• En Inde, « le confinement a été une tragédie humanitaire pour les migrants de l’intérieur »
    https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2020/05/13/en-inde-le-confinement-a-ete-une-tragedie-humanitaire-pour-les-migrants-de-l

    Le confinement a été bien respecté. La capitale, New Delhi, qui compte plus de 20 millions d’habitants, était complètement déserte. Quand les Indiens devaient sortir pour faire des courses de première nécessité, ils portaient tous des masques ou des foulards. L’activité s’est totalement interrompue : usines, chantiers, transports, commerces, etc.
    Mais ce confinement très strict a fait immédiatement des victimes : les travailleurs migrants, privés de moyens de subsistance et coincés dans les villes, dans l’incapacité de rejoindre leur village d’origine et leur famille. Le confinement a été une tragédie humanitaire pour les migrants de l’intérieur.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#migrants-internes#travailleurs-migrant#confinement#inde#humanitaire#décès#vulnérabilité

  • Monitoring being pitched to fight Covid-19 was tested on refugees

    The pandemic has given a boost to controversial data-driven initiatives to track population movements

    In Italy, social media monitoring companies have been scouring Instagram to see who’s breaking the nationwide lockdown. In Israel, the government has made plans to “sift through geolocation data” collected by the Shin Bet intelligence agency and text people who have been in contact with an infected person. And in the UK, the government has asked mobile operators to share phone users’ aggregate location data to “help to predict broadly how the virus might move”.

    These efforts are just the most visible tip of a rapidly evolving industry combining the exploitation of data from the internet and mobile phones and the increasing number of sensors embedded on Earth and in space. Data scientists are intrigued by the new possibilities for behavioural prediction that such data offers. But they are also coming to terms with the complexity of actually using these data sets, and the ethical and practical problems that lurk within them.

    In the wake of the refugee crisis of 2015, tech companies and research consortiums pushed to develop projects using new data sources to predict movements of migrants into Europe. These ranged from broad efforts to extract intelligence from public social media profiles by hand, to more complex automated manipulation of big data sets through image recognition and machine learning. Two recent efforts have just been shut down, however, and others are yet to produce operational results.

    While IT companies and some areas of the humanitarian sector have applauded new possibilities, critics cite human rights concerns, or point to limitations in what such technological solutions can actually achieve.

    In September last year Frontex, the European border security agency, published a tender for “social media analysis services concerning irregular migration trends and forecasts”. The agency was offering the winning bidder up to €400,000 for “improved risk analysis regarding future irregular migratory movements” and support of Frontex’s anti-immigration operations.

    Frontex “wants to embrace” opportunities arising from the rapid growth of social media platforms, a contracting document outlined. The border agency believes that social media interactions drastically change the way people plan their routes, and thus examining would-be migrants’ online behaviour could help it get ahead of the curve, since these interactions typically occur “well before persons reach the external borders of the EU”.

    Frontex asked bidders to develop lists of key words that could be mined from platforms like Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube. The winning company would produce a monthly report containing “predictive intelligence ... of irregular flows”.

    Early this year, however, Frontex cancelled the opportunity. It followed swiftly on from another shutdown; Frontex’s sister agency, the European Asylum Support Office (EASO), had fallen foul of the European data protection watchdog, the EDPS, for searching social media content from would-be migrants.

    The EASO had been using the data to flag “shifts in asylum and migration routes, smuggling offers and the discourse among social media community users on key issues – flights, human trafficking and asylum systems/processes”. The search covered a broad range of languages, including Arabic, Pashto, Dari, Urdu, Tigrinya, Amharic, Edo, Pidgin English, Russian, Kurmanji Kurdish, Hausa and French.

    Although the EASO’s mission, as its name suggests, is centred around support for the asylum system, its reports were widely circulated, including to organisations that attempt to limit illegal immigration – Europol, Interpol, member states and Frontex itself.

    In shutting down the EASO’s social media monitoring project, the watchdog cited numerous concerns about process, the impact on fundamental rights and the lack of a legal basis for the work.

    “This processing operation concerns a vast number of social media users,” the EDPS pointed out. Because EASO’s reports are read by border security forces, there was a significant risk that data shared by asylum seekers to help others travel safely to Europe could instead be unfairly used against them without their knowledge.

    Social media monitoring “poses high risks to individuals’ rights and freedoms,” the regulator concluded in an assessment it delivered last November. “It involves the use of personal data in a way that goes beyond their initial purpose, their initial context of publication and in ways that individuals could not reasonably anticipate. This may have a chilling effect on people’s ability and willingness to express themselves and form relationships freely.”

    EASO told the Bureau that the ban had “negative consequences” on “the ability of EU member states to adapt the preparedness, and increase the effectiveness, of their asylum systems” and also noted a “potential harmful impact on the safety of migrants and asylum seekers”.

    Frontex said that its social media analysis tender was cancelled after new European border regulations came into force, but added that it was considering modifying the tender in response to these rules.
    Coronavirus

    Drug shortages put worst-hit Covid-19 patients at risk
    European doctors running low on drugs needed to treat Covid-19 patients
    Big Tobacco criticised for ’coronavirus publicity stunt’ after donating ventilators

    The two shutdowns represented a stumbling block for efforts to track population movements via new technologies and sources of data. But the public health crisis precipitated by the Covid-19 virus has brought such efforts abruptly to wider attention. In doing so it has cast a spotlight on a complex knot of issues. What information is personal, and legally protected? How does that protection work? What do concepts like anonymisation, privacy and consent mean in an age of big data?
    The shape of things to come

    International humanitarian organisations have long been interested in whether they can use nontraditional data sources to help plan disaster responses. As they often operate in inaccessible regions with little available or accurate official data about population sizes and movements, they can benefit from using new big data sources to estimate how many people are moving where. In particular, as well as using social media, recent efforts have sought to combine insights from mobile phones – a vital possession for a refugee or disaster survivor – with images generated by “Earth observation” satellites.

    “Mobiles, satellites and social media are the holy trinity of movement prediction,” said Linnet Taylor, professor at the Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology and Society in the Netherlands, who has been studying the privacy implications of such new data sources. “It’s the shape of things to come.”

    As the devastating impact of the Syrian civil war worsened in 2015, Europe saw itself in crisis. Refugee movements dominated the headlines and while some countries, notably Germany, opened up to more arrivals than usual, others shut down. European agencies and tech companies started to team up with a new offering: a migration hotspot predictor.

    Controversially, they were importing a concept drawn from distant catastrophe zones into decision-making on what should happen within the borders of the EU.

    “Here’s the heart of the matter,” said Nathaniel Raymond, a lecturer at the Yale Jackson Institute for Global Affairs who focuses on the security implications of information communication technologies for vulnerable populations. “In ungoverned frontier cases [European data protection law] doesn’t apply. Use of these technologies might be ethically safer there, and in any case it’s the only thing that is available. When you enter governed space, data volume and ease of manipulation go up. Putting this technology to work in the EU is a total inversion.”
    “Mobiles, satellites and social media are the holy trinity of movement prediction”

    Justin Ginnetti, head of data and analysis at the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre in Switzerland, made a similar point. His organisation monitors movements to help humanitarian groups provide food, shelter and aid to those forced from their homes, but he casts a skeptical eye on governments using the same technology in the context of migration.

    “Many governments – within the EU and elsewhere – are very interested in these technologies, for reasons that are not the same as ours,” he told the Bureau. He called such technologies “a nuclear fly swatter,” adding: “The key question is: What problem are you really trying to solve with it? For many governments, it’s not preparing to ‘better respond to inflow of people’ – it’s raising red flags, to identify those en route and prevent them from arriving.”
    Eye in the sky

    A key player in marketing this concept was the European Space Agency (ESA) – an organisation based in Paris, with a major spaceport in French Guiana. The ESA’s pitch was to combine its space assets with other people’s data. “Could you be leveraging space technology and data for the benefit of life on Earth?” a recent presentation from the organisation on “disruptive smart technologies” asked. “We’ll work together to make your idea commercially viable.”

    By 2016, technologists at the ESA had spotted an opportunity. “Europe is being confronted with the most significant influxes of migrants and refugees in its history,” a presentation for their Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems Programme stated. “One burning issue is the lack of timely information on migration trends, flows and rates. Big data applications have been recognised as a potentially powerful tool.” It decided to assess how it could harness such data.

    The ESA reached out to various European agencies, including EASO and Frontex, to offer a stake in what it called “big data applications to boost preparedness and response to migration”. The space agency would fund initial feasibility stages, but wanted any operational work to be jointly funded.

    One such feasibility study was carried out by GMV, a privately owned tech group covering banking, defence, health, telecommunications and satellites. GMV announced in a press release in August 2017 that the study would “assess the added value of big data solutions in the migration sector, namely the reduction of safety risks for migrants, the enhancement of border controls, as well as prevention and response to security issues related with unexpected migration movements”. It would do this by integrating “multiple space assets” with other sources including mobile phones and social media.

    When contacted by the Bureau, a spokeswoman from GMV said that, contrary to the press release, “nothing in the feasibility study related to the enhancement of border controls”.

    In the same year, the technology multinational CGI teamed up with the Dutch Statistics Office to explore similar questions. They started by looking at data around asylum flows from Syria and at how satellite images and social media could indicate changes in migration patterns in Niger, a key route into Europe. Following this experiment, they approached EASO in October 2017. CGI’s presentation of the work noted that at the time EASO was looking for a social media analysis tool that could monitor Facebook groups, predict arrivals of migrants at EU borders, and determine the number of “hotspots” and migrant shelters. CGI pitched a combined project, co-funded by the ESA, to start in 2019 and expand to serve more organisations in 2020.
    The proposal was to identify “hotspot activities”, using phone data to group individuals “according to where they spend the night”

    The idea was called Migration Radar 2.0. The ESA wrote that “analysing social media data allows for better understanding of the behaviour and sentiments of crowds at a particular geographic location and a specific moment in time, which can be indicators of possible migration movements in the immediate future”. Combined with continuous monitoring from space, the result would be an “early warning system” that offered potential future movements and routes, “as well as information about the composition of people in terms of origin, age, gender”.

