• Des syndicalistes se battent à Hong Kong

    Wong Wai-man, plus connu sous le nom d’Ah Man, avait l’habitude de transporter une pile de formulaires de demande d’adhésion à un syndicat dans son sac à dos, où qu’il aille. Après la grève historique des sidérurgistes en 2007, ce professionnel des poutres métalliques, âgé de 66 ans et doté d’une barbe blanche aussi fournie que celle d’Albus Dumbledore dans la série Harry Potter, a fondé un syndicat et a passé une grande partie de son temps à voyager entre les sites de construction pour persuader les travailleurs de le rejoindre.

    https://entreleslignesentrelesmots.wordpress.com/2022/09/19/des-syndicalistes-se-battent-a-hong-kong

    #international #hongkong

  • 3,000 migrants in camps along Serbo-Hungarian border

    Serbian police have discovered two irregular migrant camps near Subotica, at the northern border with Hungary, according to Serbia’s interior ministry. According to the NGO Asylum Protection Center, some 3,000 refugees are currently located along this border.

    Serbian police have discovered two makeshift camps with a strong concentration of migrants near Subotica, in the northern part of the country next to the border with Hungary, Serbia’s interior ministry said on Monday, July 18.

    Several dozen migrants mainly hailing from India, Pakistan and Syria were moved to a hosting center in the area, the ministry added.

    Thousands of migrants who take the so-called Balkan route settle temporarily in Serbia in areas bordering Hungary and Croatia as they wait to cross the border and continue their journey to European Union countries.

    According to Rados Djurovic, the director of Serbian NGO Asylum Protection Center, some 3,000 refugees are currently located along the border with Hungary.

    About 1,000 migrants cross into Serbia every day

    Djurovic said that about 1,000 migrants cross into Serbia every day, including 400 from North Macedonia and Kosovo, and 600 from Hungary.

    He added that Hungarian authorities send them back to Serbia. The same source said police officials are working to contain new flows along the Balkan route while fighting a growing number of trafficking organizations and rising crime involving rival groups of migrants and those who smuggle them.

    Gangs in the area are reportedly often involved in clashes and dramatic episodes of violence. One person died and several others were injured in a recent fight between rival groups in Subotica.

    Meanwhile, Slovenia over the past few days started to dismantle barbed wire at the border with Croatia. The fence was set up during the 2015-2016 migrant crisis. According to those working in the field, this could contribute to a rising number of migrants arriving in the region, in the hope of crossing this way towards Western Europe.

    https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/42024/3000-migrants-in-camps-along-serbohungarian-border

    #Subotica #frontières #route_des_balkans #Balkans #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Hongrie #Serbie #campement #encampement

  • Macau shuts all casinos in bid to contain worsening Covid outbreak | Macau | The Guardian
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/jul/11/macau-shuts-all-casinos-in-bid-to-contain-worsening-covid-outbreak
    https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/c9369f062f6b3f90b473e461e89b92180605d409/0_70_3500_2101/master/3500.jpg?width=1200&height=630&quality=85&auto=format&fit=crop&overlay-ali

    Macau shuts all casinos in bid to contain worsening Covid outbreak
    More than 30 closed for a week – with extension thought likely – and dozens of city zones locked down in gambling hub. Macau has shut all its casinos for the first time in more than two years as authorities struggle to contain the worst coronavirus outbreak yet in the world’s biggest gambling hub.The city’s 30-plus casinos, along with other non-essential businesses, will shut for one week from Monday and people have been ordered to stay at home. Police would monitor flows of people outside, the government said, and stringent punishments would be imposed for those who disobeyed.Hospitals, pharmacies, supermarkets and fresh food markets are some of the essential services that can remain open.More than 30 zones in the city that have been deemed high risk are now under lockdown, meaning no one is allowed to enter or exit for at least five days. While the government said it was not imposing a citywide lockdown, the stringent measures mean Macau is effectively closed.Macau adheres to China’s “zero-Covid” policy that aims to stamp out all outbreaks, running counter to a global trend of trying to coexist with the virus.Casinos were last shut in Macau in February 2020 for 15 days.The government had previously been hesitant to close casinos due to its mandate to protect jobs. The industry employs most of the population directly or indirectly and accounts for more than 80% of government revenues.Casinos owned by Sands China, Wynn Macau, SJM Holdings, Galaxy Entertainment, Melco Resorts and MGM Resorts have been effectively shut for the past few weeks, with no gamblers and minimal staffing as per government requirements for people to work from home.Analysts said it was likely that the suspension could be extended by another few weeks, with a recovery in gaming revenue unlikely until the end of the third or fourth quarter.“Even if the outbreak in Macau gets under control, it will likely be another few weeks before Macau-Zhuhai can remove quarantine requirements,” said Terry Ng, an analyst at Daiwa Capital Markets in Hong Kong.Frustration is mounting at the government’s handling of the outbreak. Some residents have got into fights at testing centres while others have had to queue for more than 20 hours to access healthcare facilities.Residents will be required to take part in mass Covid tests four times this week as the government attempts to cut transmission chains.Residents have already been tested six times since mid June and are expected to do rapid antigen tests daily.More than 90% of Macau’s 600,000 residents are fully vaccinated against Covid but this is the first time the city has had to grapple with the fast-spreading Omicron variant.Authorities have added two hotels in popular casino resorts to be used as Covid medical facilities as they try to increase capacity to handle the surge of infections.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#chine#sante#macau#confinement#zerocovid#omicron#depistage#vaccination#quarantaine#hongkong#mobilite#frontiere#casino#economie

  • Covid-19 patients under home quarantine to wear tracking wristbands from July 15, Hong Kong health minister says; city logs 2,863 infections | South China Morning Post
    https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/health-environment/article/3184846/coronavirus-hong-kong-covid-19-app-update-will

    Covid-19 patients under home quarantine to wear tracking wristbands from July 15, Hong Kong health minister says; city logs 2,863 infections
    Health chief Professor Lo Chung-mau also says government is studying to turn part of seven-day hotel quarantine into home isolation. Lo earlier unveiled plans for online bookings for Covid tests for travellers heading to mainland China.All Covid-19 patients under home quarantine will be required to wear tracking wristbands starting from Friday, Hong Kong’s health minister has announced, while revealing the government is preparing for a worst-case scenario as infection numbers rebound.The new plans came as the city recorded 2,863 cases, including 252 imported ones. Seven additional deaths were reported. Hong Kong’s overall coronavirus tally stands at 1,273,663 infections, with 9,419 related fatalities.Secretary of Health Professor Lo Chung-mau also said the government was studying to turn part of the seven-day hotel quarantine for arrivals from overseas into home isolation, to be conducted in a closed-loop arrangement.Lo announced the measures hours after he unveiled plans to allow online bookings for Covid-19 tests for travellers heading to mainland China via the Shenzhen Bay Port and expand the screening quota, apologising for long queues after people earlier swamped the border crossing.To tackle a backlog of nucleic acid tests at the border checkpoint, Lo said a booking system would be able to process 400 people per hour, with a peak of 500. He said the maximum daily capacity for tests would be raised to 2,500 from 1,300 with the company conducting them more than doubling screening machines from 23 to 47.“On Sunday morning, within three hours, about 1,200 people were crossing at the same time, so this created long queues,” Lo said. Shenzhen Bay Port, one of just two land passenger crossings that remain open amid the pandemic, was packed with crowds over the weekend after the Guangdong provincial city boosted the number of quarantine hotel rooms by 700 to 2,000 a day and added more spots for those in need.Earlier in the day, Lo shed some light on planned updates to the “Leave Home Safe” app, saying the aim was to enforce quarantine orders for those at home, adding that currently there was no way to ensure infected residents could not visit high-risk locations such as restaurants, hospitals and care homes.
    Lo, who first revealed officials were considering adjusting the “Leave Home Safe” app to require real-name registration a day earlier, stressed authorities were primarily considering a red health code for those who were found to be positive in nucleic acid tests, while real-name registration would make it easier to quarantine those infected.He also said a yellow health code, for example, could be used for overseas arrivals who were quarantining at home, as potentially they could be infected with Covid-19.
    “These are people who shouldn’t enter high-risk locations but can go to work point to point,” he said. Macau closes the Grand Lisboa, the first casino shuttered in the Covid-19 pandemicThe mainland uses a three-colour system, which indicates a person’s Covid-19 status via QR codes.
    The mainland’s health code app is used to track and contain patients by providing central authorities with user data such as locations, times and personal interactions.The QR codes generated follow a traffic-light system, with the colours affecting where residents can go and how they are treated: a green code declares a resident has not been exposed to any potential cases or risky areas, while yellow and red codes mean they are of higher risk.In December last year, Hong Kong launched a health code system which is built into the “Leave Home Safe” app and compatible with the mainland’s for people who travel across the border.The new health secretary on Monday addressed concerns that the planned updates would allow people’s movements to be traced, saying their main purpose was to identify high-risk individuals and not “track” them down.Some technology experts noted the “Leave Home Safe” app already contained certain personal details such as vaccine records, which included the user’ name and Hong Kong identity card number.While Lo did not give any more details about the planned update, he said the government was now looking at how to define which cases fell under red, yellow or green codes.‘Faster, daily Covid PCR tests could replace Hong Kong hotel quarantine’
    9 Jul 2022 He also did not give a timetable for the change, but said authorities hoped to bring them in as soon as possible, with the government already looking at how to make the updates. University of Hong Kong microbiologist Dr Ho Pak-leung told the same programme the government’s goals of minimising infected people’s mobility could theoretically be achieved by suspending their vaccine pass, as it was needed to enter any high-risk venues and operators were required to scan it.
    He also said he believed contact tracing should not be the city’s main concern right now. That was because of the large number of infections and a relatively high percentage of cases of unknown origin in the community.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#hongkong#chine#zerocovid#depistage#passevaccinal#QRCode#hotel#quarantaine#casimporte#testPCR#vaccination#mobilite#frontiere

  • Hong Kong residents crossing border at Shenzhen Bay Port can soon book Covid-19 tests online as eager travellers throng checkpoint | South China Morning Post
    https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/article/3184784/hong-kong-residents-crossing-border-shenzhen-bay-port-can-soon-book

    Hong Kong residents crossing border at Shenzhen Bay Port can soon book Covid-19 tests online as eager travellers throng checkpoint.New system is aimed at easing crowding at the crossing point as travellers head to mainland China. Traffic has intensified after the Shenzhen government increased quota of quarantine hotel rooms
    Hong Kong is set to allow travellers heading to mainland China through Shenzhen Bay Port to book Covid-19 tests online as residents continue to swamp the checkpoint and ignore the government’s advice to delay trips over the border.Shenzhen authorities also announced on Sunday a new measure to crack down on scalping of quarantine hotel rooms by allocating them through drawing lots following discussions with the Hong Kong government.Shenzhen Bay Port, one of just two land passenger crossings that remain open amid the pandemic, has been packed with crowds in the morning over the weekend after the Guangdong provincial city boosted the number of quarantine hotel rooms by 700 to 2,000 a day and added additional spots for those in need.
    As seen during a Post visit on Sunday, queues snaked outside the checkpoint as hundreds of travellers from Hong Kong waited to undergo the required nucleic acid test before crossing.Planning to visit his relatives on the mainland, Yuen said the Shenzhen government should have made more quarantine hotel rooms available.The 2,000 a day is definitely not enough,” he said. “Residents need to go to Shenzhen. But the issue of quarantine hotel rooms should be addressed first. I was lucky to lock in my booking early on.”Alan Wong, a 49-year-old construction company manager, was unable to book a quarantine hotel room in Shenzhen and his company paid a scalper 2,300 yuan (US$293) to secure a reservation one week in advance.
    Wong said that while it was fairer to use the quota system, the chances of failing to get a hotel room created too many uncertainties for people who needed to do business.“It’s just like waiting for the results of the Mark Six or a Home Ownership Scheme ballot. You’ll never know until the last minute,” Wong said.Secretary for Health Dr Lo Chung-mau visited the checkpoint in the afternoon. Earlier in the day, Lo explained in a TV interview that quarantine-free travel with the mainland remained unfeasible at the moment, as allowing it would require a significant change to the nation’s anti-pandemic policies. Lo added that Hong Kong residents needed to follow the mainland’s requirements when travelling there.
    ‘Faster, daily Covid PCR tests could replace Hong Kong hotel quarantine’
    9 Jul 2022
    A Hong Kong government spokesman said travellers would need to wait for about three hours to receive their Covid-19 test result at the control point and urged them to cross the boundary in the afternoon to avoid the morning rush.Under the coming booking arrangement, which is expected to be ready in a week, travellers must obtain a spot at a Shenzhen quarantine hotel and reserve a time for the Covid-19 test at the border crossing on the day of departure.Hongkongers hoping to travel across the border previously needed to book a room at a quarantine hotel through a government website on a first-come, first-served basis. But to combat the scalping, the Shenzhen government would allocate rooms to travellers by drawing lots, taking into consideration supply and demand, as well as the travel history of the applicant, authorities said. A traveller can only make one booking for the same date and results will be announced at 8pm daily.Society for Community Organisation deputy director Sze Lai-shan said: “The problem now is not much about online booking or queuing at the control point, but more about insufficient hotel rooms for quarantine on the Shenzhen side.
    “The online booking thing is a crowd management measure. It does not mean more people can go to the mainland unless the Shenzhen side makes more quarantine hotel rooms available to meet demand.”Legislator Edward Leung Hei, of the Beijing-friendly Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong, urged the government to increase shuttle bus services for the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge to allow more visitors to enter the mainland using that access point.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#hongkong#chine#shenzen#frontiere#circulationtransfrontalière#quarantaine#hotel#sante

  • Hong Kong considers Covid health code system similar to mainland China, city logs 2,992 infections | South China Morning Post
    https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/health-environment/article/3184763/hong-kong-mulls-coronavirus-code-system-similar

