Section 8, state of play report

      [20] Article 111(1), 2019 Regulation

      [21] Sergio Carrera and Marco Stefan, ‘Complaint Mechanisms in Border Management and Expulsion Operations in Europe: Effective Remedies for Victims of Human Rights Violations?’, CEPS, 2018, https://www.ceps.eu/system/files/Complaint%20Mechanisms_A4.pdf

      [22] Article 110(1), 2019 Regulation

      [23] Section 9, state of play report

      [24] ERRIN, https://returnnetwork.eu

      [25] Section 3.2, state of play report

      [26] Chapter III, state of play report

      [27] Section 3.2, state of play report

      [28] ‘’Roadmap’ for implementing new Frontex Regulation: full steam ahead’, Statewatch News, 25 November 2019, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/nov/eu-frontex-roadmap.htm

      [29] State of play report, p. 19

      [30] Matthias Monroy, ‘Drones for Frontex: unmanned migration control at Europe’s borders’, Statewatch Analysis, February 2020, http://www.statewatch.org/analyses/no-354-frontex-drones.pdf

      [31] Section 4, state of play report

      [32] Section 7.2, state of play report
      Next article >

      Mediterranean: As the fiction of a Libyan search and rescue zone begins to crumble, EU states use the coronavirus pandemic to declare themselves unsafe

      https://www.statewatch.org/analyses/2020/eu-guns-guards-and-guidelines-reinforcement-of-frontex-runs-into-problem

      #EBCG_2.0_Regulation #European_Defence_Agency’s_Satellite_Communications (#SatCom) #Communications_and_Information_System (#CIS) #immunité #droits_fondamentaux #droits_humains #Fundamental_Rights_Officer (#FRO) #European_Return_and_Reintegration_Network (#ERRIN) #renvois #expulsions #réintégration #Directive_Retour #FAR (#Frontex_Application_for_Returns) #RECAMAS #EUROSUR #European_Aviation_Safety_Agency (#EASA) #European_Organisation_for_the_Safety_of_Air_Navigation (#EUROCONTROL)

    • Frontex launches “game-changing” recruitment drive for standing corps of border guards

      On 4 January 2020 the Management Board of the European Border and Coast Guard Agency (Frontex) adopted a decision on the profiles of the staff required for the new “standing corps”, which is ultimately supposed to be staffed by 10,000 officials. [1] The decision ushers in a new wave of recruitment for the agency. Applicants will be put through six months of training before deployment, after rigorous medical testing.

      What is the standing corps?

      The European Border and Coast Guard standing corps is the new, and according to Frontex, first ever, EU uniformed service, available “at any time…to support Member States facing challenges at their external borders”.[2] Frontex’s Programming Document for the 2018-2020 period describes the standing corps as the agency’s “biggest game changer”, requiring “an unprecedented scale of staff recruitment”.[3]

      The standing corps will be made up of four categories of Frontex operational staff:

      Frontex statutory staff deployed in operational areas and staff responsible for the functioning of the European Travel Information and Authorisation System (ETIAS) Central Unit[4];
      Long-term staff seconded from member states;
      Staff from member states who can be immediately deployed on short-term secondment to Frontex; and

      A reserve of staff from member states for rapid border interventions.

      These border guards will be “trained by the best and equipped with the latest technology has to offer”.[5] As well as wearing EU uniforms, they will be authorised to carry weapons and will have executive powers: they will be able to verify individuals’ identity and nationality and permit or refuse entry into the EU.

      The decision made this January is limited to the definition of profiles and requirements for the operational staff that are to be recruited. The Management Board (MB) will have to adopt a new decision by March this year to set out the numbers of staff needed per profile, the requirements for individuals holding those positions, and the number of staff needed for the following year based on expected operational needs. This process will be repeated annually.[6] The MB can then further specify how many staff each member state should contribute to these profiles, and establish multi-annual plans for member state contributions and recruitment for Frontex statutory staff. Projections for these contributions are made in Annexes II – IV of the 2019 Regulation, though a September Mission Statement by new European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen urges the recruitment of 10,000 border guards by 2024, indicating that member states might be meeting their contribution commitments much sooner than 2027.[7]

      The standing corps of Frontex staff will have an array of executive powers and responsibilities. As well as being able to verify identity and nationality and refuse or permit entry into the EU, they will be able to consult various EU databases to fulfil operational aims, and may also be authorised by host states to consult national databases. According to the MB Decision, “all members of the Standing Corps are to be able to identify persons in need of international protection and persons in a vulnerable situation, including unaccompanied minors, and refer them to the competent authorities”. Training on international and EU law on fundamental rights and international protection, as well as guidelines on the identification and referral of persons in need of international protection, will be mandatory for all standing corps staff members.

      The size of the standing corps

      The following table, taken from the 2019 Regulation, outlines the ambitions for growth of Frontex’s standing corps. However, as noted, the political ambition is to reach the 10,000 total by 2024.

      –-> voir le tableau sur le site de statewatch!

      Category 2 staff – those on long term secondment from member states – will join Frontex from 2021, according to the 2019 Regulation.[8] It is foreseen that Germany will contribute the most staff, with 61 expected in 2021, increasing year-by-year to 225 by 2027. Other high contributors are France and Italy (170 and 125 by 2027, respectively).

      The lowest contributors will be Iceland (expected to contribute between one and two people a year from 2021 to 2027), Malta, Cyprus and Luxembourg. Liechtenstein is not contributing personnel but will contribute “through proportional financial support”.

      For short-term secondments from member states, projections follow a very similar pattern. Germany will contribute 540 staff in 2021, increasing to 827 in 2027; Italy’s contribution will increase from 300 in 2021 to 458 in 2027; and France’s from 408 in 2021 to 624 in 2027. Most states will be making less than 100 staff available for short-term secondment in 2021.

      What are the profiles?

      The MB Decision outlines 12 profiles to be made available to Frontex, ranging from Border Guard Officer and Crew Member, to Cross Border Crime Detection Officer and Return Specialist. A full list is contained in the Decision.[9] All profiles will be fulfilled by an official of the competent authority of a member state (MS) or Schengen Associated Country (SAC), or by a member of Frontex’s own statutory staff.

      Tasks to be carried out by these officials include:

      border checks and surveillance;
      interviewing, debriefing* and screening arrivals and registering fingerprints;
      supporting the collection, assessment, analysis and distribution of information with EU member and non-member states;
      verifying travel documents;
      escorting individuals being deported on Frontex return operations;
      operating data systems and platforms; and
      offering cultural mediation

      *Debriefing consists of informal interviews with migrants to collect information for risk analyses on irregular migration and other cross-border crime and the profiling of irregular migrants to identify “modus operandi and migration trends used by irregular migrants and facilitators/criminal networks”. Guidelines written by Frontex in 2012 instructed border guards to target vulnerable individuals for “debriefing”, not in order to streamline safeguarding or protection measures, but for intelligence-gathering - “such people are often more willing to talk about their experiences,” said an internal document.[10] It is unknown whether those instructions are still in place.

      Recruitment for the profiles

      Certain profiles are expected to “apply self-safety and security practice”, and to have “the capacity to work under pressure and face emotional events with composure”. Relevant profiles (e.g. crew member) are required to be able to perform search and rescue activities in distress situations at sea borders.

      Frontex published a call for tender on 27 December for the provision of medical services for pre-recruitment examinations, in line with the plan to start recruiting operational staff in early 2020. The documents accompanying the tender reveal additional criteria for officials that will be granted executive powers (Frontex category “A2”) compared to those staff stationed primarily at the agency’s Warsaw headquarters (“A1”). Those criteria come in the form of more stringent medical testing.

      The differences in medical screening for category A1 and A2 staff lie primarily in additional toxicology screening and psychiatric and psychological consultations. [11] The additional psychiatric attention allotted for operational staff “is performed to check the predisposition for people to work in arduous, hazardous conditions, exposed to stress, conflict situations, changing rapidly environment, coping with people being in dramatic, injure or death exposed situations”.[12]

      Both A1 and A2 category provisional recruits will be asked to disclose if they have ever suffered from a sexually transmitted disease or “genital organ disease”, as well as depression, nervous or mental disorders, among a long list of other ailments. As well as disclosing any medication they take, recruits must also state if they are taking oral contraceptives (though there is no question about hormonal contraceptives that are not taken orally). Women are also asked to give the date of their last period on the pre-appointment questionnaire.

      “Never touch yourself with gloves”

      Frontex training materials on forced return operations obtained by Statewatch in 2019 acknowledge the likelihood of psychological stress among staff, among other health risks. (One recommendation contained in the documents is to “never touch yourself with gloves”). Citing “dissonance within the team, long hours with no rest, group dynamic, improvisation and different languages” among factors behind psychological stress, the training materials on medical precautionary measures for deportation escort officers also refer to post-traumatic stress disorder, the lack of an area to retreat to and body clock disruption as exacerbating risks. The document suggests a high likelihood that Frontex return escorts will witness poverty, “agony”, “chaos”, violence, boredom, and will have to deal with vulnerable persons.[13]

      For fundamental rights monitors (officials deployed to monitor fundamental rights compliance during deportations, who can be either Frontex staff or national officials), the training materials obtained by Statewatch focus on the self-control of emotions, rather than emotional care. Strategies recommended include talking to somebody, seeking professional help, and “informing yourself of any other option offered”. The documents suggest that it is an individual’s responsibility to prevent emotional responses to stressful situations having an impact on operations, and to organise their own supervision and professional help. There is no obvious focus on how traumatic responses of Frontex staff could affect those coming into contact with them at an external border or during a deportation. [14]

      The materials obtained by Statewatch also give some indication of the fundamental rights training imparted to those acting as deportation ‘escorts’ and fundamental rights monitors. The intended outcomes for a training session in Athens that took place in March 2019 included “adapt FR [fundamental rights] in a readmission operation (explain it with examples)” and “should be able to describe Non Refoulement principle” (in the document, ‘Session Fundamental rights’ is followed by ‘Session Velcro handcuffs’).[15] The content of the fundamental rights training that will be offered to Frontex’s new recruits is currently unknown.

      Fit for service?

      The agency anticipates that most staff will be recruited from March to June 2020, involving the medical examination of up to 700 applicants in this period. According to Frontex’s website, the agency has already received over 7,000 applications for the 700 new European Border Guard Officer positions.[16] Successful candidates will undergo six months of training before deployment in 2021. Apparently then, the posts are a popular career option, despite the seemingly invasive medical tests (especially for sexually active women). Why, for instance, is it important to Frontex to know about oral hormonal contraception, or about sexually transmitted infections?

      When asked by Statewatch if Frontex provides in-house psychological and emotional support, an agency press officer stated: “When it comes to psychological and emotional support, Frontex is increasing awareness and personal resilience of the officers taking part in our operations through education and training activities.” A ‘Frontex Mental Health Strategy’ from 2018 proposed the establishment of “a network of experts-psychologists” to act as an advisory body, as well as creating “online self-care tools”, a “psychological hot-line”, and a space for peer support with participation of psychologists (according to risk assessment) during operations.[17]

      One year later, Frontex, EASO and Europol jointly produced a brochure for staff deployed on operations, entitled ‘Occupational Health and Safety – Deployment Information’, which offers a series of recommendations to staff, placing the responsibility to “come to the deployment in good mental shape” and “learn how to manage stress and how to deal with anger” more firmly on the individual than the agency.[18] According to this document, officers who need additional support must disclose this by requesting it from their supervisor, while “a helpline or psychologist on-site may be available, depending on location”.

      Frontex anticipates this recruitment drive to be “game changing”. Indeed, the Commission is relying upon it to reach its ambitions for the agency’s independence and efficiency. The inclusion of mandatory training in fundamental rights in the six-month introductory education is obviously a welcome step. Whether lessons learned in a classroom will be the first thing that comes to the minds of officials deployed on border control or deportation operations remains to be seen.

      Unmanaged responses to emotional stress can include burnout, compassion-fatigue and indirect trauma, which can in turn decrease a person’s ability to cope with adverse circumstance, and increase the risk of violence.[19] Therefore, aside from the agency’s responsibility as an employer to safeguard the health of its staff, its approach to internal psychological care will affect not only the border guards themselves, but the people that they routinely come into contact with at borders and during return operations, many of whom themselves will have experienced trauma.

      Jane Kilpatrick

      Endnotes

      [1] Management Board Decision 1/2020 of 4 January 2020 on adopting the profiles to be made available to the European Border and Coast Guard Standing Corps, https://frontex.europa.eu/assets/Key_Documents/MB_Decision/2020/MB_Decision_1_2020_adopting_the_profiles_to_be_made_available_to_the_

      [2] Frontex, ‘Careers’, https://frontex.europa.eu/about-frontex/careers/frontex-border-guard-recruitment

      [3] Frontex, ‘Programming Document 2018-20’, 10 December 2017, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/feb/frontex-programming-document-2018-20.pdf

      [4] The ETIAS Central Unit will be responsible for processing the majority of applications for ‘travel authorisations’ received when the European Travel Information and Authorisation System comes into use, in theory in late 2022. Citizens who do not require a visa to travel to the Schengen area will have to apply for authorisation to travel to the Schengen area.

      [5] Frontex, ‘Careers’, https://frontex.europa.eu/about-frontex/careers/frontex-border-guard-recruitment

      [6] Article 54(4), Regulation (EU) 2019/1896 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 November 2019 on the European Border and Coast Guard and repealing Regulations (EU) No 1052/2013 and (EU) 2016/1624, https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/en/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32019R1896

      [7] ‘European Commission 2020 Work Programme: An ambitious roadmap for a Union that strives for more’, 29 January 2020, https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/IP_20_124; “Mission letter” from Ursula von der Leyen to Ylva Johnsson, 10 September 2019, https://ec.europa.eu/commission/sites/beta-political/files/mission-letter-ylva-johansson_en.pdf

      [8] Annex II, 2019 Regulation

      [9] Management Board Decision 1/2020 of 4 January 2020 on adopting the profiles to be made available to the European Border and Coast Guard Standing Corps, https://frontex.europa.eu/assets/Key_Documents/MB_Decision/2020/MB_Decision_1_2020_adopting_the_profiles_to_be_made_available_to_the_

      [10] ‘Press release: EU border agency targeted “isolated or mistreated” individuals for questioning’, Statewatch News, 16 February 2017, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2017/feb/eu-frontex-op-hera-debriefing-pr.htm

      [11] ‘Provision of Medical Services – Pre-Recruitment Examination’, https://etendering.ted.europa.eu/cft/cft-documents.html?cftId=5841

      [12] ‘Provision of medical services – pre-recruitment examination, Terms of Reference - Annex II to invitation to tender no Frontex/OP/1491/2019/KM’, https://etendering.ted.europa.eu/cft/cft-document.html?docId=65398

      [13] Frontex training presentation, ‘Medical precautionary measures for escort officers’, undated, http://statewatch.org/news/2020/mar/eu-frontex-presentation-medical-precautionary-measures-deportation-escor

      [14] Ibid.