    Internal notes released by EASO to the Bureau show the sheer range of companies trying to get a slice of the action. The agency had considered offers of services not only from the ESA, GMV, the Dutch Statistics Office and CGI, but also from BIP, a consulting firm, the aerospace group Thales Alenia, the geoinformation specialist EGEOS and Vodafone.

    Some of the pitches were better received than others. An EASO analyst who took notes on the various proposals remarked that “most oversell a bit”. They went on: “Some claimed they could trace GSM [ie mobile networks] but then clarified they could do it for Venezuelans only, and maybe one or two countries in Africa.” Financial implications were not always clearly provided. On the other hand, the official noted, the ESA and its consortium would pay 80% of costs and “we can get collaboration on something we plan to do anyway”.

    The features on offer included automatic alerts, a social media timeline, sentiment analysis, “animated bubbles with asylum applications from countries of origin over time”, the detection and monitoring of smuggling sites, hotspot maps, change detection and border monitoring.

    The document notes a group of services available from Vodafone, for example, in the context of a proposed project to monitor asylum centres in Italy. The proposal was to identify “hotspot activities”, using phone data to group individuals either by nationality or “according to where they spend the night”, and also to test if their movements into the country from abroad could be back-tracked. A tentative estimate for the cost of a pilot project, spread over four municipalities, came to €250,000 – of which an unspecified amount was for “regulatory (privacy) issues”.

    Stumbling blocks

    Elsewhere, efforts to harness social media data for similar purposes were proving problematic. A September 2017 UN study tried to establish whether analysing social media posts, specifically on Twitter, “could provide insights into ... altered routes, or the conversations PoC [“persons of concern”] are having with service providers, including smugglers”. The hypothesis was that this could “better inform the orientation of resource allocations, and advocacy efforts” - but the study was unable to conclude either way, after failing to identify enough relevant data on Twitter.

    The ESA pressed ahead, with four feasibility studies concluding in 2018 and 2019. The Migration Radar project produced a dashboard that showcased the use of satellite imagery for automatically detecting changes in temporary settlement, as well as tools to analyse sentiment on social media. The prototype received positive reviews, its backers wrote, encouraging them to keep developing the product.

    CGI was effusive about the predictive power of its technology, which could automatically detect “groups of people, traces of trucks at unexpected places, tent camps, waste heaps and boats” while offering insight into “the sentiments of migrants at certain moments” and “information that is shared about routes and motives for taking certain routes”. Armed with this data, the company argued that it could create a service which could predict the possible outcomes of migration movements before they happened.

    The ESA’s other “big data applications” study had identified a demand among EU agencies and other potential customers for predictive analyses to ensure “preparedness” and alert systems for migration events. A package of services was proposed, using data drawn from social media and satellites.

    Both projects were slated to evolve into a second, operational phase. But this seems to have never become reality. CGI told the Bureau that “since the completion of the [Migration Radar] project, we have not carried out any extra activities in this domain”.

    The ESA told the Bureau that its studies had “confirmed the usefulness” of combining space technology and big data for monitoring migration movements. The agency added that its corporate partners were working on follow-on projects despite “internal delays”.

    EASO itself told the Bureau that it “took a decision not to get involved” in the various proposals it had received.

    Specialists found a “striking absence” of agreed upon core principles when using the new technologies

    But even as these efforts slowed, others have been pursuing similar goals. The European Commission’s Knowledge Centre on Migration and Demography has proposed a “Big Data for Migration Alliance” to address data access, security and ethics concerns. A new partnership between the ESA and GMV – “Bigmig" – aims to support “migration management and prevention” through a combination of satellite observation and machine-learning techniques (the company emphasised to the Bureau that its focus was humanitarian). And a consortium of universities and private sector partners – GMV among them – has just launched a €3 million EU-funded project, named Hummingbird, to improve predictions of migration patterns, including through analysing phone call records, satellite imagery and social media.

    At a conference in Berlin in October 2019, dozens of specialists from academia, government and the humanitarian sector debated the use of these new technologies for “forecasting human mobility in contexts of crises”. Their conclusions raised numerous red flags. They found a “striking absence” of agreed upon core principles. It was hard to balance the potential good with ethical concerns, because the most useful data tended to be more specific, leading to greater risks of misuse and even, in the worst case scenario, weaponisation of the data. Partnerships with corporations introduced transparency complications. Communication of predictive findings to decision makers, and particularly the “miscommunication of the scope and limitations associated with such findings”, was identified as a particular problem.

    The full consequences of relying on artificial intelligence and “employing large scale, automated, and combined analysis of datasets of different sources” to predict movements in a crisis could not be foreseen, the workshop report concluded. “Humanitarian and political actors who base their decisions on such analytics must therefore carefully reflect on the potential risks.”

    A fresh crisis

    Until recently, discussion of such risks remained mostly confined to scientific papers and NGO workshops. The Covid-19 pandemic has brought it crashing into the mainstream.

    Some see critical advantages to using call data records to trace movements and map the spread of the virus. “Using our mobile technology, we have the potential to build models that help to predict broadly how the virus might move,” an O2 spokesperson said in March. But others believe that it is too late for this to be useful. The UK’s chief scientific officer, Patrick Vallance, told a press conference in March that using this type of data “would have been a good idea in January”.

    Like the 2015 refugee crisis, the global emergency offers an opportunity for industry to get ahead of the curve with innovative uses of big data. At a summit in Downing Street on 11 March, Dominic Cummings asked tech firms “what [they] could bring to the table” to help the fight against Covid-19.

    Human rights advocates worry about the longer term effects of such efforts, however. “Right now, we’re seeing states around the world roll out powerful new surveillance measures and strike up hasty partnerships with tech companies,” Anna Bacciarelli, a technology researcher at Amnesty International, told the Bureau. “While states must act to protect people in this pandemic, it is vital that we ensure that invasive surveillance measures do not become normalised and permanent, beyond their emergency status.”

    More creative methods of surveillance and prediction are not necessarily answering the right question, others warn.

    “The single largest determinant of Covid-19 mortality is healthcare system capacity,” said Sean McDonald, a senior fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation, who studied the use of phone data in the west African Ebola outbreak of 2014-5. “But governments are focusing on the pandemic as a problem of people management rather than a problem of building response capacity. More broadly, there is nowhere near enough proof that the science or math underlying the technologies being deployed meaningfully contribute to controlling the virus at all.”

    Legally, this type of data processing raises complicated questions. While European data protection law - the GDPR - generally prohibits processing of “special categories of personal data”, including ethnicity, beliefs, sexual orientation, biometrics and health, it allows such processing in a number of instances (among them public health emergencies). In the case of refugee movement prediction, there are signs that the law is cracking at the seams.
    “There is nowhere near enough proof that the science or math underlying the technologies being deployed meaningfully contribute to controlling the virus at all.”

    Under GDPR, researchers are supposed to make “impact assessments” of how their data processing can affect fundamental rights. If they find potential for concern they should consult their national information commissioner. There is no simple way to know whether such assessments have been produced, however, or whether they were thoroughly carried out.

    Researchers engaged with crunching mobile phone data point to anonymisation and aggregation as effective tools for ensuring privacy is maintained. But the solution is not straightforward, either technically or legally.

    “If telcos are using individual call records or location data to provide intel on the whereabouts, movements or activities of migrants and refugees, they still need a legal basis to use that data for that purpose in the first place – even if the final intelligence report itself does not contain any personal data,” said Ben Hayes, director of AWO, a data rights law firm and consultancy. “The more likely it is that the people concerned may be identified or affected, the more serious this matter becomes.”

    More broadly, experts worry that, faced with the potential of big data technology to illuminate movements of groups of people, the law’s provisions on privacy begin to seem outdated.

    “We’re paying more attention now to privacy under its traditional definition,” Nathaniel Raymond said. “But privacy is not the same as group legibility.” Simply put, while issues around the sensitivity of personal data can be obvious, the combinations of seemingly unrelated data that offer insights about what small groups of people are doing can be hard to foresee, and hard to mitigate. Raymond argues that the concept of privacy as enshrined in the newly minted data protection law is anachronistic. As he puts it, “GDPR is already dead, stuffed and mounted. We’re increasing vulnerability under the colour of law.”

    https://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/stories/2020-04-28/monitoring-being-pitched-to-fight-covid-19-was-first-tested-o
    #cobaye #surveillance #réfugiés #covid-19 #coronavirus #test #smartphone #téléphones_portables #Frontex #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #Shin_Bet #internet #big_data #droits_humains #réseaux_sociaux #intelligence_prédictive #European_Asylum_Support_Office (#EASO) #EDPS #protection_des_données #humanitaire #images_satellites #technologie #European_Space_Agency (#ESA) #GMV #CGI #Niger #Facebook #Migration_Radar_2.0 #early_warning_system #BIP #Thales_Alenia #EGEOS #complexe_militaro-industriel #Vodafone #GSM #Italie #twitter #détection #routes_migratoires #systèmes_d'alerte #satellites #Knowledge_Centre_on_Migration_and_Demography #Big_Data for_Migration_Alliance #Bigmig #machine-learning #Hummingbird #weaponisation_of_the_data #IA #intelligence_artificielle #données_personnelles

    ping @etraces @isskein @karine4 @reka

    signalé ici par @sinehebdo :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/849167

  • In war-torn Middle East countries, pandemic aid is hard to come by - The Hill
    A man in eastern Syria arrived at a hospital in the city of Qamishli and died days later of what was suspected to be the coronavirus, according to reports. However, it took weeks for the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Syrian government in Damascus to provide the U.S.-backed local authorities with confirmation that he died of the virus, making it harder to control the spread of the contagion. Syria is one of many countries in the Middle East divided by civil conflicts and proxy wars, and lack of government control of portions of the country. The pandemic has thrust these divided countries under the spotlight because international organizations and local states have not been able to provide access to testing consistently across battle lines.