    Hong Kong considers Covid health code system similar to mainland China, city logs 2,992 infections. Secretary for Health Dr Lo Chung-mau says proposed measure would prevent freedoms of uninfected residents from being affected by Covid-positive people. Lack of protection of individual privacy and sensitive information with code remains concern among public, says Democratic Party spokesman Ramon Yuen
    Hong Kong may adjust its Covid-19 app to require real-name registration as mainland China does to ensure residents subject to compulsory testing orders avoid entering high-risk areas, the city’s new health minister has said. But Secretary for Health Dr Lo Chung-mau on Sunday brushed aside concerns that the proposed measure would be unpopular with Hongkongers, arguing it would enhance the freedoms of uninfected residents. Lo said the measure was justified, given the government was seeking to avoid tightening social-distancing measures.“[If] we can’t find infected people or can’t quarantine them on time, we end up ‘quarantining’ people who are negative. We hope we don’t have to do this,” he said.
    Health officials on Sunday reported 2,992 new Covid-19 cases, including 219 imported ones, and two additional deaths. The city’s overall coronavirus tally stands at 1,270,800 infections and 9,412 related fatalities.
    Commissioner of Customs and Excise Louise Ho Pui-shan was placed under quarantine after one of her colleagues tested preliminary-positive, although her own test came back negative. Meanwhile, the health minister said there were limitations to the city’s “Leave Home Safe” contact-tracing app, which could not prevent coronavirus-positive people from accessing public areas or inform residents they were entering high-risk locations. While he noted that adding a tracking function was “not the first thing to do”, Lo said he believed it was more important for residents to register their real names to use the app.“[The app] is currently limited to telling whether a person is considered to be high-risk, and that they are not supposed to go to higher-risk areas before they do PCR [polymerase chain reaction] testing,” he said.
    Lo added that the current compulsory testing order, despite its name, had “no coercive means at all”, making it unfair for residents as high-risk people could still roam around the city without detection.
    When asked whether the potential measure could have any similarities to the health code systems used by Macau and the mainland, Lo replied that the Hong Kong government had taken both into consideration as a part of the proposal.The mainland’s health code app is used to track and contain Covid-19 patients by providing central authorities with user data such as locations, times and personal interactions.The QR codes generally follow a traffic-light system, with the colours affecting where residents can go and how they are treated: a green code declares a resident has not been exposed to any potential cases or risky areas, while yellow and red codes mean they are of higher risk.Dr Chuang Shuk-kwan, head of the Centre for Health Protection’s communicable disease branch, said she had no comment about Lo’s proposal and that the government would make relevant announcements when it was ready.But she acknowledged the contact-tracing app had limitations and said there were no estimate on the number of infected people who had not reported their positive case to authorities.Although the app had residents’ phone numbers, authorities could still face difficulties in reaching some people for contact-tracing purposes if they did not answer the calls, Chuang said.The centre also had to rely on other government departments to obtain residents’ vaccine pass information whenever there was an outbreak, as it did not have access to such details, she added.She said the centre did not have any information on the number of visitors at particular premises if no infections were reported there.“Macau adopted the mainland-like code system but still suffered an outbreak recently. After all, measures on social distancing and quarantine are still key to controlling the spread, especially in cities that have not reached herd immunity,” he said.Leung added that the proportion of the population in both cities that was immune to the virus due to vaccination or prior infection was still low compared with other places. If Hong Kong implemented the mainland’s app functions, it was crucial to reduce the time needed to synchronise the compulsory testing orders with residents’ phones, otherwise it would be futile if there were delays that lasted for days, he added.Ramon Yuen Hoi-man, the Democratic Party’s healthcare policy spokesman, said the lack of protection of individual privacy and sensitive information with the code system remained a concern among the public.He added that he was worried about the implications of introducing new restrictive measures after the fifth wave of infections had already subsided.“Overseas research has shown that stringent Covid-19 measures have been unfavourable to social harmony and unity. Is this something the new government really hopes to pursue?” he said.Medical and health services lawmaker Dr David Lam Tzit-yuen said privacy issues were not a concern as long as authorities were restricted to tracking a person’s identity and other personal information only if they were deemed to be at risk.“[The code system] is the way to go for better protecting the community. Privacy issues, which could be solved by the right algorithms, should not trump safety of others,” he said.Health minister Lo also said he planned to increase the frequency of PCR tests and require high-risk people, such as employees of nursing homes, to undergo such screening once a week, on top of rapid antigen tests, before increasing it to twice a week or every 48 hours.The new administration led by Chief Executive John Lee Ka-chiu has repeatedly stressed the importance of using PCR tests at an earlier stage more effectively, which it said would exclude people who were not infected from tough restrictions.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#sante#hongkong#macau#chine#QRcode#controlesanitaire#politiquesanitaire#depistage#zerocovid#testPCR#restrictionsanitaire#surveillance

  • Australia woos Hong Kong tourists to help restore pandemic-battered tourism industry, banks on pent-up demand | South China Morning Post
    https://www.scmp.com/business/article/3184636/australia-woos-hong-kong-tourists-help-restore-pandemic-battered-tourism

    Australia woos Hong Kong tourists to help restore pandemic-battered tourism industry, banks on pent-up demand. Hong Kong was a top 10 international market before Covid-19 for Tourism Australia, which expects numbers to jump if quarantine requirements are relaxe. For the financial year ending in June 2023, Tourism Australia is targeting 121,000 visitors from Hong Kong – about 43 per cent of the pre-pandemic number
    Australia is training its sights on tourists from Hong Kong amid an anticipated recovery in tourism as Canberra welcomes visitors to its shores after two years of Covid-19 curbs.Visitor numbers from Hong Kong remain at a fraction of pre-pandemic levels, but Tourism Australia expects that to change if and when the city relaxes quarantine requirements.“Hong Kong was a top 10 international market before Covid-19 and the first to achieve its tourism spend goal,” said Andrew Hogg, executive general manager for eastern markets and aviation with Tourism Australia, noting that reducing quarantine requirements in the city to seven days from as many as 21 is likely to release some pent-up demand for travel.Hongkongers averaged four international trips per year pre-pandemic, Hogg noted. “Australia ranks high in awareness and intention among other destinations,” he added. “Australia’s offerings continue to match the expectations of high-value travellers in Hong Kong under travel restrictions.”Tourism Australia has mounted a number of recent campaigns to promote its destinations and offerings to Hongkongers.In September, Tourism Australia, along with the Australian Trade and Investment Commission and Miramar Travel, launched thematic staycation packages called “Wanderful Australia”, allowing staycationeers at The Mira Hong Kong to enjoy themed rooms recalling Aussie experiences such as New South Wales’ jacaranda season or Melbourne’s coffee culture.In January, the agency also launched “Work and Play the Aussie Way”, a showcase of adventures young people could have while working and travelling in the country. A video series called “Australia in 8D” used a YouTube audio technology to “emulate the feeling of an Australian holiday”, with help from the Melbourne Symphony orchestra.
    Australia expects full recovery for its tourism industry to arrive in 2025, Hogg said, including the Hong Kong market.

    The tourism sector, one of the worst-hit when the pandemic broke out across the globe in early 2020, is a major contributor to the Australian economy. It is the country’s fourth largest exporting industry, accounting for 8.2 per cent of export earnings in financial year 2018-2019, data from Tourism Australia show.
    International overnight tourists in Australia spent A$45.4 billion (US$31 billion), or 36 per cent of total tourism spending in the country, in 2019. The industry also employed 666,000 Australians in 2018-2019, making up 5 per cent of the country’s total workforce. In certain tourism-dependent regions, the impact is more magnified.After two years of keeping its borders shut to contain the spread of the coronavirus pandemic, Australia reopened to international travellers in February and has launched a promotion to get the sector back up and running.“Tourism was one of the first industries hit by Covid-19, and the sector’s contribution to GDP [gross domestic product] was down almost 50 per cent,” Hogg said.Hong Kong is one market that is likely to play an important role in the recovery, and despite the tough travel restrictions still being implemented in the city, Canberra believes that Hongkongers will still be willing to visit Australia.
    For the financial year ending June 2023, Tourism Australia is targeting about 121,000 visitors from Hong Kong – about 43 per cent of the pre-pandemic number. The tourism authority expects tourists from Hong Kong to spend A$654 million, or about half of their previous spending.
    Welcome back! Australia reopens its borders to fully vaccinated travellers after two yearsAs of March this year, international arrivals to Australia reached 520,000, including leisure and holiday arrivals and those visiting friends and relatives. Of those, 6,952 were from Hong Kong and 17,542 were from mainland China.Online booking platforms Booking.com and Trip.com have also recognised the pent-up demand for travel and have rolled out measures to attract travellers.“Booking.com rolled out an industry-first, the Travel Sustainable badge, to support our partners and customers in taking the next steps to become more sustainable, no matter where they might be on that journey,” said Laura Houldsworth, managing director for Asia-Pacific. “The goal of the badge is to enable travellers to make more informed choices when choosing their accommodations and provide industry-standard recognition to properties. Over 100,000 properties proudly feature the badge as an indicator of their efforts to be more sustainable.”

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#australie#hongkong#sante#pandemie#tourisme#retsrictionsanitaire#economie#frontiere#vaccination

  • Book Review Roundtable: Fragments of the City: Making and Remaking Urban Worlds
    https://urbanpolitical.podigee.io/52-fragments_city_review

    In this episode moderated by Nitin Bathla, the author Colin McFarlane discusses his recent book Fragments of the City with the critics Theresa Enright, Tatiana Thieme, and Kevin Ward. In analyzing the main arguments of the book, Theresa discusses the role of aesthetics in imagining, sensing, and learning the urban fragments, and the ambivalence of density in how it enables and disables certain kinds of politics. She questions Colin about the distinctiveness of art as a means to engage and politicize fragments, and how can we think about the relationships between fragment urbanism, density and the urban political across varied contexts. Tatiana analyses how the book journeys across a range of temporal scales of knowing fragments from its etymology to autobiographical experiences of (...)

    #urban,political,book_review,mcfarlane,fragments,city
    https://main.podigee-cdn.net/media/podcast_13964_urban_political_pdcst_episode_769948_book_review_rou

    • Fragments of the City. Making and Remaking Urban Worlds

      Cities are becoming increasingly fragmented materially, socially, and spatially. From broken toilets and everyday things, to art and forms of writing, fragments are signatures of urban worlds and provocations for change. In Fragments of the City, Colin McFarlane examines such fragments, what they are and how they come to matter in the experience, politics, and expression of cities. How does the city appear when we look at it through its fragments? For those living on the economic margins, the city is often experienced as a set of fragments. Much of what low-income residents deal with on a daily basis is fragments of stuff, made and remade with and through urban density, social infrastructure, and political practice. In this book, McFarlane explores infrastructure in Mumbai, Kampala, and Cape Town; artistic montages in Los Angeles and Dakar; refugee struggles in Berlin; and the repurposing of fragments in Hong Kong and New York. Fragments surface as material things, as forms of knowledge, as writing strategies. They are used in efforts to politicize the city and in urban writing to capture life and change in the world’s major cities. Fragments of the City surveys the role of fragments in how urban worlds are understood, revealed, written, and changed.

      https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520382244/fragments-of-the-city

      #villes #urban_matter #fragmentation #fragments #livre #marges #marginalité #Mumbai #Kampala #Cape_Town #Los_Angeles #Berlin #Dakar #Los_Angeles #Hong_Kong #New_york #matérialité
      #TRUST #master_TRUST

      ping @cede

  • Bienvenue en #Géozarbie

    #Enclaves, territoires prêtés, zones disputées, #micro-États, île fantasmée... il existe dans le monde quantité de petits bouts de terre aux frontières ou statuts bizarres ! Mêlant anecdotes loufoques et grands moments de l’Histoire, Bienvenue en Géozarbie nous fait découvrir 10 lieux où l’ubuesque se dispute à l’absurde !

    https://www.arte.tv/fr/videos/RC-022365/bienvenue-en-geozarbie

    #géographie #géographie_politique #frontières #absurdité #série #arte #vidéo #ressources_pédagogiques #Absurdistan

    –—

    Le Mont blanc n’est pas en France

    Saviez-vous que l’île de la Conférence est administrée à égalité de temps par deux pays, la France et l’Espagne ? Que la principauté d’Arbézie, à cheval sur la frontière franco-suisse, est… un hôtel-restaurant ? Ou que la France possède des territoires à Jérusalem ?
    Ce sont ces bizarreries géographiques que nous raconte #Olivier_Marchon dans ce livre étonnant qui rassemble des dizaines d’histoires de ce type, des plus tragiques au plus loufoques : de petits morceaux de terre, enclavés, disputés, au statut à part, parfois étrange, qui chacun à leur manière racontent la grande histoire…

    https://www.editionspoints.com/ouvrage/le-mont-blanc-n-est-pas-en-france-olivier-marchon/9782757895757
    #livre

    ping @reka

  • #Serbie : les exilés au pied des murs

    Dans les #Balkans comme ailleurs, toutes sortes de barrières entravent le périple des personnes exilées. Des murs concrets hérissés de barbelés, comme celui que la #Hongrie a fait construire à la frontière de la Serbie. Mais aussi des murs législatifs, technologiques, policiers ou politiques, bâtis en vue de satisfaire l’Union européenne (UE) et ses politiques concertées de rejet des « indésirables ». Pour les principaux concernés, venus d’Afghanistan, de Syrie ou d’Afrique du Nord, c’est l’assurance de violences accrues et de destins enlisés. Reportage au nord de la Serbie, aux confins de l’UE.

    Première vision du centre-ville de #Sombor : quatre jeunes migrants prennent tranquillement le soleil sur un banc d’une artère commerçante. C’est le début de l’après-midi, le dernier dimanche avant la Pâque orthodoxe, et les rues sont presque vides dans cette ville moyenne et proprette de la région de la #Bačka, au nord-ouest de la Serbie. Deux flics approchent : échange de signes, contrôle des papiers, fouille des sacs, c’est bon pour cette fois. Illico, les quatre jeunes décampent, message reçu : ils ne sont pas bienvenus en ville.