      [15] Frontex, document listing course learning outcomes from deportation escorts’ training, http://statewatch.org/news/2020/mar/eu-frontex-deportation-escorts-training-course-learning-outcomes.pdf

      [16] Frontex, ‘Careers’, https://frontex.europa.eu/about-frontex/careers/frontex-border-guard-recruitment

      [17] Frontex, ‘Frontex mental health strategy’, 20 February 2018, https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/89c168fe-e14b-11e7-9749-01aa75ed71a1/language-en

      [18] EASO, Europol and Frontex, ‘Occupational health and safety’, 12 August 2019, https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/17cc07e0-bd88-11e9-9d01-01aa75ed71a1/language-en/format-PDF/source-103142015

      [19] Trauma Treatment International, ‘A different approach for victims of trauma’, https://www.tt-intl.org/#our-work-section

      https://www.statewatch.org/analyses/2020/frontex-launches-game-changing-recruitment-drive-for-standing-corps-of-b
      #gardes_frontières #staff #corps_des_gardes-frontières

    • Drones for Frontex: unmanned migration control at Europe’s borders (27.02.2020)

      Instead of providing sea rescue capabilities in the Mediterranean, the EU is expanding air surveillance. Refugees are observed with drones developed for the military. In addition to numerous EU states, countries such as Libya could also use the information obtained.

      It is not easy to obtain majorities for legislation in the European Union in the area of migration - unless it is a matter of upgrading the EU’s external borders. While the reform of a common EU asylum system has been on hold for years, the European Commission, Parliament and Council agreed to reshape the border agency Frontex with unusual haste shortly before last year’s parliamentary elections. A new Regulation has been in force since December 2019,[1] under which Frontex intends to build up a “standing corps” of 10,000 uniformed officials by 2027. They can be deployed not just at the EU’s external borders, but in ‘third countries’ as well.

      In this way, Frontex will become a “European border police force” with powers that were previously reserved for the member states alone. The core of the new Regulation includes the procurement of the agency’s own equipment. The Multiannual Financial Framework, in which the EU determines the distribution of its financial resources from 2021 until 2027, has not yet been decided. According to current plans, however, at least €6 billion are reserved for Frontex in the seven-year budget. The intention is for Frontex to spend a large part of the money, over €2 billion, on aircraft, ships and vehicles.[2]

      Frontex seeks company for drone flights

      The upgrade plans include the stationing of large drones in the central and eastern Mediterranean. For this purpose, Frontex is looking for a private partner to operate flights off Malta, Italy or Greece. A corresponding tender ended in December[3] and the selection process is currently underway. The unmanned missions could then begin already in spring. Frontex estimates the total cost of these missions at €50 million. The contract has a term of two years and can be extended twice for one year at a time.

      Frontex wants drones of the so-called MALE (Medium Altitude Long Endurance) class. Their flight duration should be at least 20 hours. The requirements include the ability to fly in all weather conditions and at day and night. It is also planned to operate in airspace where civil aircraft are in service. For surveillance missions, the drones should carry electro-optical cameras, thermal imaging cameras and so-called “daylight spotter” systems that independently detect moving targets and keep them in focus. Other equipment includes systems for locating mobile and satellite telephones. The drones will also be able to receive signals from emergency call transmitters sewn into modern life jackets.

      However, the Frontex drones will not be used primarily for sea rescue operations, but to improve capacities against unwanted migration. This assumption is also confirmed by the German non-governmental organisation Sea-Watch, which has been providing assistance in the central Mediterranean with various ships since 2015. “Frontex is not concerned with saving lives,” says Ruben Neugebauer of Sea-Watch. “While air surveillance is being expanded with aircraft and drones, ships urgently needed for rescue operations have been withdrawn”. Sea-Watch demands that situation pictures of EU drones are also made available to private organisations for sea rescue.

      Aircraft from arms companies

      Frontex has very specific ideas for its own drones, which is why there are only a few suppliers worldwide that can be called into question. The Israel Aerospace Industries Heron 1, which Frontex tested for several months on the Greek island of Crete[4] and which is also flown by the German Bundeswehr, is one of them. As set out by Frontex in its invitation to tender, the Heron 1, with a payload of around 250 kilograms, can carry all the surveillance equipment that the agency intends to deploy over the Mediterranean. Also amongst those likely to be interested in the Frontex contract is the US company General Atomics, which has been building drones of the Predator series for 20 years. Recently, it presented a new Predator model in Greece under the name SeaGuardian, for maritime observation.[5] It is equipped with a maritime surveillance radar and a system for receiving position data from larger ships, thus fulfilling one of Frontex’s essential requirements.

      General Atomics may have a competitive advantage, as its Predator drones have several years’ operational experience in the Mediterranean. In addition to Frontex, the European Union has been active in the central Mediterranean with EUNAVFOR MED Operation Sophia. In March 2019, Italy’s then-interior minister Matteo Salvini pushed through the decision to operate the EU mission from the air alone. Since then, two unarmed Predator drones operated by the Italian military have been flying for EUNAVFOR MED for 60 hours per month. Officially, the drones are to observe from the air whether the training of the Libyan coast guard has been successful and whether these navy personnel use their knowledge accordingly. Presumably, however, the Predators are primarily pursuing the mission’s goal to “combat human smuggling” by spying on the Libyan coast. It is likely that the new Operation EU Active Surveillance, which will use military assets from EU member states to try to enforce the UN arms embargo placed on Libya,[6] will continue to patrol with Italian drones off the coast in North Africa.

      Three EU maritime surveillance agencies

      In addition to Frontex, the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) and the European Fisheries Control Agency (EFCA) are also investing in maritime surveillance using drones. Together, the three agencies coordinate some 300 civil and military authorities in EU member states.[7] Their tasks include border, fisheries and customs control, law enforcement and environmental protection.

      In 2017, Frontex and EMSA signed an agreement to benefit from joint reconnaissance capabilities, with EFCA also involved.[8] At the time, EMSA conducted tests with drones of various sizes, but now the drones’ flights are part of its regular services. The offer is not only open to EU Member States, as Iceland was the first to take advantage of it. Since summer 2019, a long-range Hermes 900 drone built by the Israeli company Elbit Systems has been flying from Iceland’s Egilsstaðir airport. The flights are intended to cover more than half of the island state’s exclusive economic zone and to detect “suspicious activities and potential hazards”.[9]

      The Hermes 900 was also developed for the military; the Israeli army first deployed it in the Gaza Strip in 2014. The Times of Israel puts the cost of the operating contract with EMSA at €59 million,[10] with a term of two years, which can be extended for another two years. The agency did not conclude the contract directly with the Israeli arms company, but through the Portuguese firm CeiiA. The contract covers the stationing, control and mission control of the drones.

      New interested parties for drone flights

      At the request of the German MEP Özlem Demirel (from the party Die Linke), the European Commission has published a list of countries that also want to use EMSA drones.[11] According to this list, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Portugal and also Greece have requested unmanned flights for pollution monitoring this year, while Bulgaria and Spain want to use them for general maritime surveillance. Until Frontex has its own drones, EMSA is flying its drones for the border agency on Crete. As in Iceland, this is the long-range drone Hermes 900, but according to Greek media reports it crashed on 8 January during take-off.[12] Possible causes are a malfunction of the propulsion system or human error. The aircraft is said to have been considerably damaged.

      Authorities from France and Great Britain have also ordered unmanned maritime surveillance from EMSA. Nothing is yet known about the exact intended location, but it is presumably the English Channel. There, the British coast guard is already observing border traffic with larger drones built by the Tekever arms company from Portugal.[13] The government in London wants to prevent migrants from crossing the Channel. The drones take off from the airport in the small town of Lydd and monitor the approximately 50-kilometre-long and 30-kilometre-wide Strait of Dover. Great Britain has also delivered several quadcopters to France to try to detect potential migrants in French territorial waters. According to the prefecture of Pas-de-Calais, eight gendarmes have been trained to control the small drones[14].

      Information to non-EU countries

      The images taken by EMSA drones are evaluated by the competent national coastguards. A livestream also sends them to Frontex headquarters in Warsaw.[15] There they are fed into the EUROSUR border surveillance system. This is operated by Frontex and networks the surveillance installations of all EU member states that have an external border. The data from EUROSUR and the national border control centres form the ‘Common Pre-frontier Intelligence Picture’,[16] referring to the area of interest of Frontex, which extends far into the African continent. Surveillance data is used to detect and prevent migration movements at an early stage.

      Once the providing company has been selected, the new Frontex drones are also to fly for EUROSUR. According to the invitation to tender, they are to operate in the eastern and central Mediterranean within a radius of up to 250 nautical miles (463 kilometres). This would enable them to carry out reconnaissance in the “pre-frontier” area off Tunisia, Libya and Egypt. Within the framework of EUROSUR, Frontex shares the recorded data with other European users via a ‘Remote Information Portal’, as the call for tender explains. The border agency has long been able to cooperate with third countries and the information collected can therefore also be made available to authorities in North Africa. However, in order to share general information on surveillance of the Mediterranean Sea with a non-EU state, Frontex must first conclude a working agreement with the corresponding government.[17]

      It is already possible, however, to provide countries such as Libya with the coordinates of refugee boats. For example, the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea stipulates that the nearest Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre (MRCC) must be informed of actual or suspected emergencies. With EU funding, Italy has been building such a centre in Tripoli for the last two years.[18] It is operated by the military coast guard, but so far has no significant equipment of its own.

      The EU military mission “EUNAVFOR MED” was cooperating more extensively with the Libyan coast guard. For communication with European naval authorities, Libya is the first third country to be connected to European surveillance systems via the “Seahorse Mediterranean” network[19]. Information handed over to the Libyan authorities might also include information that was collected with the Italian military ‘Predator’ drones.

      Reconnaissance generated with unmanned aerial surveillance is also given to the MRCC in Turkey. This was seen in a pilot project last summer, when the border agency tested an unmanned aerostat with the Greek coast guard off the island of Samos.[20] Attached to a 1,000 metre-long cable, the airship was used in the Frontex operation ‘Poseidon’ in the eastern Mediterranean. The 35-meter-long zeppelin comes from the French manufacturer A-NSE.[21] The company specializes in civil and military aerial observation. According to the Greek Marine Ministry, the equipment included a radar, a thermal imaging camera and an Automatic Identification System (AIS) for the tracking of larger ships. The recorded videos were received and evaluated by a situation centre supplied by the Portuguese National Guard. If a detected refugee boat was still in Turkish territorial waters, the Greek coast guard informed the Turkish authorities. This pilot project in the Aegean Sea was the first use of an airship by Frontex. The participants deployed comparatively large numbers of personnel for the short mission. Pictures taken by the Greek coastguard show more than 40 people.

      Drones enable ‘pull-backs’

      Human rights organisations accuse EUNAVFOR MED and Frontex of passing on information to neighbouring countries leading to rejections (so-called ‘push-backs’) in violation of international law. People must not be returned to states where they are at risk of torture or other serious human rights violations. Frontex does not itself return refugees in distress who were discovered at sea via aerial surveillance, but leaves the task to the Libyan or Turkish authorities. Regarding Libya, the Agency since 2017 provided notice of at least 42 vessels in distress to Libyan authorities.[22]

      Private rescue organisations therefore speak of so-called ‘pull-backs’, but these are also prohibited, as the Israeli human rights lawyer Omer Shatz argues: “Communicating the location of civilians fleeing war to a consortium of militias and instructing them to intercept and forcibly transfer them back to the place they fled from, trigger both state responsibility of all EU members and individual criminal liability of hundreds involved.” Together with his colleague Juan Branco, Shatz is suing those responsible for the European Union and its agencies before the International Criminal Court in The Hague. Soon they intend to publish individual cases and the names of the people accused.

      Matthias Monroy

      An earlier version of this article first appeared in the German edition of Le Monde Diplomatique: ‘Drohnen für Frontex Statt sich auf die Rettung von Bootsflüchtlingen im Mittelmeer zu konzentrieren, baut die EU die Luftüberwachung’.

      Note: this article was corrected on 6 March to clarify a point regarding cooperation between Frontex and non-EU states.

      Endnotes

      [1] Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European Border and Coast Guard, https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/PE-33-2019-INIT/en/pdf

      [2] European Commission, ‘A strengthened and fully equipped European Border and Coast Guard’, 12 September 2018, https://ec.europa.eu/commission/sites/beta-political/files/soteu2018-factsheet-coast-guard_en.pdf

      [3] ‘Poland-Warsaw: Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) for Medium Altitude Long Endurance Maritime Aerial Surveillance’, https://ted.europa.eu/udl?uri=TED:NOTICE:490010-2019:TEXT:EN:HTML&tabId=1

      [4] IAI, ‘IAI AND AIRBUS MARITIME HERON UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEM (UAS) SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED 200 FLIGHT HOURS IN CIVILIAN EUROPEAN AIRSPACE FOR FRONTEX’, 24 October 2018, https://www.iai.co.il/iai-and-airbus-maritime-heron-unmanned-aerial-system-uas-successfully-complet

      [5] ‘ European Maritime Flight Demonstrations’, General Atomics, http://www.ga-asi.com/european-maritime-demo

      [6] ‘EU agrees to deploy warships to enforce Libya arms embargo’, The Guardian, 17 February 2020, https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/feb/17/eu-agrees-deploy-warships-enforce-libya-arms-embargo

      [7] EMSA, ‘Heads of EMSA and Frontex meet to discuss cooperation on European coast guard functions’, 3 April 2019, http://www.emsa.europa.eu/news-a-press-centre/external-news/item/3499-heads-of-emsa-and-frontex-meet-to-discuss-cooperation-on-european-c

      [8] Frontex, ‘Frontex, EMSA and EFCA strengthen cooperation on coast guard functions’, 23 March 2017, https://frontex.europa.eu/media-centre/news-release/frontex-emsa-and-efca-strengthen-cooperation-on-coast-guard-functions

      [9] Elbit Systems, ‘Elbit Systems Commenced the Operation of the Maritime UAS Patrol Service to European Union Countries’, 18 June 2019, https://elbitsystems.com/pr-new/elbit-systems-commenced-the-operation-of-the-maritime-uas-patrol-servi

      [10] ‘Elbit wins drone contract for up to $68m to help monitor Europe coast’, The Times of Israel, 1 November 2018, https://www.timesofisrael.com/elbit-wins-drone-contract-for-up-to-68m-to-help-monitor-europe-coast

      [11] ‘Answer given by Ms Bulc on behalf of the European Commission’, https://netzpolitik.org/wp-upload/2019/12/E-2946_191_Finalised_reply_Annex1_EN_V1.pdf

      [12] ‘Το drone της FRONTEX έπεσε, οι μετανάστες έρχονται’, Proto Thema, 27 January 2020, https://www.protothema.gr/greece/article/968869/to-drone-tis-frontex-epese-oi-metanastes-erhodai

      [13] Morgan Meaker, ‘Here’s proof the UK is using drones to patrol the English Channel’, Wired, 10 January 2020, https://www.wired.co.uk/article/uk-drones-migrants-english-channel

      [14] ‘Littoral: Les drones pour lutter contre les traversées de migrants sont opérationnels’, La Voix du Nord, 26 March 2019, https://www.lavoixdunord.fr/557951/article/2019-03-26/les-drones-pour-lutter-contre-les-traversees-de-migrants-sont-operation

      [15] ‘Frontex report on the functioning of Eurosur – Part I’, Council document 6215/18, 15 February 2018, http://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-6215-2018-INIT/en/pdf

      [16] European Commission, ‘Eurosur’, https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/what-we-do/policies/borders-and-visas/border-crossing/eurosur_en

      [17] Legal reforms have also given Frontex the power to operate on the territory of non-EU states, subject to the conclusion of a status agreement between the EU and the country in question. The 2016 Frontex Regulation allowed such cooperation with states that share a border with the EU; the 2019 Frontex Regulation extends this to any non-EU state.