    #Covid19#Syrie#Rojava#Kurdes#Economie#Russie#Santé#ONG#Humanitaire#migrant#réfugiés#migration
    https://thehill.com/opinion/international/494157-in-war-torn-middle-east-countries-pandemic-aid-is-hard-to-come-by

  • Coronavirus Update: First Case in Northeast Syria as More Businesses Reopen- The Syria report
    The past week saw a modest uptick in Syria’s confirmed Covid-19 cases, but the apparently slow infection rate has allowed the government to start reopening some shops and official agencie.
    Meanwhile, Russian news agencies reported that Moscow had offered Syria 50 ventilators and 10,000 testing kits, much higher numbers than China provided. An additional 150 ventilators are forthcoming, according to the reports. If true, this would significantly boost Syria’s capacity from an estimated 325 ventilators currently.
    #Covid19#Syrie#Rojava#Kurdes#Economie#Russie#Santé#ONG#Humanitaire#migrant#réfugiés#migration

    https://www.syria-report.com/news/economy/coronavirus-update-first-case-northeast-syria-more-businesses-reopen-f

  • Coronavirus: Meet the Syrian refugee in Gaza running a one-man charity - Middle East Eye
    Anas al-Qatorji gets donations through social media to buy essential items for people in need amid the pandemic that’s left many without a stable income
    #Covid-19#Gaza#Réfugié_Syrien#Humanitaire#confinement#Société_civile#Entraide#migrant#migration

    https://youtu.be/EW8VnF3N9bI


    https://www.middleeasteye.net/video/coronavirus-meet-syrian-refugee-gaza-running-one-man-charity-amid-pan

  • Iraqi Kurdistan rejects NGO accusations of blocking aid to Syrian Kurds - Al Monitor
    The government of the Iraqi Kurdistan Region is responding with anger to relief organizations’ claims that it is blocking aid to the northeast Syria as COVID-19 rages, with officials saying it has “bent over backward” to help.
    #Covid19#Syrie#Rojava#Kurdes#Iraq#KRG#Santé#Blocus#Frontière#ONG#Humanitaire#migrant#réfugiés#migration

    https://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2020/04/iraq-kurdistan-region-msf-aid-covid19-coronavirus-syria.html#ixzz6KOC5VO

  • Politics hampers humanitarian response in Rojava- Rudaw
    World powers, preoccupied with containing the COVID-19 pandemic at home, have paid little notice to the potentially dire situation in Rojava. The autonomous administration in northeast Syria — while claiming de facto governing authority in most of the northeast — without international recognition, faces complications receiving help from the outside. The fractious politics of the country further hampers efforts of NGOs to facilitate humanitarian assistance.

    #Covid19#Syrie#Rojava#Kurdes#Hopital#Déplacés_internes#Santé#politique#ONG#Humanitaire#migrant#réfugiés#migration

    https://www.rudaw.net/english/middleeast/syria/coronavirus-rojava-humanitarian-aid-22042020

  • #Déconfinement_sélectif et #expérimentations_sanitaires : la #colère et le #dégoût

    La décision présidentielle de rouvrir les #écoles, #collèges et #lycées le 11 mai n’a dupé personne, que ce soit parmi les professeurs ou ailleurs : ce dont il s’agit, ce n’est pas de pallier les #inégalités_scolaires qu’engendrerait l’arrêt des cours, ce qui est l’argument officiel, mais tout bonnement de remettre les #parents au #travail. Que cette décision intervienne deux jours après les déclarations du président du #Medef invitant les #entrepreneurs à « relancer l’activité » sans plus attendre n’a sûrement rien d’un hasard du calendrier.

    Selon la méthode désormais classique des interventions présidentielles, le ministre #Blanquer est intervenu le lendemain pour « préciser les modalités » de cette #réouverture. Est alors apparu le caractère fonctionnel de ce qui pouvait n’être qu’un effet de discours parmi d’autres : la réouverture des écoles ne se fera pas d’un seul coup le 11 mai, mais d’abord dans les #quartiers_populaires et les #régions_rurales. La communication ministérielle joue elle aussi sur la corde compassionnelle, voire #humanitaire : « le premier critère est d’abord social, les publics les plus fragiles ».

    C’est donc ces « publics les plus fragiles » qui auront la chance de reprendre le travail en premier. Les autres, les moins fragiles, c’est-à-dire les plus favorisés, c’est-à-dire ceux qui télétravaillent actuellement depuis leur résidence secondaire en Dordogne pourront garder leurs enfants chez eux et rester à l’abri du virus. Entre ces deux catégories, tout un tas de gens se demandent encore à quelle sauce ils vont être mangés.

    Il est intéressant de noter que ce sont précisément ces « #publics_les_plus_fragiles » qui se trouvaient déjà être au travail, que c’est parmi ces « publics » que se trouvent ceux pour lesquels la période du confinement n’aura jamais signifié un arrêt de l’activité. La différence est qu’il s’agit là de poser les condition d’une réouverture générale de cet indispensable vivier de #main-d’œuvre bon marché que sont les quartiers populaires, de remettre tout le monde au travail.

    C’est donc encore une fois sur les plus pauvres que la #politique_compassionnelle toute particulière du gouvernement va venir s’abattre, comme un fléau supplémentaire.

    Cette politique peut et doit se lire à plusieurs niveaux, puisque ce qui caractérise toute crise véritable de la totalité capitaliste c’est son existence simultanée à tous les niveaux de cette totalité. Ici, il s’agit d’une #crise_sanitaire qui existe dans ses effets comme dans la gestion de ceux-ci aux niveaux politique, économique, social, etc.

    Les considérations d’ordre purement sanitaires sont alors intégrées à la chaîne des décisions politiques, à leur niveau particulier, et conditionnées à la logique d’ensemble de ces décisions, qui est d’ordre économique et social. La #recherche_scientifique elle-même intervient à son niveau dans la production des savoirs permettant de formuler les doctrines, les thèses étant sélectionnées non tant en raison de leur rigueur que de leur utilité pratique dans les décisions qui fondent l’action de l’Etat. Le but étant de préserver l’ordre économique et social, c’est-à-dire prioritairement, dans le cas qui nous concerne, de relancer l’#activité_économique sur laquelle repose l’ensemble social.

    Mais s’il s’agit bien, d’un point de vue économique, de remettre les gens au travail, et en particulier les plus pauvres, qui sont aussi ceux dont le travail ne peut se faire par internet, qui doivent mettre les mains à la pâte et au mortier, cette remise au travail n’est pas dépourvue d’arrière-pensées d’ordre sanitaire, qui ne sont pas sur la vie des prolétaires d’un meilleur effet que les considérations purement économiques.

    Ces arrière-pensées ne sont pas mises en avant dans les discours du gouvernement, puisque le discours public reste aujourd’hui celui de « la santé d’abord », ce que tout le monde entend comme la santé de chacun. Le problème est que la « santé » qui est contenue dans le terme « sanitaire » n’a pas le même sens pour nous en tant qu’individus que pour l’Etat qui se trouve être en charge de sa gestion : il s’agit alors de « santé publique », ce qui est d’un tout autre ordre que la santé tout court, celle que l’on se souhaite pour la nouvelle année. Dans cette optique, la santé publique est une chose toute différente de l’activité qui a pour finalité de soigner des gens. Les soignants font l’expérience quotidienne de cette différence. Pour eux comme pour les malades, et pour tous ceux qui doivent travailler quotidiennement au risque de contracter et transmettre le virus, ce sont tout autant les défaillances bien réelles de la gestion sanitaire de la crise qu’il nous faut redouter, que la pleine prise en charge de cette même gestion.

    En l’occurrence, pour l’Etat français, la doctrine officielle reste celle mise en œuvre par l’Etat chinois (qui s’embarrasse moins de discours compassionnels), qui est aussi préconisée par l’OMS et par son propre Conseil scientifique : celle du confinement des populations. Le virus circulant à travers les contacts individuels, il s’agit de limiter ces contacts. L’autre doctrine est celle de l’immunité collective, qui reste cependant valable, mais à condition de disposer des vaccins nécessaires, comme pour une grippe ordinaire ; on vaccine les plus fragiles, on laisse le virus courir dans le reste de la population, qui finit par s’immuniser à son contact répété. En revanche, sans vaccin ni traitement efficace, si on laisse courir le virus en espérant obtenir une immunité de masse, il faut s’attendre selon les projections, à un bilan de 40 à 80 millions de morts à l’échelle planétaire, ce qui est insoutenable en termes économiques, sanitaires, et sociaux.

    Cependant, l’activité économique ne peut pas cesser totalement en attendant qu’on dispose des traitements et vaccins nécessaires. Il faut donc pour l’Etat qui est en charge de cette crise trouver des solutions intermédiaires, qui combinent les nécessités sanitaires et les nécessités économiques.

    Actuellement, le niveau de contamination dans la population française est environ de 10%, pour obtenir une immunité collective il faudrait atteindre un seuil de 60%, on voit qu’on est loin du compte.

    En revanche, les « publics les plus fragiles » sont ceux qui ont été le plus touchés par le virus, et ce non pas seulement en raison d’une surmortalité liée à des cofacteurs tels que problèmes cardio-vasculaires et autres pathologies qui se retrouvent parmi des populations dont l’état sanitaire est déjà dégradé, voire aux problèmes liés au mal-logement, etc., mais d’abord parce que ces populations n’ont jamais véritablement cessé de travailler. En clair, s’ils ont été les plus frappés c’est qu’ils ont été les plus exposés. Mais, outre d’en faire un « public » particulièrement frappé, cela crée aussi des zones sociales où le niveau de contamination dépasse largement les 10% nationaux.

    C’est pour cela qu’on peut se demander si le gouvernement ne serait pas en train de mener sur ces territoires (en gros, sur les banlieues) une expérimentation socio-sanitaire in vivo, c’est-à-dire à tenter d’obtenir une immunité de masse, ou en tout cas de voir si cette immunité est possible, dans quelles conditions et à quel coût sanitaire, et ce sur les dos des plus pauvres. On voit ici que cette expérimentation est rendue à la fois possible par les seuils de contamination induits par la pauvreté dans ces zones, et nécessaire par la demande pressante de reprendre la production, et donc de libérer de la main-d’œuvre.

    C’est la doctrine du stop and go, alternative au pur et simple laisser-faire cher aux libéraux qui est ici testée sur les habitants des quartiers populaires : une fois passé le premier pic épidémique et les capacités de soin désengorgées, on fait redémarrer l’activité, en sachant que des recontaminations vont avoir lieu, et qu’un nouveau pic épidémique va se produire, et on renouvelle l’opération jusqu’à absorption du virus par la population. Il faut simplement souligner que cette méthode est uniquement théorique, et qu’elle repose sur l’hypothèse que ce virus réagisse comme ceux sur lesquels on l’a bâtie. Et que donc, on ne sait pas si cela va fonctionner, d’où le caractère expérimental de la chose.