    Un peu plus loin, sur la route qui mène aux frontières hongroise et croate (toutes deux à environ 25 km de Sombor), on roule le long d’un faubourg résidentiel. Sur le bas-côté, des silhouettes discrètes chargées de sacs de course. À l’orée d’un petit bois, on débouche sur une sorte de kermesse pas drôle. Une vingtaine de taxis attendent les clients potentiels, qui prennent le frais sous les ombrages en attendant la rupture du jeûne du Ramadan. Derrière l’enseigne « Night-Club Grizzly », des exilés se pressent dans une petite boutique ou papotent sur un vieux terrain de basket, assis en cercle sur des chaises en plastique. Dans une arrière-cour, de jeunes types du cru d’allure pas commode – survêt’, bombers, crâne rasé – rigolent autour d’un barbecue. Une impression latente et désagréable, confirmée plus tard par des connaisseurs du site : on est tombés au cœur d’un business, où chauffeurs de taxis et jeunes du coin profitent de la détresse des exilés pour arrondir les fins de mois. Pas vraiment le temps d’approfondir : le maître des lieux, un colosse patibulaire, nous prie virilement d’aller voir ailleurs1.

    « Ailleurs », c’est le camp officiel, à quelques centaines de mètres. Une allée d’arbres conduit à une ancienne colonie de vacances, réaffectée à un Centre d’accueil du Commissariat pour les réfugiés et les migrations de la République de Serbie (KIRS). Le grillage est défoncé et le portail ouvert. Assis sur un banc, quatre jeunes Syriens décrivent à gros traits le quotidien du camp de Sombor plein à craquer, où tout est pourri. Ils sont là depuis huit mois dans le vide absolu – « No money, no work ». Le dialogue est interrompu par l’irruption d’un employé tremblotant qui nous fait raccompagner par un vigile. Devant l’entrée, le mot a tourné : personne ne veut causer. Ambiance.

    Bruxelles sous-traite

    Le camp de Sombor est l’un des quatorze ouverts par la Serbie à destination des migrants présents sur son sol. Frontalière de quatre pays membres de l’Union européenne (Croatie, Hongrie, Roumanie, Bulgarie) dont un (la Hongrie) fait partie de l’espace Schengen, elle-même candidate à l’adhésion et dépendante des subsides européens, la Serbie obéit aux desiderata de Bruxelles. Les procédures d’adhésion prévoient un alignement progressif des candidats sur les politiques communautaires – y compris en matière d’immigration. C’est la quadrature du cercle qui enserre la Serbie, la Bosnie-Herzégovine ou encore l’Albanie dans ses rets : pays de transit, ils se voient néanmoins contraints de défendre les murs d’une forteresse Europe dont ils ne font pas partie, et contribuent donc, bon gré mal gré, à l’externalisation de la politique migratoire européenne, en deuxième ligne derrière la Turquie, la Libye ou le Maroc.

    En jeu ? L’exemption de visas pour leurs ressortissants dans l’espace Schengen (obtenue par la Serbie en 2009 seulement), et surtout le fonds, sonnant et trébuchant, de préadhésion à l’UE. Quand il s’agit de repousser les migrants aussi, l’Union crame la CB : 90 % du budget du KIRS en provient. Les camps ne s’en portent pas mieux pour autant. « On peut mettre tout l’argent qu’on veut, ça ne change rien car personne ne prend soin des lieux », explique le juriste Radoš Đurović, directeur de l’association de soutien juridique Azylum Protection Center (APC), à Belgrade. Son organisation, pourtant reconnue par l’État serbe, jouit d’un accès limité à l’intérieur des camps. C’est par des vidéos fuitées qu’elle documente la vétusté des lieux, l’absence d’hygiène, les toilettes infectes, le surpeuplement et le désespoir.

    Au camp de Subotica, la grande ville du nord de la Serbie, à un jet de pierres de la frontière hongroise, « la gale est endémique », affirme un membre de l’association de soutien aux exilés Collective Aid, qui remet une couche : « Nous avons vu des migrants porteurs de plaies ouvertes surinfectées par la gale. » Quand on y passe au petit matin, des exilés dorment dans des duvets à l’extérieur, par un froid peu printanier. Selon l’APC, ils seraient 350 pour une capacité d’accueil de 200. Deux jours plus tard, un Marocain y sera retrouvé mort : d’une overdose d’alcool et d’opioïdes, affirme le KIRS. Comment savoir ? Les médecins sont spécialement appointés par l’administration des camps, à qui ils doivent leur gagne-pain, explique encore Radoš Đurović – difficile, dès lors, de dénoncer la corruption, les trafics, les mauvais traitements…

    L’incurie de la Serbie dans la gestion des camps reflète son rôle de petit rouage de la machine à refouler européenne. Les violences de la police serbe sont documentées, mais sans commune mesure avec celles de ses homologues croate et hongroise. La Serbie prend tout de même sa part du jeu sinistre des « pushbacks2 en cascade », d’un pays à l’autre, d’Italie ou d’Autriche vers la Slovénie, puis la Croatie, puis la Serbie, le long de ce que le réseau Migreurop dénonce comme « une chaîne de violation de droits ». Dans le sens retour aussi, la Serbie est un cul-de-sac : la Macédoine du Nord, pays de transit précédent sur la route de l’Europe, refuse systématiquement les réadmissions. Triste routine, les autorités conduisent donc les pushbackés au camp serbe de Preševo, aux confins de la Macédoine et du Kosovo. À Preševo, les exilés sont retenus quelques jours illégalement avant de reprendre, à prix d’or, un taxi pour la capitale et le nord du pays. Manège absurde.

    Dans une région qui a récemment connu d’importants déplacements de population, les habitants semblent globalement ne pas sombrer en masse dans la haine contre les migrants. Des milices d’extrême droite ont bien entrepris de les terroriser, mais le phénomène reste relativement marginal3. Politiquement, cependant, le sujet peut se montrer aussi porteur en Serbie qu’ailleurs : les tabloïds proches du régime d’Aleksandar Vučić (voir encadré) font à l’occasion leur beurre d’un fait divers, et le ministre de l’Intérieur, l’aboyeur ultranationaliste Aleksandar Vulin, multiplie les déclarations tonitruantes. Mais en dehors de ces effets de manche xénophobes, la tendance est surtout à l’occultation : la Serbie n’est pas concernée par la crise migratoire, d’ailleurs elle la gère à merveille. Et les keufs d’assurer l’invisibilité des indésirables en mettant des bâtons dans les roues des collectifs d’aide4, en démantelant squats et campements informels et en faisant la chasse aux migrants dans les centres-villes, toujours direction Preševo. « La police communique toujours sur les mêmes nombres de migrants, multiples du nombre de bus mobilisés dans l’opération, lesquels peuvent accueillir 84 personnes. Ça n’a aucun sens », grincent à Belgrade les militants d’une autre association de soutien aux exilés, Klikaktiv. Rien qu’en avril, deux grandes rafles ont été menées contre les exilés dans la région.

    Mais squats et campements sont fatalement l’exutoire de l’insalubrité et de la saturation des camps. Employé à la gare de Subotica, Marko nous raconte que certains jours, il a compté 100 à 130 personnes migrantes sur les voies de fret, entre les squats et wagons misérables qu’ils occupent de part et d’autre des rails. « Ça me fait de la peine. Je suis orthodoxe, pour moi tous les hommes sont égaux. » Il les a filmés à destination d’un copain journaliste, qui a prudemment refusé de diffuser les images. « Le gouvernement raconte que les migrants envahissent les villes. Mais en réalité, c’est là qu’ils traînent, sur les voies. » Le milieu du rail bruisserait de rumeurs de migrants morts sous les roues de trains de marchandises. La rançon, peu surprenante, de l’indifférence.
    Murs et châtiments

    Si les personnes migrantes sont aussi nombreuses à Sombor et Subotica, c’est évidemment à cause de la proximité de l’Union européenne. D’un côté, la Croatie, dont la frontière est principalement marquée par le Danube, large à cet endroit de plusieurs centaines de mètres. Ça se tente. Le journaliste Philippe Bertinchamps, correspondant du Courrier des Balkans à Belgrade, nous montre les images filmées par ses soins d’un Zodiac se dirigeant vers la berge. Mais, depuis deux ans, la police croate s’est rendue tristement célèbre par les violences exercées contre les exilés et le caractère systématique de ses refoulements. Sur tout le territoire, fût-ce à l’autre bout du pays, les personnes migrantes arrêtées sont brutalisées et renvoyées en Serbie ou en Bosnie-Herzégovine. Côté hongrois, c’est pire : non seulement les violences et les pushbacks, mais aussi le « mur » construit en 2015 sous les ordres du Premier ministre d’extrême droite Viktor Orbán, sur toute la frontière sud du pays.

    Le mur, le voilà. Balafrant la plaine plate comme la main, immense et monotone, qui s’étend de Budapest à Belgrade, coupant en deux une opulente région agricole dont les populations mêlées ont toujours joué à saute-frontières. À l’arrière des jardins du village de Rastina, à une vingtaine de kilomètres au nord de Sombor, parmi les vergers et les cultures de colza, deux barrières métalliques, hautes de quatre et trois mètres, hérissées de barbelés concertina, encadrent une voie réservée aux patrouilles des flics et des douaniers. Le dispositif sécuritaire est agrémenté d’un arsenal de gadgets dernier cri, comme le rappelle un récent rapport du précieux réseau Migreurop : « Cette barrière est équipée de technologies capables de délivrer des chocs électriques, de capteurs de chaleur, de caméras ainsi que de haut-parleurs s’adressant aux personnes exilées en plusieurs langues5 » Le nec plus ultra.

    Pour financer ces petits bijoux et encadrer le sale boulot des gardes-frontières, on retrouve Frontex, l’agence de surveillance des frontières extérieures de l’Union européenne, dotée de moyens colossaux6. Témoin voire complice quotidien des abus de la police hongroise, des chiens d’attaque lancés sur les passe-frontières ou des migrants enfermés dans des conteneurs avant d’être refoulés7, Frontex a attendu février 2021 pour quitter le pays d’Orbán, sous la pression médiatique et après que la Cour de justice de l’Union européenne a interdit (en vain) à la Hongrie de procéder aux pushbacks. La duplicité européenne – se dire étranger aux exactions tout en les supervisant – avait fini par se voir. Sur le terrain, il y a longtemps qu’elle ne faisait de doute pour personne. Après des années passées en lien avec les institutions internationales, Radoš Đurović s’est fait une religion sur la question : « Ce n’est pas vrai qu’il n’y a pas de politique migratoire européenne commune. Dans la pratique, elle consiste tout simplement à freiner voire arrêter les migrations. » À n’importe quel prix. « L’Europe sait parfaitement ce qui se passe ici. Toutes les associations ont des contacts avec les institutions européennes, à qui elles font remonter les infos. » Violences comprises ? Oui. « À cette échelle, des violences aussi systématiques ne peuvent être orchestrées que d’en haut », lâche-t-il.

    À côté de Frontex, des accords bilatéraux entre États permettent aussi d’organiser des opérations de police communes. Quand cette coopération s’effectue au sein du très réac’ groupe de Visegrád8 au nom de la « défense collective des frontières de l’Europe » chère à Orbán, le pire est attendu : la police tchèque prêterait la main aux brutalités de la police hongroise. En revanche, la présence de la police allemande exercerait des vertus apaisantes, l’opinion du pays étant plus scrupuleuse en matière de droits humains. Misère des petits jeux diplomatiques... Passer, à tout prix

    Si médiatisé soit-il, le mur hongrois fait pâle figure à côté de ses prédécesseurs des enclaves espagnoles de Ceuta et Melilla, ou de la frontière gréco-turque. Un jeune Marocain, rencontré à Subotica, ne s’est même pas posé la question : « La frontière espagnole, c’est juste impossible. C’est grave ce qui se passe là-bas. La Hongrie, ça va beaucoup plus vite. » « Le mur n’a rien d’efficace, confirme Radoš Đurović. Il alimente juste le trafic des passeurs. » Même son de cloche du côté de l’association Klikaktiv : « Les gens continuent à tenter de passer par le mur parce que c’est la voie la plus rapide. Les barbelés et les chiens n’y changent rien. » De temps à autre, la police découvre un tunnel creusé sous le mur, au risque pour ceux qui l’empruntent de se faire cueillir à la sortie, ou de mourir étouffés sous les éboulis.

    Passer, donc, ça se fait. Le désespoir donne des ailes et l’adrénaline occulte momentanément la douleur (voir le témoignage de Zyed ci-contre). Surtout, il n’est aucun problème auquel le marché ne propose sa solution frelatée, et le « game » du passage nourrit une économie florissante9. De la course en taxi surtaxée au « package » migratoire complet, tout un catalogue de services est mis à disposition – auxquels certains migrants prêtent parfois la main pour financer leur prochaine tentative. Aux plus offrants, les passeurs proposent un « guarantee game », un passage « garanti », comme nous l’expliquent les membres de Klikaktiv : pendant qu’une première troupe est envoyée en diversion, les candidats plus fortunés tentent la traversée à un autre endroit. Côté hongrois, si tout va bien, un véhicule attend et les douaniers – dont la corruption est proverbiale en Hongrie – regardent ailleurs.