      [18] ‘Helping the Libyan Coast Guard to establish a Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre’, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/E-8-2018-000547_EN.html

      [19] Matthias Monroy, ‘EU funds the sacking of rescue ships in the Mediterranean’, 7 July 2018, https://digit.site36.net/2018/07/03/eu-funds-the-sacking-of-rescue-ships-in-the-mediterranean

      [20] Frontex, ‘Frontex begins testing use of aerostat for border surveillance’, 31 July 2019, https://frontex.europa.eu/media-centre/news-release/frontex-begins-testing-use-of-aerostat-for-border-surveillance-ur33N8

      [21] ‘Answer given by Ms Johansson on behalf of the European Commission’, 7 January 2020, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/E-9-2019-002529-ASW_EN.html

      [22] ‘Answer given by Vice-President Borrell on behalf of the European Commission’, 8 January 2020, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/E-9-2019-002654-ASW_EN.html

      https://www.statewatch.org/analyses/2020/drones-for-frontex-unmanned-migration-control-at-europe-s-borders

      #drones

    • Monitoring “secondary movements” and “hotspots”: Frontex is now an internal surveillance agency (16.12.2019)

      The EU’s border agency, Frontex, now has powers to gather data on “secondary movements” and the “hotspots” within the EU. The intention is to ensure “situational awareness” and produce risk analyses on the migratory situation within the EU, in order to inform possible operational action by national authorities. This brings with it increased risks for the fundamental rights of both non-EU nationals and ethnic minority EU citizens.

      The establishment of a new ’standing corps’ of 10,000 border guards to be commanded by EU border agency Frontex has generated significant public and press attention in recent months. However, the new rules governing Frontex[1] include a number of other significant developments - including a mandate for the surveillance of migratory movements and migration “hotspots” within the EU.

      Previously, the agency’s surveillance role has been restricted to the external borders and the “pre-frontier area” – for example, the high seas or “selected third-country ports.”[2] New legal provisions mean it will now be able to gather data on the movement of people within the EU. While this is only supposed to deal with “trends, volumes and routes,” rather than personal data, it is intended to inform operational activity within the EU.

      This may mean an increase in operations against ‘unauthorised’ migrants, bringing with it risks for fundamental rights such as the possibility of racial profiling, detention, violence and the denial of access to asylum procedures. At the same time, in a context where internal borders have been reintroduced by numerous Schengen states over the last five years due to increased migration, it may be that he agency’s new role contributes to a further prolongation of internal border controls.

      From external to internal surveillance

      Frontex was initially established with the primary goals of assisting in the surveillance and control of the external borders of the EU. Over the years it has obtained increasing powers to conduct surveillance of those borders in order to identify potential ’threats’.

      The European Border Surveillance System (EUROSUR) has a key role in this task, taking data from a variety of sources, including satellites, sensors, drones, ships, vehicles and other means operated both by national authorities and the agency itself. EUROSUR was formally established by legislation approved in 2013, although the system was developed and in use long before it was subject to a legal framework.[3]

      The new Frontex Regulation incorporates and updates the provisions of the 2013 EUROSUR Regulation. It maintains existing requirements for the agency to establish a “situational picture” of the EU’s external borders and the “pre-frontier area” – for example, the high seas or the ports of non-EU states – which is then distributed to the EU’s member states in order to inform operational activities.[4]

      The new rules also provide a mandate for reporting on “unauthorised secondary movements” and goings-on in the “hotspots”. The Commission’s proposal for the new Frontex Regulation was not accompanied by an impact assessment, which would have set out the reasoning and justifications for these new powers. The proposal merely pointed out that the new rules would “evolve” the scope of EUROSUR, to make it possible to “prevent secondary movements”.[5] As the European Data Protection Supervisor remarked, the lack of an impact assessment made it impossible: “to fully assess and verify its attended benefits and impact, notably on fundamental rights and freedoms, including the right to privacy and to the protection of personal data.”[6]

      The term “secondary movements” is not defined in the Regulation, but is generally used to refer to journeys between EU member states undertaken without permission, in particular by undocumented migrants and applicants for internal protection. Regarding the “hotspots” – established and operated by EU and national authorities in Italy and Greece – the Regulation provides a definition,[7] but little clarity on precisely what information will be gathered.

      Legal provisions

      A quick glance at Section 3 of the new Regulation, dealing with EUROSUR, gives little indication that the system will now be used for internal surveillance. The formal scope of EUROSUR is concerned with the external borders and border crossing points:

      “EUROSUR shall be used for border checks at authorised border crossing points and for external land, sea and air border surveillance, including the monitoring, detection, identification, tracking, prevention and interception of unauthorised border crossings for the purpose of detecting, preventing and combating illegal immigration and cross-border crime and contributing to ensuring the protection and saving the lives of migrants.”

      However, the subsequent section of the Regulation (on ‘situational awareness’) makes clear the agency’s new internal role. Article 24 sets out the components of the “situational pictures” that will be visible in EUROSUR. There are three types – national situational pictures, the European situational picture and specific situational pictures. All of these should consist of an events layer, an operational layer and an analysis layer. The first of these layers should contain (emphasis added in all quotes):

      “…events and incidents related to unauthorised border crossings and cross-border crime and, where available, information on unauthorised secondary movements, for the purpose of understanding migratory trends, volume and routes.”

      Article 26, dealing with the European situational picture, states:

      “The Agency shall establish and maintain a European situational picture in order to provide the national coordination centres and the Commission with effective, accurate and timely information and analysis, covering the external borders, the pre-frontier area and unauthorised secondary movements.”

      The events layer of that picture should include “information relating to… incidents in the operational area of a joint operation or rapid intervention coordinated by the Agency, or in a hotspot.”[8] In a similar vein:

      “The operational layer of the European situational picture shall contain information on the joint operations and rapid interventions coordinated by the Agency and on hotspots, and shall include the mission statements, locations, status, duration, information on the Member States and other actors involved, daily and weekly situational reports, statistical data and information packages for the media.”[9]

      Article 28, dealing with ‘EUROSUR Fusion Services’, says that Frontex will provide national authorities with information on the external borders and pre-frontier area that may be derived from, amongst other things, the monitoring of “migratory flows towards and within the Union in terms of trends, volume and routes.”

      Sources of data

      The “situational pictures” compiled by Frontex and distributed via EUROSUR are made up of data gathered from a host of different sources. For the national situational picture, these are:

      national border surveillance systems;
      stationary and mobile sensors operated by national border agencies;
      border surveillance patrols and “other monitoring missions”;
      local, regional and other coordination centres;
      other national authorities and systems, such as immigration liaison officers, operational centres and contact points;
      border checks;
      Frontex;
      other member states’ national coordination centres;
      third countries’ authorities;
      ship reporting systems;
      other relevant European and international organisations; and
      other sources.[10]

      For the European situational picture, the sources of data are:

      national coordination centres;
      national situational pictures;
      immigration liaison officers;
      Frontex, including reports form its liaison officers;
      Union delegations and EU Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) missions;
      other relevant Union bodies, offices and agencies and international organisations; and
      third countries’ authorities.[11]

      The EUROSUR handbook – which will presumably be redrafted to take into account the new legislation – provides more detail about what each of these categories may include.[12]

      Exactly how this melange of different data will be used to report on secondary movements is currently unknown. However, in accordance with Article 24 of the new Regulation:

      “The Commission shall adopt an implementing act laying down the details of the information layers of the situational pictures and the rules for the establishment of specific situational pictures. The implementing act shall specify the type of information to be provided, the entities responsible for collecting, processing, archiving and transmitting specific information, the maximum time limits for reporting, the data security and data protection rules and related quality control mechanisms.” [13]

      This implementing act will specify precisely how EUROSUR will report on “secondary movements”.[14] According to a ‘roadmap’ setting out plans for the implementation of the new Regulation, this implementing act should have been drawn up in the last quarter of 2020 by a newly-established European Border and Coast Guard Committee sitting within the Commission. However, that Committee does not yet appear to have held any meetings.[15]

      Operational activities at the internal borders

      Boosting Frontex’s operational role is one of the major purposes of the new Regulation, although it makes clear that the internal surveillance role “should not lead to operational activities of the Agency at the internal borders of the Member States.” Rather, internal surveillance should “contribute to the monitoring by the Agency of migratory flows towards and within the Union for the purpose of risk analysis and situational awareness.” The purpose is to inform operational activity by national authorities.

      In recent years Schengen member states have reintroduced border controls for significant periods in the name of ensuring internal security and combating irregular migration. An article in Deutsche Welle recently highlighted:

      “When increasing numbers of refugees started arriving in the European Union in 2015, Austria, Germany, Slovenia and Hungary quickly reintroduced controls, citing a “continuous big influx of persons seeking international protection.” This was the first time that migration had been mentioned as a reason for reintroducing border controls.

      Soon after, six Schengen members reintroduced controls for extended periods. Austria, Germany, Denmark, Sweden and Norway cited migration as a reason. France, as the sixth country, first introduced border checks after the November 2015 attacks in Paris, citing terrorist threats. Now, four years later, all six countries still have controls in place. On November 12, they are scheduled to extend them for another six months.”[16]

      These long-term extensions of internal border controls are illegal (the upper limit is supposed to be two years; discussions on changes to the rules governing the reintroduction of internal border controls in the Schengen area are ongoing).[17] A European Parliament resolution from May 2018 stated that “many of the prolongations are not in line with the existing rules as to their extensions, necessity or proportionality and are therefore unlawful.”[18] Yves Pascou, a researcher for the European Policy Centre, told Deutsche Welle that: “"We are in an entirely political situation now, not a legal one, and not one grounded in facts.”

      A European Parliament study published in 2016 highlighted that:

      “there has been a noticeable lack of detail and evidence given by the concerned EU Member States [those which reintroduced internal border controls]. For example, there have been no statistics on the numbers of people crossing borders and seeking asylum, or assessment of the extent to which reintroducing border checks complies with the principles of proportionality and necessity.”[19]

      One purpose of Frontex’s new internal surveillance powers is to provide such evidence (albeit in the ideologically-skewed form of ‘risk analysis’) on the situation within the EU. Whether the information provided will be of interest to national authorities is another question. Nevertheless, it would be a significant irony if the provision of that information were to contribute to the further maintenance of internal borders in the Schengen area.

      At the same time, there is a more pressing concern related to these new powers. Many discussions on the reintroduction of internal borders revolve around the fact that it is contrary to the idea, spirit (and in these cases, the law) of the Schengen area. What appears to have been totally overlooked is the effect the reintroduction of internal borders may have on non-EU nationals or ethnic minority citizens of the EU. One does not have to cross an internal Schengen frontier too many times to notice patterns in the appearance of the people who are hauled off trains and buses by border guards, but personal anecdotes are not the same thing as empirical investigation. If Frontex’s new powers are intended to inform operational activity by the member states at the internal borders of the EU, then the potential effects on fundamental rights must be taken into consideration and should be the subject of investigation by journalists, officials, politicians and researchers.

      Chris Jones

      Endnotes

      [1] The new Regulation was published in the Official Journal of the EU in mid-November: Regulation (EU) 2019/1896 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 November 2019 on the European Border and Coast Guard and repealing Regulations (EU) No 1052/2013 and (EU) 2016/1624, https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/en/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32019R1896

      [2] Article 12, ‘Common application of surveillance tools’, Regulation (EU) No 1052/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 October 2013 establishing the European Border Surveillance System (Eurosur), https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32013R1052

      [3] According to Frontex, the Eurosur Network first came into use in December 2011 and in March 2012 was first used to “exchange operational information”. The Regulation governing the system came into force in October 2013 (see footnote 2). See: Charles Heller and Chris Jones, ‘Eurosur: saving lives or reinforcing deadly borders?’, Statewatch Journal, vol. 23 no. 3/4, February 2014, http://database.statewatch.org/article.asp?aid=33156

      [4] Recital 34, 2019 Regulation: “EUROSUR should provide an exhaustive situational picture not only at the external borders but also within the Schengen area and in the pre-frontier area. It should cover land, sea and air border surveillance and border checks.”

      [5] European Commission, ‘Proposal for a Regulation on the European Border and Coast Guard and repealing Council Joint Action no 98/700/JHA, Regulation (EU) no 1052/2013 and Regulation (EU) no 2016/1624’, COM(2018) 631 final, 12 September 2018, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2018/sep/eu-com-frontex-proposal-regulation-com-18-631.pdf

      [6] EDPS, ‘Formal comments on the Proposal for a Regulation on the European Border and Coast Guard’, 30 November 2018, p. p.2, https://edps.europa.eu/sites/edp/files/publication/18-11-30_comments_proposal_regulation_european_border_coast_guard_en.pdf

      [7] Article 2(23): “‘hotspot area’ means an area created at the request of the host Member State in which the host Member State, the Commission, relevant Union agencies and participating Member States cooperate, with the aim of managing an existing or potential disproportionate migratory challenge characterised by a significant increase in the number of migrants arriving at the external borders”

      [8] Article 26(3)(c), 2019 Regulation

      [9] Article 26(4), 2019 Regulation

      [10] Article 25, 2019 Regulation

      [11] Article 26, 2019 Regulation

      [12] European Commission, ‘Commission Recommendation adopting the Practical Handbook for implementing and managing the European Border Surveillance System (EUROSUR)’, C(2015) 9206 final, 15 December 2015, https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/sites/homeaffairs/files/what-we-do/policies/securing-eu-borders/legal-documents/docs/eurosur_handbook_annex_en.pdf

      [13] Article 24(3), 2019 Regulation

      [14] ‘’Roadmap’ for implementing new Frontex Regulation: full steam ahead’, Statewatch News, 25 November 2019, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/nov/eu-frontex-roadmap.htm

      [15] Documents related to meetings of committees operating under the auspices of the European Commission can be found in the Comitology Register: https://ec.europa.eu/transparency/regcomitology/index.cfm?do=Search.Search&NewSearch=1

      [16] Kira Schacht, ‘Border checks in EU countries challenge Schengen Agreement’, DW, 12 November 2019, https://www.dw.com/en/border-checks-in-eu-countries-challenge-schengen-agreement/a-51033603

      [17] European Parliament, ‘Temporary reintroduction of border control at internal borders’, https://oeil.secure.europarl.europa.eu/oeil/popups/ficheprocedure.do?reference=2017/0245(COD)&l=en

      [18] ‘Report on the annual report on the functioning of the Schengen area’, 3 May 2018, para.9, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/A-8-2018-0160_EN.html

      [19] Elpseth Guild et al, ‘Internal border controls in the Schengen area: is Schengen crisis-proof?’, European Parliament, June 2016, p.9, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2016/571356/IPOL_STU(2016)571356_EN.pdf

      https://www.statewatch.org/analyses/2019/monitoring-secondary-movements-and-hotspots-frontex-is-now-an-internal-s

      #mouvements_secondaires #hotspot #hotspots

  • ’Building Fun House’ by Iggy Pop | Iggy and the Stooges
    https://www.iggyandthestoogesmusic.com/news/building-fun-house-by-iggy-pop
    https://twitter.com/Iggy_Stooges/status/1288869661988327424

    I was laying on my back on the floor of the Stooges rehearsal room, stoked on LSD and reefer, staring at the lovely amplifiers and egg cartons on the walls, when I thought I saw the word “Funhouse” hovering above me in the air, just below the ceiling. We were about half way through writing and preparation for our sophomore album, and it needed a title this time. I remember thinking “this is it; we’re going with it.”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1OedEgzDl_I


    The Stooges - Funhouse 1970

    #rock'n'roll_garage #stooges #fun_house

  • Covid-19 : première plainte criminelle pour « délaissement » de personnes vulnérables
    https://www.lemonde.fr/planete/article/2020/07/29/covid-19-premiere-plainte-criminelle-pour-delaissement-de-personnes-vulnerab

    Un enseignant trentenaire, souffrant de dépression, contraint d’appeler une demi-douzaine de fois le SAMU en une semaine avant de parvenir à être hospitalisé. Il y mourra, des suites du Covid-19… « Les gens qui sont vraiment en grande détresse, en gêne respiratoire, ils parlent beaucoup moins bien », lui avait répondu le SAMU. Arrivé à l’hôpital, il sera directement envoyé en réanimation, au vu de sa détresse respiratoire.
    Article réservé à nos abonnés Lire aussi Coronavirus : des personnes âgées écartées des hôpitaux pendant la crise sanitaire en France

    Un couple de septuagénaires dans un Ehpad. La femme tente désespérément d’alerter le personnel sur l’état de son mari. L’établissement, jugeant son attitude « alarmiste » et « nuisible », propose de la renvoyer chez ses enfants pour la « séparer » de son époux. La famille finit par obtenir, de haute lutte, l’hospitalisation du vieil homme, atteint du Covid, puis de la femme, également malade. Les deux finissent par en mourir, à quinze jours d’intervalle.