    Par ailleurs, avant même d’avoir des réponses sur la possibilité d’obtenir une immunité de masse à un coût sanitaire acceptable, la réouverture des écoles en milieu rural revient à ouvrir la vanne du virus sur des régions qui ont été jusqu’ici peu touchées, en espérant que la protection par masques et gel et le fait de maintenir les plus fragiles en confinement (personnes âgées et personnes souffrant de pathologies entraînant une surmortalité) suffira à limiter la casse.

    On assiste donc ici à un zonage socio-sanitaire de l’extension du virus. Ce zonage suit une logique à la fois sanitaire, politique et économique. On voit ici à quel point la logique sanitaire ne recouvre pas celle de la santé des individus, ni même une logique scientifique relevant d’une gestion épidémiologique de cette crise. La logique ici à l’œuvre est celle de la gestion de la population par l’Etat, et si on voit à quel point cette gestion convient aux impératifs économiques dont l’Etat est le garant, il faut aussi comprendre les a priori sociaux qui se cachent derrière cette gestion. Il apparaît ici qu’en cas d’un deuxième pic épidémique, l’Etat a choisi de placer en « première ligne » des populations qu’on peut qualifier de son point de vue d’expendable, et vis à vis desquelles au cas où le déconfinement donnerait lieu à des mouvements de protestation comme c’est déjà le cas un peu partout, une réponse autoritaire serait facile à justifier et à mettre en œuvre, puisqu’on la mène déjà au quotidien. Le caractère expérimental de ce déconfinement sélectif intègre la possibilités des révoltes comme une variable supplémentaire.

    On ne détaillera pas ici à quel point ce sont les plus « fragiles socialement » qui ont été le plus touchés par les conséquences de l’épidémie de Covid-19, avec quelle perversion logique le désastre s’articule chez les plus pauvres pour devenir plus désastreux encore, ni à quel point les conséquences se sont pour eux fait sentir à tous niveaux : pour les femmes, par l’accroissement des violences conjugales et la responsabilité accrue de la reproduction familiale occasionnée à l’échelle mondiale par le chômage, le manque de ressources, la maladie, pour les racisés (on connaît l’effrayante disproportion raciale des décès liés au Covid-19 aux Etats-Unis), pour les prisonniers et les réfugiés, pour les travailleurs les plus précaires, etc. Il faudra y revenir par ailleurs. Il nous fallait dire ici, contre ceux qui veulent « sauver le système de santé », que la sollicitude sanitaire de l’Etat est aussi terrible pour les prolétaires que ses défaillances, et que cette fameuse économie censée être source de tous les maux.

    Tout cela devra être précisé. Pour l’heure on se contentera de dire ce que l’utilisation de cette « fragilité » aux fins d’un retour à la normale qui est lui-même ce qui engendre et justifie ces « fragilités », nous inspire de colère et de dégoût.

    https://carbureblog.com/2020/04/16/deconfinement-selectif-et-experimentations-sanitaires-la-colere-et-le-d
    #déconfinement #confinement #France #11_mai #classes_sociales #inégalités #télétravail #santé_publique #gestion_sanitaire #défaillances #vaccin #immunité_de_groupe #immunité_collective #banlieues #expérimentation #stop_and_go #pic_épidémique #zonage_socio-sanitaire #géographie #gestion_de_la_population #pauvres #fragilité
    via @isskein et @reka

  • Amid coronavirus concerns, some US-funded aid work paused in northeast Syria- Al Monitor
    The global spread of the coronavirus and its reported trickle into Syria has forced the United States and its local partners to pause some of their humanitarian activities in the country’s northeast.

    #Covid19#Syrie#migrant#migration#camps#humanitaire#guerre

    https://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2020/04/coronavirus-concerns-pause-aid-work-northeast-syria.html

  • Syrian camps brace for potential COVID-19 outbreak- Al Monitor
    Humanitarian groups fear catastrophic consequences if the coronavirus reaches overcrowded camps for the displaced in opposition-held areas in northwest Syria, so the organizations are boosting their efforts to raise awareness among the people living there

    #Covid19#Syrie#migrant#migration#camps#humanitaire#guerre

    https://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2020/04/syria-displaced-camps-aleppo-coronavirus-medical.html

  • We will contiue distributing food aid to the displaced for two months – Syriac organization in Qamishli- North Press Agency
    The Syriac Cross organization (Concerned with Relief Affairs, based in Qamishli), announced on Tuesday that it will continue providing food aid to the displaced people of Sere Kaniye (Ras al-Ain) and Tal Abyad during this month and the next.
    #Covid19#Syrie#Nord-Syrie#migrant#migration#syriaque#humanitaire#IDP

    https://npasyria.com/en/blog.php?id_blog=2202&sub_blog=12&name_blog=We+will+contiue+distributing+f

  • Coronavirus drives opening of Turkish hospital in Gaza-Al Monitor
    The Palestine-Turkish Friendship Hospital has finally opened in the Gaza Strip to help fight the coronavirus outbreak, which authorities fear will quickly become a humanitarian disaste
    #Covid-19#Palestine#Turquie#Gaza#Hopital#Santé#migrant#humanitaire#migration

    https://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2020/04/gaza-turkish-hospital-islamic-university-fight-coronavirus.html

  • A Idlib, « le coronarivus semble peu de chose pour les Syriens à côté de ce qu’ils ont connu »-Le Parisien
    " Les dernières offensives lancées à partir du mois de décembre par les Russes et les forces du régime ont vu refluer des milliers de personnes, dont l’obsession est aujourd’hui de trouver un toit.La moitié loge sous des tentes. L’autre urgence pour ces familles est bien sûr de trouver à se nourrir. Ces gens ont perdu leur travail et vivent très souvent bien en dessous du seuil de pauvreté. Ils ne prennent pas au sérieux la gravité du Covid-19. Les passants vont et viennent dans les rues sans précaution et les enfants dont les écoles sont fermées sont très nombreux à traîner. Le problème est qu’il n’y a pas de pouvoir à Idlib pour imposer des mesures de protection contre le virus. Donc les gens n’en font qu’à leur tête ."
    #Covid-19#Syrie#Idlib#Pandémie#Guerre#Humanitaire#migrant

    http://www.leparisien.fr/international/a-idlib-le-coronarivus-semble-peu-de-chose-aux-syriens-a-cote-de-ce-qu-il

  • #Coronavirus : moins d’#humanitaire, plus de #politique !

    Nous devons sortir de la pensée humanitaire qui apporte avant tout des réponses techniques et repenser en des termes politiques le #bien_public, la #solidarité et la #justice_sociale, écrit Julie Billaud, professeure adjointe d’anthropologie à l’Institut de hautes études internationales et du développement.

    Ce qui est frappant dans la manière dont les réponses à la « crise du coronavirus » sont abordées par nos gouvernements, c’est l’insistance exclusive sur les mesures biomédicales. Tout se passe comme si l’#état_d’urgence qui nous est imposé était la réponse la plus évidente dans des circonstances exceptionnelles. Autrement dit, la gestion de la « #crise » relèverait d’enjeux purement techniques. D’un côté, il s’agit de promouvoir au sein de la population le #civisme_sanitaire : se laver les mains, porter un masque, rester confinés, maintenir les distances physiques. De l’autre, la réponse médicale s’articule en termes d’#urgences : réquisitionner des lits de réanimation supplémentaires, construire des hôpitaux de campagne, appeler en renfort le personnel médical retraité et les étudiants en médecine.

    Gouvernance #biopolitique

    Ce que nous voyons à l’œuvre, c’est le passage à un mode de gouvernance humanitaire et biopolitique de la #santé dont l’objectif est d’administrer les collectivités humaines par le biais de statistiques, d’indicateurs et autres instruments de mesure. Le temps presse, nous dit-on, et la fin justifie les moyens. Il faut reprendre le contrôle sur la vie dans le sens collectif du terme et non pas sur la vie humaine individuelle. Voyons, par exemple, comment le gouvernement britannique a pour un moment soulevé la possibilité de « l’immunisation de groupe » acceptant ainsi de sacrifier la vie des personnes les plus vulnérables, notamment celle des personnes âgées, pour le bien du plus grand nombre. Voyons encore comment les migrants vivant dans les camps des îles grecques sont perçus comme un danger biomédical à contenir. Réduits à des matières polluantes, ils ont perdu leur statut d’êtres humains. Leur #isolement ne vise pas à les protéger mais plutôt à protéger la population locale, et la population européenne en général, contre ce virus « venu de l’étranger ». L’#exclusion des « autres » (c’est-à-dire des #étrangers) est justifiée comme étant le seul moyen efficace de sauver « nos vies ».

    Il faut reprendre le contrôle sur la vie dans le sens collectif du terme et non pas sur la vie humaine individuelle

    Mais au-delà des justifications humanitaires du #triage entre les vies à sauver et celles à sacrifier, la #raison_humanitaire tend à neutraliser la politique et à passer sous silence les raisons profondes pour lesquelles nous nous retrouvons dans une telle situation. L’importance croissante des arguments moraux dans les discours politiques obscurcit les conséquences disciplinaires à l’œuvre dans la manière dont les règles sont imposées au nom de la #préservation_de_la_vie. En faisant de l’#expertise la seule forme valable d’engagement démocratique, des activités qui étaient auparavant considérées comme relevant de la politique et donc soumises au débat public se sont vues réduites à des questions techniques. Essayons d’imaginer à quoi ressemblerait notre situation si la santé était encore considérée comme un bien public. Sans le cadre discursif de l’#urgence, il serait peut-être possible d’examiner de manière critique les raisons pour lesquelles une organisation comme Médecins sans frontières a décidé de lancer une mission #Covid-19 en France, un pays qui était considéré il y a encore peu comme doté d’un des meilleurs systèmes de santé du monde.