    Ensuite, les personnes migrantes s’évanouissent dans la campagne hongroise. Lancé début 2015, le groupe de solidarité MigSzolt, à Szeged (à 15 km au nord de la frontière serbe), a ainsi fermé boutique dès novembre 2017. Parmi ses fondateurs, le chercheur Mark Kékesi raconte : « Nous n’avions plus d’activité. Les migrants avaient disparu de Hongrie. Il faut dire que les arrestations sont permanentes et que beaucoup d’exilés se retrouvent en prison ou expulsés, souvent après dénonciation des habitants. Ceux qui passent réémergent ensuite en Autriche ou en Allemagne, mais leur circulation sur le territoire est invisible, et sans doute liée au crime organisé. »

    Pour ceux, nombreux, qui n’ont pas les moyens financiers nécessaires, les chances sont beaucoup plus minces. Dans un square proche de la gare routière de Belgrade, Djelaluddin résume la situation en quelques phrases désabusées : « Ça fait quatre mois que je suis dans ce pays et j’ai déjà tenté plusieurs fois de passer. Et partout j’ai été brutalisé. En Hongrie, en Croatie, en Roumanie, on te tape à chaque fois. Ils m’ont aussi pris mon argent et mon téléphone. Je ne sais plus quoi faire. » Pourtant, son histoire ne laisse aucun doute sur son droit à l’asile politique : « Je suis parti d’Afghanistan quand les talibans sont revenus [en août 2021]. À cette époque, j’étais dans l’armée. Nous n’étions même pas au combat, seulement en exercice. Ça a suffi pour que les talibans me considèrent comme un ennemi », raconte-t-il en montrant les stigmates des exactions subies : un doigt tordu dans le mauvais sens et une vilaine cicatrice au cou. Il retrace à grands traits son périple, l’Iran, la Turquie, la Grèce, la Bulgarie, un trajet assez rapide, mais semé d’embûches. « Je connais trois personnes qui ont été tuées par des chiens à la frontière bulgare. Partout, on nous traite comme des animaux. » Ses yeux s’illuminent encore quand il raconte son rêve : le Canada. En attendant la rupture du jeûne, Djelaluddin propose de nous payer un sandwich. Il peut se le permettre, dit-il : il lui reste 14 ou 15 euros. Quand on le quitte, il lève le pouce, souriant.

    D’autres n’ont plus cette énergie. Chez Klikaktiv, Vuk Vučković ne compte plus les personnes blessées en franchissant le mur, ou après avoir rencontré les matraques hongroises, qui reprennent la route sans attendre d’être guéries – et finissent invalides. Quand tous les horizons sont bouchés, « certains sombrent dans la drogue ou la folie », nous explique Radoš Đurović. Ils perdent alors de vue ce territoire rêvé qui se démène pour les refouler : l’Europe, juste de l’autre côté du mur.

    Le triangle mord

    Tout a une fin – les murs aussi. Depuis 2020, une nouvelle route s’est ouverte afin de contourner le mur hongrois par le Banat, région à cheval sur la Serbie et la Roumanie10. Au niveau du poste-frontière qui relie Rabe (Serbie) à Kübekháza (Hongrie), la clôture aboutit à un simple portail métallique. De l’autre côté de la chaussée, une campagne ouverte, ponctuée de quelques bosquets : la frontière serbo-roumaine, que rien n’indique sur le terrain, pas même un bout de grillage. Un pick-up de la police roumaine se dirige vers nous avant de se garer près de la guérite des douaniers. Quelques minutes plus tôt, on l’avait repéré, arrêté à notre hauteur, tandis que nous approchions d’un squat de personnes migrantes, dans une usine abandonnée entre les hameaux de Majdan et Rabe.

    Car, en dépit des apparences, la Roumanie n’est guère plus accessible que la patrie d’Orbán. Caméras à vision thermique, chiens équipés de GPS, dispositifs de détection des battements du cœur… Toute la quincaillerie de Frontex est mobilisée pour interdire le passage. Certains exilés s’y seraient repris des dizaines de fois. Pendant des semaines ou des mois d’attente, ils rasent alors les murs des villages sinistres, aux trois quarts vides et en ruines, que relient des routes en béton défoncé le long de la frontière. Les derniers mois, on a compté jusqu’à 300 migrants squattant les maisons abandonnées de Majdan – soit davantage que la population officielle du village. Ils se font discrets, car les relations avec les habitants sont tendues ; quelques-unes des belles pintades qui errent au milieu des rues auraient assouvi la faim d’exilés.

    À une dizaine de kilomètres à l’ouest, par-delà les champs, le village de Đala s’étend mollement jusqu’à la rivière Tisza qui, sur quelques kilomètres, marque la frontière entre Serbie et Hongrie. Début 2020, la Hongrie a déployé des unités maritimes armées pour dissuader les migrants de tenter la traversée à la nage. Côté serbe, une grosse bagnole de police patrouille sur la berge, parmi les herbes hautes.

    Un peu en retrait, le bourg de Srpski Krstur semble presque vivant. C’est la sortie des classes, des enfants roms, nombreux dans la commune, gambadent sur les trottoirs. Un peu à l’écart de la route principale, un faubourg délabré s’étire en direction de la rivière. Devant une épicerie, une dizaine d’exilés papotent ou boivent des coups. Un Marocain nous raconte qu’il prend la route pour la deuxième fois. Après treize ans à Bologne, malgré femme et enfant, il a été expulsé au Maroc, d’où il est reparti pour rentrer chez lui. Son récit est interrompu quand, branle-bas de combat, deux taxis débarquent coup sur coup, déchargeant des personnes migrantes en provenance de villes voisines. Deux autres voitures arrivent dans la foulée et font chacune monter un groupe. Le conducteur de la deuxième, un jeune Serbe élégamment mis, nous jette un regard peu amène. Derrière nous, la porte de l’épicerie se ferme brusquement à double tour, clac. En quelques minutes, les exilés s’évaporent dans la nature. L’un d’eux, avec qui nous venions d’échanger quelques mots, se cache derrière l’angle du mur, son foulard remonté sur son visage.

    Comme à Sombor, nous dérangeons. C’est toute une économie locale dont les voyageurs de l’exil, pris au piège, sont la clientèle captive. Du petit taxi indépendant au réseau transfrontalier armé de sa propre flotte de voitures, le trafic des passeurs aux frontières nord de la Serbie aurait représenté entre 8,5 et 10,5 millions d’euros en 2020, selon les chiffres de la Global Initiative Against Transnational Organized Crime. Avec la complicité inévitable de la police, très présente au quotidien dans tous les pays de la région, et largement corrompue. Prises en étau entre l’Europe qui les rejette et les mafias qui leur font les poches, les flics qui les frappent et ceux qui les rackettent, les personnes exilées subissent un enfer humain. Attendant le moment où elles seront libérées de ce bourbier de frontières. Et où, à l’instar de Zyed, jeune Tunisien arrivé en Autriche après des années d’errance, elles pourront enfin dire : « C’est la fin des ténèbres. »

    http://cqfd-journal.org/Serbie-les-exiles-au-pied-des-murs
    #murs #migrations #barbelés #frontières #asile #réfugiés #barrières_frontalières #route_des_Balkans #violence #violences

  • Mainland Chinese care worker at Covid-19 holding centre found dead in Hong Kong hotel | South China Morning Post
    https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/law-and-crime/article/3175860/mainland-chinese-care-worker-covid-19-holding-centre

    Coronavirus Hong Kong
    Mainland Chinese care worker at Covid-19 holding centre found dead in Hong Kong hotel. A woman who came to Hong Kong from mainland China to look after elderly coronavirus patients as a temporary care worker at a holding centre was found dead in her hotel room on Thursday.
    According to police, emergency personnel were called to B P International hotel in Tsim Sha Tsui at about 1.30pm after the woman was found unconscious.A force spokesman said she was certified dead at the scene by paramedics.The Social Welfare Department confirmed on the same day that the woman was one of about 760 care workers temporarily hired from the mainland to look after infected elderly residents in the city’s holding centres. It said she arrived in Hong Kong in March.
    A spokesman for the department said it was saddened to learn of the death and had contacted the woman’s family to help arrange her affairs. He added there were no further details as the case was being investigated by police.
    Actor’s death in quarantine sparks call for review, Hong Kong logs 413
    The Post has learned that the woman was Zhang Xiu, aged 50, who came to Hong Kong from Guangxi province.A source said Zhang had told her colleagues on Thursday morning that she was feeling unwell.He said Zhang’s colleagues had visited her hotel after she failed to report for duty. Staff helped them access the room after they received no answer from her and found the 50-year-old unconscious in the bathroom, the source added.
    She had stayed in the hotel since March 7 and worked at the Choi Wing Road Sports Centre in Kwun Tong, which had been turned into a holding centre for elderly coronavirus patients, according to another source.
    The residential care industry has been considered one of the hardest-hit sectors by the city’s fifth wave of infections, with hundreds of facilities having previously reported outbreaks among staff and residents.
    Welfare sector urges John Lee to better support care homes for elderly
    26 Apr 2022On March 1, the Social Welfare Department announced it planned to hire 1,000 staff from the mainland to fulfil roles for three months at holding centres, community isolation facilities and quarantine camps to care for elderly residents, people with disabilities and other potential or confirmed cases.Secretary for Labour and Welfare Law Chi-kwong revealed at the time that some care homes had seen almost all their staff and residents infected, adding that the industry was facing a manpower shortage as more employees either caught Covid-19 or had to be quarantined.
    The workers can earn as much as HK$31,000 (US$3,970) a month if they are willing to take care of residents in isolation. Staff are expected to provide basic nursing care such as feeding elderly patients who are confined to their beds.Both Chief Executive Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor and operators of care homes had previously said the recruitment process had faced challenges as candidates were concerned about Hong Kong’s Covid-19 outbreak. The lockdowns across the border also presented complications.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#chine#hongkong#sante#zerocovid#travailleurmigrant#vaccination#isolement#frontiere#confinement

  • Le #Conseil_de_l’Europe dénonce le refoulement « généralisé » des migrants aux frontières européennes

    Le Conseil de l’Europe a publié, jeudi, un #rapport dans lequel il dénonce le refoulement « généralisé » des migrants aux #frontières. Une pratique émaillée de « violence[s] grave[s] et systématique[s] », selon l’organisation qui demande aux États membres de mettre fin à ce qu’elle qualifie de « violations des droits humains ».

    Dans un rapport, publié jeudi 7 avril, le Conseil de l’Europe affirme que le nombre de « réfugiés, demandeurs d’asile et migrants » refoulés aux #frontières_terrestres et maritimes de l’Union européenne (UE) a augmenté ces dernières années. L’organisation, une institution indépendante qui n’appartient pas à l’UE, parle d’un phénomène devenu un « problème paneuropéen systématique ».

    Le Conseil pointe plusieurs pays en particulier : la #Croatie, l’#Italie, l’#Autriche, la #Hongrie, la #Pologne, la #Lituanie, la #Lettonie, la #Grèce, #Chypre, la #Turquie, la #Bulgarie ou encore la #France et l’#Espagne. Ces 13 États sont vivement critiqués pour avoir renvoyé, vers les pays voisins, des migrants qui tentaient d’entrer sur leur territoire, sans leur laisser la possibilité de déposer une demande de protection.

    Le document s’appuie sur des rapports d’ONG qui ont, par exemple, dénombré entre 50 et 130 procédures de refoulement par jour pendant l’été 2020, et jusqu’à 170 en octobre de la même année, entre la France et l’Italie, dans le département français des #Alpes_maritimes.

    Les autres pays ont également été visés par plusieurs enquêtes de médias ou d’associations, faisant état de « #pushbacks » systématiques à leurs frontières. La Grèce a, par exemple, été accusée à plusieurs reprises de renvoyer des migrants en mer Égée vers la Turquie, parfois sans canot, ni gilets de sauvetage. La Pologne, la Lituanie et la Lettonie ont, de leur côté, été critiqués pour leur traitement des personnes arrivant de la Biélorussie voisine, notamment lors de l’important afflux observé à l’été 2021.

    « Des violations des droits humains cruelles et contradictoires »

    Le rapport souligne aussi que dans certains pays, « l’usage de la #violence » envers les exilés est « grave et systématique ». Il fustige également la tendance de certains États à vouloir adopter des lois légalisant les mesures de refoulement, comme c’est notamment le cas en Hongrie, ou même en France.

    « La situation actuelle montre que les graves violations des droits humains, devenues un élément essentiel des méthodes de contrôle aux frontières des États membres, sont cruelles, contradictoires et contreproductives », a souligné la Commissaire du Conseil de l’Europe pour les droits de l’Homme, Dunja Mijatovic.

    Cette dernière n’a pas manqué de pointer du doigt le double standard avec l’accueil « chaleureux » réservé aux Ukrainiens fuyant la guerre : les pays européens qui leur ont ouvert les bras sont les mêmes qui repoussent hors de leurs frontières les migrants d’autres nationalités.

    Dunja Mijatovic regrette qu’en agissant ainsi, les dirigeants créent « de faux clivages » entre les différents groupes. « Les droits humains existent pour nous protéger tous de la même manière, peu importe notre origine », a-t-elle insisté.

    Le Conseil de l’Europe, vigie des droits humains sur le continent, demande donc aux États membres de mettre fin à ces refoulements et de « respecter leurs obligations légales » vis-à-vis des personnes en demande de protection en ne les renvoyant pas de l’autre côté de la frontière « sans une procédure individualisée », ni sans « droit à un recours effectif ».

    Il exige aussi que les États mettent en place « des règles de conduite » et des « procédures standardisées claires et obligatoires » pour les autorités en charge du contrôle aux frontières afin de traiter les migrants « de manière conforme aux droits humains ».


    https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/39722/le-conseil-de-leurope-denonce-le-refoulement-generalise-des-migrants-a

    #migrations #asile #réfugiés #refoulement_généralisé #Europe #EU #UE #violence #violence_systématique #frontières_maritimes #problème_systématique #contrôles_frontaliers #droits_humains

    ping @isskein @karine4 @_kg_

    • Repoussés au-delà des limites. Il est urgent de mettre un terme aux refoulements aux frontières de l’Europe

      « Face à l’ampleur et à la #normalisation des refoulements aux frontières de l’Europe, il est urgent que les gouvernements et les parlementaires mènent une action concertée », a déclaré aujourd’hui Dunja Mijatović, Commissaire aux droits de l’homme du Conseil de l’Europe, en rendant public une Recommandation aux gouvernements et aux parlementaires des États membres décrivant la multiplication des refoulements et des violations connexes des droits de l’homme observée aux frontières terrestres et maritimes des pays européens.