    Une nonagénaire autonome, en Ehpad, présente de graves symptômes du Covid-19. Son fils demande instamment l’hospitalisation. Une infirmière sollicite le SAMU et s’entend dire : « Elle a 93 ans, c’est ça ? (...) Donc elle ne sera pas hospitalisée. (…) Il y a beaucoup de gens qui ne comprennent pas, mais elle n’ira pas aux urgences. (…) Il faut contacter le médecin, qu’il vous donne des consignes pour qu’elle évolue dans le confort. »

    Ces épisodes glaçants – et dix autres – sont consignés dans la plainte contre X avec constitution de partie civile pour « délaissement ayant provoqué la mort », « violences ayant entraîné la mort sans intention de la donner », « discrimination » et « entrave aux soins » dont vingt-huit parents ou ayants droit de treize personnes décédées du Covid-19 ont saisi, avec l’association Coronavictimes, vendredi 24 juillet, le doyen des juges d’instruction du tribunal judiciaire de Paris.

    « En raison de leur âge, de leur isolement ou de leur condition physique ou psychique préexistante, ces treize personnes n’ont pas eu accès à des soins adaptés qui auraient pu les sauver », explique Me Anaïs Mehiri, l’avocate qui a déposé cette plainte collective.

    Dans le document de 32 pages que Le Monde a consulté, les plaignants dénoncent une « stratégie » consistant, selon eux, à « laisser les personnes souffrantes à leur domicile ou dans une structure d’accueil [Ehpad] jusqu’à ce qu’elles atteignent un état de santé critique ». Ils reprochent ainsi « un tri » opéré envers leurs proches.

    #refus_de_soin #Covid #hôpital #plainte #responsabilité_légale #délaissement

  • L’été et le Covid : « Ma bonne dame, on ne trouve plus de petit personnel » - Libération
    https://www.liberation.fr/france/2020/07/25/l-ete-et-le-covid-ma-bonne-dame-on-ne-trouve-plus-de-petit-personnel_1795

    La commission d’enquête parlementaire n’a entendu que des pontes. Ministres, sous-ministres, directeurs d’agences régionales de santé (ARS), sont venus se dédouaner sur les conditions d’incurie dans lesquelles le pays a affronté la crise. Palme d’Or de l’indécence à Roselyne Bachelot, égérie sarkozyste brillamment relookée en présentatrice sympatoche et fardée, a moqué ces médecins envoyés au front sans équipements de protection : « On attend que le directeur de cabinet du préfet ou de l’ARS vienne avec une petite charrette porter des masques ? Qu’est-ce que c’est que ce pays infantilisé ? Il faut quand même se prendre un peu en main. C’est ça la leçon qu’il faut tirer. Tant qu’on attendra tout du seigneur du château, on est mal ! »

    De nature prudente voire paranoïaque, je suis depuis longtemps persuadé – et en particulier après H1N1 et les vaccinodromes de Bachelot – de l’incapacité étatique à protéger la population.

    #irresponsabilité_organisée #Covid #crise_sanitaire #hôpital #Bachelot

  • hors de prix

    Le manuscrit des paroles de « Hey Jude » a été adjugé 910 000 dollars lors d’une vente aux enchères... ça fait cher le Na na na nananana.

    La fameuse guitare électrique Blue Angel Cloud 2 utilisée pour les incontournables « Purple Rain » et « Sign O’The Times » a trouvé preneur pour la somme affolante de 563 500 dollars.

    La Martin D-18E, utilisée par Kurt Cobain pour le concert MTV Unplugged, vient d’être adjugée six millions de dollars.

    Combien vaut un lacet de basket ayant appartenu à Joey Ramone ?
    rocknfolk.com
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_MjCqQoLLA

    #hors_de_prix

  • Tests link HK virus spike to quarantine loopholes - Asia Times
    https://asiatimes.com/2020/07/tests-link-hk-virus-spike-to-quarantine-loopholes

    The Covid-19 virus that caused the recent spike in Hong Kong could have come from Philippines sailors and flight crews from Kazakhstan, DNA sequencing shows. Twenty-six samples from patients in the “third-wave” epidemic could be split into three types, said Gilman Siu, an associate professor at the health technology department of Hong Kong Polytechnic University.Of the 26, 19 were found to have a DNA sequence similar to the virus found in the Philippines. These cases were found in districts across Hong Kong.Siu said the origin could be ship crews who came from the Philippines but were exempt from the city’s 14-day quarantine and virus test requirements.Between July 1 and 27, 76 people coming from the Philippines were identified as infected. At least 15 of them were sailors. The rest were domestic and other workers, who were required to be quarantined and tested.

    #covid-19#migrant#migration#hongkong#philippines#travailleurmigrant#sante#quarantaine#test#troisiemevague

  • Hong Kong makes masks mandatory as cases grow - Asia Times
    https://asiatimes.com/2020/07/hong-kong-makes-masks-mandatory-as-cases-grow

    New daily infections have been above 100 for the last five days and the city of 7.5 million now has more than 2,600 infections with 19 fatalities.
    Some health experts have blamed the current flare-up on an exemption from the usual 14-day quarantine which the government granted to “essential personnel,” including cross-boundary truckers and air and sea crew. Because of its extensive air links and busy port, Hong Kong is a popular transit point for ships to change crews. On Sunday, authorities tightened those rules.Only vessels with freight destined for Hong Kong will be able to swap out personnel, but even they will not be allowed to mingle in public and must go straight to or from the airport, or stay in a designated quarantine venue.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#hongkong#sante#quarantaine#personnelessentiel#exemption

  • L’Afrique francophone face au e-commerce à l’OMC
    https://www.cetri.be/L-Afrique-francophone-face-au-e-5324

    L’intervention de Cédric Leterme, chargé d’étude au CETRI, lors de la visio-conférence organisée par le South Centre de Genève, sur les règles du #Commerce électronique en discussion à l’OMC et leurs implications pour les pays en développement (22 mai 2020). Pourquoi l’Afrique francophone a plus à perdre qu’à gagner dans ces négociations : > L’article de Cédric Leterme sur les négociations : L’Afrique francophone face au e-commerce à l’OMC > Pour un panorama des #Enjeux_numériques au Sud, voir le dernier (...) #Le_regard_du_CETRI

    / #Le_regard_du_CETRI, #Le_Sud_en_mouvement, #Afrique_subsaharienne, Moyen-Orient & Afrique du Nord, Commerce, Enjeux numériques, #Video, Homepage - Actualités à la (...)

    #Moyen-Orient_&_Afrique_du_Nord #Homepage_-_Actualités_à_la_une
    https://www.cetri.be/IMG/mp4/ecommerce_en_afrique_final_.mp4

  • IKEA sued in Poland for firing employee who made anti-LGBT comments
    https://www.pinknews.co.uk/2020/07/23/ikea-poland-sued-lawsuit-gay-homophobic-employee-tomasz-k

    The former Ikea employee, identified as Tomasz K, was fired last year when he refused to take down a homophobic comment he posted on the company’s internal site.

    Sadus said the Ikea human resources director showed prejudice towards the worker who, in expressing his “opinions” on gay people, “referred to Catholic values”.

    “Employers, including multinational corporations, are obliged to respect the privacy of employees, including avoiding ideological actions not linked to their work,” Sadus said.

    He said the company must “respect the freedom of expression of views, conscience and religion” and must not “discriminate against employees on the basis of their world view”.

    #homophobie #Pologne #LGBT #catholicisme (je découvre que dans le dogme il y a l’homophobie)

  • « On m’a accusé d’avoir apporté la pandémie au Sénégal, une punition de Dieu pour mon homosexualité »
    https://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2020/07/24/on-m-a-accuse-d-avoir-apporte-la-pandemie-au-senegal-une-punition-de-dieu-po

    Moustapha* raconte son histoire, un léger sourire aux lèvres. Une histoire qui lui a pourtant valu l’exclusion de sa famille, dès le début de la crise du coronavirus. « Mon grand frère et ma grande sœur m’ont accusé d’avoir apporté la pandémie au Sénégal, une punition de Dieu pour mon homosexualité », raconte le jeune Dakarois de 25 ans.Au Sénégal, un pays pourtant cité en exemple d’Etat de droit en Afrique, l’article 139 du Code pénal prévoit de un à cinq ans de prison pour des actes qualifiés de « contre nature ». L’homosexualité reste taboue dans cette société majoritairement musulmane, qui exclue les personnes de la communauté Lesbiens, gays, bisexuels et transsexuels (LGBT). Longtemps, Moustapha a vécu son orientation sexuelle en cachette de sa famille, jusqu’à cette « journée horrible » qui a changé sa vie il y a quatre ans. « Nous fêtions l’anniversaire d’un ami. Mais un voisin a averti le quartier qu’un mariage homosexuel était célébré. Ils sont venus avec des couteaux, des bâtons, ils ont forcé la porte et saccagé l’appartement. J’ai été frappé violemment et blessé à l’arme blanche », se souvient le jeune homme, qui en porte encore les cicatrices sur le flanc droit et sur le crâne. « A partir de là, toute ma famille était au courant. A la maison, plus personne ne me parlait », se souvient-il douloureusement. Des années durant, sa situation est précaire. Seule sa mère l’accepte tel qu’il est. Mais l’arrivée du nouveau coronavirus début mars, au Sénégal, a anéanti le fragile équilibre trouvé à la maison. « Un marabout a mis publiquement la faute de la pandémie sur le dos des homosexuels, ma famille avait peur d’attraper la maladie. On m’a alors imposé de quitter la maison, mon frère a même menacé de me tuer », se rappelle Moustapha. Le garçon a fui, une petite valise à la main. Il a passé trois nuits sur la plage, où il raconte avoir été victime « d’une agression et d’un viol par trois hommes ». Des crimes qu’il n’a pas dénoncés à la police, par peur de la police de son quartier.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#homosexualité#LGBT#minorite#etranger#stigmatisation#sante#violence#droit

  • Hong Kong third wave: as more sailors confirmed with Covid-19, experts call for suspension of unrestricted crew changes | South China Morning Post
    https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/health-environment/article/3094653/hong-kong-third-wave-more-sailors-confirmed-covid

    Hong Kong should review its policy of allowing unrestricted sea crew changes at the city’s port amid a sustained third wave of Covid-19 infections, health experts said on Friday, as four more imported cases involving seafarers were recorded. Concerns over the possible threat posed by vessels continued as more than 100 maritime workers were revealed on Thursday to have been quarantined aboard six cargo ships in Hong Kong waters, after a half dozen seamen tested positive for the coronavirus.
    A source familiar with the situation said the sailors in quarantine were calm and the environment on the vessels was not bad

    #Covid-19#migration#migrant#hongkong#sante#deplacementmaritime#quarantaine#troisiemevague#depistage

  • Le bilan journalier dérisoire de la pandémie en France, qui ne justifie en rien la VIOLENCE de ce gouvernement #EnMarche
    23 Juillet 2020 : Coronavirus : 7 nouveaux décès, près de 1000 nouveaux cas confirmés en 24 heures en France
    https://www.lefigaro.fr/sciences/coronavirus-7-nouveaux-deces-pres-de-1000-nouveaux-cas-confirmes-en-24-heur
    . . . . . . .
    Au cours des dernières 24h, 7 personnes hospitalisées ont perdu la vie des suites d’une infection au coronavirus.

    Selon les chiffres de la Direction générale de la santé (DGS) publiés ce mercredi 22 juillet, 6366 patients sont toujours pris en charge par les services hospitaliers, 455 d’entre eux sont en réanimation.

    « Le virus circule sur l’ensemble du territoire national », indique la DGS, en soulignant le nombre croissant de clusters. Sur les 561 détectés depuis le 9 mai, 212 sont encore en activité et 14 ont été découverts dans la journée.
    . . . . . . .
    #macro_lepenisme #maintien_de_l'ordre macronien #violence #épidémie #pandémie pas #en_vedette #imposture #confinement
    C’est pas à la une des #médias de #france #propagande #journulliste #journullistes #medias #politique #médiacrates #mass_merdias

    • Amputations, défigurations, fracas maxillo-facial ou dentaire, dilacération oculaire ou énucléation, fracas crânien, hémorragies cérébrales…

      Couvrez ces plaies que je ne saurais voir…
      Le 24 janvier 2019, le professeur Laurent Thines, neurochirurgien au CHU de Besançon, après avoir constaté les dégâts occasionnés par les #LBD, informe les pouvoirs publics et lance une pétition.
      https://www.legrandsoir.info/couvrez-ces-plaies-que-je-ne-saurais-voir.html
      Il écrit : « J’ai été particulièrement choqué par les photos prises et les lésions observées chez les personnes blessées lors des mouvements de manifestation. Beaucoup, très jeunes (potentiellement nos enfants), ont été mutilés alors qu’ils ne représentaient aucune menace spécifique ». Et d’ajouter : « amputation de membre, défiguration à vie, fracas maxillo-facial ou dentaire, dilacération oculaire ou énucléation, fracas crânien, hémorragies cérébrales engageant le pronostic vital et entrainant des séquelles neurologiques, autant de mutilations qui produisent de nouveaux cortèges de « Gueules cassées »…Tant de vies ont été ainsi sacrifiées (…)…Pour toutes ces raisons nous, soignants (médecins, chirurgiens, urgentistes, réanimateurs, infirmiers, aides-soignants…) apolitiques et attachés à l’idéal de notre pays, la France, au travers de la déclaration des Droits de l’Homme, de la Femme et du Citoyen, demandons qu’un moratoire soit appliqué sur l’usage des armes sublétales de maintien de l’ordre en vue de bannir leur utilisation lors des manifestations »(1) .

      Première parenthèse : on dit « létal » pour éviter « mortel », « bâton souple de défense » pour ne pas dire « matraque », « lanceur de balles de défense » pour cacher que le lanceur est une arme d’attaque, « forces de l’ordre » pour indiquer que la violence n’est pas imputable aux policiers, « blessures oculaires » pour que le vilain mot « éborgnement » ne soit pas prononcé.