    Sortir de la pensée humanitaire

    La crise du coronavirus met en évidence comment quatre décennies de #politiques_néolibérales ont détruit nos #systèmes_de_santé et, plus largement, ont diminué nos capacités de #résilience. Les scientifiques ces derniers jours ont rappelé que la recherche sur le coronavirus nécessite du temps et des moyens et ne peut pas se faire dans l’urgence, comme le modèle néolibéral de financement de la recherche le souhaiterait. Les services de santé, déjà surchargés avant la crise, ont besoin de moyens décents pour ne pas avoir à faire le #tri cruel entre les vies. Finalement, l’#environnement (non pas le profit) doit être notre priorité absolue à l’heure de l’effondrement des écosystèmes essentiels à la vie sur terre.

    En d’autres termes, nous devons sortir de la pensée humanitaire qui apporte avant tout des réponses techniques et repenser en des termes politiques le bien public, la solidarité et la justice sociale.

    https://www.letemps.ch/opinions/coronavirus-dhumanitaire-plus-politique
    #immunité_de_groupe #néolibéralisme

  • Les #outils_numériques de l’#humanitaire sont-ils compatibles avec le respect de la #vie_privée des #réfugiés ?

    Pour gérer les opérations humanitaires dans le camp de réfugiés syriens de #Zaatari en #Jordanie, les ONG ont mis en place des outils numériques, mais l’#innovation a un impact sur le personnel humanitaire comme sur les réfugiés. Travailler sur ce camp ouvert en 2012, où vivent 76 000 Syriens et travaillent 42 ONG, permet de s’interroger sur la célébration par le monde humanitaire de l’utilisation de #nouvelles_technologies pour venir en aide à des réfugiés.

    Après plusieurs années d’observation participative en tant que chargée d’évaluation pour une organisations non gouvernementales (ONG), je suis allée plusieurs fois à Amman et dans le camp de Zaatari, en Jordanie, entre 2017 et 2018, pour rencontrer des travailleurs humanitaires de 13 organisations différentes et agences de l’Onu et 10 familles vivant dans le camp, avec l’aide d’un interprète.

    Le camp de Zaatari a été ouvert dès 2012 par le Haut Commissariat aux Réfugiés pour répondre à la fuite des Syriens vers la Jordanie. Prévu comme une « #installation_temporaire », il peut accueillir jusqu’à 120 000 réfugiés. Les ONG et les agences des Nations Unies y distribuent de la nourriture et de l’eau potable, y procurent des soins et proposent un logement dans des caravanes.

    Pour faciliter la #gestion de cet espace de 5,2 km2 qui accueille 76 000 personnes, de très nombreux rapports, cartes et bases de données sont réalisés par les ONG. Les #données_géographiques, particulièrement, sont collectées avec des #smartphones et partagées via des cartes et des #tableaux_de_bord sur des #plateformes_en_ligne, soit internes au camp comme celle du Haut Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (HCR), soit ouvertes à tous comme #Open_Street_Map. Ainsi, grâce à des images par satellite, on peut suivre les déplacements des abris des réfugiés dans le camp qui ont souvent lieu la nuit. Ces #mouvements modifient la #géographie_du_camp et la densité de population par zones, obligeant les humanitaires à modifier les services, tel l’apport en eau potable.

    Les réfugiés payent avec leur iris

    Ces outils font partie de ce que j’appelle « l’#humanitaire_numérique_innovant ». Le scan de l’#iris tient une place à part parmi ces outils car il s’intéresse à une partie du #corps du réfugié. Cette donnée biométrique est associée à la technologie de paiement en ligne appelée #blockchain et permet de régler ses achats au #supermarché installé dans le camp par une société jordanienne privée. Avant l’utilisation des #scanners à iris, les réfugiés recevaient une #carte_de_crédit qu’ils pouvaient utiliser dans divers magasins autour du camp, y compris dans des #échoppes appartenant à des réfugiés.

    Ils ne comprennent pas l’utilité pour eux d’avoir changé de système. Nour*, une réfugiée de 30 ans, trouvait que « la #carte_Visa était si facile » et craint de « devenir aveugle si [elle] continue à utiliser [son] iris. Cela prend tellement de temps : “ouvre les yeux”, “regarde à gauche”, etc. ». Payer avec son corps n’a rien d’anecdotique quand on est réfugié dans un camp et donc dépendant d’une assistance mensuelle dont on ne maîtrise pas les modalités. Nisrine, une autre réfugiée, préférait quand « n’importe qui pouvait aller au supermarché [pour quelqu’un d’autre]. Maintenant une [seule] personne doit y aller et c’est plus difficile ». Sans transport en commun dans le camp, se rendre au supermarché est une contrainte physique pour ces femmes.

    Le principal argument des ONG en faveur du développement du scan de l’iris est de réduire le risque de #fraude. Le #Programme_Alimentaire_Mondial (#Pam) contrôle pourtant le genre de denrées qui peuvent être achetées en autorisant ou non leur paiement avec la somme placée sur le compte des réfugiés. C’est le cas par exemple pour des aliments comme les chips, ou encore pour les protections hygiéniques. Pour ces biens-là, les réfugiés doivent compléter en liquide.

    Des interactions qui changent entre le personnel humanitaire et les réfugiés

    Les effets de ces #nouvelles_technologies se font aussi sentir dans les interactions entre le personnel du camp et les réfugiés. Chargés de collecter les #données, certains humanitaires doivent régulièrement interroger des jeunes hommes venant de zones rurales limitrophes (qui forment la majorité des réfugiés) sur leur hygiène ou leurs moyens de subsistance. Cela leur permet de créer des #indicateurs pour classer les réfugiés par catégories de #vulnérabilité et donc de #besoins. Ces interactions sont considérées par les réfugiés comme une intrusion dans leur espace de vie, à cause de la nature des questions posées, et sont pourtant devenues un des rares moments d’échanges entre ceux qui travaillent et vivent dans le camp.

    Le #classement des ménages et des individus doit se faire de manière objective pour savoir qui recevra quoi, mais les données collectées sont composites. Difficile pour les responsables de projets, directement interpellés par des réfugiés dans le camp, d’assumer les choix faits par des logiciels. C’est un exercice mathématique qui décide finalement de l’#allocation de l’aide et la majorité des responsables de programmes que j’ai interrogés ne connaissent pas son fonctionnement. Le processus de décision est retiré des mains du personnel humanitaire.

    Aucune évaluation de la #protection_des_données n’a été réalisée

    La vie privée de cette population qui a fui la guerre et trouvé refuge dans un camp est-elle bien protégée alors que toutes ces #données_personnelles sont récoltées ? Le journal en ligne The New Humanitarian rapportait en 2017 une importante fuite de données de bénéficiaires du Pam en Afrique de l’Ouest, détectée par une entreprise de protection de la donnée (https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/investigations/2017/11/27/security-lapses-aid-agency-leave-beneficiary-data-risk). En Jordanie, les #données_biométriques de l’iris des réfugiés circulent entre une banque privée et l’entreprise jordanienne qui exploite le supermarché, mais aucune évaluation de la protection des données n’a été réalisée, ni avant ni depuis la mise en œuvre de cette #innovation_technologique. Si la protection des données à caractère personnel est en train de devenir un objet de légalisation dans l’Union européenne (en particulier avec le Règlement Général sur la Protection des Données), elle n’a pas encore été incluse dans le #droit_humanitaire.

    De la collecte de données sur les pratiques d’hygiène à l’utilisation de données biométriques pour la distribution de l’#aide_humanitaire, les outils numériques suivent en continu l’histoire des réfugiés. Non pas à travers des récits personnels, mais sur la base de données chiffrées qui, pense-t-on, ne sauraient mentir. Pour sensibiliser le public à la crise humanitaire, les équipes de communication des agences des Nations Unies et des ONG utilisent pourtant des histoires humaines et non des chiffres.

    Les réfugiés eux-mêmes reçoivent peu d’information, voire aucune, sur ce que deviennent leurs données personnelles, ni sur leurs droits en matière de protection de données privées. La connexion Internet leur est d’ailleurs refusée, de peur qu’ils communiquent avec des membres du groupe État Islamique… La gestion d’un camp aussi vaste que celui de Zaatari bénéficie peut-être de ces technologies, mais peut-on collecter les #traces_numériques des activités quotidiennes des réfugiés sans leur demander ce qu’ils en pensent et sans garantir la protection de leurs données personnelles ?

    http://icmigrations.fr/2020/01/16/defacto-015-01

    #camps_de_réfugiés #numérique #asile #migrations #camps #surveillance #contrôle #biométrie #privatisation

    ping @etraces @reka @karine4 @isskein

  • Les #circulations en #santé : des #produits, des #savoirs, des #personnes en mouvement

    Les circulations en santé sont constituées d’une multitude de formes de mouvements et impliquent aussi bien des savoirs, des #normes_médicales, des produits de santé, des patients et des thérapeutes. L’objectif de ce dossier consiste ainsi à mieux saisir la manière dont les #corps, les #connaissances_médicales, les produits se transforment pendant et à l’issue des circulations. Ouvert sans limite de temps, ce dossier thématique se veut un espace pour documenter ces circulations plus ordinaires dans le champ de la santé.

    Sommaire :

    BLOUIN GENEST Gabriel, SHERROD Rebecca : Géographie virale et risques globaux : la circulation des risques sanitaires dans le contexte de la gouvernance globale de la santé.

    BROSSARD ANTONIELLI Alila : La production locale de #médicaments_génériques au #Mozambique à la croisée des circulations de #savoirs_pharmaceutiques.

    PETIT Véronique : Circulations et quêtes thérapeutiques en #santé_mentale au #Sénégal.

    TAREAU Marc-Alexandre, DEJOUHANET Lucie, PALISSE Marianne, ODONNE Guillaume : Circulations et échanges de plantes et de savoirs phyto-médicinaux sur la frontière franco-brésilienne.

    TISSERAND Chloé : Médecine à la frontière : le recours aux professionnels de santé afghans en contexte d’urgence humanitaire.

    #Calais #réfugiés_afghans #humanitaire #PASS #soins #accès_aux_soins

    https://rfst.hypotheses.org/les-circulations-en-sante-des-produits-des-savoirs-des-personnes-en
    #Brésil #humanitaire #Brésil #Guyane

    ping @fil

  • #Jeff_Crisp :

    “In the past 15 years, we seem to have gone from ’refugees being completely dependent on international aid’ to ’refugees being resilient entrepreneurs’. Both notions equally unsatisfactory!”