      « Cette Recommandation est publiée dans une période où la protection des droits de l’homme en Europe est mise à particulièrement rude épreuve » a déclaré la Commissaire. « La guerre qui fait rage en Ukraine cause des morts, des destructions et a contraint plus de quatre millions de personnes à quitter leur pays pour tenter de se mettre à l’abri ailleurs en Europe. La réponse immédiate des pays européens montre qu’il est possible de mettre la protection de la dignité humaine et le respect des obligations internationales au centre de l’action des États. »

      Un tel principe devrait aussi s’appliquer à la protection des réfugiés, des demandeurs d’asile et des migrants venant d’autres parties du monde. Malheureusement, dans de nombreux États membres du Conseil de l’Europe, depuis plusieurs années, ces personnes ont fait l’objet de refoulements. Ainsi que le souligne cette Recommandation, « ces pratiques vont à l’encontre des obligations incombant aux États membres en matière de droits de l’homme car elles sont contraires au principe de non-refoulement, fragilisent le droit d’asile, privent les personnes renvoyées des garanties fondamentales qui devraient s’appliquer, et entraînent souvent des violences, des actes de torture et d’autres mauvais traitements graves, voire portent atteinte au droit à la vie. » La Recommandation décrit la manière dont plusieurs pays ont fait du refoulement des réfugiés, des demandeurs d’asile et des migrants une politique officielle, qui est parfois même inscrite dans la législation nationale, et met en garde les États contre les tentatives visant à limiter encore la surveillance exercée sur les opérations qu’ils mènent à leurs frontières.

      Quatre principaux domaines d’action sont identifiés dans cette Recommandation pour enrayer le phénomène

      Premièrement, les gouvernements doivent mettre en œuvre de bonne foi les obligations leur incombant en matière de droits de l’homme, notamment au titre de la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme, et cesser de fuir leurs responsabilités. « Lorsque les États manquent à leurs obligations, ils fragilisent l’État de droit et les garanties durement acquises dans le domaine des droits de l’homme. Cela représente un danger pour nous tous, et pas uniquement pour les réfugiés, les demandeurs d’asile et les migrants. »

      Deuxièmement, il faut que les gouvernements augmentent la transparence et la responsabilité, notamment en renforçant les mécanismes qui permettent d’exercer un contrôle indépendant des opérations de surveillance des frontières. Ces mécanismes sont indispensables pour empêcher les refoulements, mettre au jour les violations et combattre l’impunité.

      Troisièmement, tous les États membres du Conseil de l’Europe doivent reconnaître que les refoulements sont un problème grave, de dimension paneuropéenne, dont le règlement requiert la participation de tous. Cela suppose aussi, pour un gouvernement, de dénoncer les violations des droits de l’homme et de demander des comptes à ses homologues. « Les refoulements étant une réalité indéniable en Europe, tous les États membres, y compris ceux qui ne mènent pas directement de telles opérations, doivent se sentir concernés et agir. Rester passif revient à tolérer silencieusement que des violations des droits de l’homme soient commises », a prévenu la Commissaire.

      Quatrièmement, les parlementaires doivent se mobiliser pour empêcher l’adoption de propositions législatives qui autoriseraient les refoulements et pour abolir toutes les dispositions en ce sens qui seraient déjà en vigueur. Il leur appartient aussi de demander des comptes à leur gouvernement et d’utiliser leur mandat pour attirer l’attention sur les violations des droits de l’homme qui se produisent.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rM6L3njNQfY&feature=emb_logo


      https://www.coe.int/fr/web/commissioner/-/pushed-beyond-the-limits-urgent-action-needed-to-stop-push-back-at-europe-s-bor

  • La #Hongrie, entre #xénophobie officielle et recours aux #travailleurs_immigrés

    Comment pallier la #décroissance_démographique et la pénurie de main-d’œuvre sans faire appel à de la #main-d’œuvre_étrangère qui serait trop visible ? C’est le #dilemme auquel est confronté le parti de Viktor Orbán. Les élections législatives ont lieu dimanche.

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/020422/la-hongrie-entre-xenophobie-officielle-et-recours-aux-travailleurs-immigre

    #travailleurs_étrangers #main_d'oeuvre #pénurie #travail

  • Shanghai lockdown: some parents allowed to stay with Covid-positive children after backlash | China | The Guardian
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/apr/07/shanghai-lockdown-some-parents-allowed-to-stay-with-covid-positive-chil
    https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/afcacc667f64f6e84fb3a4e5381b268dd005f536/0_171_3851_2310/master/3851.jpg?width=1200&height=630&quality=85&auto=format&fit=crop&overlay-ali

    Shanghai lockdown: some parents allowed to stay with Covid-positive children after backlash
    Sanitation workers wearing PPE conduct disinfection work in Shanghai.
    Shanghai is allowing some parents to stay with their Covid-infected children during lockdown after a public backlash. Photograph: VCG/Getty Images
    Associated Press
    Shanghai is allowing at least some parents to stay with children infected with Covid-19, making an exception to a policy of isolating anyone who tests positive after a public outcry.The announcement came as China’s largest city remained in lockdown and conducted more mass testing on Wednesday following another jump in new cases.A top city health official said at a news conference that parents could apply to stay with children with “special needs” and accompany them if they fully comprehend the health risks and sign an agreement.
    The parents must wear masks, dine at a different time than their children, avoid sharing items with them and strictly follow all regulations, said Wu Qianyu of the Shanghai Municipal Health Commission. She did not define what qualified as “special needs.”Her announcement followed Chinese state media reports a day earlier that an isolation site set up at the Shanghai New International Expo Center was accepting children with parents. The city has opened sprawling isolation centres for tens of thousands of people to isolate the growing number of positive cases.Reports that parents were being separated from their infected children had sparked a wave of protest online last weekend, fuelled by photos showing several children in cots at a quarantine site with no parents in sight.Footage of a pet corgi being beaten to death on the streets of Shanghai over fears it may have the virus has also sparked outrage and frustration with China’s zero-Covid policy.
    “There is no humanity, and while the whole world is living a normal and orderly life, there are still ‘volunteers’ who have lost their humanity. Happening in China in 2022. Very sad,” one person wrote on Weibo.Last November, the death of another corgi – killed in its apartment while its owner was serving mandatory hotel quarantine in Jiangxi province – sparked a similar outcry.Shanghai reported 17,077 new cases detected over the previous day, all but 311 of them in people who showed no symptoms. Under China’s zero-Covid approach, the city requires all those who test positive to be held in designated locations for observation, along with their close contacts.The latest cases bring Shanghai’s total to about 90,000 in an outbreak that began last month. No deaths have been ascribed to the outbreak driven by the Omicron BA.2 variant, which is much more infectious but also less lethal than the previous Delta strain. Two deaths have been reported in another ongoing outbreak in Jilin province in China’s northeast.
    An official from the EU Chamber of Commerce in China joined a growing chorus of criticism of the Shanghai lockdown, which has disrupted daily life and commerce in a major financial and business centre.
    “Another really big fear is ending up in one of those mass central quarantine sites,” Schoen-Behanzin said in an online event for member companies and journalists.Others complained earlier about shortages of medical workers, volunteers and beds in the isolation wards. More than 38,000 health workers from 15 provinces have been sent to Shanghai to help with mass testing and other needs.Beijing is also tightening measures after 11 cases were detected in the Chinese capital in recent days. Authorities closed down a shopping and office centre in the busy Wangjing district and are requiring those arriving in the city to report to their place of work or residence within 12 hours and undergo a Covid-19 test within 72 hours. They must undergo another test within 48 hours of returning to their place of work.Despite growing public frustration and concerns about the economic effects, China says it is sticking to its hard-line “zero-tolerance” approach mandating lockdowns, mass testing and the compulsory isolation of all suspected cases and close contacts. While China’s vaccination rate hovers about 90%, its domestically produced inactivated virus vaccines are seen as weaker than the mRNA vaccines such as those produced by Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna that are used abroad, as well as in the Chinese territories of Hong Kong and Macau. Vaccination rates among elderly people are also much lower than the population at large, with only around half of those over 80 fully vaccinated.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#chine#shangai#sante#confinement#isolement#zerocovid#vaccination#restrictionsanitaire#hongkong#macau

  • Shanghai lockdown: some parents allowed to stay with Covid-positive children after backlash | China | The Guardian
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/apr/07/shanghai-lockdown-some-parents-allowed-to-stay-with-covid-positive-chil
    https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/afcacc667f64f6e84fb3a4e5381b268dd005f536/0_171_3851_2310/master/3851.jpg?width=1200&height=630&quality=85&auto=format&fit=crop&overlay-ali

    Shanghai lockdown: some parents allowed to stay with Covid-positive children after backlash
    Sanitation workers wearing PPE conduct disinfection work in Shanghai.
    Shanghai is allowing some parents to stay with their Covid-infected children during lockdown after a public backlash. Photograph: VCG/Getty Images
    Associated Press
    Shanghai is allowing at least some parents to stay with children infected with Covid-19, making an exception to a policy of isolating anyone who tests positive after a public outcry.The announcement came as China’s largest city remained in lockdown and conducted more mass testing on Wednesday following another jump in new cases.A top city health official said at a news conference that parents could apply to stay with children with “special needs” and accompany them if they fully comprehend the health risks and sign an agreement.
    The parents must wear masks, dine at a different time than their children, avoid sharing items with them and strictly follow all regulations, said Wu Qianyu of the Shanghai Municipal Health Commission. She did not define what qualified as “special needs.”Her announcement followed Chinese state media reports a day earlier that an isolation site set up at the Shanghai New International Expo Center was accepting children with parents. The city has opened sprawling isolation centres for tens of thousands of people to isolate the growing number of positive cases.Reports that parents were being separated from their infected children had sparked a wave of protest online last weekend, fuelled by photos showing several children in cots at a quarantine site with no parents in sight.Footage of a pet corgi being beaten to death on the streets of Shanghai over fears it may have the virus has also sparked outrage and frustration with China’s zero-Covid policy.
    “There is no humanity, and while the whole world is living a normal and orderly life, there are still ‘volunteers’ who have lost their humanity. Happening in China in 2022. Very sad,” one person wrote on Weibo.Last November, the death of another corgi – killed in its apartment while its owner was serving mandatory hotel quarantine in Jiangxi province – sparked a similar outcry.Shanghai reported 17,077 new cases detected over the previous day, all but 311 of them in people who showed no symptoms. Under China’s zero-Covid approach, the city requires all those who test positive to be held in designated locations for observation, along with their close contacts.The latest cases bring Shanghai’s total to about 90,000 in an outbreak that began last month. No deaths have been ascribed to the outbreak driven by the Omicron BA.2 variant, which is much more infectious but also less lethal than the previous Delta strain. Two deaths have been reported in another ongoing outbreak in Jilin province in China’s northeast.
    An official from the EU Chamber of Commerce in China joined a growing chorus of criticism of the Shanghai lockdown, which has disrupted daily life and commerce in a major financial and business centre.
    “Another really big fear is ending up in one of those mass central quarantine sites,” Schoen-Behanzin said in an online event for member companies and journalists.Others complained earlier about shortages of medical workers, volunteers and beds in the isolation wards. More than 38,000 health workers from 15 provinces have been sent to Shanghai to help with mass testing and other needs.Beijing is also tightening measures after 11 cases were detected in the Chinese capital in recent days. Authorities closed down a shopping and office centre in the busy Wangjing district and are requiring those arriving in the city to report to their place of work or residence within 12 hours and undergo a Covid-19 test within 72 hours. They must undergo another test within 48 hours of returning to their place of work.Despite growing public frustration and concerns about the economic effects, China says it is sticking to its hard-line “zero-tolerance” approach mandating lockdowns, mass testing and the compulsory isolation of all suspected cases and close contacts. While China’s vaccination rate hovers about 90%, its domestically produced inactivated virus vaccines are seen as weaker than the mRNA vaccines such as those produced by Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna that are used abroad, as well as in the Chinese territories of Hong Kong and Macau. Vaccination rates among elderly people are also much lower than the population at large, with only around half of those over 80 fully vaccinated.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#chine#shangai#sante#confinement#isolement#zerocovid#vaccination#restrictionsanitaire#hongkong#macau

  • Halàszlé, soupe de poisson au paprika
    https://www.cuisine-libre.org/halaszle-soupe-de-poisson-au-paprika

    Savoureuse soupe hongroise de #Poissons relevée au #Paprika. Videz et nettoyez soigneusement les poissons. Réserver la laitance au réfrigérateur. Coupez les têtes, nageoires et queues des poissons. Réservez. Coupez les filets de poisson en morceaux. Placez-les dans une grande cocotte. Salez généreusement et réservez au frais. Épluchez les oignons et coupez-les en rondelles pour les faire revenir au fond d’une grande casserole jusqu’à ce qu’ils soient tendres. Ajoutez la tomate, les têtes, nageoires et… Paprika, Poissons, #Hongrie, #Soupes_de poisson / #Sans viande, #Sans œuf, #Sans lactose, #Sans gluten, #Bouilli

  • Coronavirus: Hong Kong confirms 6,646 new cases as government considers mass at-home testing exercise to help ‘gauge infection situation’ | South China Morning Post
    https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/health-environment/article/3172549/coronavirus-hong-kong-government-considering-mass

    Coronavirus: Hong Kong confirms 6,646 new cases as government considers mass at-home testing exercise to help ‘gauge infection situation’
    A source says the mass at-home testing will serve as a ‘voluntary and supplementary’ measure, and will not replace an official universal screening exercise
    g