      Seconde parenthèse : la revendication de l’ « apolitisme » des signataires nous ferait tousser comme un contaminé au Covid-19 si l’on ne comprenait pas qu’il signifie « de diverses opinions politiques ».

      Avec Cathy JURADO, Laurent THINES publie à présent un recueil de textes dont ils disent : « né au cœur des ronds-points et des manifestations de Gilets Jaunes, il témoigne de ce combat historique, par le biais d’une évocation poétique sans concession de la répression contre ce mouvement mais aussi de la ferveur et du courage des militants. Les droits d’auteur seront reversés intégralement au Collectif des Mutilés pour l’Exemple ».

      C’est publié par « Le temps des Cerises » , excellent éditeur qui a publié.

      Maxime VIVAS Pour participer à ce geste de solidarité, contactez : poemesjaunes@gmail.com
      Pour en savoir plus, lisez l’article ci-contre https://www.legrandsoir.info/feu-poemes-jaunes.html

      Note (1) La réponse au cours de l’année a été la violence policière répétée contre le personnel soignant, matraqué et gazé. En mars 2020, des policiers se sont rendus, à la nuit tombée, avec des véhicules de service aux gyrophares allumés, devant des hôpitaux pour y applaudir (à distance) le personnel soignant qui est aux premières lignes dans la lutte contre le Coronavirus. Dérisoire initiative d’un corps de métier qui bénéficie, pour « maintenir l’ordre » de masques de protection qui font défaut dans les hôpitaux et qui usa de la matraque si les soignants manifestaient pour en réclamer. Puis, les manifestations ont repris et les brutalités contre le personnel soignant aussi.

      #violence #violences_policières #police #répression #violences #violence_policière #emmanuel_macron #giletsjaunes #resistances #social #mutilations #mutilés #maintien_de_l'ordre #gilets_jaunes #justice #répression #violence #armes_non_létales #flashball #blessures #langage

    • Le Ségur de la honte ! Jean-Michel Toulouse, ancien directeur d’hôpital public - 22 juillet 2020
      https://pardem.org/actualite/1057-le-segur-de-la-honte

      Certes il était illusoire d’espérer que des décisions à la mesure des besoins de l’hôpital, du personnel et des patients seraient prises au Ségur de la Santé. Sauf à croire au miracle ! 


      Mais la réalité dépasse la fiction : trois syndicats se sont déshonorés en signant les « accords » séguro-macroniens. Non seulement les revendications répétées des personnels hospitaliers depuis de très longs mois ont été piétinées mais il ne subsiste aucun espoir que les problèmes de fond qui minent la santé publique soient réglés.


      Mais l’honneur et la lutte n’ont pas disparu. Ils étaient incarnés le 14 juillet entre République et Bastille à Paris et dans de nombreuses villes par les soignants qui manifestaient et par les 15 organisations médicales et non médicales, qui ont refusé d’être complices du Ségur de la honte.

      Ils ont signé : la #CFDT, #FO et l’ #UNSA - les syndicats les moins représentatifs dans de nombreux hôpitaux et chez les médecins. Après 6 semaines de négociation bâclées, voici ce qu’ont accepté ces organisations : 


      – Un « socle » de 7,6 milliards d’euros pour les personnels para-médicaux (infirmières, aides-soignantes, kinésithérapeutes, etc.) et non médicaux (administratifs, agents des services hos-pitaliers, techniciens divers, etc.) est attribué à 1,5 million d’hospitaliers : une augmentation de salaire versée en deux temps, soit 90 euros au 1er septembre prochain et 93 euros au 1er mars 2021. Au total 183 euros nets mensuels sont octroyés aux agents des hôpitaux et des #EHPAD. Ce qui ne rattrape même pas le blocage du point indiciaire depuis 10 ans ! En effet pour ce rattrapage il aurait fallu 280 euros nets mensuels. Il s’agit donc d’une obole qui montre le mépris du pouvoir pour les salariés, qualifiés de « héros » par Macron ! Il est vrai que la notion de héros est commode : elle dépolitise le problème et, en outre, un héros n’a pas de besoin ! 


      – Une « révision des grilles salariales » - sans autre précision - en avril 2021, et cela ne représentera que 35 euros nets mensuels en moyenne ! Voilà la reconnaissance macronnienne pour celles et ceux qui ont tenu le pays à bout de bras pendant 3 mois et ont limité les dégâts de l’incompétence de ce pouvoir.


      – La « revalorisation » des heures supplémentaires, des primes pour travail de nuit, mais « plus tard » et sans autre précision, ce qui signifie que ce sera indolore pour ce pouvoir !


      – La création de 15 000 postes - sans précision non plus - alors qu’il en faudrait 100 000. De plus, ces postes seront à discuter avec les directions d’établissement, ce qui n’est pas acquis !


      – S’agissant des médecins, le Ségur leur octroie 450 millions d’euros (au lieu de 1 milliard), et 16 « autres mesures » à venir… La principale étant la « revalorisation » de la prime de service exclusif qui passera de 490 euros à 700 euros nets mensuels pour les PHPT (Praticiens hospitaliers plein temps), puis à 1 010 euros en 2021, à condition que ces #PHPT aient 15 ans d’ancienneté...


      – Toujours pour les médecins, révision des grilles salariales mais au rabais (100 millions d’euros), et en 2021, avec la fusion des trois premiers échelons déjà prévue par le plan Buzyn, et en créant 3 échelons supplémentaires en fin de carrière, c’est-à-dire aux calendes grecques !


      – Enfin pour les jeunes médecins et les internes, 124 millions d’euros pour les indemnités aux jeunes praticiens, qui seront portées au niveau du SMIC horaire ! Mais sans revalorisation de leurs grilles indiciaires ! Et cela alors que 30 % des postes sont vacants. Pas de mesure sur les gardes et la permanence des soins. Ce n’est pas avec cela que l’hôpital public sera plus attractif ! On risque même assister à une fuite générale des compétences vers le privé.

      Volet 2 (organisation et investissement) : du pareil au même !
      Monsieur Véran, ministre de la Santé, déclare que ce plan n’est pas fait « pour solde de tout compte ». En effet ! Nous apprenons que ce ne sera pas 15 000 postes qui seront créés mais seulement 7 500 car les 7 500 autres sont déjà inscrits dans le collectif budgétaire prévu dans le plan Buzyn « Ma santé 2022 » ! 


      Ce plan Ségur, animé par Nicole Notat, annoncé par Macron et Castex, proclame que 20 milliards de plus sont alloués aux hôpitaux. Mais en réalité il y en a déjà 13 qui sont sensés contribuer à éponger les dettes des hôpitaux (sur une dette de 30 milliards), ce qui réduit à 6/7 milliards l’ensemble des autres mesures ! 
Notat, qui a remis son rapport sur le volet 2 le 21 juillet, poursuit donc son travail d’enfumage macronien. Ce volet n°2 se limite, en effet, à injecter, sur 4 à 5 ans, 6 à 7 milliards d’euros pour financer les bâtiments, les équipements et le numérique. 6 milliards en 4-5 ans pour l’ensemble de ces mesures alors que l’hôpital est rongé par l’austérité et la réduction de moyens depuis 30 ans ! Sans compter qu’il faudra partager avec le secteur privé « assurant des missions de service public » !

      Considérant l’état des hôpitaux publics, on voit le fossé abyssal qui sépare les besoins réels et cette aumône méprisante ! En guise « d’investissement massif » - comme le promettait Macron - ce ne seront que 2,5 milliards pour les établissements de santé (projets territoriaux de santé, Ville-Hôpital, pour « casser les silos » !), 2,1 milliards pour le médico-social et les EHPAD (rénovation d’un quart des places, équipement en rails de transfert, capteurs de détection de chute, équipements numériques) et 1,5 milliard pour l’investissement dans le numérique et « les nouvelles technologies » . Il est donc évident que ce plan est loin de permettre de « changer de braquet ». Alors que ce sont des milliers de lits qui ont été supprimés depuis 30 ans (quelque 12 000 ces 5 dernières années), le plan Véran-Notat prévoit 4 000 créations mais seulement « à la demande » et « en fonction des besoins » (évalués par qui ?), et pour des motifs de « grippe saisonnière ou d’autres pics d’activité exceptionnels ». En réalité pas un lit ne sera créé pour compenser la destruction systématique de nos hôpitaux. Le COPERMO (Comité interministériel pour la performance et la modernisation de l’offre de soins hospitaliers), véritable instrument de verrouillage de l’investissement dans les hôpitaux publics, sera supprimé et remplacé par un « Conseil national de l’investissement » qui « accompagnera les projets, établira les priorités, répartira les enveloppes uniquement pour ceux qui seront financés sur fonds publics (on ne voit pas comment l’hôpital public serait financé autrement…), ou qui seront supérieurs à 100 millions d’euros » ! Autant dire que seul change le nom du COPERMO mais qu’est conservé l’instrument de verrouillage des investissements hospitaliers ; même si l’intention de le faire cautionner par quelques élus est annoncée comme une mesure formidable !
Ce volet 2 traite de « déconcentration de la gestion des investissements » et envisage de donner plus de pouvoirs aux Délégations départementales des ARS et « aux territoires ». Mais l’on sait que ces Délégations doivent respecter les « plans régionaux de santé » décidés par les ARS... Cette association des élus est donc un leurre !

      Véran annonce que les tarifs de la T2A « vont continuer d’augmenter » les années prochaines, alors que cela fait 10 ans qu’ils baissent… Par ailleurs le ministre propose « de mettre en place une enveloppe qui permettra aux hôpitaux de sortir plus rapidement de ce système » et « d’accélérer la réduction de la part de la T2A... » . Face au caractère fumeux de ces propos il est raisonnable d’être circonspect !

      Parmi « les 33 mesures » annoncées, citons aussi la volonté d’ « encourager les téléconsultations » , de décloisonner l’hôpital, la médecine de ville et le médico-social mais sans mesure concrète, « libérer les établissements des contraintes chronophages » et autres baragouinage sans mesure concrète.


      Le gouvernement veut « une gouvernance plus locale » et une revitalisation des services. Les candidats chefs de service devront présenter un projet : mais c’est déjà le cas ! On ne voit pas très bien le changement… Les pôles sont maintenus, même si les hôpitaux seront libres d’en décider.


      S’agissant des Instituts de formation en soins infirmiers (#IFSI), le gouvernement propose de doubler les formations d’aides-soignantes d’ici 2025 et d’augmenter de 10% celles des #IDE (Infirmières diplômées d’Etat). Ces mesures s’imposaient car l’on sait que la « durée de vie professionnelle » d’une IDE est de 6 ans... Mais au lieu d’augmenter massivement les postes d’IDE et de renforcer les IFSI, le gouvernement « lance une réflexion sur une nouvelle profession intermédiaire entre les IDE et les médecins » … ce qui lui permettra de gagner du temps et ne résoudra pas les manques d’effectifs dans les services !


      S’estimant satisfait d’avoir « remis de l’humain, des moyens et du sens dans notre système de santé » le Ministre conclut en annonçant un autre « Ségur de la santé publique » pour la rentrée et un « comité de suivi » des volets 1 et 2 du Plan Ségur.

      Qui peut se faire encore des illusions après cet enfumage cynique ?
      L’aumône concédée aux soignants, loin de leurs revendications qui préexistaient au Covid-19, ne suffit même pas à corriger le blocage du point d’indice depuis 10 ans alors que des centaines de milliards d’euros sont offerts aux multinationales et au #MEDEF.


      Rien n’est dit sur les ordonnances Juppé de 1995, sur la loi #HPST (hôpital, patients, santé, territoire) de la ministre de la Santé de Sarkozy, Roselyne Bachelot, qui vient de faire un grand retour en qualité de ministre de la culture ! Rien sur les lois Touraine et Buzyn qui ont continué à fermer des lits et détruire des postes !

      Rien sur le matériel, les respirateurs, les médicaments, les postes à créer, les hôpitaux à moderniser ! Rien sur les lits de réanimation dont on a vu la pénurie pendant ces 6 derniers mois ! Rien sur les 30 000 morts dont le pouvoir est responsable, faute de production locale de masques, de gel hydro-alcoolique, de gants, de tenues de protection, de médicaments, alors qu’une autre vague de la Covid-19 menace ! Où est le plan de relocalisation des industries de santé ?

      La signature de cet « accord » par la CFDT, FO et l’UNSA est une infamie ! Et cela alors que ces syndicats savent que Macron-Castex vont remettre sur la table la contre-réforme des retraites ! 


      Ils prétendaient après le volet 1 que les « autres volets » Ségur arrivaient : investissement et financement des hôpitaux, réforme de la #T2A, organisation territoriale, et « gouvernance » de l’hôpital. Pipeau !


      Qui peut se faire encore des illusions après cet enfumage cynique ? 


      Qui peut encore gober les déclarations officielles faisant des soignants des héros alors qu’ils ont été maltraités, le sont et le seront encore après ce Ségur de la honte ?


      Comment l’hôpital public va-t-il s’en sortir alors que la France est en voie de paupérisation et qu’il y aura un million de chômeurs de plus à la fin de l’année ?

      Ce qu’il faut retenir, c’est que 15 organisations n’ont pas signé cet « accord » déshonorant ! Parmi lesquelles la CGT, Sud, l’AMUF, la Confédération des praticiens des Hôpitaux, le Syndicat Jeunes Médecins, l’Union syndicale Action Praticiens des Hôpitaux, le Syndicat des professionnels IDE, etc. Leur manifestation du 14 juillet contre ce « plan » Macron-Castex-Véran-Notat est le début de la réplique contre l’indécent « hommage » de ce pouvoir aux soignants ! Il faut espérer que le mouvement social n’en restera pas là ! Que les citoyens s’en mêleront !

      Un seul objectif s’impose à nous : virer ce pouvoir inféodé aux multinationales, à la finance et à l’Union européenne !

      #Santé #santé_publique #soin #soins #enfumage #baragouinage #ségur #capitalisme #économie #budget #politique #olivier_véran #nicole_notat #agnès_buzyn #jean castex #alain_juppé #roselyne_bachelot #marisol_touraine #paupérisation #médecine #hôpital #inégalités #médecins #médecine #services_publics #conditions_de_travail #infirmières #infirmiers #soignants #soignantes #docteurs #budget #argent #fric #ue #union_européenne

  • Fehlender Schutz für Schwarze lesbische Geflüchtete
    #Mengia_Tschalaer

    NGO-Zahlen deuten darauf hin, dass in Bayern etwa 95 Prozent der Asylanträge, die von Schwarzen lesbischen Frauen gestellt werden, beim Bundesamt für Migration und Flüchtlinge (BAMF) erst einmal eine Ablehnung erfahren.

    Dies steht im Gegensatz zu der allgemeinen Ablehnungsrate von schwulen Männern von 50 Prozent und der von heterosexuellen Frauen von etwa 30 Prozent. Obwohl die Zahlen zu LSBTI-Asylanträgen nur eine Schätzung sind, weil das BAMF Asylfälle von LSBTI nicht gesondert erfasst, scheinen diese jedoch zu zeigen, dass lesbische Asylsuchende auf der Suche nach Flüchtlingsschutz in Deutschland besonderen Herausforderungen gegenüberstehen.
    Frauen und Kinder gelten als besonders schutzbedürftig

    Dies gilt insbesondere für Schwarze lesbische Frauen afrikanischer Herkunft, welche oft Formen von LSBTIQ-Feindlichkeit wie soziale Ächtung, Rassismus und (sexuelle) Gewalt erfahren.