    Even worse, “refugees being globally connected entrepreneurs...”

    https://twitter.com/JFCrisp/status/1206418043712278528

    #résilience #dépendance #réfugiés #asile #migrations #discours #rhétorique #entrepreneurs #entreprenariat #indépendance #aide #charité #travail #humanitaire #humanitarianisme

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • #métaliste autour de #ORS, une #multinationale #suisse spécialisée dans l’ "#accueil" de demandeurs d’asile et #réfugiés

    Plein de liens que j’ai commencé à rassembler sur seenthis en 2015.

    –------

    Un article générique sur le business de l’asile, dont on parle aussi de ORS...

    Dans le #business de l’#humanitaire : doit-on tirer #profit des #réfugiés ?

    Des compagnies comme #European_Homecare ou #ORS spécialisées dans la provision de service aux migrants et réfugiés ont été accusées de #maltraitance dans les milieux carcéraux envers les gardes et les réfugiés.

    https://seenthis.net/messages/778253

    –----

    Le business des réfugiés
    https://seenthis.net/messages/889791

    –---------

    #Ruth_Metzler-Arnold préside le nouveau conseil consultatif international d’ORS pour les questions de migration
    https://seenthis.net/messages/883437

    –—

    Privatisation de l’asile | ORS, un empire « en construction »
    https://seenthis.net/messages/899916

    #privatisation #business #migrations #hébergement #logement

  • Le Niger, #nouvelle frontière de l’Europe et #laboratoire de l’asile

    Les politiques migratoires européennes, toujours plus restrictives, se tournent vers le Sahel, et notamment vers le Niger – espace de transit entre le nord et le sud du Sahara. Devenu « frontière » de l’Europe, environné par des pays en conflit, le Niger accueille un nombre important de réfugiés sur son sol et renvoie ceux qui n’ont pas le droit à cette protection. Il ne le fait pas seul. La présence de l’Union européenne et des organisations internationales est visible dans le pays ; des opérations militaires y sont menées par des armées étrangères, notamment pour lutter contre la pression terroriste à ses frontières... au risque de brouiller les cartes entre enjeux sécuritaires et enjeux humanitaires.

    On confond souvent son nom avec celui de son voisin anglophone, le Nigéria, et peu de gens savent le placer sur une carte. Pourtant, le Niger est un des grands pays du Sahel, cette bande désertique qui court de l’Atlantique à la mer Rouge, et l’un des rares pays stables d’Afrique de l’Ouest qui offrent encore une possibilité de transit vers la Libye et la Méditerranée. Environné par des pays en conflit ou touchés par le terrorisme de Boko Haram et d’autres groupes, le Niger accueille les populations qui fuient le Mali et la région du lac Tchad et celles évacuées de Libye.

    « Dans ce contexte d’instabilité régionale et de contrôle accru des déplacements, la distinction entre l’approche sécuritaire et l’approche humanitaire s’est brouillée », explique la chercheuse Florence Boyer, fellow de l’Institut Convergences Migrations, actuellement accueillie au Niger à l’Université Abdou Moumouni de Niamey. Géographe et anthropologue (affiliée à l’Urmis au sein de l’IRD, l’Institut de recherche pour le Développement), elle connaît bien le Niger, où elle se rend régulièrement depuis vingt ans pour étudier les migrations internes et externes des Nigériens vers l’Algérie ou la Libye voisines, au nord, et les pays du Golfe de Guinée, au sud et à l’ouest. Sa recherche porte actuellement sur le rôle que le Niger a accepté d’endosser dans la gestion des migrations depuis 2014, à la demande de plusieurs membres de l’Union européenne (UE) pris dans la crise de l’accueil des migrants.
    De la libre circulation au contrôle des frontières

    « Jusqu’à 2015, le Niger est resté cet espace traversé par des milliers d’Africains de l’Ouest et de Nigériens remontant vers la Libye sans qu’il y ait aucune entrave à la circulation ou presque », raconte la chercheuse. La plupart venaient y travailler. Peu tentaient la traversée vers l’Europe, mais dès le début des années 2000, l’UE, Italie en tête, cherche à freiner ce mouvement en négociant avec Kadhafi, déplaçant ainsi la frontière de l’Europe de l’autre côté de la Méditerranée. La chute du dictateur libyen, dans le contexte des révolutions arabes de 2011, bouleverse la donne. Déchirée par une guerre civile, la Libye peine à retenir les migrants qui cherchent une issue vers l’Europe. Par sa position géographique et sa relative stabilité, le Niger s’impose progressivement comme un partenaire de la politique migratoire de l’UE.

    « Le Niger est la nouvelle frontière de l’Italie. »

    Marco Prencipe, ambassadeur d’Italie à Niamey

    Le rôle croissant du Niger dans la gestion des flux migratoires de l’Afrique vers l’Europe a modifié les parcours des migrants, notamment pour ceux qui passent par Agadez, dernière ville du nord avant la traversée du Sahara. Membre du Groupe d’études et de recherches Migrations internationales, Espaces, Sociétés (Germes) à Niamey, Florence Boyer observe ces mouvements et constate la présence grandissante dans la capitale nigérienne du Haut-Commissariat des Nations-Unies pour les réfugiés (HCR) et de l’Organisation internationale des migrations (OIM) chargée, entre autres missions, d’assister les retours de migrants dans leur pays.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dlIwqYKrw7c

    « L’île de Lampedusa se trouve aussi loin du Nord de l’Italie que de la frontière nigérienne, note Marco Prencipe, l’ambassadeur d’Italie à Niamey, le Niger est la nouvelle frontière de l’Italie. » Une affirmation reprise par plusieurs fonctionnaires de la délégation de l’UE au Niger rencontrés par Florence Boyer et Pascaline Chappart. La chercheuse, sur le terrain à Niamey, effectue une étude comparée sur des mécanismes d’externalisation de la frontière au Niger et au Mexique. « Depuis plusieurs années, la politique extérieure des migrations de l’UE vise à délocaliser les contrôles et à les placer de plus en plus au sud du territoire européen, explique la postdoctorante à l’IRD, le mécanisme est complexe : les enjeux pour l’Europe sont à la fois communautaires et nationaux, chaque État membre ayant sa propre politique ».

    En novembre 2015, lors du sommet euro-africain de La Valette sur la migration, les autorités européennes lancent le Fonds fiduciaire d’urgence pour l’Afrique « en faveur de la stabilité et de la lutte contre les causes profondes de la migration irrégulière et du phénomène des personnes déplacées en Afrique ». Doté à ce jour de 4,2 milliards d’euros, le FFUA finance plusieurs types de projets, associant le développement à la sécurité, la gestion des migrations à la protection humanitaire.

    Le président nigérien considère que son pays, un des plus pauvres de la planète, occupe une position privilégiée pour contrôler les migrations dans la région. Le Niger est désormais le premier bénéficiaire du Fonds fiduciaire, devant des pays de départ comme la Somalie, le Nigéria et surtout l’Érythrée d’où vient le plus grand nombre de demandeurs d’asile en Europe.

    « Le Niger s’y retrouve dans ce mélange des genres entre lutte contre le terrorisme et lutte contre l’immigration “irrégulière”. »

    Florence Boyer, géographe et anthropologue

    Pour l’anthropologue Julien Brachet, « le Niger est peu à peu devenu un pays cobaye des politiques anti-migrations de l’Union européenne, (...) les moyens financiers et matériels pour lutter contre l’immigration irrégulière étant décuplés ». Ainsi, la mission européenne EUCAP Sahel Niger a ouvert une antenne permanente à Agadez en 2016 dans le but d’« assister les autorités nigériennes locales et nationales, ainsi que les forces de sécurité, dans le développement de politiques, de techniques et de procédures permettant d’améliorer le contrôle et la lutte contre les migrations irrégulières ».

    « Tout cela ne serait pas possible sans l’aval du Niger, qui est aussi à la table des négociations, rappelle Florence Boyer. Il ne faut pas oublier qu’il doit faire face à la pression de Boko Haram et d’autres groupes terroristes à ses frontières. Il a donc intérêt à se doter d’instruments et de personnels mieux formés. Le Niger s’y retrouve dans ce mélange des genres entre la lutte contre le terrorisme et la lutte contre l’immigration "irrégulière". »

    Peu avant le sommet de La Valette en 2015, le Niger promulgue la loi n°2015-36 sur « le trafic illicite de migrants ». Elle pénalise l’hébergement et le transport des migrants ayant l’intention de franchir illégalement la frontière. Ceux que l’on qualifiait jusque-là de « chauffeurs » ou de « transporteurs » au volant de « voitures taliban » (des 4x4 pick-up transportant entre 20 et 30 personnes) deviennent des « passeurs ». Une centaine d’arrestations et de saisies de véhicules mettent fin à ce qui était de longue date une source légale de revenus au nord du Niger. « Le but reste de bloquer la route qui mène vers la Libye, explique Pascaline Chappart. L’appui qu’apportent l’UE et certains pays européens en coopérant avec la police, les douanes et la justice nigérienne, particulièrement en les formant et les équipant, a pour but de rendre l’État présent sur l’ensemble de son territoire. »

    Des voix s’élèvent contre ces contrôles installés aux frontières du Niger sous la pression de l’Europe. Pour Hamidou Nabara de l’ONG nigérienne JMED (Jeunesse-Enfance-Migration-Développement), qui lutte contre la pauvreté pour retenir les jeunes désireux de quitter le pays, ces dispositifs violent le principe de la liberté de circulation adopté par les pays d’Afrique de l’Ouest dans le cadre de la Cedeao. « La situation des migrants s’est détériorée, dénonce-t-il, car si la migration s’est tarie, elle continue sous des voies différentes et plus dangereuses ». La traversée du Sahara est plus périlleuse que jamais, confirme Florence Boyer : « Le nombre de routes s’est multiplié loin des contrôles, mais aussi des points d’eau et des secours. À ce jour, nous ne disposons pas d’estimations solides sur le nombre de morts dans le désert, contrairement à ce qui se passe en Méditerranée ».