    Published: 3:06pm, 31 Mar, 2022

    Updated: 5:23pm, 31 Mar, 2022
    Why you can trust SCMP
    140
    42
    Volunteers pack kits of rapid Covid-19 tests, masks and medicine set to be distributed to Hong Kong residents at Tai Wo Hau Sports Centre. Photo: Dickson Lee
    Volunteers pack kits of rapid Covid-19 tests, masks and medicine set to be distributed to Hong Kong residents at Tai Wo Hau Sports Centre. Photo: Dickson Lee

    Hong Kong residents may be asked to take part in mass at-home Covid-19 testing via kits set to be distributed from Saturday in order to help the government better gauge the current epidemic situation, the city’s leader has said.Chief Executive Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor floated the possibility at her regular coronavirus press conference on Thursday after being asked whether the government still planned to pursue a controversial compulsory universal testing drive.“Since we are distributing rapid antigen tests in the anti-epidemic service bags, we would like to explore whether we can make use of this convenient and accurate tool … so that we can gauge the infection situation,” Lam said, referring to packs of supplies and medicine that will be handed out to all Hong Kong residents.Lam added that the current daily caseload, though on the decline, was still too high to conduct universal screening via government-run testing sites, noting the healthcare system was unlikely to be able to cope with the new infections the exercise might uncover.The city confirmed 6,646 new coronavirus infections on Thursday, the sixth consecutive day the caseload was below the 10,000 mark. Another 119 deaths were reported, including 17 fatalities that had not been taken into account due to a backlog.
    The overall tally of confirmed cases since the start of the pandemic stands at 1,157,415, while the total number of related deaths has reached 7,825.
    The government will begin distributing the anti-epidemic service bags – containing 20 rapid tests, 20 KN95 masks and two boxes of proprietary traditional Chinese medicine – to nearly 3 million households on Saturday. Lam said it would take about a week to hand out all the packages.
    Details of the proposed mass rapid testing exercise would be announced if and when the plans were confirmed, Lam added.A source said the mass rapid testing, which would be undertaken by residents on a single day, would serve as a “voluntary and supplementary” measure, and would not replace the universal screening exercise. The source noted that experts had suggested the best time for the universal screening would be when daily caseloads were consistently in the three-digit range.
    The government announced a suspension of the universal screening exercise on March 21. Lam said mainland Chinese and Hong Kong experts had concluded that public resources should not be spent on such an exercise when the daily caseload remained high. Instead, it should be carried out towards the end of the current fifth wave of infections.Lam later told lawmakers she did not have a crystal ball to predict when the testing could be rolled out.Jack Chan Jick-chi, acting secretary for home affairs, told a radio programme on Thursday that each Hong Kong household would be entitled to one package of supplies, assuming it had three to four members, while larger ones would be allowed to collect additional kits as needed. Special arrangements would be made for people sharing living spaces in subdivided units.He added that volunteers and civil servants deployed to package and distribute the kits would be required to be vaccinated and to conduct rapid Covid-19 tests before performing their duties.
    At Thursday’s press conference, Lam also said Covid-19 patients from elderly care homes with mild or no symptoms could be sent directly to government isolation centres rather than the emergency wards of public hospitals. The move was aimed at relieving pressure on the city’s overburdened public healthcare system.Among the six isolation facilities, the Kai Tak Holding Centre is the largest, with 1,200 beds. All the facilities are able to prescribe the oral anti-Covid drugs molnupiravir and Paxlovid.
    Traditional Chinese medicine practitioners dispatched from the mainland would also be on hand to treat symptoms and facilitate patients’ recovery, Lam said.Meanwhile, the city will lift flight bans on nine high-risk countries on Friday to allow fully vaccinated Hong Kong residents to return. The quarantine period for ­arrivals to the city will also be slashed from two weeks to one, provided they test negative on their sixth and seventh days of isolation.Lam said on Thursday that an interdepartmental meeting would be conducted to ensure that testing and transport for new arrivals went smoothly, after noting the day before that the number of incoming travellers was expected to jump from around 300 a day to some 2,000.
    “We have made full preparations for their return, we hope they have a pleasant trip back to Hong Kong,” she said.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#hongkong#chine#sante#frontiere#circulation#depistageuniversel#circulationthérapeutique#medecinetraditionnelle#medecinechinoise#retour#resident

  • Hungary welcomes those fleeing Ukraine but not ’illegal migrants’

    Hungary has taken in the second-largest number of people fleeing Ukraine behind Poland. But the government, notorious for its strict anti-immigration laws, has made it clear that hospitality would only be extended to those “legally staying on the territory of Ukraine”.

    After the Russian invasion of Ukraine began a week ago (February 24), Hungary opened its borders to those fleeing the raging conflict and has reportedly already taken in more than 130,000 refugees from Ukraine.

    “We’re letting everyone in,” Prime Minister Viktor Orban said last week near the Hungarian-Ukrainian border, addressing people fleeing Ukraine.

    “All border crossing points of ours are open, fully operational 24 hours a day,” Hungarian Foreign Minister Peter Szijjarto told the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva on Wednesday (March 2). “We let everybody come in, including the Ukrainian citizens, and those who have been legally staying on the territory of Ukraine, and we do take good care of them.”

    Hungary, otherwise known for its staunch anti-immigration policies, has even passed a regulation allowing citizens of third countries who had been studying or working in Ukraine “to enter the territory of Hungary without reason,” Szijjarto said. “We organize for them the transfers to the nearest airports to enable them to return home.”

    ’We do not allow any illegal migrants to enter Hungary’

    However, the government has also made clear that these words of welcome are not meant for everyone fleeing Ukraine and that it has not changed its stance on barring all those it calls “illegal migrants”.

    The minister slammed “politicians in Hungary and abroad” suggesting his government had also opened the flood gates to “illegal migrants”. It was “fake news”, he said, that “illegal migrants would be allowed to enter the territory of Hungary, taking advantage of the flock of refugees,” Szijjarto told the UN Human Rights Council.

    “The truth is that we do not allow any illegal migrants to enter the territory of Hungary, and we will always protect Hungary from these people,” he said.

    He reiterated there was no comparison between refugees from Ukraine and the people Budapest has labelled “illegal migrants”, who have often arrived at its borders after fleeing war and conflict in places like Syria.

    Szijjarto claimed that Hungary had “a very, very clear experience” of how “illegal migrants tend to behave aggressively, ... they ruin the infrastructure and they attack police.” The minister said that refugees from Ukraine on the other hand cooperate with authorities and they “line up (at border crossing points) in a very disciplined very patient.”

    Different refugee groups, different treatment?

    Orban isn’t the only European far-right, anti-migration leader who has changed their tone towards refugees considerably since the beginning of the invasion of Ukraine by Russia.

    “These are not the refugees we are used to,” Bulgarian President Rumen Radev said last week about Ukrainian refugees, quoted by the Associated Press. “These people are Europeans. These people are intelligent, they are educated people.”

    Such remarks illustrate a discrepancy between the treatment of Ukrainian migrants and the thousands of African, Arab, Indian and other migrant groups, including many students, trying to flee Ukraine, too.

    UN agencies, activists and refugee aid groups have been calling for equal treatment of members of any nationality trying to escape. On Thursday (March 3), the International Organization for Migration (IOM) said in an online statement it had received “verified credible reports of discrimination, violence and xenophobia against third country nationals attempting to flee the conflict in Ukraine,” which resulted in “heightened risk and suffering”.

    “Discrimination on the basis of race, ethnicity, nationality or migration status is unacceptable,” IOM Director-General Antonio Vitorino said on Twitter.

    More than 28,000 third-country nationals have arrived in Moldova, Slovakia and Poland from Ukraine so far, UN migration agency IOM spokesperson Joe Lowry said on Twitter on Wednesday.

    Violating human rights, flouting EU law

    Over the past few years, the United Nations and rights groups like the Hungarian Helsinki Committee have repeatedly criticized the Prime Minister Victor Orban’s far-right government for its harsh migration policies.

    Among other things, Hungary enacted a law in 2018 that threatens jail time for people who support asylum seekers. It also proposed immigration bans and committed thousands of well-documented, illegal pushbacks of asylum seekers.

    One of the victims of these pushbacks is Moroccan migrant Jalal, who was traveling the Balkan route in early 2021 and made it over the border to Hungary before he was hit by a vehicle and suffered “terrible” injuries.

    Orban has also often made highly provocative statements in the past, including calling migrants “Muslim invaders” and claiming that “all terrorists are basically migrants.”

    In December, moreover, Orban said his country would not alter its strict immigration laws in the wake of a ruling from the EU’s top court, which had said that Hungary’s laws contravene EU law.

    https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/38928/hungary-welcomes-those-fleeing-ukraine-but-not-illegal-migrants

    #Hongrie

    #racisme #réfugiés #guerre #Ukraine #Africains #frontières #fermeture_des_frontières #catégorisation #tri #réfugiés_ukrainiens

    –-

    ajouté à ce fil de discussion :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/951230

    et plus particulièrement ici (Hongrie) :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/951230#message951672

    • ’Good asylum-seekers’ vs. ’bad migrants’ – Hungary’s varying treatment of war refugees

      The warm welcome extended to Ukrainian refugees by EU countries that otherwise take a strict anti-immigrant stance has highlighted the stark differences in the treatment of people from Ukraine and those from non-European war zones. In Hungary the contrast is especially apparent, as the example of an Afghan student shows.

      Three years after he came to Hungary to study, Hasib Qarizada found himself left alone without help in a field in neighboring Serbia. How did he end up there?

      It all started last summer when the radical Islamic Taliban seized power in Hasib’s native Afghanistan. As his home country was descending into chaos, Hasib lodged an asylum application in the EU member state. But last September, Hungarian authorities, rather than offering refuge to Hasib, brought him over the border into non-EU country Serbia, a place he knew nothing about.

      "Police just came over and handcuffed me,’’ Hasib told The Associated Press (AP) in Belgrade, the Serbian capital. "They told me ’Don’t try to run away, don’t try to fight with us, don’t do anything stupid.’’’

      Stranded in a field in the middle of nowhere, the 25-year-old had no idea where he was, where to go or what to do.

      "I was a student, and they just gave my life a totally different twist,’’ he told AP. "They didn’t give me a chance to grab my clothes, my [phone] charger or my laptop or anything important that I would need to travel.’’

      He told the AP he "had no idea where Serbia was, what language they speak, what kind of culture they have.’’
      ’Sinister practice’

      EU countries like Hungary have been notorious for their strict anti-immigration laws, and this isn’t the first time rights activists have registered such a case in the region. In 2017, a 16-year-old Kurd from Iraq was deported into Serbia from Hungary — despite having initially arrived in Hungary from Romania and having managed to reach Austria before he was sent back to Hungary.

      Last December, a Cameroonian woman who entered Hungary from Romania was expelled to Serbia. Another African woman who arrived a year ago by plane from Dubai, the capital of the United Arab Emirates, reportedly also wound up in a field in Serbia.

      "This is something that unfortunately has become normal, regular and something which cannot be considered unusual,’’ Serbian rights lawyer Nikola Kovacevic told the AP. Still, this illegal practice of sending people into a third country they hadn’t come from was “particularly sinister,” according to the AP.
      Double standard

      With the current exodus of Ukrainians fleeing war, Hungary’s policies seem to have changed. Shortly after the Russian invasion of Ukraine began, Orban announced “we’re letting everyone in.”

      There are other EU countries that face accusations of violence against migrants which now welcome people fleeing Ukraine with open arms. They include Croatia and Greece.

      While activists, UN agencies and other entities have applauded the shift from harsh anti-migration policies, they have also been warning of discrimination against refugees and migrants from Africa and the Middle East — groups of people who have been facing pushbacks at Europe’s external borders for years.

      "For those of us following these issues, it is hard to miss the stark contrast of the last few weeks with Europe’s harsh response to people fleeing other wars and crises,’’ Judith Sunderland of Human Rights Watch told AP. "A staggering number of people from Asia, Africa, and the Middle East die every year attempting to reach Europe.’’

      Zsolt Szekeres from the Hungarian Helsinki Committee noted that “the [Hungarian] government is trying their best to explain now why Ukrainians are good asylum-seekers and others are bad migrants.”

      Last week, less than ten days before Hungary holds its next national election (April 3), a government spokesperson called media reports that authorities were discriminating among the refugees arriving from Ukraine "fake news’’.

      Yet earlier this month, Hungarian Foreign Minister Peter Szijjarto said that refugees from Ukraine and the people Budapest has labeled “illegal migrants” could not be compared. He said: “The truth is that we do not allow any illegal migrants to enter the territory of Hungary, and we will always protect Hungary from these people.”

      Hungary’s harsh migration policies have manifested in, among other things, a 2018 law that threatens jail time for people who support asylum seekers, proposed immigration bans as well as thousands of illegal pushbacks.

      Orban has also often made highly provocative statements in the past, including calling migrants “Muslim invaders” and claiming that “all terrorists are basically migrants.” In December, moreover, Orban said his country would not alter its strict immigration laws in the wake of a ruling from the EU’s top court, which had said that Hungary’s laws contravene EU law.
      Next-level pushbacks

      The illegal practice of pushing asylum seekers like Afghan Hasib Qarizada back over the border
      , which many activists and journalists say are used systematically at the EU’s southeastern and eastern borders, has been observed for a number of years now. According to one human rights group, many cases involve torture.

      But when asylum seekers are expelled to a country they hadn’t come from, like Hasib, "the severity of the violation is higher,’’ Kovacevic, the Serbian lawyer, told AP.

      Hasib’s deportation is considered particularly striking given that the Afghan hadn’t arrived in Hungary irregularly. He was a self-financed student, shared an apartment and had established a life in Budapest. The reason for his decision to seek asylum was simple: His family could no longer pay his university fees due to the turmoil in Afghanistan, which meant he couldn’t renew his residence permit, according to AP.

      His family was in danger as they had connections with Afghanistan’s pre-Taliban government, Hasib told the AP. "They hardly go outside,’’ he said. Yet when Hungarian authorities rejected his request for refuge, activists say, they disregarded the fact that Afghanistan couldn’t be considered safe following the Taliban’s return to power.