    In Übereinstimmung mit einer kürzlich erlassenen EU-Richtlinie erkennt Deutschland Menschenrechtsverletzungen aufgrund der sexuellen Ausrichtung und der Geschlechtsidentität als Asylgrund an. Darüber hinaus erkennt Deutschland mit der Ratifizierung der Istanbuler Konvention von 2011, dass geschlechtsspezifische Gewalt eine Verfolgung darstellen kann und daher Flüchtlingsschutz gewährleistet werden soll. Tatsächlich werden Frauen und Kinder zusammen mit den Opfern von Sexhandel als die schutzbedürftigsten und am stärksten gefährdeten Personen im europäischen Asylsystem betrachtet.

    Wie die 2019 Statistik des Bundesamtes für Migration und Flüchtlinge zeigt, haben in Deutschland über 50 Prozent der heterosexuellen Frauen erfolgreich den Flüchtlingsstatus als Opfer geschlechtsspezifischer Verfolgung (Zwangsheirat, FGM, Ehrenmord, Vergewaltigung, häusliche Gewalt oder Zwangsprostitution) erlangt. Lesbische Geflüchtete kämpfen jedoch darum, erlebte Gewalt und Menschenrechtsverletzungen für den Flüchtlingsschutz geltend zu machen.

    [Wer mehr über queere Themen erfahren will: Der Tagesspiegel-Newsletter Queerspiegel erscheint monatlich, immer am dritten Donnerstag. Hier kostenlos anmelden: queer.tagesspiegel.de]

    Ein Beispiel dafür ist Hope, eine lesbische Frau aus Uganda deren Asylfolgeverfahren zurzeit in Bayern läuft. In mehreren Gesprächen erzählt sie ihre Geschichte. Sie war 15 Jahre alt, als sie ihre erste sexuelle Begegnung mit einer Frau hatte. Zwei Jahre später verheiratete ihr Vater sie gegen ihren Willen mit einem Freund - einem älteren Mann mit mehreren Frauen -, um ihre sexuelle Orientierung zu „korrigieren“.

    Nach etwa einem Jahr verließ Hope die missbräuchliche Ehe, die dazu geführt hatte, dass sie infolge körperlicher Gewalt zwei Mal schwanger wurde und die Babys verlor. Sie überzeugte ihren Vater, sie an studieren zu lassen. Dort lernte sie eine Frau kennen, mit der sie fast zehn Jahre lang in einer Beziehung lebte. Angesichts der sich rasant verschärfenden politische Lage für queere Menschen in Uganda, war das Paar sehr vorsichtig und hielt seine Beziehung geheim.
    In den Fängen von Menschenhändlern

    Die Nachbarn schöpften über die Jahre jedoch Verdacht und 2017 wurde Hopes Wohnung von einem Mob durchsucht. Dabei erlitt ihre Partnerin so schwere Verletzungen, dass sie ins Krankenhaus behandelt werden musste. Hope verbrachte eine Woche in Polizeigewahrsam. Kurz nach ihrer Entlassung entschloss sie sich zur Flucht aus Angst vor weiteren sozialen Repressalien und staatlicher Verfolgung.

    Mit der Unterstützung ihrer Mutter arrangierte Hope eine Flugreise nach Italien über ein lokales Reisebüro. Bei ihrer Ankunft in Italien stellt sich jedoch heraus, dass die Agentin dieses „Reisebüros“ Mitglied eines Menschenhandelsrings war. Hope wurde Opfer von Sexhandel. Während eines Monats bediente Hope etwa fünf Kunden pro Tag. Dann verhalf ihr ein „Stammkunde“ zur Ausreise nach Deutschland, wo sie im Februar 2018 Asyl beantragte.

    [Wenn Sie alle aktuellen Entwicklungen zur Coronavirus-Krise live auf Ihr Handy haben wollen, empfehlen wir Ihnen unsere runderneuerte App, die Sie hier für Apple-Geräte herunterladen können und hier für Android-Geräte]

    Im August 2018 wies das BAMF ihren Asylantrag mit der Begründung zurück, dass ihre Darstellung von Homosexualität, Trauma und Schmerz nicht glaubwürdig seien. Das BAMF rechtfertigt die Entscheidung damit dass Hopes Anspruch auf Schutzgewährung nicht im engeren Sinne unter den Flüchtlingsbegriff der Genfer Flüchtlingskonvention von 1951 fällt, weil „sie keine begründete Furcht vor Verfolgung nennen konnte“.

    Dass Hope jedoch einer Zwangsheirat und Vergewaltigung in der Ehe, häuslicher Gewalt und Sexhandel ausgesetzt war – Menschenrechtsverletzungen welche in direktem Zusammenhang mit ihrer sexuellen Orientierung stehen -, wurde in der Entscheidung völlig übersehen. Diese Gewalt wurden entweder als nicht direkt mit ihrem LSBTI-Asylantrag verbunden oder einfach als nicht glaubwürdig eingestuft. Dies beinhaltet auch den Sex-Trafficking-Vorfall.
    Sichtbarkeit würde Lesben in Uganda in Gefahr bringen

    Darüber hinaus stellte der Entscheider die Sexualität von Hope aufgrund des Mangels an (sichtbarem) Sex in Frage. Es schien ihm unglaubhaft, dass Hope keinen Geschlechtsverkehr mit Frauen während der Mittelschule hatte und dass sie es „schaffte“, fast zehn Jahre lang heimlich in einer Beziehung mit ihrer Partnerin zu leben.

    Für Hope wäre Sichtbarkeit jedoch mit großem Risiko verbunden gewesen. „Ich habe mich nie ganz geoutet. Ich kann das in Uganda nicht tun, sonst werde ich zu Tode geprügelt oder lande im Gefängnis. Die Polizei schützt dich nicht. Ich spreche also nie über diese Dinge", sagt sie.

    Und schließlich bemängelt der Entscheider, dass Hope keine gleichgeschlechtliche Beziehung in Deutschland unterhalten habe, obwohl dies nun ohne Angst vor Repressalien möglich wäre.
    Outing gegenüber deutschen Beamten fällt schwer

    Warum wurden die Episoden von Gewalt in Hopes queerer Asylgeschichte nicht mit ihrer Homosexualität in Beziehung gesetzt, könnte man fragen. Und warum wurde Hope den Flüchtlingsschutz verweigert, obwohl die Istanbuler Konvention von 2011 geschlechtsspezifische Gewalt als Fluchtgrund anerkennt?

    „Lesbische Asylsuchende sind im deutschen Asylsystem einer doppelten Diskriminierung ausgesetzt, weil sie Frauen und lesbisch sind“, sagt eine Psychologin, die in einer Beratungsstelle in Bayern lesbischen Frauen in ihren Asylanträgen hilft. Sie möchte ihren Namen zum Schutz ihrer Klientinnen nicht nennen.

    Nach Angaben der Lesbenberatungsstelle ist der häufigste Grund für die Ablehnung der, dass es für die Frauen unglaublich schwierig ist, sich gleich im ersten Moment dem/der Entscheider*in gegenüber zu outen. „Für viele Frauen sind sogar die Worte ,Ich bin lesbisch’ extrem schwierig auszusprechen", sagt die Beraterin.

    Zudem berufen sich Entscheider*innen oft auf westliche Stereotypen von Homosexualität. Vorstellungen von Zwangsehen und die Möglichkeit, dass auch lesbische Frauen Kinder haben, werden hingegen ausgeblendet. Letzteres wird tatsächlich oft als Grund für die Unglaubwürdigkeit und somit Ablehnung genannt.
    Ein positiver Bescheid macht Hoffnung

    Und letztlich wird erwartet, dass lesbische Geflüchtete, die häufig traumatisiert sind, Gewaltereignisse mit großer Genauigkeit - einschließlich genauer Daten und Orte - wiedergeben um ihre sexuelle Orientierung als „schicksalhaft und irreversibel“ (so der Wortlaut des deutschen LSBT-Asylgesetzes) darzustellen.

    Da Schwarze lesbische Geflüchtete die in Deutschland einen Asylantrag stellen meist weder dem heteronormative Opferbild von Mutterschaft und weiblicher Verletzlichkeit entsprechen noch den typisch westlichen „gay lifestyle“ verkörpern, scheint ihr Leid, ihr Schmerz und ihr Angst vor Verfolgung im deutschen Asylwesen oft unerkannt zu bleiben.

    Ein positiver Entscheid vom April 2020 im Fall einer lesbischen Geflüchteten aus Uganda lässt jedoch neue Hoffnung aufkeimen. Angesichts der zunehmenden Kriminalisierung von Homosexualität in Uganda sprach das Bayerische Obergericht nach elf Jahren Wartezeit ein positives Urteil aus.

    Es ist jedoch anzunehmen, dass der Weg bis zur Gleichberechtigung für Schwarze lesbische Frauen im Deutschen Asylwesen noch lang und steinig sein wird.
    Mengia Tschalaer ist Marie-Curie Research Fellow an der School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies der Universität von Bristol.

    Policy Brief: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/media-library/sites/policybristol/briefings-and-reports-pdfs/2020-briefings-and-reports-pdfs/Tschalaer_Briefing_86_Lesbian_Asylum_seekers_DE.pdf

    #migration #asylum #Germany #LGBTQ* #BAMF #sexuality #sexual_orientation #homosexuality

    https://www.tagesspiegel.de/gesellschaft/queerspiegel/asylgrund-homosexualitaet-fehlender-schutz-fuer-schwarze-lesbische-gefluechtete/25938886.html

    • #Safe_House „La Villa” – die LSBT*IQ-Geflüchtetenunterkunft

      Laut International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association (#ILGA) gibt es weltweit 72 Länder und Territorien mit antihomosexuellen Gesetzen, das sind 37 Prozent von 197 bewerteten Staaten. In 13 Ländern Afrikas und Asiens droht Homosexuellen sogar die Todesstrafe, darunter im Iran, in Saudi-Arabien und Teilen Nigerias. Sie gilt auch in wichtigen Reiseländern wie den Vereinigten Arabischen Emiraten und Katar, wird dort aber laut ILGA aktuell nicht vollstreckt.

      Seit der sogenannten Flüchtlingskrise 2015 wurde deutlich, dass sich unter den geflüchteten Männern und Frauen immer wieder homo-, bi- und transsexuelle Menschen befinden, die auf Grund der obengenanneten Verfolgung in ihrer Heimat zu uns gekommen sind. Leider mussten sie erleben, dass sie auch in den deutschen Erstaufnahmeeinrichtungen und Gemeinschaftsunterkünften von ihren Mitgeflüchteten oft offener Diskriminierung und Ausgrenzung ausgesetzt sind – wie schon in ihren Herkunftsländern.

      Dieser Zustand war unhaltbar. Daher hat die AIDS-Hilfe Frankfurt (AHF) früh gefordert, dass es für diese spezielle Zielgruppen einen besonderen Schutzstatus und entsprechende Schutzräume geben muss, um sie vor weiterer Diskriminierung zu bewahren und ihnen eine Perspektive in unserer freiheitlichen Gesellschaft zu eröffnen. Schon früh ermöglichte die AHF den Rainbow Refugees – eine Ehrenamtsgruppe, die sich für die Belange von LGBT*IQ-Geflüchteten einsetzt – die kostenfreie Raumnutzung für einen wöchentlichen Stammtisch im Switchboard. Die Kooperation wurde ausgebaut und besteht bis heute: es gibt inzwischen auch eine Ehrenamts-Gruppe für die La Villa. Die Nöte der Geflüchteten wurden durch die große Nachfrage nach Unterstützung und Hilfe noch sichtbarer und es war dringend notwendig, ein adäquates Angebot zu schaffen. Die Idee für eine Gemeinschaftsunterkunft für LGBT*IQ-Geflüchtete wurde geboren.

      So hat die AHF Anfang 2017 das Konzept für ein „Safe House“ erstellt und dank pragmatischer und unkonventioneller Unterstützung durch das Sozialdezernat der Stadt Frankfurt gemeinsam umsetzen können: Anfang April 2018 eröffnete die von den Bewohner*innen selbst benannte Gemeinschaftsunterkunft La Villa.

      Das Projekt begann mit 7 Bewohner*innen. Inzwischen ist das Haus mit 19 Bewohnern*innen in zehn Doppel- und zwei Einzelzimmern, wovon eines als Notfallzimmer dient, fast voll belegt. Die meisten Bewohner*innen sind schwule, junge Männer, aber auch Transfrauen und genderfluide Menschen haben dort eine sichere Unterbringung gefunden. Der jüngste Geflüchtete ist 21 Jahre, der Älteste 43 Jahre alt. Die Geflüchteten kommen aus dem Irak, Syrien, Iran, Marokko, Russland, Jamaika, Kuba, Aserbaidschan, Sudan und Kuwait. Der Bildungs- bzw. Ausbildungsstand der Bewohner*innen ist sehr unterschiedlich, genauso wie deren Einreise nach Deutschland. Die meisten der Bewohner*innen sprechen Englisch und/oder Französisch, einzelne auch schon recht gut Deutsch.

      Um das Zusammenleben zu verbessern gibt es einmal pro Monat ein verbindliches Hausmeeting. Thema ist zum Beispiel die Gemeinschaftsküche und die damit verbundenen typischen WG-Probleme wie Nutzung und Sauberkeit und wie diese gelöst werden können. Zur weiteren Stärkung des Gemeinschaftsgefühls wurden bereits kurz nach der Eröffnung Aktivitäten organisiert, die oft durch Ehrenamtliche und Spenden ermöglicht wurden. Dazu zählen beispielsweise der Besuch eines Eintrachtspiels, der Malteser-Social-Day mit Stadtführung und Bootsfahrt oder der ARCO-Weihnachtsempfang der Commerzbank, gemeinsames Kochen oder eine Ramadan-Feier.

      Viele Bewohner*innen haben sich seit ihrem Einzug weiterentwickelt. Das betrifft vor allem die Stärkung und Stabilisierung des eigenen Selbst. Die überschaubare Einrichtungsgröße mit 20 Bewohner*innen bietet Sicherheit sowie eine vertrauensvolle Atmosphäre und hilft auch traumatisierten Personen, Ruhe zu finden und sich langsam zu öffnen. Daraus resultiert das große Bemühen, auch bei einem negativen Bescheid und Abschiebedrohung, z.B. in ein Ausbildungsverhältnis zu kommen, um ihr Leben in ihrer neuen „Heimat“ zu regeln: Ein Bewohner hat trotz Sprachniveau B1 bereits einen Ausbildungsplatz im Hilton-Hotel gefunden.

      Nur fünf Bewohner*inner der La Villa haben einen gesicherten Aufenthalt – eine Bewohner*in hat subsidiären Schutz, zwei haben Asyl, zwei die Anerkennung als Flüchtling. Alle anderen sind im Asyl-Klageverfahren. Davon haben einige wenige bereits ihre zweite Ablehnung bekommen und nur eine Duldung erhalten, weil sie nicht in ihre Heimatländer abgeschoben werden können.