    Partenaire de la politique migratoire de l’Union européenne, le Niger a également développé une politique de l’asile. Il accepte de recevoir des populations en fuite, expulsées ou évacuées des pays voisins : les expulsés d’Algérie recueillis à la frontière, les rapatriés nigériens dont l’État prend en charge le retour de Libye, les réfugiés en lien avec les conflits de la zone, notamment au Mali et dans la région du lac Tchad, et enfin les personnes évacuées de Libye par le HCR. Le Niger octroie le statut de réfugié à ceux installés sur son sol qui y ont droit. Certains, particulièrement vulnérables selon le HCR, pourront être réinstallés en Europe ou en Amérique du Nord dans des pays volontaires.
    Une plateforme pour la « réinstallation »
    en Europe et en Amérique

    Cette procédure de réinstallation à partir du Niger n’a rien d’exceptionnel. Les Syriens réfugiés au Liban, par exemple, bénéficient aussi de l’action du HCR qui les sélectionne pour déposer une demande d’asile dans un pays dit « sûr ». La particularité du Niger est de servir de plateforme pour la réinstallation de personnes évacuées de Libye. « Le Niger est devenu une sorte de laboratoire de l’asile, raconte Florence Boyer, notamment par la mise en place de l’Emergency Transit Mechanism (ETM). »

    L’ETM, proposé par le HCR, est lancé en août 2017 à Paris par l’Allemagne, l’Espagne, la France et l’Italie — côté UE — et le Niger, le Tchad et la Libye — côté africain. Ils publient une déclaration conjointe sur les « missions de protection en vue de la réinstallation de réfugiés en Europe ». Ce dispositif se présente comme le pendant humanitaire de la politique de lutte contre « les réseaux d’immigration économique irrégulière » et les « retours volontaires » des migrants irréguliers dans leur pays effectués par l’OIM. Le processus s’accélère en novembre de la même année, suite à un reportage de CNN sur des cas d’esclavagisme de migrants en Libye. Fin 2017, 3 800 places sont promises par les pays occidentaux qui participent, à des degrés divers, à ce programme d’urgence. Le HCR annonce 6 606 places aujourd’hui, proposées par 14 pays européens et américains1.

    Trois catégories de personnes peuvent bénéficier de la réinstallation grâce à ce programme : évacués d’urgence depuis la Libye, demandeurs d’asile au sein d’un flux dit « mixte » mêlant migrants et réfugiés et personnes fuyant les conflits du Mali ou du Nigéria. Seule une minorité aura la possibilité d’être réinstallée depuis le Niger vers un pays occidental. Le profiling (selon le vocabulaire du HCR) de ceux qui pourront bénéficier de cette protection s’effectue dès les camps de détention libyens. Il consiste à repérer les plus vulnérables qui pourront prétendre au statut de réfugié et à la réinstallation.

    Une fois évacuées de Libye, ces personnes bénéficient d’une procédure accélérée pour l’obtention du statut de réfugié au Niger. Elles ne posent pas de problème au HCR, qui juge leur récit limpide. La Commission nationale d’éligibilité au statut des réfugiés (CNE), qui est l’administration de l’asile au Niger, accepte de valider la sélection de l’organisation onusienne. Les réfugiés sont pris en charge dans le camp du HCR à Hamdallaye, construit récemment à une vingtaine de kilomètres de la capitale nigérienne, le temps que le HCR prépare la demande de réinstallation dans un pays occidental, multipliant les entretiens avec les réfugiés concernés. Certains pays, comme le Canada ou la Suède, ne mandatent pas leurs services sur place, déléguant au HCR la sélection. D’autres, comme la France, envoient leurs agents pour un nouvel entretien (voir ce reportage sur la visite de l’Ofpra à Niamey fin 2018).

    Parmi les évacués de Libye, moins des deux tiers sont éligibles à une réinstallation dans un pays dit « sûr ».

    Depuis deux ans, près de 4 000 personnes ont été évacuées de Libye dans le but d’être réinstallées, selon le HCR (5 300 autres ont été prises en charge par l’OIM et « retournées » dans leur pays). Un millier ont été évacuées directement vers l’Europe et le Canada et près de 3 000 vers le Niger. C’est peu par rapport aux 50 800 réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile enregistrés auprès de l’organisation onusienne en Libye au 12 août 2019. Et très peu sur l’ensemble des 663 400 migrants qui s’y trouvent selon l’OIM. La guerre civile qui déchire le pays rend la situation encore plus urgente.

    Parmi les personnes évacuées de Libye vers le Niger, moins des deux tiers sont éligibles à une réinstallation dans un pays volontaire, selon le HCR. À ce jour, moins de la moitié ont été effectivement réinstallés, notamment en France (voir notre article sur l’accueil de réfugiés dans les communes rurales françaises).

    Malgré la publicité faite autour du programme de réinstallation, le HCR déplore la lenteur du processus pour répondre à cette situation d’urgence. « Le problème est que les pays de réinstallation n’offrent pas de places assez vite, regrette Fatou Ndiaye, en charge du programme ETM au Niger, alors que notre pays hôte a négocié un maximum de 1 500 évacués sur son sol au même moment. » Le programme coordonné du Niger ne fait pas exception : le HCR rappelait en février 2019 que, sur les 19,9 millions de réfugiés relevant de sa compétence à travers le monde, moins d’1 % sont réinstallés dans un pays sûr.

    Le dispositif ETM, que le HCR du Niger qualifie de « couloir de l’espoir », concerne seulement ceux qui se trouvent dans un camp accessible par l’organisation en Libye (l’un d’eux a été bombardé en juillet dernier) et uniquement sept nationalités considérées par les autorités libyennes (qui n’ont pas signé la convention de Genève) comme pouvant relever du droit d’asile (Éthiopiens Oromo, Érythréens, Iraquiens, Somaliens, Syriens, Palestiniens et Soudanais du Darfour).

    « Si les portes étaient ouvertes dès les pays d’origine, les gens ne paieraient pas des sommes astronomiques pour traverser des routes dangereuses. »

    Pascaline Chappart, socio-anthropologue

    En décembre 2018, des Soudanais manifestaient devant les bureaux d’ETM à Niamey pour dénoncer « un traitement discriminatoire (...) par rapport aux Éthiopiens et Somaliens » favorisés, selon eux, par le programme. La représentante du HCR au Niger a répondu à une radio locale que « la plupart de ces Soudanais [venaient] du Tchad où ils ont déjà été reconnus comme réfugiés et que, techniquement, c’est le Tchad qui les protège et fait la réinstallation ». C’est effectivement la règle en matière de droit humanitaire mais, remarque Florence Boyer, « comment demander à des réfugiés qui ont quitté les camps tchadiens, pour beaucoup en raison de l’insécurité, d’y retourner sans avoir aucune garantie ? ».

    La position de la France

    La question du respect des règles en matière de droit d’asile se pose pour les personnes qui bénéficient du programme d’urgence. En France, par exemple, pas de recours possible auprès de l’Ofpra en cas de refus du statut de réfugié. Pour Pascaline Chappart, qui achève deux ans d’enquêtes au Niger et au Mexique, il y a là une part d’hypocrisie : « Si les portes étaient ouvertes dès les pays d’origine, les gens ne paieraient pas des sommes astronomiques pour traverser des routes dangereuses par la mer ou le désert ». « Il est quasiment impossible dans le pays de départ de se présenter aux consulats des pays “sûrs” pour une demande d’asile », renchérit Florence Boyer. Elle donne l’exemple de Centre-Africains qui ont échappé aux combats dans leur pays, puis à la traite et aux violences au Nigéria, en Algérie puis en Libye, avant de redescendre au Niger : « Ils auraient dû avoir la possibilité de déposer une demande d’asile dès Bangui ! Le cadre législatif les y autorise. »

    En ce matin brûlant d’avril, dans le camp du HCR à Hamdallaye, Mebratu2, un jeune Érythréen de 26 ans, affiche un large sourire. À l’ombre de la tente qu’il partage et a décorée avec d’autres jeunes de son pays, il annonce qu’il s’envolera le 9 mai pour Paris. Comme tant d’autres, il a fui le service militaire à vie imposé par la dictature du président Issayas Afeworki. Mebratu était convaincu que l’Europe lui offrirait la liberté, mais il a dû croupir deux ans dans les prisons libyennes. S’il ne connaît pas sa destination finale en France, il sait d’où il vient : « Je ne pensais pas que je serais vivant aujourd’hui. En Libye, on pouvait mourir pour une plaisanterie. Merci la France. »

    Mebratu a pris un vol pour Paris en mai dernier, financé par l’Union européenne et opéré par l’#OIM. En France, la Délégation interministérielle à l’hébergement et à l’accès au logement (Dihal) confie la prise en charge de ces réinstallés à 24 opérateurs, associations nationales ou locales, pendant un an. Plusieurs départements et localités françaises ont accepté d’accueillir ces réfugiés particulièrement vulnérables après des années d’errance et de violences.

    Pour le deuxième article de notre numéro spécial de rentrée, nous nous rendons en Dordogne dans des communes rurales qui accueillent ces « réinstallés » arrivés via le Niger.

    http://icmigrations.fr/2019/08/30/defacto-10
    #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #Europe #UE #EU #sécuritaire #humanitaire #approche_sécuritaire #approche_humanitaire #libre_circulation #fermeture_des_frontières #printemps_arabe #Kadhafi #Libye #Agadez #parcours_migratoires #routes_migratoires #HCR #OIM #IOM #retour_au_pays #renvois #expulsions #Fonds_fiduciaire #Fonds_fiduciaire_d'urgence_pour_l'Afrique #FFUA #développement #sécurité #EUCAP_Sahel_Niger #La_Valette #passeurs #politique_d'asile #réinstallation #hub #Emergency_Transit_Mechanism (#ETM) #retours_volontaires #profiling #tri #sélection #vulnérabilité #évacuation #procédure_accélérée #Hamdallaye #camps_de_réfugiés #ofpra #couloir_de_l’espoir

    co-écrit par @pascaline

    ping @karine4 @_kg_ @isskein

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation des frontières :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765325

  • #DHS to store tens of thousands of refugee biometric records from #UNHCR

    The United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) began sharing records including fingerprints, iris scans, and facial biometrics of refugees it is recommending for resettlement consideration in the U.S. with the country’s Citizenship and Immigration Service (#USCIS), Nextgov reports.