      Lawyers with the Hungarian Helsinki Committee (HHC) have since taken Hasib’s case both to courts in Hungary and the European Court of Human Rights. They argue that his unlawful expulsion violates the European Convention of Human Rights.

      Although a Hungarian court has ruled in his favor, AP reported, the lawyers are now trying to use legal measures to force Hungarian authorities to implement the decision so that Hasib is allowed to return to Hungary.

      "He applied for asylum, he was staying here, and he was in need of protection, and he was pushed out in a summary manner,’’ the HHC’s Zsolt Szekeres said. "He was never given the possibility or option to explain his situation.’’
      Worst days of his life

      In Serbia, Hasib was forced to sleep outside for four nights after being sent there. The days after he was abandoned on the field were the worst of his life, Hasib said. He recalls to AP wandering around for hours and asking a woman at a gas station to let him charge his phone.

      "I felt very horrible ... because I was a normal student. I was studying, I was going to classes. I had my own friends. I had my own life,’’ he said. "I wasn’t doing anything bad.’’

      According to Szekeres, governments should treat all people escaping war zones the same. "There is no difference between Ukrainian parents fleeing with their children and Afghan parents fleeing with their children,’’ he told AP. "This is a good reminder for everyone that asylum-seekers, no matter where they come from, need protection.’’

      https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/39483/good-asylumseekers-vs-bad-migrants--hungarys-varying-treatment-of-war-

  • How Covid helped China tighten its hold on Hong Kong | Hong Kong | The Guardian
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/mar/28/covid-china-hong-kong
    https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/74eace71692be6d33cfb0f3ce882530bafac3827/0_107_3275_1964/master/3275.jpg?width=1200&height=630&quality=85&auto=format&fit=crop&overlay-ali

    How Covid helped China tighten its hold on Hong Kong
    Doctors from the mainland are treating patients and Chinese workers are building hospitals as Beijing’s presence is felt like never before
    Traffic is busier than usual in Lok Ma Chau, a village on Hong Kong’s northern border. Heavy-duty trucks shuttle mainland Chinese workers to and from the wetland district, where they are building a makeshift hospital to treat Covid-19 patients.The hubbub would have been unimaginable a year or even a month ago. The Asian financial capital is separated from the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen by a winding river. But in early March, a makeshift bridge linking the two cities was erected. Satellite images show the foundations of the structure being laid days before the Hong Kong government announced the project.
    Since its opening, the two-lane crossing in Hong Kong’s northernmost district has emerged as a physical manifestation of the shrinking space between Beijing and the semi-autonomous territory, and that gap has closed faster than ever during the pandemic.A former British colony, Hong Kong was returned to China in 1997 under the “one country, two systems” arrangement negotiated with Britain. The framework allowed the city to preserve rights and freedoms not afforded across the border for 50 years, enabling its rise as a global, freewheeling hub in the heart of Asia.
    Government workers in protective gear on a Hong Kong street this year
    Hong Kong Covid crisis: why is the death rate so high?Yet Beijing has attempted to bring the territory under its wing since then.A visitation scheme introduced in 2003 made it easier for mainland Chinese travellers to come to Hong Kong. In 2012, with Beijing’s support, Hong Kong proposed a patriotic education curriculum, which triggered citywide protests.Then in 2020, the national security law, a response to large-scale demonstrations that broke out in 2019, was passed by Beijing’s top legislature and enacted in Hong Kong a year later without being reviewed by local lawmakers. Scores of veteran pro-democracy activists have been arrested under the law.But it took a pandemic – specifically, Covid-19’s highly transmissible Omicron variant – for Beijing’s presence in Hong Kong to be felt in ways like never before.
    In late February, Hong Kong announced that it would invoke an emergency ordinance so the city could “draw on [the] mainland’s support” and “undertake key anti-epidemic projects at full speed”, a press release read.
    At a treatment facility set up in the cavernous AsiaWorld-Expo convention centre, elderly patients are now being tended to by mainland Chinese doctors and nurses. Under the emergency laws, the medical staff were able to bypass licensing exams and registration procedures normally required for staff who aren’t trained locally. Authorities said computers for recording patient information had been changed from English to Chinese to accommodate them.Hong Kong’s chief executive Carrie Lam has said the territory ‘cannot let existing laws stop us from doing what we should do’ during Covid.Hong Kong’s chief executive Carrie Lam has said the territory ‘cannot let existing laws stop us from doing what we should do’ during Covid. Meanwhile, Hong Kong’s chief executive, Carrie Lam, announced during a coronavirus press briefing on Friday that the city would be distributing rapid test kits, face masks and a traditional Chinese medication – Lianhua Qingwen – to households, donated by the mainland.
    The medication, which has been registered with the city’s pharmaceutical board, has been flagged by health authorities in Singapore and the US for being advertised with unsupported claims.“Beijing has been trying to mould Hong Kong into another [Chinese] city,” says Lynette Ong, a political science professor at the University of Toronto. “The Covid crisis gives them a legitimate reason to do so.”Besides the construction of a Covid-19 hospital in Lok Ma Chau, mainland China has already assisted Hong Kong with the building of five other isolation facilities for patients with mild or no symptoms. China and Hong Kong are among the last places in the world that still isolate or hospitalise Covid patients who are in a stable condition.
    Infrastructure projects in Hong Kong typically involve construction firms submitting tenders to compete for billion-dollar contracts. But all of the facilities being built with mainland aid have been handed over to Chinese State Construction Engineering, a state-owned company.At an opening ceremony for the newest centre in the northern district of Yuen Long, top Hong Kong officials stood at attention as a video of toiling construction workers, portrayed as worked-to-the-bone heroes, played before them. A song in Mandarin, instead of the Cantonese language spoken in Hong Kong, played in the background.“The scale and speed at which these projects were finished is unprecedented,” Hong Kong’s leader Lam said at the Thursday ceremony. “This will go down in the history of Hong Kong’s Covid-19 fight.”
    Lam is used to talking about the crisis in terms of conflict. “In an environment as urgent as this, we cannot let existing laws stop us from doing what we should do … this is not the mentality for fighting a war,” she said in February.Jeffrey Wasserstrom, a history professor at the University of California, Irvine, says “there was once a chasm separating what takes place in Hong Kong from what takes place across the mainland border”. That chasm is getting smaller.
    Under the national security law, spaces like independent newsrooms, universities and civil society groups have felt a chill as Beijing seeks to integrate Hong Kong further into its fold.And as Hong Kong prepares to welcome a batch of traditional Chinese medicine practitioners to staff treatment facilities and open more isolation camps built by mainland workers, the assimilation is now playing out more publicly than ever.
    “The way that Covid has been handled by the Hong Kong authorities has demonstrated that the ‘one country, two systems’ concept is a pale shadow of what it once was,” Wasserstrom says.

    #Covid-19#migration#migrant#chine#hongkong#sante#zerocovid#securite#politique#frontiere#chinecontinentale#medecinechinoise#circulationtherapeutique

  • Pourquoi la Chine n’est pas prête à abandonner l’objectif de zéro Covid
    https://www.lemonde.fr/planete/article/2022/03/24/pourquoi-la-chine-n-est-pas-prete-a-abandonner-l-objectif-de-zero-covid_6118

    Pourquoi la Chine n’est pas prête à abandonner l’objectif de zéro Covid
    Faible taux de vaccination des seniors, manque d’infrastructures médicales, peur du virus : malgré une politique zéro Covid toujours plus coûteuse, la Chine n’est pas prête à changer de stratégie.
    Par Simon Leplâtre(Shanghaï, correspondance)
    Des milliers de cas par jour, une province entière confinée, le Jilin, au nord-est, et des métropoles en partie refermées, Shanghaï et Shenzhen : la Chine fait face à sa plus forte vague de Covid-19 depuis le début de l’épidémie à Wuhan, fin 2019. Jeudi 24 mars, le pays a déclaré 4 732 cas, dont 2 722 asymptomatiques. Le variant Omicron, à la fois moins sévère et plus contagieux, met à l’épreuve la stratégie zéro Covid en vigueur dans le pays depuis deux ans. La situation peut-elle remettre en cause cette approche très stricte consistant à réagir dès le premier cas, à tester massivement et à fermer s’il le faut des villes entières ? Pas pour l’instant : la Chine n’est pas prête, répondent les responsables sanitaires. S’il rouvrait ses portes, le pays risquerait une « vague de sortie » massive et meurtrière, dans un territoire immense et peu immunisé.
    Le président chinois, Xi Jinping, a d’ailleurs rappelé le 17 mars que le temps était à la « persévérance ». Tout en invitant à « prendre des mesures plus efficaces pour parvenir à une prévention et à un contrôle maximum avec le coût le plus faible possible, à minimiser l’impact de l’épidémie sur l’économie et la société », d’après l’agence Chine nouvelle. Mais, pour les dirigeants locaux, engager des mesures radicales reste l’option la plus sûre, car nombre de responsables ont été sanctionnés pour avoir laissé filer l’épidémie, mais rarement pour avoir pris des mesures trop strictes.
    Le coût de cette stratégie ne fait pourtant qu’augmenter. Là où la Chine pouvait profiter de plusieurs mois de retour à la normale entre deux foyers avec les premiers variants, ce n’est plus le cas depuis l’arrivée du variant Delta à l’été 2021 : des foyers apparaissent désormais tous les mois. A chaque fois, les zones touchées subissent des conséquences économiques importantes, notamment pour les secteurs de la restauration, du tourisme et du divertissement. La consommation est fortement impactée. Ces dernières semaines, le mécontentement s’est fait sentir dans les villes où les mesures sont les plus strictes. A Shenzhen, des habitants ont protesté, parfois violemment, dans plusieurs quartiers où la quarantaine se prolongeait, d’après des vidéos partagées sur les réseaux sociaux. Sur l’une d’elle prise à Futian, un district du centre-ville, on les entend hurler derrière des barricades en plastique : « Déconfinez ! On n’en peut plus ! »
    Pourtant, l’abandon de l’objectif de tolérance zéro face au virus n’est pas à l’ordre du jour, insistent les autorités de santé chinoises. « Certains pays du monde ont relâché les mesures et ne font plus rien. Mais la vision du gouvernement chinois et du Parti communiste est de mettre la santé et le peuple au premier plan. Si nous choisissions de baisser la garde maintenant, tous nos efforts passés auraient été en vain, a déclaré Liang Wannian, le chef du groupe d’experts chargé de la réponse à l’épidémie de Covid-19 en Chine, en conférence de presse le 22 mars. Surtout face à Omicron, dont la transmission est très rapide, nous ne pouvons pas rester passifs, parce que nos ressources sont déséquilibrées (entre villes et campagnes) et que la vaccination des personnes vulnérables n’est pas encore complètement en place. » Pour le responsable, la stratégie zéro Covid permet de gagner du temps, avec l’espoir que des traitements et des vaccins plus efficaces émergent, ou qu’une mutation rende le virus moins dangereux. Le principal point faible de la Chine aujourd’hui est la vaccination des personnes âgées : alors que 87 % de la population générale est vaccinée, seuls 51 % des plus de 80 ans ont reçu deux doses et 20 % ont reçu une troisième dose, a indiqué le 18 mars la Commission nationale de la santé. Une dose de rappel d’autant plus importante que les vaccins chinois à virus inactivés sont moins efficaces que ceux à ARN. D’après une étude présentée en preprint le 22 mars par l’Université de Hongkong, l’efficacité de Sinovac n’est que de 72 % contre les cas graves et mortels après deux doses chez les plus de 60 ans, mais grimpe à 98 % après une troisième dose. Selon les chiffres du gouvernement, le taux de mortalité pour les plus de 80 ans est de 15 % sans vaccin, de 2,9 % avec deux ou trois doses Sinovac, et de 1,51 % avec deux ou trois doses du vaccin BioNTech. Mais, contrairement à Hongkong, la Chine n’a pas autorisé la commercialisation du produit de BioNTech.
    « Pour vivre avec le virus, il faut qu’ils vaccinent leur population âgée à au moins 90 %, et qu’ils les testent pour s’assurer que leurs niveaux d’anticorps sont élevés, insiste Jin Dongyan, professeur d’oncologie et de virologie à la faculté de médecine de l’université de Hongkong. Sinon, comme à Hongkong, les personnes âgées non vaccinées ou vaccinées avec une seule dose ou avec des vaccins peu efficaces, ces gens-là vont mourir, et on aura tellement de morts que les gens seront terrifiés. » L’île du sud de la Chine se détourne de la stratégie zéro Covid, rendue obsolète face à l’explosion des cas ces dernières semaines. Le territoire bénéficiant d’une certaine autonomie enregistre aujourd’hui le plus fort taux de mortalité au monde, du fait d’une faible vaccination des personnes âgées : moins d’un quart de ses plus de 80 ans avaient reçu deux doses avant l’émergence de cette vague, en février.
    En Chine continentale, la peur des effets secondaires des vaccins a dissuadé les personnes âgées ou souffrantes de se faire vacciner. Les scandales sanitaires passés liés à des vaccins frelatés y sont pour quelque chose, de même que la perception que les médicaments modernes provoquent beaucoup d’effets secondaires, contrairement à la médecine traditionnelle. Les autorités elles-mêmes sont prudentes : les femmes enceintes sont par exemple exclues de la vaccination. « Le problème est qu’au départ les personnes âgées n’ont pas été incluses dans les campagnes de vaccination massive. Ensuite, la communication publique aurait dû insister davantage sur le fait que les risques de développer des symptômes sévères sont bien plus importants que les risques associés à la vaccination, estime Huang Yanzhong, spécialiste des politiques de santé en Chine au Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), un centre de recherche américain. Mais c’est difficile dans le contexte chinois, parce que la stratégie zéro Covid a créé un faux sentiment de sécurité : si le virus ne circule pas, à quoi bon aller se faire vacciner », ajoute le chercheur.
    Pour cet expert, les autres obstacles à un changement d’approche sont psychologiques et politiques. Depuis deux ans, les autorités ont joué sur la peur pour favoriser l’adhésion des Chinois aux restrictions : « Ils sont constamment informés de la situation dramatique en Occident, qui a vu exploser le nombre de morts parce qu’ils n’ont pas opté pour la stratégie zéro Covid. Il y a ce sentiment que, si la Chine change son approche, les conséquences seraient dévastatrices », note le professeur Huang. Malgré la frustration face au retour des confinements, les remises en cause de la stratégie officielle sont très minoritaires en Chine. Enfin, les autorités sont sensibles au risque politique associé à une perte de contrôle de l’épidémie : « Maintenir la politique zéro Covid est vu comme primordial par Pékin, qui peut continuer à revendiquer la supériorité du modèle et du système politique chinois. »