      Stand Februar 2019

      Ansprechpartner*innen:

      Petra Diabaté, M. A.
      Hausleiterin „La Villa“ und Sozialberaterin
      E-Mail: petra.diabate@ah-frankfurt.de
      Telefon: 01 76 / 22 54 88 73
      Fax: 0 69 / 75 00 56 31

      Mark Hayward
      Hausleiter „La Villa“ und Sozialberater
      E-Mail: mark.hayward@ah-frankfurt.de
      Telefon: 01 59 / 01 63 10 46
      Fax: 0 69 / 75 00 56 31

      #accomodation #safe_space #Frankfurt

      https://www.frankfurt-aidshilfe.de/content/safe-house

    • OPEN DYKES*_Gleichberechtigung im Asylverfahren für lesbische und queere geflüchtete Frauen
      Online-Veranstaltung*

      Eine Verletzung der Freiheit der sexuellen Orientierung und Geschlechtsidentität begründet in Deutschland ein Recht auf Asyl – trotzdem wird dieses Recht statistisch gesehen vor allem Schwarzen lesbischen und queeren Frauen* vorenthalten, die aufgrund ihrer Sexualität in ihren Heimatländern unter Unterdrückung und Verfolgung leiden. Dr. Mengia Tschalaer (Universität Bristol) hat im Rahmen ihrer Forschungen zu LSBTTIQ und Flucht in Deutschland festgestellt, dass diese Diskriminierung auf stereotypen Vorstellungen von lesbischer Sexualität beruht, die offensichtlich nicht mit den Lebensrealitäten der abgelehnten Asylbewerber_Innen übereinstimmen. Kaum berücksichtigt werden in den Asylentscheidungen auch Formen der Verfolgung und Gewalt wie Zwangsheirat, Vergewaltigung in der Ehe und häuslicher Gewalt, obwohl in Deutschland seit Ratifizierung der Istanbul-Konvention geschlechtsspezifische Gewalt als eine Verfolgung anerkannt ist und daher Flüchtlingsschutz gewährleistet werden soll.
      Was muss sich ändern, um die strukturelle Diskriminierung von Schwarzen lesbischen und queeren geflüchteten Frauen* abzubauen? Nach einem einführenden Vortrag durch Dr. Mengia Tschalaer diskutieren Monique Richards (Unicorn Refugees, PLUS Rhein-Neckar e.V.), Sara Schmitter (LeTRa), Margret Göth (Dipl.-Psychologin, PLUS Rhein-Neckar e.V.) in einer Online-Veranstaltung, welchen Konflikten sich Schwarze lesbische und queere Frauen* ausgesetzt sehen und welche Handlungsbedarfe bestehen, um tatsächlichen allen ihr Menschenrecht auf Asyl zu garantieren.
      Moderiert wird die Veranstaltung von der Vorstandsvorsitzenden des Hessischen Flüchtlingsrates Dr. des. Harpreet Kaur Cholia.

      Die Veranstaltung findet am 22.07.2020 von 18-20 Uhr statt und ist über Zoom, erreichbar unter
      https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83494542645?pwd=Zmt2NjdTMTU2OUtEQzh3ZEFnYXhFUT09

      Meeting-ID: 834 9454 2645
      Passwort: 355106,
      und im Facebook-Livestream verfolgbar.

      Das Queeres Netzwerk Heidelberg organisiert die Veranstaltungsreihe „OPEN DYKES* - lesbisch, queer und sichtbar“ – in Kooperation mit dem Amt für Chancengleichheit der Stadt Heidelberg und Mosaik Deutschland e. V. aus Mitteln des Bundesprogramms „Demokratie leben!“.

      Weitere Informationen zu den Aktionswochen vom 22. Juli bis zum 7. August 2020 von und für lesbische, queere und frauenliebende Frauen gibt es unter www.queeres-netzwerk-hd.de .

      https://www.facebook.com/events/606886813305719

  • Hong Kong third wave: two more Covid-19 deaths as 61 infections are confirmed including worker who visited 10 care homes | South China Morning Post
    https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/health-environment/article/3094030/hong-kong-third-wave-covid-19-bed-situation

    Fifty-eight of the new infections were locally transmitted, including 25 which were of unknown origins. There were three imported cases, including one each from India and the United States, while the third involved a seafarer who arrived from the Philippines.

    #Covid-19#migrant@migration#honkong#sante#troisiemevague#casimporte#inde#etatsunis#philippines#travailleursmigrants

  • #Santé_mentale des #migrants : des #blessures invisibles

    Une prévalence élevée du trouble de stress post-traumatique et de la #dépression

    Les #migrations, les migrants et leur #santé ne peuvent être compris indépendamment du contexte historique et politique dans lequel les mouvements de population se déroulent, et, ces dernières décennies, les migrations vers l’#Europe ont changé. L’#immigration de travail s’est restreinte, et la majorité des étrangers qui arrivent en #France doivent surmonter des obstacles de plus en plus difficiles, semés de #violence et de #mort, au fur et à mesure que les #frontières de l’Europe se ferment. Ils arrivent dans des pays où l’#hostilité envers les migrants croît et doivent s’engager dans un processus hasardeux de #demande_d’asile. Ce contexte a de lourds effets sur la santé mentale des migrants. Ces migrants peuvent être des adultes ou des enfants, accompagnés ou non d’un parent – on parle dans ce dernier cas de mineur non accompagné*. S’il n’existe pas de pathologie psychiatrique spécifique de la migration1 et que tous les troubles mentaux peuvent être rencontrés, il n’en reste pas moins que certaines pathologies sont d’une grande fréquence comme le trouble de stress post-traumatique et la dépression.

    Facteurs de risque

    Pour approcher la vie psychique des migrants et les difficultés auxquelles ils font face, nous distinguerons quatre facteurs à l’origine de difficultés : le vécu prémigratoire, le voyage, le vécu post-migratoire, et les aspects transculturels.

    Vécu prémigratoire

    Avant le départ, de nombreux migrants ont vécu des événements adverses et traumatiques : #persécution, #guerre, #violence_physique, #torture, violence liée au #genre (#mutilations, #viols), #deuils de proches dans des contextes de #meurtre ou de guerre, #emprisonnement, famine, exposition à des scènes horribles, etc. Les violences ont fréquemment été dirigées contre un groupe, amenant une dislocation des liens communautaires, en même temps que des liens familiaux. Ces traumatismes ont un caractère interhumain et intentionnel, et une dimension collective, témoignant d’une situation de violence organisée, c’est-à-dire d’une relation de violence exercée par un groupe sur un autre.2, 3 Cette situation de traumatismes multiples et intentionnels est fréquemment à l’origine d’une forme particulière de troubles appelée trouble de stress post-traumatique complexe. Les nombreuses pertes, deuils et pertes symboliques fragilisent vis-à-vis du risque dépressif.

    Départ et #voyage

    La migration est en elle-même un événement de vie particulièrement intense, obligeant à des renoncements parfois douloureux, déstabilisante par tous les remaniements qu’elle implique. Ce risque est pris par ceux qui partent avec un #projet_migratoire élaboré. En revanche, l’exil dans une situation critique est plus souvent une fuite, sans projet, sans espoir de retour, bien plus difficile à élaborer.1 Vers une Europe dont les frontières se sont fermées, les routes migratoires sont d’une dangerosité extrême. Nous connaissons tous le drame de la Méditerranée, ses morts en mer innombrables.4 Les adolescents venant seuls d’Afghanistan, par exemple, peuvent mettre plusieurs années à arriver en Europe, après des avancées, des retours en arrière, des phases d’incarcération ou de #prostitution. Durant ce long voyage, tous sont exposés à de nouvelles violences, de nouveaux traumatismes et à la traite des êtres humains, surtout les femmes et les enfants.

    Vécu post-migratoire

    Une fois dans le pays hôte, les migrants se retrouvent coincés entre un discours idéal sur l’asile, la réalité d’une opinion publique souvent hostile et des politiques migratoires contraignantes qui les forcent sans cesse à prouver qu’ils ne sont pas des fraudeurs ou des criminels.5 Les réfugiés qui ont vécu un traumatisme dans le pays d’origine vivent donc un nouveau traumatisme : le déni de leur vécu par le pays d’accueil. Ce déni, qui est pathogène, prend de multiples aspects, mais il s’agit d’être cru : par les agents de l’Office de protection des réfugiés et des apatrides (Ofpra) qui délivre le statut de réfugié, par les conseils départementaux, qui décident, avec un certain arbitraire, de la crédibilité de la minorité des jeunes non accompagnés. L’obtention d’un statut protecteur dans un cas, l’obligation de quitter le territoire dans l’autre. Mais raconter en détail des événements traumatiques que l’on n’a parfois jamais pu verbaliser est difficile, parfois impossible. Lorsque des troubles de la mémoire ou des reviviscences traumatiques les empêchent de donner des détails précis, on leur répond...

    #migration #mental_health #trauma #depression #violence

    https://www.larevuedupraticien.fr/article/sante-mentale-des-migrants-des-blessures-invisibles

  • Rapport 2019 sur les #incidents_racistes recensés par les #centres_de_conseil

    La plupart des incidents racistes recensés par les centres de conseil en 2019 sont survenus dans l’#espace_public et sur le #lieu_de_travail, le plus souvent sous la forme d’#inégalités_de_traitement ou d’#insultes. Pour ce qui est des motifs de #discrimination, la #xénophobie vient en tête, suivie par le #racisme_anti-Noirs et l’#hostilité à l’égard des personnes musulmanes. Le rapport révèle aussi une augmentation des incidents relevant de l’#extrémisme_de_droite.

    La plupart des #discriminations signalées en 2019 se sont produites dans l’espace public (62 cas). Les incidents sur le lieu de travail arrivent en deuxième position (50 cas), en diminution par rapport à 2018. Les cas de #discrimination_raciale étaient aussi très fréquents dans le #voisinage, dans le domaine de la #formation et dans les contacts avec l’#administration et la #police.

    Pour ce qui est des motifs de discrimination, la xénophobie en général arrive en tête (145 cas), suivie par le racisme anti-Noirs (132 incidents) et l’hostilité à l’égard des personnes musulmanes (55 cas). Enfin, le rapport fait état d’une augmentation significative des cas relevant de l’extrémisme de droite (36 cas). À cet égard, il mentionne notamment l’exemple d’un centre de conseil confronté dans une commune à différents incidents extrémistes commis par des élèves : diffusion de symboles d’extrême droite, gestes comme le #salut_hitlérien et même #agressions_verbales et physiques d’un jeune Noir. Le centre de conseil est intervenu en prenant différentes mesures. Grâce à ce travail de sensibilisation, il a réussi à calmer la situation.

    En 2019, les centres de conseil ont également traité différents cas de #profilage_racial (23 cas). Ainsi, une femme a notamment dénoncé un incident survenu à l’#aéroport alors qu’elle revenait d’un voyage professionnel : à la suite d’un contrôle effectué par la #police_aéroportuaire et les #gardes-frontières, cette femme a été la seule passagère à être prise à part. Alors même que tous ses documents étaient en ordre et sans aucune explication supplémentaire, elle a été emmenée dans une pièce séparée où elle a subi un interrogatoire musclé. Sa valise a également été fouillée et elle a dû se déshabiller. Le rapport revient plus en détail sur cet exemple – parmi d’autres – en lien avec un entretien avec la coordinatrice du Centre d’écoute contre le racisme de Genève.

    Au total, le rapport 2019 dénombre 352 cas de discrimination raciale recensés dans toute la Suisse par les 22 centres de conseil membres du réseau. Cette publication n’a pas la prétention de recenser et d’analyser la totalité des cas de #discrimination_raciale. Elle vise plutôt à donner un aperçu des expériences vécues par les victimes de racisme et à mettre en lumière la qualité et la diversité du travail des centres de conseil. Ceux-ci fournissent en effet des informations générales et des conseils juridiques, offrent un soutien psychosocial aux victimes et apportent une précieuse contribution à la résolution des conflits.

    https://www.admin.ch/gov/fr/accueil/documentation/communiques.msg-id-78901.html

    –—

    Pour télécharger le rapport :


    http://network-racism.ch/cms/upload/200421_Rassismusbericht_19_F.pdf

    #rapport #racisme #Suisse #statistiques #chiffres #2019
    #islamophobie #extrême_droite

    ping @cede

  • Comment des #mercenaires suisses ont participé à la colonisation

    Au 19e siècle, de nombreux jeunes Suisses issus de milieux défavorisés ont combattu en Asie et en Afrique dans les troupes coloniales de puissances étrangères. Alors que le rôle des mercenaires suisses en Europe était déjà connu, des chercheurs ont maintenant découvert des documents qui mettent en évidence la contribution de combattants suisses à la domination coloniale.

    Après une rude journée de travail à la ferme, Thomas Suter* ( = nom fictif), âgé de 19 ans, se rend dans la taverne d’un village de l’Emmental pour y boire un verre. Les discussions sont animées. Tout le monde parle de Jürg Keller, un jeune du village voisin parti l’année précédente rejoindre l’armée royale des Indes néerlandaises, la Koninklijk Nederlandsch-Indisch Leger (KNIL) dans ce qui est aujourd’hui l’Indonésie.

    La famille de Jürg Keller venait de recevoir une lettre de Lombok, aux Indes orientales néerlandaises, dans laquelle il se plaignait de la chaleur, de la nourriture et des indigènes. Mais ce qu’il trouvait pénible était plutôt exotique et excitant pour ceux qui découvraient ce monde dans une taverne de l’Emmental et n’avaient pour ainsi dire rien connu d’autre que la vie simple et monotone du travail dans les champs et les pâturages. Parmi eux, des jeunes hommes rêvaient en secret de suivre son exemple, de quitter leur vallée endormie et de devenir soldats sous les tropiques.

    Pour cela, il leur suffisait d’attendre le passage d’un racoleur. Ce type de recrutement était certes interdit parce que les autorités fédérales voyaient d’un mauvais œil le fait que des Suisses servent des puissances étrangères, mais les recruteurs écumaient régulièrement la vallée. Les jeunes Suisses remontaient alors le Rhin jusqu’à Harderwijk, aux Pays-Bas, où se trouvait le bureau de recrutement de la KNIL. Dans cette ville, ils pouvaient passer la nuit à l’Hôtel Helvetia ou au Café Suisse, deux établissements tenus par d’anciens mercenaires suisses qui, contre rétribution, les aidaient à accomplir les formalités de recrutement.

    Ils s’embarquaient ensuite pour les Indes néerlandaises orientales où ils devaient rester six ans au minimum. « Pour eux, les colonies représentaient une chance de grimper dans l’échelle sociale et d’accéder à la vie bourgeoise dont ils rêvaient », explique Philipp Krauer, chercheur en histoire du monde moderne à l’ETH Zurich.

    Des caisses pleines de documents

    Philipp Krauer et ses collègues ont récemment mis la main dans les Archives fédérales sur une vingtaine de caisses remplies de documents sur la vie jusqu’à présent méconnue des mercenaires suisses de l’armée coloniale néerlandaise. Alors que l’engagement des mercenaires suisses en Europe est connu, on ne disposait jusqu’à présent que de peu d’informations sur leurs faits d’armes dans les colonies.

    Dans la seconde moitié du 19e siècle, l’engagement de mercenaires en Europe s’était étiolé – les jeunes Suisses combattaient désormais dans des colonies bien plus éloignées. Les Suisses étaient très appréciés par l’armée coloniale néerlandaise parce que la plupart d’entre eux disposaient déjà d’une instruction militaire de base et qu’ils étaient considérés comme de bons tireurs. Leur réputation s’est un peu ternie après une mutinerie suisse survenue en 1860 à Semarang pour protester contre les conditions de vie et de travail. Cependant, 8000 soldats suisses ont rejoint l’armée coloniale néerlandaise en Indonésie entre 1815 et la Première Guerre mondiale.