    The UNHCR sends tens of thousands of profiles to federal agencies each year, according to the report, and the #Department_of_Homeland_Services (DHS) is retaining the data for all of them, including those who do not actually come to the U.S. The biometric data will be stored in the #IDENT_system, and #HART once it goes live.

    “Biometric verification guards against substitution of individuals or identity fraud in the resettlement process,” the USCIS privacy impact assessment for the program states. “Many refugees live for long periods in asylum countries, and the use of biometrics ensures that there is [an] unbroken continuity of identity over time and between different locations.”

    Nextgov notes that UNHCR stats show the USCIS reviewed close to 85,000 cases in 2018, and approved less than a quarter for admission to the U.S.

    “A centralized database of biometric data belonging to refugees, without appropriate controls, could really lead to surveillance of those refugees as well as potentially coercive forms of scrutiny,” Human Rights Watch Artificial Intelligence Researcher Amos Toh told Nextgov. “I think there needs to be a lot more clarity on … how this data is being shared and is being used.”

    Toh also referred to issues around consent for personal data-sharing in humanitarian contexts.

    https://www.biometricupdate.com/201908/dhs-to-store-tens-of-thousands-of-refugee-biometric-records-from-un
    #surveillance #données_biométriques #base_de_données #database #HCR #réfugiés #asile #migrations #biométrie #empreintes_digitales #biométrie_faciale #USA #Etats-Unis #réinstallation #humanitaire

    ping @etraces

    • Inside the HART of the DHS Office of Biometric Identity Management

      #OBIM says its efforts to protect biometric data privacy and security are robust and open.

      The Automated Biometric Identification System (IDENT) operated by the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Biometric Identity Management (OBIM) was designed in 1994 and implemented in 1995. It was originally meant to perform a South-West border recidivist study, but has grown into the second largest biometric system in the world, next to Aadhaar, with 230 million unique identity records, plus access to millions more held by the FBI and Department of Defense, and 350,000 transactions on an average weekday.

      As the number of programs using IDENT has grown, the system’s roll and size have increased. As the importance of IDENT has grown, so have the warnings and criticism of the program. It is still not widely understood how it works, however, Patrick Nemeth, Director of OBIM’s Identity Operations Division told Biometric Update in an exclusive interview.

      “We don’t own the data, we’re the data stewards, and it was collected by somebody else who ultimately has the authority to change it or delete it,” Nemeth explains. While many government biometric databases around the world are not operated in this way, the arrangement is only the beginning of the complexity the system has evolved to accommodate.

      OBIM performs three basic functions, Nemeth says, with pretty much everything else done in service of them. It operates the automated matching system, which is IDENT, but will soon be the Homeland Advanced Recognition Technology (HART), performs manual examination and verification, and coordinates sharing with the owners of the data, which means setting rules for sharing data with agencies. Most government biometric data is centralized with OBIM to minimize duplication under the department’s privacy rule, and also to apply the maximum security and protection to sensitive information.

      As operators of the centralized biometric repository, OBIM takes on the responsibility of dealing with the security, privacy, and civil liberties implications of storing sensitive personally identifiable information (PII). It does so, in part, by applying Fair Information Practice principles to govern procedures for elements including transparency, accounting and auditing, and purpose specification.

      Other than specific databases run by law enforcement and the DoD, which it also coordinates sharing for, OBIM holds all of the U.S. government’s biometric data. It primarily serves DHS agencies, including Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Border Patrol, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), Transportation Security Administration (TSA), and Citizenship and Immigration Services, as well as agencies like the Coast Guard for border entries. It performs a range of functions, including both verification and identification, and during periods when the system is less busy, such as overnight, it performs deduplication and checks latent prints found on improvised explosive devices (IEDs) or in investigations of serious crimes by the FBI, according to Nemeth.

      This enormous expansion of both the system’s scale and mandate is why OBIM is now moving forward with the development of the new HART system. IDENT is becoming obsolete.

      “It’s been stretched and band-aided and added-to in every way that people can think of, but it just can’t go any further,” Nemeth says.

      HART will add a range of capabilities, including to use a fusion of fingerprint, iris, and facial recognition modalities to improve its matching accuracy. It will also expand the scale of the system, which is desperately needed.

      “At one point about five years ago they did a couple external studies and they told me that if we ever reached 300,000 transactions a day that we would see system slowness and if we ever reached 400,000 per day, we would see the blue screen of death,” Nemeth admits.

      IDENT currently process more than 400,000 transactions in a day on occasion, after remedial action was taken by OBIM to increase its capacity. It typically serves about 350,000 requests per weekday, and a little less on the weekend, returning yes or no answers for about 99.5 percent. Nemeth says he uses more than one thousand servers and other pieces of hardware to keep the system running with brute force. That is not an efficient way to operate, however, and the demand keeps increasing with each new biometric border trial, and any other program involving a use of government biometrics.

      Increasing capacity to meet the rapid growth in demand is the main motivation for the move to HART, which will be able to serve 720,000 daily fingerprint transactions when it goes live, and can be quickly scaled. It is being launched on AWS’ Government Cloud, but is designed to be cloud-agnostic. OBIM’s database is growing by about 20 million people per year, which is also accelerating, and as additional modalities become more valuable with the addition of fusion verification, its 3 million pairs of irises may also increase. The current database is twice as large as it was seven years ago, and Nemeth says the current projections are that it will double again in the next seven.

      Some future uses of HART are likely yet to be determined, but an example of the scale that may be needed can be understood by considering the possibility that all 3 million travelers per day who pass through U.S. airports may one day need to be biometrically verified.

      Tech systems from the nineties are also inherently not able to keep up with modern technology. The programming languages and architecture of IDENT are antiquated, and require an inefficient and frustrating process not just to add capabilities, but every time a statistic is requested for analytical purposes.

      “We have to figure out what our question is, send it to our contractors, they write the script, they run it, they send it back to us, and sometimes when we look at it, that wasn’t really the question, and you have to repeat the process,” Nemeth says.

      As the number of agencies and use cases for IDENT has grown, the number of questions from system users, like everything else, has increased. Switching to HART will increase the analytical capabilities and overall flexibility of the system, which is particularly important when considering some of the privacy and security issues related to operating the world’s second largest biometric matching system. IDENT currently uses a multi-layered filtering system to return only the specific information the requesting customer is entitled to.

      “What’s unique about IDENT is because of the wide breadth of Homeland Security missions — law enforcement, information, credentialing, national security – it has kind of a complicated filtering process that we call Data Access and Security Controls,” Nemeth says. “You only get to see what your agency is permitted by law to see, and what the owner of the data has said that you can see. It’s a rather complex dance we do to make sure that we respect the privacy, the reason the information was collected, the legal protections for certain protected classes, all of those things. When we provide you the information, if you’re not allowed to see it, you don’t even know that information exists.”

      Three layers of filters screen what accounts can see data for a subject, what information they are allowed to see and what should be redacted (such as criminal history, in some cases), and an activity filter, which is attached to information by the agency that submitted it. OBIM also addresses the rights of data subjects with an extensive process of consultations and privacy impact assessments for new operations.

      “Every time somebody comes up with a new mission area, or a new application of biometrics, before we can implement that, our own privacy people need to go through it and write a privacy threat assessment,” Nemeth says. “Then, potentially, if its significant enough, they have to amend the privacy impact. Then it goes to our higher headquarters at the National Protection and Programs Directorate where they have to agree, and then finally it goes to the Department’s Privacy Office, where they have to agree that its within the scope of what we’re allowed to do.”

      Some alternately goes through inter-agency Data Access Request Committee for approval, but every new capability desired by a client agency is put in place only after it has gone through many steps and assessments, providing answers about why it is needed and how it should be delivered.

      “There are a lot of constraints on us, which is good, because lots of energetic people come up with lots of ideas and sometimes we just need to slow down a little bit and make sure that we’re properly using that information and protecting it.”

      Not only are OBIM’s efforts to protect biometric data privacy and security robust, according to Nemeth, they are also open. HART will increase the privacy protection the department can provide, he says, for instance by increasing the number and functionality of filtering layers OBIM can apply to data. The combination of privacy protections which are concerted and improving along with willingness to talk about those protections makes Nemeth frustrated with allegations among some media and public advocacy groups that HART represents a surveillance overreach on the part of the government.

      “We’re not going to tell you how to break into our system, but we’ll tell you quite a bit about it,” Nemeth says. “The privacy impact assessments and the privacy threshold analysis are available on the DHS privacy web page, along with our system of record.”

      The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) warns that HART will include data collected from innocent people and questionable sources, and argues that it will provide the means for suppression of American’s rights and freedoms. Nemeth says he sympathizes with concerns over the possible erosion of privacy in digital society, and the desire to protect it. He contends that the EFF is not considering the years and painstaking processes that OBIM puts into balancing the rights of individuals to not have their data shared unnecessarily with the mandates of client agencies. He points to the Data Privacy and Integrity Advisory Council as an example of the intensive oversight and review that checks the potential for misuse of biometric data.

      “The arguments that the EFF is making they’ve made several times during the fifteen-year history of IDENT, whenever there’s a new issue of the authorizing SORN and PIA, so it’s not new,” Nemeth counters. “They’ve added the facial piece to it. Essentially, they are arguing that we will violate the law.”

      The scrutiny will likely intensify, with public awareness of biometric entry/exit growing as the program rolls out. In the meantime, the number of transactions served by HART will be increasing, and OBIM will be evaluating new procedures using its new biometric capabilities. The privacy impact assessments and other checks will continue, and OBIM will continue the work of helping U.S. government agencies identify people. Nemeth stresses that that work is critically important, even as it requires the kind of extensive evaluation and scrutiny it invites.

      “We don’t retain our highly talented staff because we pay them well,” he confesses. “We retain them because they love what they’re doing and they’re making a difference for the security of the country.”

      https://www.biometricupdate.com/201809/inside-the-hart-of-the-dhs-office-of-biometric-identity-management
      #identité_biométrique