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#chine#hongkong#sante#zerocovid#vaccination#frontiere#risquepolitique#restrictionsanitaire

  • Covid-19 : Hongkong assouplit les mesures de contrôle en pleine cinquième vague
    https://www.lemonde.fr/planete/article/2022/03/22/covid-19-en-pleine-cinquieme-vague-hongkong-assouplit-les-mesures-de-control

    Covid-19 : Hongkong assouplit les mesures de contrôle en pleine cinquième vagueAprès des mois de lutte erratique contre l’épidémie, la cheffe de l’exécutif, Carrie Lam, répond aux inquiétudes des milieux d’affaires face à un risque d’isolement.Nouveau changement de cap à Hongkong dans la lutte contre le Covid-19 : lundi 21 mars, la cheffe de l’exécutif, Carrie Lam, a annoncé la levée de l’interdiction des vols en provenance de neuf pays (dont la France, le Royaume-Uni et les Etats-Unis) et la diminution de la durée de la quarantaine obligatoire à l’hôtel pour les arrivants, qui passera de quatorze à sept jours, à partir du 1er avril. Carrie Lam a également « suspendu » la grande opération de dépistage universel obligatoire. C’était pourtant la mesure-phare de son vaste plan de lutte contre la cinquième vague de l’épidémie, rendu public le 22 février, à la suite des sommations très directes du président chinois, Xi Jinping, une semaine plus tôt, l’intimant de contrôler l’épidémie et d’assumer la responsabilité de cette crise.
    Ce nouveau coup de barre dans la gestion erratique de la crise arrive à un moment étrange, puisque Hongkong est encore en pleine cinquième vague, d’une virulence nettement supérieure aux quatre précédentes. Quant à la Chine, qui avait réussi à s’isoler du virus en imposant une stratégie zéro Covid, elle semble, à son tour, faire face à une invasion incontrôlable du variant Omicron. « Si quelqu’un est attaché au statut de centre financier international de Hongkong, c’est bien moi », a déclaré Carrie Lam, semblant avoir soudain compris qu’à force d’isoler Hongkong, elle risquait de lui faire perdre son atout principal, tant aux yeux du monde qu’aux yeux de la Chine, celui de troisième centre financier de la planète.Même si l’on est encore loin d’une réouverture complète des frontières (seules les personnes ayant le statut de résident sont autorisées à revenir à Hongkong), ces mesures ont été bien accueillies par les milieux d’affaires, de la finance et les communautés diplomatiques et expatriées qui les réclamaient désespérément depuis des mois, voire des années.
    Il faut dire que les critiques contre le gouvernement montaient désormais de partout, et non plus seulement des journaux pro-Pékin, qui servent de porte-voix au mécontentement du gouvernement central chinois. « Au cœur de cette crise se trouve un problème de leadership. Plus spécifiquement un manque d’humilité et un excès de confiance en soi injustifié de certains de nos dirigeants », écrivait ainsi, dans le quotidien anglophone South China Morning Post du 17 mars, Ronnie Chan, l’un des grands propriétaires fonciers de Hongkong. La pique visait explicitement Carrie Lam. Plusieurs lettres ouvertes cinglantes adressées à la cheffe de l’exécutif ont circulé sur les réseaux sociaux et dans la presse, quand bien même les principaux médias d’opposition n’existent plus.
    (...) Outre les mesures de distanciation physique, très fermement imposées depuis plus de deux ans, Hongkong s’est également isolé du reste du monde, comme jamais dans son histoire, au point que nombre d’entreprises internationales ont dû relocaliser certains de leurs cadres à Dubaï, à Singapour ou à Shanghaï. Tous ces sacrifices avaient comme seul objectif de pouvoir, un jour, rouvrir les frontières avec la Chine, qui, ayant dompté le virus, n’acceptait les visiteurs de Hongkong qu’au compte-gouttes. Tout en imposant des mois d’attente pour obtenir un visa et trois à quatre semaines de quarantaine à l’entrée en Chine. Hongkong n’était donc plus ni la porte d’entrée vers la Chine ni la plaque tournante d’échanges entre Pékin et le reste du monde. La communauté étrangère était au bord de la crise de nerfs. Outre la fermeture-réouverture constante des écoles (les familles avec enfants en sont à onze mois d’école à la maison) et la menace d’être envoyé de force en centre d’isolement public sous divers prétextes, voire d’être séparé de ses propres enfants, la perspective de l’opération de dépistage universel et obligatoire fut pour des milliers d’expatriés le déclencheur du départ.
    L’année 2021 avait déjà vu environ 100 000 personnes quitter Hongkong, plutôt des familles de la classe moyenne supérieure, après l’entrée en vigueur de la loi sur la sécurité nationale, le 30 juin 2020, qui menace directement les libertés fondamentales. Mais la gestion erratique de la cinquième vague de Covid-19, cumulée au climat politique incertain, a déclenché un exode d’expatriés et de Hongkongais d’une ampleur inégalée dans l’histoire contemporaine de la ville : depuis le 1er janvier, 134 000 résidents, en flux net, sont partis avec armes et bagages, dont 43 000 pendant la première quinzaine de mars. Les mesures annoncées lundi devraient désamorcer l’inquiétude qui commençait à gagner même les têtes les plus froides de la région administrative spéciale. Hongkong, d’abord forcée d’afficher une stratégie « zéro Covid dynamique » conforme à la doctrine de Pékin, a gaspillé d’immenses ressources pour donner l’impression de lutter « comme en Chine » à éradiquer le moindre foyer de contamination, pendant que le virus se répandait à grande vitesse dans tous les districts du territoire et décimait des milliers de personnes âgées non vaccinées. C’est à la suite de la venue de l’épidémiologiste chinois Liang Wannian, le chef de la stratégie Covid-19 au sein de la commission nationale de la santé, qu’un certain réalisme est apparu. C’est indéniablement sous son influence que la « grande idée » de dépistage universel a été remise en cause.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migraton#hongkong#chine#sante#zerocovid#frontiere#etranger#expatrié#business#economie#relocalisation#retour

  • Covid-19 : la Chine dit avoir enregistré ses deux premiers morts depuis plus d’un an
    https://www.lemonde.fr/planete/article/2022/03/19/covid-19-la-chine-dit-avoir-enregistre-ses-deux-premiers-morts-depuis-plus-d

    Covid-19 : la Chine dit avoir enregistré ses deux premiers morts depuis plus d’un an
    Le président Xi Jinping a assuré jeudi que le gouvernement « s’en tient » à la stratégie dite « zéro Covid », selon la télévision publique.
    La Chine, qui subit sa plus grande recrudescence de coronavirus depuis le début de la pandémie, a dit avoir enregistré ses deux premiers morts du Covid-19 depuis plus d’un an, samedi 19 mars. Ces deux décès, officialisés par la Commission nationale de la santé, sont survenus dans la province de Jilin au nord-est du pays. Dans le même temps, le pays a enregistré samedi 4 051 nouvelles infections.Le pays, où les premiers cas de coronavirus sont apparus à la fin de 2019, a ensuite gardé l’épidémie sous contrôle grâce à un contrôle strict des frontières, de longues quarantaines et des confinements ciblés.
    Mais le variant Omicron, hautement contagieux, est venu menacer cette stratégie, obligeant les autorités à confiner des villes comme le centre technologique Shenzhen et ses 17,5 millions d’habitants dans le sud de la Chine. La deuxième économie du monde, qui enregistrait moins de 100 cas par jour il y a encore trois semaines, annonce plus d’un millier de nouvelles infections quotidiennes depuis une semaine.Le président Xi Jinping a assuré jeudi que le gouvernement « s’en tient » à la stratégie dite « zéro Covid », selon la télévision publique. « Nous devons toujours mettre au premier plan les gens et leur vie, nous en tenir (…) à la politique du zéro Covid, et enrayer au plus vite la propagation de l’épidémie », a-t-il ordonné.
    Des dizaines de millions de personnes sont actuellement confinées chez elles à travers le pays, et les autorités se sont efforcées de libérer des lits d’hôpitaux, craignant que l’épidémie ne mette le système de santé sous grande tension. Pékin a fait de son faible taux de mortalité un argument politique, assurant que cela démontrait la puissance de son modèle de gouvernance. La province de Jilin, qui a rapporté des milliers de cas la semaine passée, a construit huit hôpitaux temporaires et deux centres de quarantaine pour gérer l’épidémie. Hongkong, région chinoise semi-autonome, subit aussi la vague de coronavirus la plus importante depuis le début de la pandémie, enregistrant plus de 200 décès chaque jour, soit plus de 5 000 depuis le début de l’année.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#chine#hongkong#sante#omicron#frontiere#circulation#zerocovid#quarantaine#gouvernance#confinement

  • Coronavirus: Hong Kong shuts public beaches amid Covid-19 surge, but frustrated residents ask: why can’t we swim and relax? | South China Morning Post
    https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/health-environment/article/3170833/why-not-let-us-swim-and-relax-frustrated

    Coronavirus: Hong Kong shuts public beaches amid Covid-19 surge, but frustrated residents ask: why can’t we swim and relax?Government closes all public beaches amid outcry from mainland Chinese online users over social-distancing measures perceived as lax Residents react with mixed emotions, with one restaurant manager urging authorities to give clear deadline to allow businesses to adjust
    Residents have expressed their frustration at a decision by Hong Kong authorities to close all public beaches amid a Covid-19 outbreak, while some have called it necessary as a result of frequent social-distancing violations.On Wednesday, the government announced that all public beaches would close from Thursday until further notice to reduce social gatherings and the risk of virus transmission. The measure kicked in as the city confirmed 21,650 new coronavirus cases.A source had said the decision followed the circulation of posts on Chinese social media platforms Weibo and WeChat which compared scenes of Shenzhen’s empty streets and closed subway stations with Hong Kong’s crowded beaches and malls.
    The posts went viral among mainland online users, who criticised Hong Kong’s looser social-distancing measures, contrasting these with the lockdown across the border. They blamed Hongkongers for contributing to the surge in cases on the mainland.

    #Covid-19#migration#migrant#chine#hongkong#sante#frontiere#zerocovid#restrictionsanitaire#circulation#politiquesante

  • Coronavirus Hong Kong: use mainland Chinese help well, plan for next stage of battle and ensure social stability, top Beijing official tells local government | South China Morning Post
    https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/health-environment/article/3170759/coronavirus-hong-kong-use-mainland-chinese-help

    Coronavirus Hong Kong: use mainland Chinese help well, plan for next stage of battle and ensure social stability, top Beijing official tells local governmentHong Kong and Macau Affairs Office director Xia Baolong says city still facing uphill battle against pandemic. At high-level meeting in Shenzhen, he calls on local administration to plan for next phase of crisis, with focus on ‘three reductions’, referring to infections, severe cases and deaths
    Hong Kong’s government should distribute aid from the central government properly and plan for the next stage of the Covid-19 pandemic in an orderly way, a top Beijing official has told a high-level meeting in Shenzhen on the health crisis facing the financial hub. Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office (HKMAO) director Xia Baolong also emphasised the need for local officials to safeguard social stability, according to the Hong Kong China News Agency. He was chairing the meeting on Wednesday after flying back to Shenzhen from the capital where he attended the annual “two sessions” of the nation’s parliament and top advisory body.Lau Siu-kai, vice-president of semi-official Chinese Association of Hong Kong and Macau Studies think tank, said Beijing believed reforms were needed after the pandemic was under control, such as improving the government’s managerial abilities and the leadership capabilities of the executive branch.It was the ninth meeting of the tripartite coordination task force, involving Hong Kong and mainland officials, and the second in less than a week, with the last one taking place on March 11.Xia said in the latest meeting that the current epidemic situation in the city was still serious and the fight against the virus has remained an uphill battle.
    During the meeting, he also spoke via video link with teams sent to assist Hong Kong and called on the local government to speed up the distribution of Chinese medicine, boost the occupancy rate of isolation facilities and make good use of the medical professionals sent from the mainland.
    Xia went on to instruct the local administration to plan ahead for the next phase of the outbreak, focusing on the strategy of “three reductions, three focuses and one priority”.The first element refers to reducing infections, severe cases and deaths. The second involves three specific areas of focus: boosting vaccinations among the elderly and enforcing closed-loop staffing arrangements in care homes; strengthening the work of clinics, hospitals and isolation facilities; and identifying high-risk premises for children, seniors and the disabled, and stepping up protections there.
    Think tank vice-president Lau said Xia’s remarks not only focused on offering guidance and supervision, but also showed that Beijing would hold Hong Kong’s government accountable for failing to control the epidemic.
    “There is a need for improvement of our health care system and formulating contingency plans within the government on how to deal with such kinds of crisis.”Central authorities would look at improving the local government’s managerial abilities and its executive role, Lau said, adding the city needed to “prepare well for any upcoming sixth or seventh waves”.
    Lau suggested it was very rare that Beijing had to be so “hands-on” on Hong Kong’s issues, calling it proof that the city government’s poor handling of the outbreak had already greatly affected national interests.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#chine#macau#hongkong#pekin#sante#zerocovid#politique#retsrictionsanitaire#shenzen#pandemie