    Le nombre de ceux qui ont rejoint la Légion étrangère française est encore plus important : on estime qu’entre 1830 et 1960, 40’000 Suisses ont participé aux combats en Afrique du Nord et au Vietnam. Par moments, les mercenaires suisses constituaient 10% des troupes des pays européens.
    Misère en Suisse

    Les mercenaires suisses fuyaient souvent la misère. Jusqu’à la fin des années 1880, la Suisse était un des pays les plus pauvres d’Europe et une terre d’émigration. Le gouvernement suisse accordait même des aides à ceux qui partaient aux États-Unis ou en Amérique du Sud. De plus, que des jeunes hommes turbulents issus de familles modestes s’en aillent mener une vie de soldat à l’étranger était plutôt une bonne affaire aux niveaux politique et financier. « De nombreux politiciens et agents de la force publique connaissaient les pratiques illégales de recrutement de mercenaires sur le territoire suisse, mais ils fermaient les yeux, a indiqué Philipp Krauer à swissinfo.ch. Ils estimaient préférable que ces pauvres et ces indésirables partent à l’étranger plutôt que de causer des troubles dans le pays. »

    Mais la misère n’était pas la seule raison qui poussait les jeunes Suisses dans les armées coloniales – nombre d’entre eux espéraient ainsi trouver une vie pleine d’aventures. « J’ai lu la lettre où un soldat expliquait à sa mère qu’il avait rêvé de partir chaque fois qu’il voyait un train passer près de son village. Il ne pouvait pas supporter l’idée de rester dans ce petit village et d’y finir paysan comme son père et son grand-père », dit Philipp Krauer.

    De plus, certaines légendes qui circulaient magnifiaient la vie menée par ceux qui avaient eu le courage de faire le grand saut. Gottfried Keller, un des écrivains les plus populaires du milieu du 19e siècle, avait écrit l’histoire d’un jeune homme ayant quitté son foyer pour rejoindre d’abord la Compagnie britannique des Indes orientales puis la Légion étrangère française en Afrique du Nord. Il y avait tué un lion, été promu colonel et fait fortune.

    Une vie dure

    Mais la réalité était souvent bien différente. Pour beaucoup, l’arrivée en Indonésie constituait un choc, non seulement en raison du climat tropical, mais aussi parce que les jeunes recrues passaient les trois premiers mois en formation et n’avaient que peu d’autres contacts avec les autres Européens sur place. Elles devaient faire face à des maladies mortelles telles que la malaria et le choléra. « Avant que la quinine soit disponible dans les années 1850, la majeure partie d’entre eux mouraient dans les premiers mois de maladies tropicales », indique Philipp Krauer.

    La vie quotidienne était cependant plutôt ennuyeuse. Les soldats devaient faire de nombreux exercices et s’entraîner à manipuler leurs armes. La nourriture de base était le riz et ils buvaient essentiellement du ‘jenever’, soit du gin hollandais, parce que la bière était importée. Les soldats suisses étaient en revanche autorisés à avoir des concubines et même à fonder des familles avec elles.

    Certains tenaient des journaux et leurs notes montrent qu’ils se réjouissaient de sortir des casernes pour aller patrouiller dans les plantations. Leur présence contribuait à entretenir un climat de peur chez les ouvriers autochtones afin qu’ils ne se relâchent pas. Le conflit le plus important dans lequel les soldats suisses furent impliqués fut la guerre d’Aceh, qui débuta en 1873 et se prolongea près d’une quarantaine d’années. À cette époque, de 8000 à 10’000 soldats étaient engagés dans le nord de Sumatra. Les Suisses se retrouvaient également dans des unités spéciales impitoyables qui patrouillaient l’archipel pour soumettre les chefs locaux – en utilisant la tactique de la terre brûlée. « Des milliers d’ennemis ont été tués, leurs maisons et d’autres propriétés ont été brûlées, le raja de Lombok a été arrêté et la plupart des chefs ennemis ont été expédiés dans l’autre monde », écrit en 1895 le soldat Emil Häfeli dans une lettre au père d’Egloff, son compatriote décédé. Les mesures de rétorsion étaient particulièrement cruelles lorsque des camarades étaient tués.

    Les descendants d’indigènes qui avaient survécu à l’intervention d’une de ces unités spéciales sur l’île indonésienne de Flores racontèrent plus tard comment ils avaient été protégés par les cadavres de leurs proches. Les soldats des armées coloniales ne faisaient aucune différence entre les civils et les combattants.

    Philipp Kauer remarque : « En Suisse, il y avait déjà le Comité international de la Croix-Rouge et on discutait de moraliser la guerre. Et simultanément des Suisses participaient en Indonésie à des massacres dans le Sumatra du Nord, à Aceh, à Flores et sur d’autres îles ».

    Retour à la maison

    Les soldats ne pouvaient rentrer chez eux qu’après avoir accompli au moins six ans de service en Indonésie. Comme ils étaient entourés par la mer, il n’était pour ainsi dire pas possible de déserter.

    « S’ils voulaient rentrer avant d’avoir achevé leurs six ans de service, il leur fallait payer 2000 francs suisses, ce qui était un montant considérable à l’époque. Et ils devaient aussi trouver un remplaçant », indique l’historien. Les soldats ne parvenaient pas à économiser grand-chose, mais après douze ans de service ils touchaient une rente annuelle d’une valeur de 200 francs au minimum, mais qui parfois atteignait 2000 francs.

    De retour en Suisse, ils n’étaient pas accueillis comme des héros. Les miliciens avaient mauvaise réputation : la population méprisait ceux qui avaient servi un autre pays et les jugeait pervertis - le nationalisme étant toujours plus fort dans le nouvel État fédéral. On craignait également qu’ils importent de mauvaises habitudes dans le pays.

    Nombre d’entre eux étaient traumatisés par les massacres auxquels ils avaient participé et ne parvenaient pas à se réintégrer dans la société. Ils rencontraient aussi de l’opposition lorsqu’ils voulaient rapatrier leurs concubines et leurs enfants en Suisse.

    Au contraire des marchands et des missionnaires suisses qui ont participé à l’aventure coloniale, les mercenaires n’ont pas laissé beaucoup de traces telles que des livres ou des musées remplis d’objets exotiques. Ils ont cependant exercé une influence considérable sur l’attitude des Suisses à l’égard des étrangers : « La manière dont ils décrivaient les indigènes dans leurs lettres a contribué à répandre des stéréotypes sur les autres races dans les vallées et villages reculés de Suisse. Certains existent toujours aujourd’hui », dit Philipp Krauer.

    https://www.swissinfo.ch/fre/comment-des-mercenaires-suisses-ont-particip%C3%A9-%C3%A0-la-colonisation/45863058
    #Suisse #colonialisme #colonisation #soldats #Java #Indonésie #Asie #Afrique #Koninklijk_Nederlandsch-Indisch_Leger (#KNIL) #Harderwijk #Pays-Bas #Hôtel_Helvetia #Café_Suisse #Indes_néerlandaises_orientale #mercenaires_suisses #Semarang

    –---

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur la #Suisse_coloniale :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/868109

    ping @albertocampiphoto @cede

  • Hong Kong third wave: Carrie Lam steps up fight against coronavirus, with masks to be made mandatory in indoor public places and civil servants working from home | South China Morning Post
    https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/health-environment/article/3093795/hong-kong-third-wave-more-100-confirmed-and

    Lam said: “In addition to filling the current needs, the new facilities will also help Hong Kong better manage the next wave, as experts are expecting a new outbreak in winter.”From next Saturday, people entering Hong Kong from seven high-risk countries, including India and Pakistan, would be required to spend their 14-day quarantine at government-approved hotels before going to their own homes.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#hongkong#inde#pakistan#sante#deuxiemevague

  • Du coeur au ventre
    #Documentaire d’Alice Gauvin. 38 minutes. Diffusé le 28 octobre 2012 dans 13h15 Le Dimanche sur France 2.

    Il y a 40 ans, une jeune fille de 17 ans, Marie-Claire était jugée au #Tribunal de Bobigny. Jugée pour avoir avorté.
    Nous sommes en 1972 et l’#avortement est interdit en #France.
    Les #femmes avortent quand même, dans la #clandestinité et des conditions dramatiques, parfois au péril de leur vie.
    Des femmes, des médecins vont s’engager pour briser la #loi_du_silence et obtenir une loi qui autorise l’#interruption_volontaire_de_grossesse.
    C’est l’histoire d’un #combat, d’un débat passionné. Sur la #vie, la #mort, et un acte encore #tabou aujourd’hui.
    « Aucune femme ne recourt de gaieté de cœur à l’avortement » dira Simone Veil à la tribune de l’Assemblée nationale. « Il suffit d’écouter les femmes ».

    https://vimeo.com/77331979


    #IVG #film #film_documentaire #histoire #justice #planning_familial #avortement_clandestin #faiseuses_d'anges #Suisse #décès #343_femmes #résistance #lutte #avortement_libre #343_salopes #Marie-Claire_Chevalier #procès_de_Bobigny #procès_politique #Gisèle_Halimi #injustice #loi #aspiration #méthode_Karman #Grenoble #Villeneuve #Joëlle_Brunerie-Kauffmann #Olivier_Bernard #manifeste_des_médecins #choix #désobéissance_civile #maternité #parentalité #liberté #Simon_Veil #Simon_Iff #clause_de_conscience #commandos #anti-IVG #commandos_anti-IVG #RU_486 #centre_IVG #loi_Bachelot #hôpitaux_publics #tabou

  • Virus spreads grip as Hong Kong tracking stumbles - Asia Times
    https://asiatimes.com/2020/07/virus-spreads-grip-as-hong-kong-tracking-stumbles

    On Friday, 58 new infections were recorded, including eight imported cases and 50 local infections. Of the local cases, 32 could be linked to previous cases while the rest were unknown.Newly-identified patients included shop and restaurant staff, nurses, a bus driver, a receptionist in a shopping mall, a foreign domestic worker and a local newspaper editor. Many other patients were infected after visiting restaurants in East Kowloon.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#hongkong#sante#deuxiemevague#casimporte#travailleurmigrant

  • Tout comme l’année dernière, Franck Descollonges de Heavenly Sweetness propose une sélection d’albums une fois par semaine dans le magazine PAM pendant tout l’été

    Ça commence encore par le Brésil comme l’année dernière, mais uniquement Marcos Valle :
    https://pan-african-music.com/dans-les-disques-de-franck-descollonges-marcos-valle

    L’année dernière, nous avions commencé en fanfare (brésilienne) avec Jorge Ben, cette année on ouvre la saison avec un autre géant de la musique auriverde : Marcos Valle. Et là encore, la discographie est tellement large, les tubes tellement nombreux qu’il va être difficile de faire le choix…

    Garra (1971)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQRg6KMp02U

    Vontadé de Rever Vocé (1981)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qUWXuzHEn6Q

    Marcos Valle (1983)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTPaDbt_USA

    Et cette semaine la Jamaïque :
    https://pan-african-music.com/dans-les-disques-de-franck-descollonges-jamaican-2

    Au-delà des instrumentaux, j’ai toujours été impressionné par la qualité des chanteurs jamaïcains ou des nombreux groupes vocaux existant dans le reggae. J’ai donc extirpé de ma discothèque deux albums vocaux et un album instrumental, avec un petit focus sur le mythique label de Clement “Coxsone” Dodd : Studio one.

    Alton Ellis – Sings Rock and Soul
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BAv5lA_bzQ

    Jackie Mittoo – Macka Fat
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KkEuMYR2yQk

    The Gladiators – Proverbial Reggae
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wsdvYre4hAo

    L’année dernière :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/792297

    #musique #Franck_Descollonges #vinyle #Brésil #Jamaïque #bossa_nova #reggae #Marcos_Valle #Alton_Ellis #Jackie_Mittoo #The_Gladiators

    • Pour mon père, un garçon qui parlait avec une fille avait forcément une idée derrière la tête. Tous sont des violeurs, toutes sont des putains, sauf sa mère bien sûr. Cette insulte revenait toujours quand le maître du foyer, l’homme de la maison, celui qui possède les bijoux de famille, se mettait en colère. D’ailleurs, pour être sûr que je n’étais pas une putain, du moins pas encore, il lui fallut bien le vérifier par lui-même. C’est à ce moment-là que la guerre entre lui et moi a commencé. Quand il a voulu poser sa bouche sur la mienne et ses mains sur mon sexe. Je l’ai mordu, griffé, frappé. J’ai utilisé les poings. Ma réputation était faite, j’étais une folle, une hystérique. Harceler ma mère ne lui suffisait pas. Il voulait posséder toutes les femmes, toutes les femelles. Pour m’éduquer, il m’obligea un jour, sous prétexte de s’assurer que je sortais le chien, à le retrouver dans un parking où stationnaient une dizaine de camping-cars. Quand les portes s’ouvraient, je voyais la femme, le lit et le mâle qui sortait ou entrait. Sans discontinuer, les mâles entraient et sortaient, entraient et sortaient, entraient et sortaient… Des hommes en voiture s’arrêtaient à ma hauteur pour me demander : « C’est combien la pipe ? » Ni le chien ni mes douze ans ne les inquiétaient. Puis mon père, son affaire une fois conclue, arriva en voiture et klaxonna. Je suis alors montée dans la voiture avec le chien, une colère noire dans le cœur.

      Aucune intimité n’était possible sous le toit du mâle paranoïaque qui devait régir son foyer. J’écrivais déjà et, bien sûr, il trouva mes écrits, en rit et les partagea avec toute la famille. Ma mère et mon frère ne voulurent jamais me croire, mon frère affirmait : « Ma sœur est folle ». Je ne pouvais donc compter que sur moi-même pour me défendre. Tant de rage contenue quand des étrangers affirmaient que mon père était un homme si drôle, si intelligent, si serviable, si sympathique.

  • L’idéologie transgenriste s’inscrit dans une histoire de croyances en l’impossible qui ont marqué nos cultures et causé d’énormes souffrances aux populations les plus défavorisées, à commencer par les jeunes filles et les femmes.
    JANICE WILLIAMS explique :
    https://tradfem.wordpress.com/2020/07/14/six-croyances-irrationnelles-et-leurs-consequences-devastatrices
    #irrationnel
    #transgenrisme #femmes #hommes #chasseauxsorcières

  • The not so great escape: Korean visitor recaptured after trying to flee coronavirus quarantine in Hong Kong for third time | South China Morning Post
    https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/health-environment/article/3092946/not-so-great-escape-korean-visitor-recaptured

    A visitor to Hong Kong jumped out of a moving van while being escorted by police to a coronavirus quarantine camp on Monday, the man’s third escape attempt in less than 24 hours.The 39-year-old from South Korea, who arrived in the city last Thursday, exited the vehicle’s emergency door as it was travelling along the Tsing Sha Highway in Sha Tin, shortly after 6am. He was quickly recaptured by two police officers wearing protective gear, and was taken to Prince of Wales Hospital suffering from a minor injury. According to police, the man was being taken to the quarantine camp at Chun Yeung Estate in Fo Tan when the incident occurred, and would be sent there after he had been treated.

    #Covid-19@migrant#migration#hongkong#coreedusud#quarantaine#sante